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Sample records for earwig anisolabis maritima

  1. Provisioning mass by females of the maritime earwig, Anisolabis maritima, is not adjusted based on the number of young.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seizi

    2011-01-01

    The amount of parental provisioning is thought to reflect the need of offspring. This hypothesis was tested in the case of provisioning food mass to young with controlled clutch size using the maritime earwig, Anisolabis maritima Bonelli (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae). The female provisioned a constant mass of food to the young irrespective of the number of nymphs and the distance of food carrying. In addition, the survival rate of young did not change with adjusted clutch size. This study showed that A. maritima females appear to provide food mass to their nymphs independent of their number. PMID:22239204

  2. Progressive provisioning by the females of the earwig, Anisolabis maritima, increases the survival rate of the young.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seizi

    2010-01-01

    Provisioning the young is an important form of insect parental care and is believed to improve the survival and growth of the young. Anisolabis maritima Bonelli (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae) is a cosmopolitan species of earwig that shows sub-social behavior in which the females tend clutches of eggs in soil burrows. The defensive and provisioning behaviors of these females were examined in this study. When disturbed, maternal individuals abandoned the nest less than non-maternal individuals. Females brought food to the nest after their eggs hatched, and the survival of the nymphs was increased by provisioning. Even when mothers were removed, providing food to the nymphs increased survival as well as when the nymphs were provisioned by the mother. These results show that A. maritima mothers provision the nymphs and that this provisioning improves their survival. PMID:21062141

  3. Morphological characterization of the antennal sensilla of t he earwig Anisolabis maritima (Dermaptera: Carcinophoridae) with reference to their probable functions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dosary, Mona Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    The earwig, Anisolabis maritima (Dermaptera: Carcinophoridae), is one of the most significant insects in KSA because, it was recorded in Saudi Arabia as a beneficial predator on eggs and newly hatched larvae of the red palm weevil, Rhyncophorus ferrugineus. We examined the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of males and females of A. maritima using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The filiform antennae of A. maritima were of the conventional type comprising a basal scape, pedicle and a long, thread-like flagellum, which was composed of 12 flagellomeres of males and 16 flagellomeres of females. Six morphologically unique sensillar types were found and described on the antennae of males and females of A. maritima. Of those identified, there were three types of porous trichoid sensilla (long, curved and arcuate), and two types of basiconic sensilla (short and curved), and one type of aporous trichoid sensilla. The shape, external morphology and array of sensilla on the antennae of males and females of A. maritima were similar. PMID:23961038

  4. Asymmetric forceps increase fighting success among males of similar size in the maritime earwig

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Nicole E.; Zink, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme asymmetric morphologies are hypothesized to serve an adaptive function that counteracts sexual selection for symmetry. However direct tests of function for asymmetries are lacking, particularly in the context of animal weapons. The weapon of the maritime earwig, Anisolabis maritima, exhibits sizeable variation in the extent of directional asymmetry within and across body sizes, making it an ideal candidate for investigating the function of asymmetry. In this study, we characterized the extent of weapon asymmetry, characterized the manner in which asymmetric weapons are used in contests, staged dyadic contests between males of different size classes and analyzed the correlates of fighting success. In contests between large males, larger individuals won more fights and emerged as the dominant male. In contests between small males, however, weapon asymmetry was more influential in predicting overall fighting success than body size. This result reveals an advantage of asymmetric weaponry among males that are below the mean size in the population. A forceps manipulation experiment suggests that asymmetry may be an indirect, correlate of a morphologically independent factor that affects fighting ability. PMID:22984320

  5. Management strategies in apple orchards influence earwig community.

    PubMed

    Malagnoux, Laure; Marliac, Gaëlle; Simon, Sylvaine; Rault, Magali; Capowiez, Yvan

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to assess whether different apple orchard management strategies (low-input, organic, Integrated Pest Management (IPM)) would have an effect on earwigs, which are important natural enemies of apple pests. These commercial orchards were as well compared to abandoned orchards. The density of Forficula auricularia and Forficula pubescens was studied for three years in 74 orchards around Avignon. The pesticide usage, some orchard characteristics and two small-scale landscape parameters were characterized. Pesticide use was significantly different between low-input, organic and IPM orchards with particularly significant differences in the number of insecticide applications (2.2, 4.9 and 9.2 respectively). Pesticide use had a much stronger impact on earwig community than other characteristics. F. auricularia density was significantly lower in IPM orchards (0.47 individuals per tree) compared to organic, low-input and abandoned orchards (3.1, 4.5 and 1.6 individuals per tree, respectively). F. pubescens was almost absent from IPM orchards and its abundance was higher in abandoned or low-input orchards compared to organic orchards (1.5 and 2.8 vs 0.8 individuals per tree). The percentage of F. pubescens in the earwig community decreased from abandoned (52%) to low-input (40%), organic (15%) and IPM orchards (0.5%). These results were confirmed by LD50 assays showing that for the two pesticides causing mortality close to normal application rates (chlorpyrifos-ethyl and acetamiprid), F. pubescens was significantly more sensitive than F. auricularia. Since earwigs are also easy to capture and identify, they may be useful to estimate the effects of management strategies and their modification in pome fruit orchards. PMID:25577700

  6. Reassessing the phylogenetic position of the epizoic earwigs (Insecta: Dermaptera).

    PubMed

    Naegle, Michael A; Mugleston, Joseph D; Bybee, Seth M; Whiting, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Dermaptera is a relatively small order of free-living insects that typically feed on detritus and other plant material. However, two earwig lineages - Arixeniidae and Hemimeridae - are epizoic on Cheiromeles bats and Beamys and Cricetomys rats respectively. Both of these epizoic families are comprised of viviparous species. The monophyly of these epizoic lineages and their placement within dermapteran phylogeny has remained unclear. A phylogenetic analyses was performed on a diverse sample of 47 earwig taxa for five loci (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, COI, Histone 3, and Tubulin Alpha I). Our results support two independent origins of the epizoic lifestyle within Dermaptera, with Hemimeridae and Arixeniidae each derived from a different lineage of Spongiphoridae. Our analyses places Marava, a genus of spongiphorids that includes free-living but viviparous earwigs, as sister group to Arixeniidae, suggesting that viviparity evolved prior to the shift to the epizoic lifestyle. Additionally, our results support the monophyly of Forficulidae and Chelisochidae and the paraphyly of Labiduridae, Pygidicranidae, Spongiphoridae, and Anisolabididae. PMID:27033951

  7. European Earwig, Forficula auricularia L. (Dermaptera: Forficulidae) at the Hanford Reach National Monument, Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The European earwig, Forficula auricularia L., was surveyed using pitfall traps at three sites at the Hanford Reach National Monument in south central Washington state. Pitfall traps were collected weekly from April 2002 through April 2003. The earwig was consistently taken during all months of the...

  8. Contact Toxicity and Residual Efficacy of Indoxacarb against the European Earwig (Dermaptera: Forficulidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Susan C.; Bryant, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    Indoxacarb (Arilon 20WG) was evaluated against a nuisance pest, the European earwig (Forficula auricularia), and was found to be an effective contact toxicant with residual activity on substrates commonly encountered in urban environments. Within 16 h of being directly sprayed with indoxacarb, ≥90% of earwigs from two populations were either ataxic, moribund, or dead, and 100% displayed these symptoms of severe intoxication at 1 d. Brief exposure (5 min or 1 h) to dried residues on either a porous (pine wood) or non-porous (ceramic tile) substrate also was sufficient to cause severe intoxication of earwigs within 1 d. In all bioassays, indoxacarb-treated earwigs showed no signs of recovery during the 21-d observation period. In outdoor urban habitats, intoxicated earwigs would be more vulnerable to desiccation, predation, or pathogens leading to higher mortality than in a laboratory setting. PMID:26466616

  9. Beta maritima: the Origin of Beets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Along the undisturbed shores, especially of the Mediterranean Sea and the European North Atlantic Ocean, is a widespread plant called Beta maritima (Beta vulgaris subspecies maritima) by the botanists, or more commonly sea beet. Nothing for the inexperienced observer's eye distinguishes it from surr...

  10. Earwigs ( Labidura riparia) mimic rotting-flesh odor to deceive vertebrate predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, John A.

    2015-08-01

    Many insects repel predators with caustic chemicals, while insects mimicking odors of wastes/dead insects to fool predators have not been documented. We found that the shore earwig, Labidura riparia (Dermaptera: Labiduridae) when bitten by anole lizards, Anolis carolinenesus, spits a rotting-flesh odor that deceives these insectivores into rejecting prey. Once a lizard attacked and rejected an earwig, the lizard did not attack another earwig during several weeks despite consuming other prey, indicating associative learning after one trial. The fetid odor was found in the head-prothorax containing salivary glands of both male and female earwigs and was comprised of ˜100 ng dimethyl disulfide and ˜600 ng dimethyl trisulfide. Nymphs had <5 ng of either compound. Adults also spit odorous sulfides after prolonged attacks by harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex rugosus, who were only deterred by the earwig's forceps. Sulfides released by the earwig are similar to odors of carrion/feces, which may be innately repulsive to some vertebrate predators. The mean initial discharge percentage (IDP) of sulfides from a cohort of earwigs was 62 %; however, IDPs of individuals were highly variable (3-99 %; mean 57 %). The discharge refill time (DRT) to refill 50 % of the earwig's allomone reservoir was estimated at 13 h. A positive relationship in sulfide amounts with body weight was found only in females in 2009, suggesting metabolic cost tradeoffs were revealed when sulfide content was half that in 2010. This is the first report of insects releasing sulfur-containing compounds that may mimic carrion-fecal odors as a deceptive defense against vertebrate predators.

  11. Earwigs (Labidura riparia) mimic rotting-flesh odor to deceive vertebrate predators.

    PubMed

    Byers, John A

    2015-08-01

    Many insects repel predators with caustic chemicals, while insects mimicking odors of wastes/dead insects to fool predators have not been documented. We found that the shore earwig, Labidura riparia (Dermaptera: Labiduridae) when bitten by anole lizards, Anolis carolinenesus, spits a rotting-flesh odor that deceives these insectivores into rejecting prey. Once a lizard attacked and rejected an earwig, the lizard did not attack another earwig during several weeks despite consuming other prey, indicating associative learning after one trial. The fetid odor was found in the head-prothorax containing salivary glands of both male and female earwigs and was comprised of ∼ 100 ng dimethyl disulfide and ∼ 600 ng dimethyl trisulfide. Nymphs had <5 ng of either compound. Adults also spit odorous sulfides after prolonged attacks by harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex rugosus, who were only deterred by the earwig's forceps. Sulfides released by the earwig are similar to odors of carrion/feces, which may be innately repulsive to some vertebrate predators. The mean initial discharge percentage (IDP) of sulfides from a cohort of earwigs was 62 %; however, IDPs of individuals were highly variable (3-99 %; mean 57 %). The discharge refill time (DRT) to refill 50 % of the earwig's allomone reservoir was estimated at 13 h. A positive relationship in sulfide amounts with body weight was found only in females in 2009, suggesting metabolic cost tradeoffs were revealed when sulfide content was half that in 2010. This is the first report of insects releasing sulfur-containing compounds that may mimic carrion-fecal odors as a deceptive defense against vertebrate predators. PMID:26071006

  12. Impact of insecticide exposure on the predation activity of the European earwig Forficula auricularia.

    PubMed

    Malagnoux, Laure; Capowiez, Yvan; Rault, Magali

    2015-09-01

    The European earwig Forficula auricularia is an effective predator in apple orchards. It is therefore crucial to study whether insecticides affect this natural pest control agent. Predation activity, i.e., the number of aphids eaten in 24 h, was determined under laboratory conditions after exposure of fourth-instar nymphs and adult earwigs to widely used insecticides (acetamiprid, chlorpyrifos-ethyl, deltamethrin, and spinosad), which were applied at the normal application rates. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities were also measured as indicators of pesticide exposure. Predation activity decreased significantly in nymphs exposed to spinosad (62%) and chlorpyrifos-ethyl (98%) compared with controls. A similar response was found for both esterase activities. Spinosad had a stronger effect on AChE (-33%) whereas chlorpyrifos-ethyl affected CbE activity preferentially (-59%). Spinosad (20% of controls), acetamiprid (28%), and chlorpyrifos-ethyl (66%) also significantly decreased the predation behavior of adult male but not female (5 to 40%) earwigs. Adult AChE and CbE activities were also significantly reduced (28 to 67% of controls) in pesticide-exposed earwigs. Our results suggest that earwigs should be included in the environmental risk assessment framework for authorization of newly marketed plant protection products. Their predation behavior appears to be a sensitive and complementary biomarker. PMID:25963069

  13. New earwigs in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar (Dermaptera, Neodermaptera)

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Two new earwigs (Dermaptera) recently discovered in mid-Cretaceous (latest Albian) amber from Myanmar are described and figured. Astreptolabis ethirosomatia gen. et sp. n. is represented by a peculiar pygidicranoid female, assigned to a new subfamily, Astreptolabidinae subfam. n., and differs from other protodermapterans in the structure of the head, pronotum, tegmina, and cercal forceps. Tytthodiplatys mecynocercus gen. et sp. n. is a distinctive form of first-instar nymph of the Diplatyidae, the earliest record for this basal earwig family. The taxon can be distinguished from other Early Cretaceous nymphs by the structure of the head, antennae, legs, and most notably its filamentous and annulate cerci. The character affinities of these taxa among Neodermaptera are generally discussed as is the identity of an enigmatic ‘earwig-like’ species from the Jurassic of China. PMID:22259272

  14. Transitional fossil earwigs - a missing link in Dermaptera evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Dermaptera belongs to a group of winged insects of uncertain relationship within Polyneoptera, which has expanded anal region and adds numerous anal veins in the hind wing. Evolutional history and origin of Dermaptera have been in contention. Results In this paper, we report two new fossil earwigs in a new family of Bellodermatidae fam. nov. The fossils were collected from the Jiulongshan Formation (Middle Jurassic) in Inner Mongolia, northeast China. This new family, characterized by an unexpected combination of primitive and derived characters, is bridging the missing link between suborders of Archidermaptera and Eodermaptera. Phylogenetic analyses support the new family to be a new clade at the base of previously defined Eodermaptera and to be a stem group of (Eodermaptera+Neodermaptera). Conclusion Evolutional history and origin of Dermaptera have been in contention, with dramatically different viewpoints by contemporary authors. It is suggested that the oldest Dermaptera might possibly be traced back to the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic and they had divided into Archidermaptera and (Eodermaptera+Neodermaptera) in the Middle Jurassic. PMID:21062504

  15. Simultaneous optimisation of earwig hindwings for flight and folding.

    PubMed

    Deiters, Julia; Kowalczyk, Wojciech; Seidl, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Earwig wings are highly foldable structures that lack internal muscles. The behaviour and shape changes of the wings during flight are yet unknown. We assume that they meet a great structural challenge to control the occurring deformations and prevent the wing from collapsing. At the folding structures especially, the wing could easily yield to the pressure. Detailed microscopy studies reveal adaptions in the structure and material which are not relevant for folding purposes. The wing is parted into two structurally different areas with, for example, a different trend or stiffness of the wing veins. The storage of stiff or more flexible material shows critical areas which undergo great changes or stress during flight. We verified this with high-speed video recordings. These reveal the extent of the occurring deformations and their locations, and support our assumptions. The video recordings reveal a dynamical change of a concave flexion line. In the static unfolded state, this flexion line blocks a folding line, so that the wing stays unfolded. However, during flight it extends and blocks a second critical folding line and prevents the wing from collapsing. With these results, more insight in passive wing control, especially within high foldable structures, is gained. PMID:27113958

  16. Simultaneous optimisation of earwig hindwings for flight and folding

    PubMed Central

    Deiters, Julia; Kowalczyk, Wojciech; Seidl, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Earwig wings are highly foldable structures that lack internal muscles. The behaviour and shape changes of the wings during flight are yet unknown. We assume that they meet a great structural challenge to control the occurring deformations and prevent the wing from collapsing. At the folding structures especially, the wing could easily yield to the pressure. Detailed microscopy studies reveal adaptions in the structure and material which are not relevant for folding purposes. The wing is parted into two structurally different areas with, for example, a different trend or stiffness of the wing veins. The storage of stiff or more flexible material shows critical areas which undergo great changes or stress during flight. We verified this with high-speed video recordings. These reveal the extent of the occurring deformations and their locations, and support our assumptions. The video recordings reveal a dynamical change of a concave flexion line. In the static unfolded state, this flexion line blocks a folding line, so that the wing stays unfolded. However, during flight it extends and blocks a second critical folding line and prevents the wing from collapsing. With these results, more insight in passive wing control, especially within high foldable structures, is gained. PMID:27113958

  17. 75 FR 35990 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Flying Earwig Hawaiian Damselfly and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... FR 21664). Candidate species are those taxa for which the Service has sufficient information on their... FR 58804), whereas the Pacific Hawaiian damselfly retained its status as a candidate species. On November 15, 1994 (59 FR 58982), the flying earwig Hawaiian damselfly was added back onto the...

  18. A "spare" compensates for the risk of destruction of the elongated penis of earwigs (Insecta: Dermaptera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Yoshitaka; Matsuo, Yoh

    2001-11-01

    Male animals in several groups have multiple intromittent organs that outnumber the corresponding female gonopore. In Dermaptera (earwigs), males of the family Anisolabididae have paired, elongated male intromittent organs (virgae), while females have a single sperm-storage organ (spermatheca). Several authors have assumed that one of the paired virgae is non-functional, because it points in the "wrong" direction. We investigated the mating success of handicapped males of Euborellia plebeja in which one of their paired virgae was removed experimentally. These handicapped males succeeded in inseminating a mate. Males with genital damage are found in the field, suggesting that the "spare" functions under natural conditions. Based on phylogenetic information on earwigs, we discuss possible evolutionary scenarios for this genital peculiarity.

  19. When the body hides the ancestry: phylogeny of morphologically modified epizoic earwigs based on molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Kocarek, Petr; John, Vaclav; Hulva, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a study regarding the phylogenetic positions of two enigmatic earwig lineages whose unique phenotypic traits evolved in connection with ectoparasitic relationships with mammals. Extant earwigs (Dermaptera) have traditionally been divided into three suborders: the Hemimerina, Arixeniina, and Forficulina. While the Forficulina are typical, well-known, free-living earwigs, the Hemimerina and Arixeniina are unusual epizoic groups living on molossid bats (Arixeniina) or murid rodents (Hemimerina). The monophyly of both epizoic lineages is well established, but their relationship to the remainder of the Dermaptera is controversial because of their extremely modified morphology with paedomorphic features. We present phylogenetic analyses that include molecular data (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA and histone-3) for both Arixeniina and Hemimerina for the first time. This data set enabled us to apply a rigorous cladistics approach and to test competing hypotheses that were previously scattered in the literature. Our results demonstrate that Arixeniidae and Hemimeridae belong in the dermapteran suborder Neodermaptera, infraorder Epidermaptera, and superfamily Forficuloidea. The results support the sister group relationships of Arixeniidae+Chelisochidae and Hemimeridae+Forficulidae. This study demonstrates the potential for rapid and substantial macroevolutionary changes at the morphological level as related to adaptive evolution, in this case linked to the utilization of a novel trophic niche based on an epizoic life strategy. Our results also indicate that the evolutionary consequences of the transition to an ectoparazitic mode of living, which is extremely rare in earwigs, have biased previous morphology-based hypotheses regarding the phylogeny of this insect group. PMID:23826171

  20. When the Body Hides the Ancestry: Phylogeny of Morphologically Modified Epizoic Earwigs Based on Molecular Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kocarek, Petr; John, Vaclav; Hulva, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a study regarding the phylogenetic positions of two enigmatic earwig lineages whose unique phenotypic traits evolved in connection with ectoparasitic relationships with mammals. Extant earwigs (Dermaptera) have traditionally been divided into three suborders: the Hemimerina, Arixeniina, and Forficulina. While the Forficulina are typical, well-known, free-living earwigs, the Hemimerina and Arixeniina are unusual epizoic groups living on molossid bats (Arixeniina) or murid rodents (Hemimerina). The monophyly of both epizoic lineages is well established, but their relationship to the remainder of the Dermaptera is controversial because of their extremely modified morphology with paedomorphic features. We present phylogenetic analyses that include molecular data (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA and histone-3) for both Arixeniina and Hemimerina for the first time. This data set enabled us to apply a rigorous cladistics approach and to test competing hypotheses that were previously scattered in the literature. Our results demonstrate that Arixeniidae and Hemimeridae belong in the dermapteran suborder Neodermaptera, infraorder Epidermaptera, and superfamily Forficuloidea. The results support the sister group relationships of Arixeniidae+Chelisochidae and Hemimeridae+Forficulidae. This study demonstrates the potential for rapid and substantial macroevolutionary changes at the morphological level as related to adaptive evolution, in this case linked to the utilization of a novel trophic niche based on an epizoic life strategy. Our results also indicate that the evolutionary consequences of the transition to an ectoparazitic mode of living, which is extremely rare in earwigs, have biased previous morphology-based hypotheses regarding the phylogeny of this insect group. PMID:23826171

  1. De Novo Transcriptome Hybrid Assembly and Validation in the European Earwig (Dermaptera, Forficula auricularia)

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Samuel; Arbore, Roberto; Kühn-Bühlmann, Simone; Kölliker, Mathias; Walser, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Background The European earwig (Forficula auricularia) is an established system for studies of sexual selection, social interactions and the evolution of parental care. Despite its scientific interest, little knowledge exists about the species at the genomic level, limiting the scope of molecular studies and expression analyses of genes of interest. To overcome these limitations, we sequenced and validated the transcriptome of the European earwig. Methodology and Principal Findings To obtain a comprehensive transcriptome, we sequenced mRNA from various tissues and developmental stages of female and male earwigs using Roche 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina HiSeq. The reads were de novo assembled independently and screened for possible microbial contamination and repeated elements. The remaining contigs were combined into a hybrid assembly and clustered to reduce redundancy. A comparison with the eukaryotic core gene dataset indicates that we sequenced a substantial part of the earwig transcriptome with a low level of fragmentation. In addition, a comparative analysis revealed that more than 8,800 contigs of the hybrid assembly show significant similarity to insect-specific proteins and those were assigned for Gene Ontology terms. Finally, we established a quantitative PCR test for expression stability using commonly used housekeeping genes and applied the method to five homologs of known sex-biased genes of the honeybee. The qPCR pilot study confirmed sex specific expression and also revealed significant expression differences between the brain and antenna tissue samples. Conclusions By employing two different sequencing approaches and including samples obtained from different tissues, developmental stages, and sexes, we were able to assemble a comprehensive transcriptome of F. auricularia. The transcriptome presented here offers new opportunities to study the molecular bases and evolution of parental care and sociality in arthropods. PMID:24722757

  2. Advanced morphology and behaviour of extinct earwig-like cockroaches (Blattida: Fuziidae fam. nov.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršanský, Peter; Liang, Jun-Hui; Ren, Dong

    2009-12-01

    We describe the extinct cockroach family Fuziidae fam. nov., represented by Fuzia dadao gen. et sp. nov. from the ?Bathonian (168 Ma) Middle Jurassic sediments of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. Males are characterized by unique, long and narrow bodies with a notch on forceps of earwig-like cerci, which attaches to the long external ovipositor during courtship. In a combination with the presence of male tergal glands, it appears the most advanced form of reproduction in the nearly 300 Myr history of long external ovipositor-bearing cockroaches. Its advanced morphology significantly supports attribution of living and fossil cockroaches within a single order Blattida.

  3. Abiotic modulation of Spartina maritima photobiology in different latitudinal populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, B.; Couto, T.; Freitas, J.; Valentim, J.; Silva, H.; Marques, J. C.; Dias, J. M.; Caçador, I.

    2013-09-01

    Spartina maritima has a very wide distribution in the northern hemisphere salt marshes crossing a wide variety of climatic environments. Therefore, it is not strange that some differences arise when observing the photosynthetic mechanisms of different populations inhabiting different latitudes. During this study it could be observed that climate is the most important factor controlling the photosynthetic traits of different populations distributed along a climatic gradient, namely the air temperature, humidity and light environment. Also some sediment physicochemical parameters such as pH and pore water salinity showed important influences driving the photosynthetic mechanisms in S. maritima. Furthermore S. maritima is one of the most abundant halophytes colonizing the Portuguese salt marshes. These facts have greater importance if one considers the large abundance of this halophytic species and how climate change will affect their metabolism and thus the ecosystem services provided by this species to the estuarine system.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Helen E; Lapraz, François; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Telford, Maximilian J

    2015-01-01

    Strigamia maritima (Myriapoda; Chilopoda) is a species from the soil-living order of geophilomorph centipedes. The Geophilomorpha is the most speciose order of centipedes with over a 1000 species described. They are notable for their large number of appendage bearing segments and are being used as a laboratory model to study the embryological process of segmentation within the myriapods. Using a scaffold derived from the recently published genome of Strigamia maritima that contained multiple mitochondrial protein-coding genes, here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Strigamia, the first from any geophilomorph centipede. The mitochondrial genome of S. maritima is a circular molecule of 14,938 base pairs, within which we could identify the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 13 protein-coding genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Sequences resembling 16 of the 22 transfer RNA genes typical of metazoan mitochondrial genomes could be identified, many of which have clear deviations from the standard 'cloverleaf' secondary structures of tRNA. Phylogenetic trees derived from the concatenated alignment of protein-coding genes of S. maritima and >50 other metazoans were unable to resolve the Myriapoda as monophyletic, but did support a monophyletic group of chilopods: Strigamia was resolved as the sister group of the scolopendromorph Scolopocryptos sp. and these two (Geophilomorpha and Scolopendromorpha), along with the Lithobiomorpha, formed a monophyletic group the Pleurostigmomorpha. Gene order within the S. maritima mitochondrial genome is unique compared to any other arthropod or metazoan mitochondrial genome to which it has been compared. The highly unusual organisation of the mitochondrial genome of Strigamia maritima is in striking contrast with the conservatively evolving nuclear genome: sampling of more members of this order of centipedes will be required to see whether this unusual organization is typical of the Geophilomorpha or results from a more

  5. Spore dispersal of fetid Lysurus mokusin by feces of mycophagous insects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gao; Zhang, Rui-Rui; Liu, Yang; Sun, Wei-Bang

    2014-08-01

    The ecological roles and biological mechanisms of zoochory in plants have long been foci in studies of co-evolutionary processes between plants and animals. However, the dispersal of fungal spores by animals has received comparatively little attention. In this study, the dispersal of spores of a selected fetid fungus, Lysurus mokusin, via feces of mycophagous insects was explored by: collecting volatiles emitted by the fungus using dynamic headspace extraction and analyzing them by GC-MS; testing the capacity of mycophagous insects to disperse its spores by counting spores in their feces; comparing the germinability of L. mokusin spores extracted from feces of nocturnal earwigs and natural gleba of the fungus; and assessing the ability of L. mokusin volatiles to attract insects in bioassays with synthetic scent mixtures. Numerous spores were detected in insects' feces, the bioassays indicated that L. mokusin odor (similar to that of decaying substances) attracts diverse generalist mycophagous insects, and passage through the gut of Anisolabis maritima earwigs significantly enhanced the germination rate of L. mokusin spores. Therefore, nocturnal earwigs and diurnal flies probably play important roles in dispersal of L. mokusin spores, and dispersal via feces may be an important common dispersal mechanism for fungal reproductive tissue. PMID:25064696

  6. ROOT-EXUDED OXYGEN IN THE AQUATIC ANGIOSPERM 'RUPPIA MARITIMA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential impact of oxygen from roots on the source of inorganic nitrogen for Ruppia maritima L. (Potamogetonales) was investigated in laboratory experiments. Roots released oxygen at an average rate of 2 to 3 micrograms O2 (mg dry wt)/hr. A distinctive oxygenated zone with a...

  7. Wigeongrass (Ruppia maritima L.): a literature review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kantrud, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Wigeongrass (Ruppia maritima L.) is a submersed macrophyte of nearly cosmopolitan distribution and worldwide importance as a waterfowl food. Unfortunately, the plant no longer inhabits vast areas disturbed by human activities. Taxonomic status of the plant is uncertain, especially in North America. In mild climates, in habitats subject to environmental extremes, the plant behaves as an annual (vegetation perishes), or as a perennial in deeper, more stable habitats (some vegetative parts grow year round). Drupelets (seeds) provide a mechanism for wigeongrass to survive periods of drought and excessive water salinity. These sexual propagules can be washed ashore or carried by birds or fish for long distances.Wigeongrass mostly occurs in temporarily to permanently flooded mesohaline-hyperhaline estuarine wetlands, but it also occurs inland in fresh to hypersaline palustrine and lacustrine wetlands. Most populations inhabit warm, relatively unpolluted, and well lit waters 2S conditions. Turbidity frequently limits wigeongrass growth in waters overlying easily suspendible bottom substrates.Wigeongrass often occurs in monotypic stands, yet grows with many other submersed and emergent macrophytes. Dominance in certain wetlands sometimes alternates with dominance by other submersed macrophytes as salinities, seasonal temperature cycles, or other environmental factors change. The shading effect of metaphytic, planktonic, or epiphytic algae often reduces production.Wigeongrass and its detritus provide food and cover for a large invertebrate biota, although direct consumption of the living plants is minimal. Wigeongrass beds in coastal wetlands are heavily used by fish. The plant is recognized worldwide as an important food of migrant and wintering waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds. In subtropical climates, wintering waterfowl can quickly consume entire stands.Propagation and management of wigeongrass has occurred for nearly 60 years in the southern and eastern United

  8. Possible Removal of Rival Sperm by the Elongated Genitalia of the Earwig, Euborellia plebeja.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Y

    2000-07-01

    Sperm displacement is a sperm competition avoidance mechanism that reduces the paternity of males that have already mated with the female. Direct anatomical sperm removal or sperm flushing is known to occur in four insect orders: Odonata, Orthoptera, Coleoptera and Hymenoptera. In a fifth order, Dermaptera (earwigs), I found that the virga (the elongated rod of the male genitalia) of Euborellia plebeja seems to be used to remove rival sperm from the spermatheca (a fine-tubed female sperm storage organ). In this species, copulation lasted on average 4.6 minutes, during which time the male inserted the virga deep into the spermatheca, and then extracted it ejaculating semen from the opening of the virgal tip. The extraction of virgae (with its brim-like tip) appeared to cause removal of stored sperm in the spermatheca. The virga was as long as the body length of males, and the spermatheca was twice the female body length. The long length of the spermatheca and the possible removal function of the virga may select for virgal elongation. PMID:18517303

  9. Sibling cooperation in earwig families provides insights into the early evolution of social life.

    PubMed

    Falk, Joachim; Wong, Janine W Y; Kölliker, Mathias; Meunier, Joël

    2014-04-01

    The evolutionary transition from solitary to social life is driven by direct and indirect fitness benefits of social interactions. Understanding the conditions promoting the early evolution of social life therefore requires identification of these benefits in nonderived social systems, such as animal families where offspring are mobile and able to disperse and will survive independently. Family life is well known to provide benefits to offspring through parental care, but research on sibling interactions generally focused on fitness costs to offspring due to competitive behaviors. Here we show experimentally that sibling interactions also reflect cooperative behaviors in the form of food sharing in nonderived families of the European earwig, Forficula auricularia. Food ingested by individual offspring was transferred to their siblings through mouth-to-anus contacts and active allo-coprophagy. These transfers occurred in both the presence and the absence of the tending mothers, even though the direct contact with the mothers limited sibling food sharing. Neither food deprivation or relatedness influenced the total amount of transferred food, but relatedness affected frass release and the behavioral mechanisms mediating food sharing. Related offspring obtained food predominately through allo-coprophagy, whereas unrelated offspring obtained food through mouth-to-anus contacts. Overall, this study emphasizes that sibling cooperation may be a key process promoting the early evolution of social life. PMID:24642498

  10. NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE SUBMERGED ANGIO-SPERM 'RUPPIA MARITIMA' IN ALGAE-FREE CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruppia maritima has the potential to become a model laboratory organism for studies with submerged aquatic vascular plants. The present study demonstrated that algae-free R. maritima grew well in a defined medium without sediment. Growth was a linear response to photon flux densi...

