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1

Alaska Earthquake Information Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alaska Earthquake Information Center contains information on seismology and tsunami research, education and outreach projects, and earthquake preparedness. There are also maps, reports, and a database on recent earthquakes and a map of historical Alaskan earthquakes, active faults, and rupture zones.

2

PACIFIC EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER  

E-print Network

PACIFIC EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER PEER Testbed Study on a Laboratory Building, Berkeley PEER Report 2005/12 Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center College of Engineering to "exercise" the PEER performance-based earthquake engineering methodology. All projects involved

Adolphs, Ralph

3

Earthquake Monitoring in Haiti  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Following the devastating 2010 Haiti earthquake, the USGS has been helping with earthquake awareness and monitoring in the country, with continued support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This assistance has helped the Bureau des Mines et de l'Energie (BME) in Port-au-Prin...

4

Alaska Earthquake Information Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Housed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Earthquake Information Center reports and provides information on seismic activity in Alaska. While its southern Pacific coast colleague, California, gets a lot more attention when it comes to earthquakes, Alaska experienced a magnitude 6.7 earthquake already this summer and was rocked by a 7.9 in 2002. The site offers links to general information about the center, general earthquake information, research activities at the center, education and outreach materials (including information on seismology education projects), and much more. The site is well populated with materials and should provide a great resources for those interested in North American seismic events.

5

Saint Louis University Earthquake Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Saint Louis University (SLU) Earthquake Center provides recent Midwest earthquake locations, the history of central U.S. earthquakes, a link for reporting an earthquake, historic earthquake and instrument photographs, and explanations of the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale. There are earthquake information flyers, links to course websites and course notes, a textbook description, computer tools and earthquake catalogs, and recent theses and dissertations. There are also links to seismic systems and networks as well as SLU network reports.

6

AEIC: Arizona Earthquake Information Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Arizona Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) conducts research and distributes information about Arizona earthquakes in order to increase the knowledge about the causes and hazards of earthquakes. The website provides recent seismographs for many places including the Grand Canyon and Flagstaff along with a map of the fault system. Researchers can find a catalog of Arizona Earthquakes for the period of 1830 to 1998. Users can view an index map of recent earthquakes in the Intermountain West region of Utah as well.

7

Mid-America Earthquake Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Understanding earthquakes is a complex process, and the Mid-Americ Earthquake Center is one of three national earthquake engineering research centers set up to work on a variety of approaches to a broad set of related scientific concerns. Based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Center consists of a consortium of nine core institutions and is funded by the National Science Foundation. The Center's primary work is within four areas, including information technology and consequence-based risk management frameworks. Recognizing that they serve a broad range of visitors to their website, the Center has established a number of informative introductions on their homepage for the general public, potential industry partners, members of the press, and K-12 educators. While a number of visitors may be interested in their technical reports and software packages, most visitors will want to look over the graduate and undergraduate teaching modules, which will be of great use to educators in the engineering and geophysical sciences and their students. Additionally, the Center's site provides access to a number of informative webcasts, including presentations on seismic performances of bridges.

8

Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Home Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), a consortium of universities and research institutions dedicated to gathering information about earthquakes in Southern California, integrate that knowledge into a comprehensive and predictive understanding of earthquake phenomena, and communicate this understanding to end-users and the general public in order to increase earthquake awareness, reduce economic losses, and save lives. News of recent earthquake research, online resources and educational information is available here.

9

Northern California Earthquake Data Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A project between the University of California Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and the United State Geological Survey, the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) "is a long-term archive and distribution center for seismological and geodetic data for Northern and Central California." Educators and students can examine recent seismograms from the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network. Researchers will benefit from the site's enormous amount of data collections including BARD; a system of 67 constantly operating Global Positioning System receivers in Northern California. By reading the annual reports, educators will also learn about the center's many outreach activities from talks and lab tours to the production of classroom resources for kindergarten through twelfth grade teachers. This site is also reviewed in the October 17, 2003 NSDL Physical Sciences Report.

10

Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) which is a joint project of the University of California Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and the U. S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park. The NCEDC is an archive for seismological and geodetic data for Northern and Central California. Accessible through this page are news items, recent earthquake information, links to earthquake catalogs, seismic waveform data sets, and Global Positioning System information. Most data sets are accessible for downloading via ftp.

11

Center for Earthquake Research and Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CERI, established in 1977 as the Tennessee Earthquake Information Center, is a Tennessee Board of Regents Center of Excellence at the University of Memphis devoted to understanding the causes and consequences of earthquakes and the structure and evolution of the continental lithosphere. CERI addresses these needs through cutting-edge research, comprehensive graduate student education, operation of state-of-the-art seismic and GPS networks, and dissemination of technical and practical information to the private and public sectors.

Center for Earthquake Research and Information

12

Accessing Data From the Southern California Earthquake Data Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) archives and provides public access to earthquake parametric and waveform data gathered by the TriNet seismic network, southern California's earthquake monitoring network since January 1 2001. The parametric data includes earthquake locations, magnitudes, moment-tensor solutions (for some events), and phase picks. The waveform data consists of continuous recordings of 150 broadband stations, and triggered seismograms from 200 accelerometers and 200 short-period instruments. Since the Data Center and TriNet have the same Oracle database system, users can have access to earthquake data in near real-time, which usually means within a few minutes of the origin time. Catalog searches of the modern data can be done through the web interface http://www.scecdc.scec.org/catalog-search. User access to the data is via STP (Seismic Transfer Program) which can be accessed through a interactive web interface at the URL http://www.scedc.scedc.org/stp.html or through a client program that directly connects to the Data Center. The latter is a simple 'C' program for Solaris and Linux platforms and is downloadable from http://www.scecdc.scec.org/software.html. With STP, the waveform data is directly transfered to the user's computer and is converted to a number of formats, including SAC and MiniSEED. Byte-swapping is automatically taken care of. The older data is still available through the 'dbsort' program. These data are being converted to the new database over the coming year and will be uniformly accessible with the new interfaces.

Yu, E.; Kahler, K.; Clayton, R. W.

2001-12-01

13

Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the British Geological Survey, the Earthquakes Web site contains numerous educational topics for kids. Best suited for junior high school students and older, the site contains information on macroseismology (or the observable effects of earthquakes on people, buildings, and nature); seismic hazards; earthquake monitoring; recent and historical earthquakes; and more. Other links on the site include a Questions and Answers page, earthquake references, and additional educational links culminating in an informative and helpful source of online science learning. [JAB

14

Probabilistic micro-earthquake location for reservoir monitoring  

E-print Network

CWP-640 Sep 2009 Probabilistic micro-earthquake location for reservoir monitoring Ran Xuan-3557 #12;#12;PROBABILISTIC MICRO-EARTHQUAKE LOCATION FOR RESERVOIR MONITORING by Ran Xuan #12;A thesis #12;ABSTRACT Micro-seismicity is used to monitor fluid migration during reservoir production and hydro

Snieder, Roel

15

Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1986, the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER) is located at the State University of New York at Buffalo. MCEER draws on the expertise of many researchers and industry partners from across the United States, as they are "dedicated to the discovery and development of new knowledge, tools and technologies that equip communities to become more disaster resilient in the face of earthquakes and other extreme events.� The Center receives funding from a wide range of institutions, including the National Science Foundation, the Federal Highway Administration, and the Department of Homeland Security. Along with the usual conference announcements and newsletters that one might expect to find on a homepage of this sort, visitors can also peruse their archive of webcasts, which include such past presentations as "Seismic Analysis of Woodframe Structures" and "Structural Control Technologies". Visitors will not be surprised to find that there are also a number of special reports on Hurricane Katrina that are worth taking a look at here.

16

Northern California Earthquake Data Center Data Retrieval (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) offers various types of earthquake-related data. Most of the datasets are available on the WWW. A few require the establishment of a research account. Available information includes: earthquake catalogs and lists; seismic waveform data from the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network, the Northern California Seismic Network, the Parkfield High-Resolution Seismic Network, and the Calpine/Unocal Geysers Network; Global Positioning System data from continuous monitoring stations; and Berkeley Digital Seismic Network temperature, electromagnetic and strain data.

17

Enhanced Earthquake Monitoring of the European Arctic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present preliminary results from a cooperative initiative between NORSAR and seismological institutions in NW Russia (Arkhangelsk and Apatity), which each operate seismic networks. To indicate the potential of combining resources to improve the seismic coverage of the European Arctic, we have carried out a comparison based on the first six months of 2013 between the Reviewed Event Bulletin of the CTBT International Data Centre, the NORSAR reviewed regional seismic bulletin (using data from Fennoscandia, Spitsbergen and the Kola Peninsula) and the bulletin produced by the Arkhangelsk seismological center (using data from their own network in combination with the data used to produce the NORSAR bulletin). We show that the addition of the Arkhangelsk network leads to a considerable increase in the number of located seismic events, both at local distances from the individual stations and in the High Arctic. The latter increase is particularly pronounced along the Gakkel Ridge to the north of the Svalbard and Franz-Josef Land archipelagos. A closer investigation shows that the additional events in the High Arctic are included due to the contribution from the station ZFI on Franz-Josef Land in combination with the Spitsbergen stations SPITS and KBS. We also note that the vast majority of the events along the Gakkel Ridge have been located slightly to the south of the ridge. We interpret this as an effect of the lack of recording stations closer to and north of the Gakkel Ridge, and the use of a one-dimensional velocity model which is not fully representative for travel-times along observed propagation paths. We conclude that while the characteristics of earthquake activity in the European Arctic is currently poorly known, the knowledge can be expected to be significantly improved by establishing the appropriate cooperative seismic recording infrastructures.

Kvaerna, Tormod; Schweitzer, Johannes; Antonovskaya, Galina; Kremenetskaya, Elena O.

2014-05-01

18

TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS PROGRAM OF THE MID-AMERICA EARTHQUAKE CENTER  

E-print Network

in the central United States. Damage to river, port, and waterfront structures due to liquefaction, lateral, could cripple the transport of goods across the central United States and impact shipping1 TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS PROGRAM OF THE MID-AMERICA EARTHQUAKE CENTER By: Timothy D. Stark

19

Overview of the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER)  

E-print Network

operational after an earthquake--namely hospitals, lifeline systems (water and power distribution networks Research, University at Buffalo, 105 Red Jacket Quad, Buffalo, NY 14261, USA #12;INTRODUCTION at the University at Buffalo, the Center was established in 1986 by the National Science Foundation (NSF

Bruneau, Michel

20

Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

1991-01-01

21

The USGS National Earthquake Information Center's Response to the Wenchuan, China Earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Immediately after detecting the May 12th, 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake, the USGS National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) began a coordinated effort to understand and communicate the earthquake's seismological characteristics, tectonic context, and humanitarian impact. NEIC's initial estimates of magnitude and location were distributed within 30 minutes of the quake by e-mail and text message to 70,000 users via the Earthquake Notification System. The release of these basic parameters automatically triggered the generation of more sophisticated derivative products that were used by relief and government agencies to plan their humanitarian response to the disaster. Body-wave and centroid moment tensors identified the earthquake's mechanism. Predictive ShakeMaps provided the first estimates of the geographic extent and amplitude of shaking. The initial automated population exposure estimate generated and distributed by the Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system stated that 1.2 million people were exposed to severe-to-extreme shaking (Modified Mercalli Intensity VIII or greater), indicating a large-scale disaster had occurred. NEIC's modeling of the mainshock and aftershocks was continuously refined and expanded. The length and orientation of the fault were determined from aftershocks, finite-fault models, and back-projection source imaging. Firsthand accounts of shaking intensity were collected and mapped by the "Did You Feel It" system. These results were used to refine our ShakeMaps and PAGER exposure estimates providing a more accurate assessment of the extent and enormity of the disaster. The products were organized and distributed in an event-specific summary poster and via the USGS Earthquake Program web pages where they were viewed by millions and reproduced by major media outlets (over 1/2 billion hits were served that month). Rather than just a point showing magnitude and epicenter, several of the media's schematic maps showed both intensity distribution and population exposure, achieving a significant communication goal of the PAGER project and the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS).

Earle, P. S.; Wald, D. J.; Benz, H.; Sipkin, S.; Dewey, J.; Allen, T.; Jaiswal, K.; Buland, R.; Choy, G.; Hayes, G.; Hutko, A.

2008-12-01

22

Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Summer Internship Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the eleventh consecutive year, the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) coordinated undergraduate research experiences in summer 2004, allowing 35 students with a broad array of backgrounds and interests to work with the world's preeminent earthquake scientists and specialists. Students participate in interdisciplinary, system-level earthquake science and information technology research, and several group activities throughout the summer. Funding for student stipends and activities is made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. SCEC coordinates two intern programs: The SCEC Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SCEC/SURE) and the SCEC Undergraduate Summer in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/USEIT). SCEC/SURE interns work one-on-one with SCEC scientists at their institutions on a variety of earthquake science research projects. The goals of the program are to expand student participation in the earth sciences and related disciplines, encourage students to consider careers in research and education, and to increase diversity of students and researchers in the earth sciences. 13 students participated in this program in 2004. SCEC/USEIT is an NSF REU site that brings undergraduate students from across the country to the University of Southern California each summer. SCEC/USEIT interns interact in a team-oriented research environment and are mentored by some of the nation's most distinguished geoscience and computer science researchers. The goals of the program are to allow undergraduates to use advanced tools of information technology to solve problems in earthquake research; close the gap between computer science and geoscience; and engage non-geoscience majors in the application of earth science to the practical problems of reducing earthquake risk. SCEC/USEIT summer research goals are structured around a grand challenge problem in earthquake information technology. For the past three years the students have developed a new earthquake and fault visualization platform named "LA3D." 22 students participated in this program in 2004. SCEC Interns come together several times during the summer, beginning with a Communication Workshop that develops the student's oral and written communication skills. In mid-summer, a one-day SCEC Intern Colloquium is held, where student researchers present status reports on their research, followed by a three-day field trip of southern California geology and SCEC research locations. Finally, at the end of the summer each student presents a poster at the SCEC Annual Meeting.

Benthien, M. L.; Perry, S.; Jordan, T. H.

2004-12-01

23

Korea Integrated Seismic System (KISS) and Earthquake Monitoring for Korea Train eXpress (KTX).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2002 Korea Integrated Seismic System (KISS) has been playing main role in real-time seismic data exchange between different seismic networks operated by four earthquake monitoring institutes: KMA, KEPRI, KINS and KIGAM. Seismic data from different seismic networks are gathered into the data pool of KISS where clients can receive data in real-time. Before expanding and modernizing of Korean seismic stations, the consortium of the four institutes made the standard criteria of seismic observation such as instrument, data format, and communication protocol for the purpose of integrating seismic networks. More than 160 digital stations (velocity or accelerometer) installed from 1998 to 2009 in Korea could be easily linked to KISS in real time due to the standard criteria. When a big earthquake happens, the observed peak acceleration value can be used as the instrumental intensity on the local site and the distribution of peak accelerations shows roughly the severity of the damaged area. Real Time Intensity Color Mapping (RTICOM) is developed to generate every second contour map of the nationwide intensity based on the peak acceleration values retrieved through KISS from local stations. RTICOM can be used for rapid evaluation of the intensity and decision making against earthquake damages. For the purpose of rapid response to earthquake hazard, Korea Train eXpress (KTX) constructed real-time monitoring system using accelerometers installed on bridges and tunnels. KTX monitoring center receives every second PGA data and monitoring system displays these data on the dedicated screen. The frequency zone of data is considered only below 10 Hz in other to reduce artificial false alarms. If a higher PGA value overcomes the pre-determined level then an alarm will happen with making sound and brightening red and yellow lights. The KTX control center would make repaid decision whether express train should be stopped immediately or not.

Park, Jung Ho; Chi, Heon Cheol; Seub Lim, In; Kim, Geun Young; Shin, Jin Soo

2010-05-01

24

Long Baseline Tilt Meter Array to Monitor Cascadia's Slow Earthquakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five biaxial Michelson tilt meters are currently being installed in the Puget Lowlands near Seattle to monitor dynamic tilt changes accompanying episodic slow earthquakes that occur at 20-40 km depth. Each tilt meter consists of a 1-2 m deep, 500-m-long, 15-cm diameter, horizontal, half-filled water-pipe, terminated by float sensors with sub-micron water-level resolution, similar to those that have operated unattended

N. Suszek; R. Bilham; R. Flake; T. I. Melbourne; M. Miller

2004-01-01

25

Helping safeguard Veterans Affairs' hospital buildings by advanced earthquake monitoring  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the National Strong Motion Project of the U.S. Geological Survey has recently installed sophisticated seismic systems that will monitor the structural integrity of hospital buildings during earthquake shaking. The new systems have been installed at more than 20 VA medical campuses across the country. These monitoring systems, which combine sensitive accelerometers and real-time computer calculations, are capable of determining the structural health of each structure rapidly after an event, helping to ensure the safety of patients and staff.

Kalkan, Erol; Banga, Krishna; Ulusoy, Hasan S.; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Leith, William S.; Blair, James L.

2012-01-01

26

Integrating geomatics and structural investigation in post-earthquake monitoring of ancient monumental Buildings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The old city center of LAquila is rich in historical buildings of considerable merit. On April 6th 2009 a devastating earthquake caused significant structural damages, affecting especially historical and monumental masonry buildings. The results of a study carried out on a monumental building, former headquarters of the University of LAquila (The Camponeschi building, XVI century) are presented in this paper. The building is situated in the heart of the old city center and was seriously damaged by the earthquake. Preliminary visual damage analysis carried out immediately after the quake, clearly evidenced the buildings complexity, raising the need for direct and indirect investigation on the structure. Several non-destructive test methods were then performed in situ to better characterize the masonry typology and the damage distribution, as well. Subsequently, a number of representative control points were identified on the buildings facades to represent, by their motion over time, the evolution of the structural displacements and deformations. In particular, a surveying network consisting of 27 different points was established. A robotic total station mounted on top of a concrete pillar was used for periodically monitoring the surveying control network. Stability of the pillar was checked through a GNSS static survey repeated before any set of measurements. The present study evidences the interesting possibilities of combining geomatics with structural investigation during post-earthquake monitoring of ancient monumental buildings.

Dominici, Donatella; Galeota, Dante; Gregori, Amedeo; Rosciano, Elisa; Alicandro, Maria; Elaiopoulos, Michail

2014-06-01

27

Lessons Learned from Creating the Public Earthquake Resource Center at CERI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis opened the Public Earthquake Resource Center (PERC) in May 2004. The PERC is an interactive display area that was designed to increase awareness of seismology, Earth Science, earthquake hazards, and earthquake engineering among the general public and K-12 teachers and students. Funding for the PERC is provided by the US Geological Survey, The NSF-funded Mid America Earthquake Center, and the University of Memphis, with input from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. Additional space at the facility houses local offices of the US Geological Survey. PERC exhibits are housed in a remodeled residential structure at CERI that was donated by the University of Memphis and the State of Tennessee. Exhibits were designed and built by CERI and US Geological Survey staff and faculty with the help of experienced museum display subcontractors. The 600 square foot display area interactively introduces the basic concepts of seismology, real-time seismic information, seismic network operations, paleoseismology, building response, and historical earthquakes. Display components include three 22" flat screen monitors, a touch sensitive monitor, 3 helicorder elements, oscilloscope, AS-1 seismometer, life-sized liquefaction trench, liquefaction shake table, and building response shake table. All displays include custom graphics, text, and handouts. The PERC website at www.ceri.memphis.edu/perc also provides useful information such as tour scheduling, ask a geologist, links to other institutions, and will soon include a virtual tour of the facility. Special consideration was given to address State science standards for teaching and learning in the design of the displays and handouts. We feel this consideration is pivotal to the success of any grass roots Earth Science education and outreach program and represents a valuable lesson that has been learned at CERI over the last several years. Another critical lesson that has been learned is to employ K-12 education professionals and utilize undergrad and graduate student workers in the University's Department of Education. Such staff members are keenly aware of the pressures and needs in diverse communities such as Shelby County, Tennessee and are uniquely suited to design and implement new and innovative programs that provide substantive short-term user benefits and promote long-term relationships with the K-12 teachers, students, and teacher's organizations.

Patterson, G. L.; Michelle, D.; Johnston, A.

2004-12-01

28

An Earthquake Just Occurred Can I Read About It on NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers' Websites?  

E-print Network

An Earthquake Just Occurred ­ Can I Read About It on NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers' Websites with responsibility for recording and reporting earthquake activity nationwide. According to the West Coast, we can provide an early alert in most situations." Obviously, not all earthquakes generate tsunamis

29

Southern California Earthquake Center Operates 1991 present, $3 -$5 million per year  

E-print Network

Southern California Earthquake Center · Operates 1991 ­ present, $3 - $5 million per year · NSF, USC · High profile seismic hazard reports from 1993 · Community data bases ­faults, earthquakes, 3-D faults Quake rates elsewhere Putting it all together ... Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast

30

D a t a s o u r c e s Alaska earthquake data from the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (www.aeic.alaska.edu)  

E-print Network

D a t a s o u r c e s Alaska earthquake data from the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (www.aeic.alaska.edu) Lower 48 earthquake data drawn from the ANSS composite catalog (http://www.ncedc.org/cnss/catalog-search.html) Earthquake occurrence rate in Alaska 1 9 6 0

West, Michael

31

Detection and monitoring of earthquake precursors: TwinSat, a RussiaUK satellite project q  

E-print Network

Detection and monitoring of earthquake precursors: TwinSat, a Russia­UK satellite project q Vitaly the lithosphere­atmosphere­ionosphere prior to earthquake events. Nevertheless the physics of these phenomena and the possibilities of their use as part of an earthquake early warning system remain poorly understood. Proposed here

Crawford, Ian

32

Czech Infrasonic Monitoring System - Measurements in an Earthquake Epicenter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Czech infrasonic monitoring system (micobarograph and ionospheric Doppler measurements) together with seismometer and magnetometer made measurements in the epicenter of a relatively weak (M = 3.8) earthquake on 28 October 2008. At the closest station NKC (distance from the epicenter d = 2.2 km) a microbarograph, seismograph and magnetometer were located, at another close station STC a microbarograph and seismograph were installed. One ionospheric Doppler path was quasi-vertical with the ionospheric reflection point at d = 10 km. One more station with microbarograph and seismograph was located about 155 km apart. As far as we know, these have been the first infrasonic measurements during earthquake in the epicentre zone. Main results: (1) Infrasonic oscillations (~1-12 Hz) in the epicenter region appear to be excited essentially by the vertical seismic oscillations. (2) The observed oscillations are real epicentral infrasound not caused by seismic shaking of the instruments or by meteorological phenomena. (3) Seismo-infrasonic oscillations observed 155 km apart from the epicenter were excited in situ by seismic waves. (4) No earthquake-related infrasonic effects have been observed in the ionosphere. (5) The ratio of observational to theoretical transfer function was around 0.8 due to slightly lower microbarograph sensitivity at frequencies of infrasonic peaks. (6) Necessity to make vibration tests of instruments is pointed out in order to be sure that observed effects are not effects of mechanical shaking of the instrument. The results (1), (2), (3) and (6) seem to be of some relevance to CTBT.

Lastovicka, J.; Chum, J.; Sindelarova, T.

2010-12-01

33

Earthquakes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in earthquakes with an introduction to the subject. Following a section presenting an historical look at the world's major earthquakes, the booklet discusses earthquake-prone geographic areas, the nature and workings of earthquakes, earthquake

Pakiser, Louis C.

34

Earthquakes  

MedlinePLUS

An earthquake happens when two blocks of the earth suddenly slip past one another. Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning at any time of the day or night. If an earthquake occurs in a populated area, it may cause ...

35

Archiving and Distributing Seismic Data at the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) archives and provides public access to earthquake parametric and waveform data gathered by the Southern California Seismic Network and since January 1, 2001, the TriNet seismic network, southern California's earthquake monitoring network. The parametric data in the archive includes earthquake locations, magnitudes, moment-tensor solutions and phase picks. The SCEDC waveform archive prior to TriNet consists primarily of short-period, 100-samples-per-second waveforms from the SCSN. The addition of the TriNet array added continuous recordings of 155 broadband stations (20 samples per second or less), and triggered seismograms from 200 accelerometers and 200 short-period instruments. Since the Data Center and TriNet use the same Oracle database system, new earthquake data are available to the seismological community in near real-time. Primary access to the database and waveforms is through the Seismogram Transfer Program (STP) interface. The interface enables users to search the database for earthquake information, phase picks, and continuous and triggered waveform data. Output is available in SAC, miniSEED, and other formats. Both the raw counts format (V0) and the gain-corrected format (V1) of COSMOS (Consortium of Organizations for Strong-Motion Observation Systems) are now supported by STP. EQQuest is an interface to prepackaged waveform data sets for select earthquakes in Southern California stored at the SCEDC. Waveform data for large-magnitude events have been prepared and new data sets will be available for download in near real-time following major events. The parametric data from 1981 to present has been loaded into the Oracle 9.2.0.1 database system and the waveforms for that time period have been converted to mSEED format and are accessible through the STP interface. The DISC optical-disk system (the "jukebox") that currently serves as the mass-storage for the SCEDC is in the process of being replaced with a series of inexpensive high-capacity (1.6 Tbyte) magnetic-disk RAIDs. These systems are built with PC-technology components, using 16 120-Gbyte IDE disks, hot-swappable disk trays, two RAID controllers, dual redundant power supplies and a Linux operating system. The system is configured over a private gigabit network that connects to the two Data Center servers and spans between the Seismological Lab and the USGS. To ensure data integrity, each RAID disk system constantly checks itself against its twin and verifies file integrity using 128-bit MD5 file checksums that are stored separate from the system. The final level of data protection is a Sony AIT-3 tape backup of the files. The primary advantage of the magnetic-disk approach is faster data access because magnetic disk drives have almost no latency. This means that the SCEDC can provide better "on-demand" interactive delivery of the seismograms in the archive.

Appel, V. L.

2002-12-01

36

Real-time earthquake monitoring using a search engine method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When an earthquake occurs, seismologists want to use recorded seismograms to infer its location, magnitude and source-focal mechanism as quickly as possible. If such information could be determined immediately, timely evacuations and emergency actions could be undertaken to mitigate earthquake damage. Current advanced methods can report the initial location and magnitude of an earthquake within a few seconds, but estimating the source-focal mechanism may require minutes to hours. Here we present an earthquake search engine, similar to a web search engine, that we developed by applying a computer fast search method to a large seismogram database to find waveforms that best fit the input data. Our method is several thousand times faster than an exact search. For an Mw 5.9 earthquake on 8 March 2012 in Xinjiang, China, the search engine can infer the earthquakes parameters in <1?s after receiving the long-period surface wave data.

Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haijiang; Chen, Enhong; Zheng, Yi; Kuang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Xiong

2014-12-01

37

Real-time earthquake monitoring using a search engine method  

PubMed Central

When an earthquake occurs, seismologists want to use recorded seismograms to infer its location, magnitude and source-focal mechanism as quickly as possible. If such information could be determined immediately, timely evacuations and emergency actions could be undertaken to mitigate earthquake damage. Current advanced methods can report the initial location and magnitude of an earthquake within a few seconds, but estimating the source-focal mechanism may require minutes to hours. Here we present an earthquake search engine, similar to a web search engine, that we developed by applying a computer fast search method to a large seismogram database to find waveforms that best fit the input data. Our method is several thousand times faster than an exact search. For an Mw 5.9 earthquake on 8 March 2012 in Xinjiang, China, the search engine can infer the earthquakes parameters in <1?s after receiving the long-period surface wave data. PMID:25472861

Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haijiang; Chen, Enhong; Zheng, Yi; Kuang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Xiong

2014-01-01

38

SOCIOECONOMIC BENEFITS OF USING SPACE TECHNOLOGIES TO MONITOR AND RESPOND TO EARTHQUAKES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Earthquakes represent a major hazard for populations around the world, causing frequent loss of life, human suffering and enormous damage to homes, other buildings and infrastructure. The Technology Resources for Earthquake Monitoring and Response (TREMOR) Team of 36 space professionals analysed this problem over the course of the International Space University Summer Session Program and published their recommendations in the

Ian A. Christensen; Lauren E. Fletcher; Jonathan J. Liberda; Jose I. Rojas; Cristina Borrero del Pino

2008-01-01

39

Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This outline of basic information on earthquakes starts with an explanation of an earthquake, including the forces acting on rock, (tension, compression, and shear) and plastic and elastic deformation of rock. Next, the principle of the seismograph, seismometer, and seismogram along with the three types of seismic waves are discussed. Information is then presented to help the student distinguish between the focus and epicenter of an earthquake, describe the world-wide distribution pattern of earthquake activity, and explain the earthquake magnitude (Richter) scale and the Modified Mercalli scale of earthquake intensity. This site also includes an explanation of how the epicenter of an earthquake can be located. There is a discussion of some past earthquakes along with a description of the effects of earthquake activity.

Pamela Gore

40

Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will participate in a virtual earthquake lab where they will locate an epicenter and measure Richter Scale magnitude. They will also plot the positions of earthquakes that occurred that day. 1) Go to Virtual Earthquake website and follow instructions to complete the online lab assignment. 2) Go to the USGS earthquake site. Take a few minutes to explore the earthquakes displayed on the world map. Click on \\"M2.5/4+ Earthquake List\\". Use the world map provided by your teacher to plot the locations ...

Hemedinger, Mrs.

2007-11-26

41

Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson on earthquakes is based on naturalist John Muir's experiences with two significant earthquakes, the 1872 earthquake on the east side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the Great San Francisco Earthquake of 1906. Students will learn to explain that earthquakes are sudden motions along breaks in the crust called faults, and list the major geologic events including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and mountain building, which are the result of crustal plate motions. A downloadable, printable version (PDF) of the lesson plan is available.

42

Earthquakes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the causes and effects of earthquakes, defines the meaning of magnitude (measured on the Richter Magnitude Scale) and intensity (measured on a modified Mercalli Intensity Scale) and discusses earthquake prediction and control. (JR)

Roper, Paul J.; Roper, Jere Gerard

1974-01-01

43

Real-time earthquake monitoring using a search engine method.  

PubMed

When an earthquake occurs, seismologists want to use recorded seismograms to infer its location, magnitude and source-focal mechanism as quickly as possible. If such information could be determined immediately, timely evacuations and emergency actions could be undertaken to mitigate earthquake damage. Current advanced methods can report the initial location and magnitude of an earthquake within a few seconds, but estimating the source-focal mechanism may require minutes to hours. Here we present an earthquake search engine, similar to a web search engine, that we developed by applying a computer fast search method to a large seismogram database to find waveforms that best fit the input data. Our method is several thousand times faster than an exact search. For an Mw 5.9 earthquake on 8 March 2012 in Xinjiang, China, the search engine can infer the earthquake's parameters in <1?s after receiving the long-period surface wave data. PMID:25472861

Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haijiang; Chen, Enhong; Zheng, Yi; Kuang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Xiong

2014-01-01

44

Tectonic earthquakes in Greenland: An overview of the monitoring achievements during the last decades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The seismic monitoring in Greenland has been greatly improved during the last decades, and has provided new insight into the earthquake activity. Results from the earthquake monitoring in Greenland during this period are presented, and these results show; a large increase of the number of detected earthquakes, an improved detection threshold, new areas of high seismicity, several earthquake clusters and seismicity below the ice cap. Despite the improved monitoring, events detection is still performed manually, by analyzing all of the real time data. With a station separation of around 400km many earthquakes are only detected on one or two stations which make automatic detection very difficult. But improved instrumentation has enabled the use of single station location technique. Results from and challenges using this method are presented. The development of the seismic monitoring have gone from having only three seismic stations placed in Greenland in the 1970'ties, till today where there are 17 permanent stations and a similar number of temporary stations placed in Greenland. All equipped with broadband sensors and 12 of the permanent stations transmit data in real time. The resent major improvement of the seismic monitoring is performed by the Greenland ice sheet monitoring network (GLISN, http://glisn.info). The primary goal of GLISN is to provide broadband seismic data for the detection of Glacial earthquakes. GLISN will be fully implemented when the Iridium real time data transfer is in operation at five stations, hopefully by mid 2012.

Voss, P.

2011-12-01

45

Romanian Data Center: A modern way for seismic monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main seismic survey of Romania is performed by the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) which operates a real-time digital seismic network. The NIEP real-time network currently consists of 102 stations and two seismic arrays equipped with different high quality digitizers (Kinemetrics K2, Quanterra Q330, Quanterra Q330HR, PS6-26, Basalt), broadband and short period seismometers (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, KS54000, KS2000, CMG3T,STS2, SH-1, S13, Mark l4c, Ranger, gs21, Mark l22) and acceleration sensors (Episensor Kinemetrics). The data are transmitted at the National Data Center (NDC) and Eforie Nord (EFOR) Seismic Observatory. EFOR is the back-up for the NDC and also a monitoring center for the Black Sea tsunami events. NIEP is a data acquisition node for the seismic network of Moldova (FDSN code MD) composed of five seismic stations. NIEP has installed in the northern part of Bulgaria eight seismic stations equipped with broadband sensors and Episensors and nine accelerometers (Episensors) installed in nine districts along the Danube River. All the data are acquired at NIEP for Early Warning System and for primary estimation of the earthquake parameters. The real-time acquisition (RT) and data exchange is done by Antelope software and Seedlink (from Seiscomp3). The real-time data communication is ensured by different types of transmission: GPRS, satellite, radio, Internet and a dedicated line provided by a governmental network. For data processing and analysis at the two data centers Antelope 5.2 TM is being used running on 3 workstations: one from a CentOS platform and two on MacOS. Also a Seiscomp3 server stands as back-up for Antelope 5.2 Both acquisition and analysis of seismic data systems produce information about local and global parameters of earthquakes. In addition, Antelope is used for manual processing (event association, calculation of magnitude, creating a database, sending seismic bulletins, calculation of PGA and PGV, etc.), generating ShakeMap products and interaction with global data centers. National Data Center developed tools to enable centralizing of data from software like Antelope and Seiscomp3. These tools allow rapid distribution of information about damages observed after an earthquake to the public. Another feature of the developed application is the alerting of designated persons, via email and SMS, based on the earthquake parameters. In parallel, Seiscomp3 sends automatic notifications (emails) with the earthquake parameters. The real-time seismic network and software acquisition and data processing used in the National Data Center development have increased the number of events detected locally and globally, the increase of the quality parameters obtained by data processing and potentially increasing visibility on the national and internationally.

Neagoe, Cristian; Marius Manea, Liviu; Ionescu, Constantin

2014-05-01

46

Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Community Fault Model (over 150 major faults of Southern California)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a movie made using the SCEC-VDO software showing a 3D animation of the SCEC Community Fault Model (over 150 major faults of Southern California). The movie highlights the San Andreas and Puente Hills faults. The Southern California Earthquake Center's Virtual Display of Objects (SCEC-VDO) is 3D visualization software that allows users to display, study and make movies of earthquakes as they occur globally. SCEC-VDO was developed by interns of SCEC Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (UseIT), under the supervision of Sue Perry and Tom Jordan.

47

http://nees.ucla.edu/ Post-Earthquake Monitoring of Buildings in Chile Using NEES@UCLA Resources  

E-print Network

http://nees.ucla.edu/ Post-Earthquake Monitoring of Buildings in Chile Using NEES@UCLA Resources On March 13 2010, NEES@UCLA dispatched a team to Santiago, Chile for post-earthquake. The magnitude 8.8 February 27, 2010 Chile Earthquake and it's aftershock sequence

Grether, Gregory

48

Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers: A Collaboration Between the Earthquake Country Alliance and Free-Choice Learning Institutions in California  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999 the Southern California Earthquake Center initiated an effort to expand its reach to multiple target audiences through the development of an interpretive trail on the San Andreas fault at Wallace Creek and an earthquake exhibit at Fingerprints Youth Museum in Hemet. These projects and involvement with the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands beginning in 2007 led to

R. M. Degroot; K. Springer; C. J. Brooks; L. Schuman; D. Dalton; M. L. Benthien

2009-01-01

49

Earthquakes!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A strong earthquake struck Istanbul, Turkey on Monday, only weeks after a major quake in the same area claimed more than 15,500 lives. This site, from The Why Files (see the August 9, 1996 Scout Report), offers background information on the science of earthquakes, with particular emphasis on the recent tectonic activity in Turkey.

50

Design for communications center monitor & control system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Communications center monitor & control system, including power supply sub-system, environment sub-system, fire sub-system, security sub-system and so on, is widely used in school, enterprise, government and other areas. The control system designed by this paper can get temperature and humidity information from RS485 sensor of temperature-humidity. From measuring gate sensor, smoke sensor and leak-water senor, the control system can

Zhigang Lv; Cuixia Liu

2010-01-01

51

Korea Integrated Seismic System tool(KISStool) for seismic monitoring and data sharing at the local data center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Korea Integrated Seismic System(KISS) is a back-bone seismic network which distributes seismic data to different organizations in near-real time at Korea. The association of earthquake monitoring institutes has shared their seismic data through the KISS from 2003. Local data centers operating remote several stations need to send their free field seismic data to NEMA(National Emergency Management Agency) by the law of countermeasure against earthquake hazard in Korea. It is very important the efficient tool for local data centers which want to rapidly detect local seismic intensity and to transfer seismic event information toward national wide data center including PGA, PGV, dominant frequency of P-wave, raw data, and etc. We developed the KISStool(Korea Integrated Seismic System tool) for easy and convenient operation seismic network in local data center. The KISStool has the function of monitoring real time waveforms by clicking station icon on the Google map and real time variation of PGA, PGV, and other data by opening the bar type monitoring section. If they use the KISStool, any local data center can transfer event information to NEMA(National Emergency Management Agency), KMA(Korea Meteorological Agency) or other institutes through the KISS using UDP or TCP/IP protocols. The KISStool is one of the most efficient methods to monitor and transfer earthquake event at local data center in Korea. KIGAM will support this KISStool not only to the member of the monitoring association but also local governments.

Park, J.; Chi, H. C.; Lim, I.; Jeong, B.

2011-12-01

52

The Development of an Earthquake Preparedness Plan for a Child Care Center in a Geologically Hazardous Region.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The director of a child care center at a community college in California developed an earthquake preparedness plan for the center which met state and local requirements for earthquake preparedness at schools. The plan consisted of: (1) the identification and reduction of nonstructural hazards in classrooms, office, and staff rooms; (2) storage of

Wokurka, Linda

53

Earthquakes  

MedlinePLUS

... earthquake is the sudden, rapid shaking of the earth, caused by the breaking and shifting of subterranean ... the forces of plate tectonics have shaped the earth, as the huge plates that form the earths ...

54

Coseismic groundwater level changes at multiple-well monitoring stations due to large earthquakes occurred in Taiwan region  

Microsoft Academic Search

Taiwan is located in the Circum-Pacific seismic belt. As earthquakes occurred frequently, various earthquake monitoring devices have been placed all over this island. More than 600 wells, which include single-well and multiple-well stations, have been installed to monitor earthquake-related groundwater level changes. Co- seismic groundwater level changes may reflect tectonic stress redistribution and crustal strain in 3-D spatial distribution. This

C. Liu; Y. Chia; Y. Chiang; Y. Chang; Y. Kuan

2008-01-01

55

Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1995, the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) was created in order to measure the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on natural and physical resources along the Colorado River. As such, the GCMRC's projects also monitor and examine the biological, cultural, and physical resources of the entire Colorado River ecosystem. The materials on their site are divided into five primary sections, including "News & Info", "Research", and "Products". In the "News & Info" area visitors can learn about the endangered species that reside in the area covered by the GCMRC and also take a look at their outreach materials, which include fact sheets, posters, and transcripts from recent symposia. The "Research" area is a bit more technical in nature, containing papers on water flow simulations and elevation data. The site is rounded out by the "Products" area, where visitors can look over new publications and evaluate simulation models.

56

EQInfo - earthquakes world-wide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EQInfo is a free Android app providing recent earthquake information from various earthquake monitoring centers as GFZ, EMSC, USGS and others. It allows filtering of agency, region and magnitude as well as controlling update interval, institute priority and alarm types. Used by more than 25k active users and beeing in the top ten list of Google Play, EQInfo is one of the most popular apps for earthquake information.

Weber, Bernd; Herrnkind, Stephan

2014-05-01

57

Application Results of The Mdcb-3 Model Earthquake Precursor Monitoring Instrument In Many Regions In China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The MDCB-3 Type Earthquake Precursor Monitoring Instrument is used by over 40 seismology organizations in 14 provinces in China. Some have used this type of instru- ment in observation for over 11 years, some others just started; Some are using Model 1 of the instrument, some others are already using Model 4. The instrument has been used by the co-authors

M. Deng; H. K. Yang; R. Shen; X. Wu; F. X. Wang; B. C. Guo; Y. Y. Xu; Y. X. Zhao; Z. Y. Chen; K. S. Deng

2002-01-01

58

Pragmatic Metrics for Monitoring Science Data Centers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science data metrics and their analysis are critical components to the end-to-end data and service flow for science data centers. The Earth Science Data and Information System Project has collected records of EOS science data archive, processing and distribution metrics from NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers since 1996. The ESDIS Science Operations Office and the DAAC data centers have cooperated to develop a DAAC metrics reporting capability called the EOSDIS Data Gathering and Reporting Systems (EDGRS). This poster illustrates EDGRS processes and metrics data applications. EDGRS currently accesses detailed archive and distribution metrics from nine DAAC sites and transfers results to a centralized collection system on a routine basis. After automated quality checks the records are immediately made available through a web-based Graphic User Interface. Users can obtain standard graphs and prepare custom queries to generate specific reports for monitoring science data processing progress. Applications are illustrated that explore methods for performing data availability studies and performance analyses. Improvements are planned to support granule-level science data accounting and characterization of product distribution.

Moses, J. F.; Behnke, J.

2003-12-01

59

88 hours: the U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center response to the March 11, 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The M 9.0 11 March 2011 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake and associated tsunami near the east coast of the island of Honshu caused tens of thousands of deaths and potentially over one trillion dollars in damage, resulting in one of the worst natural disasters ever recorded. The U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (USGS NEIC), through its responsibility to respond to all significant global earthquakes as part of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, quickly produced and distributed a suite of earthquake information products to inform emergency responders, the public, the media, and the academic community of the earthquake's potential impact and to provide scientific background for the interpretation of the event's tectonic context and potential for future hazard. Here we present a timeline of the NEIC response to this devastating earthquake in the context of rapidly evolving information emanating from the global earthquake-response community. The timeline includes both internal and publicly distributed products, the relative timing of which highlights the inherent tradeoffs between the requirement to provide timely alerts and the necessity for accurate, authoritative information. The timeline also documents the iterative and evolutionary nature of the standard products produced by the NEIC and includes a behind-the-scenes look at the decisions, data, and analysis tools that drive our rapid product distribution.

Wald, David J.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Benz, Harley M.; Earle, Paul S.; Briggs, Richard W.

2011-01-01

60

Potential utilization of the NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in earthquake engineering research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Earthquake engineering research capabilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facilities at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Alabama, were evaluated. The results indicate that the NASA/MSFC facilities and supporting capabilities offer unique opportunities for conducting earthquake engineering research. Specific features that are particularly attractive for large scale static and dynamic testing of natural and man-made structures include the following: large physical dimensions of buildings and test bays; high loading capacity; wide range and large number of test equipment and instrumentation devices; multichannel data acquisition and processing systems; technical expertise for conducting large-scale static and dynamic testing; sophisticated techniques for systems dynamics analysis, simulation, and control; and capability for managing large-size and technologically complex programs. Potential uses of the facilities for near and long term test programs to supplement current earthquake research activities are suggested.

Scholl, R. E. (editor)

1979-01-01

61

Application of collocated GPS and seismic sensors to earthquake monitoring and early warning.  