  11. When it is costly to have a caring mother: food limitation erases the benefits of parental care in earwigs.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Joël; Kölliker, Mathias

    2012-08-23

    The aggregation of parents with offspring is generally associated with different forms of care that improve offspring survival at potential costs to parents. Under poor environments, the limited amount of resources available can increase the level of competition among family members and consequently lead to adaptive changes in parental investment. However, it remains unclear as to what extent such changes modify offspring fitness, particularly when offspring can survive without parents such as in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia. Here, we show that under food restriction, earwig maternal presence decreased offspring survival until adulthood by 43 per cent. This effect was independent of sibling competition and was expressed after separation from the female, indicating lasting detrimental effects. The reduced benefits of maternal presence on offspring survival were not associated with higher investment in future reproduction, suggesting a condition-dependent effect of food restriction on mothers and local mother-offspring competition for food. Overall, these findings demonstrate for the first time a long-term negative effect of maternal presence on offspring survival in a species with maternal care, and highlight the importance of food availability in the early evolution of family life. PMID:22535642

  12. Effect of Oxygen and Redox Potential on Glucose Fermentation in Thermotoga maritima under Controlled Physicochemical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal, Raja; Auria, Richard; Davidson, Sylvain; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hamdi, Moktar; Combet-Blanc, Yannick

    2010-01-01

    Batch cultures of Thermotoga maritima were performed in a bioreactor equipped with instruments adapted for experiments performed at 80°C to mimic the fluctuating oxidative conditions in the hot ecosystems it inhabits. When grown anaerobically on glucose, T. maritima was shown to significantly decrease the redox potential (Eh) of the culture medium down to about −480 mV, as long as glucose was available. Addition of oxygen into T. maritima cultures during the stationary growth phase led to a drastic reduction in glucose consumption rate. However, although oxygen was toxic, our experiment unambiguously proved that T. maritima was able to consume it during a 12-hour exposure period. Furthermore, a shift in glucose metabolism towards lactate production was observed under oxidative conditions. PMID:21461371

  13. Volatile composition of oyster leaf (Mertensia maritima (L.) Gray).

    PubMed

    Delort, Estelle; Jaquier, Alain; Chapuis, Christian; Rubin, Mark; Starkenmann, Christian

    2012-11-28

    Oyster leaf (Mertensia maritima), also called vegetarian oyster, has a surprising oyster-like aroma. Its volatile composition was investigated here for the first time. In total, 109 compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and quantified by GC-FID. The use of GC-olfactometry on both polar and nonpolar columns allowed the detection of the molecules having an oyster-like, marine odor. Four compounds were identified and confirmed by synthesis: (Z)-3-nonenal, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-ol, (Z,Z)-3,6-nonadienal, and (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one. After evaluation of freshly prepared reference samples, these compounds were confirmed to be reminiscent of the oyster-like marine notes perceived in the tasting of cut leaves. PMID:23140514

  14. The Genome Organization of Thermotoga maritima Reflects Its Lifestyle

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, Haythem; Lerman, Joshua A.; Portnoy, Vasiliy A.; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Nagarajan, Harish; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lee, Dae-Hee; Qiu, Yu; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-04-25

    Recent studies have revealed that microbial genomes have many more organizational features than previously thought. Here, an integrated approach utilizing multiple ‘omics’ datasets and bioinformatics tools is established that elucidates genomic features spanning various levels of cellular organization. This methodology produces gene annotation improvements and includes the definition of transcription units. These enhancements to the annotation enable identification of a set of genetic elements instrumental to gene expression and regulation including promoters, ribosome binding sites (RBSs) and untranslated regions (UTRs). This was applied to characterize the genome organization of Thermotoga maritima—a phylogenetically deep-branching, hyperthermophilic bacterium with a small 1.86 Mb genome. Analysis derived from this multiomics approach in combination with bioinformatics tools demonstrate that the genome organization of T. maritima reflects its lifestyle, both with respect to its extreme growth temperature and compact genome. Comparative analysis of genome features suggests that thermodynamic limitations on binding kinetics for RNA polymerase and the ribosome necessitate increased sequence conservation of promoters and RBSs. Thus, restricting the sequences capable of initiating transcription and translation. Furthermore, this organism has uncharacteristically short 5’UTRs (11-17 nucleotides), which reduce the potential for 5’UTR regulatory interactions. The short intergenic distances in the T. maritima genome (5 bp on average) leave little space for regulation through transcription factor binding. The net effect of these constraints, temperature and genomic space, is a reduced ability to tune gene expression. This effect is readily apparent in global gene expression patterns, which show a high fraction of genes expressed independent of growth state with a tight, linear mRNA/protein correlation (Pearson r = 0.62, p < 2.2 x 10-16 t-test). This methodology

  15. Characterization of the Earwig, Doru lineare, as a Predator of Larvae of the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda: A Functional Response Study

    PubMed Central

    Sueldo, Mabel Romero; Bruzzone, Octavio A.; Virla, Eduardo G.

    2010-01-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is considered as the most important pest of maize in almost all tropical America. In Argentina, the earwig Doru lineare Eschscholtz (Dermaptera: Forficulidae) has been observed preying on S. frugiperda egg masses in corn crops, but no data about its potential role as a biocontrol agent of this pest have been provided. The predation efficiency of D. lineare on newly emerged S. frugiperda larva was evaluated through a laboratory functional response study. D. lineare showed type II functional response to S. frugiperda larval density, and disc equation estimations of searching efficiency and handling time were (a) = 0.374 and (t) = 182.9 s, respectively. Earwig satiation occurred at 39.4 S. frugiperda larvae. PMID:20575739

  16. Effects of insecticide sublethal concentrations on the ringlegged earwig, Euborellia annulipes (Lucas).

    PubMed

    Poramarcom, R

    2011-01-01

    Integrated pest control of the sugarcane stem borer (SSB), Chila infuscatellus, recommends the use of a voracious predator as the ring legged earwig (RE), Euborellia annulipes (Lucas) and insecticide application. This study was conducted to determine sublethal effects of two recommended pyrethroid insecticides, cypermethrin and deltamethrin, on predation, the number of eggs/batch, % egg hatch and the developmental period of the offspring of RE adults. Sublethal concentrations of cypermethrin (10% EC) and deltamethrin (3% EC) at LC1 and LC10 were topically applied with a micro-applicator on tested individuals with direct and indirect methods. They were applied directly once on adults of RE or on ten 3rd instar larvae of SSB which were then fed to RE adults. Surviving adults were further investigated. Insecticide-treated RE adults with LC1 and LC10 of cypermethrin showed significantly slower onset of predation averaged 14.20 and 18.35 h, lower number of preys killed, averaged 4.8 and 4.2 larvae/d, respectively, as compared to those of untreated ones. The corresponding figures of treated adults with deltamethrin were 30.5 and 42.2 h, 4.6 and 3.8 larvae/d respectively. Similar results were obtained on RE adults that fed on insecticide-treated 3rd instar SSB larvae with the same concentrations of insecticides. The only different result was recorded on the number of preys killed by indirectly treated adults with LC1 of cypermethrin and deltamethrin averaged 9.6 and 8.8 larvae/d, respectively, which was not significantly different as compared to those of untreated ones. Insecticide-treated RE adults with LC10 of cypermethrin and deltamethrin showed significantly lower number of eggs/batch averaged 31.4 and 27.4 eggs, lower % egg hatch averaged 29.8 and 31.7%, prolonged developmental period of the offspring averaged 91.8 and 113.0 d, respectively, as compared to those of untreated ones. The corresponding figures of those from RE adults that fed on insecticide-treated 3rd

  17. Loktanella maritima sp. nov. isolated from shallow marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoto; Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Kurilenko, Valeriya V; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Kalinovskaya, Natalia I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2014-07-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-motile bacterium, KMM 9530(T), was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis positioned novel strain KMM 9530(T) in the genus Loktanella as a separate line adjacent to Loktanella sediminilitoris KCTC 32383(T), Loktanella tamlensis JCM 14020(T) and Loktanella maricola JCM 14564(T) with 98.5-98.2% sequence similarity. Strain KMM 9530(T) was characterized by its weak hydrolytic capacity and inability to assimilate most organic substrates. The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-10, polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid, an unknown aminolipid and unknown lipids, and the major fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic characterization, it can be concluded that the novel strain KMM 9530(T) represents a novel species in the genus Loktanella, for which the name Loktanella maritima sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is KMM 9530(T) ( = NRIC 0919(T) = JCM 19807(T)). PMID:24744019

  18. Contribution of Spartina maritima to the reduction of eutrophication in estuarine systems.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana I; Lillebø, Ana I; Caçador, Isabel; Pardal, Miguel A

    2008-12-01

    Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, performing important ecosystem functions, particularly nutrient recycling. In this study, a comparison is made between Mondego and Tagus estuaries in relation to the role of Spartina maritima in nitrogen retention capacity and cycling. Two mono-specific S. maritima stands per estuary were studied during 1yr (biomass, nitrogen (N) pools, litter production, decomposition rates). Results showed that the oldest Tagus salt marsh population presented higher annual belowground biomass and N productions, and a slower decomposition rate for litter, contributing to the higher N accumulation in the sediment, whereas S. maritima younger marshes had higher aboveground biomass production. Detritus moved by tides represented a huge amount of aboveground production, probably significant when considering the N balance of these salt marshes. Results reinforce the functions of salt marshes as contributing to a reduction of eutrophication in transitional waters, namely through sedimentation processes. PMID:18684544

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the free-living earwig, Challia fletcheri (Dermaptera: Pygidicranidae) and phylogeny of Polyneoptera.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinlong; Kim, Man Il; Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Iksoo

    2012-01-01

    The insect order Dermaptera, belonging to Polyneoptera, includes ∼2,000 extant species, but no dermapteran mitochondrial genome has been sequenced. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the free-living earwig, Challia fletcheri, compared its genomic features to other available mitochondrial sequences from polyneopterous insects. In addition, the Dermaptera, together with the other known polyneopteran mitochondrial genome sequences (protein coding, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes), were employed to understand the phylogeny of Polyneoptera, one of the least resolved insect phylogenies, with emphasis on the placement of Dermaptera. The complete mitochondrial genome of C. fletcheri presents the following several unusual features: the longest size in insects is 20,456 bp; it harbors the largest tandem repeat units (TRU) among insects; it displays T- and G-skewness on the major strand and A- and C-skewness on the minor strand, which is a reversal of the general pattern found in most insect mitochondrial genomes, and it possesses a unique gene arrangement characterized by a series of gene translocations and/or inversions. The reversal pattern of skewness is explained in terms of inversion of replication origin. All phylogenetic analyses consistently placed Dermaptera as the sister to Plecoptera, leaving them as the most basal lineage of Polyneoptera or sister to Ephemeroptera, and placed Odonata consistently as the most basal lineage of the Pterygota. PMID:22879905

  20. Negative association between parental care and sibling cooperation in earwigs: a new perspective on the early evolution of family life?

    PubMed

    Kramer, J; Thesing, J; Meunier, J

    2015-07-01

    The evolution of family life requires net fitness benefits for offspring, which are commonly assumed to mainly derive from parental care. However, an additional source of benefits for offspring is often overlooked: cooperative interactions among juvenile siblings. In this study, we examined how sibling cooperation and parental care could jointly contribute to the early evolution of family life. Specifically, we tested whether the level of food transferred among siblings (sibling cooperation) in the European earwig Forficula auricularia (1) depends on the level of maternal food provisioning (parental care) and (2) is translated into offspring survival, as well as female investment into future reproduction. We show that higher levels of sibling food transfer were associated with lower levels of maternal food provisioning, possibly reflecting a compensatory relationship between sibling cooperation and maternal care. Furthermore, the level of sibling food transfer did not influence offspring survival, but was associated with negative effects on the production of the second and terminal clutch by the tending mothers. These findings indicate that sibling cooperation could mitigate the detrimental effects on offspring survival that result from being tended by low-quality mothers. More generally, they are in line with the hypothesis that sibling cooperation is an ancestral behaviour that can be retained to compensate for insufficient levels of parental investment. PMID:25975926

  1. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Free-Living Earwig, Challia fletcheri (Dermaptera: Pygidicranidae) and Phylogeny of Polyneoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinlong; Kim, Man Il; Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Iksoo

    2012-01-01

    The insect order Dermaptera, belonging to Polyneoptera, includes ∼2,000 extant species, but no dermapteran mitochondrial genome has been sequenced. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the free-living earwig, Challia fletcheri, compared its genomic features to other available mitochondrial sequences from polyneopterous insects. In addition, the Dermaptera, together with the other known polyneopteran mitochondrial genome sequences (protein coding, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes), were employed to understand the phylogeny of Polyneoptera, one of the least resolved insect phylogenies, with emphasis on the placement of Dermaptera. The complete mitochondrial genome of C. fletcheri presents the following several unusual features: the longest size in insects is 20,456 bp; it harbors the largest tandem repeat units (TRU) among insects; it displays T- and G-skewness on the major strand and A- and C-skewness on the minor strand, which is a reversal of the general pattern found in most insect mitochondrial genomes, and it possesses a unique gene arrangement characterized by a series of gene translocations and/or inversions. The reversal pattern of skewness is explained in terms of inversion of replication origin. All phylogenetic analyses consistently placed Dermaptera as the sister to Plecoptera, leaving them as the most basal lineage of Polyneoptera or sister to Ephemeroptera, and placed Odonata consistently as the most basal lineage of the Pterygota. PMID:22879905

  2. Data on the abundance of the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus and of the earwig Euborellia caraibea in bare soil and cover crop plots.

    PubMed

    Carval, Dominique; Resmond, Rémi; Achard, Raphaël; Tixier, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Cover cropping reduces the abundance of the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus but does not reduce its damage to the banana plants" (Carval et al., in press) [1]. This article describes how the abundance of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus, and the abundance of the earwig Euborellia caraibea were affected by the addition of a cover crop. The field data set is made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyzes. PMID:27222854

  3. Data on the abundance of the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus and of the earwig Euborellia caraibea in bare soil and cover crop plots

    PubMed Central

    Carval, Dominique; Resmond, Rémi; Achard, Raphaël; Tixier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Cover cropping reduces the abundance of the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus but does not reduce its damage to the banana plants” (Carval et al., in press) [1]. This article describes how the abundance of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus, and the abundance of the earwig Euborellia caraibea were affected by the addition of a cover crop. The field data set is made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyzes. PMID:27222854

  4. ASSESSING THE IMPACTS OF SALINITY AND NUTRIENT STRESS TO RUPPIA MARITIMA AND ZOSTERA MARINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy seagrass beds were once found throughout the shallow areas of Narragansett Bay, R.I. but have disappeared due to infilling, pollution and disease. In Greenwich Bay, a highly developed embayment within Narragansett Bay, Ruppia maritima has colonized an area on the norther...

  5. IMPACTS OF SALINITY AND NUTRIENT STRESS TO RUPPIA MARITIMA AND ZOSTERA MARINA: A MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy seagrass beds were once found throughout the shallow areas of Narragansett Bay, R.I. but have disappeared due to infilling, pollution and disease. In Greenwich Bay, a highly developed embayment within Narragansett Bay, Ruppia maritima has colonized an area on the norther...

  6. EFFECTS OF SALINITY AND BOTTOM SUBSTRATE COMPOSITION ON THE GROWTH AND PROLIFERATION OF WIDGEONGRASS (RUPPIA MARITIMA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The preliminary work for these experiments has been conducted, and the data will be collected during the next 6-8 months. We will collect R. maritima samples from different environments along the Gulf Coast and compare the genetic diversity using the ITRS reg...

  7. The Thermotoga maritima Phenotype Is Impacted by Syntrophic Interaction with Methanococcus jannaschii in Hyperthermophilic Coculture†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. R.; Conners, S. B.; Montero, C. I.; Chou, C. J.; Shockley, K. R.; Kelly, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    Significant growth phase-dependent differences were noted in the transcriptome of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima when it was cocultured with the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii. For the mid-log-to-early-stationary-phase transition of a T. maritima monoculture, 24 genes (1.3% of the genome) were differentially expressed twofold or more. In contrast, methanogenic coculture gave rise to 292 genes differentially expressed in T. maritima at this level (15.5% of the genome) for the same growth phase transition. Interspecies H2 transfer resulted in three- to fivefold-higher T. maritima cell densities than in the monoculture, with concomitant formation of exopolysaccharide (EPS)-based cell aggregates. Differential expression of specific sigma factors and genes related to the ppGpp-dependent stringent response suggests involvement in the transition into stationary phase and aggregate formation. Cell aggregation was growth phase dependent, such that it was most prominent during mid-log phase and decayed as cells entered stationary phase. The reduction in cell aggregation was coincidental with down-regulation of genes encoding EPS-forming glycosyltranferases and up-regulation of genes encoding β-specific glycosyl hydrolases; the latter were presumably involved in hydrolysis of β-linked EPS to release cells from aggregates. Detachment of aggregates may facilitate colonization of new locations in natural environments where T. maritima coexists with other organisms. Taken together, these results demonstrate that syntrophic interactions can impact the transcriptome of heterotrophs in methanogenic coculture, and this factor should be considered in examining the microbial ecology in anaerobic environments. PMID:16391122

  8. The aquatic vascular plant Ruppia maritima as an indicator organisms for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliabue, M.D.; Thursby, G.B.; Walker, H.A.; Johnston, R.K.

    1994-12-31

    An ongoing estuarine ecological risk assessment case study for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in the Great Bay (Kittery, ME, Portsmouth, NH) has been the catalyst for continued methods development with a rooted aquatic plant for a sediment toxicity test. A test using the aquatic vascular plant Ruppia maritima would be similar in it`s utility to the Algal (Champia parvula) Reproduction Test, an accepted, short term test (US EPA Short term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Marine and Estuarine Organisms). Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of lead, the primary site contaminant on R. maritima in the Great Bay. Morphology and life cycle of R. maritima are similar to that of the aquatic vascular plant Zostra marina which comprises up to 46% of the Great Bay habitat (Short 1992). R. maritima`s reduced size makes it a practical laboratory organism and Ruppia`s effects may offer useful insights into potential effects on Zostra or other aquatic vascular plants. Presently rooted vascular plants are not found in the site of concern (Clark Cove). This can be contributed to either of two factors; the physical parameters of the site, i.e., a depositional zone or the chemical parameters, i.e., metals contamination, specifically lead. Exposure of bedded and nonbedded plants occurred over a four day and ten day period using lead sulfate. Concentrations for bedded exposures were as follows, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0 simultaneously extracted metal/acid volatile sulfide (SEM/AVS) molar ratios, and 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 and 100.0mg/l Pb for water only exposures. Some reduction in cumulative leaf growth was observed in the site samples as well as the spiked samples as compared to site controls. Results of this study and associated research which focuses on the further development of the Ruppia test methods will be presented.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of cytosolic α-mannosidase from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Fushinobu, Shinya Imamura, Hiromi; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2006-02-01

    Cytosolic class II α-mannosidase from T. maritima (TM1851), a family 38 glycoside hydrolase, was crystallized. A diffraction data set was collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Class II α-mannosidase cleaves off α-1,2-, α-1,3- and α-1,6-mannose residues. In this paper, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of cytosolic class II α-mannosidase from Thermotoga maritima (TM1851), a family 38 glycoside hydrolase, is described. The crystal of recombinant TM1851 belongs to the C-centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 244.7, b = 87.4, c = 166.6 Å, β = 124.7°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.9 Å.

  10. Structures of and Interactions Between Domains of Trigger Factor from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hackert,E.; Hendrickson, W.

    2007-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a eubacterial chaperone that associates with ribosomes at the peptide-exit tunnel and also occurs in excess free in the cytosol. TF is a three-domain protein that appears to exist in a dynamic equilibrium of oligomerization states and interdomain conformations. X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking were used to study the roles of the N- and C-terminal domains of Thermotoga maritima TF in TF oligomerization and chaperone activity. The structural conservation of both the N- and C-terminal TF domains was unambiguously established. The biochemical and crystallographic data reveal a tendency for these domains to partake in diverse and apparently nonspecific protein-protein interactions. It is found that the T. maritima and Escherichia coli TF surfaces lack evident exposed hydrophobic patches. Taken together, these data suggest that TF chaperones could interact with nascent proteins via hydrophilic surfaces.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Hippea maritima type strain (MH2T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, K

    2011-01-01

    Hippea maritima (Miroshnichenko et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus Hippea, which belongs to the family Desulfurellaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. The anaerobic, moderately thermophilic marine sulfur-reducer was first isolated from shallow-water hot vents in Matipur Harbor, Papua New Guinea. H. maritima was of interest for genome se- quencing because of its isolated phylogenetic location, as a distant next neighbor of the ge- nus Desulfurella. Strain MH2T is the first type strain from the order Desulfurellales with a com- pletely sequenced genome. The 1,694,430 bp long linear genome with its 1,723 protein- coding and 57 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and structure analysis of Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Puttick, Jennifer; Vieille, Claire; Song, Seung H; Fodje, Michel N; Grochulski, Pawel; Delbaere, Louis T J

    2007-04-01

    Diffraction data have been collected from a crystal of Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase at the Canadian Light Source. The crystal diffracted to 3.3 A resolution and belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 83.43, b = 120.61, c = 145.76 A. The structure is likely to be solved by molecular replacement. PMID:17401214

  13. The aquatic vascular plant Ruppia maritima as an indicator organism for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliabue, M.D.; Thursby, G.B.; Walker, H.A.; Johnston, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    An ongoing estuarine ecological risk assessment case study for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in the Great Bay Estuary (New Hampshire, Maine) was the catalyst to continue development a rooted aquatic plant sediment toxicity test. Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of lead, the primary site contaminant on R. maritima in the Great Bay. Although the aquatic vascular plant Zostra marina comprises up to 46% of the Great Bay subtidal habitat, R. maritima`s much smaller size makes it a more practical laboratory organism. Effects on Ruppia may offer useful insights into potential effects on Zostra or other aquatic vascular plants. Presently rooted vascular plants are not found in Clark Cove located adjacent to a landfill disposal site on the shipyard. The absence of rooted vegetation can be contributed to, physical parameters of the site (turbidity, grain size, texture) or chemical parameters (heavy metal/Pb contamination, redox potential). Exposure of bedded and nonbedded plants occurred over a four day and ten day period using lead sulfate. Concentrations for bedded exposures were as follows, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0 simultaneously extracted metal/acid volatile sulfide (SEM/AVS) molar ratios, and 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 and 100.0mg/l Pb for water only exposures. Reduction in cumulative leaf growth was observed for the Clark Cove sediments as well as the spiked sediments as compared to reference sediments.

  14. Complexes of Thermotoga maritima S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase provide insights into substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shridhar; Baba, Kavita; McCloskey, Diane E.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-25

    The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine are ubiquitous aliphatic cations and are essential for cellular growth and differentiation. S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) is a critical pyruvoyl-dependent enzyme in the polyamine-biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structures of AdoMetDC from humans and plants and of the AdoMetDC proenzyme from Thermotoga maritima have been obtained previously. Here, the crystal structures of activated T. maritima AdoMetDC (TmAdoMetDC) and of its complexes with S-adenosylmethionine methyl ester and 5{prime}-deoxy-5{prime}-dimethylthioadenosine are reported. The results demonstrate for the first time that TmAdoMetDC autoprocesses without the need for additional factors and that the enzyme contains two complete active sites, both of which use residues from both chains of the homodimer. The complexes provide insights into the substrate specificity and ligand binding of AdoMetDC in prokaryotes. The conservation of the ligand-binding mode and the active-site residues between human and T. maritima AdoMetDC provides insight into the evolution of AdoMetDC.

  15. Overexpression, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of shikimate dehydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Ho

    2011-01-01

    Shikimate dehydrogenase (SDH), which catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of 3-dehydroshikimate to shikimate in the shikimate pathway, is an attractive target for the development of herbicides and antimicrobial agents. Previous structural studies showed that SDH exists in two conformations, an open form and a closed form, and it is believed that the conformational state is crucial to understanding a catalytic mechanism. To facilitate further structural comparisons among SDHs, structural analysis of an SDH from Thermotoga maritima encoded by the Tm0346 gene has been initiated. SDH from T. maritima has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at 296 K using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Crystals of T. maritima SDH diffracted to 1.45 Å resolution and belonged to orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.21, b = 62.45 and c = 68.68 Å. The asymmetric unit contains a monomer, with a corresponding V M of 2.01 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 38.9% by volume. PMID:21795804

  16. Structure of a NAD kinase from Thermotoga maritima at 2.3 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Huang, Candice; Adams, Paul D.; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao A.; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-07-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization, and structure determination of NAD-kinase from T. maritima are reported. Similarity to other NAD-kinases as well as homo-oligomrization state of the enzyme from T. maritima are discussed. NAD kinase is the only known enzyme that catalyzes the formation of NADP, a coenzyme involved in most anabolic reactions and in the antioxidant defense system. Despite its importance, very little is known regarding the mechanism of catalysis and only recently have several NAD kinase structures been deposited in the PDB. Here, an independent investigation of the crystal structure of inorganic polyphosphate/ATP-NAD kinase, PPNK-THEMA, a protein from Thermotoga maritima, is reported at a resolution of 2.3 Å. The crystal structure was solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) data collected at the Se absorption-peak wavelength in a state in which no cofactors or substrates were bound. It revealed that the 258-amino-acid protein is folded into two distinct domains, similar to recently reported NAD kinases. The N-terminal α/β-domain spans the first 100 amino acids and the last 30 amino acids of the polypeptide and has several topological matches in the PDB, whereas the other domain, which spans the middle 130 residues, adopts a unique β-sandwich architecture and only appreciably matches the recently deposited PDB structures of NAD kinases.

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of the Cosmopolitan Marine Fungus Corollospora maritima Under Two Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Patricia; Alejandri-Ramírez, Naholi D.; González, María C.; Estrada, Karel J.; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D.

    2015-01-01

    Marine sandy beaches represent dynamic environments often subject to harsh conditions and climate fluctuations, where natural and anthropogenic inputs of freshwater from fluvial and pluvial sources alter salinity, which has been recognized as a key variable affecting the distribution of aquatic organisms and influencing critical physiological processes. The marine arenicolous fungus Corollospora maritima is a worldwide-distributed saprobe that has been reported to present tolerance to freshwater. Here, we present a transcriptome analysis that will provide the first insight of the genomic content for this fungus and a gene expression comparison between two different salinity conditions. We also identified genes that are candidates for being differentially expressed in response to environmental variations on salinity during the fungal growth. The de novo reconstruction of C. maritima transcriptome Illumina sequencing provided a total of 14,530 transcripts (16 megabases). The comparison between the two growth conditions rendered 103 genes specifically overexpressed in seawater, and 132 genes specifically up-regulated under freshwater. Using fungal isolates collected from different beaches, the specific environmental regulation of particular transcript differential expression was confirmed by RT-qPCR. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis that explores the marine fungus C. maritima molecular responses to overcome freshwater stress, and these data could shed light to understand the fungal adaptation and plasticity mechanisms to the marine habitat. PMID:26116293

  18. Description and biology of Euborellia arcanum sp. nov., an alien earwig           occupying greenhouses in Germany and Austria (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae).