PubMed

We explore the use of collocated GPS and seismic sensors for earthquake monitoring and early warning. The GPS and seismic data collected during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki (Japan) and the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) earthquakes are analyzed by using a tightly-coupled integration. The performance of the integrated results is validated by both time and frequency domain analysis. We detect the P-wave arrival and observe small-scale features of the movement from the integrated results and locate the epicenter. Meanwhile, permanent offsets are extracted from the integrated displacements highly accurately and used for reliable fault slip inversion and magnitude estimation. PMID:24284765

Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Guo, Bofeng

2013-01-01

62

Application of Collocated GPS and Seismic Sensors to Earthquake Monitoring and Early Warning  

PubMed Central

We explore the use of collocated GPS and seismic sensors for earthquake monitoring and early warning. The GPS and seismic data collected during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki (Japan) and the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) earthquakes are analyzed by using a tightly-coupled integration. The performance of the integrated results is validated by both time and frequency domain analysis. We detect the P-wave arrival and observe small-scale features of the movement from the integrated results and locate the epicenter. Meanwhile, permanent offsets are extracted from the integrated displacements highly accurately and used for reliable fault slip inversion and magnitude estimation. PMID:24284765

Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Guo, Bofeng

2013-01-01

63

Some problems on detection of earthquake precursors by means of continuous monitoring of crustal strains and tilts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work carried out in Japan to search for earthquake precursors by means of continuous monitoring of crustal strains and tilts was reexamined. We find no evidence of reliable precursors observed simultaneously with more than two instruments or at more than two observation sites. There is a fair chance to detect earthquake precursors if strain meters and tiltmeters are distributed

Shuzo Takemoto

1991-01-01

64

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center's Response to the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The largest Pacific basin earthquake in 47 years, and also the largest magnitude earthquake since the Sumatra 2004 earthquake, struck off of the east coast of the Tohoku region of Honshu, Japan at 5:46 UTC on 11 March 2011. The Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) generated a massive tsunami with runups of up to 40m along the Tohoku coast. The tsunami waves crossed the Pacific Ocean causing significant damage as far away as Hawaii, California, and Chile, thereby becoming the largest, most destructive tsunami in the Pacific Basin since 1960. Triggers on the seismic stations at Erimo, Hokkaido (ERM) and Matsushiro, Honshu (MAJO), alerted Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) scientists 90 seconds after the earthquake began. Four minutes after its origin, and about one minute after the earthquake's rupture ended, PTWC issued an observatory message reporting a preliminary magnitude of 7.5. Eight minutes after origin time, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) issued its first international tsunami message in its capacity as the Northwest Pacific Tsunami Advisory Center. In accordance with international tsunami warning system protocols, PTWC then followed with its first international tsunami warning message using JMA's earthquake parameters, including an Mw of 7.8. Additional Mwp, mantle wave, and W-phase magnitude estimations based on the analysis of later-arriving seismic data at PTWC revealed that the earthquake magnitude reached at least 8.8, and that a destructive tsunami would likely be crossing the Pacific Ocean. The earthquake damaged the nearest coastal sea-level station located 90 km from the epicenter in Ofunato, Japan. The NOAA DART sensor situated 600 km off the coast of Sendai, Japan, at a depth of 5.6 km recorded a tsunami wave amplitude of nearly two meters, making it by far the largest tsunami wave ever recorded by a DART sensor. Thirty minutes later, a coastal sea-level station at Hanasaki, Japan, 600 km from the epicenter, recorded a tsunami wave amplitude of nearly three meters. The evacuation of Hawaii's coastlines commenced at 7:31 UTC. Concurrent with this tsunami event, a widely-felt Mw 4.6 earthquake occurred beneath the island of Hawai`i at 8:58 UTC. PTWC responded within three minutes of origin time with a Tsunami Information Statement stating that the Hawaii earthquake would not generate a tsunami. After issuing 27 international tsunami bulletins to Pacific basin countries, and 16 messages to the State of Hawaii during a period of 25 hours after the event began, PTWC concluded its role during the Tohoku tsunami event with the issuance of the corresponding warning cancellation message at 6:36 UTC on 12 March 2011. During the following weeks, however, the PTWC would continue to respond to dozens of aftershocks related to the earthquake. We will present a complete timeline of PTWC's activities, both domestic and international, during the Tohoku tsunami event. We will also illustrate the immense number of website hits, phone calls, and media requests that flooded PTWC during the course of the event, as well as the growing role social media plays in communicating tsunami hazard information to the public.

Weinstein, S. A.; Becker, N. C.; Shiro, B.; Koyanagi, K. K.; Sardina, V.; Walsh, D.; Wang, D.; McCreery, C. S.; Fryer, G. J.; Cessaro, R. K.; Hirshorn, B. F.; Hsu, V.

2011-12-01

65

Volcano and Earthquake Monitoring Plan for the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, 2006-2015  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To provide Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and its surrounding communities with a modern, comprehensive system for volcano and earthquake monitoring, the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) has developed a monitoring plan for the period 2006-2015. Such a plan is needed so that YVO can provide timely information during seismic, volcanic, and hydrothermal crises and can anticipate hazardous events before they occur. The monitoring network will also provide high-quality data for scientific study and interpretation of one of the largest active volcanic systems in the world. Among the needs of the observatory are to upgrade its seismograph network to modern standards and to add five new seismograph stations in areas of the park that currently lack adequate station density. In cooperation with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and its Plate Boundary Observatory Program (PBO), YVO seeks to install five borehole strainmeters and two tiltmeters to measure crustal movements. The boreholes would be located in developed areas close to existing infrastructure and away from sensitive geothermal features. In conjunction with the park's geothermal monitoring program, installation of new stream gages, and gas-measuring instruments will allow YVO to compare geophysical phenomena, such as earthquakes and ground motions, to hydrothermal events, such as anomalous water and gas discharge. In addition, YVO seeks to characterize the behavior of geyser basins, both to detect any precursors to hydrothermal explosions and to monitor earthquakes related to fluid movements that are difficult to detect with the current monitoring system. Finally, a monitoring network consists not solely of instruments, but requires also a secure system for real-time transmission of data. The current telemetry system is vulnerable to failures that could jeopardize data transmission out of Yellowstone. Future advances in monitoring technologies must be accompanied by improvements in the infrastructure for data transmission. Overall, our strategy is to (1) maximize our ability to provide rapid assessments of changing conditions to ensure public safety, (2) minimize environmental and visual impact, and (3) install instrumentation in developed areas.

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

2006-01-01

66

Foreshocks and Mainshock of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Observed by Ocean Bottom Seismic/Geodetic Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A megathrust earthquake of M=9.0 occurred along the Japan Trench subduction zone to cause devastating damage to the Pacific coast of northeastern Japan by strong ground shaking and tall tsunami. The rupture of the earthquake started at the central part of the subduction zone, where interplate earthquakes of M ~ 7.5 have occurred along the subducting plate boundary repeatedly at about 40 years intervals, so-called the Miyagi-Oki earthquakes. Since 2002, we have maintained a seismic and geodetic observation network in the source area of the earthquakes by repeated deployment and retrieval of ocean bottom off-line recording instruments. Continuous ocean-bottom pressure monitoring has been made in the Miyagi-Oki area to detect vertical movement of the seafloor. Our bottom pressure gauges (OBPs) have detected secular vertical seafloor motion due to strong interplate coupling until the occurrence of the M9 earthquake. Coseismic deformation associated with the M 9.0 was clearly observed by the OBPs. At the stations close to the trench axis, the OBPs detected large uplift from 3 to 5 m, whereas ~ 1 m depressions were recorded at landward stations. These observations provide strong constraint on the slip distribution along the plate interface. The OBPs could also detect co-seismic and post-seismic deformation due to the largest foreshock (M 7.3, on Mar. 9), as well as the post-seismic deformation after the mainshock occurrence. The observed amount of the post-seismic deformation tend to be larger in the landward stations, indicating larger slip in the deeper portion of the plate interface, as opposed to the coseismic slip, much larger slip occurred at the toe of the subduction zone. The network of ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) successfully observed a sequence of the foreshocks, the mainshock, and the aftershocks of the Tohoku earthquake. Although their coverage is much smaller than the entire rupture area, close examination provides us detailed spatio-temporal variation of microseismicity before and after the occurrence of the M9 earthquake around its epicenter. According to the relocation using the OBS data, the foreshock activity seems to have been expanded toward the hypocenter of the M9.0 earthquake. Our OBP data suggest the postseismic slip after the M 7.3 event occurred inbetween the hypocenters of the largest foreshock and the maishock. It is probable that the migration of the foreshock activity was a manifestation of expansion of the aseismic slip towards the hypocenter of the M9.0 mainshock.

Hino, R.; Ito, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Inazu, D.; Iinuma, T.; Ohta, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Shinohara, M.; Kaneda, Y.

2011-12-01

67

Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers: A Collaboration Between the Earthquake Country Alliance and Free-Choice Learning Institutions in California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1999 the Southern California Earthquake Center initiated an effort to expand its reach to multiple target audiences through the development of an interpretive trail on the San Andreas fault at Wallace Creek and an earthquake exhibit at Fingerprints Youth Museum in Hemet. These projects and involvement with the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands beginning in 2007 led to the creation of Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers (EPIcenters) in 2008. The impetus for the development of the network was to broaden participation in The Great Southern California ShakeOut. In 2009 it has grown to be more comprehensive in its scope including its evolution into a statewide network. EPIcenters constitute a variety of free-choice learning institutions, representing museums, science centers, libraries, universities, parks, and other places visited by a variety of audiences including families, seniors, and school groups. They share a commitment to demonstrating and encouraging earthquake preparedness. EPIcenters coordinate Earthquake Country Alliance activities in their county or region, lead presentations or organize events in their communities, or in other ways demonstrate leadership in earthquake education and risk reduction. The San Bernardino County Museum (Southern California) and The Tech Museum of Innovation (Northern California) serve as EPIcenter regional coordinating institutions. They interact with over thirty institutional partners who have implemented a variety of activities from displays and talks to earthquake exhibitions. While many activities are focused on the time leading up to and just after the ShakeOut, most EPIcenter members conduct activities year round. Network members at Kidspace Museum in Pasadena and San Diego Natural History Museum have formed EPIcenter focus groups on early childhood education and safety and security. This presentation highlights the development of the EPIcenter network, synergistic activities resulting from this collaboration, and lessons learned from interacting with free-choice learning institutions.

Degroot, R. M.; Springer, K.; Brooks, C. J.; Schuman, L.; Dalton, D.; Benthien, M. L.

2009-12-01

68

Network of seismo-geochemical monitoring observatories for earthquake prediction research in India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Present paper deals with a brief review of the research carried out to develop multi-parametric gas-geochemical monitoring facilities dedicated to earthquake prediction research in India by installing a network of seismo-geochemical monitoring observatories at different regions of the country. In an attempt to detect earthquake precursors, the concentrations of helium, argon, nitrogen, methane, radon-222 (222Rn), polonium-218 (218Po), and polonium-214 (214Po) emanating from hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously and round the clock at these observatories. In this paper, we make a cross correlation study of a number of geochemical anomalies recorded at these observatories. With the data received from each of the above observatories we attempt to make a time series analysis to relate magnitude and epicentral distance locations through statistical methods, empirical formulations that relate the area of influence to earthquake scale. Application of the linear and nonlinear statistical techniques in the recorded geochemical data sets reveal a clear signature of long-range correlation in the data sets.

Chaudhuri, Hirok; Barman, Chiranjib; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar; Ghose, Debasis; Sen, Prasanta; Sinha, Bikash

2013-08-01

69

Hydrochemical monitoring, petrological observation, and geochemical modeling of fault healing after an earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

on hydrochemical monitoring, petrological observations, and geochemical modeling, we identify a mechanism and estimate a time scale for fault healing after an earthquake. Hydrochemical monitoring of groundwater samples from an aquifer, which is at an approximate depth of 1200 m, was conducted over a period of 10 years. Groundwater samples have been taken from a borehole (HU-01) that crosses the Hsavk-Flatey Fault (HFF) near Hsavk town, northern Iceland. After 10 weeks of sampling, on 16 September 2002, an M 5.8 earthquake occurred on the Grimsey Lineament, which is approximately parallel to the HFF. This earthquake caused rupturing of a hydrological barrier resulting in an influx of groundwater from a second aquifer, which was recorded by 15-20% concentration increases for some cations and anions. This was followed by hydrochemical recovery. Based on petrological observations of tectonically exhumed fault rocks, we conclude that hydrochemical recovery recorded fault healing by precipitation of secondary minerals along fractures. Because hydrochemical recovery accelerated with time, we conclude that the growth rate of these minerals was controlled by reaction rates at mineral-water interfaces. Geochemical modeling confirmed that the secondary minerals which formed along fractures were saturated in the sampled groundwater. Fault healing and therefore hydrochemical recovery was periodically interrupted by refracturing events. Supported by field and petrographic evidence, we conclude that these events were caused by changes of fluid pressure probably coupled with earthquakes. These events became successively smaller as groundwater flux decreased with time. Despite refracturing, hydrochemical recovery reached completion 8-10 years after the earthquake.

Wsteby, Niklas; Skelton, Alasdair; Tollefsen, Elin; Andrn, Margareta; Stockmann, Gabrielle; Claesson Liljedahl, Lillemor; Sturkell, Erik; Mrth, Magnus

2014-07-01

70

Providing Seismotectonic Information to the Public Through Continuously Updated National Earthquake Information Center Products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the main missions of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) is the dissemination of information to national and international agencies, scientists, and the general public through various products such as ShakeMap and earthquake summary posters. During the summer of 2012, undergraduate and graduate student interns helped to update and improve our series of regional seismicity posters and regional tectonic summaries. The "Seismicity of the Earth (1900-2007)" poster placed over a century's worth of global seismicity data in the context of plate tectonics, highlighting regions that have experienced great (M+8.0) earthquakes, and the tectonic settings of those events. This endeavor became the basis for a series of more regionalized seismotectonic posters that focus on major subduction zones and their associated seismicity, including the Aleutian and Caribbean arcs. The first round of these posters were inclusive of events through 2007, and were made with the intent of being continually updated. Each poster includes a regional tectonic summary, a seismic hazard map, focal depth cross-sections, and a main map that illustrates the following: the main subduction zone and other physiographic features, seismicity, and rupture zones of historic great earthquakes. Many of the existing regional seismotectonic posters have been updated and new posters highlighting regions of current seismological interest have been created, including the Sumatra and Java arcs, the Middle East region and the Himalayas (all of which are currently in review). These new editions include updated lists of earthquakes, expanded tectonic summaries, updated relative plate motion vectors, and major crustal faults. These posters thus improve upon previous editions that included only brief tectonic discussions of the most prominent features and historic earthquakes, and which did not systematically represent non-plate boundary faults. Regional tectonic summaries provide the public with immediate background information useful for teaching and media related purposes and are an essential component to many NEIC products. As part of the NEIC's earthquake response, rapid earthquake summary posters are created in the hours following a significant global earthquake. These regional tectonic summaries are included in each earthquake summary poster along with a discussion of the event, written by research scientists at the NEIC, often with help from regional experts. Now, through the efforts of this and related studies, event webpages will automatically contain a regional tectonic summary immediately after an event has been posted. These new summaries include information about plate boundary interactions and other associated tectonic elements, trends in seismicity and brief descriptions of significant earthquakes that have occurred in a region. The tectonic summaries for the following regions have been updated as part of this work: South America, the Caribbean, Alaska and the Aleutians, Kuril-Kamchatka, Japan and vicinity, and Central America, with newly created summaries for Sumatra and Java, the Mediterranean, Middle East, and the Himalayas. The NEIC is currently planning to integrate concise stylized maps with each tectonic summary for display on the USGS website.

Bernardino, M. J.; Hayes, G. P.; Dannemann, F.; Benz, H.

2012-12-01

71

Implications of the World Trade Center Health Program (WTCHP) for the Public Health Response to the Great East Japan Earthquake  

PubMed Central

The attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001 resulted in a serious burden of physical and mental illness for the 50,000 rescue workers that responded to 9/11 as well as the 400,000 residents and workers in the surrounding areas of New York City. The Zadroga Act of 2010 established the WTC Health Program (WTCHP) to provide monitoring and treatment of WTC exposure-related conditions and health surveillance for the responder and survivor populations. Several reports have highlighted the applicability of insights gained from the WTCHP to the public health response to the Great East Japan Earthquake. Optimal exposure monitoring processes and attention to the welfare of vulnerable exposed sub-groups are critical aspects of the response to both incidents. The ongoing mental health care concerns of 9/11 patients accentuate the need for accessible and appropriately skilled mental health care in Fukushima. Active efforts to demonstrate transparency and to promote community involvement in the public health response will be highly important in establishing successful long-term monitoring and treatment programs for the exposed populations in Fukushima. PMID:24317449

CRANE, Michael A.; CHO, Hyunje G.; LANDRIGAN, Phillip J.

2013-01-01

72

Monitoring of Earthquake Disasters by Satellite Radio Tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work addresses lithospheric-ionospheric coupling during strong earthquakes (EQ). Particular interest is placed on the physical phenomena preceding EQs - the precursors. We discuss both the ionospheric implications of EQs, and the ionospheric precursors to EQ. The requisite ionospheric sounding is carried out using satellite navigational system data; the data are analyzed using the methods of satellite radio tomography (RT). Signals from both low-orbiting beacons (Transit, Tsikada, etc.) and high orbiting global navigational satellite systems (GNSS including GPS and GLONASS) are used. The resulting 2D and 3D tomographic images and their time flow (4D RT) make it possible to study the spatiotemporal structure of ionospheric perturbations induced by EQs and EQ precursors, and to distinguish ionospheric responses to processes of EQ preparation against the effects of other factors. Low-orbital RT (LORT) provides almost "instantaneous" (with a time span of 5-8 min) 2-D snapshots of the electron density over the seismically active region of interest. LORT allows 2D imaging of various anomalies, including wave structures such as ionospheric manifestations of acoustic-gravity waves (AGW), wave-like disturbances, and solitary waves with the gaps between images, depending on the number of operating satellites (currently, 30-100 minutes). High-orbital RT (HORT) is capable of imaging 4D distributions of ionospheric plasma (resulting in 3D snapshots every 20-30 minutes). Using this approach, one can reconstruct RT images of ionospheric irregularities, wave structures, and perturbations such as solitary waves. In regions with a sufficient number of GNSS receivers (California, Japan), 4-D RT images can be generated every 2-4 minutes. The spatial resolution of LORT and HORT systems is on the order of 20-40, and 100 km, respectively. The combination of LORT and HORT systems has the potential for exploiting data provided by other experimental techniques, including radio occultation, ionosonde, and radar measurements, inter alia. Further integration of RT systems with other multi-instrumental observations of EQ-related phenomena is possible. We present the results of long-term RT studies of the ionosphere over California, Alaska, and Southeast Asia (Taiwan region). We used the experimental data from the LORT systems in Alaska and Taiwan. At present, LORT system in California is put into operation. The input for HORT imaging was the data from IGS, UNAVCO, and Japan GPS network stations. A variety of examples are given to illustrate the ionospheric perturbations associated with EQs and to illustrate EQ-related, ionospheric precursors including specific ionospheric disturbances, AGW, and solitary-wave-like perturbations. Several dozen precursors are identified from the results of many years of RT studies in Alaska and the Taiwan region during the period from 2006-2008. We discuss the results of a HORT analysis of a series of recent EQs including San Simeon (2003), Parkfield (2004), Sumatra (2004), Sichuan (China, 2008), Haiti (2010), Chile (2010), Japan (Tohoku, 2011), and other events. We are grateful to Dr. L.-C.Tsai and Northwest Research Associates, Inc., for providing raw RT data for Taiwan and Alaska.

Kunitsyn, V.; Andreeva, E.; Nesterov, I.; Rekenthaler, D. A.

2011-12-01

73

Cloud-based systems for monitoring earthquakes and other environmental quantities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are many advantages to using a cloud-based system to record and analyze environmental quantities such as earthquakes, radiation, various gases, dust and meteorological parameters. These advantages include robustness and dynamic scalability, and also reduced costs. In this paper, we present our experiences over the last three years in developing a cloud-based earthquake monitoring system (the Community Seismic Network). This network consists of over 600 sensors (accelerometers) in the S. California region that send data directly to the Google App Engine where they are analyzed. The system is capable of handing many other types of sensor data and generating a situation-awareness analysis as a product. Other advantages to the cloud-based system are integration with other peer networks, and being able to deploy anywhere in the world without have to build addition computing infrastructure.

Clayton, R. W.; Olson, M.; Liu, A.; Chandy, M.; Bunn, J.; Guy, R.

2013-12-01

74

Basin-centered asperities in great subduction zone earthquakes: A link between slip, subsidence, and subduction erosion?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Published areas of high coseismic slip, or asperities, for 29 of the largest Circum-Pacific megathrust earthquakes are compared to forearc structure revealed by satellite free-air gravity, bathymetry, and seismic profiling. On average, 71% of an earthquake's seismic moment and 79% of its asperity area occur beneath the prominent gravity low outlining the deep-sea terrace; 57% of an earthquake's asperity area, on average, occurs beneath the forearc basins that lie within the deep-sea terrace. In SW Japan, slip in the 1923, 1944, 1946, and 1968 earthquakes was largely centered beneath five forearc basins whose landward edge overlies the 350??C isotherm on the plate boundary, the inferred downdip limit of the locked zone. Basin-centered coseismic slip also occurred along the Aleutian, Mexico, Peru, and Chile subduction zones but was ambiguous for the great 1964 Alaska earthquake. Beneath intrabasin structural highs, seismic slip tends to be lower, possibly due to higher temperatures and fluid pressures. Kilometers of late Cenozoic subsidence and crustal thinning above some of the source zones are indicated by seismic profiling and drilling and are thought to be caused by basal subduction erosion. The deep-sea terraces and basins may evolve not just by growth of the outer arc high but also by interseismic subsidence not recovered during earthquakes. Basin-centered asperities could indicate a link between subsidence, subduction erosion, and seismogenesis. Whatever the cause, forearc basins may be useful indicators of long-term seismic moment release. The source zone for Cascadia's 1700 A.D. earthquake contains five large, basin-centered gravity lows that may indicate potential asperities at depth. The gravity gradient marking the inferred downdip limit to large coseismic slip lies offshore, except in northwestern Washington, where the low extends landward beneath the coast. Transverse gravity highs between the basins suggest that the margin is seismically segmented and could produce a variety of large earthquakes. Published in 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Sugiyama, Y.; Scholl, D. W.; Dinterman, P.A.

2003-01-01

75

USGS contributions to earthquake and tsunami monitoring in the Caribbean Region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

USGS Caribbean Project Team: Lind Gee, Gary Gyure, John Derr, Jack Odum, John McMillan, David Carver, Jim Allen, Susan Rhea, Don Anderson, Harley Benz Caribbean Partners: Christa von Hillebrandt-Andrade-PRSN, Juan Payero ISU-UASD,DR, Eduardo Camacho - UPAN, Panama, Lloyd Lynch - SRU,Gonzalo Cruz - UNAH,Honduras, Margaret Wiggins-Grandison - Jamaica, Judy Thomas - CERO Barbados, Sylvan McIntyre - NADMA Grenada, E. Bermingham - STRI. The magnitude-9 Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of December 26, 2004, increased global awareness of the destructive hazard posed by earthquakes and tsunamis. In response to this tragedy, the US government undertook a collaborative project to improve earthquake and tsunami monitoring along a major portion of vulnerable coastal regions, in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Seismically active areas of the Caribbean Sea region pose a tsunami risk for Caribbean islands, coastal areas along the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic seaboard of North America. Nearly 100 tsunamis have been reported for the Caribbean region in the past 500 years, including 14 tsunamis reported in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Partners in this project include the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Smithsonian Institute, the National Oceanic and Aeronautic Administration (NOAA), and several partner institutions in the Caribbean region. This presentation focuses on the deployment of nine broadband seismic stations to monitor earthquake activity in the Caribbean region that are affiliated with the Global Seismograph Network (GSN). By the end of 2006, five stations were transmitting data to the USGS National Earthquake Information Service (NEIS), and regional partners through Puerto Rico seismograph network (PRSN) Earthworm systems. The following stations are currently operating: SDDR - Sabaneta Dam Dominican Republic, BBGH - Gun Hill Barbados, GRGR - Grenville, Grenada, BCIP - Barro Colorado, Panama, TGUH - Tegucigalpa, Honduras. These stations complement the existing GSN stations SJG - San Juan, Puerto Rico, SDV - Santo Domingo, Venezuela, TEIG - Tepich, Yucatan, Mexico, and JTS - Costa, Rica. 2007 will see the construction of two additional stations in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and Barbuda. Planned stations in Jamaica and Grand Turks are awaiting local approval. In this presentation we examine noise conditions at the five operating sites and assess the capabilities of the current seismic network using three different measures of capability. The three measures of network capability are: 1) minimum Mw detection threshold; 2) response time of the automatic processing system and; 3) theoretical earthquake location errors. The new seismic stations are part of a larger effort to monitor and mitigate tsunami hazard in the region. Destructive earthquakes and tsunamis are known to be a threat in various parts of the Caribbean. We demonstrate that considerable improvement in network magnitude threshold, response time and earthquake location error have been achieved.

McNamara, D.; Caribbean Project Team, U.; Partners, C.

2007-05-01

76

Data Center Workload Monitoring, Analysis, and Emulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last ten years we have witnessed a shift from large mainframe computing to commodity, off-the-shelf clusters of servers. Today's data centers contain thousands or tens of thousands of servers, providing services and computation for tens or hundreds of thousands of users. In addition to tra- ditional IT challenges such as server management, security, and performance, data center owners

Justin Moore; Jeff Chase; Keith Farkas; Parthasarathy Ranganathan

77

Center of Excellence in Structural Health Monitoring  

E-print Network

's Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring project within the Aviation Safety Program. His research interests safety. Applications include civil structures, aerostructures, infrastructure, power generation Directorate. He is the Associate Principal Investigator for the Airframe Health Management element of NASA

78

Role of WEGENER (World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research) in monitoring natural hazards (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WEGENER was originally the acronym for Working Group of European Geoscientists for the Establishment of Networks for Earth-science Research. It was founded in March 1981 in response to an appeal delivered at the Journes Luxembourgeoises de Geodynamique in December 1980 to respond with a coordinated European proposal to a NASA Announcement of Opportunity inviting participation in the Crustal Dynamics and Earthquake Research Program. WEGENER, during the past 33 years, has always kept a close contact with the Agencies and Institutions responsible for the development and maintenance of the global space geodetic networks with the aim to make them aware of the scientific needs and outcomes of the project which might have an influence on the general science policy trends. WEGENER served as Inter-commission Project 3.2, between Commission 1 and Commission 3, of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) until 2012. Since then, WEGENER project has become the Sub-commission 3.5 of IAG commission 3, namely Tectonics and Earthquake Geodesy. In this presentation, we briefly review the accomplishments of WEGENER as originally conceived and outline and justify the new focus of the WEGENER consortium. The remarkable and rapid evolution of the present state of global geodetic monitoring in regard to the precision of positioning capabilities (and hence deformation) and global coverage, the development of InSAR for monitoring strain with unprecedented spatial resolution, and continuing and planned data from highly precise satellite gravity and altimetry missions, encourage us to shift principal attention from mainly monitoring capabilities by a combination of space and terrestrial geodetic techniques to applying existing observational methodologies to the critical geophysical phenomena that threaten our planet and society. Our new focus includes developing an improved physical basis to mitigate earthquake, tsunami, and volcanic risks, and the effects of natural and anthropogenic climate change (sea level, ice degradation). In addition, expanded applications of space geodesy to atmospheric studies will remain a major focus with emphasis on ionospheric and tropospheric monitoring to support forecasting extreme events. Towards these ends, we will encourage and foster interdisciplinary, integrated initiatives to develop a range of case studies for these critical problems. Geological studies are needed to extend geodetic deformation studies to geologic time scales, and new modeling approaches will facilitate full exploitation of expanding geodetic databases. In light of this new focus, the WEGENER acronym now represents, 'World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research.

Ozener, H.; Zerbini, S.; Bastos, M. L.; Becker, M. H.; Meghraoui, M.; Reilinger, R. E.

2013-12-01

79

Strength Drop as a Detectable Earthquake Precursor by means of Acoustic Monitoring at a Natural Scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rate- and state-dependent friction law (RSF), proposed on the basis of laboratory experiments, has been extensively applied to modeling earthquake stick-slip cycle. Simple spring-slider models with RSF predicted a significant decrease of frictional strength Phi (state of contact) that was localized within a few years preceding the occurrence of an earthquake. This suggested a possibility of earthquake forecast by monitoring the strength of a natural fault by means of acoustic methodology. Recent laboratory experiments, on the other hand, successfully monitored the histories of strength in two major servo-controlled velocity-step- and hold-slide-tests by means of simultaneously measured P-wave transmissivity |T| across the frictional interface using a 1 MHz transducer. However, critical problems remained that how such acoustic monitoring can be realized at a natural scale and how large changes can really occur. The present paper explored the feasibility based on physics of RSF combined with displacement discontinuity model (DDM) proposed in the classical acoustic methodology for monitoring mechanical properties of a partially contacted interface. It was here theoretically derived that I times greater strength and J times greater L on a natural fault than those in laboratory lead to a relationship fc^fld=(I/J) fc^lab, where L is a characteristic slip distance, fc is a characteristic frequency around which |T| is proportional to the strength, and superscripts indicate in the field and in laboratory, respectively. To start with the observed quantities of the order of strength 10MPa, L^lab=1micron and fc^lab=1MHz, fc^fld was estimated as 100 Hz for values of 100MPa strength and L=10cm assumed in seismic cycle simulations and it could be as low as 1 Hz for recently reported large L=1m and weak strength of 10MPa for the 2012 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake. The frequency range between 1 to 100 Hz would be seismically observable in the field. Expected change of |T| in the preslip period would depend on the ratio of the strength change to the absolute value, whereas the ratio is arbitrary in the simulations. The ratio could be more than 50 % if a weak fault is considered, and it would be easily detected by acoustic methods such as seismic reflection surveys.

Kame, N.; Nagata, K.; Nakatani, M.; Kusakabe, T.

2013-12-01

80

Near-Real time, High Resolution Reservoir Monitoring and Modeling with Micro-earthquake Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a micro-earthquake recording and automated processing system along with a methodology to provide near-real time, high resolution reservoir monitoring and modeling. An interactive program for testing micro-earthquake network designs helps identify configurations for optimum accuracy and resolution. We select the Northwest Geysers, California geothermal field to showcase the usefulness of the system. The system's inexpensive recorders requires very little time or expertise to install, and the automated processing requires merely placing flash memory chips (or telemetry) into a computer. Together these make the deployment of a large numbers of sensors feasible and thus rapid, high resolution results possible. Data are arranged into input files for tomography for Vp, Vs, Qp and Qs, and their combinations to provide for interpretation in terms of rock properties. Micro-earthquake source parameters include seismic moments, full moment tensor solutions, stress drops, source durations, radiated energy, and hypocentral locations. The methodology for interpretation is to utilize visualization with GUI analysis to cross compare tomography and source property results along with borehole or other independent information and rock physics to identify reservoir properties. The system can potentially provide information heretofore unattainable or affordable to many small companies, organizations, and countries around the world.

Hutchings, L. J.; Jarpe, S.; Boyle, K. L.; Bonner, B. P.; Viegas, G.; Philson, H.; Statz-Boyer, P.; Majer, E.

2011-12-01

81

Disasters; the 2010 Haitian earthquake and the evacuation of burn victims to US burn centers.  

PubMed

Response to the 2010 Haitian earthquake included an array of diverse yet critical actions. This paper will briefly review the evacuation of a small group of patients with burns to burn centers in the southeastern United States (US). This particular evacuation brought together for the first time plans, groups, and organizations that had previously only exercised this process. The response to the Haitian earthquake was a glimpse at what the international community working together can do to help others, and relieve suffering following a catastrophic disaster. The international response was substantial. This paper will trace one evacuation, one day for one unique group of patients with burns to burn centers in the US and review the lessons learned from this process. The patient population with burns being evacuated from Haiti was very small compared to the overall operation. Nevertheless, the outcomes included a better understanding of how a larger event could challenge the limited resources for all involved. This paper includes aspects of the patient movement, the logistics needed, and briefly discusses reimbursement for the care provided. PMID:24411582

Kearns, Randy D; Holmes, James H; Skarote, Mary Beth; Cairns, Charles B; Strickland, Samantha Cooksey; Smith, Howard G; Cairns, Bruce A

2014-09-01

82

Wireless sensor network for data-center environmental monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data centers' energy consumption has attracted global attention because of the fast growth of the information technology (IT) industry. Up to 60% of the energy consumed in a data center is used for cooling in wasteful ways as a result of lack of environmental information and overcompensated cooling systems. In this project, a wireless sensor network for data-enter environmental monitoring

Michael G. Rodriguez; Luis E. Ortiz Uriarte; Yi Jia; Kazutomo Yoshii; Robert Ross; Peter H. Beckman

2011-01-01

83

Real-time earthquake monitoring for tsunami warning in the Indian Ocean and beyond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mw = 9.3 Sumatra earthquake of 26 December 2004 generated a tsunami that affected the entire Indian Ocean region and caused approximately 230 000 fatalities. In the response to this tragedy the German government funded the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) Project. The task of the GEOFON group of GFZ Potsdam was to develop and implement the seismological component. In this paper we describe the concept of the GITEWS earthquake monitoring system and report on its present status. The major challenge for earthquake monitoring within a tsunami warning system is to deliver rapid information about location, depth, size and possibly other source parameters. This is particularly true for coast lines adjacent to the potential source areas such as the Sunda trench where these parameters are required within a few minutes after the event in order to be able to warn the population before the potential tsunami hits the neighbouring coastal areas. Therefore, the key for a seismic monitoring system with short warning times adequate for Indonesia is a dense real-time seismic network across Indonesia with densifications close to the Sunda trench. A substantial number of supplementary stations in other Indian Ocean rim countries are added to strengthen the teleseismic monitoring capabilities. The installation of the new GITEWS seismic network - consisting of 31 combined broadband and strong motion stations - out of these 21 stations in Indonesia - is almost completed. The real-time data collection is using a private VSAT communication system with hubs in Jakarta and Vienna. In addition, all available seismic real-time data from the other seismic networks in Indonesia and other Indian Ocean rim countries are acquired also directly by VSAT or by Internet at the Indonesian Tsunami Warning Centre in Jakarta and the resulting "virtual" network of more than 230 stations can jointly be used for seismic data processing. The seismological processing software as part of the GITEWS tsunami control centre is an enhanced version of the widely used SeisComP software and the well established GEOFON earthquake information system operated at GFZ in Potsdam (http://geofon.gfz-potsdam.de/db/eqinfo.php). This recently developed software package (SeisComP3) is reliable, fast and can provide fully automatic earthquake location and magnitude estimates. It uses innovative visualization tools, offers the possibility for manual correction and re-calculation, flexible configuration, support for distributed processing and data and parameter exchange with external monitoring systems. SeisComP3 is not only used for tsunami warning in Indonesia but also in most other Tsunami Warning Centres in the Indian Ocean and Euro-Med regions and in many seismic services worldwide.

Hanka, W.; Saul, J.; Weber, B.; Becker, J.; Harjadi, P.; Fauzi; Gitews Seismology Group

2010-12-01

84

Earthquake Monitoring: SeisComp3 at the Swiss National Seismic Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) has an ongoing responsibility to improve the seismicity monitoring capability for Switzerland. This is a crucial issue for a country with low background seismicity but where a large M6+ earthquake is expected in the next decades. With over 30 stations with spacing of ~25km, the SED operates one of the densest broadband networks in the world, which is complimented by ~ 50 realtime strong motion stations. The strong motion network is expected to grow with an additional ~80 stations over the next few years. Furthermore, the backbone of the network is complemented by broadband data from surrounding countries and temporary sub-networks for local monitoring of microseismicity (e.g. at geothermal sites). The variety of seismic monitoring responsibilities as well as the anticipated densifications of our network demands highly flexible processing software. We are transitioning all software to the SeisComP3 (SC3) framework. SC3 is a fully featured automated real-time earthquake monitoring software developed by GeoForschungZentrum Potsdam in collaboration with commercial partner, gempa GmbH. It is in its core open source, and becoming a community standard software for earthquake detection and waveform processing for regional and global networks across the globe. SC3 was originally developed for regional and global rapid monitoring of potentially tsunamagenic earthquakes. In order to fulfill the requirements of a local network recording moderate seismicity, SED has tuned configurations and added several modules. In this contribution, we present our SC3 implementation strategy, focusing on the detection and identification of seismicity on different scales. We operate several parallel processing "pipelines" to detect and locate local, regional and global seismicity. Additional pipelines with lower detection thresholds can be defined to monitor seismicity within dense subnets of the network. To be consistent with existing processing procedures, the nonlinloc algorithm was implemented for manual and automatic locations using 1D and 3D velocity models; plugins for improved automatic phase picking and Ml computation were developed; and the graphical user interface for manual review was extended (including pick uncertainty definition; first motion focal mechanisms; interactive review of station magnitude waveforms; full inclusion of strong motion data). SC3 locations are fully compatible with those derived from the existing in-house processing tools and are stored in a database derived from the QuakeML data model. The database is shared with the SED alerting software, which merges origins from both SC3 and external sources in realtime and handles the alerting procedure. With the monitoring software being transitioned to SeisComp3, acquisition, archival and dissemination of SED waveform data now conforms to the seedlink and ArcLink protocols and continuous archives can be accessed via SED and all EIDA (European Integrated Data Archives) web-sites. Further, a SC3 module for waveform parameterisation has been developed, allowing rapid computation of peak values of ground motion and other engineering parameters within minutes of a new event. An output of this module is USGS ShakeMap XML. n minutes of a new event. An output of this module is USGS ShakeMap XML.

Clinton, J. F.; Diehl, T.; Cauzzi, C.; Kaestli, P.

2011-12-01

85

Rapid monitoring in vaccination campaigns during emergencies: the post-earthquake campaign in Haiti  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem The earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010 caused 1.5 million people to be displaced to temporary camps. The Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population and global immunization partners developed a plan to deliver vaccines to those residing in these camps. A strategy was needed to determine whether the immunization targets set for the campaign were achieved. Approach Following the vaccination campaign, staff from the Ministry of Public Health and Population interviewed convenience samples of households in specific predetermined locations in each of the camps regarding receipt of the emergency vaccinations. A camp was targeted for mop-up vaccination i.e. repeat mass vaccination if more than?25% of the children aged 9months to 7years in the sample were found not to have received the emergency vaccinations. Local setting Rapid monitoring was implemented in camps located in the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area. Camps that housed more than?5000 people were monitored first. Relevant changes By the end of March 2010, 72 (23%) of the 310 vaccinated camps had been monitored. Although 32 (44%) of the monitored camps were targeted for mop-up vaccination, only six of them had received such repeat mass vaccination when checked several weeks after monitoring. Lessons learnt Rapid monitoring was only marginally beneficial in achieving immunization targets in the temporary camps in Port-au-Prince. More research is needed to evaluate the utility of conventional rapid monitoring, as well as other strategies, during post-disaster vaccination campaigns that involve mobile populations, particularly when there is little capacity to conduct repeat mass vaccination. PMID:24347735

Sugerman, David; Brennan, Muireann; Cadet, Jean Ronald; Ernsly, Jackson; Lacapre, Franois; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Mubalama, Jean-Claude; Nandy, Robin

2013-01-01

86

Southern California Earthquake Center/Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/UseIT): Towards the Next Generation of Internship  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SCEC/UseIT internship program is training the next generation of earthquake scientist, with methods that can be adapted to other disciplines. UseIT interns work collaboratively, in multi-disciplinary teams, conducting computer science research that is needed by earthquake scientists. Since 2002, the UseIT program has welcomed 64 students, in some two dozen majors, at all class levels, from schools around the nation. Each summer''s work is posed as a ``Grand Challenge.'' The students then organize themselves into project teams, decide how to proceed, and pool their diverse talents and backgrounds. They have traditional mentors, who provide advice and encouragement, but they also mentor one another, and this has proved to be a powerful relationship. Most begin with fear that their Grand Challenge is impossible, and end with excitement and pride about what they have accomplished. The 22 UseIT interns in summer, 2005, were primarily computer science and engineering majors, with others in geology, mathematics, English, digital media design, physics, history, and cinema. The 2005 Grand Challenge was to "build an earthquake monitoring system" to aid scientists who must visualize rapidly evolving earthquake sequences and convey information to emergency personnel and the public. Most UseIT interns were engaged in software engineering, bringing new datasets and functionality to SCEC-VDO (Virtual Display of Objects), a 3D visualization software that was prototyped by interns last year, using Java3D and an extensible, plug-in architecture based on the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment. Other UseIT interns used SCEC-VDO to make animated movies, and experimented with imagery in order to communicate concepts and events in earthquake science. One movie-making project included the creation of an assessment to test the effectiveness of the movie''s educational message. Finally, one intern created an interactive, multimedia presentation of the UseIT program.

Perry, S.; Benthien, M.; Jordan, T. H.

2005-12-01

87

Towards real-time regional earthquake simulation I: real-time moment tensor monitoring (RMT) for regional events in Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a real-time moment tensor monitoring system (RMT) which takes advantage of a grid-based moment tensor inversion technique and real-time broad-band seismic recordings to automatically monitor earthquake activities in the vicinity of Taiwan. The centroid moment tensor (CMT) inversion technique and a grid search scheme are applied to obtain the information of earthquake source parameters, including the event origin time, hypocentral location, moment magnitude and focal mechanism. All of these source parameters can be determined simultaneously within 117 s after the occurrence of an earthquake. The monitoring area involves the entire Taiwan Island and the offshore region, which covers the area of 119.3E to 123.0E and 21.0N to 26.0N, with a depth from 6 to 136 km. A 3-D grid system is implemented in the monitoring area with a uniform horizontal interval of 0.1 and a vertical interval of 10 km. The inversion procedure is based on a 1-D Green's function database calculated by the frequency-wavenumber (fk) method. We compare our results with the Central Weather Bureau (CWB) catalogue data for earthquakes occurred between 2010 and 2012. The average differences between event origin time and hypocentral location are less than 2 s and 10 km, respectively. The focal mechanisms determined by RMT are also comparable with the Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology (BATS) CMT solutions. These results indicate that the RMT system is realizable and efficient to monitor local seismic activities. In addition, the time needed to obtain all the point source parameters is reduced substantially compared to routine earthquake reports. By connecting RMT with a real-time online earthquake simulation (ROS) system, all the source parameters will be forwarded to the ROS to make the real-time earthquake simulation feasible. The RMT has operated offline (2010-2011) and online (since January 2012 to present) at the Institute of Earth Sciences (IES), Academia Sinica (http://rmt.earth.sinica.edu.tw). The long-term goal of this system is to provide real-time source information for rapid seismic hazard assessment during large earthquakes.

Lee, Shiann-Jong; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Tu, Feng-Shan; Ma, Kuo-Fong; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Liu, Chun-Chi

2014-01-01

88

Long-term blood pressure changes induced by the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake: assessment by 24 h ambulatory monitoring.  

PubMed

An increased rate of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events has been described during and immediately after earthquakes. In this regard, few data are available on long-term blood pressure control in hypertensive outpatients after an earthquake. We evaluated the long-term effects of the April 2009 L'Aquila earthquake on blood pressure levels, as detected by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Before/after (means.d. 6.94.5/14.25.1 months, respectively) the earthquake, the available 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data for the same patients were extracted from our database. Quake-related daily life discomforts were evaluated through interviews. We enrolled 47 patients (25 female, age 5214 years), divided into three groups according to antihypertensive therapy changes after versus before the earthquake: unchanged therapy (n=24), increased therapy (n=17) and reduced therapy (n=6). Compared with before the quake, in the unchanged therapy group marked increases in 24 h (P=0.004), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.02) systolic blood pressure were observed after the quake. Corresponding changes in 24 h (P=0.005), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.009) diastolic blood pressure were observed. Daily life discomforts were reported more frequently in the unchanged therapy and increased therapy groups than the reduced therapy group (P=0.025 and P=0.018, respectively). In conclusion, this study shows that patients with unchanged therapy display marked blood pressure increments up to more than 1 year after an earthquake, as well as long-term quake-related discomfort. Our data suggest that particular attention to blood pressure levels and adequate therapy modifications should be considered after an earthquake, not only early after the event but also months later. PMID:23595046

Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Petrarca, Marco; Petrazzi, Luisa; Pasqualetti, Paolo; Properzi, Giuliana; Desideri, Giovambattista; Omboni, Stefano; Parati, Gianfranco; Ferri, Claudio

2013-09-01

89

Advanced earthquake monitoring system for U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical buildings--instrumentation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the National Strong Motion Project (NSMP; http://nsmp.wr.usgs.gov/) of the U.S. Geological Survey has been installing sophisticated seismic systems that will monitor the structural integrity of 28 VA hospital buildings located in seismically active regions of the conterminous United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico during earthquake shaking. These advanced monitoring systems, which combine the use of sensitive accelerometers and real-time computer calculations, are designed to determine the structural health of each hospital building rapidly after an event, helping the VA to ensure the safety of patients and staff. This report presents the instrumentation component of this project by providing details of each hospital building, including a summary of its structural, geotechnical, and seismic hazard information, as well as instrumentation objectives and design. The structural-health monitoring component of the project, including data retrieval and processing, damage detection and localization, automated alerting system, and finally data dissemination, will be presented in a separate report.

Kalkan, Erol; Banga, Krishna; Ulusoy, Hasan S.; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Leith, William S.; Reza, Shahneam; Cheng, Timothy

2012-01-01

90

Southern California Earthquake Center - SCEC1: Final Report Summary Alternative Earthquake Source Characterization for the Los Angeles Region  

SciTech Connect

The objective my research has been to synthesize current understanding of the tectonics and faults of the Los Angeles Basin and surrounding region to quantify uncertainty in the characterization of earthquake sources used for geologically- and geodetically-based regional earthquake likelihood models. This work has focused on capturing epistemic uncertainty; i.e. uncertainty stemming from ignorance of the true characteristics of the active faults in the region and of the tectonic forces that drive them. In the present context, epistemic uncertainty has two components: First, the uncertainty in source geometrical and occurrence rate parameters deduced from the limited geological, geophysical and geodetic observations available; and second. uncertainties that result from fundamentally different interpretations of regional tectonic deformation and faulting. Characterization of the large number of active and potentially active faults that need to be included in estimating earthquake occurrence likelihoods for the Los Angeles region requires synthesis and evaluation of large amounts of data and numerous interpretations. This was accomplished primarily through a series of carefully facilitated workshops, smaller meetings involving key researchers, and email groups. The workshops and meetings were made possible by the unique logistical and financial resources available through SCEC, and proved to be extremely effective forums for the exchange and critical debate of data and interpretations that are essential in constructing fully representative source models. The main products from this work are a complete source model that characterizes all know or potentially active faults in the greater Los Angeles region. which includes the continental borderland as far south as San Diego, the Ventura Basin, and the Santa Barbara Channel. The model constitutes a series of maps and representative cross-sections that define alternative fault geometries, a table containing rault geometrical and slip-rate parameters, including full uncertainty distributions, and a set of logic trees that define alternative source characterizations, particularly for sets of fault systems having inter-dependent geometries and kinematics resulting from potential intersection and interaction in the sub-surface. All of these products exist in a form suitable for input to earthquake likelihood and seismic hazard analyses. In addition, moment-balanced Poissonian earthquake rates for the alternative multi-segment characterizations of each fault system have been estimated. Finally, this work has served an important integrative function in that the exchange and debate of data, results and ideas that it has engendered has helped to focus SCEC research over the past six years on to key issues in tectonic deformation and faulting.