    PubMed

    Matzke, Danilo; Kocarek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Greenhouses in botanical or zoological gardens are home to dozens of species of invertebrates that were introduced alongside plants or potting soil. Our study presents the description of an alien species of earwig, Euborellia arcanum sp. nov., found in tropical greenhouses in Leipzig and Potsdam (Germany) and in Vienna (Austria), including information about its biology in breeding culture. The species was most likely introduced into Europe by way of plants or plant matter from Florida, but the region of its natural habitat is unknown. The sequence of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) was also evaluated and added to GenBank as a DNA barcode for further identification. PMID:26248909

  19. Structural Insight inot the low Affinity Between Thermotoga maritima CheA and CheB Compared to their Escherichia coli/Salmonella typhimurium Counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    S Park; B Crane

    2011-12-31

    CheA-mediated CheB phosphorylation and the subsequent CheB-mediated demethylation of the chemoreceptors are important steps required for the bacterial chemotactic adaptation response. Although Escherichia coli CheB has been reported to interact with CheA competitively against CheY, we have observed that Thermotoga maritima CheB has no detectable CheA-binding. By determining the CheY-like domain crystal structure of T. maritima CheB, and comparing against the T. maritima CheY and Salmonella typhimurium CheB structures, we propose that the two consecutive glutamates in the {beta}4/{alpha}4 loop of T. maritima CheB that is absent in T. maritima CheY and in E. coli/S. typhimurium CheB may be one factor contributing to the low CheA affinity.

  20. Scouting contaminated estuaries: heavy metal resistant and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in the native metal rhizoaccumulator Spartina maritima.

    PubMed

    Mesa, J; Mateos-Naranjo, E; Caviedes, M A; Redondo-Gómez, S; Pajuelo, E; Rodríguez-Llorente, I D

    2015-01-15

    Spartina maritima is a native endangered heavy metal rhizoaccumulator cordgrass naturally growing in southwest coasts of Spain, where is used as a biotool to rehabilitate degraded salt marshes. Fifteen bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of S. maritima growing in the estuary of the Tinto River, one of the most polluted areas in the world. A high proportion of bacteria were resistant towards several heavy metals. They also exhibited multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) properties, in the absence and the presence of Cu. Bacillus methylotrophicus SMT38, Bacillusaryabhattai SMT48, B. aryabhattai SMT50 and Bacilluslicheniformis SMT51 were selected as the best performing strains. In a gnobiotic assay, inoculation of Medicago sativa seeds with the selected isolates induced higher root elongation. The inoculation of S. maritima with these indigenous metal-resistant PGP rhizobacteria could be an efficient method to increase plant adaptation and growth in contaminated estuaries during restoration programs. PMID:25467875

  1. The first myriapod genome sequence reveals conservative arthropod gene content and genome organisation in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Chipman, Ariel D; Ferrier, David E K; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S T; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C; Alonso, Claudio R; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C J; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D; Extavour, Cassandra G; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A; Green, Jack E; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H L; Hunn, Julia P; Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Jiggins, Francis M; Jones, Tamsin E; Kaiser, Tobias S; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Kraus, F Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Robertson, Helen E; Robertson, Hugh M; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E; Schurko, Andrew M; Siggens, Kenneth W; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  2. The First Myriapod Genome Sequence Reveals Conservative Arthropod Gene Content and Genome Organisation in the Centipede Strigamia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, Ariel D.; Ferrier, David E. K.; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C.; Alonso, Claudio R.; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C. J.; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K.; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J.; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D.; Extavour, Cassandra G.; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J.; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A.; Green, Jack E.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H. L.; Hunn, Julia P.; Hunnekuhl, Vera S.; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Tamsin E.; Kaiser, Tobias S.; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J.; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L.; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L.; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N.; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J.; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H.; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C.; Robertson, Helen E.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E.; Schurko, Andrew M.; Siggens, Kenneth W.; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J.; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M.; Willis, Judith H.; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M.; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  3. Effects of Oil-Contaminated Sediments on Submerged Vegetation: An Experimental Assessment of Ruppia maritima.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charles W; Hollis, Lauris O; Turner, R Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Oil spills threaten the productivity of ecosystems through the degradation of coastal flora and the ecosystem services these plants provide. While lab and field investigations have quantified the response of numerous species of emergent vegetation to oil, the effects on submerged vegetation remain uncertain. Here, we discuss the implications of oil exposure for Ruppia maritima, one of the most common species of submerged vegetation found in the region affected by the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We grew R. maritima in a range of manipulated sediment oil concentrations: 0, 0.26, 0.53, and 1.05 mL oil /L tank volume, and tracked changes in growth (wet weight and shoot density/length), reproductive activity (inflorescence and seed production), root characteristics (mass, length, diameter, and area), and uprooting force of plants. While no statistical differences were detected in growth, plants exhibited significant changes to reproductive output, root morphology, and uprooting force. We found significant reductions in inflorescences and fruiting bodies at higher oil concentrations. In addition, the roots growing in the high oil were shorter and wider. Plants in medium and high oil required less force to uproot. A second experiment was performed to separate the effects of root morphology and oiled sediment properties and indicated that there were also changes to sediment cohesion that contributed to a reduction in uprooting forces in medium and high oil. Given the importance of sexual reproduction for these plants, oil contamination may have substantial population-level effects. Moreover, areas containing buried oil may be more susceptible to high energy storm events due to the reduction in uprooting force of foundation species such as R. maritima. PMID:26430971

  4. The role of Spartina maritima and Sarcocornia fruticosa on trace metals retention in Ria Formosa, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira da Silva, Manuela; Duarte, Duarte; Isidoro, Jorge; Chícharo, Luís

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years, phytoremediation has become an increasingly recognized pathway for contaminant removal from water and shallow soils. Assessing the phytoremediation potential of wetlands is complex due to variable conditions of hydrology, soil/sediment types, plant species diversity, growing season and water chemistry. Physico-chemical properties of wetlands provide many positive attributes for remediating contaminants. Saltmarsh plants can sequestrate and inherently tolerate high metal concentrations found in saltmarsh sediments. An increasing number of studies have been carried out to understand the role of halophyte vegetation on retention, biovailability and remediation of the pollutants in coastal areas (estuaries and lagoons). It is already known that the accumulation capacity and the pattern of metal distribution in the plant tissues vary among plant species, namely monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous, and with sediment characteristics. During the last decades, there has been a large increase in urbanization and industrialization of the area surrounding Ria Formosa. Due to this reality, anthropogenic contaminants, including trace metals, are transported via untreated sewage and agricultural effluents to several parts of the lagoon. The dominant producers are Spartina maritima (Poales: Poaceae) and Sarcocornia fruticosa (Caryophyllales: Chenopodiaceae), appearing in pure stands respectively in the lower and in the upper saltmarshes. The aim of this work was to survey, comparatively, the role of S. maritima and S. fruticosa on minor and trace element (Ag, Cd, Cu, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn), contents and distribution amongst sediment and plant tissues. Both S. maritima and S. fruticosa could fix metals from the surrounding belowground environment and accumulate metals, mainly in roots (also in rhizomes in the case of the former). Metal translocation to aerial parts of the plants was, in general, residual.

  5. Effects of Oil-Contaminated Sediments on Submerged Vegetation: An Experimental Assessment of Ruppia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Charles W.; Hollis, Lauris O.; Turner, R. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Oil spills threaten the productivity of ecosystems through the degradation of coastal flora and the ecosystem services these plants provide. While lab and field investigations have quantified the response of numerous species of emergent vegetation to oil, the effects on submerged vegetation remain uncertain. Here, we discuss the implications of oil exposure for Ruppia maritima, one of the most common species of submerged vegetation found in the region affected by the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We grew R. maritima in a range of manipulated sediment oil concentrations: 0, 0.26, 0.53, and 1.05 mL oil /L tank volume, and tracked changes in growth (wet weight and shoot density/length), reproductive activity (inflorescence and seed production), root characteristics (mass, length, diameter, and area), and uprooting force of plants. While no statistical differences were detected in growth, plants exhibited significant changes to reproductive output, root morphology, and uprooting force. We found significant reductions in inflorescences and fruiting bodies at higher oil concentrations. In addition, the roots growing in the high oil were shorter and wider. Plants in medium and high oil required less force to uproot. A second experiment was performed to separate the effects of root morphology and oiled sediment properties and indicated that there were also changes to sediment cohesion that contributed to a reduction in uprooting forces in medium and high oil. Given the importance of sexual reproduction for these plants, oil contamination may have substantial population-level effects. Moreover, areas containing buried oil may be more susceptible to high energy storm events due to the reduction in uprooting force of foundation species such as R. maritima. PMID:26430971

  6. Computational prediction and experimental validation of a novel miRNA in Suaeda maritima, a halophyte.

    PubMed

    Gharat, S A; Shaw, B P

    2016-01-01

    The lack of available transcriptome data for plants of no economic or agronomic importance limits the identification of miRNAs in many species. Considering the possible similarity of the transcriptome between related species, the present study used expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Suaeda salsa and Suaeda glauca to identify conserved miRNAs, which were validated in a halophyte, Suaeda maritima, with the aim of identifying salt-responsive miRNAs from naturally salt-tolerant plants, information on which is limited. In this study, computational analysis predicted three miRNA sequences by mapping non-redundant miRNA sequences from miRBase 16.0 on 1534 ESTs of S. salsa and S. glauca. The expression of one could be validated in S. maritima, and was named sma-miR1867. This miRNA was downregulated in response to NaCl treatment. It was predicted to target ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR), cell division control protein 6 (CDC6), and ubiquitin-protein ligase (UPL) in S. salsa and/or S. glauca. However, only UPL could be amplified in S. maritima, and RT-qPCR showed that it was upregulated in response to NaCl treatment. These results indicate that, in halophytes, FTR and CDC6 may promote carbon metabolism and cell division, respectively, in the presence of salt, while UPL may regulate the abundance of proteins that are important for salt tolerance in halophytes. Thus, sma-miR1867 could be an essential component of salt resistance in halophytes. PMID:26909919

  7. Chemical composition of essential oils and aromatic waters from different Italian Anthemis maritima populations.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Daniela; Noccioli, Cecilia; Pistelli, Luisa

    2013-09-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils and aromatic waters isolated from six Italian Anthemis maritima populations was determined by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. In total, 122 and 100 chemical compounds were identified in the essential oils and the aromatic waters, respectively. The main compound classes represented in the oils were monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, and terpene esters. Multivariate chemometric techniques such as cluster analysis (CA) and principal coordinate analysis (PCO) were used to classify the samples according to the geographical origin. Statistical analysis allowed the attribution of the analyzed populations to different chemotype groups. PMID:24078600

  8. Essential Oils from Anthemis maritima Flowers: Infraspecific Variability along the Adriatic Coast (Italy).

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Daniela; Giovanelli, Silvia; Pistelli, Luisa

    2016-05-01

    The hydrodistilled essential oils (EOs) from flowers of five Adriatic populations of Anthemis maritima were analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. Anthemis maritima is a psammophilous plant living generally on coastal sand dunes but occasionally on sea cliffs and shingle beaches. A total of 163 chemical compounds were identified, accounting for 90.5% of the oils. The main classes of compounds represented in the EOs were monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, and terpene esters.The multivariate chemometric techniques, in particular cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis, used to classify the samples, highlighted three different chemotypes linked to a geographic origin. One group living in northern Italy was characterized by the highest content of β-pinene, γ-terpinene, and β-caryophyllene, a second chemotype was in central Italy with the highest amount of trans-chrysanthenyl acetate and a third group living in southern Italy with a more heterogeneous volatile profile was characterized by the highest values of cis-chrysanthenyl acetate, trans-chrysanthenyl isobutyrate, cis-carveol propionate, α-zingiberene, and cubenol. Moreover, the comparison of the Adriatic populations with the Tyrrhenian samples, analyzed in a previous research, showed that cubenol (absent in all the Tyrrhenian populations) and (E)-β-farnesene (absent in all the Adriatic samples) play a crucial role in discriminating the Italian populations. PMID:27114258

  9. The chloroplast genome of the hexaploid Spartina maritima (Poaceae, Chloridoideae): Comparative analyses and molecular dating.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Gueutin, M; Bellot, S; Martin, G E; Boutte, J; Chelaifa, H; Lima, O; Michon-Coudouel, S; Naquin, D; Salmon, A; Ainouche, K; Ainouche, M

    2015-12-01

    The history of many plant lineages is complicated by reticulate evolution with cases of hybridization often followed by genome duplication (allopolyploidy). In such a context, the inference of phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic scenarios based on molecular data is easier using haploid markers like chloroplast genome sequences. Hybridization and polyploidization occurred recurrently in the genus Spartina (Poaceae, Chloridoideae), as illustrated by the recent formation of the invasive allododecaploid S. anglica during the 19th century in Europe. Until now, only a few plastid markers were available to explore the history of this genus and their low variability limited the resolution of species relationships. We sequenced the complete chloroplast genome (plastome) of S. maritima, the native European parent of S. anglica, and compared it to the plastomes of other Poaceae. Our analysis revealed the presence of fast-evolving regions of potential taxonomic, phylogeographic and phylogenetic utility at various levels within the Poaceae family. Using secondary calibrations, we show that the tetraploid and hexaploid lineages of Spartina diverged 6-10 my ago, and that the two parents of the invasive allopolyploid S. anglica separated 2-4 my ago via long distance dispersal of the ancestor of S. maritima over the Atlantic Ocean. Finally, we discuss the meaning of divergence times between chloroplast genomes in the context of reticulate evolution. PMID:26182838

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a lectin from Canavalia maritima seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de; Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Cajazeiras, João Batista; Rocha, Bruno Anderson M. da; Rustiguel, Joane Kathelen Rodrigues; Freitas, Beatriz Tupinamba; Canduri, Fernanda; Delatorre, Plínio; Azevedo, Walter Filgueira Jr de; Cavada, Benildo S.

    2005-01-01

    A lectin from C. maritima was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method and crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. A molecular-replacement search found a solution with a correlation coefficient of 69.2% and an R factor of 42.5%, refinement is in progress. A lectin from Canavalia maritima seeds (ConM) was purified and submitted to crystallization experiments. The best crystals were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method at a constant temperature of 293 K and grew in 7 d. A complete structural data set was collected to 2.1 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The ConM crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.15, b = 70.90, c = 97.37 Å. A molecular-replacement search found a solution with a correlation coefficient of 69.2% and an R factor of 42.5%. Crystallographic refinement is under way.

  11. Structural and functional characterization of a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphatase from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Awwad, Khaldeyah; Desai, Anna; Smith, Clyde; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2013-02-01

    A 2.15 Å resolution crystal structure of TM0159 with bound IMP and enzyme-kinetic data are presented. This noncanonical nucleoside triphosphatase from T. maritima helps to maintain a correct pool of DNA and RNA precursor molecules. The hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphatase that catalyzes the conversion of inosine triphosphate (ITP), deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) and xanthosine triphosphate (XTP) into inosine monophosphate (IMP), deoxyinosine monophosphate (IMP) and xanthosine monophosphate (XMP), respectively. The k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values determined at 323 and 353 K fall between 1.31 × 10{sup 4} and 7.80 × 10{sup 4} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}. ITP and dITP are slightly preferred over XTP. Activity towards canonical nucleoside triphosphates (ATP and GTP) was not detected. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg{sup 2+} as a cofactor and has a preference for alkaline conditions. A protein X-ray structure of the enzyme with bound IMP was obtained at 2.15 Å resolution. The active site houses a well conserved network of residues that are critical for substrate recognition and catalysis. The crystal structure shows a tetramer with two possible dimer interfaces. One of these interfaces strongly resembles the dimer interface that is found in the structures of other noncanonical nucleoside pyrophosphatases from human (human ITPase) and archaea (Mj0226 and PhNTPase)

  12. Biophysical probing of Spartina maritima photo-system II changes during prolonged tidal submersion periods.

    PubMed

    Duarte, B; Santos, D; Marques, J C; Caçador, I

    2014-04-01

    Submergence is one of the major constrains affecting wetland plants, with inevitable impacts on their physiology and productivity. Global warming as a driving force of sea level rise, tend to increase the submersion periods duration. Photosynthesis biophysical probing arise as an important tool to understand the energetics underlying plant feedback to these constrains. As in previous studies with Spartina maritima, there was no inhibition of photosynthetic activity in submerged individuals. Comparing both donor and acceptor sides of the PSII, the first was more severely affected during submersion, driven by the inactivation of the OEC with consequent impairment of the ETC. Although this apparent damage in the PSII donor side, the electron transport per active reaction centre was not substantially affected, indicating that this reduction in the electron flow is accompanied by a proportional increase in the number of active reaction centres. These conditions lead to the accumulation of excessive reducing power, source of damaging ROS, counteracted by efficient energy dissipation processes and anti-oxidant enzymatic defences. This way, S. maritima appears as a well-adapted species with an evident photochemical plasticity towards submersion, allowing it to maintain its photosynthetic activity even during prolonged submersion periods. PMID:24630362

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a Thermostable Endonuclease IV from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Hughes, Ronny C; NG, Joseph D; Demarse, Neil A

    2009-01-01

    The DNA repair enzyme Endonuclease IV from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga Maritima MSB8 (reference sequence: NC_000853) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X ray analysis. Thermotoga maritima Endonuclease IV is a 287 amino acid protein with 32% sequence identity to the Escherichia coli Endonuclease IV. The protein was purified to homogeneity and was crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The protein crystallized in the space group P61, with a composition of one biological molecule in the asymmetric unit corresponding to a Mathew s coefficient of 2.39 and a 47% solvent fraction. The unit cell parameters for the crystals are a = 123.23 , b = 123.23 , c = 35.34 , = = 90 , = 120 . Microseeding and further optimization yielded crystals with an X ray diffraction limit of 2.4 . A single 70 data set was collected and processed resulting in an overall Rmerge and completeness of 9.5% and 99.3% respectively.

  14. Both DNA gyrase and reverse gyrase are present in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Guipaud, Olivier; Marguet, Evelyne; Noll, Kenneth M.; de la Tour, Claire Bouthier; Forterre, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Like all hyperthermophiles yet tested, the bacterium Thermotoga maritima contains a reverse gyrase. Here we show that it contains also a DNA gyrase. The genes top2A and top2B encoding the two subunits of a DNA gyrase-like enzyme have been cloned and sequenced. The Top2A (type II DNA topoisomerase A protein) is more similar to GyrA (DNA gyrase A protein) than to ParC [topoisomerase IV (Topo IV) C protein]. The difference is especially striking at the C-terminal domain, which differentiates DNA gyrases from Topo IV. DNA gyrase activity was detected in T. maritima and purified to homogeneity using a novobiocin-Sepharose column. This hyperhermophilic DNA gyrase has an optimal activity around 82–86°C. In contrast to plasmids from hyperthermophilic archaea, which are from relaxed to positively supercoiled, we found that the plasmid pRQ7 from Thermotoga sp. RQ7 is negatively supercoiled. pRQ7 became positively supercoiled after addition of novobiocin to cell cultures, indicating that its negative supercoiling is due to the DNA gyrase of the host strain. The findings concerning DNA gyrase and negative supercoiling in Thermotogales put into question the role of reverse gyrase in hyperthermophiles. PMID:9380682

  15. Chemical composition and biological effects of Artemisia maritima and Artemisia nilagirica essential oils from wild plants of western Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Stappen, Iris; Wanner, Jürgen; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Ali, Abbas; Khan, Ikhlas A; Kaul, Vijay K; Lal, Brij; Jaitak, Vikas; Gochev, Velizar; Girova, Tania; Stoyanova, Albena; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2014-08-01

    Artemisia species possess pharmacological properties that are used for medical purposes worldwide. In this paper, the essential oils from the aerial parts of Artemisia nilagirica and Artemisia maritima from the western Indian Himalaya region are described. The main compounds analyzed by simultaneous GC/MS and GC/FID were camphor and 1,8-cineole from A. maritima, and camphor and artemisia ketone from A. nilagirica. Additionally, the oils were evaluated for their antibacterial, antifungal, mosquito biting deterrent, and larvicidal activities. A. nilagirica essential oil demonstrated nonselective antifungal activity against plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, Colletotrichum fragariae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, whereas A. maritima did not show antifungal activity. Both Artemisia spp. exhibited considerable mosquito biting deterrence, whereas only A. nilagirica showed larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti. Antibacterial effects assessed by an agar dilution assay demonstrated greater activity of A. maritima essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to A. nilagirica. PMID:25127023

  16. Chemical composition and biological effects of Artemisia maritima and Artemisia nilagirica essential oils from wild plant of Western Himalaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artemisia species possess pharmacological properties that are used for medical purposes worldwide. In this paper, the essential oils from the aerial parts of A. nilagirica and A. maritima from the western Indian Himalaya region are described. The main compounds analyzed by simultaneous GC/MS and GC/...

  17. Comparison of NaCl-induced programmed cell death in the obligate halophyte Cakile maritima and the glycophyte Arabidospis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamed-Laouti, Ibtissem; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; De Bont, Linda; Biligui, Bernadette; Gakière, Bertrand; Abdelly, Chedly; Ben Hamed, Karim; Bouteau, François

    2016-06-01

    Salinity represents one of the most important constraints that adversely affect plants growth and productivity. In this study, we aimed at determining possible differences between salt tolerant and salt sensitive species in early salt stress response. To this purpose, we subjected suspension-cultured cells from the halophyte Cakile maritima and the glycophyte Arabidopsis thaliana, two Brassicaceae, to salt stress and compared their behavior. In both species we could observe a time and dose dependent programmed cell death requiring an active metabolism, a dysfunction of mitochondria and caspase-like activation although C. maritima cells appeared less sensitive than A. thaliana cells. This capacity to mitigate salt stress could be due to a higher ascorbate pool that could allow C. maritima reducing the oxidative stress generated in response to NaCl. It further appeared that a higher number of C. maritima cultured cells when compared to A. thaliana could efficiently manage the Na(+) accumulation into the cytoplasm through non selective cation channels allowing also reducing the ROS generation and the subsequent cell death. PMID:27095399

  18. Arginine biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: characterization of the arginine-sensitive N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-09-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and appears not to involve classical acetylglutamate synthase. The inhibition of NAGK by arginine was found to be pH independent and to depend sigmoidally on the concentration of arginine, with a Hill coefficient (N) of approximately 4, and the 50% inhibitory arginine concentration (I0.5) was shown to increase with temperature, approaching above 65 degrees C the I0.50 observed at 37 degrees C with the mesophilic NAGK of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the best-studied arginine-inhibitable NAGK). At 75 degrees C, the inhibition by arginine of T. maritima NAGK was due to a large increase in the Km for acetylglutamate triggered by the inhibitor, but at 37 degrees C arginine also substantially decreased the Vmax of the enzyme. The NAGKs of T. maritima and P. aeruginosa behaved in gel filtration as hexamers, justifying the sigmoidicity and high Hill coefficient of arginine inhibition, and arginine or the substrates failed to disaggregate these enzymes. In contrast, Escherichia coli NAGK is not inhibited by arginine and is dimeric, and thus the hexameric architecture may be an important determinant of arginine sensitivity. Potential thermostability determinants of T. maritima NAGK are also discussed. PMID:15342584

  19. Arginine Biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: Characterization of the Arginine-Sensitive N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L.; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and appears not to involve classical acetylglutamate synthase. The inhibition of NAGK by arginine was found to be pH independent and to depend sigmoidally on the concentration of arginine, with a Hill coefficient (N) of ∼4, and the 50% inhibitory arginine concentration (I0.5) was shown to increase with temperature, approaching above 65°C the I0.50 observed at 37°C with the mesophilic NAGK of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the best-studied arginine-inhibitable NAGK). At 75°C, the inhibition by arginine of T. maritima NAGK was due to a large increase in the Km for acetylglutamate triggered by the inhibitor, but at 37°C arginine also substantially decreased the Vmax of the enzyme. The NAGKs of T. maritima and P. aeruginosa behaved in gel filtration as hexamers, justifying the sigmoidicity and high Hill coefficient of arginine inhibition, and arginine or the substrates failed to disaggregate these enzymes. In contrast, Escherichia coli NAGK is not inhibited by arginine and is dimeric, and thus the hexameric architecture may be an important determinant of arginine sensitivity. Potential thermostability determinants of T. maritima NAGK are also discussed. PMID:15342584

  20. Isolation and characterization of 28 microsatellite loci for a Korean endemic, Lespedeza maritima (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Dong-Pil; Cho, Won-Bum; Choi, In-Su; Choi, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed microsatellite primers for Lespedeza maritima (Fabaceae), a Korean endemic shrub, and conducted cross-amplifications for closely related species. Methods and Results: We produced 28 polymorphic microsatellite markers through reference mapping of 300-bp paired-end reads obtained from Illumina MiSeq data. For 47 individual plants from two populations, the total alleles numbered two to 13, and observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.067 to 0.867 and from 0.064 to 0.848, respectively. Most of these markers were well amplified in closely related species. Conclusions: In future research, the microsatellite markers described here will help reveal the taxonomic entity of this species. PMID:26819860

  1. Structural characterization of the putative ABC–type 2 transporter from Thermotoga maritima MSB8

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Tkaczuk, Karolina L.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Xu, Xiaohui; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the structure of the putative ABC-type 2 transporter TM0543 from Thermotoga maritima MSB8 determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. In comparative sequence-clustering analysis, TM0543 displays similarity to NatAB-like proteins, which are components of the ABC-type Na+ efflux pump permease. However, the overall structure fold of the predicted nucleotide-binding domain reveals that it is different from any known structure of ABC-type efflux transporters solved to date. The structure of the putative TM0543 domain also exhibits different dimer architecture and topology of its presumed ATP binding pocket, which may indicate that it does not bind nucleotide at all. Structural analysis of calcium ion binding sites found at the interface between TM0543 dimer subunits suggests that protein may be involved in ion-transporting activity. A detailed analysis of the protein sequence and structure is presented and discussed. PMID:25306867

  2. High phenotypic plasticity of Suaeda maritima observed under hypoxic conditions in relation to its physiological basis

    PubMed Central

    Wetson, Anne M.; Zörb, Christian; John, Elizabeth A.; Flowers, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Phenotypic plasticity, the potential of specific traits of a genotype to respond to different environmental conditions, is an important adaptive mechanism for minimizing potentially adverse effects of environmental fluctuations in space and time. Suaeda maritima shows morphologically different forms on high and low areas of the same salt marsh. Our aims were to examine whether these phenotypic differences occurred as a result of plastic responses to the environment. Soil redox state, indicative of oxygen supply, was examined as a factor causing the observed morphological and physiological differences. Methods Reciprocal transplantation of seedlings was carried out between high and low marsh sites on a salt marsh and in simulated tidal-flow tanks in a glasshouse. Plants from the same seed source were grown in aerated or hypoxic solution, and roots were assayed for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase, and changes in their proteome. Key Results Transplanted (away) seedlings and those that remained in their home position developed the morphology characteristic of the home or away site. Shoot Na+, Cl− and K+ concentrations were significantly different in plants in the high and low marsh sites, but with no significant difference between home and away plants at each site. High LDH activity in roots of plants grown in aeration and in hypoxia indicated pre-adaptation to fluctuating root aeration and could be a factor in the phenotypic plasticity and growth of S. maritima over the full tidal range of the salt marsh environment. Twenty-six proteins were upregulated under hypoxic conditions. Conclusions Plasticity of morphological traits for growth form at extremes of the soil oxygenation spectrum of the tidal salt marsh did not correlate with the lack of physiological plasticity in the constitutively high LDH found in the roots. PMID:22316572

  3. Structure of thermotoga maritima stationary phase survival protein SurE : a novel acid phosphatase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.-G; Skarina, T.; Katz, J. E.; Khachatryan, A; Vyas, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Clarke, S.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. of California; Clinical Genomics Centre /Proteomics, Univ. Health Network

    2001-11-01

    Background: The rpoS, nlpD, pcm, and surE genes are among many whose expression is induced during the stationary phase of bacterial growth. rpoS codes for the stationary-phase RNA polymerase {sigma} subunit, and nlpD codes for a lipoprotein. The pcm gene product repairs damaged proteins by converting the atypical isoaspartyl residues back to L-aspartyls. The physiological and biochemical functions of surE are unknown, but its importance in stress is supported by the duplication of the surE gene in E. coli subjected to high-temperature growth. The pcm and surE genes are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea, and plants. Results: The structure of SurE from Thermotoga maritima was determined at 2.0 Angstroms. The SurE monomer is composed of two domains; a conserved N-terminal domain, a Rossman fold, and a C-terminal oligomerization domain, a new fold. Monomers form a dimer that assembles into a tetramer. Biochemical analysis suggests that SurE is an acid phosphatase, with an optimum pH of 5.5-6.2. The active site was identified in the N-terminal domain through analysis of conserved residues. Structure-based site-directed point mutations abolished phosphatase activity. T. maritima SurE intra- and intersubunit salt bridges were identified that may explain the SurE thermostability. Conclusions: The structure of SurE provided information about the protein's fold, oligomeric state, and active site. The protein possessed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity, but the physiologically relevant substrate(s) remains to be identified. The importance of three of the assigned active site residues in catalysis was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  4. Adaptive Evolution of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Plasticity of the ABC Transporter Network

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Haythem; Sahin, Merve; Tarasova, Janna; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Portnoy, Vasiliy A.; Nogales, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Thermotoga maritima is a hyperthermophilic anaerobe that utilizes a vast network of ABC transporters to efficiently metabolize a variety of carbon sources to produce hydrogen. For unknown reasons, this organism does not metabolize glucose as readily as it does glucose di- and polysaccharides. The leading hypothesis implicates the thermolability of glucose at the physiological temperatures at which T. maritima lives. After a 25-day laboratory evolution, phenotypes were observed with growth rates up to 1.4 times higher than and glucose utilization rates exceeding 50% those of the wild type. Genome resequencing revealed mutations in evolved cultures related to glucose-responsive ABC transporters. The native glucose ABC transporter, GluEFK, has more abundant transcripts either as a result of gene duplication-amplification or through mutations to the operator sequence regulating this operon. Conversely, BglEFGKL, a transporter of beta-glucosides, is substantially downregulated due to a nonsense mutation to the solute binding protein or due to a deletion of the upstream promoter. Analysis of the ABC2 uptake porter families for carbohydrate and peptide transport revealed that the solute binding protein, often among the transcripts detected at the highest levels, is predominantly downregulated in the evolved cultures, while the membrane-spanning domain and nucleotide binding components are less varied. Similar trends were observed in evolved strains grown on glycerol, a substrate that is not dependent on ABC transporters. Therefore, improved growth on glucose is achieved through mutations favoring GluEFK expression over BglEFGKL, and in lieu of carbon catabolite repression, the ABC transporter network is modulated to achieve improved growth fitness. PMID:26048924

  5. Endophytic Cultivable Bacteria of the Metal Bioaccumulator Spartina maritima Improve Plant Growth but Not Metal Uptake in Polluted Marshes Soils

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Jennifer; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Caviedes, Miguel A.; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Pajuelo, Eloisa; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacterial population was isolated from Spartina maritima tissues, a heavy metal bioaccumulator cordgrass growing in the estuaries of Tinto, Odiel, and Piedras River (south west Spain), one of the most polluted areas in the world. Strains were identified and ability to tolerate salt and heavy metals along with plant growth promoting and enzymatic properties were analyzed. A high proportion of these bacteria were resistant toward one or several heavy metals and metalloids including As, Cu, and Zn, the most abundant in plant tissues and soil. These strains also exhibited multiple enzymatic properties as amylase, cellulase, chitinase, protease and lipase, as well as plant growth promoting properties, including nitrogen fixation, phosphates solubilization, and production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), siderophores and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. The best performing strains (Micrococcus yunnanensis SMJ12, Vibrio sagamiensis SMJ18, and Salinicola peritrichatus SMJ30) were selected and tested as a consortium by inoculating S. maritima wild plantlets in greenhouse conditions along with wild polluted soil. After 30 days, bacterial inoculation improved plant photosynthetic traits and favored intrinsic water use efficiency. However, far from stimulating plant metal uptake, endophytic inoculation lessened metal accumulation in above and belowground tissues. These results suggest that inoculation of S. maritima with indigenous metal-resistant endophytes could mean a useful approach in order to accelerate both adaption and growth of this indigenous cordgrass in polluted estuaries in restorative operations, but may not be suitable for rhizoaccumulation purposes. PMID:26733985

  6. Structure of the endonuclease IV homologue from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of active-site divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Hughes, Ronny C.; Ng, Joseph D.; Coates, Leighton

    2010-10-05

    The most frequent lesion in DNA is at apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites resulting from DNA-base losses. These AP-site lesions can stall DNA replication and lead to genome instability if left unrepaired. The AP endonucleases are an important class of enzymes that are involved in the repair of AP-site intermediates during damage-general DNA base-excision repair pathways. These enzymes hydrolytically cleave the 5{prime}-phosphodiester bond at an AP site to generate a free 3{prime}-hydroxyl group and a 5{prime}-terminal sugar phosphate using their AP nuclease activity. Specifically, Thermotoga maritima endonuclease IV is a member of the second conserved AP endonuclease family that includes Escherichia coli endonuclease IV, which is the archetype of the AP endonuclease superfamily. In order to more fully characterize the AP endonuclease family of enzymes, two X-ray crystal structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue were determined in the presence of divalent metal ions bound in the active-site region. These structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue further revealed the use of the TIM-barrel fold and the trinuclear metal binding site as important highly conserved structural elements that are involved in DNA-binding and AP-site repair processes in the AP endonuclease superfamily.