Foxall, B

2003-02-26

91

New Continuous Timeseries Data at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) is an archive and distribution center for geophysical data for networks in northern and central California. Recent discovery of non-volcanic tremors in northern and central California has sparked user interest in access to a wider range of continuous seismic data in the region. The NCEDC has responded by expanding its archiving and distribution to all new available continuous data from northern California seismic networks (the USGS NCSN, the UC Berkeley BDSN, the Parkfield HRSN borehole network, and local USArray stations) at all available sample rates, to provide access to all recent real-time timeseries data, and to restore from tape and archive all NCSN continuous data from 2001-present. All new continuous timeseries data will also be available in near-real-time from the NCEDC via the DART (Data Available in Real Time) system, which allows users to directly download daily Telemetry MiniSEED files or to extract and retrieve the timeseries of their selection. The NCEDC will continue to create and distribute event waveform collections for all events detected by the Northern California Seismic System (NCSS), the northern California component of the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN). All new continuous and event timeseries will be archived in daily intervals and are accessible via the same data request tools (NetDC, BREQ_FAST, EVT_FAST, FISSURES/DHI, STP) as previously archived waveform data. The NCEDC is a joint project of the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and USGS Menlo Park.

Neuhauser, D. S.; Dietz, L.; Zuzlewski, S.; Kohler, W.; Gee, L.; Oppenheimer, D.; Romanowicz, B.

2005-12-01

92

Data and Visualizations in the Southern California Earthquake Center's Fault Information System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern California Earthquake Center's Fault Information System (FIS) provides a single point of access to fault-related data and models from multiple databases and datasets. The FIS is built of computer code, metadata and Web interfaces based on Web services technology, which enables queries and data interchange irrespective of computer software or platform. Currently we have working prototypes of programmatic and browser-based access. The first generation FIS may be searched and downloaded live, by automated processes, as well as interactively, by humans using a browser. Users get ascii data in plain text or encoded in XML. Via the Earthquake Information Technology (EIT) Interns (Juve and others, this meeting), we are also testing the effectiveness of querying multiple databases using a fault database ontology. For more than a decade, the California Geological Survey (CGS), SCEC, and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) have put considerable, shared resources into compiling and assessing published fault data, then providing the data on the Web. Several databases now exist, with different formats, datasets, purposes, and users, in various stages of completion. When fault databases were first envisioned, the full power of today's internet was not yet recognized, and the databases became the Web equivalents of review papers, where one could read an overview summation of a fault, then copy and paste pertinent data. Today, numerous researchers also require rapid queries and downloads of data. Consequently, the first components of the FIS are MySQL databases that deliver numeric values from earlier, text-based databases. Another essential service provided by the FIS is visualizations of fault representations such as those in SCEC's Community Fault Model. The long term goal is to provide a standardized, open-source, platform-independent visualization technique. Currently, the FIS makes available fault model viewing software for users with access to Matlab or Java3D. The latter is the interactive LA3D software of the SCEC EIT intern team, which will be demonstrated at this session.

Perry, S.

2003-12-01

93

Earthquake prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The state of the art in earthquake prediction is discussed. Short-term prediction based on seismic precursors, changes in the ratio of compressional velocity to shear velocity, tilt and strain precursors, electromagnetic precursors, hydrologic phenomena, chemical monitors, and animal behavior is examined. Seismic hazard assessment is addressed, and the applications of dynamical systems to earthquake prediction are discussed.

Turcotte, Donald L.

1991-01-01

94

Response changes of some wells in the mainland subsurface fluid monitoring network of China, due to the September 21, 1999, Ms7.6 Chi-Chi Earthquake  

Microsoft Academic Search

About 60 hydrologic changes in response to the Chi-Chi earthquake with Ms7.6 on September 21, 1999, occurred in 52 wells, including groundwater level, temperature, discharge rate, well pressure and radon, etc., in the subsurface fluid monitoring network. These response changes were mainly co-seismic, but some pre- and post-earthquake changes occurred mainly within 5 days before and after the Chi-Chi earthquake.

Fu-Qiong Huang; Chun-Lin Jian; Yi Tang; Gui-Ming Xu; Zhi-Hui Deng; Gong-Cai Chi

2004-01-01

95

Postseismic Deformation after the 1964 Great Alaskan Earthquake: Collaborative Research with Goddard Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this project was to carry out GPS observations on the Kenai Peninsula, southern Alaska, in order to study the postseismic and contemporary deformation following the 1964 Alaska earthquake. All of the research supported in this grant was carried out in collaboration with Dr. Steven Cohen of Goddard Space Flight Center. The research funding from this grant primarily supported GPS fieldwork, along with the acquisition of computer equipment to allow analysis and modeling of the GPS data. A minor amount of salary support was provided by the PI, but the great majority of the salary support was provided by the Geophysical Institute. After the expiration of this grant, additional funding was obtained from the National Science Foundation to continue the work. This grant supported GPS field campaigns in August 1995, June 1996, May-June and September 1997, and May-June 1998. We initially began the work by surveying leveling benchmarks on the Kenai peninsula that had been surveyed after the 1964 earthquake. Changes in height from the 1964 leveling data to the 1995+ GPS data, corrected for the geoid-ellipsoid separation, give the total elevation change since the earthquake. Beginning in 1995, we also identified or established sites that were suitable for long-term surveying using GPS. In the subsequent annual GPS campaigns, we made regular measurements at these GPS marks, and steadily enhanced our set of points for which cumulative postseismic uplift data were available. From 4 years of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements, we find significant spatial variations in present-day deformation between the eastern and western Kenai peninsula, Alaska. Sites in the eastern Kenai peninsula and Prince William Sound move to the NNW relative to North America, in the direction of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. Velocities decrease in magnitude from nearly the full plate rate in southern Prince William Sound to about 30 mm/yr at Seward and to about 5 mm/yr near Anchorage. In contrast, sites in the western Kenai peninsula move to the SW, in a nearly trenchward direction, with a velocity of about 20 mm/yr. The data are consistent with the shallow plate interface offshore and beneath the eastern Kenai and Prince William Sound being completely locked or nearly so, with elastic strain accumulation resulting in rapid motion in the direction of relative plate motion of sites in the overriding plate. The velocities of sites in the western Kenai, along strike to the southwest, are opposite in sign with those predicted from elastic strain accumulation. These data are incompatible with a significant locked region in this segment of the plate boundary. Trenchward velocities are found also for some sites in the Anchorage area. We interpret the trenchward velocities as being caused by a continuing postseismic transient from the 1964 great Alaska earthquake.

Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

1999-01-01

96

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Overview of FRMAC Operations  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This cooperative effort will ensure that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas.

NONE

1998-03-01

97

Passive Seismic Monitoring of Natural and Induced Earthquakes: Case Studies, Future Directions and SocioEconomic Relevance  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a An important discovery in crustal mechanics has been that the Earths crust is commonly stressed close to failure, even in\\u000a tectonically quiet areas. As a result, small natural or man-made perturbations to the local stress field may trigger earthquakes.\\u000a To understand these processes, Passive Seismic Monitoring (PSM) with seismometer arrays is a widely used technique that has\\u000a been successfully applied

Marco Bohnhoff; Georg Dresen; William L. Ellsworth; Hisao Ito

98

Earthquakes for Kids  

MedlinePLUS

... Education FAQ Earthquake Glossary For Kids Prepare Google Earth/KML Files Earthquake Summary Posters Photos Publications Share ... for Education FAQ EQ Glossary For Kids Google Earth/KML Files EQ Summary Posters Photos Publications Monitoring ...

99

Development a Heuristic Method to Locate and Allocate the Medical Centers to Minimize the Earthquake Relief Operation Time  

PubMed Central

Background Location-allocation is a combinatorial optimization problem, and is defined as Non deterministic Polynomial Hard (NP) hard optimization. Therefore, solution of such a problem should be shifted from exact to heuristic or Meta heuristic due to the complexity of the problem. Locating medical centers and allocating injuries of an earthquake to them has high importance in earthquake disaster management so that developing a proper method will reduce the time of relief operation and will consequently decrease the number of fatalities. Methods: This paper presents the development of a heuristic method based on two nested genetic algorithms to optimize this location allocation problem by using the abilities of Geographic Information System (GIS). In the proposed method, outer genetic algorithm is applied to the location part of the problem and inner genetic algorithm is used to optimize the resource allocation. Results: The final outcome of implemented method includes the spatial location of new required medical centers. The method also calculates that how many of the injuries at each demanding point should be taken to any of the existing and new medical centers as well. Conclusions: The results of proposed method showed high performance of designed structure to solve a capacitated location-allocation problem that may arise in a disaster situation when injured people has to be taken to medical centers in a reasonable time. PMID:23514709

AGHAMOHAMMADI, Hossein; SAADI MESGARI, Mohammad; MOLAEI, Damoon; AGHAMOHAMMADI, Hasan

2013-01-01

100

Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty seismic monitoring: 2012 USNAS report and recent explosions, earthquakes, and other seismic sources  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive ban on nuclear explosive testing is briefly characterized as an arms control initiative related to the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The work of monitoring for nuclear explosions uses several technologies of which the most important is seismology-a physics discipline that draws upon extensive and ever-growing assets to monitor for earthquakes and other ground-motion phenomena as well as for explosions. This paper outlines the basic methods of seismic monitoring within that wider context, and lists web-based and other resources for learning details. It also summarizes the main conclusions, concerning capability to monitor for test-ban treaty compliance, contained in a major study published in March 2012 by the US National Academy of Sciences.

Richards, Paul G. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)

2014-05-09

101

Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty seismic monitoring: 2012 USNAS report and recent explosions, earthquakes, and other seismic sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comprehensive ban on nuclear explosive testing is briefly characterized as an arms control initiative related to the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The work of monitoring for nuclear explosions uses several technologies of which the most important is seismology-a physics discipline that draws upon extensive and ever-growing assets to monitor for earthquakes and other ground-motion phenomena as well as for explosions. This paper outlines the basic methods of seismic monitoring within that wider context, and lists web-based and other resources for learning details. It also summarizes the main conclusions, concerning capability to monitor for test-ban treaty compliance, contained in a major study published in March 2012 by the US National Academy of Sciences.

Richards, Paul G.

2014-05-01

102

Earthquake and ambient vibration monitoring of the steel-frame UCLA factor building  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dynamic property measurements of the moment-resisting steel-frame University of California, Los Angeles, Factor building are being made to assess how forces are distributed over the building. Fourier amplitude spectra have been calculated from several intervals of ambient vibrations, a 24-hour period of strong winds, and from the 28 March 2003 Encino, California (ML = 2.9), the 3 September 2002 Yorba Linda, California (ML = 4.7), and the 3 November 2002 Central Alaska (Mw = 7.9) earthquakes. Measurements made from the ambient vibration records show that the first-mode frequency of horizontal vibration is between 0.55 and 0.6 Hz. The second horizontal mode has a frequency between 1.6 and 1.9 Hz. In contrast, the first-mode frequencies measured from earthquake data are about 0.05 to 0.1 Hz lower than those corresponding to ambient vibration recordings indicating softening of the soil-structure system as amplitudes become larger. The frequencies revert to pre-earthquake levels within five minutes of the Yorba Linda earthquake. Shaking due to strong winds that occurred during the Encino earthquake dominates the frequency decrease, which correlates in time with the duration of the strong winds. The first shear wave recorded from the Encino and Yorba Linda earthquakes takes about 0.4 sec to travel up the 17-story building. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

Kohler, M.D.; Davis, P.M.; Safak, E.

2005-01-01

103

Monitoring Earthquake Fault Slip from Space: Model Implications for a High Precision, High Resolution Dedicated Gravity Mission (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring deformation produced by slip on earthquake faults can be carried out via GPS or InSAR measurements. Both of these types of observations have their advantages and disadvantages, in terms of cost, availability, and technical difficulty. It has been suggested that another method to accomplish many of the same objectives would be via a dedicated gravity mission. The GRACE mission has shown that it is possible to make detailed gravity measurements from space for climate dynamics and other purposes. An important question is what level of accuracy will be needed for precise estimation of fault slip in earthquakes of interest to researchers. To answer this question, we turn to numerical simulations of earthquake fault systems and use these to estimate gravity changes. Rundle (1978) considered the question of gravity changes from dilation sources and thrust faults, and found that gravity changes in these cases were free air anomaly (dilation) and Bouguer anomaly (thrust fault). Walsh and Rice (1978) computed these by a different method and found the same result. Okada (1991) listed gravity and potential Green functions for all possible sources for the general case. Hayes et al (2006) then took the Okada Greens functions and applied them computed from an earlier version of Virtual California earthquake fault system simulations. Those simulations only involved vertical strike slip faults. The current far more advanced generation of Virtual California simulations involves faults of any orientation, dip, and rake. In this talk, we discuss these computations and the implications they have for accuracies needed for a dedicated gravity monitoring mission. Preliminary results are in agreement with previous results from Hayes et al (2006). Computed gravity changes are in the range of tens to hundreds of microgals over distances of few to many tens of kilometers. These values are presumably well within the range of measurement for a modern gravity mission flown either at low altitudes, or via UAVs.

Rundle, J. B.; Sachs, M. K.; Tiampo, K. F.; Fernandez, J.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.; Heien, E. M.; Kellogg, L. H.

2013-12-01

104

Detection and monitoring of earthquake precursors: TwinSat, a Russia-UK satellite project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is now a body of evidence to indicate that coupling occurs between the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere prior to earthquake events. Nevertheless the physics of these phenomena and the possibilities of their use as part of an earthquake early warning system remain poorly understood. Proposed here is a programme to create a much greater understanding in this area through the deployment of a dedicated space asset along with coordinated ground stations, modelling and the creation of a highly accessible database. The space element would comprise 2 co-orbiting spacecraft (TwinSat) involving a microsatellite and a nanosatellite, each including a suite of science instruments appropriate to this study. Over a mission duration of 3 years ? 400 earthquakes in the range 6-6.9 on the Richter scale would be observed. Such a programme is a prerequisite for an effective earthquake early warning system.

Chmyrev, Vitaly; Smith, Alan; Kataria, Dhiren; Nesterov, Boris; Owen, Christopher; Sammonds, Peter; Sorokin, Valery; Vallianatos, Filippos

2013-09-01

105

Products and Services Available from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) and the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SCEDC archives continuous and triggered data from nearly 3000 data channels from 375 SCSN recorded stations. The SCSN and SCEDC process and archive an average of 12,000 earthquakes each year, contributing to the southern California earthquake catalog that spans from 1932 to present. The SCEDC provides public, searchable access to these earthquake parametric and waveform data through its website www.data.scec.org and through client applications such as STP, NETDC and DHI. New data products: ? The SCEDC is distributing synthetic waveform data from the 2008 ShakeOut scenario (Jones et al., USGS Open File Rep., 2008-1150) and (Graves et al. 2008; Geophys. Res. Lett.) This is a M 7.8 earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault. Users will be able to download 40 sps velocity waveforms in SAC format from the SCEDC website. The SCEDC is also distributing synthetic GPS data (Crowell et al., 2009; Seismo. Res. Letters.) for this scenario as well. ? The SCEDC has added a new web page to show the latest tomographic model of Southern California. This model is based on Tape et al., 2009 Science. New data services: ? The SCEDC is exporting data in QuakeML format. This is an xml format that has been adopted by the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). This data will also be available as a web service. ? The SCEDC is exporting data in StationXML format. This is an xml format created by the SCEDC and adopted by ANSS to fully describe station metadata. This data will also be available as a web service. ? The stp 1.6 client can now access both the SCEDC and the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) earthquake and waveform archives. In progress - SCEDC to distribute 1 sps GPS data in miniSEED format: ? As part of a NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology project in collaboration with Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the SCEDC will receive real time 1 sps streams of GPS displacement solutions from the California Real Time Network (http://sopac.ucsd.edu/projects/realtime; Genrich and Bock, 2006, J. Geophys. Res.). These channels will be archived at the SCEDC as miniSEED waveforms, which then can be distributed to the user community via applications such as STP.

Yu, E.; Chen, S.; Chowdhury, F.; Bhaskaran, A.; Hutton, K.; Given, D.; Hauksson, E.; Clayton, R. W.

2009-12-01

106

A new era for low frequency Galactic center transient monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An upgrade of the low frequency observing system of the VLA developed by NRL and NRAO, called low band (LB), will open a new era of Galactic center (GC) transient monitoring. Our previous searches using the VLA and GMRT have revealed a modest number of radio-selected transients, but have been severely sensitivity and observing time limited. The new LB system, currently accessing the 236--492 MHz frequency range, promises ?5 improved sensitivity over the legacy VLA system. The new system is emerging from commissioning in time to catch any enhanced sub-GHz emission from the G2 cloud event, and we review existing limits based on recent observations. We also describe a proposed 24/7 commensal system, called the LOw Band Observatory (LOBO). LOBO offers over 100 VLA GC monitoring hours per year, possibly revealing new transients and helping validate ASTRO2010's anticipation of a new era of transient radio astronomy. A funded LOBO pathfinder called the VLA Low Frequency Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) is under development. Finally, we consider the impact of LB and LOBO on our GC monitoring program.

Kassim, N. E.; Hyman, S. D.; Intema, H.; Lazio, T. J. W.

2014-05-01

107

Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2007, AVO located 6,664 earthquakes of which 5,660 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Monitoring highlights in 2007 include: the eruption of Pavlof Volcano, volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarms at the Augustine, Illiamna, and Little Sitkin volcanic centers, and the cessation of episodes of unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, Mount Veniaminof and the northern Atka Island volcanoes (Mount Kliuchef and Korovin Volcano). This catalog includes descriptions of : (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2007; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2007; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2007.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.

2008-01-01

108

Examination of element concentrations in groundwater by ICP-MS for monitoring of pre-earthquake activities.  

PubMed

This study presents the results of hydrogeochemical studies carried out in Zeytun thermal springs in Kahramanmaras, located South Middle Anatolia-Turkey. More than 90 thermal water samples were collected on a regular basis from 2006 to 2008 to measure element concentrations as a monitor of earthquake precursors. Water samples were analyzed using ICP-MS. The observed B, Ba, Br and Ge concentrations for 16 months are in ranges of 79-422, 103-167, 28-93 and 0.3-1.2 microg x L(-1), respectively. Chloride concentrations for these periods are in range of 7-21 mg x L(-1). The data identify some element anomalies before earthquakes. These anomalies are characterized by decreases up to 158% in Ba and Cl concentrations. The occurrence of these anomalies can be attributed to stress/strain induced pressure changes in the subsurface water systems. It can be suggested that the thermal springs in the fault line area are ideal sites for precursors of earthquakes. PMID:23586212

Mehmet, Yaman; Sasmaz, Ahmet

2013-01-01

109

Real Earthquakes, Real Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred

Schomburg, Aaron

2003-01-01

110

Products and Services Available from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) and the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently the SCEDC archives continuous and triggered data from nearly 5000 data channels from 425 SCSN recorded stations, processing and archiving an average of 12,000 earthquakes each year. The SCEDC provides public access to these earthquake parametric and waveform data through its website www.data.scec.org and through client applications such as STP and DHI. This poster will describe the most significant developments at the SCEDC in the past year. Updated hardware: ? The SCEDC has more than doubled its waveform file storage capacity by migrating to 2 TB disks. New data holdings: ? Waveform data: Beginning Jan 1, 2010 the SCEDC began continuously archiving all high-sample-rate strong-motion channels. All seismic channels recorded by SCSN are now continuously archived and available at SCEDC. ? Portable data from El Mayor Cucapah 7.2 sequence: Seismic waveforms from portable stations installed by researchers (contributed by Elizabeth Cochran, Jamie Steidl, and Octavio Lazaro-Mancilla) have been added to the archive and are accessible through STP either as continuous data or associated with events in the SCEDC earthquake catalog. This additional data will help SCSN analysts and researchers improve event locations from the sequence. ? Real time GPS solutions from El Mayor Cucapah 7.2 event: Three component 1Hz seismograms of California Real Time Network (CRTN) GPS stations, from the April 4, 2010, magnitude 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake are available in SAC format at the SCEDC. These time series were created by Brendan Crowell, Yehuda Bock, the project PI, and Mindy Squibb at SOPAC using data from the CRTN. The El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake demonstrated definitively the power of real-time high-rate GPS data: they measure dynamic displacements directly, they do not clip and they are also able to detect the permanent (coseismic) surface deformation. ? Triggered data from the Quake Catcher Network (QCN) and Community Seismic Network (CSN): The SCEDC in cooperation with QCN and CSN is exploring ways to archive and distribute data from high density low cost networks. As a starting point the SCEDC will store a dataset from QCN and CSN and distribute it through a separate STP client. New archival methods: ? The SCEDC is exploring the feasibility of archiving and distributing waveform data using cloud computing such as Google Apps. A month of continuous data from the SCEDC archive will be stored in Google Apps and a client developed to access it in a manner similar to STP. XML formats: ? The SCEDC is now distributing earthquake parameter data through web services in QuakeML format. ? The SCEDC in collaboration with the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) and USGS Golden has reviewed and revised the StationXML format to produce version 2.0. The new version includes a rules on extending the schema, use of named complex types, and greater consistency in naming conventions. Based on this work we plan to develop readers and writers of the StationXML format.

Yu, E.; Bhaskaran, A.; Chen, S.; Chowdhury, F. R.; Meisenhelter, S.; Hutton, K.; Given, D.; Hauksson, E.; Clayton, R. W.

2010-12-01

111

Monitoring velocity variations in the crust using earthquake doublets: An application to the Calaveras fault, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a technique that greatly improves the precision in measuring temporal variations of crustal velocities using an earthquake doublet, or pair of microearthquakes that have nearly identical waveforms and the same hypocenter and magnitude but occur on different dates. We compute differences in arrival times between seismograms recorded at the same station in the frequency domain by cross correlation

G. Poupinet; V. L. Ellsworth; J. Frechet

1984-01-01

112

Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake  

E-print Network

Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 20130327 1 #12;0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake Source, Intensity 5 #12;I II III IV V VI VII Intensity Shake map of the March 27 Earthquake The peak ground and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR) #12;Earthquake Response and Evacuation are a Part of Students

113

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 3,405 earthquakes, of which 2,846 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity in 2010 at these monitored volcanic centers. Seismograph subnetworks with severe outages in 2009 were repaired in 2010 resulting in three volcanic centers (Aniakchak, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being relisted in the formal list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes locations and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2010 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

2011-01-01

114

Evidence from in situ pore pressure monitoring of submarine slope failures generated by the December 26, 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The scientific Sumatra Aftershocks cruise was performed onboard the French R/V Marion Dufresne during summer 2005 (July, 14 - August, 9), within a relatively short delay from the Great Sumatra Earthquake (26 December 2004). One of the main aims of the cruise was to enquire about submarine mass wasting processes possibly associated with recent earthquake events. Within the whole investigated area from the trench up to the accretionary prism and the continental slope flanking the Aceh forearc basin, the swath bathymetric data acquired during the cruise have only shown the occurrence of relatively minor scars and deposits with a `fresh' aspect corresponding to likely recent slope failures. The fact that no huge submarine landslide was found could be explained with the high frequency of high-magnitude seismic events occurring in the study area. This recurrence of events might favor the presence of numerous very small-scale rather than a few large landslides. Core MD05-2975, recovered on the slope of the wedge, close to the trench and close to a small landslide already identified by the HMS Scott, indicates the existence of remoulded sediment. The in situ pore pressure monitoring at the same site, using a piezometer recently developed by Ifremer, demonstrates that an excess pore pressure was generated by a recent earthquake event. Although we obtained indication of recent seafloor deformation at a single site, we suspect, based on the new morphological data, that similar phenomena might have occurred throughout the margin. To verify if slope failures have contributed or not to the trigger of the devastating tsunami of December, 26, 2004, more piezometer measurements are needed together with a quantitative evaluation of morphological parameters of landslides.

Sultan, N.; Cattaneo, A.; Sibuet, J.

2005-12-01

115

Seismic ACROSS Transmitter Installed at Morimachi above the Subducting Philippine Sea Plate for the Test Monitoring of the Seismogenic Zone of Tokai Earthquake not yet to Occur  

Microsoft Academic Search

Here we report the first seismic monitoring system in active and constant operation for the wave propagation characteristics in tectonic region just above the subducting plate driving the coming catastrophic earthquakes. Developmental works of such a system (ACROSS; acronym for Accurately Controlled, Routinely Operated, Signal System) have been started in 1994 at Nagoya University and since 1996 also at TGC

T. Kunitomo; M. Kumazawa; T. Masuda; N. Morita; T. Torii; Y. Ishikawa; S. Yoshikawa; A. Katsumata; Y. Yoshida

2008-01-01

116

CONTINUOUS MONITORING FOR NITRATE IN USGS WATER SCIENCE CENTERS ACROSS THE U.S.  

E-print Network

1 CONTINUOUS MONITORING FOR NITRATE IN USGS WATER SCIENCE CENTERS ACROSS THE U.S. USGS scientists-time monitoring approaches to allow for continuous nitrate information available in real-time. Currently, USGS and its partners monitor nitrate continuously at nearly 80 locations. (Access WaterQualityWatch website

Torgersen, Christian

117

THE KASHMIR EARTHQUAKE OF OCTOBER 8, 2005 A QUICKLOOK REPORT  

E-print Network

THE KASHMIR EARTHQUAKE OF OCTOBER 8, 2005 A QUICKLOOK REPORT Ahmad Jan Durrani Amr Salah Elnashai Youssef M.A. Hashash Sung Jig Kim Arif Masud Mid-America Earthquake Center University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mid-America Earthquake CenterMid-America Earthquake Center #12;2Mid-America Earthquake

Masud, Arif

118

Space Monitoring Data Center at Moscow State University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space monitoring data center of Moscow State University provides operational information on radiation state of the near-Earth space. Internet portal http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/ gives access to the actual data characterizing the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation conditions in the magnetosphere and heliosphere in the real time mode. Operational data coming from space missions (ACE, GOES, ELECTRO-L1, Meteor-M1) at L1, LEO and GEO and from the Earths surface are used to represent geomagnetic and radiation state of near-Earth environment. On-line database of measurements is also maintained to allow quick comparison between current conditions and conditions experienced in the past. The models of space environment working in autonomous mode are used to generalize the information obtained from observations on the whole magnetosphere. Interactive applications and operational forecasting services are created on the base of these models. They automatically generate alerts on particle fluxes enhancements above the threshold values, both for SEP and relativistic electrons using data from LEO orbits. Special forecasting services give short-term forecast of SEP penetration to the Earth magnetosphere at low altitudes, as well as relativistic electron fluxes at GEO. Velocities of recurrent high speed solar wind streams on the Earth orbit are predicted with advance time of 3-4 days on the basis of automatic estimation of the coronal hole areas detected on the images of the Sun received from the SDO satellite. By means of neural network approach, Dst and Kp indices online forecasting 0.5-1.5 hours ahead, depending on solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field, measured by ACE satellite, is carried out. Visualization system allows representing experimental and modeling data in 2D and 3D.

Kalegaev, Vladimir; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Shugay, Yulia; Barinov, Oleg; Dolenko, Sergey; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Shiroky, Vladimir

119

PNG ON THE MOVE- GPS MONITORING OF PLATE TECTONICS AND EARTHQUAKES  

E-print Network

PNG is one of the most tectonically active countries in the world. Major earthquakes and volcanic eruptions resulting from this tectonic activity pose significant threats to PNG's population and fragile infrastructure. Modern surveying techniques such as GPS can measure movement of tectonic plates to within a centimetre anywhere in PNG. These measurements have provided a much better understanding of PNG's tectonic setting and also have the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of PNGs geodetic datum. This paper highlights contributions made by The Australian National University, the National Mapping Bureau, RVO and UniTech's Department of Surveying and Land Studies showing some startling results from these surveys.

Richard Stanaway

120

On the Potential Uses of Static Offsets Derived From Low-Cost Community Instruments and Crowd-Sourcing for Earthquake Monitoring and Rapid Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore the efficacy of low-cost community instruments (LCCIs) and crowd-sourcing to produce rapid estimates of earthquake magnitude and rupture characteristics which can be used for earthquake loss reduction such as issuing tsunami warnings and guiding rapid response efforts. Real-time high-rate GPS data are just beginning to be incorporated into earthquake early warning (EEW) systems. These data are showing promising utility including producing moment magnitude estimates which do not saturate for the largest earthquakes and determining the geometry and slip distribution of the earthquake rupture in real-time. However, building a network of scientific-quality real-time high-rate GPS stations requires substantial infrastructure investment which is not practicable in many parts of the world. To expand the benefits of real-time geodetic monitoring globally, we consider the potential of pseudorange-based GPS locations such as the real-time positioning done onboard cell phones or on LCCIs that could be distributed in the same way accelerometers are distributed as part of the Quake Catcher Network (QCN). While location information from LCCIs often have large uncertainties, their low cost means that large numbers of instruments can be deployed. A monitoring network that includes smartphones could collect data from potentially millions of instruments. These observations could be averaged together to substantially decrease errors associated with estimated earthquake source parameters. While these data will be inferior to data recorded by scientific-grade seismometers and GPS instruments, there are features of community-based data collection (and possibly analysis) that are very attractive. This approach creates a system where every user can host an instrument or download an application to their smartphone that both provides them with earthquake and tsunami warnings while also providing the data on which the warning system operates. This symbiosis helps to encourage people to both become users of the warning system and to contribute data to the system. Further, there is some potential to take advantage of the LCCI hosts' computing and communications resources to do some of the analysis required for the warning system. We will present examples of the type of data which might be observed by pseudorange-based positioning for both actual earthquakes and laboratory tests as well as performance tests of potential earthquake source modeling derived from pseudorange data. A highlight of these performance tests is a case study of the 2011 Mw 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake.

Minson, S. E.; Brooks, B. A.; Murray, J. R.; Iannucci, R. A.

2013-12-01

121

Faster Short-Distance Earthquake Early Warning Using Continued Monitoring of Filtered Vertical Displacement: A Case Study  

E-print Network

-motion accelerograms from the 2010 Jiasian earthquake (M 6:4) that struck southern Taiwan recorded by the Taiwan Strong:4), which occurred on 4 March 2010, was the largest inland earthquake to strike southern Taiwan) was recorded might be too short to apply the emergency procedures. When a large earthquake occurs, an EEWS aims

Wu, Yih-Min

122

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. comprehensive earthquake management plan: Emergency Operations Center training manual  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this training is to: describe the responsibilities, resources, and goals of the Emergency Operations Center and be able to evaluate and interpret this information to best direct and allocate emergency, plant, and other resources to protect life and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1990-02-28

123

88 hours: The U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center response to the 11 March 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This article presents a timeline of NEIC response to a major global earthquake for the first time in a formal journal publication. We outline the key observations of the earthquake made by the NEIC and its partner agencies, discuss how these analyses evolved, and outline when and how this information was released to the public and to other internal and external parties. Our goal in the presentation of this material is to provide a detailed explanation of the issues faced in the response to a rare, giant earthquake. We envisage that the timeline format of this presentation can highlight technical and procedural successes and shortcomings, which may in turn help prompt research by our academic partners and further improvements to our future response efforts. We have shown how NEIC response efforts have significantly improved over the past six years since the great 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. We are optimistic that the research spawned from this disaster, and the unparalleled dense and diverse data sets that have been recorded, can lead to similar-and necessary-improvements in the future.

Hayes, G.P.; Earle, P.S.; Benz, H.M.; Wald, D.J.; Briggs, R.W.

2011-01-01

124

GONAF - A deep Geophysical Observatory at the North Anatolian Fault: Permanent downhole monitoring of a pending major earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ hereafter) is a right-lateral transform plate boundary between the Anatolian plate and Eurasia accommodating a relative plate motion of ~25 mm/yr. Almost the entire fault zone has failed during the last century as a westward migrating sequence of destructive earthquakes leaving a very high probability of a forthcoming large event to the Sea of Marmara segments. This area did not host any M>7 earthquake since 1766. Therefore, listening to the Sea of Marmara segments at a very low detection threshold is required to address how the brittle deformation develops along a critically-stressed fault segment prior to a potential failure. GONAF-ICDP project has been developed to design a downhole seismic network surrounding the Sea of Marmara segments of the NAFZ deploying 300 m deep boreholes equipped with a chain of sensitive seismographs. Natural and city-induced noise is attenuated through the unconsolidated subsurface formation and therefore provides ideal boundary conditions for seismic monitoring within the intact rocks at greater depths. A typical GONAF borehole consists of 1 Hz vertical sensor at every 75 m depth increment and a combination of 1Hz, 2Hz and 15 Hz 3C sensors at 300 m depth. By now, three boreholes were successfully implemented in the Tuzla and Yalova-?narc?k regions. The plan is to complete four more GONAF boreholes in 2014. Our preliminary results show that GONAF waveform recordings will broaden the magnitude range down to ~M -1 in the target area providing a better characterization of seismically active features in time and space.

Bulut, Fatih; Bohnhoff, Marco; Dresen, Georg; Raub, Christina; Kilic, Tugbay; Kartal, Recai F.; Tuba Kadirioglu, F.; Nurlu, Murat; Ito, Hisao; Malin, Peter E.

2014-05-01

125

Hatfield Marine Science Center Dynamic Revetment Project DSL permit #45455-FP, Monitoring Report February 2012  

EPA Science Inventory

A Dynamic Revetment (gravel beach) was installed in November, 2011 on the shoreline along the northeastern edge of the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) to mitigate erosion that threatened HMSC critical infrastructure. Shoreline topographic and biological monitoring was init...

126

Hatfield Marine Science Center Dynamic Revetment Project DSL permit #45455-FP, Monitoring Report February, 2013  

EPA Science Inventory

A Dynamic Revetment (gravel beach) was installed in November, 2011 on the shoreline along the northeastern edge of the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) to mitigate erosion that threatened HMSC critical infrastructure. Shoreline topographic and biological monitoring was init...

127

A cost effective wireless structural health monitoring network for buildings in earthquake zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design, programming and implementation of a cost effective wireless structural health monitoring system (wSHMs) is presented, able to monitor the seismic and/or man-made acceleration in buildings. This system actually operates as a sensor network exploiting internet connections that commonly exist, aiming to monitor the structural health of the buildings being installed. Key-feature of wSHMs is that it can be implemented in Wide Area Network mode to cover many remote structures and buildings, on metropolitan scale. Acceleration data is able to send, in real time, from dozens of buildings of a broad metropolitan area, to a central database, where they are analyzed in order to depict possible structural damages or nonlinear characteristics and alert for non-appropriateness of specific structures.

Pentaris, F. P.; Stonham, J.; Makris, J. P.

2014-10-01

128

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

129

Earthquakes Canada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the earthquake information page of the Natural Resources Canada Geologic Survey. It contains links to reports, maps, and lists of recent earthquakes, information and hazards as well as earthquake research and network and data archives. Links also connect to information on earthquake hazards, products and publications, a site to report earthquakes, and a link to other earthquake resources.

130

Earthquake Monitoring at 9 50'N on the East Pacific Rise RIDGE 2000 Integrated Studies Site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the fall of 2003 nine ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed from the R/V Keldysh within the `bull's-eye' region of the R2K ISS at 9 49'N - 9 51'N on the East Pacific Rise as part of the Ridge 2000 Integrated Studies Site. These instruments were recovered using the R/V Atlantis in April 2004, and twelve more were deployed to take their place for a second year of monitoring (with three years total planned). During the turn-around cruise, two short temporary deployments (~4-8 days), of an additional 3 OBSs each, were accomplished to provide very dense instrument spacing (a few 100 m) around specific vents where in situ chemical monitoring was taking place (Luther et al.). Good data were collected on seven of the nine long deployment and six short deployment OBSs. We will present early results from analysis of these data including an estimate of the level of activity observed through-out the seven month period of the first deployment, and preliminary epicenters. Data will also be shown from the short temporary deployments. Early analysis of these data indicates an event rate of ~8 events per day for events where arrivals are apparent on at least three instruments, and may therefore expect to be located. Also notable in these data are pulses and prolonged periods of what appear to be tremor. This tremor is not generally coherent or synchronous from station to station and is therefore likely a very localized phenomena associated with hydrothermal fluid flow. The exceptionally well characterized and monitored seafloor at this site will allow for unprecedented correlation of observed seismic activity with local biology, geology, geochemical and hydrothermal monitoring. In addition, past and future detailed geophysical imaging of this area will provide an excellent context for observed faulting and fracturing.

Tolstoy, M.; Waldhauser, F.; Kim, W.

2004-12-01

131

Evidence from in situ pore pressure monitoring of submarine slope failures generated by the December 26, 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake  

Microsoft Academic Search

The scientific Sumatra Aftershocks cruise was performed onboard the French R\\/V Marion Dufresne during summer 2005 (July, 14 - August, 9), within a relatively short delay from the Great Sumatra Earthquake (26 December 2004). One of the main aims of the cruise was to enquire about submarine mass wasting processes possibly associated with recent earthquake events. Within the whole investigated

N. Sultan; A. Cattaneo; J. Sibuet

2005-01-01

132

Structural Health Monitoring Sensor Development at NASA Langley Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is applying considerable effort on the development of sensor technology for structural health monitoring (SHM). This research is targeted toward increasing the safety and reliability of aerospace vehicles, while reducing operating and maintenance costs. Research programs are focused on applications to both aircraft and space vehicles. Sensor technologies under development span a wide range including fiber-optic sensing, active and passive acoustic sensors, electromagnetic sensors, wireless sensing systems, MEMS, and nanosensors. Because of their numerous advantages for aerospace applications, fiber-optic sensors are one of the leading candidates and are the major focus of this presentation. In addition, recent advances in active and passive acoustic sensing will also be discussed.

Prosser, W. H.; Wu, M. C.; Allison, S. G.; DeHaven, S. L.; Ghoshal, A.

2002-01-01

133

Surface displacements following the Mw 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake: One year of continuous monitoring via Robotized Total Station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a continuous monitoring of the surface displacements following the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in the area of Paganica village, central Italy. We considered 3-dimensional displacements measured via Robotized Total Station (RTS) installed the April 24th 2009 in the area of Paganica village (ca. 5 km ENE from L'Aquila town), where a water pipeline located within the urban centre was severely damaged. The RTS ran continuously for about one year, with high sampling rates, and measured displacements at selected point targets. The revealed surface displacements are in agreement with the results of a DInSAR time series analysis relevant to satellite SAR data acquired over the same area and time period by the Italian satellite's constellation Cosmo-SkyMed. Moreover, despite the RTS monitored area was spatially limited, our analyses provide detailed feedbacks on fault processes following the L'Aquila earthquake. The aftershocks temporal evolution and the post-seismic displacements measured in the area show very similar exponential decays over time, with estimated cross-correlation coefficients values ranging from 0.86 to 0.97. The results of our time dependent modelling of the RTS measurements suggest that L'Aquila earthquake post-seismic displacements were dominated by the fault afterslip and/or fault creep, while poroelastic and viscoelastic processes had negligible effects.

Manconi, Andrea; Giordan, Daniele; Allasia, Paolo; Baldo, Marco; Lollino, Giorgio

2013-04-01

134

Occupational radiation monitoring at a large medical center in Japan.  

PubMed

Occupational radiation dose monitoring is a method of ensuring that radiation levels are within the regulatory limits. Our objective in this study was to evaluate the radiation doses experienced by personnel at a radiology facility between 2001 and 2010. Overall, 2418 annual dose records for workers who were categorized into four occupational groups were analyzed. The groups included: (1) radiologists, (2) radiologic technologists, (3) nurses, and (4) other workers, who belong to other hospital departments, but who participate partially in some radiologic procedures. The dose distribution was found to be skewed, with 76 % of personnel having received no measurable doses and almost 2 % having received doses of more than 2 mSv. The weighted-average annual doses ranged from 0.13 to 0.57, 0.9 to 2.12, 0.01 to 0.19, and 0.01 to 0.09 mSv for the radiologists, radiologic technologists, nurses, and the other workers, respectively. The radiologic technologists received the highest radiation exposure among the four groups. It was found that the average annual doses were decreasing over time for the radiologists, radiologic technologists, and others, whereas they were increasing for the nurses. Nurses play an important role in assisting radiologists and patients during various radiologic procedures, which might have increased their average annual dose. During the 10-year period of this study, there was no incidence of a dose exceeding the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Furthermore, there was no detectable neutron exposure. PMID:24570292

ALMasri, Hussein Y; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Yogi, Tadashi

2014-07-01

135

Earthquake swarms in Greenland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake swarms occur primarily near active volcanoes and in areas with frequent tectonic activity. However, intraplate earthquake swarms are not an unknown phenomenon. They are located near zones of weakness, e.g. in regions with geological contrasts, where dynamic processes are active. An earthquake swarm is defined as a period of increased seismicity, in the form of a cluster of earthquakes of similar magnitude, occurring in the same general area, during a limited time period. There is no obvious main shock among the earthquakes in a swarm. Earthquake swarms occur in Greenland, which is a tectonically stable, intraplate environment. The first earthquake swarms in Greenland were detected more than 30 years ago in Northern and North-Eastern Greenland. However, detection of these low-magnitude events is challenging due to the enormous distances and the relatively sparse network of seismographs. The seismograph coverage of Greenland has vastly improved since the international GLISN-project was initiated in 2008. Greenland is currently coved by an open network of 19 BB seismographs, most of them transmitting data in real-time. Additionally, earthquake activity in Greenland is monitored by seismographs in Canada, Iceland, on Jan Mayen, and on Svalbard. The time-series of data from the GLISN network is still short, with the latest station been added in NW Greenland in 2013. However, the network has already proven useful in detecting several earthquake swarms. In this study we will focus on two swarms: one occurring near/on the East Greenland coast in 2008, and another swarm occurring in the Disko-area near the west coast of Greenland in 2010. Both swarms consist of earthquakes with local magnitudes between 1.9 and 3.2. The areas, where the swarms are located, are regularly active with small earthquakes. The earthquake swarms are analyzed in the context of the general seismicity and the possible relationship to the local geological conditions.

Larsen, Tine B.; Voss, Peter H.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine

2014-05-01

136

Permeable Pavement Monitoring at the Edison Environmental Center Demonstration Site - Abstract  

EPA Science Inventory

The EPA?s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) is monitoring an instrumented, working, 110-space pervious pavement parking at EPA?s Edison Environmental Center (EEC). Permeable pavement systems are classified as stormwater best management practices (BMPs) which reduce runo...

137

Permeable Pavement Monitoring at the Edison Environmental Center Demonstration Site - presentation  

EPA Science Inventory

The EPA?s Urban Watershed Management Branch has been monitoring an instrumented 110-space pervious pavement parking lot. The lot is used by EPA personnel and visitors to the Edison Environmental Center. The design includes 28-space rows of three permeable pavement types: asphal...

138

Swift resumes X-ray monitoring observations of the Galactic center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 2015 February 3, Swift resumed its daily X-ray monitoring campaign of the Galactic center (Atel #5006; see link below). The only active X-ray source in the ~0.9 ks XRT image is the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary AX J1745.6-2901.

Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Gehrels, N.

2015-02-01

139

Biometric Monitoring as a Persuasive Technology: Ensuring Patients Visit Health Centers in India's Slums  

E-print Network

Biometric Monitoring as a Persuasive Technology: Ensuring Patients Visit Health Centers in India Bhardwaj3 , and William Thies4 1 Operation ASHA 2 University of Toronto 3 Innovators In Health 4 Microsoft- cations on the right schedule. We evaluate the perceived impact of the terminal via interviews with 8

Toronto, University of

140

The advanced ocean floor real time monitoring system for mega thrust earthquakes and tsunamis-application of DONET and DONET2 data to seismological research and disaster mitigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mega thrust earthquakes such as the 2004 Sumatra earthquake and the 2010 Chile earthquake generate severe damages by strong motions and large tsunamis. In Japan, the recurrences of mega thrust earthquakes around the Nankai trough off southwestern Japan, is one of the most severe problems in Japanese natural disasters. Especially, around the Nankai trough, mega thrust earthquakes over magnitude8 class

Yoshiyuki Kaneda

2010-01-01

141

Program Evaluation of Remote Heart Failure Monitoring: Healthcare Utilization Analysis in a Rural Regional Medical Center.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. "Care Beyond Walls and Wires," a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Materials and Methods: Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. Results: HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. Conclusions: The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems. PMID:25025239

Riley, William T; Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A Susana; Carroll, Mark

2014-07-15

142

Real Earthquakes, Real Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred worldwide over the school year and to see if any patterns emerged. Through this experience students conducted "real" science--using actual data, drawing conclusions based on that data.

Schomburg, Aaron

2003-09-01

143

GPS Monitoring of Surface Change During and Following the Fortuitous Occurrence of the M(sub w) = 7.3 Landers Earthquake in our Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accomplishments: (1) Continues GPS monitoring of surface change during and following the fortuitous occurrence of the M(sub w) = 7.3 Landers earthquake in our network, in order to characterize earthquake dynamics and accelerated activity of related faults as far as 100's of kilometers along strike. (2) Integrates the geodetic constraints into consistent kinematic descriptions of the deformation field that can in turn be used to characterize the processes that drive geodynamics, including seismic cycle dynamics. In 1991, we installed and occupied a high precision GPS geodetic network to measure transform-related deformation that is partitioned from the Pacific - North America plate boundary northeastward through the Mojave Desert, via the Eastern California shear zone to the Walker Lane. The onset of the M(sub w) = 7.3 June 28, 1992, Landers, California, earthquake sequence within this network poses unique opportunities for continued monitoring of regional surface deformation related to the culmination of a major seismic cycle, characterization of the dynamic behavior of continental lithosphere during the seismic sequence, and post-seismic transient deformation. During the last year, we have reprocessed all three previous epochs for which JPL fiducial free point positioning products available and are queued for the remaining needed products, completed two field campaigns monitoring approx. 20 sites (October 1995 and September 1996), begun modeling by development of a finite element mesh based on network station locations, and developed manuscripts dealing with both the Landers-related transient deformation at the latitude of Lone Pine and the velocity field of the whole experiment. We are currently deploying a 1997 observation campaign (June 1997). We use GPS geodetic studies to characterize deformation in the Mojave Desert region and related structural domains to the north, and geophysical modeling of lithospheric behavior. The modeling is constrained by our existing and continued GPS measurements, which will provide much needed data on far-field strain accumulation across the region and on the deformational response of continental lithosphere during and following a large earthquake, forming the basis for kinematic and dynamic modeling of secular and seismic-cycle deformation. GPS geodesy affords both regional coverage and high precision that uniquely bear on these problems.

Miller, M. Meghan

1998-01-01

144

Triggering of volcanic activity by large earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Statistical analysis of temporal relationships between large earthquakes and volcanic eruptions suggests seismic waves may trigger eruptions even over great distances, although the causative mechanism is not well constrained. In this study the relationship between large earthquakes and subtle changes in volcanic activity was investigated in order to gain greater insight into the relationship between dynamic stress and volcanic response. Daily measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), onboard the Aura satellite, provide constraints on volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates as a measure of subtle changes in activity. An SO2 timeseries was produced from OMI data for thirteen persistently active volcanoes. Seismic surface-wave amplitudes were modeled from the source mechanisms of moment magnitude (Mw) ?7 earthquakes, and peak dynamic stress (PDS) was calculated. The SO2 timeseries for each volcano was used to calculate a baseline threshold for comparison with post-earthquake emission. Delay times for an SO2 response following each earthquake at each volcano were analyzed and compared to a random catalog. The delay time analysis was inconclusive. However, an analysis based on the occurrence of large earthquakes showed a response at most volcanoes. Using the PDS calculations as a filtering criterion for the earthquake catalog, the SO2 mass for each volcano was analyzed in 28-day windows centered on the earthquake origin time. If the average SO2 mass after the earthquake was greater than an arbitrary percentage of pre-earthquake mass, we identified the volcano as having a response to the event. This window analysis provided insight on what type of volcanic activity is more susceptible to triggering by dynamic stress. The volcanoes with lava lakes included in this study, Ambrym, Gaua, Villarrica, and Erta Ale, showed a clear response to dynamic stress while the volcanoes with lava domes, Merapi, Semeru, and Bagana showed no response at all. Perhaps dynamic stress triggers release of accumulated gasses or gas nucleation events , which is more likely to produce an observable degassing response in less viscous magmas, or in a magmatic system that facilitates the equilibrium needed to maintain a lava lake.

Avouris, D.; Carn, S. A.; Waite, G. P.

2011-12-01

145

U.S. Geological Survey and The National Academies; USGS OF-2007-1047, Extended Abstract 011 Hydroacoustic monitoring of the Bransfield Strait and Drake Passage,  

E-print Network

recorded hundreds of earthquakes from the seafloor spreading centers and submarine volcanoes within Hydroacoustic monitoring of the Bransfield Strait and Drake Passage, Antarctica: A first analysis of seafloor: A first analysis of seafloor seismicity, cryogenic acoustic sources, and cetacean vocalizations

Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne

146

Does Size and Location of the Vital Signs Monitor Matter? A Study of Two Trauma Centers  

PubMed Central

We report the results of an observational study in which we compared how the size and location of the vital signs monitor impact teamwork at two trauma centers. Our observations focused on three factors: information exchange, situational awareness, and ergonomic issues. We found that the smaller display was difficult to view and required more team communication and workarounds, such as periodic verbal reports. The larger and closer display, although accessible to more team members, did not uniformly improve teams situational awareness because vital signals were not verbalized and the monitor was often ignored. We suggest introducing multiple larger and closer displays, while keeping the practice of periodic verbal reporting. PMID:21347070

Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S.

2010-01-01

147

Advancing Research Methodology for Measuring & Monitoring Patient-centered Communication in Cancer Care  

Cancer.gov

A critical step in facilitating the delivery of patient-centered communication (PCC) as part of routine cancer care delivery is creating a measurement and monitoring system that will allow for the ongoing assessment, tracking, and improvement of these six functions of patient-centered communication. To build the foundation of such a system and to advance research methodology in this area, the ORB has collaborated with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) on a research project conducted within AHRQ's DEcIDE network.

148

Ghana's experience in the establishment of a national data center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The government of Ghana in a bilateral agreement with the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) has established a National Data Center in Ghana with the aim of monitoring the testing of nuclear explosions. Seismic, hydroacoustic, radionuclide and infrasound methods are used for the monitoring. The data center was commissioned on 3 February, 2010 at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. At present Ghana does not have any operational, centralised data (seismic, hydroacoustic, radionuclide and infrasound) acquisition system with the capability of accessing data from other international stations. Hence, the need of setting up the National Data Center which would enable us constantly monitor, manage and coordinate both natural and man-made seismic activities in the country and around the globe, upload data to the International Data Center (IDC) as well as receive and use International Monitoring System (IMS) data and IDC products for treaty verification and compliance. Apart from these, the center also accesses and analyzes seismic waveforms relevant to its needs from the International Data Center; makes data available to its stakeholder institutions for earthquake disaster mitigation; reports on all aspects of disasters related to earthquake to the relevant government agencies that deal with disasters; makes recommendations to the government of Ghana on earthquake safety measures; provides information to assist government institutions to develop appropriate land and building policies. The center in collaboration with stakeholder agencies periodically organises public lectures on earthquake disaster risk mitigation.

Ekua, Amponsah Paulina; Yaw, Serfor-Armah

2012-08-01

149

Earthquake Myths  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site serves to belie several popular myths about earthquakes. Students will learn that most earthquakes do not occur in the early morning and one cannot be swallowed up by an earthquake. In addition, there is no such thing as earthquake weather and California is not falling into the ocean. On the more practical side, students can learn that good building codes do not insure good buildings, it is safer under a table than in a doorway during an earthquake, and most people do not panic during an earthquake.

150

Inside Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By watching this National Geographic video, you will witness the destructive power of earthquakes. You will watch home videos taken during earthquake tremors and you will go inside the Earth for the birth of a quake.

2010-01-01

151

EARTHQUAKES POWEROUTAGES  

E-print Network

TSUNAMI HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES POWEROUTAGES FIRE FOREMERGENCIES PREPAREFOREMERGENCIES Sign up in the event of a widespread disaster, such as a hurricane or earthquake. If a large area is affected, phone

152

Earthquakes Rock!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn the two main methods to measure earthquakes, the Richter Scale and the Mercalli Scale. They make a model of a seismographa measuring device that records an earthquake on a seismogram. Students also investigate which structural designs are most likely to survive an earthquake. And, they illustrate an informational guide to the Mercalli Scale.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

153

Virtual Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive feature shows students how an earthquake epicenter is located and how Richter magnitude is determined. They will use recordings of seismograms from three stations (provided in the activity), learn the difference between the focus and epicenter of an earthquake, and that the magnitude of an earthquake is an estimate of the amount of energy that it has released.

Novak, Gary

154

Forecasting Earthquakes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this video there are scenes of damage from the Northridge Earthquake and interviews with Dr. Andrea Donnelan, Geophysics at JPL, and Dr. Jim Dolan, earthquake geologist from Cal. Tech. The interviews discuss earthquake forecasting by tracking changes in the earth's crust using antenna receiving signals from a series of satellites called the Global Positioning System (GPS).

1994-01-01

155

Products and Services Available from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) and the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, the SCEDC archives continuous and triggered data from nearly 8400 data channels from 425 SCSN recorded stations, processing and archiving an average of 6.4 TB of continuous waveforms and 12,000 earthquakes each year. The SCEDC provides public access to these earthquake parametric and waveform data through its website www.data.scec.org and through client applications such as STP and DHI. This poster will describe the most significant developments at the SCEDC during 2011. New website design: ? The SCEDC has revamped its website. The changes make it easier for users to search the archive, discover updates and new content. These changes also improve our ability to manage and update the site. New data holdings: ? Post processing on El Mayor Cucapah 7.2 sequence continues. To date there have been 11847 events reviewed. Updates are available in the earthquake catalog immediately. ? A double difference catalog (Hauksson et. al 2011) spanning 1981 to 6/30/11 will be available for download at www.data.scec.org and available via STP. ? A focal mechanism catalog determined by Yang et al. 2011 is available for distribution at www.data.scec.org. ? Waveforms from Southern California NetQuake stations are now being stored in the SCEDC archive and available via STP as event associated waveforms. Amplitudes from these stations are also being stored in the archive and used by ShakeMap. ? As part of a NASA/AIST project in collaboration with JPL and SIO, the SCEDC will receive real time 1 sps streams of GPS displacement solutions from the California Real Time Network (http://sopac.ucsd.edu/projects/realtime; Genrich and Bock, 2006, J. Geophys. Res.). These channels will be archived at the SCEDC as miniSEED waveforms, which then can be distributed to the user community via applications such as STP. Improvements in the user tool STP: ? STP sac output now includes picks from the SCSN. New archival methods: ? The SCEDC is exploring the feasibility of archiving and distributing waveform data using cloud computing such as Google Apps. A month of continuous data from the SCEDC archive will be stored in Google Apps and a client developed to access it in a manner similar to STP. The data is stored in miniseed format with gzip compression. Time gaps between time series were padded with null values, which substantially increases search efficiency by make the records uniform in length.

Chen, S. E.; Yu, E.; Bhaskaran, A.; Chowdhury, F. R.; Meisenhelter, S.; Hutton, K.; Given, D.; Hauksson, E.; Clayton, R. W.

2011-12-01

156

Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Earthquake Research Institute (ERI) at the University of Tokyo acts as the primary association for fundamental geophysical research in Japan and oversees the Earthquake Predication Center and the Volcanic Eruption Prediction Program. The website offers the latest earthquake and volcano news. While a few of the research projects are described only in Japanese, visitors can learn about the Ocean Hemisphere Network Project, Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Urban Areas, and the Marine Seismic Survey. The web site offers links to numerous earthquake databases and to the Institute's many research centers.

157

The earth's absolute gravitation potential function in the prospect 'gravitational potential metering' of geological objects and earthquake centers  

E-print Network

The direct problem of the detection of the Earth's absolute gravitation potential maximum value (MGP) was solved. The inverse problem finding of the Earth maximum gravitation (where there is a maximum of gravitation field intensity and a potential function has a 'bending point') with the help of MGP was solved as well. The obtained results show that the revealed Earth maximum gravitation coincides quite strictly with the cseismic D" layer on the border of the inner and outer (liquid) core. The validity of the method of an absolute gravitation potential detection by the equal- potential velocity was proved as 'gravitation potential measurement' or 'Vs-gravity method'. The prospects of this method for detecting of low-power or distant geological objects with abnormal density and the possible earthquakes with low density was shown.

Aleksandr Fridrikson; Marina Kasatochkina

2009-04-08

158

Virtual Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Virtual Earthquake was created by California State University, Los Angeles, as part of the Electronic Desktop Project. This virtual simulation allows students to locate the epicenter of an earthquake and determine its magnitude on the Richter scale. Students can choose from four geographic areas for their simulation. Virtual Earthquake carefully guides the student through the steps required to calculate the epicenter and to determine the magnitude of a simulated earthquake. The actual epicenter is provided along with the epicenter determined by the user. The user can then determine the magnitude of the earthquake as measured on the Richter scale.

1997-01-01

159

Utility of video-EEG monitoring in a tertiary care epilepsy center.  

PubMed

Our video-EEG monitoring (VEEG) unit is part of a typical metropolitan tertiary care center that services a diverse patient population. We aimed to determine if the specific clinical reason for inpatient VEEG was actually resolved. Our method was to retrospectively determine the stated goal of inpatient VEEG and to analyze the outcome of one hundred consecutive adult patients admitted for VEEG. The reason for admission fit into one of four categories: 1) to characterize paroxysmal events as either epileptic or nonepileptic, 2) to localize epileptic foci, 3) to characterize the epilepsy syndrome, and 4) to attempt safe antiepileptic drug adjustment. We found that VEEG was successful in accomplishing the goal of admission in 77% of cases. The remaining 23% failed primarily due to lack of typical events during monitoring. Furthermore, of the overall study cohort, VEEG outcomes altered medical management in 53% and surgery was pursued in 5%. PMID:23892581

Kumar-Pelayo, M; Oller-Cramsie, M; Mihu, N; Harden, C

2013-09-01

160

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) overview of FRMAC operations  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the designated Lead Federal Agency (LFA) and the state(s) that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. The mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Operations describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas. These off-site areas may include one or more affected states.

NONE

1996-02-01

161

Listening to Earthquakes with Infrasound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A tripartite infrasound array was installed to listen to earthquakes occurring along the Guy-Greenbrier fault in Arkansas. The active earthquake swarm is believed to be caused by deep waste water injections and will allow us to explain the mechanisms causing earthquake "booms" that have been heard during an earthquake. The array has an aperture of 50 meters and is installed next to the X301 seismograph station run by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI). This arrangement allows simultaneous recording of seismic and acoustic changes from the arrival of an earthquake. Other acoustic and seismic sources that have been found include thunder from thunderstorms, gunshots, quarry explosions and hydraulic fracturing activity from the local gas wells. The duration of the experiment is from the last week of June to the last week of September 2011. During the first month and a half, seven local earthquakes were recorded, along with numerous occurrences of the other infrasound sources. Phase arrival times of the recorded waves allow us to estimate wave slowness and azimuth of infrasound events. Using these two properties, we can determine whether earthquake "booms" occur at a site from the arrival of the P-wave or whether the earthquake "booms" occur elsewhere and travel through the atmosphere. Preliminary results show that the infrasound correlates well to the ground motion during an earthquake for frequencies below 15 Hertz.

Mucek, A. E.; Langston, C. A.

2011-12-01

162

A real-time navigation monitoring expert system for the Space Shuttle Mission Control Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ONAV (Onboard Navigation) Expert System has been developed as a real time console assistant for use by ONAV flight controllers in the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center. This expert knowledge based system is used to monitor the Space Shuttle onboard navigation system, detect faults, and advise flight operations personnel. This application is the first knowledge-based system to use both telemetry and trajectory data from the Mission Operations Computer (MOC). To arrive at this stage, from a prototype to real world application, the ONAV project has had to deal with not only AI issues but operating environment issues. The AI issues included the maturity of AI languages and the debugging tools, verification, and availability, stability and size of the expert pool. The environmental issues included real time data acquisition, hardware suitability, and how to achieve acceptance by users and management.

Wang, Lui; Fletcher, Malise

1993-01-01

163

Photovoltaic Performance and Reliability Database: A Gateway to Experimental Data Monitoring Projects for PV at the Florida Solar Energy Center  

DOE Data Explorer

This site is the gateway to experimental data monitoring projects for photovoltaic (PV) at the Florida Solar Energy Center. The website and the database were designed to facilitate and standardize the processes for archiving, analyzing and accessing data collected from dozens of operational PV systems and test facilities monitored by FSEC's Photovoltaics and Distributed Generation Division. [copied from http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/research/photovoltaics/data_monitoring/index.htm

164

Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Final report, September 1986--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Earthquake activity in the New Madrid Seismic Zone had been monitored by regional seismic networks since 1975. During this time period, over 3,700 earthquakes have been located within the region bounded by latitudes 35{degrees}--39{degrees}N and longitudes 87{degrees}--92{degrees}W. Most of these earthquakes occur within a 1.5{degrees} x 2{degrees} zone centered on the Missouri Bootheel. Source parameters of larger earthquakes in the zone and in eastern North America are determined using surface-wave spectral amplitudes and broadband waveforms for the purpose of determining the focal mechanism, source depth and seismic moment. Waveform modeling of broadband data is shown to be a powerful tool in defining these source parameters when used complementary with regional seismic network data, and in addition, in verifying the correctness of previously published focal mechanism solutions.

Herrmann, R.B.; Nguyen, B. [Saint Louis Univ., MO (US). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

1993-08-01

165

The Terminator Time in subionospheric VLF/LF diurnal variation as recorded by the Romanian VLF/LF radio monitoring system related to earthquake occurrence and volcano erruptions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Romanian VLF/LF monitoring system consisting in a radio receiver and the infrastructure that is necessary to record and transmit the collected data is part of the European international network named INFREP. Information on electromagnetic fields' intensities created by transmitters at a receiving site are indicating the quality of the propagation along the paths between the receivers and transmitters. Studying the ionosphere's influences on the electromagnetic waves' propagation along a certain path is a method to put into evidence possible modifications of its lower structure and composition as earthquakes' precursors. The VLF/LF receiver installed in Romania was put into operation in February 2009 and has already 3 years of testing, functioning and proving its utility in the forecast of some earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. Simultaneously we monitor, in the same site with the VLF/LF receiver, the vertical atmospheric electric field and different other meteorological parameters as: temperature, pressure or rainfall. The global magnetic conditions are emphasized with the help of Daily Geomagnetic Index Kp. At a basic level, the adopted analysis consists in a simple statistical evaluation of the signals by comparing the instantaneous values to the trend of the signal. In this paper we pay attention to the terminator times in subionospheric VLF/LF diurnal variation, which are defined as the times of minimum in amplitude (or phase) around sunrise and sunset. These terminator times are found to shift significantly just around the earthquake. In the case of Kobe earthquake, there were found significant shifts in both morning and evening terminator times and these authors interpreted the shift in terminator time in terms of the lowering of lower ionosphere by using the full-wave mode theory. A LabVIEW application which accesses the VLF/LF receiver through internet was developed. This program opens the receiver's web-page and automatically retrieves the list of data files to synchronize the user-side data with the receiver's data. Missing zipped files are also automatically downloaded. The application appends daily files into monthly and anual files and performs 3D colour-coded maps with graphic representations of VLF and LF signals' intensities versus the minute-of-the-day and the day-of-the-month, facilitating a near real-time observation of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves' propagation. This type of representation, highlights the modification of the terminator time versus the length of the solar-day, improves the user's capability to detect possible propagation anomalies due to ionosphere conditions and allows a quick visual inspection of unexpected behaviors of transmission channels at different frequencies and paths. A very special result, was observed on the recordings made on the propagation path to Iceland (NRK, 37.5kHz). Recordings are made once a minute, for a period of 303 days. Icelandic channel propagation anomalies present in the range of 40-90 days are considered to be precursory phenomena associated with Eyjafjallajokull - Iceland, volcanic eruption occurred in April-May 2010.

Moldovan, I. A.; Moldovan, A. S.; Biagi, P. F.; Ionescu, C.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Boudjada, M. Y.

2012-04-01

166

1964 Great Alaska Earthquake: a photographic tour of Anchorage, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., a magnitude 9.2 earthquake, the largest recorded earthquake in U.S. history, struck southcentral Alaska (fig. 1). The Great Alaska Earthquake (also known as the Good Friday Earthquake) occurred at a pivotal time in the history of earth science, and helped lead to the acceptance of plate tectonic theory (Cox, 1973; Brocher and others, 2014). All large subduction zone earthquakes are understood through insights learned from the 1964 event, and observations and interpretations of the earthquake have influenced the design of infrastructure and seismic monitoring systems now in place. The earthquake caused extensive damage across the State, and triggered local tsunamis that devastated the Alaskan towns of Whittier, Valdez, and Seward. In Anchorage, the main cause of damage was ground shaking, which lasted approximately 4.5 minutes. Many buildings could not withstand this motion and were damaged or collapsed even though their foundations remained intact. More significantly, ground shaking triggered a number of landslides along coastal and drainage valley bluffs underlain by the Bootlegger Cove Formation, a composite of facies containing variably mixed gravel, sand, silt, and clay which were deposited over much of upper Cook Inlet during the Late Pleistocene (Ulery and others, 1983). Cyclic (or strain) softening of the more sensitive clay facies caused overlying blocks of soil to slide sideways along surfaces dipping by only a few degrees. This guide is the document version of an interactive web map that was created as part of the commemoration events for the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. It is accessible at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska Science Center website: http://alaska.usgs.gov/announcements/news/1964Earthquake/. The website features a map display with suggested tour stops in Anchorage, historical photographs taken shortly after the earthquake, repeat photography of selected sites, scanned documents, and small-scale maps, as well as links to slideshows of additional photographs and Google Street View scenes. Buildings in Anchorage that were severely damaged, sites of major landslides, and locations of post-earthquake engineering responses are highlighted. The web map can be used online as a virtual tour or in a physical self-guided tour using a web-enabled Global Positioning System (GPS) device. This publication serves the purpose of committing most of the content of the web map to a single distributable document. As such, some of the content differs from the online version.

Thoms, Evan E.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; McGimsey, Robert G.

2014-01-01

167

Data Management Coordinators Monitor STS-78 Mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launched on June 20, 1996, the STS-78 mission's primary payload was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS), which was managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During the 17 day space flight, the crew conducted a diverse slate of experiments divided into a mix of life science and microgravity investigations. In a manner very similar to future International Space Station operations, LMS researchers from the United States and their European counterparts shared resources such as crew time and equipment. Five space agencies (NASA/USA, European Space Agency/Europe (ESA), French Space Agency/France, Canadian Space Agency /Canada, and Italian Space Agency/Italy) along with research scientists from 10 countries worked together on the design, development and construction of the LMS. This photo represents Data Management Coordinators monitoring the progress of the mission at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at MSFC. Pictured are assistant mission scientist Dr. Dalle Kornfeld, Rick McConnel, and Ann Bathew.

1996-01-01

168

Hidden earthquakes  

SciTech Connect

Seismologists generally look for earthquakes to happen along visible fault lines, e.g., the San Andreas fault. The authors maintain that another source of dangerous quakes has been overlooked: the release of stress along a fault that is hidden under a fold in the earth's crust. The paper describes the differences between an earthquake which occurs on a visible fault and one which occurs under an anticline and warns that Los Angeles greatest earthquake threat may come from a small quake originating under downtown Los Angeles, rather than a larger earthquake which occurs 50 miles away at the San Andreas fault.

Stein, R.S.; Yeats, R.S.

1989-06-01

169

Izmit Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab allows students to look at variety of data from the North Anatolian fault in Turkey. Specifically, students have the oportunity to: interpret seismograms from the Izmit earthquake in 1999 (while accessing some seismograph station information from IRIS) make and interpret an earthquake focal mechanism solution based on these seismograms locate the earthquake epicenter calculate the moment magnitude of the earthquake using published data showing epicenter locations and displacement measurements intepret historical data from the North Anatolian fault and tectonic-scale plate motion information to see what patterns occur in the regional seismicity.

Sarah Titus

170

Broadband characteristics of earthquakes recorded during a dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens, Washington, between October 2004 and May 2005: Chapter 5 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From October 2004 to May 2005, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information of the University of Memphis operated two to six broadband seismometers within 5 to 20 km of Mount St. Helens to help monitor recent seismic and volcanic activity. Approximately 57,000 earthquakes identified during the 7-month deployment had a normal magnitude distribution with a mean magnitude of 1.78 and a standard deviation of 0.24 magnitude units. Both the mode and range of earthquake magnitude and the rate of activity varied during the deployment. We examined the time domain and spectral characteristics of two classes of events seen during dome building. These include volcano-tectonic earthquakes and lower-frequency events. Lower-frequency events are further classified into hybrid earthquakes, low-frequency earthquakes, and long-duration volcanic tremor. Hybrid and low-frequency earthquakes showed a continuum of characteristics that varied systematically with time. A progressive loss of high-frequency seismic energy occurred in earthquakes as magma approached and eventually reached the surface. The spectral shape of large and small earthquakes occurring within days of each other did not vary with magnitude. Volcanic tremor events and lower-frequency earthquakes displayed consistent spectral peaks, although higher frequencies were more favorably excited during tremor than earthquakes.

Horton, Stephen P.; Norris, Robert D.; Moran, Seth C.

2008-01-01

171

Parkfield: Earthquake Prediction: A Brief History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report describes recent efforts at earthquake prediction, focusing on the modern era beginning in the mid- to late 1970's. Topics include a history of prediction efforts, the measurement of physical parameters in areas where earthquakes occur, and the development of a model upon which predictions could be based. The efforts centered around Parkfield, California, whose well-known seismic history allowed the development of a 'characteristic Parkfield earthquake' model and led to a formal prediction that a moderate-size earthquake would occur at Parkfield between 1985 and 1993. However, the anticipated earthquake did not occur until September 2004.

172

Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country is an informational Web site provided by the Southern California Earthquake Center. Citizens can learn about the San Andreas fault, other California faults, how to build and maintain an earthquake safe house, how to survive an earthquake, how they are measured and what the magnitude means, common earthquake myths, and much more. As a safety and an educational site, this unique resource does a good job of presenting a lot of information, illustrations, and graphics in an easy-to-follow format that helps explain this powerful and potentially deadly natural occurrence.

173

Pain Reduction and Financial Incentives to Improve Glucose Monitoring Adherence in a Community Health Center  

PubMed Central

Self-monitoring of blood glucose is a critical component of diabetes management. However, patients often do not maintain the testing schedule recommended by their healthcare provider. Many barriers to testing have been cited, including cost and pain. We present a small pilot study to explore whether the use of financial incentives and pain-free lancets could improve adherence to glucose testing in a community health center patient population consisting largely of non-English speaking ethnic minorities with low health literacy. The proportion of patients lost to follow-up was 17%, suggesting that a larger scale study is feasible in this type of setting, but we found no preliminary evidence suggesting a positive effect on adherence by either financial incentives or pain-free lancets. Results from this pilot study will guide the design of larger-scale studies to evaluate approaches to overcome the variety of barriers to glucose testing that are present in disadvantaged patient populations. PMID:25486531

Huntsman, Mary Ann H.; Olivares, Faith J.; Tran, Christina P.; Billimek, John; Hui, Elliot E.

2014-01-01

174

Earthquake Prediction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video segment adapted from NOVA tells the tragic story of two Japanese seismologists who disagreed about the threat of earthquakes in the early twentieth century. Today, seismologists in California offer residents a probability of risk that an earthquake might occur.

2005-12-17

175

Earthquakes 101  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By watching this National Geographic video, you will learn all about earthquakes! You will learn what causes them, how many occur daily, and where they usually happen. The video will also tell you about some of the earthquakes that have occurred in the United States.

2010-01-01

176

Plotting Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners discover how to plot earthquakes on a map by exploring recent earthquake activity in California and Nevada. Within this activity, learners also practice using latitudinal and longitudinal lines and make predictions. This detailed lesson plan includes key vocabulary words, background information for educators, extension ideas, and resources.

California Academy of Sciences

2012-06-26

177

Using Back-Projection of Surface Waves for Near Real-Time Determination of Global Earthquake Locations, Magnitudes and Mechanisms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will discuss our recent progress in the implementation of a global earthquake detection and analysis system using back-projection of long-period (60-120 s) surface waves. A prototype system for Surface wave Location and Association in Quasi Real time (SLAQR) has been operational in test mode at the United States Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (USGS NEIC) using data from around 40 stations of the Global Seismographic Network. The algorithm does not require a human operator to select or analyze data and uses a Rayleigh wave back-projection approach consisting of a continuous progressive conversion of time series into spectrograms and the mapping of those spectrograms onto a grid of locations and origin times. It distinguishes itself by its straightforward adaptation into a routine monitoring system and its constant load approach. This method provides a reliable estimate of the moment of global earthquakes without saturating and thus is particularly useful for large earthquakes. It can also act as a backup to the current NEIC monitoring software and detect events that are missed, or underestimated, by the current system. Particularly important in this regard are long-period tsunami earthquakes and slow oceanic transform earthquakes. Our newly added calculation of moment tensors and earthquake depths employs the same spectral parameters already calculated for the determination of magnitudes and locations. We have analyzed the results of this prototype system for the time period of March 2009 to April 2010, to assess its performance and calibrate the produced magnitudes with those in the final NEIC earthquake catalog. Our analysis shows that the system performs well for events greater than magnitude 5.5 and determines reliable magnitudes and locations for global events shallower than 150 km in depth. We have also tested a new extension to this system to determine earthquake moment tensors and depths, and have found that it performs well for very large events, but will require changes to the current system to be functional for smaller earthquakes.

Polet, J.; Thio, H. K.; Earle, P. S.

2010-12-01

178

Earthquake Precursors in Thermal Infrared Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of an agreement between NASA and the Arab Youth Venture Foundation (AYVF), three engineering students from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) participated in a 10-week experiential learning program this summer. This educational program is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center Office of Education and Public Outreach and is administered by the Education Associates Program (EAP). One of the research projects under this program tested the hypothesis that signals emitted by the Earths surface prior to the occurrence of an earthquake, including thermal infrared (TIR) emissions, can be detected through appropriate analysis of data collected by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensors. After applying a set of preprocessing algorithms to the satellite data, we analyzed MODIS images showing the TIR emitted by a ground area in the days prior to an eventual earthquake. We used computing tools and software, such as MATLAB and ENVI, to isolate these pre-seismic signals from the background noise. The development of a technique to monitor pre-seismic signals holds promise in finding a method to predict earthquakes.

Alqassim, S. S.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

2010-12-01

179

Role of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) following a radiological accident  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) calls for the Department of Energy to establish a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) immediately following a major radiological accident to coordinate all federal off-site monitoring efforts in support of the State and the Cognizant Federal Agency (CFA) for the facility or material involved in the accident. Some accidents are potentailly very complex and may require hundreds of radiation specialists to ensure immediate protection of the public and workers in the area, and to identify priorities for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) long-term efforts once the immediate protective actions have been carried out. The FRMAC provides a working environment with today's high technology tools (i.e., communication, computers, management procedures, etc.) to assure that the State and CFA decision makers have the best possible information in a timely manner on which to act. The FRMAC planners also recognize an underlying responsibility to continuously document such operations in order to provide the State, the CFA, and the EPA the technical information they will require for long term assessments. In addition, it is fully recognized that information collected and actions taken by the FRMAC will be subjected to the same scrutiny as other parts of the accident and the overall response.

Doyle, J.F. III

1986-01-01

180

Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes  

PubMed Central

The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1?MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 110?MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor foreshocks, since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

2014-01-01

181

Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor ``foreshocks'', since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

2014-08-01

182

Anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes.  

PubMed

The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1?MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10?MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor "foreshocks", since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

2014-01-01

183

Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering  

E-print Network

, Anchorage, AK, 2014. #12;Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake 21-25, 2014 Anchorage, Alaska10NCEE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING THROUGH DENSE INSTRUMENTATION Engineering July 21-25, 2014 Anchorage, Alaska10NCEE Structural Health Monitoring Through Dense

Heaton, Thomas H.

184

Earthquake Effects and Experiences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portion of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) frequently-asked-questions feature on earthquakes addresses what individuals might actually experience during an earthquake. Topics include earthquake motion (rolling or shaking), earthquake effects (ground shaking, surface faulting, ground failure, etc.), earthquake magnitude, what an earthquake feels like, and others. There are also links to additional resources on earthquake effects and experiences.

185

Earthquake Effects and Experiences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portion of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) frequently-asked-questions feature on earthquakes addresses what individuals might actually experience during an earthquake. Topics include earthquake motion (rolling or shaking), earthquake effects (ground shaking, surface faulting, ground failure, etc.), earthquake magnitude, what an earthquake feels like, and others. There are also links to additional resources on earthquake effects and experiences.

2010-11-23

186

Earthquakes Living Lab: Locating Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) real-time, real-world seismic data from around the planet to identify where earthquakes occur and look for trends in earthquake activity. They explore where and why earthquakes occur, learning about faults and how they influence earthquakes. Looking at the interactive maps and the data, students use Microsoft® Excel® to conduct detailed analysis of the most-recent 25 earthquakes; they calculate mean, median, mode of the data set, as well as identify the minimum and maximum magnitudes. Students compare their predictions with the physical data, and look for trends to and patterns in the data. A worksheet serves as a student guide for the activity.

Civil And Environmental Engineering Department

187

Earthquake Search  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is designed to provide instruction on how to collect earthquake data from on-line databases. The parameters can be changed so that data for earthquakes occurring at any time or part of the world can be accessed. Following completion of this activity the user will be able to find the epicenter and hypocenter (focus), determine the number of earthquakes in a given area or region, determine magnitude, and make inferences why ground shaking does not always decrease with increasing distance from the epicenter.

Hopson, R.

188

Towards to Understanding the Recurrence Cycle of Mega Thrust Earthquakes and Tsunamis Around the Nankai Trough Southwestern Japan Real Time Monitoring (DONET), Simulation and Comprehensive Analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Nankai trough located southwestern Japan is well known as the mega thrust earthquake seismogenic zone. There are four mega thrust seismogenic zones such as the Tokai, Tonankai, Nankai and Hyuga off Kyushu Island. In the Nankai trough, mega thrust earthquakes are occurring with an interval of 100-200 years. Therefore, we have to improve the structure model and the recurrence

Y. Kaneda; K. Hirahara; T. Furumura

2009-01-01

189

U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center  

E-print Network

Monitoring Pathogen Monitors for E. coli and Total Coliforms in Water Testing Toxic Blue-Green Algae on microcystins and E.coli monitoring technologies. The stakeholders followed along with the presentation

190

A PMD-insensitive OSNR monitoring scheme based on polarization-nulling with off-center narrowband filtering  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose and experimentally demonstrate using polarization-nulling with off-center narrowband filtering to monitor OSNR for 10-Gb\\/s and 40-Gb\\/s RZ signals. Robustness to PMD is significantly enhanced compared with prior polarization-nulling scheme without employing narrowband filtering.

Man-Hong Cheung; Lian-Kuan Chen; Chun-Kit Chan

2004-01-01

191

Earthquake Facts  

MedlinePLUS

... and have smaller magnitudes than earthquakes on the Earth. It appears they are related to the tidal stresses associated with the varying distance between the Earth and Moon. They also occur at great depth, ...

192

VERY LARGE ARRAY MONITORING OF 1720 MHz OH MASERS TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER  

SciTech Connect

We present the first variability study of the 1720 MHz OH masers located in the Galactic center. Most of these masers are associated with the interaction between the supernova remnant Sgr A East and the interstellar medium, but a few masers are associated with the circumnuclear disk (CND). The monitoring program covered five epochs and a timescale of 20-195 days, during which no masers disappeared and no new masers appeared. All masers have previously been detected in a single-epoch observation about one year prior to the start of the monitoring experiment, implying relatively stable conditions for the 1720 MHz OH masers. No extreme variability was detected. The masers associated with the northeastern interaction region between the supernova remnant and the +50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud show the highest level of variability. This can be explained with the +50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud being located behind the supernova remnant and with a region of high OH absorbing column density along the line of sight. Possibly, the supernova remnant provides additional turbulence to the gas in this region, through which the maser emission must travel. The masers in the southern interaction region are located on the outermost edge of Sgr A East, the line of sight of which is not covered by either absorbing OH gas or a supernova remnant, in agreement with the much lower variability level observed. Similarly, the masers associated with the CND show little variability, consistent with those arising through collisions between relatively large clumps of gas in the CND and no significant amount of turbulent gas along the line of sight.

Pihlstroem, Y. M.; Mesler, R. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Sjouwerman, L. O., E-mail: ylva@unm.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Lopezville Road 1001, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2011-10-20

193

Earthquake Location  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Earthquake location is an interesting and significant aspect of seismology. Locating earthquakes is necessary for compiling useful seismicity information, calculating magnitudes, and study of fault zones, Earth structure and the earthquake process. Methods of earthquake location involve understanding of seismic waves, wave propagation, interpretation of seismograms, Earth velocity structure, triangulation, and the concepts (and mathematics) of inverse problems. Because earthquake location can be approached with relatively simple to very complex methods, it can be included in various levels of educational curricula and for "in-depth" study. Progressively developing a deep understanding of concepts, computational techniques and applications (and the capabilities, limitations and uncertainties of these applications) is a characteristic of science and an opportunity to "learn science by doing science." A number of methods that vary from simple to complex are available for learning about earthquake location. The methods also allow connections to other important concepts in seismology and provide a variety of approaches that address different learning styles and can be used for reinforcement and assessment. Uses online and/or real-time data Has minimal/no quantitative component

Braile, Larry

194

Network-based real-time radiation monitoring system in Synchrotron Radiation Research Center.  

PubMed

The real-time radiation monitoring system (RMS) in the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC) has been upgraded significantly during the past years. The new framework of the RMS is built on the popular network technology, including Ethernet hardware connections and Web-based software interfaces. It features virtually no distance limitations, flexible and scalable equipment connections, faster response time, remote diagnosis, easy maintenance, as well as many graphic user interface software tools. This paper briefly describes the radiation environment in SRRC and presents the system configuration, basic functions, and some operational results of this real-time RMS. Besides the control of radiation exposures, it has been demonstrated that a variety of valuable information or correlations could be extracted from the measured radiation levels delivered by the RMS, including the changes of operating conditions, beam loss pattern, radiation skyshine, and so on. The real-time RMS can be conveniently accessed either using the dedicated client program or World Wide Web interface. The address of the Web site is http:// www-rms.srrc.gov.tw. PMID:13678290

Sheu, R J; Wang, J P; Chen, C R; Liu, J; Chang, F D; Jiang, S H

2003-10-01

195

Earthquake Education and Outreach in Haiti  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Following the devastating 2010 Haiti earthquake, the USGS has been helping with earthquake awareness and monitoring in the country, with continued support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This assistance has helped the Bureau des Mines et de l'Energie (BME) in Port-au-Prin...

196

Earthquakes in Arkansas and vicinity 1699-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This map summarizes approximately 300 years of earthquake activity in Arkansas. It is one in a series of similar State earthquake history maps. Work on the Arkansas map was done in collaboration with the Arkansas Geological Survey. The earthquake data plotted on the map are from several sources: the Arkansas Geological Survey, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality. In addition to earthquake locations, other materials presented include seismic hazard and isoseismal maps and related text. Earthquakes are a legitimate concern in Arkansas and parts of adjacent states. Arkansas has undergone a number of significant felt earthquakes since 1811. At least two of these events caused property damage: a magnitude 4.7 earthquake in 1931, and a magnitude 4.3 earthquake in 1967. The map shows all historical and instrumentally located earthquakes in Arkansas and vicinity between 1811 and 2010. The largest historic earthquake in the vicinity of the State was an intensity XI event, on December 16, 1811; the first earthquake in the New Madrid sequence. This violent event and the earthquakes that followed caused considerable damage to the then sparsely settled region.

Dart, Richard L.; Ausbrooks, Scott M.

2011-01-01

197

Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES)NEED IMPACT STATEMENT  

E-print Network

Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES)NEED IMPACT STATEMENT INITIATIVE In October E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation, or NEES, which is an integral component of the U.S. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). Purdue's NEEScomm Center serves

Ginzel, Matthew

198

77 FR 53225 - National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USGS-GX12GG00995NP00] National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC...to Public Law 96-472, the National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC...the U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC), 1711...

2012-08-31

199

Earthquake Machine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a demonstration of the principle of elastic rebound for the cause and recurrence of earthquakes. Under the Elastic Rebound Theory, the continuous motion of plates on Earth causes stress to build up at the boundaries between the plates, where friction keeps the boundaries locked. Stress is continually building up, and earthquakes act to relieve that stress. In the demonstration, the two sides of a fault are represented by sandpaper-covered blocks resting on a sandpaper-covered board. A weight rests on the block to apply a chosen amount of pressure on the sandpaper (defining the frictional strength of the fault). A spring is attached to the block and to a string, on which a constant pull is maintained. This apparatus is used to discover when the stress causes the blocks to move. Conclusions on earthquake recurrence (seismicity) may then be drawn.

Barker, Jeffrey

200

Predicting Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Five moderate-to-strong earthquakes struck California in June 2005. Could the cluster of quakes be a harbinger of the Big One? Another earthquake-prone area, New Madrid, near Memphis, Tennessee, has had more than its share of impressive quakes and strain is building along its fault lines. This radio broadcast discusses these two seismic zones, the new data based on years of GPS (Global Positioning System) measurements that may give scientists more information, and how the Earth generates the stress which leads to earthquakes. There is also discussion of the danger of tsunamis in the Virgin Islands and the need for a worldwide tsunami warning network. The broadcast is 18 minutes in length.

201

Earthquake Shaking - Finding the "Hot Spots"  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new Southern California Earthquake Center study has quantified how local geologic conditions affect the shaking experienced in an earthquake. The important geologic factors at a site are softness of the rock or soil near the surface and thickness of the sediments above hard bedrock. Even when these 'site effects' are taken into account, however, each earthquake exhibits unique 'hotspots' of anomalously strong shaking. Better predictions of strong ground shaking will therefore require additional geologic data and more comprehensive computer simulations of individual earthquakes.

Field, Ned; Jones, Lucile; Jordan, Tom; Benthien, Mark; Wald, Lisa

2001-01-01

202

The EM Earthquake Precursor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, American earthquake investigators predetermined magnetometer use and a minimum earthquake magnitude necessary for EM detection. This action was set in motion, due to the extensive damage incurred and public outrage concerning earthquake forecasting; however, the magnetometers employed, grounded or buried, are completely subject to static and electric fields and have yet to correlate to an identifiable precursor. Secondly, there is neither a networked array for finding any epicentral locations, nor have there been any attempts to find even one. This methodology needs dismissal, because it is overly complicated, subject to continuous change, and provides no response time. As for the minimum magnitude threshold, which was set at M5, this is simply higher than what modern technological advances have gained. Detection can now be achieved at approximately M1, which greatly improves forecasting chances. A propagating precursor has now been detected in both the field and laboratory. Field antenna testing conducted outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013, detected three strong EM sources along with numerous weaker signals. The antenna had mobility, and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. Next, two directional techniques were employed, resulting in three mapped, potential epicenters. The remaining, weaker signals presented similar directionality results to more epicentral locations. In addition, the directional results of the Timpson field tests lead to the design and construction of a third prototype antenna. In a laboratory setting, experiments were created to fail igneous rock types within a custom-designed Faraday Cage. An antenna emplaced within the cage detected EM emissions, which were both reproducible and distinct, and the laboratory results paralleled field results. With a viable system and continuous monitoring, a fracture cycle could be established and observed in real-time. Sequentially, field data would be reviewed quickly for assessment; thus, leading to a much improved earthquake forecasting capability. The EM precursor determined by this method may surpass all prior precursor claims, and the general public will finally receive long overdue forecasting.

Jones, K. B., II; Saxton, P. T.

2013-12-01

203

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01

204

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/11: Cooperative Environmental Monitoring in the Coastal Regions of India and Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

The cessation of hostilities between India and Pakistan is an immediate need and of global concern, as these countries have tested nuclear devices, and have the capability to deploy nuclear weapons and long-range ballistic missiles. Cooperative monitoring projects among neighboring countries in South Asia could build regional confidence, and, through gradual improvements in relations, reduce the threat of war and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. This paper discusses monitoring the trans-border movement of flow and sediment in the Indian and Pakistani coastal areas. Through such a project, India and Pakistan could initiate greater cooperation, and engender movement towards the resolution of the Sir Creek territorial dispute in their coastal region. The Joint Working Groups dialogue being conducted by India and Pakistan provides a mechanism for promoting such a project. The proposed project also falls within a regional framework of cooperation agreed to by several South Asian countries. This framework has been codified in the South Asian Seas Action Plan, developed by Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. This framework provides a useful starting point for Indian and Pakistani cooperative monitoring in their trans-border coastal area. The project discussed in this paper involves computer modeling, the placement of in situ sensors for remote data acquisition, and the development of joint reports. Preliminary computer modeling studies are presented in the paper. These results illustrate the cross-flow connections between Indian and Pakistani coastal regions and strengthen the argument for cooperation. Technologies and actions similar to those suggested for the coastal project are likely to be applied in future arms control and treaty verification agreements. The project, therefore, serves as a demonstration of cooperative monitoring technologies. The project will also increase people-to-people contacts among Indian and Pakistani policy makers and scientists. In the perceptions of the general public, the project will crystallize the idea that the two countries share ecosystems and natural resources, and have a vested interest in increased collaboration.