  7. The influence of Spartina maritima on carbon retention capacity in salt marshes from warm-temperate estuaries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana I; Lillebø, Ana I; Pardal, Miguel A; Caçador, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Salt marshes constitute highly productive systems playing an important role on ecosystem functions. The aim of this study is to compare the role of Spartina maritima salt marshes on carbon cycling. Thus, four salt marshes located in two mesotidal estuarine systems (Tagus and Mondego, two salt marshes per estuary) were studied. The S. maritima above- and belowground biomass, carbon production, decomposition rates (through a litterbag experiment) and carbon content in the sediment were estimated for a one year period in both systems and compared. In Corroios (located at the Tagus estuary) S. maritima salt marsh had the highest belowground production (1008 gC m(-2) y(-1)), slower decomposition rate (k=0.0024 d(-1)), and the highest carbon content in sediments (750 gC m(-2) y(-1)); and thus, the highest carbon retention capacity. The other three salt marshes had comparatively higher aboveground productions, higher decomposition rates and lower carbon retention capacity. Therefore, Corroios had the most important carbon cycling characteristics. As a whole, results show that differences in carbon cycling in salt marshes depend mostly on its own characteristics and maturity, rather than the system itself. The intrinsic characteristics of the salt marshes, namely the physicochemical conditions determined by the maturity of the system, are more important factors affecting the role of warm-temperate mesotidal salt marshes as carbon sinks. PMID:20304438

  8. Endophytic Cultivable Bacteria of the Metal Bioaccumulator Spartina maritima Improve Plant Growth but Not Metal Uptake in Polluted Marshes Soils.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Jennifer; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Caviedes, Miguel A; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Pajuelo, Eloisa; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacterial population was isolated from Spartina maritima tissues, a heavy metal bioaccumulator cordgrass growing in the estuaries of Tinto, Odiel, and Piedras River (south west Spain), one of the most polluted areas in the world. Strains were identified and ability to tolerate salt and heavy metals along with plant growth promoting and enzymatic properties were analyzed. A high proportion of these bacteria were resistant toward one or several heavy metals and metalloids including As, Cu, and Zn, the most abundant in plant tissues and soil. These strains also exhibited multiple enzymatic properties as amylase, cellulase, chitinase, protease and lipase, as well as plant growth promoting properties, including nitrogen fixation, phosphates solubilization, and production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), siderophores and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. The best performing strains (Micrococcus yunnanensis SMJ12, Vibrio sagamiensis SMJ18, and Salinicola peritrichatus SMJ30) were selected and tested as a consortium by inoculating S. maritima wild plantlets in greenhouse conditions along with wild polluted soil. After 30 days, bacterial inoculation improved plant photosynthetic traits and favored intrinsic water use efficiency. However, far from stimulating plant metal uptake, endophytic inoculation lessened metal accumulation in above and belowground tissues. These results suggest that inoculation of S. maritima with indigenous metal-resistant endophytes could mean a useful approach in order to accelerate both adaption and growth of this indigenous cordgrass in polluted estuaries in restorative operations, but may not be suitable for rhizoaccumulation purposes. PMID:26733985

  9. The centipede Strigamia maritima possesses a large complement of Wnt genes with diverse expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Luke; Arthur, Wallace

    2014-05-01

    The genes of the Wnt family play important roles in the development of many animals. In the arthropods, these genes are known to have multiple functions, including roles in posterior development and segmentation. Despite this, secondary loss of Wnt genes is common among the Arthropoda. Unlike many arthropods, Strigamia maritima, a geophilomorph centipede, possesses a large complement of Wnt ligands, with 11 Wnt genes present. In this study, the expression of each of these genes was examined across a range of stages during embryonic development. The expression of Wnt genes in Strigamia displays much variability. Most Wnt genes are expressed in segmental stripes in the trunk; near the proctodeum; and in the head region. However, despite this overall broad similarity, there are many differences between the various Wnt genes in their exact patterns of expression. These data should be considered in the context of different hypotheses regarding the functional relationships between the Wnt genes and the degree of redundancy present in this system. The findings of this study are consistent with one particular model of Wnt activity, the combinatorial model, whereby the combination of Wnt ligands present in a particular region defines its identity. These findings should also be useful in attempts to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Wnt signaling in arthropods. PMID:24754405

  10. XX/XY System of Sex Determination in the Geophilomorph Centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack E; Dalíková, Martina; Sahara, Ken; Marec, František; Akam, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We show that the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima possesses an XX/XY system of sex chromosomes, with males being the heterogametic sex. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of sex chromosomes in any geophilomorph centipede. Using the recently assembled Strigamia genome sequence, we identified a set of scaffolds differentially represented in male and female DNA sequence. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we confirmed that three candidate X chromosome-derived scaffolds are present at approximately twice the copy number in females as in males. Furthermore, we confirmed that six candidate Y chromosome-derived scaffolds contain male-specific sequences. Finally, using this molecular information, we designed an X chromosome-specific DNA probe and performed fluorescent in situ hybridization against mitotic and meiotic chromosome spreads to identify the Strigamia XY sex-chromosome pair cytologically. We found that the X and Y chromosomes are recognizably different in size during the early pachytene stage of meiosis, and exhibit incomplete and delayed pairing. PMID:26919730

  11. Germ cells of the centipede Strigamia maritima are specified early in embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack E; Akam, Michael

    2014-08-15

    We provide the first systematic description of germ cell development with molecular markers in a myriapod, the centipede Strigamia maritima. By examining the expression of Strigamia vasa and nanos orthologues, we find that the primordial germ cells are specified from at least the blastoderm stage. This is a much earlier embryonic stage than previously described for centipedes, or any other member of the Myriapoda. Using these genes as markers, and taking advantage of the developmental synchrony of Strigamia embryos within single clutches, we are able to track the development of the germ cells throughout embryogenesis. We find that the germ cells accumulate at the blastopore; that the cells do not internalize through the hindgut, but rather through the closing blastopore; and that the cells undergo a long-range migration to the embryonic gonad. This is the first evidence for primordial germ cells displaying these behaviours in any myriapod. The myriapods are a phylogenetically important group in the arthropod radiation for which relatively little developmental data is currently available. Our study provides valuable comparative data that complements the growing number of studies in insects, crustaceans and chelicerates, and is important for the correct reconstruction of ancestral states and a fuller understanding of how germ cell development has evolved in different arthropod lineages. PMID:24930702

  12. Temporal dynamics of sediment bacterial communities in monospecific stands of Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima.

    PubMed

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Sousa, A I; Lillebø, A I; Queiroga, H; Gomes, N C M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we used 16S rRNA barcoded pyrosequencing to investigate to what extent monospecific stands of different salt marsh plant species (Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima), sampling site and temporal variation affect sediment bacterial communities. We also used a bioinformatics tool, PICRUSt, to predict metagenome gene functional content. Our results showed that bacterial community composition from monospecific stands of both plant species varied temporally, but both host plant species maintained compositionally distinct communities of bacteria. Juncus sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Myxococcales, Rhodospirillales, NB1-j and Ignavibacteriales, while Spartina sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Anaerolineae, Synechococcophycidae, Desulfobacterales, SHA-20 and Rhodobacterales. The differences in composition and higher taxon abundance between the sediment bacterial communities of stands of both plant species may be expected to affect overall metabolic diversity. In line with this expectation, there were also differences in the predicted enrichment of selected metabolic pathways. In particular, bacterial communities of Juncus sediment were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the degradation of various (xenobiotic) compounds. Bacterial communities of Spartina sediment in turn were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the biosynthesis of various bioactive compounds. Our study highlights the differences in composition and predicted functions of sediment-associated bacterial communities from two different salt marsh plant species. Loss of salt marsh habitat may thus be expected to both adversely affect microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning and have consequences for environmental processes such as nutrient cycling and pollutant remediation. PMID:27061465

  13. Crystal structure of the cell division protein FtsA from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    van den Ent, F; Löwe, J

    2000-10-16

    Bacterial cell division requires formation of a septal ring. A key step in septum formation is polymerization of FtsZ. FtsA directly interacts with FtsZ and probably targets other proteins to the septum. We have solved the crystal structure of FtsA from Thermotoga maritima in the apo and ATP-bound form. FtsA consists of two domains with the nucleotide-binding site in the interdomain cleft. Both domains have a common core that is also found in the actin family of proteins. Structurally, FtsA is most homologous to actin and heat-shock cognate protein (Hsc70). An important difference between FtsA and the actin family of proteins is the insertion of a subdomain in FtsA. Movement of this subdomain partially encloses a groove, which could bind the C-terminus of FtsZ. FtsZ is the bacterial homologue of tubulin, and the FtsZ ring is functionally similar to the contractile ring in dividing eukaryotic cells. Elucidation of the crystal structure of FtsA shows that another bacterial protein involved in cytokinesis is structurally related to a eukaryotic cytoskeletal protein involved in cytokinesis. PMID:11032797

  14. [Expression, purification and characterization of a thermostable lactate dehydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima].

    PubMed

    Qian, Guojun; Chen, Caiping; Zhai, Ruying; Shao, Weilan; Mei, Yanzhen

    2014-04-01

    The gene encoding thermostable lactate dehydrogenase (Tm-LDH) was cloned into the plasmid pHsh from Thermotoga maritima, and expressed in Escherichia coli JM 109. The recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity by a simple step, heat treatment. The recombinant enzyme had a molecular mass of 33 kDa. The optimal temperature and pH of Tm-LDH were observed 95 degrees C and 7.0. The purified enzyme had a half-life of 2 h at 90 degrees C, and exhibited better stability over a pH range from 5.5 to 8.0. The K(m) and V(max) values were 1.7 mmol/L, 3.8 x 10(4) U/mg of protein for pyruvate, and 7.2 mmol/L and 1.1 x 10(5) U/mg for NADH, respectively. The expression of Tm-LDH in T7 system could not obtain high efficiency, but it has been soluble over-expression in pHsh system and reached 340 mg/L. The superior stability and productivity of Tm-LDH will lay the foundation of its industrial-scale fermentation and application in the NAD regeneration. PMID:25195245

  15. Food and feeding ecology of purple sandpipers Calidris maritima on rocky intertidal habitats (Helgoland, German Bight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierschke, Volker

    On the island of Helgoland (German Bight) Purple Sandpipers Calidris maritima feed mainly in the intertidal of piers and rocky shores. The main prey species are Littorina saxatilis and Mytilus edulis, complemented by crustaceans, polychaetes, other molluscs and green algae. Beach habitats are used as alternative feeding sites during storms. Feeding sites seem to be selected according to rates of assimilated energy intake. The most profitable habitat (wrack beds on the high-tide line with kelp-fly larvae, 16.8 W) is used after arrival in October but is not available during winter. Because of high intake rates in rocky habitats (13.1 W on piers, 5.5 W on mussel beds), which allow short daily feeding times, and available alternative feeding sites during storms, Purple Sandpipers do not need to carry fat reserves in winter like other waders wintering in central and Western Europe. This, and the ever accessible food supply of epibenthic macrofauna on rocky shores, may enable Purple Sandpipers to winter further north than other wader species.

  16. Expression and Characterization of a Novel Thermo-Alkalistable Lipase from Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Tian, Rui; Chen, Huayou; Ni, Zhong; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Zhongge; Zhang, Tianxi; Zhang, Chunxia; Yang, Shengli

    2015-07-01

    A gene coding for lipase (Tm1350) from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima MSB8 was cloned and overexpressed by Escherichia coli. The enzyme can degrade substrates with both short and long acyl chain lengths. The apparent Km and Vmax values for p-nitrophenyl butyrate were 8 mM and 333 U/mg, respectively. The enzyme displayed optimal activity at pH 7.5 and 70 °C, maintained 66 % of the original activity after 8 h of incubation, and its half-lives at pHs 9 and 10 were 8 and 1 h. The activity of Tm1350 was stimulated up to 131 or 151 % of the original activity by incubating with 4 M urea or 20 % (v/v) methanol, and 90.1 or 70.2 % of the activity was maintained after 8 h incubation of the enzyme in 20 or 75 % (v/v) of the methanol, showing potential for biodiesel production. The activity of the enzyme without cysteine residue was stimulated up to 618 and 550 % of the original activity by incubating with dithiothreitol (DTT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) at a concentration of 1 mM. However, the circular dichroism spectra of the enzyme have no obvious change after DTT treatment. It is speculated that DTT interacts with potential residues in some key active sites without influence of structure. PMID:25957275

  17. Characterization and structural modeling of a new type of thermostable esterase from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; van der Oost, John; Kengen, Servé W M

    2007-06-01

    A bioinformatic screening of the genome of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima for ester-hydrolyzing enzymes revealed a protein with typical esterase motifs, though annotated as a hypothetical protein. To confirm its putative esterase function the gene (estD) was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Recombinant EstD was found to exhibit significant esterase activity with a preference for short acyl chain esters (C4-C8). The monomeric enzyme has a molecular mass of 44.5 kDa and optimal activity around 95 degrees C and at pH 7. Its thermostability is relatively high with a half-life of 1 h at 100 degrees C, but less stable compared to some other hyperthermophilic esterases. A structural model was constructed with the carboxylesterase Est30 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus as a template. The model covered most of the C-terminal part of EstD. The structure showed an alpha/beta-hydrolase fold and indicated the presence of a typical catalytic triad consisting of a serine, aspartate and histidine, which was verified by site-directed mutagenesis and inhibition studies. Phylogenetic analysis showed that EstD is only distantly related to other esterases. A comparison of the active site pentapeptide motifs revealed that EstD should be grouped into a new family of esterases (Family 10). EstD is the first characterized member of this family. PMID:17466017

  18. A simple assay for determining activities of phosphopentomutase from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Hanan M A; Zaghloul, Taha I; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-05-15

    Phosphopentomutase (PPM) catalyzes the interconversion of α-D-(deoxy)-ribose 1-phosphate and α-D-(deoxy)-ribose 5-phosphate. We developed a coupled or uncoupled enzymatic assay with an enzyme nucleoside phosphorylase for determining PPM activities on D-ribose 5-phosphate at a broad temperature range from 30 to 90 °C. This assay not only is simple and highly sensitive but also does not require any costly special instrument. Via this technology, an open reading frame TM0167 from a thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima putatively encoding PPM was cloned. The recombinant PPM was overexpressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta. This enzyme has the highest activity at 90 °C. MnCl2 (0.1 mM) and 50 μM α-D-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate are cofactors. The kinetic parameters of Km and kcat are 1.2 mM and 185 s(-1) at 90 °C, respectively. The enzyme has a half-life time of up to 156 min at 90 °C. This enzyme is the most active and thermostable PPM reported to date. PMID:26924489

  19. Enzymatic activity in the rhizosphere of Spartina maritima: potential contribution for phytoremediation of metals.

    PubMed

    Reboreda, Rosa; Caçador, Isabel

    2008-02-01

    Extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) of five enzymes (peroxidase, phenol oxidase, beta-glucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) was analysed in sediments colonised by Spartina maritima in two salt marshes (Rosário and Pancas) of the Tagus estuary (Portugal) with different characteristics such as sediment parameters and metal contaminant levels. Our aim was a better understanding of the influence of the halophyte on microbial activity in the rhizosphere under different site conditions, and its potential consequences for metal cycling and phytoremediation in salt marshes. Acid phosphatase and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase presented significantly higher EEA in Rosário than in Pancas, whereas the opposite occurred for peroxidase. This was mainly attributed to differences in organic matter between the two sites. A positive correlation between root biomass and EEA of hydrolases (beta-glucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) was found, indicating a possible influence of the halophyte in sediment microbial function. This would potentially affect metal cycling in the rhizosphere through microbial reactions. PMID:17935772

  20. Structural and functional characterization of a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphatase from Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Khaldeyah; Desai, Anna; Smith, Clyde; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphatase that catalyzes the conversion of inosine triphosphate (ITP), deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) and xanthosine triphosphate (XTP) into inosine monophosphate (IMP), deoxyinosine monophosphate (IMP) and xanthosine monophosphate (XMP), respectively. The k cat/K m values determined at 323 and 353 K fall between 1.31 × 104 and 7.80 × 104  M −1 s−1. ITP and dITP are slightly preferred over XTP. Activity towards canonical nucleoside triphosphates (ATP and GTP) was not detected. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg2+ as a cofactor and has a preference for alkaline conditions. A protein X-ray structure of the enzyme with bound IMP was obtained at 2.15 Å resolution. The active site houses a well conserved network of residues that are critical for substrate recognition and catalysis. The crystal structure shows a tetramer with two possible dimer interfaces. One of these interfaces strongly resembles the dimer interface that is found in the structures of other noncanonical nucleoside pyrophosphatases from human (human ITPase) and archaea (Mj0226 and PhNTPase). PMID:23385455

  1. XX/XY System of Sex Determination in the Geophilomorph Centipede Strigamia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jack E.; Dalíková, Martina; Sahara, Ken; Marec, František; Akam, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We show that the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima possesses an XX/XY system of sex chromosomes, with males being the heterogametic sex. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of sex chromosomes in any geophilomorph centipede. Using the recently assembled Strigamia genome sequence, we identified a set of scaffolds differentially represented in male and female DNA sequence. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we confirmed that three candidate X chromosome-derived scaffolds are present at approximately twice the copy number in females as in males. Furthermore, we confirmed that six candidate Y chromosome-derived scaffolds contain male-specific sequences. Finally, using this molecular information, we designed an X chromosome-specific DNA probe and performed fluorescent in situ hybridization against mitotic and meiotic chromosome spreads to identify the Strigamia XY sex-chromosome pair cytologically. We found that the X and Y chromosomes are recognizably different in size during the early pachytene stage of meiosis, and exhibit incomplete and delayed pairing. PMID:26919730

  2. Structure of a Diguanylate Cyclase from Thermotoga maritima: Insights into Activation, Feedback Inhibition and Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, Angeline; Liew, Chong Wai; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Lescar, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of bis-3′-5′-cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) would facilitate biological studies of numerous bacterial signaling pathways and phenotypes controlled by this second messenger molecule, such as virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP constitutes also a potentially interesting molecule as a vaccine adjuvant. Even though chemical synthesis of c-di-GMP can be done, the yields are incompatible with mass-production. tDGC, a stand-alone diguanylate cyclase (DGC or GGDEF domain) from Thermotoga maritima, enables the robust enzymatic production of large quantities of c-di-GMP. To understand the structural correlates of tDGC thermostability, its catalytic mechanism and feedback inhibition, we determined structures of an active-like dimeric conformation with both active (A) sites facing each other and of an inactive dimeric conformation, locked by c-di-GMP bound at the inhibitory (I) site. We also report the structure of a single mutant of tDGC, with the R158A mutation at the I-site, abolishing product inhibition and unproductive dimerization. A comparison with structurally characterized DGC homologues from mesophiles reveals the presence of a higher number of salt bridges in the hyperthermophile enzyme tDGC. Denaturation experiments of mutants disrupting in turn each of the salt bridges unique to tDGC identified three salt-bridges critical to confer thermostability. PMID:25360685

  3. Improving thermal stability of thermophilic L-threonine aldolase from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Wieteska, Lukasz; Ionov, Maksim; Szemraj, Janusz; Feller, Claudia; Kolinski, Andrzej; Gront, Dominik

    2015-04-10

    Threonine aldolase (TA) catalyzes a reversible reaction, in which threonine is decomposed into glycine and acetaldehyde. The same enzyme can be used to catalyze aldol reaction between glycine and a variety of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, thus creating various alpha-amino-alcohols. Therefore, TA is a very promising enzyme that could be used to prepare biologically active compounds or building blocks for pharmaceutical industry. Rational design was applied to thermophilic TA from Thermotoga maritima to improve thermal stability by the incorporation of salt and disulfide bridges between subunits in the functional tetramer. An activity assay together with CD analysis and Western-blot detection was used to evaluate mutants. Except one, each of the designed mutants preserved activity toward the natural substrate. One of the 10 proposed single point mutants, P56C, displayed significantly enhanced stability compared to the wild type (WT). Its initial activity was not affected and persisted longer than WT, proportionally to increased stability. Additionally one of the mutants, W86E, displayed enhanced activity, with stability similar to WT. Higher activity may be explained by a subtle change in active site availability. Salt bridge formation between glutamic acid at position 86 and arginine at position 120 in the neighboring chain may be responsible for the slight shift of the chain fragment, thus creating wider access to the active site both for the substrate and PLP. PMID:25701680

  4. Crystal structure of YjeQ from Thermotoga maritima contains a circularly permuted GTPase domain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hae; Lou, Yun; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of the GDP complex of the YjeQ protein from Thermotoga maritima (TmYjeQ), a member of the YjeQ GTPase subfamaily. TmYjeQ, a homologue of Escherichia coli YjeQ, which is known to bind to the ribosome, is composed of three domains: an N-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding fold domain, a central GTPase domain, and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain. The crystal structure of TmYjeQ reveals two interesting domains: a circularly permutated GTPase domain and an unusual zinc-finger domain. The binding mode of GDP in the GTPase domain of TmYjeQ is similar to those of GDP or GTP analogs in ras proteins, a prototype GTPase. The N-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding fold domain, together with the GTPase domain, forms the extended RNA-binding site. The C-terminal domain has an unusual zinc-finger motif composed of Cys-250, Cys-255, Cys-263, and His-257, with a remote structural similarity to a portion of a DNA-repair protein, rad51 fragment. The overall structural features of TmYjeQ make it a good candidate for an RNA-binding protein, which is consistent with the biochemical data of the YjeQ subfamily in binding to the ribosome. PMID:15331784

  5. Ecology of beach wrack in northern New England with special reference to Orchestia platensis*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbehani, Manaf I.; Croker, Robert A.

    1982-12-01

    The northern New England beach wrack community with special reference to the cosmopolitan amphipod crustacean, Orchestia platensis, was examined at estuarine and open coastal habitats. Beach wrack was dominated by the plant genera Ascophyllum, Zostera, Spartina and Chondrus, and was most abundant during spring and late summer. Animal community numbers, biomass and frequency in fresh to moderately decomposed wrack were dominated by O. platensis throughout the year at all habitats; oligochaetes and Collembola were also important. The abundance of O. platensis showed high spatial and temporal variability, with low abundance generally associated with decreased amounts of wrack during colder months. An exception was the winter presence of the species at one estuarine habitat, in patchy aggregations within gravel-cobble refuges. The abundance of O. platensis averaged 1280 (0.04 m 2) -1, with a maximum of 7040 (0.04 m 2) -1. The life cycle of O. platensis is bivoltine, with summer-hatched young reaching maturity within 1 month. Laboratory studies indicate females with up to 4 broods (30 days) -1, averaging 18 eggs brood -1. Orchestia platensis is omnivorous, eating fresh plant tissue, live oligochaetes, Limulus eggs and diatom 'fuzz'. The rate of laboratory consumption of algae and Zostera was 0.05 mg plant mg -1 wet body weight day -1. Presumptive predators of O. platensis are juvenile green crab, Carcinus maenus, and the earwig. Anisolabis maritima. The mobility, aggregation and aggressiveness of O. platensis assist the species in establishing and maintaining populations in the rigorous wrack habitat. The general competitive superiority of O. platensis over its congener, O. gammarella, and the co-occurrence of these species on both eastern and western Atlantic shores is discussed.

  6. Flowering time in wild beet ( Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) along a latitudinal cline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijk, Henk Van; Boudry, Pierre; McCombre, Helen; Vernet, Philippe

    The wild beet ( Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima, a perennial species from the Mediterranean and the European Atlantic coasts) shows marked variation in flowering time in terms of both the year of first flowering and flowering date in a given year. Much of this variability is related to latitude. Beta vulgaris plants flower either in the same year as they germinate or in their second year. This is mainly due to differences in their requirement for vernalization, which is determined by a single gene B/b and by quantitative trait loci. The more southern the origin of the plants, the less vernalization is required. Also the B allele, which cancels vernalization requirement completely, has a high frequency in the Mediterranean region, but is completely absent in the northern part of the distribution of this species. We found that flowering date variation in relation to the latitude of origin is maintained under greenhouse conditions but does not follow a simple clinal relationship. From the Mediterranean northwards to the west coast of Brittany, flowering occurs progressively earlier, but from Brittany northwards to south-east England and The Netherlands it is progressively later. A possible explanation for this difference is that in the southern part of the range sensitivity to daylength and warmth control flowering time, whereas further north vernalization requirement is also a key factor. A substantial part of all differences in flowering time was heritable: heritability within populations was measured as 0.33 under greenhouse conditions. The high heritability implies evolutionary change may occur in this character.

  7. Substrate specificities and expression patterns reflect the evolutionary divergence of maltose ABC transporters in Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Dhaval M; Nguyen, Tu N; Noll, Kenneth M

    2005-03-01

    Duplication of transporter genes is apparent in the genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. The physiological impacts of these duplications are not well understood, so we used the bacterium's two putative maltose transporters to begin a study of the evolutionary relationship between a transporter's function and the control of expression of its genes. We show that the substrate binding proteins encoded by these operons, MalE1 and MalE2, have different substrate specificities and affinities and that they are expressed under different growth conditions. MalE1 binds maltose (dissociation constant [KD], 24 +/- 1 microM), maltotriose (KD, 8 +/- 0.5 nM), and beta-(1-->4)-mannotetraose (KD, 38 +/- 1 microM). In contrast, MalE2 binds maltose (KD, 8.4 +/- 1 microM), maltotriose (KD, 11.5 +/- 1.5 microM), and trehalose (KD, 9.5 +/- 1.0 microM) confirming the findings of Wassenberg et al. (J. Mol. Biol. 295:279-288, 2000). Neither protein binds lactose. We examined the expression of these operons at both the transcriptional and translational levels and found that MalE1 is expressed in cells grown on lactose or guar gum and that MalE2 is highly expressed in starch- and trehalose-grown cells. Evidence is provided that malE1, malF1, and perhaps malG1 are cotranscribed and so constitute an operon. An open reading frame encoding a putative transcriptional regulatory protein adjacent to this operon (TM1200) is also up-regulated in response to growth on lactose. These evolutionarily related transporter operons have diverged both in function and expression to assume apparently different physiological roles. PMID:15743948

  8. Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima: Structural Insights into Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-10-02

    In the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway, formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) amidotransferase, also known as PurL, catalyzes the conversion of FGAR, ATP, and glutamine to formyl glycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM), ADP, P{sub i}, and glutamate. Two forms of PurL have been characterized, large and small. Large PurL, present in most Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes, consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains three major domains: the N-terminal domain, the FGAM synthetase domain, and the glutaminase domain, with a putative ammonia channel located between the active sites of the latter two. Small PurL, present in Gram-positive bacteria and archaea, is structurally homologous to the FGAM synthetase domain of large PurL, and forms a complex with two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS. The structure of the PurS dimer is homologous with the N-terminal domain of large PurL, while PurQ, whose structure has not been reported, contains the glutaminase activity. In Bacillus subtilis, the formation of the PurLQS complex is dependent on glutamine and ADP and has been demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, a structure of the PurLQS complex from Thermotoga maritima is described revealing a 2:1:1 stoichiometry of PurS:Q:L, respectively. The conformational changes observed in TmPurL upon complex formation elucidate the mechanism of metabolite-mediated recruitment of PurQ and PurS. The flexibility of the PurS dimer is proposed to play a role in the activation of the complex and the formation of the ammonia channel. A potential path for the ammonia channel is identified.