Rajen, Gauray

1999-06-01

205

A National Tracking Center for Monitoring Shipments of HEU, MOX, and Spent Nuclear Fuel: How do we implement?  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear material safeguards specialists and instrument developers at US Department of Energy (USDOE) National Laboratories in the United States, sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of NA-24, have been developing devices to monitor shipments of UF6 cylinders and other radioactive materials , . Tracking devices are being developed that are capable of monitoring shipments of valuable radioactive materials in real time, using the Global Positioning System (GPS). We envision that such devices will be extremely useful, if not essential, for monitoring the shipment of these important cargoes of nuclear material, including highly-enriched uranium (HEU), mixed plutonium/uranium oxide (MOX), spent nuclear fuel, and, potentially, other large radioactive sources. To ensure nuclear material security and safeguards, it is extremely important to track these materials because they contain so-called direct-use material which is material that if diverted and processed could potentially be used to develop clandestine nuclear weapons . Large sources could be used for a dirty bomb also known as a radioactive dispersal device (RDD). For that matter, any interdiction by an adversary regardless of intent demands a rapid response. To make the fullest use of such tracking devices, we propose a National Tracking Center. This paper describes what the attributes of such a center would be and how it could ultimately be the prototype for an International Tracking Center, possibly to be based in Vienna, at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Mark Schanfein

2009-07-01

206

IRIS Seismic Monitor  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The IRIS Seismic Monitor allows users to monitor global earthquakes in near real time. Researchers can locate the geology, vault conditions, site description, station instrumentation, and additional information on stations throughout the world. Visitors can learn about the latest earthquake news, including special reports of earthquakes that significantly affected human populations or had scientific significance. Students and teachers can find images and descriptions of plate tectonics as well as links to outside educational resources.

207

Koyna Earthquake  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE Koyna earthquake of December 11, 1967, killed about 200 people and injured a few thousand. The eipcentre was within 5 km of the Koyna Dam (17 23' N., 73 45' E.). A magnitude of the order of 7.5 on the Richter scale has been reported by the Indian Meteorological Department and the Central Water and Power Research Station. The

Hari Narain; Harsh Gupta

1968-01-01

208

Earthquake Formation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the structure of the earth and how an earthquake happens. In one activity, students make a model of the earth including all of its layers. In a teacher-led demonstration, students learn about continental drift. In another activity, students create models demonstrating the different types of faults.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

209

Earthquake Vulnerability  

E-print Network

This report is available as an online document at www.nbmg.unr.edu. Please use links on the tables to view summary reports for scenarios involving earthquakes of magnitude 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, and 7.0 for 38 communities in Nevada.

Jonathan G. Price; Gary Johnson; Christine M. Ballard; Heather Armeno; Jonathan G. Price; Gary Johnson; Christine M. Ballard; Heather Armeno; Irene Seeley Linda D. Goar

210

The Earthquake  

Microsoft Academic Search

ONE of the most curious effects of the earthquake in the Peldon district is the evidence of a decided twist or apparent rotation of the shock evident in many cases upon standing buildings. Is is very apparent in the cracks throughout Dr. Green's house, which take a complete screw round some of the rooms and the staircase. It is also

W. F. Stanley

1884-01-01

211

Stalking the next Parkfield earthquake  

SciTech Connect

The 30-kilometer section of the San Andreas fault midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles is the most well understood and most intensely monitored fault in the world. The geology of the area, its rock mechanics, the study of its past earthquakes, and prediction efforts for the next quake are described.

Kerr, R.A.

1984-01-06

212

Is Your Class a Natural Disaster? It can be... The Real Time Earthquake Education (RTEE) System  

Microsoft Academic Search

In cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) in Golden, Colorado, we have implemented an autonomous version of the NEIC's real-time earthquake database management and earthquake alert system (Earthworm). This is the same system used professionally by the USGS in its earthquake response operations. Utilizing this system, Penn State University students participating in

J. S. Whitlock; K. Furlong

2003-01-01

213

Earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity 1811-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This map summarizes two centuries of earthquake activity in Mississippi. Work on the Mississippi map was done in collaboration with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Office of Geology. The earthquake data plotted on the map are from several sources: the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, and the Arkansas Geological Survey. In addition to earthquake locations, other materials include seismic hazard and isoseismal maps and related text. Earthquakes are a legitimate concern in Mississippi and parts of adjacent States. Mississippi has undergone a number of felt earthquakes since 1811. At least two of these events caused property damage: a magnitude 4.7 earthquake in 1931, and a magnitude 4.3 earthquake in 1967. The map shows all historical and instrumentally located earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity between 1811 and 2010. The largest historic earthquake in the vicinity of the State was an intensity XI event, on December 16, 1811; the first earthquake in the New Madrid sequence. This violent event and the earthquakes that followed caused considerable damage to the then sparsely settled region.

Dart, Richard L.; Bograd, Michael B.E.

2011-01-01

214

2010 Chile Earthquake Aftershock Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mw=8.8 earthquake off the coast of Chile on 27 February 2010 is the 5th largest megathrust earthquake ever to be recorded and provides an unprecedented opportunity to advance our understanding of megathrust earthquakes and associated phenomena. The 2010 Chile earthquake ruptured the Concepcion-Constitucion segment of the Nazca/South America plate boundary, south of the Central Chile region and triggered a tsunami along the coast. Following the 2010 earthquake, a very energetic aftershock sequence is being observed in an area that is 600 km along strike from Valparaiso to 150 km south of Concepcion. Within the first three weeks there were over 260 aftershocks with magnitude 5.0 or greater and 18 with magnitude 6.0 or greater (NEIC, USGS). The Concepcion-Constitucion segment lies immediately north of the rupture zone associated with the great magnitude 9.5 Chile earthquake, and south of the 1906 and the 1985 Valparaiso earthquakes. The last great subduction earthquake in the region dates back to the February 1835 event described by Darwin (1871). Since 1835, part of the region was affected in the north by the Talca earthquake in December 1928, interpreted as a shallow dipping thrust event, and by the Chillan earthquake (Mw 7.9, January 1939), a slab-pull intermediate depth earthquake. For the last 30 years, geodetic studies in this area were consistent with a fully coupled elastic loading of the subduction interface at depth; this led to identify the area as a mature seismic gap with potential for an earthquake of magnitude of the order 8.5 or several earthquakes of lesser magnitude. What was less expected was the partial rupturing of the 1985 segment toward north. Today, the 2010 earthquake raises some disturbing questions: Why and how the rupture terminated where it did at the northern end? How did the 2010 earthquake load the adjacent segment to the north and did the 1985 earthquake only partially ruptured the plate interface leaving loaded asperities since 1906? Since the number of M>7.0 aftershocks has been low, does the distribution of large-magnitude aftershocks differ from previous events of this size? What is the origin of the extensional-type aftershocks at shallow depths within the upper plate? The international seismological community (France, Germany, U.K., U.S.A.) in collaboration with the Chilean seismological community responded with a total of 140 portable seismic stations to deploy in order to record aftershocks. This combined with the Chilean permanent seismic network, in the area results in 180 stations now in operation recording continuous at 100 cps. The seismic equipment is a mix of accelerometers, short -period and broadband seismic sensors deployed along the entire length of the aftershock zone that will record the aftershock sequence for three to six months. The collected seismic data will be merged and archived to produce an international data set open to the entire seismological community immediately after archiving. Each international group will submit their data as soon as possible in standard (mini seed) format with accompanying meta data to the IRIS DMC where the data will be merged into a combined data set and available to individuals and other data centers. This will be by far the best-recorded aftershock sequence of a large megathrust earthquake. This outstanding international collaboration will provide an open data set for this important earthquake as well as provide a model for future aftershock deployments around the world.

Barientos, Sergio

2010-05-01

215

Earthquake and tsunami forecasts: Relation of slow slip events to subsequent earthquake rupture  

PubMed Central

The 5 September 2012 Mw 7.6 earthquake on the Costa Rica subduction plate boundary followed a 62-y interseismic period. High-precision GPS recorded numerous slow slip events (SSEs) in the decade leading up to the earthquake, both up-dip and down-dip of seismic rupture. Deeper SSEs were larger than shallower ones and, if characteristic of the interseismic period, release most locking down-dip of the earthquake, limiting down-dip rupture and earthquake magnitude. Shallower SSEs were smaller, accounting for some but not all interseismic locking. One SSE occurred several months before the earthquake, but changes in MohrCoulomb failure stress were probably too small to trigger the earthquake. Because many SSEs have occurred without subsequent rupture, their individual predictive value is limited, but taken together they released a significant amount of accumulated interseismic strain before the earthquake, effectively defining the area of subsequent seismic rupture (rupture did not occur where slow slip was common). Because earthquake magnitude depends on rupture area, this has important implications for earthquake hazard assessment. Specifically, if this behavior is representative of future earthquake cycles and other subduction zones, it implies that monitoring SSEs, including shallow up-dip events that lie offshore, could lead to accurate forecasts of earthquake magnitude and tsunami potential. PMID:25404327

Dixon, Timothy H.; Jiang, Yan; Malservisi, Rocco; McCaffrey, Robert; Voss, Nicholas; Protti, Marino; Gonzalez, Victor

2014-01-01

216

Deep Defect Centers in Silicon Carbide Monitored with Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electrical data obtained from deep level transient spectroscopy investigations on deep defect centers in the 3C, 4H, and 6H SiC polytypes are reviewed. Emphasis is put on intrinsic defect centers observed in as-grown material and subsequent to ion implantation or electron irradiation as well as on defect centers caused by doping with or implantation of transition metals (vanadium, titanium, chromium,

T. Dalibor; G. Pensl; H. Matsunami; T. Kimoto; W. J. Choyke; A. Schner; N. Nordell

1997-01-01

217

September 12, 2012 (v. 3) Summary of Cyanobacteria Monitoring and Assessments in USGS Water Science Centers  

E-print Network

1 September 12, 2012 (v. 3) Summary of Cyanobacteria Monitoring and Assessments in USGS Water, are pioneering new monitoring, assessment, and laboratory capabilities needed to address cyanobacteria issues in freshwaters across the Nation. Why Cyanobacteria? - An evolving issue of concern with both a national (U

218

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/4: Missile Control in South Asia and the Role of Cooperative Monitoring Technology  

SciTech Connect

The succession of nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in May 1998 has changed the nature of their missile rivalry, which is only one of numerous manifestations of their relationship as hardened adversaries, deeply sensitive to each other's existing and evolving defense capabilities. The political context surrounding this costly rivalry remains unmediated by arms control measures or by any nascent prospect of detente. As a parallel development, sensible voices in both countries will continue to talk of building mutual confidence through openness to avert accidents, misjudgments, and misinterpretations. To facilitate a future peace process, this paper offers possible suggestions for stabilization that could be applied to India's and Pakistan's missile situation. Appendices include descriptions of existing missile agreements that have contributed to better relations for other countries as well as a list of the cooperative monitoring technologies available to provide information useful in implementing subcontinent missile regimes.

Kamal, N.; Sawhney, P.

1998-10-01

219

Earthquakes and plate tectonics.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

Spall, H.

1982-01-01

220

CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE  

EPA Science Inventory

This data set contains data concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions related to t...

221

CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE  

EPA Science Inventory

This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

222

Darwin's earthquake.  

PubMed

Charles Darwin experienced a major earthquake in the Concepcin-Valdivia region of Chile 175 years ago, in February 1835. His observations dramatically illustrated the geologic principles of James Hutton and Charles Lyell which maintained that the surface of the earth was subject to alterations by natural events, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and the erosive action of wind and water, operating over very long periods of time. Changes in the land created new environments and fostered adaptations in life forms that could lead to the formation of new species. Without the demonstration of the accumulation of multiple crustal events over time in Chile, the biologic implications of the specific species of birds and tortoises found in the Galapagos Islands and the formulation of the concept of natural selection might have remained dormant. PMID:21038753

Lee, Richard V

2010-07-01

223

Improvements of the RST (Robust Satellite Techniques) approach for the thermal monitoring of the earthquake prone areas: an analysis on Italian peninsula in the period 2004-2012  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past, a Robust Satellite data analysis Technique (RST) was proposed to investigate possible relations between earthquake occurrence and space-time fluctuations of Earth's emitted TIR radiation observed from satellite. Based on a statistically definition of 'TIR anomalies' it allowed their identification even in very different natural (e.g. related to atmosphere and/or surface) and observational (e.g. related to time/season, but also to solar and satellite zenithal angles) conditions. RST approach has been implemented on different, polar and geostationary satellite systems (e.g. MSG/SEVIRI, GOES/IMAGER, EOS/MODIS, NOAA/AVHRR, etc.) and to earthquakes with a wide range of magnitudes (from 4.0 to 7.9) occurred in different tectonic contexts in all the world. In this paper, in order to further reduce false positives due to particular meteorological conditions, a refined RST approach is presented and validated on a long time series (9 years) of TIR satellite records collected by the geostationary satellite sensor MSG/SEVIRI over the Italian peninsula. The space-time persistence analysis performed on TIR anomaly maps shows: - a significant reduction of false positives; - several sequences of TIR anomalies, in a significant space-time relation with earthquakes with M>4. The relations among particular features of TIR anomalies (e.g. space-time extension and intensity) and earthquakes (e.g. magnitude, depth, focal mechanism) will be also discussed.

Genzano, N.; Paciello, R.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

2013-12-01

224

RESOURCE INVENTORY AND MONITORING CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-print Network

to develop monitoring programs that support the military mission and natural resources conservation) program and other natural resources management programs. Accurate and precise data collection consistently over time. Ecologists at CEMML have extensive experience with natural resources management

225

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/7: A Generic Model for Cooperative Border Security  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a generic model for dealing with security problems along borders between countries. It presents descriptions and characteristics of various borders and identifies the threats to border security, while emphasizing cooperative monitoring solutions.

Netzer, Colonel Gideon

1999-03-01

226

The development of a remote monitoring system for the Nuclear Science Center reactor  

E-print Network

system for many types of facilities, including STAR reactors. This system takes data from reactor cooling systems, power monitoring channels, fuel temperature indicators, control rod drives, security alarm sensors and stores it on local and remote hard...

Jiltchenkov, Dmitri Victorovich

2012-06-07

227

Earthquake Hazards Program: NEIC Near Real Time Earthquake List  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United States Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center site offers readers near real time updates of seismological events worldwide. As one can gather from a glimpse at the report, our planet is in a near constant state of geophysical change and upheaval, given the numerous earthquakes registered on a daily basis by the NEIC, sometimes up to a dozen or more. Readers will discover that the NEIC Web site lists, in chronological order, the earthquakes of the past several days, each with its own hyperlink to separate pages that detail geographic location and magnitude of specific events, as well as the faults responsible for geological upsets. Beyond the above, the site lists activity for the past week and month -- all with charts, maps, and detailed descriptions of regions cited.

228

USGS Earthquake Hazards Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This page points to information on earthquakes in Northern California, the United States, and the world. Topics include reports on recent large earthquakes, real-time earthquake maps, real-time shaking maps, real-time seismograms, earthquake network reports and updates, recent and significant earthquakes, and earthquake news releases. Users will be able to view maps and click on them. The EHP is part of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) lead by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

229

Continental dynamics and continental earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two key research projects in geoscience field in China since the IUGG meeting in Birmingham in 1999, the project of East Asian Continental Geodynamics and the project of Mechanism and Prediction of Strong Continental Earthquakes are introduced in this paper. Some details of two projects, such as their sub-projects, some initial research results published are also given here. Because of the large magnitude of the November 14, 2001 Kunlun Mountain Pass M S=8.1 earthquake, in the third part of this paper, some initial research results are reviewed for the after-shock monitoring and the multi-discipline field survey, the impact and disaster of this earthquake on the construction site of Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) railway and some other infrastructure.

Dong-Ning, Zhang; Guo-Min, Zhang; Pei-Zhen, Zhang

2003-09-01

230

Using of Remote Sensing Techniques for Monitoring the Earthquakes Activities Along the Northern Part of the Syrian Rift System (LEFT-LATERAL),SYRIA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake mitigation can be achieved with a better knowledge of a region's infra-and substructures. High resolution Remote Sensing data can play a significant role to implement Geological mapping and it is essential to learn about the tectonic setting of a region. It is an effective method to identify active faults from different sources of Remote Sensing and compare the capability of some satellite sensors in active faults survey. In this paper, it was discussed a few digital image processing approaches to be used for enhancement and feature extraction related to faults. Those methods include band ratio, filtering and texture statistics . The experimental results show that multi-spectral images have great potentials in large scale active faults investigation. It has also got satisfied results when deal with invisible faults. Active Faults have distinct features in satellite images. Usually, there are obvious straight lines, circular structures and other distinct patterns along the faults locations. Remotely Sensed imagery Landsat ETM and SPOT XS /PAN are often used in active faults mapping. Moderate and high resolution satellite images are the best choice, because in low resolution images, the faults features may not be visible in most cases. The area under study is located Northwest of Syria that is part of one of the very active deformation belt on the Earth today. This area and the western part of Syria are located along the great rift system (Left-Lateral or African- Syrian Rift System). Those areas are tectonically active and caused a lot of seismically events. The AL-Ghab graben complex is situated within this wide area of Cenozoic deformation. The system formed, initially, as a result of the break up of the Arabian plate from the African plate. This action indicates that these sites are active and in a continual movement. In addition to that, the statistic analysis of Thematic Mapper data and the features from a digital elevation model ( DEM )produced from SAR interferometer show the existence of spectral structures at the same sites. The Arabian plate is moving in a NNW direction, whereas the African plate is moving to the North. The left-lateral motion along the Dead Sea Fault accommodates the difference in movement rate between both plates. The analysis of TM Space Imagery and digital image processing of spectral data show that the lineaments along AL-Ghab graben maybe considered as linear conjunctions accompanied with complex fracturing system. This complex is affected by distance stresses accompanied with intensive forces. The digital image processing of Radar imagery showing the presence of active and fresh faulting zones along the AL-Ghab graben. TM and SAR-DTM data, also showed a gradual color tone and interruptions of linear-ellipse shapes which reflecting the presence of discontinuity contours along the fault zone extension .This features refer to abundance of surface morphological features indicate to Fresh Faults. Recent faulting is expressed as freshly exposed soil within the colluvial apron visible by its light tone color. These indicators had been proved by field checks. Furthermore, the statistic digital analysis of the spectral data show that there are distribution of spectral plumes. These plumes are decreasing in intensity and color contrast from the center of the site to the direction of its edges.

Dalati, Moutaz

231

Patient-centered technological assessment and monitoring of depression for low-income patients.  

PubMed

Depression is a significant challenge for ambulatory care because it worsens health status and outcomes, increases health care utilizations and costs, and elevates suicide risk. An automatic telephonic assessment (ATA) system that links with tasks and alerts to providers may improve quality of depression care and increase provider productivity. We used ATA system in a trial to assess and monitor depressive symptoms of 444 safety-net primary care patients with diabetes. We assessed system properties, evaluated preliminary clinical outcomes, and estimated cost savings. The ATA system is feasible, reliable, valid, safe, and likely cost-effective for depression screening and monitoring for low-income primary care population. PMID:24525531

Wu, Shinyi; Vidyanti, Irene; Liu, Pai; Hawkins, Caitlin; Ramirez, Magaly; Guterman, Jeffrey; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Ell, Kathleen

2014-01-01

232

Patient-Centered Technological Assessment and Monitoring of Depression for Low-Income Patients  

PubMed Central

Depression is a significant challenge for ambulatory care because it worsens health status and outcomes, increases health care utilizations and costs, and elevates suicide risk. An automatic telephonic assessment (ATA) system that links with tasks and alerts to providers may improve quality of depression care and increase provider productivity. We used ATA system in a trial to assess and monitor depressive symptoms of 444 safety-net primary care patients with diabetes. We assessed system properties, evaluated preliminary clinical outcomes, and estimated cost savings. The ATA system is feasible, reliable, valid, safe, and likely cost-effective for depression screening and monitoring for low-income primary care population. PMID:24525531

Wu, Shinyi; Vidyanti, Irene; Liu, Pai; Hawkins, Caitlin; Ramirez, Magaly; Guterman, Jeffrey; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Ell, Kathleen

2014-01-01

233

The Electronic Encyclopedia of Earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Electronic Encyclopedia of Earthquakes is a collaborative project of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), the Consortia of Universities for Research in Earthquake Engineering (CUREE) and the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). This digital library organizes earthquake information online as a partner with the NSF-funded National Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Digital Library (NSDL) and the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE). When complete, information and resources for over 500 Earth science and engineering topics will be included, with connections to curricular materials useful for teaching Earth Science, engineering, physics and mathematics. Although conceived primarily as an educational resource, the Encyclopedia is also a valuable portal to anyone seeking up-to-date earthquake information and authoritative technical sources. "E3" is a unique collaboration among earthquake scientists and engineers to articulate and document a common knowledge base with a shared terminology and conceptual framework. It is a platform for cross-training scientists and engineers in these complementary fields and will provide a basis for sustained communication and resource-building between major education and outreach activities. For example, the E3 collaborating organizations have leadership roles in the two largest earthquake engineering and earth science projects ever sponsored by NSF: the George E. Brown Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (CUREE) and the EarthScope Project (IRIS and SCEC). The E3 vocabulary and definitions are also being connected to a formal ontology under development by the SCEC/ITR project for knowledge management within the SCEC Collaboratory. The E3 development system is now fully operational, 165 entries are in the pipeline, and the development teams are capable of producing 20 new, fully reviewed encyclopedia entries each month. Over the next two years teams will complete 450 entries, which will populate the E3 collection to a level that fully spans earthquake science and engineering. Scientists, engineers, and educators who have suggestions for content to be included in the Encyclopedia can visit www.earthquake.info now to complete the "Suggest a Web Page" form.

Benthien, M.; Marquis, J.; Jordan, T.

2003-12-01

234

Present Status of the Tsukuba Magnet Laboratory. A Report on the Aftereffects of the March 11, 2011 Earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tsukuba Magnet Laboratory (TML) is located 324 km from the seismic center of the first 9.0 magnitude earthquake that struck Japan on Friday, March 11, 2011. TML suffered peak ground acceleration of 372 Gal. The large 930 and 1030 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnets of TML were severely affected by the earthquake. The hybrid magnet and its control system were not significantly damaged. After the earthquake, serious electricity shortages occurred and our awareness of the importance of energy conservation increased. A control system for a hybrid magnet has been in development for several years. The system has sophisticated monitoring capability, detailed and rapid data recording, and is now nearing completion. The newly developed system provides detailed data; our ability to interpret this data and identify difficulties in the acquisition of critical data is improving. We are now beginning to optimize operations to reduce electricity consumption and achieve higher efficiency magnet operations.

Nimori, Shigeki

2014-10-01

235

Mission Planning and Monitoring for Heterogeneous Unmanned Vehicle Teams: A Human-Centered Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Future unmanned systems in the military will be highly heterogeneous in nature, with vehicles from multiple domainsaerial, underwater, and landworking in collaborative teams to complete a variety of missions. The complexity of supervising these teams will be enormous and will rely on human creativity, judgment, and experience. Therefore, the design and development of mission planning and monitoring technologies must be

Ryan M. Kilgore; Carl Nehme; M. L. Cummings

236

U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center  

E-print Network

(API) Roy Owens, Owens Corning Joann Rice, EPA Don Stedman, University of Denver Eben Thoma, EPA ETV Tom Kelly, Battelle John McKernan, EPA Rachel Sell, Battelle Abby Waits, EPA Welcome Rachel Sell technology was being considered for particulate monitors for black carbon emissions. Dr. Tom Kelly (Battelle

237

MONITORING IMPACTS OF ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER ON SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER QUALITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brief Project Summary An ongoing water quality monitoring program was instituted in October of 1996 to determine the impact of ARC operations on surface water and ground water quality. All relevant water quality, flow, well, and spatial data have been archived on BAE computer systems. The data is readily available for teaching, research, and planning use and have been utilized

Joseph L. Taraba; Alex W. Fogle; James S. Dinger

238

CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 07: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER POST-MONITORING  

EPA Science Inventory

This data set contains data concerning the child?s daily activities and potential exposures to pollutants at their homes. It included questions on chemicals applied and cigarettes smoked at the home over the 48-h monitoring period. It also collected information on the child?s han...

239

CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 07: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER POST-MONITORING  

EPA Science Inventory

This data set contains data concerning the child?s daily activities and potential exposures to pollutants at their homes for CTEPP-OH. It included questions on chemicals applied and cigarettes smoked at the home over the 48-h monitoring period. It also collected information on th...

240

Monitoring of the permeable pavement demonstration site at Edison Environmental Center  

EPA Science Inventory

The EPA?s Urban Watershed Management Branch has installed an instrumented, working full-scale 110-space pervious pavement parking lot and has been monitoring several environmental stressors and runoff. This parking lot demonstration site has allowed the investigation of differenc...

241

Transaxillary gasless robotic thyroid surgery with nerve monitoring: initial two experince in a North American center.  

PubMed

Minimally invasive thyroid surgery using various techniques is well described. The present study reviews our initial experience with the technique with added intraoperative monitoring to assess its safety and feasibility. The study group consisted of ten consecutive patients with suspicious thyroid nodules who were candidates for thyroid lobectomy from September to December 2009. All patients underwent intraoperative nerve integrity monitoring and postoperative direct laryngoscopy. The patients' demographic information, operative times, learning curve, complications, and postoperative hospital stay were evaluated. All procedures were successfully completed with intraoperative nerve monitoring. No cases were converted to an open procedure. The median age was 38.5 years (? = 13.5) and nine of the ten patients were females. The mean operating time was 131 minutes (range 101-203 minutes) and the mean operating time with the da Vinci system was 55 minutes. All patients were discharged home after an overnight stay. One patient developed transient radial nerve neuropathy that resolved spontaneously. There were no other postoperative complications. None of the patients complained of postoperative neck pain. Postoperative laryngoscopy showed intact and mobile vocal cords in all patients. Robotic endoscopic thyroid surgery with gasless transaxillary approach is feasible and safe in the treatment of suspicious thyroid nodules. Monitoring of the RLN during this approach is feasible. PMID:21395464

Kandil, Emad; Winters, Ryan; Aslam, Rizwan; Friedlander, Paul; Bellows, Charles

2012-03-01

242

EVALUATION OF ENVIROSCAN CAPACITANCE PROBES FOR MONITORING SOIL MOISTURE IN CENTER PIVOT IRRIGATED POTATOES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Careful irrigation scheduling is the key to providing adequate water to minimize potential leaching losses below the rootzone, while supplying adequate water to minimize negative effects of water stress. Capacitance probes were used for real-time continuous monitoring of soil moisture content at va...

243

EARTHQUAKE TRIGGERING AND SPATIAL-TEMPORAL RELATIONS IN THE VICINITY OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

It is well accepted that the 1992 M 5.6 Little Skull Mountain earthquake, the largest historical event to have occurred within 25 km of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was triggered by the M 7.2 Landers earthquake that occurred the day before. On the premise that earthquakes can be triggered by applied stresses, we have examined the earthquake catalog from the Southern Great Basin Digital Seismic Network (SGBDSN) for other evidence of triggering by external and internal stresses. This catalog now comprises over 12,000 events, encompassing five years of consistent monitoring, and has a low threshold of completeness, varying from M 0 in the center of the network to M 1 at the fringes. We examined the SGBDSN catalog response to external stresses such as large signals propagating from teleseismic and regional earthquakes, microseismic storms, and earth tides. Results are generally negative. We also examined the interplay of earthquakes within the SGBDSN. The number of ''foreshocks'', as judged by most criteria, is significantly higher than the background seismicity rate. In order to establish this, we first removed aftershocks from the catalog with widely used methodology. The existence of SGBDSN foreshocks is supported by comparing actual statistics to those of a simulated catalog with uniform-distributed locations and Poisson-distributed times of occurrence. The probabilities of a given SGBDSN earthquake being followed by one having a higher magnitude within a short time frame and within a close distance are at least as high as those found with regional catalogs. These catalogs have completeness thresholds two to three units higher in magnitude than the SGBDSN catalog used here. The largest earthquake in the SGBDSN catalog, the M 4.7 event in Frenchman Flat on 01/27/1999, was preceded by a definite foreshock sequence. The largest event within 75 km of Yucca Mountain in historical time, the M 5.7 Scotty's Junction event of 08/01/1999, was also preceded by foreshocks. The monitoring area of the SGBDSN has been in a long period of very low moment release rate since February of 1999. The seismicity catalog to date suggests that the next significant (M > 4) earthquake within the SGBDSN will be preceded by foreshocks.

na

2001-02-08

244

MONITORING TOXIC ORGANIC GASES AND PARTICLES NEAR THE WORLD TRADE CENTER AFTER SEPTEMBER 11, 2001  

EPA Science Inventory

The September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) resulted in an intense fire and the subsequent, complete collapse of the two main structures and adjacent buildings, as well as significant damage to many surrounding buildings within and around the WTC complex. Thi...

245

NC State to lead NSF Nanosystems Engineering Research Center on self-powered health monitoring  

E-print Network

than a human hair -- and thermoelectric and piezoelectric materials that use body heat and motion. "What's unique about our technologies is the fact that they are powered by the human body, so they don. The National Science Foundation Nanosystems Engineering Research Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

246

Hatfield Marine Science Center Dynamic Revetment Project DSL Permit # 45455-FP. Monitoring Report. February, 2014.  

EPA Science Inventory

Stabilization of the Yaquina Bay shoreline along the northeastern edge of the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) campus became necessary to halt erosion that threatened both HMSC critical infrastructure (seawater storage tank) and public access to the HMSC Nature Trail. A Dyn...

247

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES  

E-print Network

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety) and Walter E. Gray (Indiana Geological Survey) Earthquakes occur with little or no warning, and so planning of an earthquake. While most historical earthquakes were minor, Indiana's proximity to two seismic zones

Polly, David

248

Mechanism of tsunami earthquakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanism of the Aleutian islands earthquake of 1946 and the Sanriku earthquake of 1896 is studied on the basis of the data on seismic waves from 5 to 100 s and on tsunamis. These earthquakes generated, despite their relatively small earthquake magnitude, two of the largest and most widespread tsunamis in history. The data obtained at different periods are

Hiroo Kanamori

1972-01-01

249

A pilot study to monitor the Galactic Center for radio transients with the First Station of the Long Wavelength Array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present preliminary results from a pilot study to monitor the Galactic Center (GC) for radio transients at low-frequencies with the First Station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). Observations were conducted between May 23 - June 8, 2013 utilizing the full LWA1 station beam correlated with an outlier dipole to form a two-element interferometer in order to resolve out extended Galactic emission. This study focuses on radio-selected transients with timescales from minutes to days, longer than those probed by complementary single-dispersed-pulse type searches. A monitoring campaign with LWA1 builds upon successful GC monitoring programs at 330 MHz and 235 MHz with both the VLA and the GMRT, respectively. While there exists a long-established phenomenology of variability in the radio sky, wide-field radio transient surveys of the sky have been rare, and most variable radio sources have been found as a result of following-up X-ray transients and gamma-ray bursts. Long wavelength (> 1 m) observations provide a naturally wide field-of-view, and are well suited for detecting the generally non-thermal emission from radio transients. Our preliminary results indicate we can constrain enhanced emission below 100 MHz from within a few degrees towards the GC that are significant with respect to reasonable extrapolations of previously detected VLA and GMRT non-thermal transients at higher frequencies.

Cutchin, Sean E.; Hyman, S. D.; Kassim, N. E.; Lazio, J.

2014-01-01

250

Earthquake occurrence and effects.  

PubMed

Although earthquakes are mainly concentrated in zones close to boundaries of tectonic plates of the Earth's lithosphere, infrequent events away from the main seismic regions can cause major disasters. The major cause of damage and injury following earthquakes is elastic vibration, rather than fault displacement. This vibration at a particular site will depend not only on the size and distance of the earthquake but also on the local soil conditions. Earthquake prediction is not yet generally fruitful in avoiding earthquake disasters, but much useful planning to reduce earthquake effects can be done by studying the general earthquake hazard in an area, and taking some simple precautions. PMID:2347628

Adams, R D

1990-01-01

251

Virtual Courseware: Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Virtual Earthquake is an interactive web-based program designed to introduce the concepts of how an earthquake epicenter is located and how the Richter magnitude of an earthquake is determined. Virtual Earthquake shows the recordings of an earthquake's seismic waves detected by instruments far away from the earthquake. The instrument recording the seismic waves is called a seismograph and the recording is a seismogram. The point of origin of an earthquake is called its focus and the point on the earth's surface directly above the focus is the epicenter. You are to locate the epicenter of an earthquake by making simple measurements on three seismograms that are generated by the Virtual Earthquake program. Additionally, you will be required to determine the Richter Magnitude of that quake from the same recordings. Richter Magnitude is an estimate of the amount of energy released during an earthquake.

Novak, Gary

2000-04-25

252

X-ray Weekly Monitoring of the Galactic Center Sgr A* with Suzaku  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A small gas cloud, G2, is on an orbit almost straight into the supermassive blackhole Sgr A* by spring 2014. This event gives us a rare opportunity to test the mass feeding onto the blackhole by a gas. To catch a possible rise of the mass accretion from the cloud, we have been performing the bi-week monitoring of Sgr A* in autumn and spring in the 2013 fiscal year. The key feature of Suzaku is the high-sensitivity wide-band X-ray spectroscopy all in one observatory. It is characterized by a large effective area combined with low background and good energy resolution, in particular a good line spread function in the low-energy range. Since the desired flare events associated with the G2 approach is a transient event, the large effective area is critical and powerful tools to hunt them. The first monitoring in 2013 autumn was successfully made. The X-rays from Sgr A* and its nearby emission were clearly resolved from the bright transient source AX J1745.6-2901. No very large flare from Sgr A*was found during the monitoring. We also may report the X-ray properties of two serendipitous sources, the neutron star binary AX J1745.6-2901 and a magnetar SGR J1745-29.

Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Takayuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Saitoh, Takayuki; Murakami, Hiroshi

253

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/9: De-Alerting Strategic Ballistic Missiles  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a framework for evaluating the technical merits of strategic ballistic missile de-alerting measures, and it uses the framework to evaluate a variety of possible measures for silo-based, land-mobile, and submarine-based missiles. De-alerting measures are defined for the purpose of this paper as reversible actions taken to increase the time or effort required to launch a strategic ballistic missile. The paper does not assess the desirability of pursuing a de-alerting program. Such an assessment is highly context dependent. The paper postulates that if de-alerting is desirable and is used as an arms control mechanism, de-alerting measures should satisfy specific cirteria relating to force security, practicality, effectiveness, significant delay, and verifiability. Silo-launched missiles lend themselves most readily to de-alerting verification, because communications necessary for monitoring do not increase the vulnerabilty of the weapons by a significant amount. Land-mobile missile de-alerting measures would be more challenging to verify, because monitoring measures that disclose the launcher's location would potentially increase their vulnerability. Submarine-launched missile de-alerting measures would be extremely challlenging if not impossible to monitor without increasing the submarine's vulnerability.

Connell, Leonard W.; Edenburn, Michael W.; Fraley, Stanley K.; Trost, Lawrence C.

1999-03-01

254

Observing the Greatest Earthquakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

AGU Chapman Conference on Giant Earthquakes and Their Tsunamis; Via del Mar and Valparaso, Chile, 16-20 May 2010 ; An AGU Chapman Conference commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the 1960 M 9.5 Chile earthquake. Participants reexamined this earthquake, the largest ever recorded instrumentally, and compared it with Chile's February 2010 M 8.8 earthquake. They also addressed the giant earthquake potential

Brian Atwater; Sergio Barrientos; Ins Cifuentes; Marco Cisternas; Kelin Wang

2010-01-01

255

Earthquake Photo Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of earthquake photos, published by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), contains links to photos for specific earthquakes, as well as links to other USGS image collections and non-USGS collections. Highlights include photos from the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, and the 1994 earthquake in Northridge, California. There is also a link to the USGS photo library (general geologic topics), and links to collections published by universities, museums, other government organizations, and professional organizations.

256

Toward real-time regional earthquake simulation of Taiwan earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed a Real-time Online earthquake Simulation system (ROS) to simulate regional earthquakes in Taiwan. The ROS uses a centroid moment tensor solution of seismic events from a Real-time Moment Tensor monitoring system (RMT), which provides all the point source parameters including the event origin time, hypocentral location, moment magnitude and focal mechanism within 2 minutes after the occurrence of an earthquake. Then, all of the source parameters are automatically forwarded to the ROS to perform an earthquake simulation, which is based on a spectral-element method (SEM). We have improved SEM mesh quality by introducing a thin high-resolution mesh layer near the surface to accommodate steep and rapidly varying topography. The mesh for the shallow sedimentary basin is adjusted to reflect its complex geometry and sharp lateral velocity contrasts. The grid resolution at the surface is about 545 m, which is sufficient to resolve topography and tomography data for simulations accurate up to 1.0 Hz. The ROS is also an infrastructural service, making online earthquake simulation feasible. Users can conduct their own earthquake simulation by providing a set of source parameters through the ROS webpage. For visualization, a ShakeMovie and ShakeMap are produced during the simulation. The time needed for one event is roughly 3 minutes for a 70 sec ground motion simulation. The ROS is operated online at the Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica (http://ros.earth.sinica.edu.tw/). Our long-term goal for the ROS system is to contribute to public earth science outreach and to realize seismic ground motion prediction in real-time.

Lee, S.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Liang, W.; Huang, B.

2013-12-01

257

THE GEOLOGIC RISK IN THE LAKE KIVU BASIN AREA PRODUCTED BY EARTHQUAKES. Case of the February 3th 2008 earthquake. By: L.M.Bagalwa(1), F.Lukaya(1), M.Burume(2), J.Moeyerson(3) (1): Goma Volcano Observatory, D.R.Congo (2): Naturals Sciences Research Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eastern Democratic Republic of Congo is prone to earthquakes of magnitude greater than or equal to 4 on the Richter scale. The western edge of Lake Kivu, the most populated part of the region is no exception to the solicitation of these earthquakes. Since 1997, the western basin of Lake Kivu is experiencing intense seismicity, several earthquakes of great

Montfort Bagalwa Rukeza

2010-01-01

258

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options  

SciTech Connect

This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early warning, command and control, communications, and transportation. Technical solutions can expand opportunities for the detection and identification of intruders. Sensors (such as seismic, break-wire, pressure-sensing, etc.) can warn border security forces of intrusion and contribute to the identification of the intrusion and help formulate the response. This document describes conceptual options for cooperation, offering three scenarios that relate to three hypothetical levels (low, medium, and high) of cooperation. Potential cooperative efforts under a low cooperation scenario could include information exchanges on military equipment and schedules to prevent misunderstandings and the establishment of protocols for handling emergency situations or unusual circumstances. Measures under a medium cooperation scenario could include establishing joint monitoring groups for better communications, with hot lines and scheduled meetings. The high cooperation scenario describes coordinated responses, joint border patrols, and sharing border intrusion information. Finally, the document lists recommendations for organizational, technical, and operational initiatives that could be applicable to the current situation.

Qojas, M.

1999-03-01

259

Increased Seismicity in the Tsaoling Reservoir Region After the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, Earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 1999 Mw7.6 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake has triggered several large landslides. Among them, the Tsaoling landslide has blocked the flow of Ching-sui River. The stream water backed up behind the landslide deposit, forming a 4.6 million cubic-meter reservoir about 5 km and 50 m deep. This reservoir was then filled by sediments about 4 years later. As a result, it provides a rare opportunity to monitor possible reservoir- induced seismicity. From the earthquake catalog derived from the dense seismic network of Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan, we selected 1666 earthquakes that occurred between the years 1997 and 2004 within a 10 km by 10 km rectangular region centered at 23.584763N and 120.661160E. We compared this catalog with another published catalog that relocated only the earthquakes in 1999 using double-difference method. The double-difference catalog has less events, possibly due to the stricter criteria used in the relocation inversion. However, we found the overall results from these two catalogs are similar, suggesting that the catalog used for this study is of high quality. On average only 0.6 earthquakes occurred per month prior to the Chi-Chi mainshock. However, high seismicity, with an average rate of 27.8 event/month, has occurred right after the Chi-Chi mainshock until the reservoir got filled by sediments in 2003, after which the seismicity almost ceased for 3.5 weeks. Following that, the raining season started, causing the seismicity to increase with a rate of 23.7 event/month. It is not usual for an Mw7.6 earthquake like Chi-Chi earthquake to have aftershocks continuously for more than 4 years. Thus we interpreted that some of these earthquakes were induced by the reservoir. There are 44 earthquakes shallower than 5 km located sparsely in this small region. However, there is one cluster of about 16 earthquakes located south of the reservoir. Field mapping between 1999 and 2004 found that the river channel has cut through a shale unit that overlies a south-dipping sandstone unit, providing a conduit for reservoir water to migrate to the south, and possibly induced this cluster. Due to the complicated geologic structures in this region, some other vertical fluid conduits might have formed by the strong ground shaking of the Chi-Chi mainshock. In addition, we found the shallow earthquakes usually occur during the raining season in this region for the five years post-Chi Chi earthquake period. In sum, the post-Chi Chi earthquake seismicity in Tsaoling region shows increased seismicity. And these earthquakes correlate spatially with landslide-induced reservoir region and temporally with precipitation. We interpret that part of these earthquakes were triggered by fluid-related processes.

Chang, K.; Chi, W.

2006-12-01

260

1906 San Francisco Earthquake Tsunami  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A series of visualizations of the tsunami generated by the 1906 earthquake. Included are maps of the San Andreas fault offshore, in San Francisco Bay, diagrams of the magnitude of the slip under the San Francisco Bay, and animations of wave height following the earthqake. Two separate animations are featured as QuickTime movies; one is centered on the Golden Gate Bridge, the other shows the whole San Francisco Bay.

Usgs, Tsunami A.

261

Seismic Monitoring in Haiti  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Following the devastating 2010 Haiti earthquake, the USGS has been helping with earthquake awareness and monitoring in the country, with continued support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This assistance has helped the Bureau des Mines et de l'Energie (BME) in Port-au-Prin...

262

Tohoku earthquake: a surprise?  

E-print Network

We consider three issues related to the 2011 Tohoku mega-earthquake: (1) how to evaluate the earthquake maximum size in subduction zones, (2) what is the repeat time for the largest earthquakes in Tohoku area, and (3) what are the possibilities of short-term forecasts during the 2011 sequence. There are two quantitative methods which can be applied to estimate the maximum earthquake size: a statistical analysis of the available earthquake record and the moment conservation principle. The latter technique studies how much of the tectonic deformation rate is released by earthquakes. For the subduction zones, the seismic or historical record is not sufficient to provide a reliable statistical measure of the maximum earthquake. The moment conservation principle yields consistent estimates of maximum earthquake size: for all the subduction zones the magnitude is of the order 9.0--9.7, and for major subduction zones the maximum earthquake size is statistically indistinguishable. Starting in 1999 we have carried out...

Kagan, Yan Y

2011-01-01

263

Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response  

SciTech Connect

During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

E. C. Nielsen

2006-01-01

264

The ICOS Ecosystem network and Thematic Center: an infrastructure to monitor and better understand the ecosystem GHGs exchanges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ICOS Ecosystem network is part of the ICOS European Research Infrastructure (www.icos-infrastructure.eu) together with the Atmospheric and Ocean networks. The ICOS Ecosystem includes highly standardized monitoring sites based on commercially available instruments embedded into an integrated system that is coordinated by the ICOS Ecosystem Thematic Center (ETC) which is responsible for the methodologies advancement, data processing and data distribution. The ecosystem monitoring activity will involve human intervention in field activities and for this reason rigorously standardized protocol for field ecosystem measurements are in preparation also in coordination with others international related activities. The core measurement in the ICOS Ecosystem sites are the main GHGs fluxes that include CO2, H2O, CH4 and N2O, using the eddy covariance method and chambers for the soil effluxes. To better interpret and understand the GHGs exchanges a full series of meteorological data (including spectral reflectance measurements and full radiation and water balance) are also collected and the sites are characterized in terms of carbon stocks, nutrients availability and management and disturbance history. Centralized raw data processing, QAQC and uncertainty estimation, test and development of new methodologies and techniques, assistance to the network and chemical analysis and long term storage of the vegetation and soil samples are the main activities where the ETC is responsible. The ETC, based in Italy and with sections in Belgium and France, is under construction and will be operative in 2013. The Ecosystem network, including the variables collected, the protocols under preparation and the data access and data use policies will be presented together with the Ecosystem Thematic Center role and development strategy. The aim is to identify and discuss integration and collaboration with others similar initiatives, also thanks to the support of the COOPEUS European project that will facilitate coordination between US and EU networks, and to receive the feedbacks from potential users of the infrastructure.

Papale, D.; Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, I.; Loustau, D.; Valentini, R.

2012-12-01

265

Earthquake Magnitude - Linking Earthquake Magnitude and Intensity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Earthquake magnitude is commonly used to represent the size of an earthquake. However, most people want to understand how much impact or damage earthquakes do. These two concepts are linked by shaking. Earthquake magnitude can be measured in a variety of ways, most commonly moment magnitude or Richter magnitude. Shaking is measured in units of acceleration, (often a percentage of g). Damage or intensity can be measured by the modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) scale. In this activity, students will model earthquakes of various magnitudes to determine the amount of shaking that these quakes will cause. They will then convert the shaking to modified Mercalli intensity and generate an isoseismal map for a M8 and M6 earthquake. Uses geophysics to solve problems in other fields Addresses student misconceptions

Baer, Eric

266

Avian Flu / Earthquake Prediction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast includes a discussion of the avian flu spreading though Southeast Asia, Russia and parts of Europe. Topics include whether the outbreak is a pandemic in the making, and what preparations might be made to control the outbreak. The next segment of the broadcast discusses earthquake prediction, in light of the 2005 earthquake in Pakistan. Two seismologists discuss what was learned in the Parkfield project, an experiment in earthquake prediction conducted in California. Other topics include the distribution of large versus small earthquakes; how poor construction magnifies earthquake devastation; and the relationship of plate tectonics to the Pakistan earthquake.

267

Precursory signals around epicenters and local active faults prior to inland or coastal earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although earthquakes are still considered as unpredictable phenomenon but scientific efforts during the past decade have revealed some pronounced changes in the quality and quantity of some materials and natural phenomenon on and above the earths surface taking place before strong shakes. Pre-earthquake physical and chemical interactions in the earths ground may cause anomalies in temperature, surface latent heat flux (SLHF), relative humidity, upwelling index and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration on the ground or sea surface. Earthquakes are triggered when the energy accumulated in rocks releases causing ruptures in place of faults. The main purpose of this study is to explore and demonstrate possibility of any changes in surface temperature or latent heat flux before, during and after earthquakes. We expect that variations in these factors are accompanied with the increase of Chl-a concentration on the sea surface and upwelling events prior to coastal earthquake events. For monitoring the changes in surface temperature we used NOAA-AVHRR and microwave radiometers like AMSR-E/Aqua data. SLHF data and upwelling indices are provided by National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis Project and Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratory (PFEL) respectively. Chl-a concentration is also available in MODIS website. Our detailed analyses show significant increase of SLHF and upwelling of nutrient-rich water prior to the main events which is attributed to the raise in surface temperature and Chl-a concentration at that time. Meaningful increases in temperature, relative humidity and SLHF variations from weeks before the earthquakes in epicentral areas and along local active faults are revealed. In addition, considerable anomalies in Chl-a concentration are also attributed to the raise in upwelling index.

Valizadeh Alvan, Habibeh

268

Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering  

E-print Network

Engineering, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, Anchorage, AK,2014. DOI: 10.4231/D3NV99B46 #12;Tenth U 21-25, 2014 Anchorage, Alaska10NCEE WAVE METHOD FOR SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND HEALTH MONITORING Anchorage, Alaska10NCEE Wave Method for System Identification and Health Monitoring of Buildings ­ Extension

Southern California, University of

269

Seismological Research Letters, 74, 3, May/June 2003, 271-273 Speculations on Earthquake Forecasting  

E-print Network

Seismological Research Letters, 74, 3, May/June 2003, 271-273 OPINION Speculations on Earthquake of stress- monitoring sites could lead to earthquake forecasting analogous to the way networks to be a major advance that offers more hope for forecasting earthquakes than was envisioned in the survey Living

270

First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th  

E-print Network

1 First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th MONITORING THE DYNAMICS OF A CONCRETE BUILDING ENDURING EARTHQUAKE AND WIND EXCITATION Jónas Thór SN?BJ?RNSSON1 and Ragnar SIGBJ?RNSSON2 SUMMARY Earthquake and wind induced acceleration data has been

Southern California, University of

271

Postseismic deformation recorded by small survey networks following the 1987 Edgecumbe earthquake, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the 1987 March 2 Edgecumbe earthquake, six small-aperture (c. 250 m) survey networks were established in the Rangitaiki Plains to monitor horizontal and vertical postseismic deformation across faulttraces formed during the earthquake. Results indicate that both horizontal and vertical deformation have continued since the earthquake across the area covered by the networks. Across the Awaiti Fault the vertical deformation

G. H. Blick; P. M. Otway; B. J. Scott

1989-01-01

272

Earthquake Education in Prime Time  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2001, the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has collaborated on several video production projects that feature important topics related to earthquake science, engineering, and preparedness. These projects have also fostered many fruitful and sustained partnerships with a variety of organizations that have a stake in hazard education and preparedness. The Seismic Sleuths educational video first appeared in the spring season 2001 on Discovery Channel's Assignment Discovery. Seismic Sleuths is based on a highly successful curriculum package developed jointly by the American Geophysical Union and The Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency. The California Earthquake Authority (CEA) and the Institute for Business and Home Safety supported the video project. Summer Productions, a company with a reputation for quality science programming, produced the Seismic Sleuths program in close partnership with scientists, engineers, and preparedness experts. The program has aired on the National Geographic Channel as recently as Fall 2004. Currently, SCEC is collaborating with Pat Abbott, a geology professor at San Diego State University (SDSU) on the video project Written In Stone: Earthquake Country - Los Angeles. Partners on this project include the California Seismic Safety Commission, SDSU, SCEC, CEA, and the Insurance Information Network of California. This video incorporates live-action demonstrations, vivid animations, and a compelling host (Abbott) to tell the story about earthquakes in the Los Angeles region. The Written in Stone team has also developed a comprehensive educator package that includes the video, maps, lesson plans, and other supporting materials. We will present the process that facilitates the creation of visually effective, factually accurate, and entertaining video programs. We acknowledge the need to have a broad understanding of the literature related to communication, media studies, science education, and hazard response to create a program that is both educational and provides a public service. Seismic Sleuths and Written in Stone are the harbingers of a new genre of earthquake programs that are the antithesis of the 1974 film Earthquake and the 2004 miniseries 10.5. Film producers and those in the earthquake education community are demonstrating that it is possible to tell an exciting story, inspire awareness, and encourage empowerment without sensationalism.

de Groot, R.; Abbott, P.; Benthien, M.

2004-12-01

273

Combining Real-time Seismic and Geodetic Data to Improve Rapid Earthquake Information  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Berkeley Seismological Laboratory operates seismic and geodetic stations in the San Francisco Bay area and northern California for earthquake and deformation monitoring. The seismic systems, part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN), include strong motion and broadband sensors, and 24-bit dataloggers. The data from 20 GPS stations, part of the Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) network of more than 70 stations in northern California, are acquired in real-time. We have developed methods to acquire GPS data at 12 stations that are collocated with the seismic systems using the seismic dataloggers, which have large on-site data buffer and storage capabilities, merge it with the seismic data stream in MiniSeed format, and continuously stream both data types using reliable frame relay and/or radio modem telemetry. Currently, the seismic data are incorporated into the Rapid Earthquake Data Integration (REDI) project to provide notification of earthquake magnitude, location, moment tensor, and strong motion information for hazard mitigation and emergency response activities. The geodetic measurements can provide complementary constraints on earthquake faulting, including the location and extent of the rupture plane, unambiguous resolution of the nodal plane, and distribution of slip on the fault plane, which can be used, for example, to refine strong motion shake maps. We are developing methods to rapidly process the geodetic data to monitor transient deformation, such as coseismic station displacements, and for combining this information with the seismic observations to improve finite-fault characterization of large earthquakes. The GPS data are currently processed at hourly intervals with 2-cm precision in horizontal position, and we are beginning a pilot project in the Bay Area in collaboration with the California Spatial Reference Center to do epoch-by-epoch processing with greater precision.

Murray, M. H.; Neuhauser, D. S.; Gee, L. S.; Dreger, D. S.; Basset, A.; Romanowicz, B.

2002-12-01

274

Usefulness of long-term video-EEG monitoring in children at a tertiary care center.  

PubMed

The value of video-electroencephalographic monitoring (EEG-VM) in evaluating patients with epileptic disorders constitutes a major research field. This study investigates the usefulness of inpatient long-term EEG-VM for pediatric neurology patients under four headings: pre-surgical evaluation; seizure classification; epileptic seizure and non-epileptic paroxysmal event differentiation; and antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment modification. A retrospective study of 101 patients over a one-year period was carried out. The results showed that following EEG-VM, 57.4% of the patients were referred for discussion to the epilepsy surgery conference regarding resective surgery, and of these, 31% were deemed to be surgical candidates. The seizure classification assigned to the patients before EEG-VM changed in 73.3% of the patients after EEG-VM. Regarding the differentiation between epileptic seizure and non-epileptic paroxysmal events, a diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizure (PNES) was made in 4% of the patients after EEG-VM. EEG-VM outcomes led to the modification of AED treatment in 68.3% of the patients. These significant alterations demonstrate the usefulness of EEG-VM in the management of pediatric neurology patients. PMID:24577976

Onay, Selin; Yaln?zo?lu, Dilek; Topu, Meral; Turanl?, Gzide

2013-01-01

275

Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit  

ScienceCinema

When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

2014-07-22

276

Associating an ionospheric parameter with major earthquake occurrence throughout the world  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With time, ionospheric variation analysis is gaining over lithospheric monitoring in serving precursors for earthquake forecast. The current paper highlights the association of major (Ms ? 6.0) and medium (4.0 ? Ms < 6.0) earthquake occurrences throughout the world in different ranges of the Ionospheric Earthquake Parameter (IEP) where `Ms' is earthquake magnitude on the Richter scale. From statistical and graphical analyses, it is concluded that the probability of earthquake occurrence is maximum when the defined parameter lies within the range of 0-75 (lower range). In the higher ranges, earthquake occurrence probability gradually decreases. A probable explanation is also suggested.

Ghosh, D.; Midya, S. K.

2014-02-01

277

Near real-time magnitude determination for large crustal earthquakes  

E-print Network

Near real-time magnitude determination for large crustal earthquakes Yih-Min Wua , Ta-liang Tengb,* a Central Weather Bureau, 64 kung-Yuan Road, Taipei, Taiwan ROC b Southern California Earthquake Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740, USA Received 26 December 2001; received

Wu, Yih-Min

278

Implementation of Real-Time Testing of Earthquake Early Warning Algorithms: Using the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) Infrastructure as a Test Bed for the P Amplitude and Period Monitor for a Single Station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A necessary first step toward the goal of implementing proof-of-concept projects for earthquake early warning (EEW) is the real-time testing of the seismological algorithms. To provide the most appropriate environment, the CISN has designed and implemented a platform for such testing. We are testing the amplitude (Pd) and period (Tau-c) monitor developed for providing on-site earthquake early warning (EEW) using data from a single seismic station. We have designed and implemented a framework generator that can automatically generate code for waveform- processing systems. The framework generator is based on Code Worker software www.codeworker.org, which provides APIs and a scripting language to build parsers and template processing engines. Higher-level description of the waveform processing system is required to generate the waveform-processing framework. We have implemented Domain Specific Language DSL to provide description of the waveform-processing framework. The framework generator allows the developer to focus more on the waveform processing algorithms and frees him/her from repetitive and tedious coding tasks. It also has an automatic gap detector, transparent buffer management, and built in thread management. We have implemented the waveform-processing framework to process real-time waveforms coming from the dataloggers deployed throughout southern California by the Southern California Seismic Network. The system also has the capability of processing data from archived events to facilitate off-line testing. An application feeds data from MiniSEED packets into the Wave Data Area (WDA). The system that grabs the data from the WDA processes each real-time data stream independently. To verify results, sac files are generated at each processing step. Currently, we are processing broadband data streams from 160 stations and determining Pd and Tau-c as local earthquakes occur in southern California. We present the results from this testing and compare the detection capability of the EEW algorithm with the routine real-time processing of the Southern California Seismic Network.

Solanki, K.; Hauksson, E.; Kanamori, H.; Friberg, P.; Wu, Y.

2006-12-01

279

Earthquakes: The Prehistoric Record  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment adapted from NOVA, a geologist digs a trench along the San Andreas Fault to reveal three thousand years of earthquake history. Information from the layers of sediment may help geologists to predict earthquakes.

2005-12-17

280

Earthquakes in Your State  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is part of Planet Diary and is an online investigation of where earthquakes occur. Students research past earthquakes to see if any have occurred in their region. This activity has an accompanying page of websites for further research.

281

Earthquakes: Hydrogeochemical precursors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

Ingebritsen, S. E.; Manga, M.

2014-10-01

282

Earthquakes - Discover Our Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from Cornell University, describes the origins, effects, measurement, and consequences of earthquakes. The site includes an overview and an exercise section that discusses key points pertaining to earthquakes, followed up with three activities.

Institute for the Study of the Continents (INSTOC) Geoscience Information Project

283

Speeding earthquake disaster relief  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In coping with recent multibillion-dollar earthquake disasters, scientists and emergency managers have found new ways to speed and improve relief efforts. This progress is founded on the rapid availability of earthquake information from seismograph networks.

Mortensen, Carl; Donlin, Carolyn; Page, Robert A.; Ward, Peter

1995-01-01

284

Title: Earthquake Information for International Students To all International Students at the University of Tokyo  

E-print Network

Title: Earthquake Information for International Students To all International Students devastated by the massive earthquake and tsunami that occurred on March 11, 2011. In Tokyo, planned rolling: http://dir.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/Center/ International Advising Room earthquake-related information: http

Miyashita, Yasushi

285

Table-Top Earthquakes: Learn How Earthquakes Really Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This easily built classroom apparatus is ideal for gaining a better understanding of how earthquakes work and how they are recorded. The apparatus consists of a heavy object that is dragged steadily with an elastic cord. Although pulled with a constant velocity, the heavy object repeatedly slides and then stops. A small vibration sensor, attached to a computer display, graphically monitors this motion, which mimics the intermittent fault slippage that characterizes earthquake fault zones. Slides from a talk given at the Geological Society of America's Cordilleran Section Centennial meeting on June 2, 1999, show how this table-top demonstration can be used to help meet many of the K-12 teaching goals described in Benchmarks for Science Literacy (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1993).

Lahr, John

1998-07-01

286

A slow earthquake  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anomalous earthquakes such as creep events, tsunami earthquakes and silent earthquakes have been reported in the recent literature. In this paper we discuss an anomalous ``slow earthquake'' that occurred on June 6, 1960 in southern Chile. Although the surface-wave magnitude of this event is only 6.9, it excited anomalously large long-period multiple surface waves with a seismic moment of 5.6

Hiroo Kanamori; Gordon S. Stewart

1979-01-01

287

Earthquake History of California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes major earthquakes that have occurred in California since the colonial era, beginning with a 1769 earthquake experienced by a Spanish expedition near what is now Los Angeles, and ending with the July 1952 earthquake in Kern County. Each account provides observer's reports of injuries, fatalities, property damage, and ground effects (cracking, subsidence). More recent earthquake accounts include an estimated or measured magnitude.

288

Alaskan Earthquake of 1964  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students will describe how a natural event, the Alaskan Earthquake of 1964, affected human activity. They will study a fact sheet with an account of the earthquake, examine maps of the tectonic plates in the vicinity of Alaska, model plate collisions using sponges, and make lists of what might happen during an earthquake in a hypothetical Alaskan city.

Mazzetti, Linda

289

Children's Ideas about Earthquakes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Earthquake, a natural disaster, is among the fundamental problems of many countries. If people know how to protect themselves from earthquake and arrange their life styles in compliance with this, damage they will suffer will reduce to that extent. In particular, a good training regarding earthquake to be received in primary schools is considered

Simsek, Canan Lacin

2007-01-01

290

School Safety and Earthquakes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent assessment of earthquake risk to Quito, Ecuador, concluded that many of its public schools are vulnerable to collapse during major earthquakes. A subsequent examination of 60 buildings identified 15 high-risk buildings. These schools were retrofitted to meet standards that would prevent injury even during Quito's largest earthquakes. US

Dwelley, Laura; Tucker, Brian; Fernandez, Jeanette

1997-01-01

291

Redefining Earthquakes and the Earthquake Machine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Earthquake Machine (EML), a mechanical model of stick-slip fault systems, can increase student engagement and facilitate opportunities to participate in the scientific process. This article introduces the EML model and an activity that challenges ninth-grade students' misconceptions about earthquakes. The activity emphasizes the role of models

Hubenthal, Michael; Braile, Larry; Taber, John

2008-01-01

292

Center for Integration of Natural Disaster Information  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's Center for Integration of Natural Disaster Information (CINDI) is a research and operational facility that explores methods for collecting, integrating, and communicating information about the risks posed by natural hazards and the effects of natural disasters. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is mandated by the Robert Stafford Act to warn citizens of impending landslides, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes. The USGS also coordinates with other Federal, State, and local disaster agencies to monitor threats to communities from floods, coastal storms, wildfires, geomagnetic storms, drought, and outbreaks of disease in wildlife populations.

U.S. Geological Survey

2001-01-01

293

Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Latin America: Process and Methods for a Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Abstract In patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), the influence on important outcomes of the use of information from intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring to direct treatment has never been tested in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). We are conducting an RCT in six trauma centers in Latin America to test this question. We hypothesize that patients randomized to ICP monitoring will have lower mortality and better outcomes at 6-months post-trauma than patients treated without ICP monitoring. We selected three centers in Bolivia to participate in the trial, based on (1) the absence of ICP monitoring, (2) adequate patient accession and data collection during the pilot phase, (3) preliminary institutional review board approval, and (4) the presence of equipoise about the value of ICP monitoring. We conducted extensive training of site personnel, and initiated the trial on September 1, 2008. Subsequently, we included three additional centers. A total of 176 patients were entered into the trial as of August 31, 2010. Current enrollment is 81% of that expected. The trial is expected to reach its enrollment goal of 324 patients by September of 2011. We are conducting a high-quality RCT to answer a question that is important globally. In addition, we are establishing the capacity to conduct strong research in Latin America, where TBI is a serious epidemic. Finally, we are demonstrating the feasibility and utility of international collaborations that share resources and unique patient populations to conduct strong research about global public health concerns. PMID:22435793

Lujan, Silvia; Dikmen, Sureyya; Temkin, Nancy; Petroni, Gustavo; Pridgeon, Jim; Barber, Jason; Machamer, Joan; Cherner, Mariana; Chaddock, Kelley; Hendrix, Terence; Rondina, Carlos; Videtta, Walter; Celix, Juanita M.; Chesnut, Randall

2012-01-01

294

Operational earthquake forecasting can enhance earthquake preparedness  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We cannot yet predict large earthquakes in the short term with much reliability and skill, but the strong clustering exhibited in seismic sequences tells us that earthquake probabilities are not constant in time; they generally rise and fall over periods of days to years in correlation with nearby seismic activity. Operational earthquake forecasting (OEF) is the dissemination of authoritative information about these time?dependent probabilities to help communities prepare for potentially destructive earthquakes. The goal of OEF is to inform the decisions that people and organizations must continually make to mitigate seismic risk and prepare for potentially destructive earthquakes on time scales from days to decades. To fulfill this role, OEF must provide a complete description of the seismic hazardground?motion exceedance probabilities as well as short?term rupture probabilitiesin concert with the long?term forecasts of probabilistic seismic?hazard analysis (PSHA).

Jordan, T.H.; Marzocchi, W.; Michael, A.J.; Gerstenberger, M.C.

2014-01-01

295

Earthquake Nucleation and Its Relationship to Earthquake Clustering  

E-print Network

Earthquake clustering phenomena such as aftershocks, foreshocks, and pairing of mainshocks are prominent and characteristic features of earthquake occurrence. Because the earthquake nucleation process controls the time and place of occurrence of earthquakes, non-linear dependence of nucleation times on stress changes can strongly affect the spatial and temporal patterns of earthquake occurrence. Earthquake nucleation on faults with rate- and statedependent fault properties has this characteristic, and appears to quantitatively represent the details and broad statistical patterns of earthquake clustering.

James Dieterich Geological; James H. Dieterich

296

Engaging Students in Earthquake Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern California Earthquake Center Communication, Education, and Outreach program (SCEC CEO) has been collaborating with the University of Southern California (USC) Joint Education Project (JEP) and the Education Consortium of Central Los Angeles (ECCLA) to work directly with the teachers and schools in the local community around USC. The community surrounding USC is 57 % Hispanic (US Census, 2000) and 21% African American (US Census, 2000). Through the partnership with ECCLA SCEC has created a three week enrichment intersession program, targeting disadvantaged students at the fourth/fifth grade level, dedicated entirely to earthquakes. SCEC builds partnerships with the intersession teachers, working together to actively engage the students in learning about earthquakes. SCEC provides a support system for the teachers, supplying them with the necessary content background as well as classroom manipulatives. SCEC goes into the classrooms with guest speakers and take the students out of the classroom on two field trips. There are four intersession programs each year. SCEC is also working with USC's Joint Education Project program. The JEP program has been recognized as one of the "oldest and best organized" Service-Learning programs in the country (TIME Magazine and the Princeton Review, 2000). Through this partnership SCEC is providing USC students with the necessary tools to go out to the local schools and teach students of all grade levels about earthquakes. SCEC works with the USC students to design engaging lesson plans that effectively convey content regarding earthquakes. USC students can check out hands-on/interactive materials to use in the classrooms from the SCEC Resource Library. In both these endeavors SCEC has expanded our outreach to the local community. SCEC is reaching over 200 minority children each year through our partnerships, and this number will increase as our programs grow.

Cooper, I. E.; Benthien, M.

2004-12-01

297

The Depth of Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This map of world seismicity illustrates earthquake data for the years 1991 through 1996. It is intended to provide a sense of the depth distribution of earthquakes. Plate boundaries are shown, along with diffuse regions of seismicity, such as in central Asia, and earthquake locations are color-coded to indicate the depths at which they occurred. In addition to the map, selected cross-sections of subduction zones in South America, Tonga, Japan, and the Aleutian Islands are provided. They feature a map showing the orientation of the cross-section and graphs illustrating distribution of earthquake depth versus longitude and number of earthquakes.

298

The Depth of Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This map of world seismicity illustrates earthquake data for the years 1991 through 1996. It is intended to provide a sense of the depth distribution of earthquakes. Plate boundaries are shown, along with diffuse regions of seismicity, such as in central Asia, and earthquake locations are color-coded to indicate the depths at which they occurred. In addition to the map, selected cross-sections of subduction zones in South America, Tonga, Japan, and the Aleutian Islands are provided. They feature a map showing the orientation of the cross-section and graphs illustrating distribution of earthquake depth versus longitude and number of earthquakes.

2011-05-05

299

Uplift and Subsidence Associated with the Great Aceh-Andaman Earthquake of 2004  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The magnitude 9.2 Indian Ocean earthquake of December 26, 2004, produced broad regions of uplift and subsidence. In order to define the lateral extent and the downdip limit of rupture, scientists from Caltech, Pasadena, Calif.; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.; the U.S. Geological Survey, Pasadena, Calif.; and the Research Center for Geotechnology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Bandung, Indonesia; first needed to define the pivot line separating those regions. Interpretation of satellite imagery and a tidal model were one of the key tools used to do this.

These pre-Sumatra earthquake (a) and post-Sumatra earthquake (b) images of North Sentinel Island in the Indian Ocean, acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft, show emergence of the coral reef surrounding the island following the earthquake. The tide was 30 plus or minus 14 centimeters lower in the pre-earthquake image (acquired November 21, 2000) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 20, 2005), requiring a minimum of 30 centimeters of uplift at this locality. Observations from an Indian Coast Guard helicopter on the northwest coast of the island suggest that the actual uplift is on the order of 1 to 2 meters at this site.

In figures (c) and (d), pre-earthquake and post-earthquake ASTER images of a small island off the northwest coast of Rutland Island, 38 kilometers east of North Sentinel Island, show submergence of the coral reef surrounding the island. The tide was higher in the pre-earthquake image (acquired January 1, 2004) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 4, 2005), requiring subsidence at this locality. The pivot line must run between North Sentinel and Rutland islands. Note that the scale for the North Sentinel Island images differs from that for the Rutland Island images.

The tidal model used for this study was based on data from JPL's Topex/Poseidon satellite. The model was used to determine the relative sea surface height at each location at the time each image was acquired, a critical component used to quantify the deformation.

The scientists' method of using satellite imagery to recognize changes in elevation relative to sea surface height and of using a tidal model to place quantitative bounds on coseismic uplift or subsidence is a novel approach that can be adapted to other forms of remote sensing and can be applied to other subduction zones in tropical regions.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

2006-01-01

300

75 FR 2159 - Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee (SESAC) will hold its next meeting at the U.S. Geological Survey, John Wesley Powell National Center, Room 3B457, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, Virginia 20192. The Committee is...

2010-01-14

301

Developing stress-monitoring sites using cross-hole seismology to stress-forecast the times and magnitudes of future earthquakes  

E-print Network

Developing stress-monitoring sites using cross-hole seismology to stress-forecast the times 2000 Abstract A new understanding of rockmass deformation suggests that changing stress in the crust almost all rocks in the crust. These stress-aligned micro cracks cause the widely observed splitting

302

Earthquake Engineering Mitigation of Blast Loading  

E-print Network

Earthquake Engineering Mitigation of Blast Loading Health Monitoring & Condition Assessment-structural building components, and visual sensing for dy- namic testing. Associate Professor Hyonny Kim comes to UC-fluidics and protective/energy absorbing materials provides synergy with the Department's ongoing work in blast mitigation

Wang, Deli

303

Seismic quiescence precursors to two M7 earthquakes on Sakhalin Island, measured by two methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two large earthquakes occurred during the last decade on Sakhalin Island, the M w 7.6 Neftegorskoe earthquake of 27 May 1995 and the M w 6.8 Uglegorskoe earthquake of 4 August 2000, in the north and south of the island, respectively. Only about five seismograph stations record earthquakes along the 1000 km, mostly strike-slip plate boundary that transects the island from north to south. In spite of that, it was possible to investigate seismicity patterns of the last two to three decades quantitatively. We found that in, and surrounding, their source volumes, both of these main shocks were preceded by periods of pronounced seismic quiescence, which lasted 2.5 0.5 years. The distances to which the production of earthquakes was reduced reached several hundred kilometers. The probability that these periods of anomalously low seismicity occurred by chance is estimated to be about 1% to 2%. These conclusions were reached independently by the application of two methods, which are based on different approaches. The RTL-algorithm measures the level of seismic activity in moving time windows by counting the number of earthquakes, weighted by their size, and inversely weighted by their distance, in time and space from the point of observation. The Z-mapping approach measures the difference of the seismicity rate, within moving time windows, to the background rate by the standard deviate Z. This generates an array of comparisons that cover all of the available time and space, and that can be searched for all anomalous departures from the normal seismicity rate. The RTL-analysis was based on the original catalog with K-classes measuring the earthquake sizes; the Z-mapping was based on the catalog with Ktransformed into magnitudes. The RTL-analysis started with data from 1980, the Z-mapping technique used the data from 1974 on. In both methods, cylindrical volumes, centered at the respective epicenters, were sampled. The Z-mapping technique additionally investigated the seismicity in about 1000 volumes centered at the nodes of a randomly placed regular grid with node spacing of 20 km. The fact that the two methods yield almost identical results strongly suggests that the observed precursory quiescence anomalies are robust and real. If the seismicity on Sakhalin Island is monitored at a completeness-level an order of magnitude below the present one, then it may be possible to detect future episodes of quiescence in real time.

Wyss, Max; Sobolev, Gennady; Clippard, James D.

2004-08-01

304

Benefits of Earthquake Early Warning to Large Municipalities (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The City of Los Angeles has been involved in the testing of the Cal Tech Shake Alert, Earthquake Early Warning (EQEW) system, since February 2012. This system accesses a network of seismic monitors installed throughout California. The system analyzes and processes seismic information, and transmits a warning (audible and visual) when an earthquake occurs. In late 2011, the City of Los Angeles Emergency Management Department (EMD) was approached by Cal Tech regarding EQEW, and immediately recognized the value of the system. Simultaneously, EMD was in the process of finalizing a report by a multi-discipline team that visited Japan in December 2011, which spoke to the effectiveness of EQEW for the March 11, 2011 earthquake that struck that country. Information collected by the team confirmed that the EQEW systems proved to be very effective in alerting the population of the impending earthquake. The EQEW in Japan is also tied to mechanical safeguards, such as the stopping of high-speed trains. For a city the size and complexity of Los Angeles, the implementation of a reliable EQEW system will save lives, reduce loss, ensure effective and rapid emergency response, and will greatly enhance the ability of the region to recovery from a damaging earthquake. The current Shake Alert system is being tested at several governmental organizations and private businesses in the region. EMD, in cooperation with Cal Tech, identified several locations internal to the City where the system would have an immediate benefit. These include the staff offices within EMD, the Los Angeles Police Department's Real Time Analysis and Critical Response Division (24 hour crime center), and the Los Angeles Fire Department's Metropolitan Fire Communications (911 Dispatch). All three of these agencies routinely manage the collaboration and coordination of citywide emergency information and response during times of crisis. Having these three key public safety offices connected and included in the early testing of an EQEW system will help shape the EQEW policy which will determine the seismic safety of millions of Californians in the years to come.

Featherstone, J.

2013-12-01

305

Post-earthquake building safety assessments for the Canterbury Earthquakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper explores the post-earthquake building assessment program that was utilized in Christchurch, New Zealand following the Canterbury Sequence of earthquakes beginning with the Magnitude (Mw.) 7.1 Darfield event in September 2010. The aftershocks or triggered events, two of which exceeded Mw 6.0, continued with events in February and June 2011 causing the greatest amount of damage. More than 70,000 building safety assessments were completed following the February event. The timeline and assessment procedures will be discussed including the use of rapid response teams, selection of indicator buildings to monitor damage following aftershocks, risk assessments for demolition of red-tagged buildings, the use of task forces to address management of the heavily damaged downtown area and the process of demolition. Through the post-event safety assessment program that occurred throughout the Canterbury Sequence of earthquakes, many important lessons can be learned that will benefit future response to natural hazards that have potential to damage structures.

Marshall, J.; Barnes, J.; Gould, N.; Jaiswal, K.; Lizundia, B.; Swanson, D.; Turner, F.

2012-01-01

306

Investigating Earthquakes through Regional Seismicity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this module, sudents will use online interactive materials to investigate the nature of earthquakes. The module consists of three major sections, "What is an Earthquake?", "The Distribution of Earthquakes", and "Measuring Earthquakes". Each section presents online material for background and interactive learning activities which help them to understand such characteristics of earthquakes as their associated faults, rates of occurrence, magnitudes, and geographic distribution.

John Marquis

307

Istanbul Earthquake Early Warning and Rapid Response System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the preparations for the future earthquake in Istanbul a Rapid Response and Early Warning system in the metropolitan area is in operation. For the Early Warning system ten strong motion stations were installed as close as possible to the fault zone. Continuous on-line data from these stations via digital radio modem provide early warning for potentially disastrous earthquakes. Considering the complexity of fault rupture and the short fault distances involved, a simple and robust Early Warning algorithm, based on the exceedance of specified threshold time domain amplitude levels is implemented. The band-pass filtered accelerations and the cumulative absolute velocity (CAV) are compared with specified threshold levels. When any acceleration or CAV (on any channel) in a given station exceeds specific threshold values it is considered a vote. Whenever we have 2 station votes within selectable time interval, after the first vote, the first alarm is declared. In order to specify the appropriate threshold levels a data set of near field strong ground motions records form Turkey and the world has been analyzed. Correlations among these thresholds in terms of the epicenter distance the magnitude of the earthquake have been studied. The encrypted early warning signals will be communicated to the respective end users by UHF systems through a "service provider" company. The users of the early warning signal will be power and gas companies, nuclear research facilities, critical chemical factories, subway system and several high-rise buildings. Depending on the location of the earthquake (initiation of fault rupture) and the recipient facility the alarm time can be as high as about 8s. For the rapid response system one hundred 18 bit-resolution strong motion accelerometers were placed in quasi-free field locations (basement of small buildings) in the populated areas of the city, within an area of approximately 50x30km, to constitute a network that will enable early damage assessment and rapid response information after a damaging earthquake. Early response information is achieved through fast acquisition and analysis of processed data obtained from the network. The stations are routinely interrogated on regular basis by the main data center. After triggered by an earthquake, each station processes the streaming strong motion data to yield the spectral accelerations at specific periods, 12Hz filtered PGA and PGV and will send these parameters in the form of SMS messages at every 20s directly to the main data center through a designated GSM network and through a microwave system. A shake map and damage distribution map (using aggregate building inventories and fragility curves) will be automatically generated using the algorithm developed for this purpose. Loss assessment studies are complemented by a large citywide digital database on the topography, geology, soil conditions, building, infrastructure and lifeline inventory. The shake and damage maps will be conveyed to the governor's and mayor's offices, fire, police and army headquarters within 3 minutes using radio modem and GPRS communication. An additional forty strong motion recorders were placed on important structures in several interconnected clusters to monitor the health of these structures after a damaging earthquake.

Erdik, M. O.; Fahjan, Y.; Ozel, O.; Alcik, H.; Aydin, M.; Gul, M.

2003-12-01

308

The Distribution of Earthquakes: An Earthquake Deficit?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students use online resources to investigate the occurrence of earthquakes in Southern California to decide if there has been a 'deficit', that is, not enough earthquakes in the area in historical time to release the amount of strain energy that plate tectonics is constantly supplying to the crust. In the first two parts, they must determine the appropriate year to begin their study of historic earthquake records (from 1860-1900), and then they must decide if the energy released by past earthquakes has been equivalent to the amount of energy accumulating through the action of plate tectonics over the same number of years. In part three, they perform an analysis of their findings by answering a set of questions. References are included.

Marquis, John

309

Signals of ENPEMF Used in Earthquake Prediction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The signals of Earth's natural pulse electromagnetic field (ENPEMF) is a combination of the abnormal crustal magnetic field pulse affected by the earthquake, the induced field of earth's endogenous magnetic field, the induced magnetic field of the exogenous variation magnetic field, geomagnetic pulsation disturbance and other energy coupling process between sun and earth. As an instantaneous disturbance of the variation field of natural geomagnetism, ENPEMF can be used to predict earthquakes. This theory was introduced by A.A Vorobyov, who expressed a hypothesis that pulses can arise not only in the atmosphere but within the Earth's crust due to processes of tectonic-to-electric energy conversion (Vorobyov, 1970; Vorobyov, 1979). The global field time scale of ENPEMF signals has specific stability. Although the wave curves may not overlap completely at different regions, the smoothed diurnal ENPEMF patterns always exhibit the same trend per month. The feature is a good reference for observing the abnormalities of the Earth's natural magnetic field in a specific region. The frequencies of the ENPEMF signals generally locate in kilo Hz range, where frequencies within 5-25 kilo Hz range can be applied to monitor earthquakes. In Wuhan, the best observation frequency is 14.5 kilo Hz. Two special devices are placed in accordance with the S-N and W-E direction. Dramatic variation from the comparison between the pulses waveform obtained from the instruments and the normal reference envelope diagram should indicate high possibility of earthquake. The proposed detection method of earthquake based on ENPEMF can improve the geodynamic monitoring effect and can enrich earthquake prediction methods. We suggest the prospective further researches are about on the exact sources composition of ENPEMF signals, the distinction between noise and useful signals, and the effect of the Earth's gravity tide and solid tidal wave. This method may also provide a promising application in mineral deposits detecting, surface relics pipeline surveying and safety resonance monitoring on reservoir dam.

Hao, G.; Dong, H.; Zeng, Z.; Wu, G.; Zabrodin, S. M.

2012-12-01

310

Section D. Anisotropic rock physics and related studies D4-1 GEMS: the opportunity for stress-forecasting all damaging earthquakes  

E-print Network

Section D. Anisotropic rock physics and related studies D4-1 GEMS: the opportunity for stress@jamstec.go.jp. 5 Institute of Earthquake Science, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100036, China. E-borehole Stress-Monitoring Sites (SMSs) (Crampin & Gao 2010) is GEMS, a Global Earthquake stress-Monitoring System

311

Reply to "Comment on 'Operational Earthquake Forecasting: Status of Knowledge and Guidelines for Implementation by Jordan et al. [2011]'  

E-print Network

Earthquake Administration, Beijing, China 4 AMRA (Analisi e Monitoraggio del Rischio Ambientale) Scarl monitored at a three-borehole Stress-Monitoring Site (SMS) in central Italy could monitor stress-accumulation and stress-relaxation (crack-coalescence) before all damaging (M 5) earthquakes within 1000 km of the SMS

312

Electric field and ion density anomalies in the mid latitude ionosphere: Possible connection with earthquakes?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of earthquake prediction has stimulated the search for a correlation between seismic activity and ionospherical anomalies. We found observational evidence of possible earthquake effects in the near-equatorial and low latitude ionosphere; these ionospheric anomalies have been proposed by Gousheva et al. [Gousheva, M., Glavcheva, R., Danov, D., Angelov P., Hristov, P., Influence of earthquakes on the electric field disturbances in the ionosphere on board of the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite. Compt. Rend. Acad. Bulg. Sci. 58 (8) 911-916, 2005a; Gousheva, M., Glavcheva, R., Danov, D., Angelov, P., Hristov, P., Kirov, B., Georgieva, K., Observation from the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite of anomalies associated with seismic activity. In: Poster Proceeding of 2nd International Conference on Recent Advances in Space Technologies: Space in the Service of Society, RAST '2005, June 9-11, Istanbul, Turkey, pp. 119-123, 2005b; Gousheva, M., Glavcheva, R., Danov, D., Angelov, P., Hristov, P., Kirov, B., Georgieva, K., Satellite monitoring of anomalous effects in the ionosphere probably related to strong earthquakes. Adv. Space Res. 37 (4), 660-665, 2006]. This paper presents new results from observations of the quasi-static electric field and ion density on board INTERCOSMOS-BULGARIA-1300 satellite in the mid latitude ionosphere above sources of moderate earthquakes. Data from INTERCOSMOS-BULGARIA-1300 satellite and seismic data (World Data Center, Denver, Colorado, USA) for magnetically quiet and medium quiet days are juxtaposed in time-space domain. For satellite's orbits in the time period 15.09-01.10.1981 an increase in the horizontal and vertical components of the quasi-static electric field and fluctuations of the ion density are observed over zones of forthcoming seismic events. Some similar post effects are observed too. The emphasis of this paper is put on the anomalies which specify the mid latitude ionosphere. The obtained results contain important information because they confirm our previous results for near-equatorial and low latitude regions.

Gousheva, M. N.; Glavcheva, R. P.; Danov, D. L.; Hristov, P. L.; Kirov, B. B.; Georgieva, K. Y.

2008-07-01

313

An assessment of seismic monitoring in the United States; requirement for an Advanced National Seismic System  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report assesses the status, needs, and associated costs of seismic monitoring in the United States. It sets down the requirement for an effective, national seismic monitoring strategy and an advanced system linking national, regional, and urban monitoring networks. Modernized seismic monitoring can provide alerts of imminent strong earthquake shaking; rapid assessment of distribution and severity of earthquake shaking (for use in emergency response); warnings of a possible tsunami from an offshore earthquake; warnings of volcanic eruptions; information for correctly characterizing earthquake hazards and for improving building codes; and data on response of buildings and structures during earthquakes, for safe, cost-effective design, engineering, and construction practices in earthquake-prone regions.

U.S. Geological Survey

1999-01-01

314

Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2006, AVO located 8,666 earthquakes of which 7,783 occurred on or near the 33 volcanoes monitored within Alaska. Monitoring highlights in 2006 include: an eruption of Augustine Volcano, a volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarm at Mount Martin, elevated seismicity and volcanic unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, and elevated seismicity and low-level tremor at Mount Veniaminof and Korovin Volcano. A new seismic subnetwork was installed on Fourpeaked Mountain. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field during 2006, (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems, (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations, (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2006, and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2006.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl

2008-01-01

315

Researching Intermountain West Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson designed for 7-12th (adaptable for 4-6) grade students. It focuses on earthquakes in the Utah region, but can be adapted to use anywhere. Forty-eight Intermountain West earthquakes that have occurred since 1876 have been researched by Earthquake Education Services (EES). Newspaper articles, individual accounts (diary entries, interviews, letters, etc.), and photographs have been collected. They are a primary data source for scientists and are valuable for anyone interested in learning about earthquakes. These data provide an entertaining, relevant resource for students studying earthquakes. Students select a research question (list provided) and search newspaper articles written about one or more earthquakes for data relevant to the question. Reports could be oral or written. Some of the questions can be reworded to allow students to first develop their own hypothesis, then search for data that supports or disproves the hypothesis.

316

Earthquake resistant design  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After having learned about earthquakes in class, through readings and earlier lab assignments, students (in groups of two) are asked to design and construct (using balsa wood, string, paper and glue) a three-story building designed to minimize the effects of shear-wave vibrations that occur during an earthquake. The students are required to research the design concepts on their own and most of the construction work occurs outside of the regular laboratory period. The structures are tested for strength a week before the earthquake occurs - can they support the required load for each floor? On earthquake day, the buildings a tested for a "design earthquake" and then each group is given the opportunity to see how "large" and earthquake their structure can withstand - both in terms of frequency and amplitude variations. In addition to building the structure, each team has to submit a paper reflecting on why they designed and built the structure the way they did.

Malinconico, Lawrence L.

317

Plate Tectonics: Earthquake Epicenter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson provides an overview of destructive earthquakes and their connection to tectonic movements of the Earth's crust. It includes a discussion of some especially destructive historic earthquakes, and a brief introduction to contintental drift and the theory of plate tectonics. There is also discussion of basic seismology (types of waves) and measures of the magnitude of an earthquake (the Richter Scale). The lesson inlcudes an activity in which students use an online simulator to locate the epicenter of an earthquake using readings from three different seismograph stations. After they have completed the simulation, they attempt to locate the epicenter of a real earthquake using data from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) earthquake website.

Pratte, John

318

Earthquakes and Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unit provides an introduction for younger students on earthquakes, volcanoes, and how they are related. Topics include evidence of continental drift, types of plate boundaries, types of seismic waves, and how to calculate the distance to the epicenter of an earthquake. There is also information on how earthquake magnitude and intensity are measured, and how seismic waves can reveal the Earth's internal structure. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

Medina, Philip

319

Levy Flights and Earthquakes  

E-print Network

Levy flights representation is proposed to describe earthquake characteristics like the distribution of waiting times and position of hypocenters in a seismic region. Over 7500 microearthquakes and earthquakes from 1985 to 1994 were analyzed to test that its spatial and temporal distributions are such that can be described by a Levy flight with anomalous diffusion (in this case in a subdiffusive regime). Earthquake behavior is well described through Levy flights and Levy distribution functions such as results show.

O. Sotolongo-Costa; J. C. Antoranz; A. Posadas; F. Vidal; A. Vazquez

2002-05-27

320

Earthquakes in Utah  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will gain a better understanding of how earthquakes and volcanoes are formed and how they have contributed to the geology of Utah. This web-based lesson will help guide you through a number of websites that will help you gain a better understanding of earthquakes and volcanoes especially happening in Utah. Follow the instructions for each and enjoy. You will need your headphones on for the videos. Site #1 .Watch video on earthquake ...

Ribera, Mr.

2009-02-25

321

2004), Importance of small earthquakes for stress transfers and earthquake  

E-print Network

Abstract. We estimate the relative importance of small and large earthquakes for static stress changes and for earthquake triggering, assuming that earthquakes are triggered by static stress changes and that earthquakes are located on a fractal network of dimension D. This model predicts that both the number of events triggered by an earthquake of magnitude m and the stress change induced by this earthquake at the location of other earthquakes increase with m as ? 10 Dm/2. The stronger the spatial clustering, the larger the influence of small earthquakes on stress changes at the location of a future event as well as earthquake triggering. If earthquake magnitudes follow the Gutenberg-Richter law with b> D/2, small earthquakes collectively dominate stress transfer and earthquake triggering, because their greater frequency overcomes their smaller individual triggering potential. Using a Southern-California catalog, we observe that the rate of seismicity triggered by an earthquake of magnitude m increases with m as 10 ?m, where ? = 1.00 0.05. We also find that the magnitude distribution of triggered earthquakes is independent of the triggering earthquakes magnitude m. When ? ? b, small earthquakes are roughly as important to earthquake triggering as larger ones. We evaluate the fractal correlation

Agns Helmstetter; Yan Y. Kagan; David D. Jackson

322

Eye in the Sky: Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource presents a general introduction to earthquakes, including sections on the science, the phenomenon, and effects. It includes an animation of how earthquakes form, and footage of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake near San Francisco.

323

First Results of the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models Experiment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The ability to successfully predict the future behavior of a system is a strong indication that the system is well understood. Certainly many details of the earthquake system remain obscure, but several hypotheses related to earthquake occurrence and seismic hazard have been proffered, and predicting earthquake behavior is a worthy goal and demanded by society. Along these lines, one of the primary objectives of the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) working group was to formalize earthquake occurrence hypotheses in the form of prospective earthquake rate forecasts in California. RELM members, working in small research groups, developed more than a dozen 5-year forecasts; they also outlined a performance evaluation method and provided a conceptual description of a Testing Center in which to perform predictability experiments. Subsequently, researchers working within the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) have begun implementing Testing Centers in different locations worldwide, and the RELM predictability experiment-a truly prospective earthquake prediction effort-is underway within the U. S. branch of CSEP. The experiment, designed to compare time-invariant 5-year earthquake rate forecasts, is now approximately halfway to its completion. In this paper, we describe the models under evaluation and present, for the first time, preliminary results of this unique experiment. While these results are preliminary-the forecasts were meant for an application of 5 years-we find interesting results: most of the models are consistent with the observation and one model forecasts the distribution of earthquakes best. We discuss the observed sample of target earthquakes in the context of historical seismicity within the testing region, highlight potential pitfalls of the current tests, and suggest plans for future revisions to experiments such as this one. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

Schorlemmer, D.; Zechar, J.D.; Werner, M.J.; Field, E.H.; Jackson, D.D.; Jordan, T.H.