  9. Structure of SAICAR synthase from Thermotoga maritima at 2.2 Å reveals an unusual covalent dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongguang; Skarina, Tatiana; Evdokimova, Elena; Edwards, Aled; Savchenko, Alexei; Laskowski, Roman; Cuff, Marianne E.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2006-04-01

    The crystal structure of phophoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide or SAICAR synthase from T. maritima at 2.2 Å revealed an unusual covalent dimer. As a part of a structural genomics program, the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the PurC gene product from Thermotoga maritima has been solved. This 26.2 kDa protein belongs to the phophoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide or SAICAR synthase family of enzymes, the members of which are involved in de novo purine biosynthesis. SAICAR synthase can be divided into three subdomains: two α+β regions exhibiting structural homology with ATP-binding proteins and a carboxy-terminal subdomain of two α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains two copies of the protein which are covalently linked by a disulfide bond between Cys126(A) and Cys126(B). This 230-amino-acid protein exhibits high structural homology with SAICAR synthase from baker’s yeast. The protein structure is described and compared with that of the ATP–SAICAR synthase complex from yeast.

  10. Modulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isozymes by organ development and high long-term salinity in the halophyte Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Houmani, Hayet; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Palma, José M; Abdelly, Chedly; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. This enzyme is considered to be a first line of defense for controlling the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the number and type of SOD isozymes were identified in the principal organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) of Cakile maritima. We also analyzed the way in which the activity of these SOD isozymes is modulated during development and under high long-term salinity (400 mM NaCl) stress conditions. The data indicate that this plant contains a total of ten SOD isozymes: two Mn-SODs, one Fe-SOD, and seven CuZn-SODs, with the Fe-SOD being the most prominent isozyme in the different organs analyzed. Moreover, the modulation of SOD isozymes, particularly CuZn-SODs, was only detected during development and under severe salinity stress conditions. These data suggest that, in C. maritima, the occurrence of these CuZn-SODs in roots and leaves plays an adaptive role since this CuZn-SOD isozyme might replace the diminished Fe-SOD activity under salinity stress to overcome this adverse environmental condition. PMID:26159565

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles. PMID:26032540

  12. Anthelmintic activity of Artemisia vestita Wall ex DC. and Artemisia maritima L. against Haemonchus contortus from sheep.

    PubMed

    Irum, Shamaila; Ahmed, Haroon; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Mushtaq, Muhammad; Mirza, Bushra; Donskow-Łysoniewska, Katarzyna; Qayyum, Mazhar; Simsek, Sami

    2015-09-15

    Current study was designed to evaluate in vivo and in vitro anthelmintic activity of Artemisia vestita Wall ex DC. and Artemisia maritima L. against Haemonchus contortus in comparison with ivermectin to investigate the effect of plant extracts on survival of infective L3 and adults under in vitro condition. Plant extracts were given to H. contortus infected sheep orally and it was infected with L3 stage of H. contortus at dose of 5000 larvae/sheep. Total of 25-30 larvae were incubated with plant extracts in PBS alone and ivermectin at different concentration used as positive control. It was recorded that there is a significant decrease in fecal egg count (FEC) after post-treatment period for both plants. The highest fecal egg count reduction for A. vestita was 87.2% at 100mg/kg while for A. maritima it was 84.5% on day 28 post-treatment. Investigated extracts indicated significant activity against larvae and adult worms. PMID:26194429

  13. Redox-Active Profile Characterization of Remirea maritima Extracts and Its Cytotoxic Effect in Mouse Fibroblasts (L929) and Melanoma (B16F10) Cells.

    PubMed

    Dória, Grace Anne A; Santos, Anderson R; Bittencourt, Leonardo S; Bortolin, Rafael C; Menezes, Paula P; Vasconcelos, Bruno S; Souza, Rebeca O; Fonseca, Maria José V; Santos, Alan Diego C; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Silva, Francilene A; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Prata, Ana Paula N; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Araújo, Adriano A S

    2015-01-01

    Remirea maritima is a tropical plant with a reticulated root system belonging to the family Cyperaceae, also known to have biologically active secondary metabolites. However, very few data on R. maritima's biological actions are available and there are no reports regarding the redox-active profile of this plant. In this study, we examined the total phenolic content of Remirea maritima hydroalcoholic (RMHA) extracts, redox properties against different reactive species generated in vitro and their cytotoxic effect against fibroblasts (L929) and melanoma (B16F10) cells. Total reactive antioxidant potential index (TRAP) and total antioxidant reactivity (TAR) results revealed that RMHA at all concentrations tested showed significant antioxidant capacity. RMHA was also effective against hydroxyl radical formation, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and in scavenging nitric oxide (NO) radicals. In vitro, the level of lipid peroxidation was reduced by RMHA extract and the data showed significant oxidative damage protection. The RMHA cytotoxicity was evaluated by a neutral red assay in fibroblast (L929) and melanome (B16F10) cells. The obtained results showed that the RMHA (40 and 80 µg/mL, respectively) reduced 70% of the viable cells. In conclusion, this study represents the first report regarding the antioxidant and anti-proliferative potential of R. maritima against B16F10 melanoma cells. PMID:26121396

  14. Comparison of parasitic hymenoptera captured in malaise traps baited with two flowering plants Lobularia maritima (Brassicales:Brassicaceae) and Spermacoce verticillate (Gentianales:Rubiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many adult hymenopterous parasitoids feed on floral nectar, and occasionally pollen. However, flowers differ in both accessibility and attractiveness to these insects. Malaise traps, a type of “passive/interception” trap, were baited with potted flowering plants, Lobularia maritima L. (Brassicaceae)...

  15. Putative free radical-scavenging activity of an extract of Cineraria maritima in preventing selenite-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, Thirugnanasambandhar Sivasubramanian; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Annadurai, Thangaraj; Jesudasan, Christdas Arul Nelson; Thomas, Philip Aloysius

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the possible free radical-scavenging activity of an extract of Cineraria maritima on selenite-induced cataractous lenses in Wistar rat pups. Methods In the present study, Wistar rat pups were divided into three experimental groups. On P10, Group I (control) rat pups received an intraperitoneal injection of 0.89% saline. Rats in groups II (selenite-challenged, untreated) and III (selenite-challenged, C. maritima treated) received a subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (19 μmol/kg bodyweight); Group III rat pups also received an intraperitoneal injection of the extract of C. maritima (350 mg/kg bodyweight) once daily P9–14. Both eyes of each pup were examined from P16 until P30. Cytochemical localization of nitroblue tetrazolium salts and generation of superoxide, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide levels were measured. The expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene was evaluated with reverse transcription-PCR. Immunoblot analysis was also performed to confirm the differential expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. Results Subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite led to severe oxidative damage in the lenticular tissues, shown by increased formation of formazan crystals, elevated generation of superoxide, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide radicals, and elevated inducible nitric oxide synthase gene and protein expression that possibly contributed to the opacification of the lens and thus cataract formation. When rat pups were treated with intraperitoneal administration of the extract of C. maritima, the generation of free radicals as well as the messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase were maintained at near normal levels. Conclusions The data generated by this study suggest that an ethanolic extract of C. maritima possibly prevents cataractogenesis in a rat model by minimizing free radical generation. PMID:24357923

  16. Cyclocoelid ( Morishitium sp.) Trematodes from an Air Sac of a Purple Sandpiper, Calidris maritima (Brünnich).

    PubMed

    Shutler, Dave; Mallory, Mark L; Elderkin, Mark; McLaughlin, J Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Like many shorebirds, purple sandpipers ( Calidris maritima [Brünnich] Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) have experienced population declines in recent years, but causes of these declines have not been established. As part of a larger study to identify causes of these declines, we collected and examined 25 purple sandpipers in coastal Nova Scotia, Canada during March 2013. In the course of dissections to collect tissue samples, we detected a cluster of trematodes in the air sac of 1 bird that were subsequently identified as cyclocoelids belonging to the genus Morishitium Witenberg, 1928, which we believe is the first report of this genus of parasites in this host. Cyclocoelids have been reported from other scolopacids and other shorebird families, but we are unaware of reports of serious pathology arising from these trematodes. Given this and the low prevalence (4%) in our sample, our data cannot ascribe declines in purple sandpiper populations to these trematodes, but our sample is limited both spatially and temporally. PMID:26779884

  17. In vivo selection for the enhancement of Thermotoga maritima exopolygalacturonase activity at neutral pH and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Drone, Jullien; Dion, Michel; Tellier, Charles; Rabiller, Claude

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an Escherichia coli-based metabolic selection system for the uncovering of new oligogalacturonate-active enzymes. Based on the expression of the specific permease TogMNAB, this system enabled the entry of oligogalacturonates into the cytoplasm of E. coli thus providing a modified strain usable for this purpose. This tool was used for the metabolic selection of Thermotoga maritima exopolygalacturonase (TmGalU) mutants enabling the uptake of sodium trigalacturonate as the sole carbon source by the bacterium. In only one round of error-prone PCR and selection, mutants of TmGalU with a 4-fold increased turnover at pH 7.0 and 2-fold more active at 37 degrees C than wild-type enzyme were isolated. These results show the versatility of this strain for the evolution of oligogalacturonate-active enzymes. PMID:17218336

  18. Shotgun crystallization strategy for structural genomics: an optimized two-tiered crystallization screen against the Thermotoga maritima proteome.

    PubMed

    Page, Rebecca; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Canaves, Jaume M; Spraggon, Glen; Kreusch, Andreas; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C; Lesley, Scott A

    2003-06-01

    As the field of structural genomics continues to grow and new technologies are developed, novel strategies are needed to efficiently crystallize large numbers of protein targets, thus increasing output, not just throughput [Chayen & Saridakis (2002). Acta Cryst. D58, 921-927]. One strategy, developed for the high-throughput structure determination of the Thermotoga maritima proteome, is to quickly determine which proteins have a propensity for crystal formation followed by focused SeMet-incorporated protein crystallization attempts. This experimental effort has resulted in over 320 000 individual crystallization experiments. As such, it has provided one of the most extensive systematic data sets of commonly used crystallization conditions against a wide range of proteins to date. Analysis of this data shows that many of the original screening conditions are redundant, as all of the T. maritima proteins that crystallize readily could be identified using just 23% of the original conditions. It also shows that proteins that contain selenomethionine and are more extensively purified often crystallize in distinctly different conditions from those of their native less pure counterparts. Most importantly, it shows that the two-tiered strategy employed here is extremely successful for predicting which proteins will readily crystallize, as greater than 99% of the proteins identified as having a propensity to crystallize under non-optimal native conditions did so again as selenomethionine derivatives during the focused crystallization trials. This crystallization strategy can be adopted for both large-scale genomics programs and individual protein studies with multiple constructs and has the potential to significantly accelerate future crystallographic efforts. PMID:12777766

  19. The elucidation of the structure of Thermotoga maritima peptidoglycan reveals two novel types of cross-link.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Audrey; Parquet, Claudine; Arthur, Michel; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier

    2009-08-14

    Thermotoga maritima is a Gram-negative, hyperthermophilic bacterium whose peptidoglycan contains comparable amounts of L- and D-lysine. We have determined the fine structure of this cell-wall polymer. The muropeptides resulting from the digestion of peptidoglycan by mutanolysin were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by amino acid analysis after acid hydrolysis, dinitrophenylation, enzymatic determination of the configuration of the chiral amino acids, and mass spectrometry. The high-performance liquid chromatography profile contained four main peaks, two monomers, and two dimers, plus a few minor peaks corresponding to anhydro forms. The first monomer was the d-lysine-containing disaccharide-tripeptide in which the D-Glu-D-Lys bond had the unusual gamma-->epsilon arrangement (GlcNAc-MurNAc-L-Ala-gamma-D-Glu-epsilon-D-Lys). The second monomer was the conventional disaccharide-tetrapeptide (GlcNAc-MurNAc-L-Ala-gamma-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala). The first dimer contained a disaccharide-L-Ala as the acyl donor cross-linked to the alpha-amine of D-Lys in a tripeptide acceptor stem with the sequence of the first monomer. In the second dimer, donor and acceptor stems with the sequences of the second and first monomers, respectively, were connected by a D-Ala4-alpha-D-Lys3 cross-link. The cross-linking index was 10 with an average chain length of 30 disaccharide units. The structure of the peptidoglycan of T. maritima revealed for the first time the key role of D-Lys in peptidoglycan synthesis, both as a surrogate of L-Lys or meso-diaminopimelic acid at the third position of peptide stems and in the formation of novel cross-links of the L-Ala1(alpha-->alpha)D-Lys3 and D-Ala4(alpha-->alpha)D-Lys3 types. PMID:19542229

  20. Overexpression and simple purification of the Thermotoga maritima 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli and its application for NADPH regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiran; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2009-01-01

    Background Thermostable enzymes from thermophilic microorganisms are playing more and more important roles in molecular biology R&D and industrial applications. However, over-production of recombinant soluble proteins from thermophilic microorganisms in mesophilic hosts (e.g. E. coli) remains challenging sometimes. Results An open reading frame TM0438 from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima putatively encoding 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purified protein was confirmed to have 6PGDH activity with a molecular mass of 53 kDa. The kcat of this enzyme was 325 s-1 and the Km values for 6-phosphogluconate, NADP+, and NAD+ were 11, 10 and 380 μM, respectively, at 80°C. This enzyme had half-life times of 48 and 140 h at 90 and 80°C, respectively. Through numerous approaches including expression vectors, hosts, cultivation conditions, inducers, and codon-optimization of the 6pgdh gene, the soluble 6PGDH expression levels were enhanced to ~250 mg per liter of culture by more than 500-fold. The recombinant 6PGDH accounted for >30% of total E. coli cellular proteins when lactose was used as a low-cost inducer. In addition, this enzyme coupled with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase for the first time was demonstrated to generate two moles of NADPH per mole of glucose-6-phosphate. Conclusion We have achieved a more than 500-fold improvement in the expression of soluble T. maritima 6PGDH in E. coli, characterized its basic biochemical properties, and demonstrated its applicability for NADPH regeneration by a new enzyme cocktail. The methodology for over-expression and simple purification of this thermostable protein would be useful for the production of other thermostable proteins in E. coli. PMID:19497097

  1. Active Site Metal Occupancy and Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Activity of Thermotoga maritima HD-GYP.

    PubMed

    Miner, Kyle D; Kurtz, Donald M

    2016-02-16

    HD-GYPs make up a subclass of the metal-dependent HD phosphohydrolase superfamily and catalyze conversion of cyclic di(3',5')-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'→5')-guanosine (pGpG) and GMP. Until now, the only reported crystal structure of an HD-GYP that also exhibits c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity contains a His/carboxylate ligated triiron active site. However, other structural and phylogenetic correlations indicate that some HD-GYPs contain dimetal active sites. Here we provide evidence that an HD-GYP c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, TM0186, from Thermotoga maritima can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. We show that an as-isolated iron-containing TM0186 has an oxo/carboxylato-bridged diferric site, and that the reduced (diferrous) form is necessary and sufficient to catalyze conversion of c-di-GMP to pGpG, but that conversion of pGpG to GMP requires more than two metals per active site. Similar c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities were obtained with divalent iron or manganese. On the basis of activity correlations with several putative metal ligand residue variants and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that TM0186 can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. Our results also suggest that a Glu residue conserved in a subset of HD-GYPs is required for formation of the trimetal site and can also serve as a labile ligand to the dimetal site. Given the anaerobic growth requirement of T. maritima, we suggest that this HD-GYP can function in vivo with either divalent iron or manganese occupying di- and trimetal sites. PMID:26786892

  2. Phenological development stages variation versus mercury tolerance, accumulation, and allocation in salt marsh macrophytes Triglochin maritima and Scirpus maritimus prevalent in Ria de Aveiro coastal lagoon (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Ahmad, Iqbal; Válega, Mónica; Figueira, Etelvina; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda

    2013-06-01

    Efficient and sustainable management of rapidly mounting environmental issues has been the focus of current intensive research. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of plant phenological development stage variation on mercury (Hg) tolerance, accumulation, and allocation in two salt marsh macrophytes Triglochin maritima and Scirpus maritimus prevalent in historically Hg-contaminated Ria de Aveiro coastal lagoon (Portugal). Both plant samples and the sediments vegetated by monospecific stands of T. maritima and S. maritimus were collected from reference (R) and sites with moderate (M) and high (H) Hg contamination in Laranjo bay within Ria de Aveiro lagoon. Hg tolerance, uptake, and allocation in T. maritima and S. maritimus, physico-chemical traits (pH, redox potential, and organic matter content) and Hg concentrations in sediments vegetated by these species were impacted differentially by phenological development stages variation irrespective of the Hg contamination level. In T. maritima, Hg concentration increased with increase in Hg contamination gradient where root displayed significantly higher Hg followed by rhizome and leaf maximally at H. However, in S. maritimus, the highest Hg concentration was perceptible in rhizome followed by root maximally at M. Between the two studied plant species, S. maritimus displayed higher Hg tolerance index (depicted by higher plant dry mass allocated to reproductive stage) and higher available Hg at M (during all growth stages) and H (during senescent stage) when compared to T. maritimus. Both plant species proved to be Hg excluder (low root/rhizome-leaf Hg translocation). Additionally, T. maritima also acted as Hg stabilizer while, S. maritimus as Hg accumulator. It can be inferred from the study that (a) the plant phenological development stage variations significantly influenced plant Hg sensitivity by impacting sediment chemistry, plant growth (in terms of plant dry mass), Hg accumulation, and its subsequent

  3. Permeability and reactivity of Thermotoga maritima in latex bimodal blend coatings at 80 degrees C: a model high temperature biocatalytic coating.

    PubMed

    Lyngberg, Olav K; Solheid, Chris; Charaniya, Salim; Ma, Yue; Thiagarajan, Venkata; Scriven, L E; Flickinger, Michael C

    2005-06-01

    Thermostable polymers cast as thin, porous coatings or membranes may be useful for concentrating and stabilizing hyperthermophilic microorganisms as biocatalysts. Hydrogel matrices can be unstable above 65 degrees C. Therefore a 55-microm thick, two layer (cell coat + polymer top coat) bimodal, adhesive latex coating of partially coalesced polystyrene particles was investigated at 80 degrees C using Thermotoga maritima as a model hyperthermophile. Coating permeability (pore structure) was critical for maintaining T. maritima viability. The permeability of bimodal coatings generated from 0.8 v/v of a suspension of non-film-forming 800 nm polystyrene particles with high glass transition temperature (T(g) = 94 degrees C, 26.9% total solids) blended with 0.2 v/v of a suspension of film-forming 158 nm polyacrylate/styrene particles (T(g) approximately -5 degrees C, 40.9% total solids) with 0.3 g sucrose/g latex was measured in a KNO3 diffusion cell. Diffusivity ratio remained above 0.04 (D(eff)/D) when incubated at 80 degrees C in artificial seawater (ASW) for 5 days. KNO3 permeability was corroborated by cryogenic-SEM images of the pore structure. In contrast, the permeability of a mono-dispersed acrylate/vinyl acetate latex Rovace SF091 (T(g) approximately 10 degrees C) rapidly decreased and became impermeable after 2 days incubation in ASW at 80 degrees C. Thermotoga maritima were entrapped in these coatings at a cell density of 49 g cell wet weight/liter of coating volume, 25-fold higher than the density in liquid culture. Viable T. maritima were released from single-layer coatings at 80 degrees C but accurate measurement of the percentage of viable entrapped cells by plate counting was not successful. Metabolic activity could be measured in bilayer coatings by utilization of glucose and maltose, which was identical for latex-entrapped and suspended cells. Starch was hydrolyzed for 200 h by latex-entrapped cells due to the slow diffusion of starch through the

  4. Periplasmic Binding Proteins in Thermophiles: Characterization and Potential Application of an Arginine-Binding Protein from Thermotoga maritima: A Brief Thermo-Story.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Alessio; Staiano, Maria; Dattelbaum, Jonathan; Varriale, Antonio; Capo, Alessandro; D'Auria, Sabato

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima is a 27.7 kDa protein possessing the typical two-domain structure of the periplasmic binding proteins family. The protein is characterized by a very high specificity and affinity to bind to arginine, also at high temperatures. Due to its features, this protein could be taken into account as a potential candidate for the design of a biosensor for arginine. It is important to investigate the stability of proteins when they are used for biotechnological applications. In this article, we review the structural and functional features of an arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima with a particular eye on its potential biotechnological applications. PMID:25371336

  5. Spatial genetic structure in Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa reveals the effect of contrasting mating system, influence of marine currents, and footprints of postglacial recolonization routes

    PubMed Central

    Leys, Marie; Petit, Eric J; El-Bahloul, Yasmina; Liso, Camille; Fournet, Sylvain; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to population genetic divergence across a species' range is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology and ecological genetics. We examined the relative importance of historical and ecological features in shaping the present-day spatial patterns of genetic structure in two related plant species, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we surveyed 93 populations from Brittany (France) to Morocco – the southern limit of their species' range distribution. Whereas B. macrocarpa showed a genotypic structure and a high level of genetic differentiation indicative of selfing, the population genetic structure of B. vulgaris subsp. maritima was consistent with an outcrossing mating system. We further showed (1) a strong geographic clustering in coastal B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that highlighted the influence of marine currents in shaping different lineages and (2) a peculiar genetic structure of inland B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that could indicate the admixture of distinct evolutionary lineages and recent expansions associated with anthropogenic disturbances. Spatial patterns of nuclear diversity and differentiation also supported a stepwise recolonization of Europe from Atlantic-Mediterranean refugia after the last glacial period, with leading-edge expansions. However, cytoplasmic diversity was not impacted by postglacial recolonization: stochastic long-distance seed dispersal mediated by major oceanic currents may mitigate the common patterns of reduced cytoplasmic diversity observed for edge populations. Overall, the patterns we documented here challenge the general view of reduced genetic diversity at the edge of a species' range distribution and provide clues for understanding how life-history and major geographic features interact to shape the distribution of genetic diversity. PMID:24963380

  6. Haplotype Detection from Next-Generation Sequencing in High-Ploidy-Level Species: 45S rDNA Gene Copies in the Hexaploid Spartina maritima

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Julien; Aliaga, Benoît; Lima, Oscar; Ferreira de Carvalho, Julie; Ainouche, Abdelkader; Macas, Jiri; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Coriton, Olivier; Ainouche, Malika; Salmon, Armel

    2015-01-01

    Gene and whole-genome duplications are widespread in plant nuclear genomes, resulting in sequence heterogeneity. Identification of duplicated genes may be particularly challenging in highly redundant genomes, especially when there are no diploid parents as a reference. Here, we developed a pipeline to detect the different copies in the ribosomal RNA gene family in the hexaploid grass Spartina maritima from next-generation sequencing (Roche-454) reads. The heterogeneity of the different domains of the highly repeated 45S unit was explored by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and assembling reads based on shared polymorphisms. SNPs were validated using comparisons with Illumina sequence data sets and by cloning and Sanger (re)sequencing. Using this approach, 29 validated polymorphisms and 11 validated haplotypes were reported (out of 34 and 20, respectively, that were initially predicted by our program). The rDNA domains of S. maritima have similar lengths as those found in other Poaceae, apart from the 5′-ETS, which is approximately two-times longer in S. maritima. Sequence homogeneity was encountered in coding regions and both internal transcribed spacers (ITS), whereas high intragenomic variability was detected in the intergenic spacer (IGS) and the external transcribed spacer (ETS). Molecular cytogenetic analysis by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed the presence of one pair of 45S rDNA signals on the chromosomes of S. maritima instead of three expected pairs for a hexaploid genome, indicating loss of duplicated homeologous loci through the diploidization process. The procedure developed here may be used at any ploidy level and using different sequencing technologies. PMID:26530424

  7. Structure of a d-tagatose 3-epimerase-related protein from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Yoneda, Kazunari; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of a d-tagatose 3-epimerase-related protein (TM0416p) encoded by the hypothetical open reading frame TM0416 in the genome of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The asymmetric unit contained two homologous subunits and a dimer was generated by twofold symmetry. The main-chain coordinates of the enzyme monomer proved to be similar to those of d-tagatose 3-­epimerase from Pseudomonas cichorii and d-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens; however, TM0416p exhibited a unique solvent-accessible substrate-binding pocket that reflected the absence of an α-helix that covers the active-site cleft in the two aforementioned ketohexose 3-epimerases. In addition, the residues responsible for creating a hydrophobic environment around the substrate in TM0416p differ entirely from those in the other two enzymes. Collectively, these findings suggest that the substrate specificity of TM0416p is likely to differ substantially from those of other d-tagatose 3-­epimerase family enzymes. PMID:19255464

  8. Thermophilic Thermotoga maritima ribose-5-phosphate isomerase RpiB: optimized heat treatment purification and basic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Myung, Suwan; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2012-04-01

    The open reading frame TM1080 from Thermotoga maritima encoding ribose-5-phosphate isomerase type B (RpiB) was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). After optimization of cell culture conditions, more than 30% of intracellular proteins were soluble recombinant RpiB. High-purity RpiB was obtained by heat pretreatment through its optimization in buffer choice, buffer pH, as well as temperature and duration of pretreatment. This enzyme had the maximum activity at 70°C and pH 6.5-8.0. Under its suboptimal conditions (60°C and pH 7.0), k(cat) and K(m) values were 540s(-1) and 7.6mM, respectively; it had a half lifetime of 71h, resulting in its turn-over number of more than 2×10(8)mol of product per mol of enzyme. This study suggests that it is highly feasible to discover thermostable enzymes from exploding genomic DNA database of extremophiles with the desired stability suitable for in vitro synthetic biology projects and produce high-purity thermoenzymes at very low costs. PMID:22333529

  9. The structural basis of alpha-glucan recognition by a family 41 carbohydrate-binding module from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    van Bueren, Alicia Lammerts; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2007-01-19

    Starch recognition by carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) is important for the activity of starch-degrading enzymes. The N-terminal family 41 CBM, TmCBM41 (from pullulanase PulA secreted by Thermotoga maritima) was shown to have alpha-glucan binding activity with specificity for alpha-1,4-glucans but was able to tolerate the alpha-1,6-linkages found roughly every three or four glucose units in pullulan. Using X-ray crystallography, the structures were solved for TmCBM41 in an uncomplexed form and in complex with maltotetraose and 6(3)-alpha-D-glucosyl-maltotriose (GM3). Ligand binding was facilitated by stacking interactions between the alpha-faces of the glucose residues and two tryptophan side-chains in the two main subsites of the carbohydrate-binding site. Overall, this mode of starch binding is quite well conserved by other starch-binding modules. The structure in complex with GM3 revealed a third binding subsite with the flexibility to accommodate an alpha-1,4- or an alpha-1,6-linked glucose. PMID:17095014

  10. Nutritional and biological qualities of the ripened beans of Canavalia maritima from the coastal sand dunes of India.

    PubMed

    Bhagya, B; Sridhar, K R; Raviraja, N S; Young, C-C; Arun, A B

    2009-01-01

    Raw and pressure-cooked ripened beans of Canavalia maritima were assessed for nutritional quality. The beans possess high protein, carbohydrate, fiber and energy contents. Potassium, magnesium, zinc and manganese of the raw and cooked beans meet NRC/NAS recommended pattern for infants. The essential amino acids (threonine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine/phenylalanine and lysine) in raw and cooked ripened beans fulfill the FAO/WHO/UNU recommended pattern for adults. Oleic acid in raw beans and linolenic acid in cooked beans were highest and linoleic and arachidonic acids were confined to raw beans. Cooking lowered the total phenolics, while tannins were negligible and devoid of orthodihydric phenols and trypsin inhibitors. Hemagglutinating activity decreased up to 50% in cooked beans. Rats fed with a pressure-cooked bean diet showed significant elevation of all growth and nitrogen balance parameters (P<0.05) than the rats which received the raw bean diet. The low protein quality of beans warrants appropriate thermal processing to eliminate antinutritional factors. PMID:19200923

  11. Structural Dissection of the Active Site of Thermotoga maritima β-Galactosidase Identifies Key Residues for Transglycosylating Activity.

    PubMed

    Talens-Perales, David; Polaina, Julio; Marín-Navarro, Julia

    2016-04-13

    Glycoside hydrolases, specifically β-galactosidases, can be used to synthesize galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) due to the transglycosylating (secondary) activity of these enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermoresistant β-galactosidase from Thermotoga maritima has been carried out to study the structural basis of transgalactosylation and to obtain enzymatic variants with better performance for GOS biosynthesis. Rational design of mutations was based on homologous sequence analysis and structural modeling. Analysis of mutant enzymes indicated that residue W959, or an alternative aromatic residue at this position, is critical for the synthesis of β-3'-galactosyl-lactose, the major GOS obtained with the wild-type enzyme. Mutants W959A and W959C, but not W959F, showed an 80% reduced synthesis of this GOS. Other substitutions, N574S, N574A, and F571L, increased the synthesis of β-3'-galactosyl-lactose about 40%. Double mutants F571L/N574S and F571L/N574A showed an increase of about 2-fold. PMID:26998654

  12. The Structural Basis of Alpha-Glucan Recognition by a Family 41 Carbohydrate-Binding Module from Therotoga Maritima

    SciTech Connect

    van Bueren,A.; Boraston, A.

    2006-01-01

    Starch recognition by carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) is important for the activity of starch-degrading enzymes. The N-terminal family 41 CBM, TmCBM41 (from pullulanase PulA secreted by Thermotoga maritima) was shown to have {alpha}-glucan binding activity with specificity for {alpha}-1, 4-glucans but was able to tolerate the {alpha}-1, 6-linkages found roughly every three or four glucose units in pullulan. Using X-ray crystallography, the structures were solved for TmCBM41 in an uncomplexed form and in complex with maltotetraose and 63-{alpha}-d-glucosyl-maltotriose (GM3). Ligand binding was facilitated by stacking interactions between the {alpha}-faces of the glucose residues and two tryptophan side-chains in the two main subsites of the carbohydrate-binding site. Overall, this mode of starch binding is quite well conserved by other starch-binding modules. The structure in complex with GM3 revealed a third binding subsite with the flexibility to accommodate an {alpha}-1, 4- or an {alpha}-1, 6-linked glucose.

  13. Metabolic fate of cardiac glycosides and flavonoids upon fermentation of aqueous sea squill (Drimia maritima L.) extracts.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Diana N; Stintzing, Florian C; Kammerer, Dietmar R

    2015-06-10

    Sea squill (Drimia maritima L.) extracts have been used for centuries for the medical treatment of heart diseases. A procedure for the preparation of Drimia extracts applied for such purposes comprising a fermentation step is described in the German Homoeopathic Pharmacopoeia (GHP). However, little is known about the secondary metabolite profile of such extracts and the fate of these components upon processing and storage. Thus, in the present study sea squill extracts were monitored during fermentation and storage by HPLC-DAD-MS(n) and GC-MS to characterise and quantitate individual cardiac glycosides and phenolic compounds. For this purpose, a previously established HPLC method for the separation and quantitation of pharmacologically relevant cardiac glycosides (bufadienolides) was validated. Within 12 months of storage, total bufadienolide contents decreased by about 50%, which was attributed to microbial and plant enzyme activities. The metabolisation and degradation rates of individual bufadienolide glycosides significantly differed, which was attributed to differing structures of the aglycones. Further degradation of bufadienolide aglycones was also observed. Besides reactions well known from human metabolism studies, dehydration of individual compounds was monitored. Quantitatively predominating flavonoids were also metabolised throughout the fermentation process. The present study provides valuable information about the profile and stability of individual cardiac glycosides and phenolic compounds in fermented Drimia extracts prepared for medical applications, and expands the knowledge of cardiac glycoside conversion upon microbial fermentation. PMID:25841205

  14. Proteomic and physiological responses of the halophyte Cakile maritima to moderate salinity at the germinative and vegetative stages.

    PubMed

    Debez, Ahmed; Braun, Hans-Peter; Pich, Andreas; Taamalli, Wael; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Abdelly, Chedly; Huchzermeyer, Bernhard

    2012-10-22

    Responses of the halophyte Cakile maritima to moderate salinity were addressed at germination and vegetative stages by bringing together proteomics and eco-physiological approaches. 75 mM NaCl-salinity delayed significantly the germination process and decreased slightly the seed germination percentage compared to salt-free conditions. Monitoring the proteome profile between 0 h and 120 h after seed sowing revealed a delay in the degradation of seed storage proteins when germination took place under salinity, which may explain the slower germination rate observed. Of the sixty-seven proteins identified by mass spectrometry, several proteins involved in glycolysis, amino acid metabolism, photosynthesis, and protein folding showed significantly increased abundance during germination. This pattern was less pronounced under salinity. At the vegetative stage, 100mM NaCl-salinity stimulated significantly the plant growth, which was sustained by enhanced leaf expansion, water content, and photosynthetic activity. Comparative proteome analyses of leaf tissue revealed 44 proteins with different abundance changes, most of which being involved in energy metabolism. A specific set of proteins predominantly involved in photosynthesis and respiration showed significantly higher abundance in salt-treated plants. Altogether, combining proteomics with eco-physiological tools provides valuable information, which contributes to improve our understanding in the salt-response of this halophyte during its life cycle. PMID:22940175

  15. Evolutionary optimization of life-history traits in the sea beet Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima: Comparing model to data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautekèete, N.-C.; Van Dijk, H.; Piquot, Y.; Teriokhin, A.

    2009-01-01

    At evolutionary equilibrium, ecological factors will determine the optimal combination of life-history trait values of an organism. This optimum can be assessed by assuming that the species maximizes some criterion of fitness such as the Malthusian coefficient or lifetime reproductive success depending on the degree of density-dependence. We investigated the impact of the amount of resources and habitat stability on a plant's age at maturity and life span by using an evolutionary optimization model in combination with empirical data. We conducted this study on sea beet, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima, because of its large variation in life span and age at first reproduction along a latitudinal gradient including considerable ecological variation. We also compared the consequence in our evolutionary model of maximizing either the Malthusian coefficient or the lifetime reproductive success. Both the data analysis and the results of evolutionary modeling pointed to habitat disturbance and resources like length of the growing season as factors negatively related to life span and age at maturity in sea beet. Resource availability had a negative theoretical influence with the Malthusian coefficient as the chosen optimality criterion, while there was no influence in the case of lifetime reproductive success. As suggested by previous theoretical work the final conclusion on what criterion is more adequate depends on the assumptions of how in reality density-dependence restrains population growth. In our case of sea beet data R0 seems to be less appropriate than λ.

  16. Transcriptomic profiling of the salt stress response in excised leaves of the halophyte Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima.

    PubMed

    Skorupa, Monika; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Domagalski, Krzysztof; Kurnik, Katarzyna; Abu Nahia, Karim; Złoch, Michał; Tretyn, Andrzej; Tyburski, Jarosław

    2016-02-01

    Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima is a halophytic relative of cultivated beets. In the present work a transcriptome response to acute salt stress imposed to excised leaves of sea beet was investigated. Salt treatments consisted of adding NaCl directly to the transpiration stream by immersing the petioles of excised leaves into the salt solutions. Sequencing libraries were generated from leaves subjected to either moderate or strong salt stress. Control libraries were constructed from untreated leaves. Sequencing was performed using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We obtained 32970 unigenes by assembling the pooled reads from all the libraries with Trinity software. Screening the nr database returned 18,362 sequences with functional annotation. Using the reference transcriptome we identified 1,246 genes that were differentially expressed after 48 h of NaCl stress. Genes related to several cellular functions such as membrane transport, osmoprotection, molecular chaperoning, redox metabolism or protein synthesis were differentially expressed in response to salt stress. The response of sea beet leaves to salt treatments was marked out by transcriptomic up-regulation of genes related to photosynthetic carbon fixation, ribosome biogenesis, cell wall-building and cell wall expansion. Furthermore, several novel and undescribed transcripts were responsive to salinity in leaves of sea beet. PMID:26795151

  17. Histone acetylation influences the transcriptional activation of POX in Beta vulgaris L. and Beta maritima L. under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Seher; Ozdemir, Filiz; Güler, Aybüke; Bor, Melike

    2016-03-01

    Acetylation of histone proteins is a type of chromatin modification which facilitates the activation of genes. Recent studies brought up the importance of this reversible and rapid process for the regulation of gene expression especially in plant defense against a variety of environmental stresses. Deciphering the exact mechanisms of chromatin modifications under abiotic stress conditions is important for improving crop plants' performance and yield. In a previous study we compared the salt stress responses of Beta vulgaris (sugar beet) and Beta maritima (wild beet). In accordance with those results we suggested that chromatin remodeling can be an active process in the regulation of genes related to salt stress tolerance of these plants. Therefore we performed ChIP assay in control and salt stressed (250 and 500 mM NaCl) plants and compared the enrichment of acetylation in the associated chromatin sites. We found that the transcriptional activation of one peroxidase (POX) encoding gene was associated with the elevated levels of acetylation in H3K9 and H3K27 sites. The acetylation patterns were remarkably different between two species in which the highest acetylation levels were found at H3K9 and H3K27 in wild beet and sugar beet respectively. PMID:26773543

  18. The Crystal Structure of Thermotoga maritima Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase Lacks a Radical Cysteine Pre-Positioned in the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Aurelius, Oskar; Johansson, Renzo; Bågenholm, Viktoria; Lundin, Daniel; Tholander, Fredrik; Balhuizen, Alexander; Beck, Tobias; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Mulliez, Etienne; Logan, Derek T.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA synthesis, and are found in all but a few organisms. RNRs use radical chemistry to catalyze the reduction reaction. Despite RNR having evolved several mechanisms for generation of different kinds of essential radicals across a large evolutionary time frame, this initial radical is normally always channelled to a strictly conserved cysteine residue directly adjacent to the substrate for initiation of substrate reduction, and this cysteine has been found in the structures of all RNRs solved to date. We present the crystal structure of an anaerobic RNR from the extreme thermophile Thermotoga maritima (tmNrdD), alone and in several complexes, including with the allosteric effector dATP and its cognate substrate CTP. In the crystal structure of the enzyme as purified, tmNrdD lacks a cysteine for radical transfer to the substrate pre-positioned in the active site. Nevertheless activity assays using anaerobic cell extracts from T. maritima demonstrate that the class III RNR is enzymatically active. Other genetic and microbiological evidence is summarized indicating that the enzyme is important for T. maritima. Mutation of either of two cysteine residues in a disordered loop far from the active site results in inactive enzyme. We discuss the possible mechanisms for radical initiation of substrate reduction given the collected evidence from the crystal structure, our activity assays and other published work. Taken together, the results suggest either that initiation of substrate reduction may involve unprecedented conformational changes in the enzyme to bring one of these cysteine residues to the expected position, or that alternative routes for initiation of the RNR reduction reaction may exist. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis showing that the structure of tmNrdD is representative of a new RNR subclass IIIh, present in all Thermotoga

  19. 1H nuclear-magnetic-resonance investigation of oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima. Hyperfine-shifted resonances, sequence-specific assignments and secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Wildegger, G; Bentrop, D; Ejchart, A; Alber, M; Hage, A; Sterner, R; Rösch, P

    1995-05-01

    The oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has been investigated by one- and two-dimensional NMR in order to characterize its hyperfine-shifted resonances originating from the cysteinyl cluster ligands and to assign its resonances in the diamagnetic shift range. The chemical shift and relaxation time pattern of the hyperfine-shifted signals is very similar to other oxidized Fe4S4 ferredoxins. A tentative sequence-specific assignment of these resonances according to a general pattern of chemical shift of cysteine protons versus sequence position of cluster ligand is presented. Furthermore, sequence-specific assignments for 85% of the amino acid residues that were obtained without any guidance by known X-ray structures of ferredoxins are given. They reveal the formation of at least two elements of secondary structure by the polypeptide chain of T. maritima ferredoxin: an alpha-helix comprising residues C43-D49 and a double-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet consisting of the N- and C-terminal parts of the protein. This folding pattern is very similar to that of the crystallographically characterized ferredoxin from the mesophile Desulfovibrio gigas [Kissinger, C.R., Sieker, L.C., Adman E.T. & Jensen, L.H. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 219, 693-715] and therefore suggesting different mechanisms of stabilization for T. maritima ferredoxin and the ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus that was recently investigated by NMR [Teng, Q., Zhou, Z.H., Smith, E.T., Busse, S. C., Howard, J.B., Adams M.W.W. & La Mar, G.N. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 6316-6326]. PMID:7758460

  20. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on growth dynamics and exopolysaccharide production for the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis and bacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Rinker, K D; Kelly, R M

    2000-09-01

    Batch and continuous cultures were used to compare specific physiological features of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis (T(opt) of 85 degrees to 88 degrees C), to another fermentative hyperthermophile that reduces S degrees facultatively, that is, the bacterium Thermotoga maritima (T(opt) of 80 degrees to 85 degrees C). Under nutritionally optimal conditions, these two hyperthermophiles had similar growth yields on maltose and similar cell formula weights based on elemental analysis: CH(1.7)O(0. 7)N(0.2)S(0.006) for T. litoralis and CH(1.6)O(0.6)N(0.2)S(0.005) for T. maritima. However, they differed with respect to nitrogen source, fermentation product patterns, and propensity to form exopolysaccharides (EPS). T. litoralis could be cultured in the absence or presence of maltose on an amino acid-containing defined medium in which amino acids served as the sole nitrogen source. T. maritima, on the other hand, did not utilize amino acids as carbon, energy, or nitrogen sources, and could be grown in a similar defined medium only when supplemented with maltose and ammonium chloride. Not only was T. litoralis unable to utilize NH(4)Cl as a nitrogen source, its growth was inhibited at certain levels. At 1 g/L ( approximately 20 mM) NH(4)Cl, the maximum growth yield (Y(x/s(max))) for T. litoralis was reduced to 13 g cells dry weight (CDW)/mol glucose from 40 g CDW/mol glucose in media lacking NH(4)Cl. Alanine production increased with increasing NH(4)Cl concentrations and was most pronounced if growth on NH(4)Cl was carried out in an 80% H(2) atmosphere. In T. maritima cultures, which would not grow in an 80% H(2) atmosphere, alanine and EPS were produced at much lower levels, which did not change with NH(4)Cl concentration. EPS production rose sharply at high dilution rates for both organisms, such that maltose utilization plots were biphasic. Wall growth effects were also noted, because cultures failed to wash out at dilution rates significantly

  1. Complexed Structures of Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima Describe a Novel ATP-binding Protein Superfamily†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Morar, Mariya; Anand, Ruchi; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Formylglycinamide ribonucleotide amidotransferase (FGAR-AT) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM) from formylglycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) and glutamine in the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway. FGAR-AT is encoded by the purL gene. Two types of PurL have been detected. The first type, found in eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria, consists of a single 140 kDa polypeptide chain and is designated large PurL (lgPurL). The second type, small PurL (smPurL), is found in archaea and Gram-positive bacteria and consists of an 80 kDa polypeptide chain. Small PurL requires two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS, for activity. PurL is a member of a protein superfamily that contains a novel ATP-binding domain. Structures of several members of this superfamily are available in the apo form. We determined five different structures of FGAR-AT from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of substrates, a substrate analog, and a product. These complexes have allowed a detailed description of the novel ATP-binding motif. Availability of a ternary complex enabled mapping of the active site thus identifying potential residues involved in catalysis. The complexes show a conformational change in the active site compared to the unliganded structure. A surprising discovery, an ATP molecule in an auxiliary site of the protein and the conformational changes associated with its binding, provoke speculations about the regulatory role of the auxiliary site in PurLSQ complex formation as well as the evolutionary relationship of PurL's from different organisms. PMID:17154526

  2. Proline 235 plays a key role in the regulation of the oligomeric states of Thermotoga maritima Arginine Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Giovanni; Vigorita, Marilisa; Ruggiero, Alessia; Balasco, Nicole; Dattelbaum, Jonathan D; D'Auria, Sabato; Del Vecchio, Pompea; Graziano, Giuseppe; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    The Arginine Binding Protein isolated from Thermotoga maritima (TmArgBP) is a protein endowed with several peculiar properties. We have previously shown that TmArgBP dimerization is a consequence of the swapping of the C-terminal helix. Here we explored the structural determinants of TmArgBP domain swapping and oligomerization. In particular, we report a mutational analysis of the residue Pro235, which is located in the hinge region of the swapping dimer. This residue was either replaced with a Gly-Lys dipeptide (TmArgBP(P235GK)) or a Gly residue (TmArgBP(P235G)). Different forms of these mutants were generated and extensively characterized using biophysical techniques. For both TmArgBP(P235GK) and TmArgBP(P235G) mutants, the occurrence of multiple oligomerization states (monomers, dimers and trimers) was detected. The formation of well-folded monomeric forms for these mutants indicates that the dimerization through C-terminal domain swapping observed in wild-type TmArgBP is driven by conformational restraints imposed by the presence of Pro235 in the hinge region. Molecular dynamics studies corroborate this observation by showing that Gly235 assumes conformational states forbidden for Pro residues in the TmArgBP(P235G) monomer. Unexpectedly, the trimeric forms present: (a) peculiar circular dichroism spectra, (b) a great susceptibility to heating, and (c) the ability to bind the Thioflavin T dye. The present findings clearly demonstrate that single-point mutations have an important impact on the TmArgBP oligomerization process. In a wider context, they also indicate that proteins endowed with an intrinsic propensity to swap have an easy access to states with altered structural and, possibly, functional properties. PMID:27087545

  3. Improved activity of a thermophilic cellulase, Cel5A, from Thermotoga maritima on ionic liquid pretreated switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Pereira, Jose H; Liu, Hanbin; Tran, Huu M; Hsu, Nathan S Y; Dibble, Dean; Singh, Seema; Adams, Paul D; Sapra, Rajat; Hadi, Masood Z; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquid pretreatment of biomass has been shown to greatly reduce the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass, resulting in improved sugar yields after enzymatic saccharification. However, even under these improved saccharification conditions the cost of enzymes still represents a significant proportion of the total cost of producing sugars and ultimately fuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Much of the high cost of enzymes is due to the low catalytic efficiency and stability of lignocellulolytic enzymes, especially cellulases, under conditions that include high temperatures and the presence of residual pretreatment chemicals, such as acids, organic solvents, bases, or ionic liquids. Improving the efficiency of the saccharification process on ionic liquid pretreated biomass will facilitate reduced enzyme loading and cost. Thermophilic cellulases have been shown to be stable and active in ionic liquids but their activity is typically at lower levels. Cel5A_Tma, a thermophilic endoglucanase from Thermotoga maritima, is highly active on cellulosic substrates and is stable in ionic liquid environments. Here, our motivation was to engineer mutants of Cel5A_Tma with higher activity on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]) pretreated biomass. We developed a robotic platform to screen a random mutagenesis library of Cel5A_Tma. Twelve mutants with 25-42% improvement in specific activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and up to 30% improvement on ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass were successfully isolated and characterized from a library of twenty thousand variants. Interestingly, most of the mutations in the improved variants are located distally to the active site on the protein surface and are not directly involved with substrate binding. PMID:24244549

  4. Improved Activity of a Thermophilic Cellulase, Cel5A, from Thermotoga maritima on Ionic Liquid Pretreated Switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Pereira, Jose H.; Liu, Hanbin; Tran, Huu M.; Hsu, Nathan S. Y.; Dibble, Dean; Singh, Seema; Adams, Paul D.; Sapra, Rajat; Hadi, Masood Z.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquid pretreatment of biomass has been shown to greatly reduce the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass, resulting in improved sugar yields after enzymatic saccharification. However, even under these improved saccharification conditions the cost of enzymes still represents a significant proportion of the total cost of producing sugars and ultimately fuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Much of the high cost of enzymes is due to the low catalytic efficiency and stability of lignocellulolytic enzymes, especially cellulases, under conditions that include high temperatures and the presence of residual pretreatment chemicals, such as acids, organic solvents, bases, or ionic liquids. Improving the efficiency of the saccharification process on ionic liquid pretreated biomass will facilitate reduced enzyme loading and cost. Thermophilic cellulases have been shown to be stable and active in ionic liquids but their activity is typically at lower levels. Cel5A_Tma, a thermophilic endoglucanase from Thermotoga maritima, is highly active on cellulosic substrates and is stable in ionic liquid environments. Here, our motivation was to engineer mutants of Cel5A_Tma with higher activity on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]) pretreated biomass. We developed a robotic platform to screen a random mutagenesis library of Cel5A_Tma. Twelve mutants with 25–42% improvement in specific activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and up to 30% improvement on ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass were successfully isolated and characterized from a library of twenty thousand variants. Interestingly, most of the mutations in the improved variants are located distally to the active site on the protein surface and are not directly involved with substrate binding. PMID:24244549

  5. Directed evolution of the alpha-L-fucosidase from Thermotoga maritima into an alpha-L-transfucosidase.

    PubMed

    Osanjo, George; Dion, Michel; Drone, Jullien; Solleux, Claude; Tran, Vinh; Rabiller, Claude; Tellier, Charles

    2007-01-30

    The alpha-L-fucosidase from Thermotoga maritima (Tm alpha fuc) was converted into alpha-L-transfucosidase variants by directed evolution. The wild-type enzyme catalyzes oligosaccharide synthesis by transfer of a fucosyl residue from a pNP-fucoside donor to pNP-fucoside (self-condensation) with alpha-(1-->3) regioselectivity or pNP-galactoside (transglycosylation) with alpha-(1-->2) regioselectivity at low yields (7%). The wild-type enzyme was submitted to one cycle of mutagenesis, followed by rational recombination of the selected mutations, which allowed identification of variants with improved transferase activity. The transferase and hydrolytic kinetics of all the mutants were assessed by NMR methods and capillary electrophoresis. It was shown that the best mutant exhibited a dramatic 32-fold increase in the transferase/hydrolytic kinetic ratio, while keeping 60% of the overall wild-type enzyme activity. Accordingly, the maximum yield of a specific transglycosylation product [pNP-Gal-alpha-(1-->2)-Fuc] reached more than 60% compared to 7% with WT enzyme at equimolar and low concentrations of donor and acceptor (10 mM). Such an improvement was obtained with only three mutations (T264A, Y267F, L322P), which were all located in the second amino acid shell of the fucosidase active site. Molecular modeling suggested that some of these mutations (T264A, Y267F) cause a reorientation of the amino acids that are in direct contact with the substrates, resulting in a better docking energy. Such mutants with high transglycosidase activity may constitute novel enzymatic tools for the synthesis of fucooligosaccharides. PMID:17240986

  6. Growth of the dune wintergreen ( Pyrola rotundifolia ssp. maritima) at Braunton Burrows in relation to weather factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R.; Hope-Simpson, J. F.; Snape, J. B.

    1985-12-01

    The dune wintergreen ( Pyrola rotundifolia ssp. maritima) is an evergreen perennial herb which has spread extensively in recent decades to, and on, various British dune systems including Braunton Burrows, N. Devon. Its multiplication is partly vegetative, by rhizomes bearing leaf rosettes. This study primarily concerns the relation between: (i) the growth of one particular invasive colony on Braunton Burrows, as shown by the numbers of living rosettes counted at midsummer from 1964 74 inclusive; and (ii) concurrent meteorological records made nearby. Monthly weather means were calculated on various quarterly bases. After de-trending the Pyrola data statistically, correlations were sought between the growth in numbers achieved in each year and the local air temperature (three bases), rainfall and duration of bright sunshine. While the annual increase in net numbers appears to have been unaffected by sunshine hours, this increase does seem to have been much diminished by cold nights, particularly in early spring and, though less strongly so, by low rainfall in the latter part of the preceding summer. Taking account of the performance of Pyrola in other habitats on the Burrows, it is suggested that the rainfall correlation may reflect the influence of atmospheric humidity rather than water supply to the roots. Local meteorological records over a 51-year period show combined temperature and rainfall conditions consistently favourable to Pyrola growth throughout a 5-year run to a degree which might be expected to occur in only three such runs out of every hundred. The favourable period (1957 61) occurred between the inferred first occurrence of Pyrola on the Burrows and its observed rapid spread.

  7. The structural basis of substrate promiscuity in UDP-hexose 4-epimerase from the hyperthermophilic Eubacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun-Mi; Choi, Jin Myung; di Luccio, Eric; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-01

    UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) and UDP-galactose (UDP-Gal), which is a pivotal step in the Leloir pathway for d-galactose metabolism. Although GalE is widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, little information is available regarding hyperthermophilic GalE. We overexpressed the TM0509 gene, encoding a putative GalE from Thermotoga maritima (TMGalE), in Escherichia coli and characterized the encoded protein. To further investigate the molecular basis of this enzyme's catalytic function, we determined the crystal structures of TMGalE and TMGalE bound to UDP-Glc at resolutions of 1.9 Å and 2.0 Å, respectively. The enzyme was determined to be a homodimer with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme could reversibly catalyze the epimerization of UDP-GalNAc/UDP-GlcNAc as well as UDP-Gal/UDP-Glc at elevated temperatures, with an apparent optimal temperature and pH of 80 °C and 7.0, respectively. Our data showed that TM0509 is a UDP-galactosugar 4-epimerase involved in d-galactose metabolism; consequently, this study provides the first detailed characterization of a hyperthermophilic GalE. Moreover, the promiscuous substrate specificity of TMGalE, which is more similar to human GalE than E. coli GalE, supports the notion that TMGalE might exhibit the earliest form of sugar-epimerizing enzymes in the evolution of galactose metabolism. PMID:26344854

  8. Crystal Structure of Butyrate Kinase 2 from Thermotoga maritima, a Member of the ASKHA Superfamily of Phosphotransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Jiasheng; Hasson, Miriam S.

    2009-04-01

    The enzymatic transfer of phosphoryl groups is central to the control of many cellular processes. One of the phosphoryl transfer mechanisms, that of acetate kinase, is not completely understood. Besides better understanding of the mechanism of acetate kinase, knowledge of the structure of butyrate kinase 2 (Buk2) will aid in the interpretation of active-site structure and provide information on the structural basis of substrate specificity. The gene buk2 from Thermotoga maritima encodes a member of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/heat shock cognate/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases. The encoded protein Buk2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of butyrate and isobutyrate. We have determined the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of Buk2 complexed with ({beta},{gamma}-methylene) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Buk2 folds like an open-shelled clam, with each of the two domains representing one of the two shells. In the open active-site cleft between the N- and C-terminal domains, the active-site residues consist of two histidines, two arginines, and a cluster of hydrophobic residues. The ATP binding region of Buk2 in the C-terminal domain consists of abundant glycines for nucleotide binding, and the ATP binding motif is similar to those of other members of the ASKHA superfamily. The enzyme exists as an octamer, in which four disulfide bonds form between intermolecular cysteines. Sequence alignment and structure superposition identify the simplicity of the monomeric Buk2 structure, a probable substrate binding site, the key residues in catalyzing phosphoryl transfer, and the substrate specificity differences among Buk2, acetate, and propionate kinases. The possible enzyme mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of a Hyperthermophilic Endoglucanase Cel12B from Thermotoga maritima Based on Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Shi, Hao; Xu, Linyu; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiangqian

    2015-01-01

    To meet the demand for the application of high activity and thermostable cellulases in the production of new-generation bioethanol from nongrain-cellulose sources, a hyperthermostable β-1,4-endoglucase Cel12B from Thermotoga maritima was selected for further modification by gene site-directed mutagenesis method in the present study, based on homology modeling and rational design. As a result, two recombinant enzymes showed significant improvement in enzyme activity by 77% and 87%, respectively, higher than the parental enzyme TmCel12B. Furthermore, the two mutants could retain 80% and 90.5% of their initial activity after incubation at 80°C for 8 h, while only 45% for 5 h to TmCel12B. The Km and Vmax of the two recombinant enzymes were 1.97±0.05 mM, 4.23±0.15 μmol·mg-1·min-1 of TmCel12B-E225H-K207G-D37V, and 2.97±0.12 mM, 3.15±0.21 μmol·mg-1·min-1 of TmCel12B-E225H-K207G, respectively, when using CMC-Na as the substrate. The roles of the mutation sites were also analyzed and evaluated in terms of electron density, hydrophobicity of the modeled protein structures. The recombinant enzymes may be used in the hydrolysis of cellulose at higher temperature in the future. It was concluded that the gene mutagenesis approach of a certain active residues may effectively improve the performance of cellulases for the industrial applications and contribute to the study the thermostable mechanism of thermophilic enzymes. PMID:26218520

  10. Genetic Diversity and Physiological Performance of Portuguese Wild Beet (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from Three Contrasting Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Isa C.; Pinheiro, Carla; Ribeiro, Carla M.; Veloso, Maria M.; Simoes-Costa, Maria C.; Evaristo, Isabel; Paulo, Octávio S.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of stress resilient sugar beets (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is an important breeding goal since this cash crop is susceptible to drought and salinity. The genetic diversity in cultivated sugar beets is low and the beet wild relatives are useful genetic resources for tolerance traits. Three wild beet populations (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from contrasting environments, Vaiamonte (VMT, dry inland hill), Comporta (CMP, marsh) and Oeiras (OEI, coastland), and one commercial sugar beet (Isella variety, SB), are compared. At the genetic level, the use of six microsatellite allowed to detect a total of seventy six alleles. It was observed that CMP population has the highest value concerning the effective number of alleles and of expected heterozygosity. By contrast, sugar beet has the lowest values for all the parameters considered. Loci analysis with STRUCTURE allows defining three genetic clusters, the sea beet (OEI and CMP), the inland ruderal beet (VMT) and the sugar beet (SB). A screening test for progressive drought and salinity effects demonstrated that: all populations were able to recover from severe stress; drought impact was higher than that from salinity; the impact on biomass (total, shoot, root) was population specific. The distinct strategies were also visible at physiological level. We evaluated the physiological responses of the populations under drought and salt stress, namely at initial stress stages, late stress stages, and early stress recovery. Multivariate analysis showed that the physiological performance can be used to discriminate between genotypes, with a strong contribution of leaf temperature and leaf osmotic adjustment. However, the separation achieved and the groups formed are dependent on the stress type, stress intensity and duration. Each of the wild beet populations evaluated is very rich in genetic terms (allelic richness) and exhibited physiological plasticity, i.e., the capacity to physiologically adjust to

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of PotA, a membrane-associated ATPase of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Kanai, Ken; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2014-01-01

    A membrane-associated ATPase, PotA, is a component of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in prokaryotes that plays an important role in normal cell growth by regulating the cellular polyamine concentration. No three-dimensional structures of membrane-associated ATPases in polyamine-uptake systems have been determined to date. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PotA from Thermotoga maritima are reported. Diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.7 Å resolution from both native and selenomethionine-labelled crystals. Preliminary crystallographic analysis revealed that the crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P3112 (or P3212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 88.9, c = 221.2 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°, indicating that a dimer was present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24915082

  12. Transcriptome de novo assembly from next-generation sequencing and comparative analyses in the hexaploid salt marsh species Spartina maritima and Spartina alterniflora (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira de Carvalho, J; Poulain, J; Da Silva, C; Wincker, P; Michon-Coudouel, S; Dheilly, A; Naquin, D; Boutte, J; Salmon, A; Ainouche, M

    2013-01-01

    Spartina species have a critical ecological role in salt marshes and represent an excellent system to investigate recurrent polyploid speciation. Using the 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencer, we assembled and annotated the first reference transcriptome (from roots and leaves) for two related hexaploid Spartina species that hybridize in Western Europe, the East American invasive Spartina alterniflora and the Euro-African S. maritima. The de novo read assembly generated 38 478 consensus sequences and 99% found an annotation using Poaceae databases, representing a total of 16 753 non-redundant genes. Spartina expressed sequence tags were mapped onto the Sorghum bicolor genome, where they were distributed among the subtelomeric arms of the 10 S. bicolor chromosomes, with high gene density correlation. Normalization of the complementary DNA library improved the number of annotated genes. Ecologically relevant genes were identified among GO biological function categories in salt and heavy metal stress response, C4 photosynthesis and in lignin and cellulose metabolism. Expression of some of these genes had been found to be altered by hybridization and genome duplication in a previous microarray-based study in Spartina. As these species are hexaploid, up to three duplicated homoeologs may be expected per locus. When analyzing sequence polymorphism at four different loci in S. maritima and S. alterniflora, we found up to four haplotypes per locus, suggesting the presence of two expressed homoeologous sequences with one or two allelic variants each. This reference transcriptome will allow analysis of specific Spartina genes of ecological or evolutionary interest, estimation of homoeologous gene expression variation using RNA-seq and further gene expression evolution analyses in natural populations. PMID:23149455

  13. TM0486 from the hyperthermophilic anaerobe Thermotoga maritima is a thiamin binding protein involved in response of the cell to oxidative conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dermoun, Zorah; Foulon, Amélie; Miller, Mitchell D.; Harrington, Daniel J.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Roche, Philippe; Lafitte, Daniel; Bornet, Olivier; Wilson, Ian A.; Dolla, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Using the COG database, a comparative genome analysis from anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms, was performed with the aim of identifying proteins specific to the anaerobic way of life. Thirty-three COGs were identified, five of which corresponded to proteins of unknown function. We focused our study on TM0486, from Thermotoga maritima, that belongs to one of these latter COGs of unknown function, namely COG0011. The crystal structure of the protein was determined at 2 Å resolution. The structure adopts a βαββαβ ferredoxin-like fold and assembles as a homotetramer. The structure also revealed the presence of a pocket in each monomer that bound an unidentified ligand NMR and calorimetric experiments revealed that TM0486 specifically bound thiamin with a Kd of 1.58 µM, but not hydroxymethyl pyrimidine (HMP), that was implicated previously as a potential ligand. We demonstrated that the TM0486 gene belongs to the same multicistronic unit as TM0483, TM0484 and TM0485. Although these three genes have already been assigned to the transport of HMP, with TM0484 being the periplasmic thiamin/HMP binding protein and TM0485 and TM0483 the transmembrane and the ATPase components, respectively, our results led us to conclude that this operon encodes for an ABC transporter dedicated to thiamin, with TM0486 transporting charged thiamin in the cytoplasm. Given that this transcriptional unit was up-regulated when T. maritima was exposed to oxidative conditions, we propose that by chelating cytoplasmic thiamin, TM0486 and, by extension, proteins belonging to COG0011 are involved in the response mechanism to stress that could arise during aerobic conditions. PMID:20471400

  14. Structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn{sup 2+}-binding FCD domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David R.; Grossoehme, Nickolas E.; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Giedroc, David P.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2009-04-01

    Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged-helix DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal regulatory domains which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all-α-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR-C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of FadR-family members, those of Escherichia coli FadR protein and LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, have been described to date in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator and contains a buried metal-binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, it is shown that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions but that it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub d} < 70 nM. It is concluded that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal and that it may perform either structural or regulatory roles or both. Finally, the TM0439 structure is compared with two other FadR-family structures recently deposited by structural genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  15. Fungal decontamination and enhancement of shelf life of edible split beans of wild legume Canavalia maritima by the electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriya, P.; Sridhar, K. R.; Ganesh, S.