2010-01-01

324

Are earthquake magnitudes clustered?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The question of earthquake predictability is a longstanding and important challenge. Recent results (Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 098501, 2007; ibid 100, 038501, 2008) have suggested that earthquake magnitudes are clustered, thus, indicating that they are not independent in contrast to what is typically assumed. Here, we present evidence that the observed magnitude correlations are an artifact due to short-term incompleteness of earthquake catalogs and the well-known modified Omori law. The latter leads to variations in the frequency magnitude distribution if the distribution is constrained to those earthquakes that are close in space and time to the directly following event.

Green, A.; Davidsen, J.

2010-12-01

325

Parkfield, California: Earthquake History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report describes the history of seismic activity at Parkfield, California, which is situated on the San Andreas Fault. It points out that moderate-size earthquakes have occurred on the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault at fairly regular intervals, and that the earthquakes may have been 'characteristic' in the sense that they occurred with some regularity (mean repetition time of about 22 years). This indicates that they may have repeatedly ruptured the same area on the fault. A diagram shows the timing of the earthquakes, and illustrations of the seismic waveforms show the similarities between earthquakes occurring in 1922, 1934, and 1966.

326

Learning About Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How much do you know about earthquakes? Did you even know that Utah actually has earthquakes and that it has a large fault line that is overdue for a major earthquake? The purpose of this activity is to find the locations of the fault lines in Utah and understand that they are usually earthquake zones. Students will learn how often earthquakes are expected to occur, when Utah is due for another one, and where the next one is expected to occur. This meets the Utah Core Standard 2 for 5th grade science: Students will understand that volcanoes, earthquakes, uplift, weathering, and erosion reshape Earth's surface. Objective 1: Explain the relationship between time and specific geological changes. Objective 2: Explain how volcanoes, earthquakes, and uplift affect Earth's surface. If your friend were moving to Utah from another state, where would you advise them the safest place to buy or build a house would be? Teacher Instruction Put students into groups of 4 or 5 and create a KWL chart about earthquakes. Instruct the groups that they are going to learn about earthquakes in ...

Mrs. Wallace

2012-02-07

327

Earthquakes and Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity, from the Real World Learning Objects Resource Library, allows students to use first-hand data analysis to "determine if there is any pattern to earthquake events and speculate on the causes of earthquakes." Intended to be an introductory activity for a unit of study on earthquakes, this 60-minute activity is complete with learning goals, step-by-step classroom procedures, materials, assessment activities, and resources for further information. The "Content Materials" section contains directions for students and graphics to help students understand earthquakes and plate tectonics. This is an excellent resource for geology and earth science instructors that is ready to use for the classroom.

2007-10-04

328

Are Earthquake Magnitudes Clustered?  

SciTech Connect

The question of earthquake predictability is a long-standing and important challenge. Recent results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 098501 (2007); ibid.100, 038501 (2008)] have suggested that earthquake magnitudes are clustered, thus indicating that they are not independent in contrast to what is typically assumed. Here, we present evidence that the observed magnitude correlations are to a large extent, if not entirely, an artifact due to the incompleteness of earthquake catalogs and the well-known modified Omori law. The latter leads to variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution if the distribution is constrained to those earthquakes that are close in space and time to the directly following event.

Davidsen, Joern; Green, Adam [Complexity Science Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

2011-03-11

329

Earthquakes Learning Module  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This earthquake unit was designed to be used with a college course in physical geography. From this module, students learn the location of areas in the United States with the greatest potential for earthquake shaking and the hazards presented by earthquakes. They also learn how geological conditions and building construction affect the amount of destruction during an earthquake. Seismographs and the Richter scale are also covered. The module contains a study guide and outline notes, study questions, and a practice quiz. One feature of the module is a web exploration section with links to fifteen outside sites that augment the instruction.

Haberlin, Rita

330

National Information Service for Earthquake Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the University of California, Berkeley, the National Information Service for Earthquake Engineering (NISEE) is a public service of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center. NISEE was started in 1972 and the site contains hundreds of publicly sponsored technical reports, research papers, data sets, and other materials related to scholarly investigations in this field. Visitors can wander around the archives of papers, images, data, movies, and software or look through the scrolling feed of newly added works. Additionally, users can use the site's tag cloud to locate works that are focused around a certain word or phrase.

2013-09-05

331

Development of a Telecare System Based on ZigBee Mesh Network for Monitoring Blood Pressure of Patients with Hemodialysis in Health Care Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Taiwan, the number of the patients needing dialysis increases rapidly in recent years. Because there is risk in every hemodialysis\\u000a session, monitoring physiological status, such as blood pressure measurement every 30min to 1h is needed during about 4h\\u000a hemodialysis process. Therefore, an assisted measurement on blood pressure is needful in dialysis care centers. Telecare system\\u000a (TCS) is regarded as

Yi-Chun Du; You-Yun Lee; Yun-Yuan Lu; Chia-Hung Lin; Ming-Jei Wu; Chung-Lin Chen; Tainsong Chen

332

Regional characterization of mine blasts, earthquakes, mine tremors, and nuclear explosions using the intelligent seismic event identification system. Final report, 1 April 1992-1 July 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a study of the Intelligent Seismic Event Identification System (ISEIS) which was installed at the Center for Seismic Studies and applied to regional events in the Intelligent Monitoring System (IMS) database. A subset of IMS data has been collected for known events in a database called the Ground Truth Database (GTD) and these events were processed by ISEIS. This has shown that the regional high-frequency PIS ratio discriminates between explosions and earthquakes in the Vogtland region recorded at the GERESSS array. Mine tremors in the Lubin and Upper Silesia resemble earthquakes. Lg spectral ratio was found to separate explosions and earthquakes in the Vogtland region, but the Lubin and Upper Silesia region mine tremors had large scatter. An evaluation was made of the discrimination rules in the ISEIS expert system on the events in four regions (Vogtland. Lubin, Upper Silesia, and Steigen) in the GTD. This report also describes the results of the analysis of the December 31, 1992 event which occurred near the Russian test site on Novaya Zemlya. Analysis of Pn/Sn ratios at NORESS indicated that these ratios were comparable to those measured for Kola Peninsula mine blasts, although the propagation paths were different. The ratios were only slightly greater than those observed for earthquakes in the Greenland Sea. The August 1. 1986 event recorded was re-analyzed and also found to resemble mine blasts. However, other discriminants indicate that the event was probably an earthquake.

Baumgardt, D.R.

1993-07-31

333

Earthquake-induced water-level fluctuations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, June 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report presents earthquake-induced water-level and fluid-pressure data for wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during June 1992. Three earthquakes occurred which caused significant water-level and fluid-pressure responses in wells. Wells USW H-5 and USW H-6 are continuously monitored to detect short-term responses caused by earthquakes. Two wells, monitored hourly, had significant, longer-term responses in water level following the earthquakes. On June 28, 1992, a 7.5-magnitude earthquake occurred near Landers, California causing an estimated maximum water-level change of 90 centimeters in well USW H-5. Three hours later a 6.6-magnitude earthquake occurred near Big Bear Lake, California; the maximum water-level fluctuation was 20 centimeters in well USW H-5. A 5.6-magnitude earthquake occurred at Little Skull Mountain, Nevada, on June 29, approximately 23 kilometers from Yucca Mountain. The maximum estimated short-term water-level fluctuation from the Little Skull Mountain earthquake was 40 centimeters in well USW H-5. The water level in well UE-25p {number_sign}1, monitored hourly, decreased approximately 50 centimeters over 3 days following the Little Skull Mountain earthquake. The water level in UE-25p {number_sign}1 returned to pre-earthquake levels in approximately 6 months. The water level in the lower interval of well USW H-3 increased 28 centimeters following the Little Skull Mountain earthquake. The Landers and Little Skull Mountain earthquakes caused responses in 17 intervals of 14 hourly monitored wells, however, most responses were small and of short duration. For several days following the major earthquakes, many smaller magnitude aftershocks occurred causing measurable responses in the continuously monitored wells.

O`Brien, G.M.

1993-07-01

334

A search for paleoliquefaction and evidence bearing on the recurrence behavior of the great 1811-12 New Madrid earthquakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Missouri. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This professional paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

Wesnousky, S.G.; Leffler, L.M.

1994-01-01

335

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb) earthquake was felt from Austin, Texas, to Des Moines, Iowa, and covered a felt area of approximately 362,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to 1962, all earthquakes in Oklahoma (59) were either known from historical accounts or from seismograph stations outside the state. Over half of these events were located in Canadian County. In late 1961, the first seismographs were installed in Oklahoma. From 1962 through 1976, 70 additional earthquakes were added to the earthquake database. In 1977, a statewide network of seven semipermanent and three radio-telemetry seismograph stations were installed. The additional stations have improved earthquake detection and location in the state of Oklahoma. From 1977 to 1988, over 570 additional earthquakes were located in Oklahoma, mostly of magnitudes less than 2.5. Most of these events occurred on the eastern margin of the Anadarko basin along a zone 135 km long by 40 km wide that extends from Canadian County to the southern edge of Garvin County. Another general area of earthquake activity lies along and north of the Ouachita Mountains in the Arkoma basin. A few earthquakes have occurred in the shelves that border the Arkoma and Anadarko basins.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

336

1st IWA International Symposium on Water and Wastewater Technologies in Ancient Civilizations PYMATUNING EARTHQUAKE IN PENNSYLVANIA  

E-print Network

PYMATUNING EARTHQUAKE IN PENNSYLVANIA (USA) AND LATE MINOAN CRISIS ON CRETE Yuri Gorokhovich Center during widespread earthquake activity and then much stronger disaster at the end of Late Minoan IIIA) destruction and some burning; · Evan's/Hood's MM - LM (c.1500 B.C.­1000 BCE) earthquake destruction

Columbia University

337

Psychological distress following urban earthquakes in California.  

PubMed

During and following a disaster caused by a natural event, human populations are thought to be at greater risk of psychological morbidity and mortality directly attributable to increased, disaster-induced stress. Drawing both on the research of others and that conducted at the Center for Public Health and Disaster Relief of the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) following California earthquakes, this paper examines the extent to which research evidence supports these assumptions. Following a brief history of disaster research in the United States, the response of persons at the time of an earthquake was examined with particular attention to psychological morbidity; the number of deaths that can be attributed to cardiovascular events and suicides; and the extent to which and by whom, health services are used following an earthquake. The implications of research findings for practitioners in the field are discussed. PMID:12500731

Bourque, Linda B; Siegel, Judith M; Shoaf, Kimberley I

2002-01-01

338

Caltech Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory Technical Reports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Institute of Technology Library System and the Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory provides the Caltech Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory Technical Reports Web site. Visitors will find access to technical reports by browsing the categorized sets from the Center for Research on the Prevention of Natural Disasters, Dynamics Laboratory, Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory, and the Soil Mechanics Laboratory, as well as the section entitled Policy Documents. The materials can also be viewed by year (going back to 1952) or fully searched to gain access to the full-text reports, which include offerings like Impact of Seismic Risk on Lifetime Property Values. Although the topics covered are somewhat limited on the site, those interested will appreciate the well organized and informative resources provided.

339

Tsunamigenic Earthquakes: Past and Present Milestones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review a number of events which, taken individually, have significantly affected our understanding of the generation of tsunamis by earthquake sources and our efforts at mitigating their hazards, notably through the development of warning algorithms. Starting with the 1700 Cascadia earthquake, we examine how significant tsunamis have changed our views in fields as diverse as seismotectonics, the diversity of earthquake cycles, the development of warning algorithms, the response of communities at risk to warnings, and their education, the latter being either formal or rooted in ancestral heritage. We discuss in detail lessons from the 2004 Sumatra disasters and review the performance of warning centers and the response of affected populations during the nine significant tsunamis which have taken place since 2004.

Okal, Emile A.

2011-06-01

340

Earthquakes for Kids  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These resources include sections on the latest quakes, science project ideas, puzzles and games, online activities, a glossary, and cool earthquake facts. In addition, there is an Ask A Geologist section, and earthquake FAQs. One link leads to a teacher page with grade level topics and educational materials.

2002-12-13

341

Earthquakes and Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts global distribution of earthquakes. A world map shows the location of large earthquakes that occurred from 1975-1995. A slider at the bottom left of the map allows the user to change the map to reveal the location of major plates or to select both views layered on top of one another.

342

Earthquakes and Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Earthquakes are low-probability, high-consequence events. Though they may occur only once in the life of a school, they can have devastating, irreversible consequences. Moderate earthquakes can cause serious damage to building contents and non-structural building systems, serious injury to students and staff, and disruption of building operations.

National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

2008-01-01

343

The magnitude distribution of earthquakes near Southern California faults  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We investigate seismicity near faults in the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Fault Model. We search for anomalously large events that might be signs of a characteristic earthquake distribution. We find that seismicity near major fault zones in Southern California is well modeled by a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, with no evidence of characteristic earthquakes within the resolution limits of the modern instrumental catalog. However, the b value of the locally observed magnitude distribution is found to depend on distance to the nearest mapped fault segment, which suggests that earthquakes nucleating near major faults are likely to have larger magnitudes relative to earthquakes nucleating far from major faults. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

Page, M.T.; Alderson, D.; Doyle, J.

2011-01-01

344

Implications for earthquake risk reduction in the United States from the Kocaeli, Turkey, earthquake of August 17, 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents implications for earthquake risk reduction in the U.S. The magnitude 7.4 earthquake caused 17,127 deaths, 43,953 injuries, and displaced more than 250,000 people from their homes. The report warns that similar disasters are possible in the United States where earthquakes of comparable size strike the heart of American urban areas. Another concern described in the report is the delayed emergency response that was caused by the inadequate seismic monitoring system in Turkey, a problem that contrasts sharply with rapid assessment and response to the September Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan. Additionally, the experience in Turkey suggests that techniques for forecasting earthquakes may be improving.

U.S. Geological Survey

2000-01-01

345

Harnessing the Collective Power of Eyewitnesses for Improved Earthquake Information  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Euro-Med Seismological Centre (EMSC) operates the second global earthquake information website (www.emsc-csem.org) which attracts 2 million visits a month from about 200 different countries. We collect information about earthquakes' effects from eyewitnesses such as online questionnaires, geolocated pics to rapidly constrain impact scenario. At the beginning, the collection was purely intended to address a scientific issue: the rapid evaluation of earthquake's impact. However, it rapidly appears that the understanding of eyewitnesses' expectations and motivations in the immediate aftermath of an earthquake was essential to optimise this data collection. Crowdsourcing information on earthquake's effects does not apply to a pre-existing community. By definition, eyewitnesses only exist once the earthquake has struck. We developed a strategy on social networks (Facebook, Google+, Twitter...) to interface with spontaneously emerging online communities of eyewitnesses. The basic idea is to create a positive feedback loop: attract eyewitnesses and engage with them by providing expected earthquake information and services, collect their observations, collate them for improved earthquake information services to attract more witnesses. We will present recent examples to illustrate how important the use of social networks is to engage with eyewitnesses especially in regions of low seismic activity where people are unaware of existing Internet resources dealing with earthquakes. A second type of information collated in our information services is derived from the real time analysis of the traffic on our website in the first minutes following an earthquake occurrence, an approach named flashsourcing. We show, using the example of the Mineral, Virginia earthquake that the arrival times of eyewitnesses of our website follows the propagation of the generated seismic waves and then, that eyewitnesses can be considered as ground motion sensors. Flashsourcing discriminates felt earthquakes within, as an average 90s of their occurrence, and can map, in certain cases, the damaged areas. Thanks to the flashsourced and crowdsourced information, we developed an innovative Twitter earthquake information service (currently under test and to be open by November) which intends to offer notifications for earthquakes that matter for the public only. It provides timely information for felt and damaging earthquakes regardless their magnitude and heads-up for seismologists. In conclusion, the experience developed at the EMSC demonstrates the benefit of involving eyewitnesses in earthquake surveillance. The data collected directly and indirectly from eyewitnesses complement information derived from monitoring networks and contribute to improved services. By increasing interaction between science and society, it opens new opportunities for raising awareness on seismic hazard.

Bossu, R.; Lefebvre, S.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Steed, R.

2013-12-01

346

Demand surge following earthquakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Demand surge is understood to be a socio-economic phenomenon where repair costs for the same damage are higher after large- versus small-scale natural disasters. It has reportedly increased monetary losses by 20 to 50%. In previous work, a model for the increased costs of reconstruction labor and materials was developed for hurricanes in the Southeast United States. The model showed that labor cost increases, rather than the material component, drove the total repair cost increases, and this finding could be extended to earthquakes. A study of past large-scale disasters suggested that there may be additional explanations for demand surge. Two such explanations specific to earthquakes are the exclusion of insurance coverage for earthquake damage and possible concurrent causation of damage from an earthquake followed by fire or tsunami. Additional research into these aspects might provide a better explanation for increased monetary losses after large- vs. small-scale earthquakes.

Olsen, Anna H.

2012-01-01

347

Observing the Greatest Earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AGU Chapman Conference on Giant Earthquakes and Their Tsunamis; Via del Mar and Valparaso, Chile, 16-20 May 2010 ; An AGU Chapman Conference commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the 1960 M 9.5 Chile earthquake. Participants reexamined this earthquake, the largest ever recorded instrumentally, and compared it with Chile's February 2010 M 8.8 earthquake. They also addressed the giant earthquake potential of subduction zones worldwide and strategies for reducing losses due to tsunamis. The conference drew 96 participants from 18 countries, and it reached out to public audiences in Chile. Its program and abstracts are posted at http://www.agu.org/meetings/chapman/2010/acall/pdf/Scientific_Program.pdf.

Atwater, Brian; Barrientos, Sergio; Cifuentes, Ins; Cisternas, Marco; Wang, Kelin

2010-11-01

348

1 INTRODUCTION Korea has a long history of earthquakes. Earthquake  

E-print Network

1 INTRODUCTION Korea has a long history of earthquakes. Earthquake events are well documented by those historic and recent earthquakes was not very high, and it is believed that Korea belongs to a low to moderate seismicity zone. However, after the Northridge and Kobe earthquakes, there was a growing concern

Spencer Jr., B.F.

349

Earthquakes Living Lab: Geology and the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students examine the effects of geology on earthquake magnitudes and how engineers anticipate and prepare for these effects. Using information provided through the Earthquakes Living Lab interface, students investigate how geology, specifically soil type, can amplify the magnitude of earthquakes and their consequences. Students look in-depth at the historical 1906 San Francisco earthquake and its destruction thorough photographs and data. They compare the 1906 California earthquake to another historical earthquake in Kobe, Japan, looking at the geological differences and impacts in the two regions, and learning how engineers, geologists and seismologists work to predict earthquakes and minimize calamity. A worksheet serves as a student guide for the activity.

Civil And Environmental Engineering Department

350

Earthquakes in Afghanistan Nicholas Ambraseys  

E-print Network

that are currently seismically quiet but where earthquakes have occurred historically, and aseismic regions elsewhere between shallow moderate earthquakes that occur within a few minutes to days of deep earthquakes beneath1 Earthquakes in Afghanistan Nicholas Ambraseys Dept. of Civil Engineering, Imperial College

Bilham, Roger

351

An Atlas of ShakeMaps for Selected Global Earthquakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An atlas of maps of peak ground motions and intensity 'ShakeMaps' has been developed for almost 5,000 recent and historical global earthquakes. These maps are produced using established ShakeMap methodology (Wald and others, 1999c; Wald and others, 2005) and constraints from macroseismic intensity data, instrumental ground motions, regional topographically-based site amplifications, and published earthquake-rupture models. Applying the ShakeMap methodology allows a consistent approach to combine point observations with ground-motion predictions to produce descriptions of peak ground motions and intensity for each event. We also calculate an estimated ground-motion uncertainty grid for each earthquake. The Atlas of ShakeMaps provides a consistent and quantitative description of the distribution and intensity of shaking for recent global earthquakes (1973-2007) as well as selected historic events. As such, the Atlas was developed specifically for calibrating global earthquake loss estimation methodologies to be used in the U.S. Geological Survey Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) Project. PAGER will employ these loss models to rapidly estimate the impact of global earthquakes as part of the USGS National Earthquake Information Center's earthquake-response protocol. The development of the Atlas of ShakeMaps has also led to several key improvements to the Global ShakeMap system. The key upgrades include: addition of uncertainties in the ground motion mapping, introduction of modern ground-motion prediction equations, improved estimates of global seismic-site conditions (VS30), and improved definition of stable continental region polygons. Finally, we have merged all of the ShakeMaps in the Atlas to provide a global perspective of earthquake ground shaking for the past 35 years, allowing comparison with probabilistic hazard maps. The online Atlas and supporting databases can be found at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/shakemap/atlas.php/.

Allen, Trevor I.; Wald, David J.; Hotovec, Alicia J.; Lin, Kuo-Wan; Earle, Paul S.; Marano, Kristin D.

2008-01-01

352

Fusion of Multi Precursors Earthquake Parameters to Estimate the Date, Magnitude and Affected Area of the Forthcoming Powerful Earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since not any individual precursor can be used as an accurate stand alone means for the earthquake prediction, it is necessary to integrate different kinds of precursors. The precursors selected for analysis in this study include electron and ion density, electron temperature, total electron content (TEC), electric and magnetic fields and land surface temperature (LST) several days before three strong earthquakes which happened in Samoa Islands, Sichuan (China) and Borujerd (Iran). The precursor's variations were monitored using data obtained from experiments onboard DEMETER (IAP, ISL, ICE and IMSC) and Aqua-MODIS satellites. Regarding the ionospheric precursors, the geomagnetic indices Dst and Kp were used to distinguish pre-earthquake disturbed states from the other anomalies related to the geomagnetic activities. The inter-quartile range of data was utilized to construct their upper and lower bound to detect disturbed states outsides the bounds which might be associated with impending earthquakes. When the disturbed state associated with impending earthquake is detected, based on the type of precursor, the number of days relative to earthquake day is estimated. Then regarding the deviation value of the precursor from the undisturbed state the magnitude of impending earthquake is estimated. The radius of the affected area is calculated using the estimated magnitude and Dobrovolsky formula. In order to assess final earthquake parameters (which are date, magnitude and radius of the affected area) for each case study, using the median and inter-quartile range of earthquake parameters obtained from different precursors, the approximate bounds of final earthquake parameters are defined. For each studied case, a good agreement was found between the estimated and registered earthquake parameters.

Akhoondzadeh, M.; Saradjian, M. R.

2012-07-01

353

The Challenge of Centennial Earthquakes to Improve Modern Earthquake Engineering  

SciTech Connect

The recent commemoration of the centennial of the San Francisco and Valparaiso 1906 earthquakes has given the opportunity to reanalyze their damages from modern earthquake engineering perspective. These two earthquakes plus Messina Reggio Calabria 1908 had a strong impact in the birth and developing of earthquake engineering. The study of the seismic performance of some up today existing buildings, that survive centennial earthquakes, represent a challenge to better understand the limitations of our in use earthquake design methods. Only Valparaiso 1906 earthquake, of the three considered centennial earthquakes, has been repeated again as the Central Chile, 1985, Ms = 7.8 earthquake. In this paper a comparative study of the damage produced by 1906 and 1985 Valparaiso earthquakes is done in the neighborhood of Valparaiso harbor. In this study the only three centennial buildings of 3 stories that survived both earthquakes almost undamaged were identified. Since for 1985 earthquake accelerogram at El Almendral soil conditions as well as in rock were recoded, the vulnerability analysis of these building is done considering instrumental measurements of the demand. The study concludes that good performance of these buildings in the epicentral zone of large earthquakes can not be well explained by modern earthquake engineering methods. Therefore, it is recommended to use in the future of more suitable instrumental parameters, such as the destructiveness potential factor, to describe earthquake demand.

Saragoni, G. Rodolfo [Department of Civil Engineering, Universidad of Chile (Chile)

2008-07-08

354

Earthquakes in the Central United States, 1699-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This publication is an update of an earlier report, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Geologic Investigation I-2812 by Wheeler and others (2003), titled ?Earthquakes in the Central United States-1699-2002.? Like the original poster, the center of the updated poster is a map showing the pattern of earthquake locations in the most seismically active part of the central United States. Arrayed around the map are short explanatory texts and graphics, which describe the distribution of historical earthquakes and the effects of the most notable of them. The updated poster contains additional, post 2002, earthquake data. These are 38 earthquakes covering the time interval from January 2003 to June 2010, including the Mount Carmel, Illinois, earthquake of 2008. The USGS Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) was the source of these additional data. Like the I-2812 poster, this poster was prepared for a nontechnical audience and designed to inform the general public as to the widespread occurrence of felt and damaging earthquakes in the Central United States. Accordingly, the poster should not be used to assess earthquake hazard in small areas or at individual locations.

Dart, Richard L.; Volpi, Christina M.

2010-01-01

355

Post-earthquake ignition vulnerability assessment of Kkekmece District  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, a geographic information system (GIS)-based model was developed to calculate the post-earthquake ignition probability of a building, considering damage to the building's interior gas and electrical distribution system and the overturning of appliances. In order to make our model more reliable and realistic, a weighting factor was used to define the possible existence of each appliance or other contents in the given occupancy. A questionnaire was prepared to weigh the relevance of the different components of post-earthquake ignitions using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP). The questionnaire was evaluated by researchers who were experienced in earthquake engineering and post-earthquake fires. The developed model was implemented to HAZTURK's (Hazards Turkey) earthquake loss assessment software, as developed by the Mid-America Earthquake Center with the help of Istanbul Technical University. The developed post-earthquake ignition tool was applied to Kkekmece, Istanbul, in Turkey. The results were evaluated according to structure types, occupancy types, the number of storeys, building codes and specified districts. The evaluated results support the theory that post-earthquake ignition probability is inversely proportional to the number of storeys and the construction year, depending upon the building code.

Yildiz, S. S.; Karaman, H.

2013-12-01

356

Post-earthquake ignition vulnerability assessment of Kkekmece District  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, a Geographic Information System (GIS) based model was developed to calculate the post-earthquake ignition probability of a building, considering damage to the building's interior gas and electrical distribution system and the overturning of appliances. In order to make our model more reliable and realistic, a weighting factor was used to define the possible existence of each appliance or other contents in the given occupancy. A questionnaire was prepared to weigh the relevance of the different components of post-earthquake ignitions using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). The questionnaire was evaluated by researchers who were experienced in earthquake engineering and post earthquake fires. The developed model was implemented to HAZTURK (Hazards Turkey) earthquake loss assessment software, as developed by Mid-America Earthquake Center with the help of Istanbul Technical University. The developed post-earthquake ignition tool was applied to Kkekmece, Istanbul in Turkey. The results were evaluated according to structure types, occupancy types, the number of storeys, building codes and specified districts. The evaluated results support the theory that post-earthquake ignition probability is inversely proportional to the number of storeys and the construction year, depending upon the building code.

Yildiz, S. S.; Karaman, H.

2013-05-01

357

Bladder Monitor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

1993-01-01

358

Sun, Moon and Earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During a study conducted to find the effect of Earth tides on the occurrence of earthquakes, for small areas [typically 1000km X1000km] of high-seismicity regions, it was noticed that the Sun's position in terms of universal time [GMT] shows links to the sum of EMD [longitude of earthquake location - longitude of Moon's foot print on earth] and SEM [Sun-Earth-Moon angle]. This paper provides the details of this relationship after studying earthquake data for over forty high-seismicity regions of the world. It was found that over 98% of the earthquakes for these different regions, examined for the period 1973-2008, show a direct relationship between the Sun's position [GMT] and [EMD+SEM]. As the time changes from 00-24 hours, the factor [EMD+SEM] changes through 360 degree, and plotting these two variables for earthquakes from different small regions reveals a simple 45 degree straight-line relationship between them. This relationship was tested for all earthquakes and earthquake sequences for magnitude 2.0 and above. This study conclusively proves how Sun and the Moon govern all earthquakes. Fig. 12 [A+B]. The left-hand figure provides a 24-hour plot for forty consecutive days including the main event (00:58:23 on 26.12.2004, Lat.+3.30, Long+95.980, Mb 9.0, EQ count 376). The right-hand figure provides an earthquake plot for (EMD+SEM) vs GMT timings for the same data. All the 376 events including the main event faithfully follow the straight-line curve.

Kolvankar, V. G.

2013-12-01

359

Measuring Earthquakes: Intensity Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of exercises will introduce students to the construction of earthquake intensity maps, familiarize them with the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale, and give them the opportunity to build their own maps online in order to locate the epicenter of an earthquake. In the first exercise, they will use intensity data from the 1986 North Palm Springs, California earthquake to create an isoseismal map. In the second, they will use a special interactive page of dynamic HTML to plot intensities that they assign based on reports, and attempt to determine the epicenter based on the area of highest intensity.

360

Earthquakes and emergence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquakes and emerging infections may not have a direct cause and effect relationship like tax evasion and jail, but new evidence suggests that there may be a link between the two human health hazards. Various media accounts have cited a massive 1993 earthquake in Maharashtra as a potential catalyst of the recent outbreak of plague in India that has claimed more than 50 lives and alarmed the world. The hypothesis is that the earthquake may have uprooted underground rat populations that carry the fleas infected with the bacterium that causes bubonic plague and can lead to the pneumonic form of the disease that is spread through the air.

361

Mercalli Earthquake Activity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is an inquiry approach to term and concept introduction. Students will work in a jigsaw format to read through the descriptions of eyewitness accounts from earthquakes and assess a Mercalli value. In the jigsaw groups, they will compare the different Mercalli and Richter values and describe the basic events that occurred during different earthquakes. They will share this information in order to collaboratively assess the strengths and weaknesses of this scale relative to the Richter magnitudes provided. They will also begin to determine what types of hazards result from earthquakes.

Kaatje Kraft

362

Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 7,097 earthquakes of which 5,318 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the AVO. Monitoring highlights in 2008 include the eruptions of Okmok Caldera, and Kasatochi Volcano, as well as increased unrest at Mount Veniaminof and Redoubt Volcano. This catalog includes descriptions of: (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2008; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2008; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2008.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.

2009-01-01

363

Toward real-time regional earthquake simulation II: Real-time Online earthquake Simulation (ROS) of Taiwan earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed a Real-time Online earthquake Simulation system (ROS) to simulate regional earthquakes in Taiwan. The ROS uses a centroid moment tensor solution of seismic events from a Real-time Moment Tensor monitoring system (RMT), which provides all the point source parameters including the event origin time, hypocentral location, moment magnitude and focal mechanism within 2 min after the occurrence of an earthquake. Then, all of the source parameters are automatically forwarded to the ROS to perform an earthquake simulation, which is based on a spectral-element method (SEM). A new island-wide, high resolution SEM mesh model is developed for the whole Taiwan in this study. We have improved SEM mesh quality by introducing a thin high-resolution mesh layer near the surface to accommodate steep and rapidly varying topography. The mesh for the shallow sedimentary basin is adjusted to reflect its complex geometry and sharp lateral velocity contrasts. The grid resolution at the surface is about 545 m, which is sufficient to resolve topography and tomography data for simulations accurate up to 1.0 Hz. The ROS is also an infrastructural service, making online earthquake simulation feasible. Users can conduct their own earthquake simulation by providing a set of source parameters through the ROS webpage. For visualization, a ShakeMovie and ShakeMap are produced during the simulation. The time needed for one event is roughly 3 min for a 70 s ground motion simulation. The ROS is operated online at the Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica (http://ros.earth.sinica.edu.tw/). Our long-term goal for the ROS system is to contribute to public earth science outreach and to realize seismic ground motion prediction in real-time.

Lee, Shiann-Jong; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Huang, Bor-Shouh

2014-06-01

364

Correlation of groundwater radon anomalies with earthquakes in the greater Palmdale bulge area  

SciTech Connect

Recent measurements in the Central Transverse Ranges of southern California suggest possible correlations of changes in groundwater radon content with occurences of nearby earthquakes. Since measurements began in 1974, three radon anomalies have been accompanied by subsequent nearby seismic events. Two of these anomalies were associated with moderate-sized earthquakes and one with a swarm. Within a 60-day window prior to the seismicity, groundwater radon increased in each case at sites close to the earthquake epicenters. Before the Big Bear earthquake of June 30, 1979 (M = 4.8), radon anomalies were found at three nearby monitoring sites. Groundwater radon content at one site near the January 1, 1979 Malibu earthquake (M = 5.0) showed negative as well as positive anomalies both prior to and following the earthquake. A radon anomaly occurred at a nearby spring prior to the fall 1976 Palmdale swarm. The observed pattern is similar to pre-earthquake anomalies reported from Russia, China, and Japan.

Teng, T.; Sun, L.; McRaney, J.K.

1981-05-01

365

Short-term earthquake forecasting may be feasible at Koyna, India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reservoir triggered earthquakes have been occurring since the impoundment of Shivaji Sagar Lake created by Koyna Dam in 1962 near the west coast of India. Over the past 38 years, 15 earthquakes of magnitude ?5, including the biggest reservoir triggered earthquake of M 6.3 on December 10, 1967, and several hundred thousand smaller earthquakes have occurred. We believe it is an ideal site for monitoring earthquake precursors, which may lead to forecasts of M5 earthquakes with adequate accuracy. This optimism is based on the fact that here earthquakes occur in a small area of 30 km by 15 km and there are no other seismically active regions in the near vicinity. The epicentral region is accessible for all kinds of experiments and observations, and certain characters of Koyna seismicity are quite well understood.

Gupta, Harsh K.

2001-08-01

366

Prospective testing of Coulomb short-term earthquake forecasts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake induced Coulomb stresses, whether static or dynamic, suddenly change the probability of future earthquakes. Models to estimate stress and the resulting seismicity changes could help to illuminate earthquake physics and guide appropriate precautionary response. But do these models have improved forecasting power compared to empirical statistical models? The best answer lies in prospective testing in which a fully specified model, with no subsequent parameter adjustments, is evaluated against future earthquakes. The Center of Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) facilitates such prospective testing of earthquake forecasts, including several short term forecasts. Formulating Coulomb stress models for formal testing involves several practical problems, mostly shared with other short-term models. First, earthquake probabilities must be calculated after each perpetrator earthquake but before the triggered earthquakes, or victims. The time interval between a perpetrator and its victims may be very short, as characterized by the Omori law for aftershocks. CSEP evaluates short term models daily, and allows daily updates of the models. However, lots can happen in a day. An alternative is to test and update models on the occurrence of each earthquake over a certain magnitude. To make such updates rapidly enough and to qualify as prospective, earthquake focal mechanisms, slip distributions, stress patterns, and earthquake probabilities would have to be made by computer without human intervention. This scheme would be more appropriate for evaluating scientific ideas, but it may be less useful for practical applications than daily updates. Second, triggered earthquakes are imperfectly recorded following larger events because their seismic waves are buried in the coda of the earlier event. To solve this problem, testing methods need to allow for censoring of early aftershock data, and a quantitative model for detection threshold as a function of distance, time, and magnitude is needed. Third, earthquake catalogs contain errors in location and magnitude that may be corrected in later editions. One solution is to test models in pseudo-prospective mode (after catalog revision but without model adjustment). Again, appropriate for science but not for response. Hopefully, demonstrations of modeling success will stimulate improvements in earthquake detection.

Jackson, D. D.; Kagan, Y. Y.; Schorlemmer, D.; Zechar, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Wong, K.

2009-12-01

367

Coriolis effect contribution to earthquake triggering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coriolis force plays an important role on the surface of the earth in many dynamic problems of the atmosphere, or the ocean, in which moving velocity reaches ~m s-1 or higher. It is also important in the dynamo of outer core. In the solid earth, velocities of motion are usually low (~cm/a) and the effects of Coriolis force are usually believed negligible. However, during the fracture process of earthquake, rock bodies may slip at a velocity of ~km s-1, and Coriolis forces may produce effect either facilitate the fracture or hinder the fracture growth depending on the fault geometry and slip mode. Based on the Harvard CMT (centroid moment tensor) catalogue, NEIC (national earthquake information center) catalogue since 1976, for 127 earthquakes with magnitude Mw or Ms greater than or equal to 7.5 and fault plane and slip direction known, we calculated the incremental stresses produced by Coriolis forces at coseismic moment, including the normal stress increment ??n, shear stress increment projected to the direction of fault slip ??, and then the Coulomb failure stress increment ?CFS = ??+ ???n respectively. We then counted the frequency of occurrence of these great earthquakes versus Coriolis Coulomb stress changes (?CFS). Although Coriolis ?CFS usually is only at the order of 10 kPa, we found that among M?7.5 earthquakes, about 62% of them occurred with positive ?CFS, and only 38% occurred with negative ?CFS. We did similar calculations for 50 earthquakes of Ms?6.0 in China based on CEA (China earthquake administration) catalogue, the ratio turned to be 64% versus 36%. The results indicate that coseismic Coriolis force does affect the growth of earthquake fault. Earthquakes with positive Coriolis ?CFS do have a better chance for fault growth, while those with negative Coriolis ?CFS may come to a premature end. Fault segment with favorite Coriolis ?CFS may have a 60~70% higher chance to grow bigger. The phenomena may help to forecast the probability of occurrence rate in regions with dominate fault geometry and mechanism.

Cheng, H.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, H.; Shi, Y.

2011-12-01

368

1964 Alaska Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video adapted from the Valdez Museum & Historical Archive, explores what happened during the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 through original footage, first-person accounts, and animations illustrating plate tectonics.

2008-11-04

369

Mammoth Mountain Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By watching this National Geographic video, you will learn about the seismic activity of Mammoth Mountain. Located in the eastern Sierra Mountains, everyday earthquakes shake the region and there are signs of an imminent volcanic eruption.

2010-01-01

370

Earthquake Magnitude and Intensity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this exercise, students compare the amount of shaking caused by historic earthquakes, and use data from seismograms to determine Richter magnitude. They will also investigate moment magnitude, an alternative to Richter magnitude, and calculate a seismic moment. In the second portion of the exercise, students investigate earthquake intensity and prepare a map of intensity values from the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake, using actual reports of its effects. Introductory materials explain the difference between earthquake magnitude and intensity, point out the logarithmic nature of the Richter scale, and present criteria for assigning modified Mercalli intensity values to a particular location. The exercise includes instructions, maps, data, and study questions. A bibliography is also provided.

Pinter, Nicholas

2012-04-26

371

Earthquake Magnitude and Intensity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this exercise, students compare the amount of shaking caused by historic earthquakes, and use data from seismograms to determine Richter magnitude. They will also investigate moment magnitude, an alternative to Richter magnitude, and calculate a seismic moment. In the second portion of the exercise, students investigate earthquake intensity and prepare a map of intensity values from the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake, using actual reports of its effects. Introductory materials explain the difference between earthquake magnitude and intensity, point out the logarithmic nature of the Richter scale, and present criteria for assigning modified Mercalli intensity values to a particular location. The exercise includes instructions, maps, data, and study questions. A bibliography is also provided.

Pinter, Nicholas

372

Northridge, CA Earthquake Damage  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The person in this image was a USGS employee at the time this was taken. Collection of USGS still images taken after the January 17, 1994 Northridge earthquake highlighting the damage to buildings and infrastructure....

373

To capture an earthquake  

SciTech Connect

An earthquake model based on the theory of plate tectonics is presented. It is assumed that the plates behave elastically in response to slow, steady motions and the strains concentrate within the boundary zone between the plates. When the accumulated stresses exceed the bearing capacity of the rocks, the rocks break, producing an earthquake and releasing the accumulated stresses. As the steady movement of the plates continues, strain begins to reaccumulate. The cycle of strain accumulation and release is modeled using the motion of a block, pulled across a rough surface by a spring. A model earthquake can be predicted by taking into account a precursory event or the peak spring force prior to slip as measured in previous cycles. The model can be applied to faults, e.g., the San Andreas fault, if the past earthquake history of the fault and the rate of strain accumulation are known.

Ellsworth, W.L. (USGS, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-11-01

374

New research project for the next Nankai trough mega thrust earthquakes -Integration of Observation, Simulation and Disaster Mitigation researches-  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nankai trough located off Southwestern Japan is well known as mega thrust earthquake seismogenic zone, In the Nankai trough, there are three mega thrust earthquake rupture zones such as Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai earthquake rupture zones, around there mega thrust earthquakes are occurring with an interval of 100-200 years. In past three mega thrust earthquakes around the Nankai trough, 1944/1946(Showa earthquake), 1854(Ansei earthquake) and 1707(Hoei earthquake), these occurrence patterns are quite differences. In the1994/1946 Showa earthquakes, the first rupture started from the Tonankai earthquake rupture zone a head of the Nankai earthquake with a interval of 2 years, however, in the 1854 Ansei earthquakes, time difference between the Tonankai/Tokai earthquakes and the Nankai earthquake were about 32 hours, and in the 1707 Hoei earthquakes, time differences among these earthquakes are estimated as almost same. According to results of these historical earthquakes, we understand that there quite diversities in the mega thrust earthquake recurrences around the Nankai trough. To understand and estimate the diversities among ten next Nankai trough mega thrust earthquakes , we have to improve the structure model and the recurrence cycle simulation model with higher reliabilities. Especially, the estimation of recurrence cycle between the Tonankai and Nankai earthquake is very important for disaster preventions. The new research project for the next Nanaki trough mega thrust earthquakes is starting as the MEXT project which is a kind of Japanese government. In this project, we will propose research plans as follows, 1) Construct the detailed crustal medium around the Nankai trough using controlled sources and seismic tomography using dense seismic lines and OBS network arrays. 2) Observations of crustal activities around the Nankai trough using seismometers and pressure gauges. 3) Construct the database of long term plate coupling dynamics. And study the diversity of recurrence pattern and scale of next mega thrust earthquakes. 4) Develop the advanced simulation methods. 5) Improve the large scale recurrence cycle simulation model based on theoretical and experimental analyses. 6) Evaluate the precise strong motions and tsunamis for the disaster mitigation. 7) Develop the reliable risk management system for next mega thrust earthquake. 8) Develop and construct the real time monitoring system around the Tonankai earthquake rupture zone. This system is called as DONET(Dense Ocean floor Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis). 9) Apply scientific results of Nankai seismogenic zone drilling to recurrence cycle simulation. Finally, we will progress these researches and integrate these results for the next Nankai trough mega thrust earthquakes. We will introduce these researches in the detail.

Kaneda, Y.; Hirahara, K.; Furumuea, T.

2009-04-01

375

Quantitative Earthquake Prediction on Global and Regional Scales  

SciTech Connect

The Earth is a hierarchy of volumes of different size. Driven by planetary convection these volumes are involved into joint and relative movement. The movement is controlled by a wide variety of processes on and around the fractal mesh of boundary zones, and does produce earthquakes. This hierarchy of movable volumes composes a large non-linear dynamical system. Prediction of such a system in a sense of extrapolation of trajectory into the future is futile. However, upon coarse-graining the integral empirical regularities emerge opening possibilities of prediction in a sense of the commonly accepted consensus definition worked out in 1976 by the US National Research Council. Implications of the understanding hierarchical nature of lithosphere and its dynamics based on systematic monitoring and evidence of its unified space-energy similarity at different scales help avoiding basic errors in earthquake prediction claims. They suggest rules and recipes of adequate earthquake prediction classification, comparison and optimization. The approach has already led to the design of reproducible intermediate-term middle-range earthquake prediction technique. Its real-time testing aimed at prediction of the largest earthquakes worldwide has proved beyond any reasonable doubt the effectiveness of practical earthquake forecasting. In the first approximation, the accuracy is about 1-5 years and 5-10 times the anticipated source dimension. Further analysis allows reducing spatial uncertainty down to 1-3 source dimensions, although at a cost of additional failures-to-predict. Despite of limited accuracy a considerable damage could be prevented by timely knowledgeable use of the existing predictions and earthquake prediction strategies. The December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean Disaster seems to be the first indication that the methodology, designed for prediction of M8.0+ earthquakes can be rescaled for prediction of both smaller magnitude earthquakes (e.g., down to M5.5+ in Italy) and for mega-earthquakes of M9.0+. The monitoring at regional scales may require application of a recently proposed scheme for the spatial stabilization of the intermediate-term middle-range predictions. The scheme guarantees a more objective and reliable diagnosis of times of increased probability and is less restrictive to input seismic data. It makes feasible reestablishment of seismic monitoring aimed at prediction of large magnitude earthquakes in Caucasus and Central Asia, which to our regret, has been discontinued in 1991. The first results of the monitoring (1986-1990) were encouraging, at least for M6.5+.