    2014-03-01

    Ripened split beans of the coastal sand dune wild legume Canavalia maritima serve as one of the traditional nutritional sources of the coastal dwellers in Southwest coast of India. Nine fungi were isolated from the unirradiated dry beans by plating on the potato dextrose agar medium. Toxigenic fungus Aspergillus niger showed the highest incidence (33-50%) followed by Aspergillus flavus (14-20%) and Penicillium chrysogenum (7-13%). Unirradiated dry beans and irradiated dry beans with electron beam doses 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 kGy were monitored for occurrence of fungal species and their incidence during 0, 3 and 6 months storage period under laboratory conditions. Irradiation resulted in dose-dependent decrease in fungal species (5-7, 4-6, 3-6 and 0 on irradiation at 0, 2.5, 5 and 10 or 15 kGy, respectively) as well as incidence (80-99, 19-46, 13-21 and 0%, respectively). Although aflatoxins (B1 and B2) were found below detectable level (<2 ng/g) in 0, 3 and 6 months stored unirradiated and irradiated beans (2.5 and 5 kGy), they were not present in beans irradiated with 10 and 15 kGy. In spite of occurrence of toxigenic fungus Aspergillus ochraceus in unirradiated and irradiated beans (2.5 and 5 kGy) stored for 3 and 6 months, the beans were devoid of ochratoxin-A. Electron beam irradiation dose 10 kGy could be recommended for fungal decontamination and improvement of shelf life of C. maritima ripened dry split beans.

  16. Engineering activity and stability of Thermotoga maritima glutamate dehydrogenase. II: construction of a 16-residue ion-pair network at the subunit interface.

    PubMed

    Lebbink, J H; Knapp, S; van der Oost, J; Rice, D; Ladenstein, R; de Vos, W M

    1999-06-01

    The role of an 18-residue ion-pair network, that is present in the glutamate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, in conferring stability to other, less stable homologous enzymes, has been studied by introducing four new charged amino acid residues into the subunit interface of glutamate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. These two GDHs are 55 % identical in amino acid sequence, differ greatly in thermo-activity and stability and derive from microbes with different phylogenetic positions. Amino acid substitutions were introduced as single mutations as well as in several combinations. Elucidation of the crystal structure of the quadruple mutant S128R/T158E/N117R/S160E T. maritima glutamate dehydrogenase showed that all anticipated ion-pairs are formed and that a 16-residue ion-pair network is present. Enlargement of existing networks by single amino acid substitutions unexpectedly resulted in a decrease in resistance towards thermal inactivation and thermal denaturation. However, combination of destabilizing single mutations in most cases restored stability, indicating the need for balanced charges at subunit interfaces and high cooperativity between the different members of the network. Combination of the three destabilizing mutations in triple mutant S128R/T158E/N117R resulted in an enzyme with a 30 minutes longer half-life of inactivation at 85 degrees C, a 3 degrees C higher temperature optimum for catalysis, and a 0.5 degrees C higher apparent melting temperature than that of wild-type glutamate dehydrogenase. These findings confirm the hypothesis that large ion-pair networks do indeed stabilize enzymes from hyperthermophilic organisms. PMID:10366510

  17. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  18. Structural bases of feed-back control of arginine biosynthesis, revealed by the structures of two hexameric N-acetylglutamate kinases, from Thermotoga maritima and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Fernández-Murga, María Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Vagin, Alexei; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2006-02-24

    N-Acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyses the second step in the route of arginine biosynthesis. In many organisms this enzyme is inhibited by the final product of the route, arginine, and thus plays a central regulatory role. In addition, in photosynthetic organisms NAGK is the target of the nitrogen-signalling protein PII. The 3-D structure of homodimeric, arginine-insensitive, Escherichia coli NAGK, clarified substrate binding and catalysis but shed no light on arginine inhibition of NAGK. We now shed light on arginine inhibition by determining the crystal structures, at 2.75 A and 2.95 A resolution, of arginine-complexed Thermotoga maritima and arginine-free Pseudomonas aeruginosa NAGKs, respectively. Both enzymes are highly similar ring-like hexamers having a central orifice of approximately 30 A diameter. They are formed by linking three E.coli NAGK-like homodimers through the interlacing of an N-terminal mobile kinked alpha-helix, which is absent from E.coli NAGK. Arginine is bound in each subunit of T.maritima NAGK, flanking the interdimeric junction, in a site formed between the N helix and the C lobe of the subunit. This site is also present, in variable conformations, in P.aeruginosa NAGK, but is missing from E.coli NAGK. Arginine, by gluing the C lobe of each subunit to the inter-dimeric junction, may stabilize an enlarged active centre conformation, hampering catalysis. Acetylglutamate counters arginine inhibition by promoting active centre closure. The hexameric architecture justifies the observed sigmoidal arginine inhibition kinetics with a high Hill coefficient (N approximately 4), and appears essential for arginine inhibition and for NAGK-PII complex formation, since this complex may involve binding of NAGK and PII with their 3-fold axes aligned. The NAGK structures allow identification of diagnostic sequence signatures for arginine inhibition. These signatures are found also in the homologous arginine-inhibited enzyme NAG synthase. The findings

  19. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase complex with a substrate analog: Insights into the distinctive substrate specificity in the CE7 carbohydrate esterase family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrityunjay K; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-07-22

    The carbohydrate esterase family 7 (CE7) members are acetyl esterases that possess unusual substrate specificity for cephalosporin C and 7-amino-cephalosporanic acid. This family containing the α/β hydrolase fold has a distinctive substrate profile that allows it to carry out hydrolysis of esters containing diverse alcohol moieties while maintaining narrow specificity for an acetate ester. Here we investigate the structural basis of this preference for small acyl groups using the crystal structure of the thermostable Thermotoga maritima CE7 acetyl esterase (TmAcE) complexed with a non-cognate substrate analog. The structure determined at 1.86 Å resolution provides direct evidence for the location of the largely hydrophobic and rigid substrate binding pocket in this family. Furthermore, a three-helix insertion domain near the catalytic machinery shapes the substrate binding site. The structure reveals two residues (Pro228 and Ile276) which constitute a hydrophobic rigid binding surface for the acyl group of the ester and thus restricts the size of the acyl group that be accommodated. In combination with previous literature on kinetic properties of the enzyme, our studies suggest that these residues determine the unique specificity of the TmAcE for short straight chain esters. The structure provides a template for focused attempts to engineer the CE7 enzymes for enhanced stability, selectivity or activity for biocatalytic applications. PMID:27181355

  20. Hyperthermostable Thermotoga maritima xylanase XYN10B shows high activity at high temperatures in the presence of biomass-dissolving hydrophilic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyi; Anbarasan, Sasikala; Wang, Yawei; Telli, Kübra; Aslan, Aşkın Sevinç; Su, Zhengding; Zhou, Yin; Zhang, Li; Iivonen, Piia; Havukainen, Sami; Mentunen, Tero; Hummel, Michael; Sixta, Herbert; Binay, Baris; Turunen, Ossi; Xiong, Hairong

    2016-07-01

    The gene of Thermotoga maritima GH10 xylanase (TmXYN10B) was synthesised to study the extreme limits of this hyperthermostable enzyme at high temperatures in the presence of biomass-dissolving hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs). TmXYN10B expressed from Pichia pastoris showed maximal activity at 100 °C and retained 92 % of maximal activity at 105 °C in a 30-min assay. Although the temperature optimum of activity was lowered by 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc), TmXYN10B retained partial activity in 15-35 % hydrophilic ILs, even at 75-90 °C. TmXYN10B retained over 80 % of its activity at 90 °C in 15 % [EMIM]OAc and 15-25 % 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DMP) during 22-h reactions. [EMIM]OAc may rigidify the enzyme and lower V max. However, only minor changes in kinetic parameter K m showed that competitive inhibition by [EMIM]OAc of TmXYN10B is minimal. In conclusion, when extended enzymatic reactions under extreme conditions are required, TmXYN10B shows extraordinary potential. PMID:27240671

  1. Determination of GC content of Thermotoga maritima, Thermotoga neapolitana and Thermotoga thermarum strains: A GC dataset for higher level hierarchical classification.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2016-09-01

    A total of 16 strains of hyperthermophilic Thermotoga complete genome sequences viz. Thermotoga maritima (AE000512, CP004077, CP007013, CP011107, NC_000853, NC_021214, NC_023151, NZ_CP011107, CP011108, NZ_CP011108, CP010967 & NZ_CP010967), Thermotoga neapolitana (CP000916, & NC_011978) and Thermotoga thermarum (CP002351 & NC_015707) complete genome sequences were retrieved from NCBI BioSample database. ENDMEMO GC used for creation of data on GC content in Thermotoga sp. DNA sequences. Maximum GC content was observed in Thermotoga strains AE000512 & NC_000853 (69 %GC), followed by NZ_CP011108, CP011108, NZ_CP011107, NC_023151, NC_021214, CP011107 & CP004077 (68.5 %GC), followed by NZ_CP010967 & CP010967 (68.3 %GC), followed by CP000916, CP007013 & NC_011978 (68 %GC), followed by CP002351 & NC_015707 (67 %GC) strains. The use of GC dataset ratios helps in higher level hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics in addition to phenotypic and other genotypic characters. PMID:27331105

  2. Quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of glycerophospholipid molecular species in the two halophyte seed oils: Eryngium maritimum and Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Zitouni, Manel; Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Abdelly, Chedly; Ben Youssef, Nabil

    2016-12-15

    Future applications of lipids in clinical cohort studies demand detailed glycerophospholipid molecule information and the application of high-throughput lipidomics platforms. In the present work, a novel sensitive technique with high mass resolution and accuracy was applied to accomplish phospholipid analysis. Nanospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to separate and quantify the glycerophospholipid classes as well as molecular species in two halophyte seed oils from Cakile maritima and Eryngium maritimum. Precursor or neutral loss scans of their polar head groups allowed the detection of molecular species within particular glycerophospholipid classes. Phosphatidylcholine was found to be the most abundant glycerophospholipid in both seed oils whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid were less abundant. Phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylglycerol were minor glycerophospholipids. Several molecular species within each class were detected and the main molecular species (C36:4, C36:3, C36:2, 34:2 and C34:1) were quantitatively different between the two halophytes and the different glycerophospholipids. PMID:27451187

  3. Structure analysis of peptide deformylases from Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Thermotoga maritima and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: snapshots of the oxygen sensitivity of peptide deformylase.

    PubMed

    Kreusch, Andreas; Spraggon, Glen; Lee, Chris C; Klock, Heath; McMullan, Daniel; Ng, Ken; Shin, Tanya; Vincent, Juli; Warner, Ian; Ericson, Christer; Lesley, Scott A

    2003-07-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) has received considerable attention during the last few years as a potential target for a new type of antibiotics. It is an essential enzyme in eubacteria for the removal of the formyl group from the N terminus of the nascent polypeptide chain. We have solved the X-ray structures of four members of this enzyme family, two from the Gram-positive pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, and two from the Gram-negative bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Combined with the known structures from the Escherichia coli enzyme and the recently solved structure of the eukaryotic deformylase from Plasmodium falciparum, a complete picture of the peptide deformylase structure and function relationship is emerging. This understanding could help guide a more rational design of inhibitors. A structure-based comparison between PDFs reveals some conserved differences between type I and type II enzymes. Moreover, our structures provide insights into the known instability of PDF caused by oxidation of the metal-ligating cysteine residue. PMID:12823970

  4. Enhancement of the alcoholytic activity of alpha-amylase AmyA from Thermotoga maritima MSB8 (DSM 3109) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Damián-Almazo, Juanita Yazmin; Moreno, Alina; López-Munguía, Agustin; Soberón, Xavier; González-Muñoz, Fernando; Saab-Rincón, Gloria

    2008-08-01

    AmyA, an alpha-amylase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima, is able to hydrolyze internal alpha-1,4-glycosidic bonds in various alpha-glucans at 85 degrees C as the optimal temperature. Like other glycoside hydrolases, AmyA also catalyzes transglycosylation reactions, particularly when oligosaccharides are used as substrates. It was found that when methanol or butanol was used as the nucleophile instead of water, AmyA was able to catalyze alcoholysis reactions. This capability has been evaluated in the past for some alpha-amylases, with the finding that only the saccharifying fungal amylases from Aspergillus niger and from Aspergillus oryzae present measurable alcoholysis activity (R. I. Santamaria, G. Del Rio, G. Saab, M. E. Rodriguez, X. Soberon, and A. Lopez, FEBS Lett. 452:346-350, 1999). In the present work, we found that AmyA generates larger quantities of alkyl glycosides than any amylase reported so far. In order to increase the alcoholytic activity observed in AmyA, several residues were identified and mutated based on previous analogous positions in amylases, defining the polarity and geometry of the active site. Replacement of residue His222 by glutamine generated an increase in the alkyl glucoside yield as a consequence of a higher alcoholysis/hydrolysis ratio. The same change in specificity was observed for the mutants H222E and H222D, but instability of these mutants toward alcohols decreased the yield of alkyl glucoside. PMID:18552192

  5. Role of N-terminal extension of Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 and C-terminal extension of Thermotoga maritima RNase H2.

    PubMed

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Koga, Yuichi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2013-10-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 (BstRNH2) and Thermotoga maritima RNase H2 (TmaRNH2) have N-terminal and C-terminal extensions, respectively, as compared with Aquifex aeolicus RNase H2 (AaeRNH2). To analyze the role of these extensions, BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 without these extensions were constructed, and their biochemical properties were compared with those of their intact partners and AaeRNH2. The far-UV CD spectra of all proteins were similar, suggesting that the protein structure is not significantly altered by removal of these extensions. However, both the junction ribonuclease and RNase H activities of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, as well as their substrate-binding affinities, were considerably decreased by removal of these extensions. The stability of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 was also decreased by removal of these extensions. The activity, substrate binding affinity and stability of TmaRNH2 without the C-terminal 46 residues were partly restored by the attachment of the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2. These results suggest that the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2 functions as a substrate-binding domain and stabilizes the RNase H domain. Because the C-terminal extension of TmaRNH2 assumes a helix hairpin structure and does not make direct contact with the substrate, this extension is probably required to make the conformation of the substrate-binding site functional. AaeRNH2 showed comparable junction ribonuclease activity to those of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, and was more stable than these proteins, indicating that bacterial RNases H2 do not always require an N-terminal or C-terminal extension to increase activity, substrate-binding affinity, and/or stability. PMID:23937561

  6. Effect of bioflavonoids extracted from the bark of Pinus maritima on proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7.

    PubMed

    Cho, K J; Yun, C H; Yoon, D Y; Cho, Y S; Rimbach, G; Packer, L; Chung, A S

    2000-10-01

    Currently, bioflavonoids have been known to have strong antioxidant capacities, and a variety of efforts have been made to identify the utilities of bioflavonoids in treating various diseases based on their antioxidant capacities. The effects of bioflavonoids extracted from the bark of Pinus maritima Pycnogenol (PYC) on free radical formation, activation of redox sensitive transcription factors, as well as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) production were investigated in murine macrophage cell lines. PYC exerted strong scavenging activities against reactive oxygen species generated either by H(2)O(2) or PMA in RAW 264.7 and IC-21 cells, respectively. In situ ELISA, immunoblot analysis, and competitive RT-PCR demonstrated that PYC pretreatment of LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells dose-dependently reduced both the production of IL-1 beta and its mRNA levels. Furthermore, in the same cells, PYC blocked the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) and activator protein-1 (AP-1), two major transcription factors centrally involved in IL-1 beta gene expression. When RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS, the inhibitor protein I kappa B largely disappeared from cytosolic fractions. However, pretreatment of the cells with PYC abolished the LPS-induced I kappa B degradation. These results suggest that PYC can inhibit the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 by regulating redox-sensitive transcription factors. This study may support the possibility that bioflavonoids including PYC can be used as antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs based on their radical scavenging activities. PMID:11000101

  7. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  8. Differences between the rhizosphere microbiome of Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima-ancestor of all beet crops-and modern sugar beets.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Müller, Henry; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The structure and function of the plant microbiome is driven by plant species and prevailing environmental conditions. Effectuated by breeding efforts, modern crops diverge genetically and phenotypically from their wild relatives but little is known about consequences for the associated microbiota. Therefore, we studied bacterial rhizosphere communities associated with the wild beet B. vulgaris ssp. maritima grown in their natural habitat soil from coastal drift lines (CS) and modern sugar beets (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) cultivated in CS and potting soil (PS) under greenhouse conditions. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and pyrosequencing-based amplicon libraries revealed plant genotype- and soil-specific microbiomes. Wild beet plants harbor distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a more diverse bacterial community than the domesticated sugar beet plants. Although the rhizospheres of both plant genotypes were dominated by Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes, 37.5% of dominant OTUs were additionally detected in the wild beet rhizosphere. Analysis of the cultivable fraction confirmed these plant genotype-specific differences at functional level. The proportion of isolates displayed in vitro activity against phytopathogens was lower for wild beet (≤45.8%) than for sugar beet (≤57.5%). Conversely, active isolates from the wild beet exhibited stronger ability to cope with abiotic stresses. From all samples, active isolates of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila were frequently identified. In addition, soil type-specific impacts on the composition of bacterial communities were found: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were only detected in plants cultivated in CS; whereas Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria dominated in PS. Overall, in comparison to modern sugar beets, wild beets were associated with taxonomically and functionally distinct microbiomes. PMID:25206350

  9. Constitutive high-level expression of a codon-optimized β-fructosidase gene from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Carmen; Martínez, Duniesky; Trujillo, Luis E; Mazola, Yuliet; González, Ernesto; Pérez, Enrique R; Hernández, Lázaro

    2013-02-01

    Enzymes for use in the sugar industry are preferred to be thermotolerant. In this study, a synthetic codon-optimized gene encoding a highly thermostable β-fructosidase (BfrA, EC 3.2.1.26) from the bacterium Thermotoga maritima was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The gradual increase of the transgene dosage from one to four copies under the control of the constitutive glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter had an additive effect on BfrA yield without causing cell toxicity. Maximal values of cell biomass (115 g/l, dry weight) and overall invertase activity (241 U/ml) were reached at 72 h in fed-batch fermentations using cane sugar as the main carbon source for growth. Secretion driven by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal peptide resulted in periplasmic retention (44 %) and extracellular release (56 %) of BfrA. The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides did not influence the optimal activity, thermal stability, kinetic properties, substrate specificity, and exo-type action mode of the yeast-secreted BfrA in comparison to the native unglycosylated enzyme. Complete inversion of cane sugar at initial concentration of 60 % (w/v) was achieved by periplasmic BfrA in undisrupted cells reacting at pH 5.5 and 70 °C, with average productivity of 4.4 g of substrate hydrolyzed per grams of biomass (wet weight) per hour. The high yield of fully active glycosylated BfrA here attained by recombinant P. pastoris in a low-cost fermentation process appears to be attractive for the large-scale production of this thermostable enzyme useful for the manufacture of inverted sugar syrup. PMID:22821437

  10. Importance of Hydrogen Bonding in Fine Tuning the [2Fe-2S] Cluster Redox Potential of HydC from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Birrell, James A; Laurich, Christoph; Reijerse, Edward J; Ogata, Hideaki; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters form one of the largest and most diverse classes of enzyme cofactors in nature. They may serve as structural factors, form electron transfer chains between active sites and external redox partners, or form components of enzyme active sites. Their specific role is a consequence of the cluster type and the surrounding protein environment. The relative effects of these factors are not completely understood, and it is not yet possible to predict the properties of iron-sulfur clusters based on amino acid sequences or rationally tune their properties to generate proteins with new desirable functions. Here, we generate mutations in a [2Fe-2S] cluster protein, the TmHydC subunit of the trimeric [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima, to study the factors that affect its redox potential. Saturation mutagenesis of Val131 was used to tune the redox potential over a 135 mV range and revealed that cluster redox potential and electronic properties correlate with amino acid hydrophobicity and the ability to form hydrogen bonds to the cluster. Proline scanning mutagenesis between pairs of ligating cysteines was used to remove backbone amide hydrogen bonds to the cluster and decrease the redox potential by up to 132 mV, without large structural changes in most cases. However, substitution of Gly83 with proline caused a change of HydC to a [4Fe-4S] cluster protein with a redox potential of -526 mV. Together, these results confirm the importance of hydrogen bonding in tuning cluster redox potentials and demonstrate the versatility of iron-sulfur cluster protein folds at binding different types of clusters. PMID:27396836

  11. Contrasting effects of ecosystem engineering by the cordgrass Spartina maritima and the sandprawn Callianassa kraussi in a marine-dominated lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, D.; Branch, G. M.; Dawson, J.; Henry, D.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem engineering by plants and animals significantly influences community structure and the physico-chemical characteristics of marine habitats. In this paper we document the contrasting effects of ecosystem engineering by the cordgrass Spartina maritima and the burrowing sandprawn Callianassa kraussi on physico-chemical characteristics, microflora, macrofaunal community structure and morphological attributes in the high shore intertidal sandflats of Langebaan Lagoon, a marine-dominated system on the west coast of South Africa. Comparisons were made at six sites in the lagoon within Spartina and Callianassa beds, and in a "bare zone" of sandflat between these two habitats that lacks both sandprawns and cordgrass. Sediments in Spartina habitats were consolidated by the root-shoot systems of the cordgrass, leading to low sediment penetrability, while sediments in beds of C. kraussi were more penetrable, primarily due to the destabilising effects of sandprawn bioturbation. Sediments in the "bare zone" had intermediate to low values of penetrability. Sediment organic content was lowest in bare zones and greatest in Spartina beds, while sediment chl- a levels were greatest on bare sand, but were progressively reduced in the Spartina and Callianassa beds. These differences among habitats induced by ecosystem engineering in turn affected the macrofauna. Community structure was different between all three habitats sampled, with species richness being surprisingly greater in Callianassa beds than either the bare zone or Spartina beds. In general, the binding of surface sediments by the root systems of Spartina favoured rigid-bodied, surface-dwelling and tube-building species, while the destabilising effect of bioturbation by C. kraussi favoured burrowing species. The contrasting effects of these ecosystem engineers suggest that they play important roles in increasing habitat heterogeneity. Importantly, the role of bioturbation by C. kraussi in enhancing macrofaunal

  12. A loose domain swapping organization confers a remarkable stability to the dimeric structure of the arginine binding protein from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Alessia; Dattelbaum, Jonathan D; Staiano, Maria; Berisio, Rita; D'Auria, Sabato; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The arginine binding protein from Thermatoga maritima (TmArgBP), a substrate binding protein (SBP) involved in the ABC system of solute transport, presents a number of remarkable properties. These include an extraordinary stability to temperature and chemical denaturants and the tendency to form multimeric structures, an uncommon feature among SBPs involved in solute transport. Here we report a biophysical and structural characterization of the TmArgBP dimer. Our data indicate that the dimer of the protein is endowed with a remarkable stability since its full dissociation requires high temperature as well as SDS and urea at high concentrations. In order to elucidate the atomic level structural properties of this intriguing protein, we determined the crystallographic structures of the apo and the arginine-bound forms of TmArgBP using MAD and SAD methods, respectively. The comparison of the liganded and unliganded models demonstrates that TmArgBP tertiary structure undergoes a very large structural re-organization upon arginine binding. This transition follows the Venus Fly-trap mechanism, although the entity of the re-organization observed in TmArgBP is larger than that observed in homologous proteins. Intriguingly, TmArgBP dimerizes through the swapping of the C-terminal helix. This dimer is stabilized exclusively by the interactions established by the swapping helix. Therefore, the TmArgBP dimer combines a high level of stability and conformational freedom. The structure of the TmArgBP dimer represents an uncommon example of large tertiary structure variations amplified at quaternary structure level by domain swapping. Although the biological relevance of the dimer needs further assessments, molecular modelling suggests that the two TmArgBP subunits may simultaneously interact with two distinct ABC transporters. Moreover, the present protein structures provide some clues about the determinants of the extraordinary stability of the biomolecule. The availability of

  13. Helical shifts generate two distinct conformers in the atomic resolution structure of the CheA phosphotransferase domain from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Cindy M; Gradinaru, Cristian; Simon, Melvin I; Bilwes, Alexandrine M; Crane, Brian R

    2004-08-27

    Helical histidine phosphotransferase (HPt) domains play a central role in many aspects of bacterial signal transduction. The 0.98 A resolution crystallographic structure of the amino-terminal HPt domain (P1) from the chemotaxis kinase CheA of Thermotoga maritima reveals a remarkable degree of structural heterogeneity within a four-helix bundle. Two of the four helices have alternate main-chain conformations that differ by a 1.3-1.7A shift along the bundle axis. These dual conformers were only resolved with atomic resolution diffraction data and their inclusion significantly improved refinement statistics. Neither conformer optimizes packing within the helical core, consistent with their nearly equal refined occupancies. Altered hydrogen bonding within an inter-helical loop may facilitate transition between conformers. Two discrete structural states rather than a continuum of closely related conformations indicates an energetic barrier to conversion between conformers in the crystal at 100K, although many more states are expected in solution at physiological temperatures. Anisotropic atomic thermal B factors within the two conformers indicate modest overall atomic displacement that is largest perpendicular to the helical bundle and not along the direction of apparent motion. Despite the conformational heterogeneity of P1 in the crystal at low temperature, the protein displays high thermal stability in solution (T(m)=100 degrees C). Addition of a variable C-terminal region that corresponds to a mobile helix in other CheA structures significantly narrows the temperature width of the unfolding transition and may affect domain dynamics. Helices that compose the kinase recognition site and contain the phospho-accepting His45 do not have alternate conformations. In this region, atomic resolution provides detailed structural parameters for a conserved hydrogen-bonding network that tunes the reactivity of His45. A neighboring glutamate (E67), essential for

  14. Kinetic and mechanistic analyses of new classes of inhibitors of two-component signal transduction systems using a coupled assay containing HpkA-DrrA from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Foster, J Estelle; Sheng, Qin; McClain, Jonathan R; Bures, Mark; Nicas, Thalia I; Henry, Kenneth; Winkler, Malcolm E; Gilmour, Raymond

    2004-04-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) play fundamental roles in bacterial survival and pathogenesis and have been proposed as targets for the development of novel classes of antibiotics. A new coupled assay was developed and applied to analyse the kinetic mechanisms of three new kinds of inhibitors of TCS function. The assay exploits the biochemical properties of the cognate HpkA-DrrA histidine kinase-response regulator pair from Thermotoga maritima and allows multiple turnovers of HpkA, linear formation of phosphorylated DrrA, and Michaelis-Menten analysis of inhibitors. The assay was validated in several ways, including confirmation of competitive inhibition by adenosine 5'-beta,gamma-imidotriphosphate (AMP-PNP). The coupled assay, autophosphorylation and chemical cross-linking were used to determine the mechanisms by which several compounds inhibit TCS function. A cyanoacetoacetamide showed non-competitive inhibition with respect to ATP concentration in the coupled assay. The cyanoacetoacetamide also inhibited autophosphorylation of histidine kinases from other bacteria, indicating that the coupled assay could detect general inhibitors of histidine kinase function. Inhibition of HpkA autophosphorylation by this compound was probably caused by aggregation of HpkA, consistent with a previous model for other hydrophobic compounds. In contrast, ethodin was a potent inhibitor of the combined assay, did not inhibit HpkA autophosphorylation, but still led to aggregation of HpkA. These data suggest that ethodin bound to the HpkA kinase and inhibited transfer of the phosphoryl group to DrrA. A peptide corresponding to the phosphorylation site of DrrA appeared to inhibit TCS function by a mechanism similar to that of ethodin, except that autophosphorylation was inhibited at high peptide concentrations. The latter mechanism of inhibition of TCS function is unusual and its analysis demonstrates the utility of these approaches to the kinetic analyses of additional

  15. Genetic structure and gene flow in Beta vulgaris subspecies maritima along the Atlantic coast of France

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Locating and quantifying genetic variation within crop wild relatives is an ongoing activity of gene banks tasked with ex situ conservation. Without detailed information about the population genetics of a species geography often serves as a reasonable proxy for differentiation. With this in mind, ...

  16. An analysis of segmentation dynamics throughout embryogenesis in the centipede Strigamia maritima

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most segmented animals add segments sequentially as the animal grows. In vertebrates, segment patterning depends on oscillations of gene expression coordinated as travelling waves in the posterior, unsegmented mesoderm. Recently, waves of segmentation gene expression have been clearly documented in insects. However, it remains unclear whether cyclic gene activity is widespread across arthropods, and possibly ancestral among segmented animals. Previous studies have suggested that a segmentation oscillator may exist in Strigamia, an arthropod only distantly related to insects, but further evidence is needed to document this. Results Using the genes even skipped and Delta as representative of genes involved in segment patterning in insects and in vertebrates, respectively, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the spatio-temporal dynamics of gene expression throughout the process of segment patterning in Strigamia. We show that a segmentation clock is involved in segment formation: most segments are generated by cycles of dynamic gene activity that generate a pattern of double segment periodicity, which is only later resolved to the definitive single segment pattern. However, not all segments are generated by this process. The most posterior segments are added individually from a localized sub-terminal area of the embryo, without prior pair-rule patterning. Conclusions Our data suggest that dynamic patterning of gene expression may be widespread among the arthropods, but that a single network of segmentation genes can generate either oscillatory behavior at pair-rule periodicity or direct single segment patterning, at different stages of embryogenesis. PMID:24289308

  17. Local and global influences on population declines of coastal waders: Purple Sandpiper Calidris maritima numbers in the Moray Firth, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Ron W.; Foster, Simon; Swann, Bob; Etheridge, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Declines in numbers by several wader species in Britain have been linked to climate change, but the mechanism for the declines has rarely been explored. Britain lies at the northern end of the East Atlantic Flyway, and supports 1.3 million out of the Flyway's 8.5 million coastal waders (Charadrii) in winter and the Purple Sandpiper is one of the species whose numbers have declined. Here, we examine the dynamics of the decline as observed in the Moray Firth, northeast Scotland, investigating whether the decline was due to poorer apparent survival (return rate) or poorer recruitment of young birds. The maximum number in the Moray Firth declined from 860 in 1987/88 to 236 in 2006/07, with some increase during winters 2007/08 and 2008/09. At the three main high-tide roosts (Balintore, Lossiemouth and Buckie) the maximum combined number declined from 574 to 90. Changes in survival and recruitment (percentage of first-year birds) were examined at these roosts from captured samples, which were ringed and recaptured. There were no significant changes between winters in survival rates, nor were there differences between the survival rates of age groups (first-year and adult) or bill size groups, which represented birds of different sex and breeding origin. Annual survival estimates for the three roosts ranged from 72 to 77%. The percentage of first-year birds varied among roosts and years; the lowest values were during the late 1980s/early 1990s and early 2000s. A free-running population model incorporating varying percentages of first-year birds and constant mortality for each roost provided a plausible explanation for the decline. Although modelled numbers followed the observed pattern, a discrepancy in one year was carried forward in subsequent years, so that the fit with the observed numbers was parallel rather than similar. However, it seems that the decline in numbers was largely due to poorer recruitment. We discuss whether breeding success had declined, whether the population had responded to changes in the local sewage treatment systems, which could affect invertebrate food for Purple Sandpipers, or whether fewer birds chose to winter in Scotland. The Moray Firth population is derived from Norway and possibly Canada, and there is evidence that the Norwegian population was disproportionately affected. The reason for poor recruitment requires further study, and other wader species require examination to test if poor recruitment is a common feature of decline in numbers.

  18. Cytotoxicity of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Neoambrosin and Damsin from Ambrosia maritima Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohamed; Jacob, Stefan; Sandjo, Louis P.; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Khalid, Hassan E.; Opatz, Till; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a prevailing phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in cancer patients. In the current study two known cytotoxic pseudoguaianolide sesquiterpene lactones; neoambrosin (1) and damsin (2) that circumvent MDR were identified. The two cytotoxic compounds were isolated using column chromatography, characterized using 1D and 2D NMR, MS, and compared with literature values. The isolated compounds were investigated for their cytotoxic potential using resazurin assays and thereafter confirmed with immunoblotting and in silico studies. MDR cells overexpressing ABC transporters (P-glycoprotein, BCRP, ABCB5) did not confer cross-resistance toward (1) and (2), indicating that these compounds are not appropriate substrates for any of the three ABC transporters analyzed. Resistance mechanisms investigated also included; the loss of the functions of the TP53 and the mutated EGFR. The HCT116 p53-/- cells were sensitive to 1 but resistant to 2. It was interesting to note that resistant cells transfected with oncogenic ΔEGFR exhibited hypersensitivity CS toward (1) and (2) (degrees of resistances were 0.18 and 0.15 for (1) and (2), respectively). Immunoblotting and in silico analyses revealed that 1 and 2 silenced c-Src kinase activity. It was hypothesized that inhibition of c-Src kinase activity may explain CS in EGFR-transfected cells. In conclusion, the significant cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against different drug-resistant tumor cell lines indicate that they may be promising candidates to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26617519

  19. The feasibility and efficacy of early-season releases of a generalist predator (Forficula auricularia L.) to control populations of the RAA (Dysaphis plantaginea Passerini) in Southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Dib, H; Jamont, M; Sauphanor, B; Capowiez, Y

    2016-04-01

    Augmentative biological control is not commonly used in commercial orchards. We used an exclusion system to evaluate the potential of early-season releases of the European earwig (Forficula auricularia L., Dermaptera: Forficulidae) for control of the rosy apple aphid (Dysaphis plantaginea Passerini, Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the spring of 2009 in two pesticide-free apple orchards. In order to conduct this experiment we successfully reared earwigs with a high survival rate of nymphs (more than 96%) which may have commercial application. There were three treatments in the study: (i) a 'release treatment' where we confined the released earwigs in the canopy by using a barrier system; (ii) an 'exclusion treatment' where we blocked free access of earwigs into the canopy using the same barrier system; and (iii) a 'control treatment' that represented the natural situation. Contrary to expectations, earwig releases did not reduce D. plantaginea populations. In general, the abundance of natural enemies and their groups did not differ significantly among treatments, except for earwigs. We observed that the exclusion systems we used successfully kept both earwigs and ants away from tree canopies; total numbers on trees in the 'exclusion treatment' were significantly lower than on the other two treatments. Due to the complexity and difficulty of evaluating augmentative releases of natural enemies in open orchard conditions, we conclude that new technical approaches to control site conditions are needed when conducting such studies. PMID:26780826

  20. An anterior medial cell population with an apical-organ-like transcriptional profile that pioneers the central nervous system in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Akam, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The apical plate of primary marine larvae is characterized by a common set of transcription factors comprising six3, rx, hbn, nk2.1 and FoxQ2. It harbours the apical organ, a neural and ciliary structure with neurosecretory properties. Recent studies in lophotrochozoans have found that apical organ cells form the anterior tip of the developing central nervous system. We identify an anterior medial tissue in the embryonic centipede head that shares the transcriptional profile of the apical plate of marine larvae, including nested domains of FoxQ2 and six3 expression. This domain gives rise to an anterior medial population of neural precursors distinct from those arising within the segmental neuroectoderm. These medial cells do not express achaete scute homologue in proneural clusters, but express collier, a marker for post mitotic cells committed to a neural fate, while they are still situated in the surface ectodermal layer. They then sink under the surface to form a compact cell cluster. Once internalized these cells extend axons that pioneer the primary axonal scaffold of the central nervous system. The same cells express phc2, a neural specific prohormone convertase, which suggests that they form an early active neurosecretory centre. Some also express markers of hypothalamic neurons, including otp, vtn and vax1. These medial neurosecretory cells of the centipede are distinct from those of the pars intercerebralis, the anterior neurosecretory part of the insect brain. The pars intercerebralis derives from vsx positive placodal-like invagination sites. In the centipede, vsx expressing invaginating ectoderm is situated bilaterally adjacent to the medial pioneer cell population. Hence the pars intercerebralis is present in both insect and centipede brains, whereas no prominent anterior medial cluster of pioneer neurons is present in insects. These observations suggest that the arthropod brain retained ancestrally an anterior medial population of neurosecretory cells homologous to those of the apical plate in other invertebrate phyla, but that this cell population has been lost or greatly reduced in insects. PMID:25263198

  1. Detection of Intermediates in the Oxidative Half-Reaction of the FAD-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase from Thermotoga maritima: Carbon Transfer without Covalent Pyrimidine Activation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate, a vital DNA precursor, is synthesized by thymidylate synthases (TSs). A second class of TSs, encoded by the thyX gene, is found in bacteria and a few other microbes and is especially widespread in anaerobes. TS encoded by thyX requires a flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group for activity. In the oxidative half-reaction, the reduced flavin is oxidized by 2′-deoxyuridine 5′-monophosphate (dUMP) and (6R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), synthesizing 2′-deoxythymidine 5′-monophosphate (dTMP). dTMP synthesis is a complex process, requiring the enzyme to promote carbon transfer, probably by increasing the nucleophilicity of dUMP and the electrophilicity of CH2THF, and reduction of the transferred carbon. The mechanism of the oxidative half-reaction was investigated by transient kinetics. Two intermediates were detected, the first by a change in the flavin absorbance spectrum in stopped-flow experiments and the second by the transient disappearance of deoxynucleotide in acid quenching experiments. The effects of substrate analogues and the behavior of mutated enzymes on these reactions lead to the conclusion that activation of dUMP does not occur through a Michael-like addition, the mechanism for the activation analogous with that of the flavin-independent TS. Rather, we propose that the nucleophilicity of dUMP is enhanced by electrostatic polarization upon binding to the active site. This conclusion rationalizes many of our observations, for instance, the markedly slower reactions when two arginine residues that hydrogen bond with the uracil moiety of dUMP were mutated to alanine. The activation of dUMP by polarization is consistent with the majority of the published data on ThyX and provides a testable mechanistic hypothesis. PMID:25068636

  2. Interactions between indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) with a lectin from Canavalia maritima seeds reveal a new function for lectins in plant physiology.

    PubMed

    Delatorre, Plinio; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; da Nóbrega, Raphael Batista; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto Almeida; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2013-09-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) bound is considered a storage molecule and is inactive. However, some studies have proposed an additional possible regulatory mechanism based on the ability of lectins to form complexes with IAA. We report the first crystal structure of ConM in complex with IAA at 2.15 Å resolution. Based on a tetrameric model of the complex, we hypothesize how the lectin controls the availability of IAA during the early seedling stages, indicating a possible new physiological role for these proteins. A free indole group is also bound to the protein. The ConM interaction with different forms of IAA is a strategy to render the phytohormone unavailable to the cell. Thus, this new physiological role proposed for legume lectins might be a novel mechanism by which IAA levels are decreased in addition to the destruction and formation of new complexes in the later stages of seed germination. PMID:23727478

  3. Detection of intermediates in the oxidative half-reaction of the FAD-dependent thymidylate synthase from Thermotoga maritima: carbon transfer without covalent pyrimidine activation.

    PubMed

    Conrad, John A; Ortiz-Maldonado, Mariliz; Hoppe, Samuel W; Palfey, Bruce A

    2014-08-19

    Thymidylate, a vital DNA precursor, is synthesized by thymidylate synthases (TSs). A second class of TSs, encoded by the thyX gene, is found in bacteria and a few other microbes and is especially widespread in anaerobes. TS encoded by thyX requires a flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group for activity. In the oxidative half-reaction, the reduced flavin is oxidized by 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (dUMP) and (6R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), synthesizing 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP). dTMP synthesis is a complex process, requiring the enzyme to promote carbon transfer, probably by increasing the nucleophilicity of dUMP and the electrophilicity of CH2THF, and reduction of the transferred carbon. The mechanism of the oxidative half-reaction was investigated by transient kinetics. Two intermediates were detected, the first by a change in the flavin absorbance spectrum in stopped-flow experiments and the second by the transient disappearance of deoxynucleotide in acid quenching experiments. The effects of substrate analogues and the behavior of mutated enzymes on these reactions lead to the conclusion that activation of dUMP does not occur through a Michael-like addition, the mechanism for the activation analogous with that of the flavin-independent TS. Rather, we propose that the nucleophilicity of dUMP is enhanced by electrostatic polarization upon binding to the active site. This conclusion rationalizes many of our observations, for instance, the markedly slower reactions when two arginine residues that hydrogen bond with the uracil moiety of dUMP were mutated to alanine. The activation of dUMP by polarization is consistent with the majority of the published data on ThyX and provides a testable mechanistic hypothesis. PMID:25068636

  4. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  5. A floral-derived compound attractive to the tephritid fruit fly parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many adult hymenopteran parasitoids, even host-feeding species, consume the nectar of flowering plants. Previous field studies had identified plants attractive (Lobularia maritima L.) and unattractive (Spermacoce verticillata L) to certain opiine braconids (Hymenoptera). Under laboratory conditions,...

  6. Agronomy of strip intercropping broccoli with alyssum for biological control of aphids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic broccoli growers in California typically control aphids by intercropping broccoli with strips of alyssum (Lobularia maritima (L.) Desv.) which attracts hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) that are important predators of aphids. A three year study with transplanted organic broccoli in Salinas, ...

  7. Which insect species numerically respond to allochthonous inputs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Herons (Ardeidae) frequently breed in inland forests and provide organic material in the form of carcasses of prey (that they drop) and chicks (that die) to the forest floor. Such allochthonous inputs of organic materials are known to increase arthropod populations in forests. However, the exact species that show numerical responses to allochthonous inputs in heron breeding colonies remains unclear. Very few studies have clarified which factors determine numerical responses in individual species. We used pitfall and baited traps to compare the densities of arthropods between forest patches in heron breeding colonies (five sites) and areas outside of colonies (five sites) in central Japan. The density of all arthropods was not significantly different between colonies and non-colony areas. However, significant differences between colonies and non-colony areas were found in four arthropod groups. Earwigs (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae), hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae), and carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were more abundant in colonies, while ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) were less abundant in colonies. We detected numerical responses to heron breeding in two earwig, one histerid, five silphid, and one ant species. Chick and prey carcasses from herons may have directly led to increases in consumer populations such as earwigs, histerids, and silphids in colonies, while microenvironmental changes caused by heron breeding may have reduced ant abundance. In the Silphidae, five species showed numerical responses to allochthonous inputs, and the other two species did not. Numerical responses in individual species may have been determined by life history traits such as reproductive behaviour.

  8. Which insect species numerically respond to allochthonous inputs?

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Herons (Ardeidae) frequently breed in inland forests and provide organic material in the form of carcasses of prey (that they drop) and chicks (that die) to the forest floor. Such allochthonous inputs of organic materials are known to increase arthropod populations in forests. However, the exact species that show numerical responses to allochthonous inputs in heron breeding colonies remains unclear. Very few studies have clarified which factors determine numerical responses in individual species. We used pitfall and baited traps to compare the densities of arthropods between forest patches in heron breeding colonies (five sites) and areas outside of colonies (five sites) in central Japan. The density of all arthropods was not significantly different between colonies and non-colony areas. However, significant differences between colonies and non-colony areas were found in four arthropod groups. Earwigs (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae), hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae), and carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were more abundant in colonies, while ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) were less abundant in colonies. We detected numerical responses to heron breeding in two earwig, one histerid, five silphid, and one ant species. Chick and prey carcasses from herons may have directly led to increases in consumer populations such as earwigs, histerids, and silphids in colonies, while microenvironmental changes caused by heron breeding may have reduced ant abundance. In the Silphidae, five species showed numerical responses to allochthonous inputs, and the other two species did not. Numerical responses in individual species may have been determined by life history traits such as reproductive behaviour. PMID:23780624

  9. Native plant restoration combats environmental change: development of carbon and nitrogen sequestration capacity using small cordgrass in European salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Curado, Guillermo; Rubio-Casal, Alfredo E; Figueroa, Enrique; Grewell, Brenda J; Castillo, Jesús M

    2013-10-01

    Restoration of salt marshes is critical in the context of climate change and eutrophication of coastal waters because their vegetation and sediments may act as carbon and nitrogen sinks. Our primary objectives were to quantify carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks and sequestration rates in restored marshes dominated by Spartina maritima to provide support for restoration and management strategies that may offset negative aspects of eutrophication and climate change in estuarine ecosystems. Sediment C content was between ca. 13 mg C g(-1)and sediment N content was ca. 1.8 mg N g(-1). The highest C content for S. maritima was recorded in leaves and stems (ca. 420 mg C g(-1)) and the lowest in roots (361 ± 4 mg C g(-1)). S. maritima also concentrated more N in its leaves (31 ± 1 mg N g(-1)) than in other organs. C stock in the restored marshes was 29.6 t C ha(-1); ca. 16 % was stored in S. maritima tissues. N stock was 3.6 t N ha(-1), with 8.3 % stored in S. maritima. Our results showed that the S. maritima restored marshes, 2.5 years after planting, were sequestering atmospheric C and, therefore, provide some mitigation for global warming. Stands are also capturing nitrogen and reducing eutrophication. The concentrations of C and N contents in sediments, and cordgrass relative cover of 62 %, and low below-ground biomass (BGB) suggest restored marshes can sequester more C and N. S. maritima plantations in low marshes replace bare sediments and invasive populations of exotic Spartina densiflora and increase the C and N sequestration capacity of the marsh by increasing biomass production and accumulation. PMID:23591677

  10. Were the original eubacteria thermophiles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Gupta, R.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.; Johnson, P. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Thermotoga maritima is one of the more unusual eubacteria: It is highly thermophilic, growing at temperatures higher than any other eubacterium; its cell wall appears to have a unique structure and its lipids a unique composition; and the organism is surrounded by a loose-fitting sheath of unknown function. Its phenotypic uniqueness is matched by its phylogenetic position; Thermotoga maritima represents the deepest known branching in the eubacterial line of descent, as measured by ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons. T. maritima also represents the most slowly evolving of eubacterial lineages. The fact that the two deepest branchings in the eubacterial line of descent (the other, the green non-sulfur bacteria and relatives, i.e. Chloroflexus, Thermomicrobium, etc.) are both basically thermophilic and slowly evolving, strongly suggests that all eubacteria have ultimately arisen from a thermophilic ancestor.

  11. Sugar Transport and Metabolism in Thermotoga

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, Kenneth M.; Romano, Antonio H.

    2003-02-11

    The work conducted under this grant demonstrated that the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana carries out glucose and lactose transport in a sodium-dependent manner and that energization of anaerobic cells is required to observe transport. We also demonstrated that Thermotoga maritima carries out maltose and glucose transport using periplasmic sugar binding proteins. We began defining patterns of expression of genes encoding sugar transport and catabolic functions in both T. maritima and T. neapolitana. We began a collaborative effort to identify all the genes regulated at the transcriptional level in response to sugars substrates. These funds also allowed us to begin an examination of the functions of several periplasmic substrate binding proteins encoded in the genome of T. maritima.

  12. Cues of maternal condition influence offspring selfishness.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janine W Y; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of parent-offspring communication was mostly studied from the perspective of parents responding to begging signals conveying information about offspring condition. Parents should respond to begging because of the differential fitness returns obtained from their investment in offspring that differ in condition. For analogous reasons, offspring should adjust their behavior to cues/signals of parental condition: parents that differ in condition pay differential costs of care and, hence, should provide different amounts of food. In this study, we experimentally tested in the European earwig (Forficula auricularia) if cues of maternal condition affect offspring behavior in terms of sibling cannibalism. We experimentally manipulated female condition by providing them with different amounts of food, kept nymph condition constant, allowed for nymph exposure to chemical maternal cues over extended time, quantified nymph survival (deaths being due to cannibalism) and extracted and analyzed the females' cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC). Nymph survival was significantly affected by chemical cues of maternal condition, and this effect depended on the timing of breeding. Cues of poor maternal condition enhanced nymph survival in early broods, but reduced nymph survival in late broods, and vice versa for cues of good condition. Furthermore, female condition affected the quantitative composition of their CHC profile which in turn predicted nymph survival patterns. Thus, earwig offspring are sensitive to chemical cues of maternal condition and nymphs from early and late broods show opposite reactions to the same chemical cues. Together with former evidence on maternal sensitivities to condition-dependent nymph chemical cues, our study shows context-dependent reciprocal information exchange about condition between earwig mothers and their offspring, potentially mediated by cuticular hydrocarbons. PMID:24498046

  13. Piper kelleyi, a hotspot of ecological interactions and a new species from Ecuador and Peru

    PubMed Central

    Tepe, Eric. J.; Rodríguez-Castañeda, Genoveva; Glassmire, Andrea E.; Dyer, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe Piper kelleyi sp. nov., a new species from the eastern Andes of Ecuador and Peru, named in honor of Dr. Walter Almond Kelley. Piper kelleyi is a member of the Macrostachys clade of the genus Piper and supports a rich community of generalist and specialist herbivores, their predators and parasitoids, as well as commensalistic earwigs, and mutualistic ants. This new species was recognized as part of an ecological study of phytochemically mediated relationships between plants, herbivores, predators, and parasitoids. Compared to over 100 other Piper species surveyed, Piper kelleyi supports the largest community of specialist herbivores and parasitoids observed to date. PMID:24596490

  14. Genome Sequence of Thermotoga sp Strain RQ2, a Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Geothermally Heated Region of the Seafloor near Ribeira Quente, the Azores

    SciTech Connect

    Swithers, Kristen S; DiPippo, Jonathan L; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Lykidis, A; Land, Miriam L; Stetter, Karl O; Nelson, Karen E; Gogarten, Peter; Noll, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Thermotoga sp. strain RQ2 is probably a strain of Thermotoga maritima. Its complete genome sequence allows for an examination of the extent and consequences of gene flow within Thermotoga species and strains. Thermotoga sp. RQ2 differs from T. maritima in its genes involved in myo-inositol metabolism. Its genome also encodes an apparent fructose phosphotransferase system (PTS) sugar transporter. This operon is also found in Thermotoga naphthophila strain RKU-10 but no other Thermotogales. These are the first reported PTS transporters in the Thermotogales.

  15. Enzymatic synthesis of 2'-ara and 2'-deoxy analogues of c-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Shchokolova, Anastasia S; Rymko, Alexander N; Kvach, Sergey V; Shabunya, Polina S; Fatykhava, Svetlana A; Zinchenko, Anatoly I

    2015-01-01

    The substrate specificity of recombinant full-length diguanylate cyclase (DGC) of Thermotoga maritima with mutant allosteric site was investigated. It has been originally shown that the enzyme could use GTP closest analogues - 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-triphosphate (dGTP) and 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-guanine-5'-triphosphate (araGTP) as the substrates. The first demonstrations of an enzymatic synthesis of bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric deoxyguanosine monophosphate (c-di-dGMP) and the previously unknown bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric araguanosine monophosphate (c-di-araGMP) using DGC of T. maritima in the form of inclusion bodies have been provided. PMID:25965330

  16. Inbreeding depression in an insect with maternal care: influences of family interactions, life stage and offspring sex.

    PubMed

    Meunier, J; Kölliker, M

    2013-10-01

    Although inbreeding is commonly known to depress individual fitness, the severity of inbreeding depression varies considerably across species. Among the factors contributing to this variation, family interactions, life stage and sex of offspring have been proposed, but their joint influence on inbreeding depression remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that these three factors jointly shape inbreeding depression in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia. Using a series of cross-breeding, split-clutch and brood size manipulation experiments conducted over two generations, we first showed that sib mating (leading to inbred offspring) did not influence the reproductive success of earwig parents. Second, the presence of tending mothers and the strength of sibling competition (i.e. brood size) did not influence the expression of inbreeding depression in the inbred offspring. By contrast, our results revealed that inbreeding dramatically depressed the reproductive success of inbred adult male offspring, but only had little effect on the reproductive success of inbred adult female offspring. Overall, this study demonstrates limited effects of family interactions on inbreeding depression in this species and emphasizes the importance of disentangling effects of sib mating early and late during development to better understand the evolution of mating systems and population dynamics. PMID:23981229

  17. Paternal signature in kin recognition cues of a social insect: concealed in juveniles, revealed in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Janine W. Y.; Meunier, Joël; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Kin recognition is a key mechanism to direct social behaviours towards related individuals or avoid inbreeding depression. In insects, recognition is generally mediated by cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) compounds, which are partly inherited from parents. However, in social insects, potential nepotistic conflicts between group members from different patrilines are predicted to select against the expression of patriline-specific signatures in CHC profiles. Whereas this key prediction in the evolution of insect signalling received empirical support in eusocial insects, it remains unclear whether it can be generalized beyond eusociality to less-derived forms of social life. Here, we addressed this issue by manipulating the number of fathers siring clutches tended by females of the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, analysing the CHC profiles of the resulting juvenile and adult offspring, and using discriminant analysis to estimate the information content of CHC with respect to the maternal and paternal origin of individuals. As predicted, if paternally inherited cues are concealed during family life, increases in mating number had no effect on information content of CHC profiles among earwig juveniles, but significantly decreased the one among adult offspring. We suggest that age-dependent expression of patriline-specific cues evolved to limit the risks of nepotism as family-living juveniles and favour sibling-mating avoidance as group-living adults. These results highlight the role of parental care and social life in the evolution of chemical communication and recognition cues. PMID:25165768

  18. Paternal signature in kin recognition cues of a social insect: concealed in juveniles, revealed in adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janine W Y; Meunier, Joël; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-10-22

    Kin recognition is a key mechanism to direct social behaviours towards related individuals or avoid inbreeding depression. In insects, recognition is generally mediated by cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) compounds, which are partly inherited from parents. However, in social insects, potential nepotistic conflicts between group members from different patrilines are predicted to select against the expression of patriline-specific signatures in CHC profiles. Whereas this key prediction in the evolution of insect signalling received empirical support in eusocial insects, it remains unclear whether it can be generalized beyond eusociality to less-derived forms of social life. Here, we addressed this issue by manipulating the number of fathers siring clutches tended by females of the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, analysing the CHC profiles of the resulting juvenile and adult offspring, and using discriminant analysis to estimate the information content of CHC with respect to the maternal and paternal origin of individuals. As predicted, if paternally inherited cues are concealed during family life, increases in mating number had no effect on information content of CHC profiles among earwig juveniles, but significantly decreased the one among adult offspring. We suggest that age-dependent expression of patriline-specific cues evolved to limit the risks of nepotism as family-living juveniles and favour sibling-mating avoidance as group-living adults. These results highlight the role of parental care and social life in the evolution of chemical communication and recognition cues. PMID:25165768

  19. Genome evolution: groping in the soil interstices.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Centipedes are a very old lineage of terrestrial animals. The first completely sequenced myriapod genome reveals that the blind centipede Strigamia maritima has no gene for light-sensory proteins, lacks the canonical circadian clock and possesses unusual features related to chemosensory perception. PMID:25734267

  20. Beet curly top resistance of USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System plant introductions, 2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) in 2009. The curly top evaluation was conducted at the USDA-ARS North Farm in Kimberly...

  1. Rhizoctonia Crown and Root Rot Resistance of Beta Plant Introductions from the USDA, Agricultural Research Service's National Plant Germplasm System, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Research Farm. The Rhizoctonia sc...

  2. Evaluation of genetic diversity and root traits of sea beet accessions of the Adriatic Sea coast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty nine sea beet [Beta vulgaris L. subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang.] accessions of the Adriatic coast were screened genetically and for their adaptive morpho-functional root traits in order to identify new sources of abiotic resistances for sugar beet breeding programs. Genetic diversity was evaluat...

  3. Screening Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance of Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS, National Plant Germplasm System, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang and Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris L.) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Re...

  4. Evaluation of Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS, NPGS for Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) and beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris L.) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Col...

  5. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty beet accessions of either cultivated beet or sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris or Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) from the Beta collection of the USDA-Agricultural Research Service National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot ...

  6. Registration of EL54 and EL55 sugarbeet germplasms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    EL54 (PI 654357) is a sugarbeet germplasm derived from wild beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) accession WB879 (PI 540625), released in the interest of broadening the genetic base of sugar beet. The parent accession WB879, collected in 1989 from Port-de-Houet, France. EL54 has shown excellent Aphan...

  7. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis of Pycnogenol® dietary supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    French maritime bark (Pinus maritima) has been widely used as an herbal remedy for various degenerative diseases. A standardized bark extract is available that complies with its USP monograph and is derived from Pinus pinaster, Ait. (Pycnogenol®, Horphag Research Ltd., UK). The method specified in...

  8. Genetic structure and immigation in French sea beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we examined accessions of sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang.), collected along the Mediterranean Sea up the Atlantic coast of France. The aim was to identify the scale and magnitude of differentiation and diversity in these accessions using both molecular and quantita...

  9. Release of EL54 Sugarbeet Germplasm Derived from WB879 Wild Germplasm With Resistance to Aphanomyces and Excellent