Kossobokov, Vladimir G. [International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Mathematical Geophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Warshavskoye sh. 79-2, Moscow, 117556 (Russian Federation); Institute de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris, 75252 (France)

2006-03-23

376

The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN): Recent Network Upgrades and Northern New Mexico Earthquake Catalog Updates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From the first data recorded in the fall of 1973 to now, the Los Alamos Seismograph Network (LASN) has operated for nearly 40 years. LASN data have been used to locate more than 2,500 earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. The network was installed for seismic verification research, as well as to monitor and locate earthquakes near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LASN stations are the only earthquake monitoring stations in New Mexico north of Albuquerque. In the late 1970s, LASN included 22 stations spread over a geographic area of 150 km (N-S) by 350 km (E-W), of northern New Mexico. In the early 1980s, the available funding limited the stations that could be operated to a set of 7, located within an area of about 15 km (N-S) by 15 km (E-W), centered on Los Alamos. Over the last 3 years, 6 additional stations have been installed, which have considerably expanded the spatial coverage of the network. These new stations take advantage of broadband state-of-the-art sensors as well as digital recording and telemetry technology. Currently, 7 stations have broadband, three-component seismometers with digital telemetry, and the remaining 6 have traditional 1 Hz short-period seismometers with analog telemetry. In addition, a vertical array of accelerometers was installed in a wellbore on LANL property. This borehole station has 3-component digital strong-motion sensors. In addition, four forensic strong-motion accelerometers (SMA) are operated at LANL facilities. With 3 of the new broadband stations in and around the nearby Valles Caldera, LASN is now able to monitor any very small volcano-seismic events that may be associated with the caldera. We will present a complete description of the current LASN station, instrumentation and telemetry configurations, as well as the data acquisition and event-detection software structure used to record events in Earthworm. More than 2,000 earthquakes were detected and located in north-central New Mexico during the first 11 years of LASN's operation (1973 to 1984). With the subsequent downsizing of the network, only 1-2 earthquakes per month were detected and located within about 150 km of Los Alamos. Over 850 of these nearby earthquakes have been located from 1973 to present. We recently updated the LASN earthquake catalog for north-central New Mexico up through 2011 and most of 2012. This involved re-assessing phase picks and ensuring that all locations are derived using updated station locations and the best available velocity model. We are also looking at subsets of the catalog that include earthquake swarms and clusters and applying relative location techniques to obtain high-precision re-locations for these events. Most events that were detected and located by LASN have magnitudes less than 1.5 and do not appear in the catalogs of any other network. We will present a newly updated map of north-central New Mexico seismicity based on these recent efforts.

Roberts, P. M.; House, L. S.; Greene, M.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Kelley, R.

2012-12-01

377

Connecting Earthquakes and Violins  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Violins, earthquakes, and the "singing rod" demonstration all have something in common--stick-slip frictional motion. This article begins with a typical classroom experiment used to understand the transition between sticking and slipping, proceeds to a mechanical earthquake model that is truly "stick-slip" as scientists describe it, and progresses to acoustic examples of the same phenomenon in action. Other interesting cases involving frictional effects are described.

James Ringlein

2005-11-01

378

Focus of an Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simple Flash animation by McGraw-Hill shows the relationship between earthquake focus and earthquake epicenter which is found directly above the focus. Also displayed in the animation are the fault plane, fault scarp, and fault trace. The animation is part of a collection of animations and movies related to Physical Geology published by McGraw-Hill. http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072402466/student_view0/chapter16/animations_and_movies.html

Mcgraw-Hill

379

Virtual Courseware: Earthquake  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive exercise lets students investigate how seismic waves are used to locate the epicenter of an earthquake and determine its magnitude. They will place virtual seismic stations on an interactive map, trigger a virtual explosion, and measure the difference in arrival times of S- and P-waves generated by the explosion. Using this data, they can determine the distance to each station and use triangulation to determine the epicenter of the earthquake.

380

Tectonics, Earthquakes, Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students do background reading on plate tectonics and associated geologic hazards. In the first part of this exercise, students use on-line courseware from California State University, Los Angeles (Virtual Earthquake) to investigate seismograph records and use these records to determine earthquake epicenters and magnitudes. In the second part, they complete a crossword puzzle designed to help them master new vocabulary related to plate tectonics.

Holmgren, Camille

381

Frequency distribution and quantification of deep earthquakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The frequency distribution of deep earthquakes (d>350 km) is analyzed on a regional scale, using magnitude data from ~4660 events reported in the International Seismological Center Bulletin (1964-1982) and 391 centroid moment tensor solutions (1977-1987). We use the moment magnitude Mw to define b values comparable with studies of shallow seismicity; scaling laws relating Mw, mb, and M0 are derived

Domenico Giardini

1988-01-01

382

System of Earthquakes Alert (SEA) on the territory of Bulgaria developed as a result of DACEA project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prevention of the natural disasters and the performing management of reactions to crisis are common problems for many countries. The Romania-Bulgaria border region is significantly affected by earthquakes occurred in both territories: on the one-hand, Vrancea seismic source, with intermediate-depth events and on the other hand, crustal seismicity recorded in the northern part of Bulgaria (Shabla, Dulovo, Gorna Orjahovitza). The general objective of DACEA (2010-2013) project is to develop an system of earthquake alert in order to prevent the natural disasters caused by earthquakes in the cross-border area, taking into account the nuclear power plants and other chemical plants located along the Danube on the territories of Romania and Bulgaria. An integrated warning system is designed and implemented in the cross-border area. A seismic detection network is put in operation in order to warn the bodies in charge with emergency situations management in case of seismic danger. The main purpose of this network is: monitoring of the four seismogenic areas relevant for the cross-border area, in order to detect dangerous earthquakes sending the seismic warning signals within several seconds to the local public authorities in the cross-border area On the territory of Bulgaria the seismic network belonging to SEA is consists of: 8 seismic stations equipped with Basalt digitizer, accelerometer Epi-sensor and BB seismometer KS2000. 8 seismic stations equipped with Basalt digitizer, accelerometer Epi-sensor, warning and visual monitoring equipment. The stations are spanned allover the North Bulgaria. The sites were thoroughly examined and the most important requirement was the low level of noise or vibrations. SEA centers were established both in Sofia (in National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography - NIGGG) and Bucharest (in National Institute of Research and Development for Earth Physics). Both centers are equipped with servers for data analyses and storage. Specialized software for elaboration of scenarios of seismic hazard is designed and implemented. The reaction of buildings, roads, bridges, land etc. to earthquakes is graphically shown on the monitor. The high risk areas are highlighted in order for the emergency units to be prepared for intervention. This software is designed on the base of a comprehensive relational data base of historical and contemporary seismicity in the cross-border region. The output shake maps and scenarios are to be used by the emergency intervention units, local public authorities and for general public awareness.

Solakov, Dimcho; Dimitrova, Liliya; Simeonova, Stela; Aleksandrova, Irena; Stoyanov, Stoyan; Metodiev, Metodi

2013-04-01

383

Injection-induced earthquakes.  

PubMed

Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard. PMID:23846903

Ellsworth, William L

2013-07-12

384

Emergency seismic and CGPS networks: a first employment for the L'Aquila Mw 6.3 earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last 2 years, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) developed an important real-time temporary seismic network infrastructure in order to densify the Italian National Seismic Network in epicentral areas thus enhancing the localization of the micro-seismicity after main earthquake events. This real-time temporary seismic network is constituted by various mobile and autonomous seismic stations that in group of three are telemetered to a Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT). This system uses a dedicated bandwidth on UHF, Wi-Fi and satellite frequency that allows the data flow in real-time at INGV centre in Rome (and Grottaminarda as backup center). The deployment of the seismic network is managed in a geographical information systems (GIS) by particular scenarios that visualizes, for the epicentral area, information about instrumental seismicity, seismic risk, macroseismic felts and territorial data. Starting from digital terrain model, the surface spatial analysis (Viewshed, Observer Point) allows the geographic arrangement of the stations and relative scenarios. The April, 6th, 2009 Mw 6.3 L'Aquila destructive earthquake represented the first real-case to test the entire emergency seismic network infrastructure. Less than 6 hours after the earthquake occurrence, a first accelerometer station was already sending data at INGV seismic monitoring headquarters. A total number of 9 seismic stations have been installed within 3 days after the earthquake. Furthermore, 5 permanent GPS stations have been installed in the epicentral area within 1 to 9 days after the main shock to detect the post-seismic deformation induced by the earthquake. We will show and describe the details of the Emergency Seismic Network infrastructure, and the first results from the collected data.

Abruzzese, L.; Avallone, A.; Cecere, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cardinale, V.; Castagnozzi, A.; Cogliano, R.; Criscuoli, F.; D'Agostino, N.; D'Ambrosio, C.; de Luca, G.; D'Anastasio, E.; Falco, L.; Flammia, V.; Migliari, F.; Minichiello, F.; Memmolo, A.; Monachesi, G.; Moschillo, R.; Pignone, M.; Pucillo, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Zarrilli, L.; Delladio, A.; Govoni, A.; Franceschi, D.; de Martin, M.; Moretti, M.

2009-12-01

385

Post-traumatic stress disorder in children and adolescents of the Armenian earthquake  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of the Armenian earthquake of 1988 on children and adolescents screened through the National Mental Health Research\\u000a Center in Spitak, Armenia, is discussed. The earthquake caused close to 20,000 deaths, almost two-thirds of which were children\\u000a and adolescents. Clinical data which address advances in understanding the diagnostic indicators and resulting psychopathology\\u000a in victims of the Armenian earthquake are

Thomas W. Miller; Robert F. Kraus; Adel Semyonova Tatevosyan; Peter Kamenchenko

1993-01-01

386

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2011, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 4,364 earthquakes, of which 3,651 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity above background levels in 2011 at these instrumented volcanic centers. This catalog includes locations, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2011 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

2012-01-01

387

Real-time processing of earthquake information in Iceland.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tools for real-time analysis have been implemented at seismic stations in the SIL system in Iceland, as a part of the Icelandic Meteorological Office participation in the SAFER and TRANSFER projects. These tools include processes to support alert maps and Shake Maps, first steps towards fast magnitude determination based on dominant frequency, and the development of procedures to map faults in near-real-time. Data for alert maps and Shake Maps is obtained using a real-time process that monitors both ground velocity and acceleration in 4 separate frequency bands at each station: 4-50 Hz, 1-10 Hz, 0.25-2.5 Hz and 0.05-0.5 Hz. A reference level is maintained for horizontal and vertical components in each frequency band, such that it is exceeded a few times per hour. When signals exceed this level by more than 50%, a report is sent to the processing center. When 5 or more stations send reports within a time interval of 20 seconds, alert maps are generated. The alert maps show observed values for each station, including peak ground velocity and arrival times for peaks in ground motion and first break. An attempt is also made to solve for the location of the event. The location solution is based on the assumption that time when the vertical component first exceeds the reference level by a certain amount indicate the arrival of the P wave from an earthquake. Before searching for a location solution, the arrival times for different stations are compared and stations are dropped so that no time differences are greater than the time that it takes a P wave to travel from one station to another. The location calculation uses a fixed depth ( 4 km ) and uses a parametric travel time curve that is based on observations from South Iceland. All possible combinations of 3 stations are used to compute potential solutions; the location that yields the lowest sum of absolute residuals is then found. Once the location has been determined, conventional magnitude can be calculated, using recently refined magnitude-distance relations for Icelandic earthquakes. When a good fit is obtained for at least 5 stations, for both arrival times and amplitudes, and the magnitude indicated is greater than 2.0, a Shake Map is generated and placed online automatically. The Shake Maps are usually ready within 2 minutes of the earthquake. The maps can be accessed at http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/alert. This real-time analysis has been operational on over 40 stations in the SIL system since early September 2008. These tools have yielded accurate magnitude estimations for nearly all earthquakes that have been felt in Iceland during this period. In order to extend coverage to surrounding ocean areas, we are working on having access to real-time data from a few seismic stations around the North-Atlantic. This should enable early warning for large offshore earthquakes. Mapping of faults in near-real-time fault is performed by using double-difference relocation of automatically located microearthquakes, relative to a library of events already located with high precision. Thus, taking advantage of the tens of thousands of earthquakes in South Iceland that have been relatively located. Automation of the relocation process is under development. When completed, the process will enable near-real-time delineation of activated faults by the distribution of microearthquakes.

Kjartansson, E.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Hjaltadottir, S.; Sveinbjornsson, H.; Armannsdottir, S.; Gudmundsson, G. B.

2009-04-01

388

Charles Darwin's earthquake reports  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As it is the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birth, 2009 has also been marked as 170 years since the publication of his book Journal of Researches. During the voyage Darwin landed at Valdivia and Concepcion, Chile, just before, during, and after a great earthquake, which demolished hundreds of buildings, killing and injuring many people. Land was waved, lifted, and cracked, volcanoes awoke and giant ocean waves attacked the coast. Darwin was the first geologist to observe and describe the effects of the great earthquake during and immediately after. These effects sometimes repeated during severe earthquakes; but great earthquakes, like Chile 1835, and giant earthquakes, like Chile 1960, are rare and remain completely unpredictable. This is one of the few areas of science, where experts remain largely in the dark. Darwin suggested that the effects were a result of the rending of strata, at a point not very deep below the surface of the earth' and when the crust yields to the tension, caused by its gradual elevation, there is a jar at the moment of rupture, and a greater movement...'. Darwin formulated big ideas about the earth evolution and its dynamics. These ideas set the tone for the tectonic plate theory to come. However, the plate tectonics does not completely explain why earthquakes occur within plates. Darwin emphasised that there are different kinds of earthquakes ...I confine the foregoing observations to the earthquakes on the coast of South America, or to similar ones, which seem generally to have been accompanied by elevation of the land. But, as we know that subsidence has gone on in other quarters of the world, fissures must there have been formed, and therefore earthquakes...' (we cite the Darwin's sentences following researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474). These thoughts agree with results of the last publications (see Nature 461, 870-872; 636-639 and 462, 42-43; 87-89). About 200 years ago Darwin gave oneself airs by the problems which began to discuss only during the last time. Earthquakes often precede volcanic eruptions. According to Darwin, the earthquake-induced shock may be a common mechanism of the simultaneous eruptions of the volcanoes separated by long distances. In particular, Darwin wrote that the elevation of many hundred square miles of territory near Concepcion is part of the same phenomenon, with that splashing up, if I may so call it, of volcanic matter through the orifices in the Cordillera at the moment of the shock;'. According to Darwin the crust is a system where fractured zones, and zones of seismic and volcanic activities interact. Darwin formulated the task of considering together the processes studied now as seismology and volcanology. However the difficulties are such that the study of interactions between earthquakes and volcanoes began only recently and his works on this had relatively little impact on the development of geosciences. In this report, we discuss how the latest data on seismic and volcanic events support the Darwin's observations and ideas about the 1835 Chilean earthquake. The material from researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474 is used. We show how modern mechanical tests from impact engineering and simple experiments with weakly-cohesive materials also support his observations and ideas. On the other hand, we developed the mathematical theory of the earthquake-induced catastrophic wave phenomena. This theory allow to explain the most important aspects the Darwin's earthquake reports. This is achieved through the simplification of fundamental governing equations of considering problems to strongly-nonlinear wave equations. Solutions of these equations are constructed with the help of analytic and numerical techniques. The solutions can model different strongly-nonlinear wave phenomena which generate in a variety of physical context. A comparison with relevant experimental observations is also presented.

Galiev, Shamil

2010-05-01

389

Assessing truck driver exposure at the World Trade Center disaster site: personal and area monitoring for particulate matter and volatile organic compounds during October 2001 and April 2002.  

PubMed

The destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City on September 11, 2001, created a 16-acre debris field composed of pulverized and burning material significantly impacting air quality. Site cleanup began almost immediately. Cleanup workers were potentially exposed to airborne contaminants, including particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, and asbestos, at elevated concentrations. This article presents the results of the exposure assessment of one important group of WTC workers, truck drivers, as well as area monitoring that was conducted directly on site during October 2001 and April 2002. In cooperation with a local labor union, 54 drivers (October) and 15 drivers (April) were recruited on site to wear two monitors during their 12-hour work shifts. In addition, drivers were administered a questionnaire asking for information ranging from "first day at the site" to respirator use. Area monitoring was conducted at four perimeter locations during October and three perimeter locations during April. During both months, monitoring was also conducted at one location in the middle of the rubble. Contaminants monitored for included total dust (TD), PM10, PM2.5, and volatile organic compounds. Particle samples were analyzed for mass, as well as elemental and organic carbon content. During October, the median personal exposure to TD was 346 microg/m3. The maximum area concentration, 1742 microg/m3, was found in middle of the debris. The maximum TD concentration found at the perimeter was 392 microg/m3 implying a strong concentration gradient from the middle of debris outward. PM2.5/PM10 ratios ranged from 23% to 100% suggesting significant fire activity during some of the sampled shifts. During April, the median personal exposure to TD was 144 microg/m3, and the highest area concentration, 195 microg/m3, was found at the perimeter. During both months, volatile organic compounds concentrations were low. PMID:15764541

Geyh, Alison S; Chillrud, Steven; Williams, D'Ann L; Herbstman, Julie; Symons, J Morel; Rees, Katherine; Ross, James; Kim, Sung Roul; Lim, Ho-Jin; Turpin, Barbara; Breysse, Patrick

2005-03-01

390

AMBIENT AIR MONITORING AT GROUND ZERO AND LOWER MANHATTAN FOLLOWING THE COLLAPSE OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) collaborated with EPA's Regional offices to establish a monitoring network to characterize ambient air concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and air toxics in lower Manhattan following the collapse of the World Trade...

391

Seafloor Geodetic Approaches to Subduction Thrust Earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observation systems and some observed results of seafloor geodesy are reviewed with a focus on the research activities of Japanese groups, especially those of Tohoku University. Seafloor acoustic ranging has been adopted as the simplest way to continuously monitor local crustal activities. The GPS-Acoustic (GPSA) method has been the most important for seafloor positioning. It seems that commercial technologies can be used to lessen the considerable differences in repeatability and spatio-temporal resolution of GPSA and land based GPS. Ocean bottom pressure sensors have been used to continuously monitor vertical crustal movements. Improvements in the resolution and long-term stability of pressure sensors will lead to monitoring slow slip events and interplate locking. Ocean bottom and underwater gravimeters have been developed for precise gravity mapping and monitoring mass change beneath the seafloor. The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake is an historical event demonstrating that seafloor geodetic observations are crucial to understanding the mechanism of giant earthquakes. Coseismic displacements detected through geodetic observations on the seafloor have indicated huge slips on the shallow part of the plate boundary. A slow slip event near the zone of the coseismic slip preceding the main event has been detected from slight pressure variations. This illustrates the importance of real-time monitoring with a cabled seafloor observatory, which is also a key to establishing a reliable early tsunami warning system.

Fujimoto, H.

2014-03-01

392

Cruise report for 01-99-SC: southern California earthquake hazards project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The focus of the Southern California Earthquake Hazards project is to identify the landslide and earthquake hazards and related ground-deformation processes occurring in the offshore areas that have significant potential to impact the inhabitants of the Southern California coastal region. The project activity is supported through the Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the Geologic Division of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and is a component of the Geologic Division's Science Strategy under Goal 1Conduct Geologic Hazard Assessments for Mitigation Planning (Bohlen et al., 1998). The project research is specifically stated under Activity 1.1.2 of the Science Strategy: Earthquake Hazard Assessments and Loss Reduction Products in Urban Regions. This activity involves "research, seismic and geodetic monitoring, field studies, geologic mapping, and analyses needed to provide seismic hazard assessments of major urban centers in earthquake-prone regions including adjoining coastal and offshore areas." The southern California urban areas, which form the most populated urban corridor along the U.S. Pacific margin, are among a few specifically designated for special emphasis under the Division's science strategy (Bohlen et al., 1998). The primary objective of the project is to help mitigate the earthquake hazards for the Southern California region by improving our understanding of how deformation is distributed (spatially and temporally) in the offshore with respect to the onshore region. To meet this objective, we are conducting field investigations to observe the distribution, character, and relative intensity of active (i.e., primarily Holocene) deformation within the basins and along the shelf adjacent to the most highly populated areas (Fig. 1). In addition, acoustic imaging should help determine the subsurface dimensions of the faults and identify the size and frequency of submarine landslides, both of which are necessary for evaluating the potential for generating destructive tsunamis in the southern California offshore. In order to evaluate the strain associated with the offshore structures, the initial results from the field mapping under this project will be used to identify possible sites for deployment of acoustic geodetic instruments to monitor strain in the offshore region. A major goal of mapping under this project is to provide detailed geologic and geophysical information in GIS data bases that build on the earlier studies and use the new data to precisely locate active faults and to map recent submarine landslide deposits.

Normark, William R.; Reid, Jane A.; Sliter, Ray W.; Holton, David; Gutmacher, Christina E.; Fisher, Michael A.; Childs, Jonathan R.

1999-01-01

393

Nevada Earthquake Response GPS Network (NEARNET)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG), a statewide agency at the University of Nevada, has accepted the responsibility of responding to a Nevada earthquake by operating a Nevada post-earthquake technical information clearinghouse [ State of Nevada Standard Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, Oct 2004]. The NSMHM Plan identifies the need to be prepared to rapidly study a major event within the first few days after an earthquake. In preparation for a rapid earthquake response, the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory at NBMG has designed and has begun to implement a statewide 400-station GPS geodetic network with spatial resolution of approximately 20 km: (1) to provide existing, pre-earthquake geodetic control such that co-seismic displacements can be measured with 1 mm precision within days following any large earthquake that might affect anywhere in Nevada, (2) to monitor post-seismic deformation related to transient processes and stress transfer between active faults from days to years following large earthquakes, (3) to produce high resolution strain-rate maps toward improving neotectonic models of the Great Basin and seismic hazard assessment. From January 2004 - September 2005, 110 GPS control points have been installed and measured precisely in western Nevada and eastern California, spanning the Walker Lane and Central Nevada Seismic Belt (CNSB), where crustal strain rates are highest. Approximately 10 new control points are being added and measured every month, with approximately 30 days of continuous data collected at each point to establish epoch coordinates. NBMG now has approximately 50 GPS receivers deployed in NEARNET at any given time. A 60-station core of the NEARNET network (known as "MAGNET") spans the northern Walker Lane and CNSB at the latitude of Reno and is occupied approximately 50% of the time so that strain rates can be more rapidly resolved in this region. Aspects of the design, operation, and analysis of the NEARNET network are proving to mitigate problems that often plague GPS campaigns, and enhance the precision of coordinate time series. Preliminary crustal strain-rate maps are already becoming available using sites that have now been in operation for only just over one year. In addition to providing Nevada with an earthquake response capability, NEARNET serves multiple purposes, and is jointly funded by the State of Nevada and the Department of Energy's Geothermal Program and Yucca Mountain Project.

Blewitt, G.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.; Plag, H.

2005-12-01

394

Pronounced soil-radon anomalyPrecursor of recent earthquakes in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

The real time radon monitoring is an extensively studied area in order to give premonitory signs prior to an earthquake. The strain changes that occurred within the earth surface during earthquake is expected to enhance the radon concentration in soil gas. In order to support this theoretical view, we have performed an experiment on measuring radon concentration in soil gas

Dipak Ghosh; Argha Deb; Rosalima Sengupta; Kanchan Kumar Patra; Sukumar Bera

2007-01-01

395

Google Mapplets for Earthquakes and Volcanic Activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The USGS Earthquake and Volcano Hazards Programs monitor, assess, and issue warnings of natural hazards. Users can access our hazards information through our web pages, RSS feeds, and now through USGS Mapplets. Mapplets allow third party data layers to be added on top of Google Maps (http://maps.google.com - My Maps tab). Mapplets are created by parsing a GeoRSS feed, which involves searching through an XML file for location data and plotting the associated information on a map. The new Mapplets allow users to view both real-time earthquakes and current volcanic activity on the same map for the first time. In addition, the USGS Mapplets have been added to Google's extensive collection of Mapplets, allowing users to add the types of information they want to see on their own customized maps. The Earthquake Mapplet plots the past week of earthquakes around the world, showing the location, time and magnitude. The Volcano Mapplet displays the latest U.S. volcano updates, including the current level of both ground-based and aviation hazards. Join us to discuss how Mapplets are made and how they can be used to create your own customized map.

Haefner, S. A.; Venezky, D. Y.

2007-12-01

396

Sun-earth environment study to understand earthquake prediction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake prediction is possible by looking into the location of active sunspots before it harbours energy towards earth. Earth is a restless planet the restlessness turns deadly occasionally. Of all natural hazards, earthquakes are the most feared. For centuries scientists working in seismically active regions have noted premonitory signals. Changes in thermosphere, Ionosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere are noted before the changes in geosphere. The historical records talk of changes of the water level in wells, of strange weather, of ground-hugging fog, of unusual behaviour of animals (due to change in magnetic field of the earth) that seem to feel the approach of a major earthquake. With the advent of modern science and technology the understanding of these pre-earthquake signals has become stronger enough to develop a methodology of earthquake prediction. A correlation of earth directed coronal mass ejection (CME) from the active sunspots has been possible to develop as a precursor of the earthquake. Occasional local magnetic field and planetary indices (Kp values) changes in the lower atmosphere that is accompanied by the formation of haze and a reduction of moisture in the air. Large patches, often tens to hundreds of thousands of square kilometres in size, seen in night-time infrared satellite images where the land surface temperature seems to fluctuate rapidly. Perturbations in the ionosphere at 90 - 120 km altitude have been observed before the occurrence of earthquakes. These changes affect the transmission of radio waves and a radio black out has been observed due to CME. Another heliophysical parameter Electron flux (Eflux) has been monitored before the occurrence of the earthquakes. More than hundreds of case studies show that before the occurrence of the earthquakes the atmospheric temperature increases and suddenly drops before the occurrence of the earthquakes. These changes are being monitored by using Sun Observatory Heliospheric observatory (SOHO) satellite data. Whatever the manifestations in the environment of the atmosphere or geosphere may be, there is a positive correlation of CMEs with change in magnetic field followed by aurora borealis or sudden spark of light from the sky before an earthquake. Any change in geomorphology in the pixel level, changes in groundwater level, geochemical anomalies of soils surrounding active faults and vegetation anomalies should be monitored in the mirror image position of sunspots on the earth facing side in reference to CME from the sun.

Mukherjee, S.

2007-05-01

397

Combining earthquake forecasts using differential probability gains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe an iterative method to combine seismicity forecasts. With this method, we produce the next generation of a starting forecast by incorporating predictive skill from one or more input forecasts. For a single iteration, we use the differential probability gain of an input forecast relative to the starting forecast. At each point in space and time, the rate in the next-generation forecast is the product of the starting rate and the local differential probability gain. The main advantage of this method is that it can produce high forecast rates using all types of numerical forecast models, even those that are not rate-based. Naturally, a limitation of this method is that the input forecast must have some information not already contained in the starting forecast. We illustrate this method using the Every Earthquake a Precursor According to Scale (EEPAS) and Early Aftershocks Statistics (EAST) models, which are currently being evaluated at the US testing center of the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability. During a testing period from July 2009 to December 2011 (with 19 target earthquakes), the combined model we produce has better predictive performance - in terms of Molchan diagrams and likelihood - than the starting model (EEPAS) and the input model (EAST). Many of the target earthquakes occur in regions where the combined model has high forecast rates. Most importantly, the rates in these regions are substantially higher than if we had simply averaged the models.

Shebalin, Peter N.; Narteau, Clment; Zechar, Jeremy Douglas; Holschneider, Matthias

2014-12-01

398

Real-time neural network earthquake profile predictor  

DOEpatents

A neural network has been developed that uses first-arrival energy to predict the characteristics of impending earthquake seismograph signals. The propagation of ground motion energy through the earth is a highly nonlinear function. This is due to different forms of ground motion as well as to changes in the elastic properties of the media throughout the propagation path. The neural network is trained using seismogram data from earthquakes. Presented with a previously unseen earthquake, the neural network produces a profile of the complete earthquake signal using data from the first seconds of the signal. This offers a significant advance in the real-time monitoring, warning, and subsequent hazard minimization of catastrophic ground motion. 17 figs.

Leach, R.R.; Dowla, F.U.

1996-02-06

399

Real-time neural network earthquake profile predictor  

DOEpatents

A neural network has been developed that uses first-arrival energy to predict the characteristics of impending earthquake seismograph signals. The propagation of ground motion energy through the earth is a highly nonlinear function. This is due to different forms of ground motion as well as to changes in the elastic properties of the media throughout the propagation path. The neural network is trained using seismogram data from earthquakes. Presented with a previously unseen earthquake, the neural network produces a profile of the complete earthquake signal using data from the first seconds of the signal. This offers a significant advance in the real-time monitoring, warning, and subsequent hazard minimization of catastrophic ground motion.

Leach, Richard R. (Castro Valley, CA); Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA)

1996-01-01

400

US earthquake observatories: recommendations for a new national network  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first attempt by the seismological community to rationalize and optimize the distribution of earthquake observatories across the United States. The main aim is to increase significantly our knowledge of earthquakes and the earth's dynamics by providing access to scientifically more valuable data. Other objectives are to provide a more efficient and cost-effective system of recording and distributing earthquake data and to make as uniform as possible the recording of earthquakes in all states. The central recommendation of the Panel is that the guiding concept be established of a rationalized and integrated seismograph system consisting of regional seismograph networks run for crucial regional research and monitoring purposes in tandem with a carefully designed, but sparser, nationwide network of technologically advanced observatories. Such a national system must be thought of not only in terms of instrumentation but equally in terms of data storage, computer processing, and record availability.

Not Available

1980-01-01

401

Evaluation of the effects of ground shaking and static volumetric strain change on earthquake-related groundwater level changes in Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Between 2001 and 2005, the Disaster Prevention Research Center of National Cheng-Kung University established a groundwater observation network consisting of 16 wells. Most of these were located along active faults for research on earthquake-related groundwater changes. They were selected mainly from among the 550 groundwater observation wells of the Water Resources Agency (WRA), which monitors and manages groundwater resources in Taiwan. The groundwater level was observed at a resolution of 0.2 mm at the wells. The depths of the well screens ranged between 80 and 252 m. Groundwater level data at six of the 16 wells were analyzed between 2003 and 2006 in an evaluation of such data for use in detecting earthquake-related groundwater level changes. The strain sensitivities of the groundwater level at these six wells ranged between 0.1 and 0.5 mm/10-9, indicating that an analysis of groundwater level data at these six wells can detect volumetric strain changes on the order of 10-9. Coseismic and/or postseismic groundwater level changes associated with 17 earthquakes in and around Taiwan whose magnitudes were ?6 were also analyzed. Our analysis shows that ground shaking seems the main reason for earthquake-related changes but that the acceleration of ground shaking cannot always explain the observed groundwater level changes.

Lai, W.-C.; Hsu, K.-C.; Shieh, C.-L.; Lee, Y.-P.; Chung, K.-C.; Koizumi, N.; Matsumoto, N.

2010-04-01

402

Center of Excellence for Applied Mathematical and Statistical Research in support of development of multicrop production monitoring capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Efforts in support of the development of multicrop production monitoring capability are reported. In particular, segment level proportion estimation techniques based upon a mixture model were investigated. Efforts have dealt primarily with evaluation of current techniques and development of alternative ones. A comparison of techniques is provided on both simulated and LANDSAT data along with an analysis of the quality of profile variables obtained from LANDSAT data.

Woodward, W. A.; Gray, H. L.

1983-01-01

403

Earthquake impact scale  

USGS Publications Warehouse

With the advent of the USGS prompt assessment of global earthquakes for response (PAGER) system, which rapidly assesses earthquake impacts, U.S. and international earthquake responders are reconsidering their automatic alert and activation levels and response procedures. To help facilitate rapid and appropriate earthquake response, an Earthquake Impact Scale (EIS) is proposed on the basis of two complementary criteria. On the basis of the estimated cost of damage, one is most suitable for domestic events; the other, on the basis of estimated ranges of fatalities, is generally more appropriate for global events, particularly in developing countries. Simple thresholds, derived from the systematic analysis of past earthquake impact and associated response levels, are quite effective in communicating predicted impact and response needed after an event through alerts of green (little or no impact), yellow (regional impact and response), orange (national-scale impact and response), and red (international response). Corresponding fatality thresholds for yellow, orange, and red alert levels are 1, 100, and 1,000, respectively. For damage impact, yellow, orange, and red thresholds are triggered by estimated losses reaching $1M, $100M, and $1B, respectively. The rationale for a dual approach to earthquake alerting stems from the recognition that relatively high fatalities, injuries, and homelessness predominate in countries in which local building practices typically lend themselves to high collapse and casualty rates, and these impacts lend to prioritization for international response. In contrast, financial and overall societal impacts often trigger the level of response in regions or countries in which prevalent earthquake resistant construction practices greatly reduce building collapse and resulting fatalities. Any newly devised alert, whether economic- or casualty-based, should be intuitive and consistent with established lexicons and procedures. Useful alerts should also be both specific (although allowably uncertain) and actionable. In this analysis, an attempt is made at both simple and intuitive color-coded alerting criteria; yet the necessary uncertainty measures by which one can gauge the likelihood for the alert to be over- or underestimated are preserved. The essence of the proposed impact scale and alerting is that actionable loss information is now available in the immediate aftermath of significant earthquakes worldwide on the basis of quantifiable loss estimates. Utilizing EIS, PAGER's rapid loss estimates can adequately recommend alert levels and suggest appropriate response protocols, despite the uncertainties; demanding or awaiting observations or loss estimates with a high level of accuracy may increase the losses. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

Wald, D.J.; Jaiswal, K.S.; Marano, K.D.; Bausch, D.

2011-01-01

404

Assessment of point process models for earthquake forecasting Andrew Bray1  

E-print Network

Assessment of point process models for earthquake forecasting Andrew Bray1 and Frederic Paik Schoenberg1 1 UCLA Department of Statistics, 8125 Math Sciences Building, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1554 Abstract Models for forecasting earthquakes are currently tested prospectively in well- organized testing centers

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

405

Earthquake and Geothermal Energy  

E-print Network

The origin of earthquake has long been recognized as resulting from strike-slip instability of plate tectonics along the fault lines. Several events of earthquake around the globe have happened which cannot be explained by this theory. In this work we investigated the earthquake data along with other observed facts like heat flow profiles etc... of the Indian subcontinent. In our studies we found a high-quality correlation between the earthquake events, seismic prone zones, heat flow regions and the geothermal hot springs. As a consequence, we proposed a hypothesis which can adequately explain all the earthquake events around the globe as well as the overall geo-dynamics. It is basically the geothermal power, which makes the plates to stand still, strike and slip over. The plates are merely a working solid while the driving force is the geothermal energy. The violent flow and enormous pressure of this power shake the earth along the plate boundaries and also triggers the intra-plate seismicity. In the light o...

Kapoor, Surya Prakash

2013-01-01

406

Mid-continent earthquakes:Mid continent earthquakes: the need for a system  

E-print Network

the rupture zone #12;In general we assume: Past large earthquakes indicate where large earthquakes will occur earthquakes indicate where Past large earthquakes indicate where large earthquakes will occurMid-continent earthquakes:Mid continent earthquakes: the need for a system approach Mian Liu

407

Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation shows earthquake and volcanic activity corresponds to plate boundaries. This interactive topographical map with the ocean water removed shows the boundaries of major plates and the locations of major volcanic eruptions and earthquakes worldwide.

408

Investigating Earthquakes with Google Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will explore the relationship between earthquakes and the tectonic plate boundaries using Google Earth. Students will track earthquakes noting location, magnitude and date. Students will apply their findings to formulate an understanding the processes that shape the earth.

Molledo, Maggie

2012-07-25

409

Earthquake Education Environment (E3)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Earthquake Education Environment (E3) supports high-quality K-12 and undergraduate education by providing up-to-date earthquake information, authoritative technical sources, and educational resources for the classroom.

2007-07-16

410

ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 500, Vol. 46, No. 1, March 2009, pp. 117 SMOOTH SPECTRA OF HORIZONTALAND VERTICAL GROUND  

E-print Network

ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 500, Vol. 46, No. 1, March 2009, pp. 1­17 SMOOTH*** *Seismology Research Center, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, Tehran, Iran **Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan ***Iran Strong Motion Network, Building

Gupta, Vinay Kumar

411

TEC enhancement immediately before M9 mega-thrust earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquakes are often preceded by electromagnetic precursors, e.g. electric currents in the ground and propagation anomalies of radio waves. By monitoring the differences of the L1 and L2 carrier phases from GPS satellites, we can infer ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). Here I report that positive anomalies of ionospheric TEC appeared immediately before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki (Mw9.0), 2010 Chile (Maule) (Mw8.8), 2007 Bengkulu (Mw8.6), and 2004 Sumatra-Andaman (Mw9.2) earthquakes. Coseismic vertical movements of the surface excite acoustic and internal gravity waves, causing coseismic ionospheric disturbances (CID), and GPS-TEC data showed that they occurred about ten minutes after these earthquakes. In addition to them, positive TEC anomalies were found to start 60-40 minutes before these earthquakes above the focal regions, and to last until the onsets of CID. In the Tohoku-Oki case, the anomaly was reached about one tenth of the background TEC immediately before the earthquake. TEC enhancements often occur irrespective of earthquakes, for example, sudden increase of TEC due to solar flares and large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTID) propagating from the auroral oval to mid-latitude regions. These disturbances can be distinguished by carefully observing their spatial extents and movements. Geomagnetic activities were relatively high in the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 2011 Tohoku-Oki events, but were low in the 2007 Bengkulu and 2010 Chile events. For the Tohoku-Oki and the Bengkulu earthquakes, we analyzed the TEC time series of the same satellite and receiver pair over 120 days before and after the earthquakes, and confirmed that the precursory anomalies of the earthquakes were the largest in these periods. We also investigated three M8 class earthquakes, the 1994 Hokkaido-Toho-Oki (Mw8.3), 2006 Kuril (Mw8.2), and the 2003 Tokachi-Oki (Mw8.0) earthquakes. However, only weak precursory TEC anomalies were seen in the 1994 event, and not in the 2003 event. Only M9 class earthquakes are considered to be immediately preceded by such positive TEC anomalies. Because the raw GPS data files are available on the web, one can easily reproduce the results reported here and apply the method to other (including future) earthquakes. The physical mechanism of the preseismic TEC anomalies is not clear, but concentration of positive electric charges on the ground is a possibility.

Heki, Kosuke

2012-07-01

412

Earthquake prediction activities and Damavand earthquake precursor test site in Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iran has long been known as one of the most seismically active areas of the world, and it frequently suffers destructive and catastrophic earthquakes that cause heavy loss of human life and widespread damage. The Alborz region in the northern part of Iran is an active EW trending mountain belt of 100 km wide and 600 km long. The Alborz range is bounded by the Talesh Mountains to the west and the Kopet Dagh Mountains to the east and consists of several sedimentary and volcanic layers of Cambrian to Eocene ages that were deformed during the late Cenozoic collision. Several active faults affect the central Alborz. The main active faults are the North Tehran and Mosha faults. The Mosha fault is one of the major active faults in the central Alborz as shown by its strong historical seismicity and its clear morphological signature. Situated in the vicinity of Tehran city, this 150-km-long N100 E trending fault represents an important potential seismic source. For earthquake monitoring and possible future prediction/precursory purposes, a test site has been established in the Alborz mountain region. The proximity to the capital of Iran with its high population density, low frequency but high magnitude earthquake occurrence, and active faults with their historical earthquake events have been considered as the main criteria for this selection. In addition, within the test site, there are hot springs and deep water wells that can be used for physico-chemical and radon gas analysis for earthquake precursory studies. The present activities include magnetic measurements; application of methodology for identification of seismogenic nodes for earthquakes of M ? 6.0 in the Alborz region developed by International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Mathematical Geophysics, IIEPT RAS, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (IIEPT&MG RAS); a feasibility study using a dense seismic network for identification of future locations of seismic monitoring stations and application of short-term prediction of medium- and large -size earthquakes is based on Markov and extended self-similarity analysis of seismic data. The establishment of the test site is ongoing, and the methodology has been selected based on the IASPEI evaluation report on the most important precursors with installation of (i) a local dense seismic network consisting of 25 short-period seismometers, (ii) a GPS network consisting of eight instruments with 70 stations, (iii) magnetic network with four instruments, and (iv) radon gas and a physico-chemical study on the springs and deep water wells

Mokhtari, Mohammad

2010-01-01

413

Sand boils without earthquakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sedimentary deformation caused by liquefaction has become a popular means for inferring prehistoric strong earthquakes. This report describes a new mechanism for generating such features in the absence of earthquakes. Sand boils and a 180-m-long sand dike formed in Fremont Valley, California, when sediment-laden surface runoff was intercepted along the upslope part of a 500-m-long preexisting ground crack, flowed subhorizonally in the crack, and then flowed upward in the downslope part of the crack where it discharged as sand boils on the land surface. If the sand boils and their feeder dike were stratigraphically preserved, they could be misinterpreted as evidence for earthquake-induced liquefaction. -Authors

Holzer, T.L.; Clark, M.M.

1993-01-01

414

Earthquake Resistant Cathedral in Chile  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A cathedral in the central square of Chilln, Chile replaces the ancient cathedral that collapsed during the strong earthquake of 1939. This modern structure was constructed with earthquake resistance as the primary consideration. The only damage caused by the M 8.8 earthquake on Feb. 27, 2010 was b...

415

Earthquakes! Amplitude and Magnitude Connection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interdisciplinary learning activity illustrates the differences between the amplitude and magnitude of earthquakes in a mathematical context. Students will express earthquake magnitude as a logarithmic function of amplitude and express earthquake amplitude as an exponential function of magnitude. Worksheets are also included in the document.

2010-12-13

416

Staying Safe in Earthquake Country  

E-print Network

two of the largest earthquakes in the history of the State of California, including the famous event; some of the intervals between geologically recorded earthquakes are as short as 30 years, while othersStaying Safe in Earthquake Country David Bowman On July 29 of this year, Mother Nature sent Cal

de Lijser, Peter

417

Can earthquakes be Karen Felzer  

E-print Network

to duck and cover! >99% chance that a M 6.7 earthquake will occur in CA within 30 years. 2008 Working another large quake can occur #12;The Seismic Gap Model Earthquakes occur periodically or quasi from Bakun and Lindh, 1985 Like Old Faithful! Earthquake supposed to occur 1985 - 1993 with 95

Felzer, Karen

418

March 13, 2011 Tohoku Earthquake  

E-print Network

March 13, 2011 Tohoku Earthquake I extend my sincere sympathies to the many people affected by the Tohoku earthquake. I pray that those affected are able to return to a peaceful existence as quickly staff have been affected by this earthquake. The situation remains unpredictable, with aftershocks

Miyashita, Yasushi

419

Turkish Children's Ideas about Earthquakes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Earthquake, a natural disaster, is among the fundamental problems of many countries. If people know how to protect themselves from earthquake and arrange their life styles in compliance with this, damage they will suffer will reduce to that extent. In particular, a good training regarding earthquake to be received in primary schools is considered

Simsek, Canan Lacin

2007-01-01

420

PAGER--Rapid assessment of an earthquake?s impact  

USGS Publications Warehouse

PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts--which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking--now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses.

Wald, D.J.; Jaiswal, K.; Marano, K.D.; Bausch, D.; Hearne, M.

2010-01-01

421

The New Madrid Compendium: A Comprehensive Source of References for the 1811-1812 Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"The New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-1812 were one of the most dramatic natural disasters to strike the North American continent." At this website, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (ERI) supplies numerous archived eyewitness accounts to these earthquakes. Visitors can search through reports about these earthquakes from three databases. Researchers can find countless references of documents and maps. The website lists items still wanted by ERI to complete this project as well. This site is also reviewed in the January 7, 2005_NSDL Physical Sciences Report_.

422

Earthquake Word Searches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Finding the words in these word searches will help you learn about earthquakes. The words in the puzzles may be hidden horizontally, vertically, diagonally, forward, or backward. To circle a discovered word, mouse-click on one end of the word and mouse-drag to the other end of the word. Once a word is found, it will be taken off the list. There are nine word searches that you can play: famous seismologists, general earthquake terms, magnitude, Mercalli Intensity Scale, plate names, plate tectonics, Richter Magnitude Scale, seismic waves, and tsunamis.

Harshbarger, Eric

2009-10-27

423

Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

1997-07-01

424

Stochastic relation between anomalous propagation in the line-of-sight VHF radio band and occurrences of earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper was intended to find out any relation between anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the VHF band and occurrences of earthquakes near the VHF propagation paths. The television and FM radio broadcasting waves on the VHF band were monitored continuously over the long term. For that purpose, a multidirectional VHF band monitoring system was established and utilized. Anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the VHF band was distinguished from the monitored wave by using a statistical analysis. After the stochastic consideration, it was found out that earthquakes associated with anomalous propagation were characterized by magnitude of earthquakes M ? 4.5, and distances from epicenters L ? 75 km. The anomalous propagation was monitored on the VHF band a few days earlier the associated earthquakes occurred. Moreover, the anomaly appeared on multidirectional propagation paths simultaneously. The anomaly on the line-of-sight propagation indicates possibility of narrow focusing the area of epicenter of earthquake.

Motojima, K.; Haga, N.

2013-11-01

425

Stochastic relation between anomalous propagation in the line-of-sight VHF radio band and occurrences of earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper was intended to find out any relation between anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the very high frequency (VHF) band and occurrences of earthquakes near the VHF propagation paths. The television and FM radio broadcasting waves on the VHF band were monitored continuously over the long term. For that purpose, a multidirectional VHF band monitoring system was established and utilized. Anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the VHF band was distinguished from the monitored wave by using a statistical analysis. After the stochastic consideration, it was found out that earthquakes associated with anomalous propagation were characterized by magnitude of earthquakes M ? 4.5, and distances from epicenters L ? 75 km. The anomalous propagation was monitored on the VHF band a few days before the associated earthquakes occurred. Moreover, the anomaly appeared on multidirectional propagation paths simultaneously. The anomaly on the line-of-sight propagation indicates the possibility of narrowly focusing the area of the epicenter of earthquake.

Motojima, K.; Haga, N.

2014-08-01

426

Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400 800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30 240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400 m, 600 m, and 800 m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

Ryan, R. E.; Irons, J. R.; Allen, R.; Spruce, J.; Underwood, L. W.; Pagnutti, M.

2006-12-01

427

Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate th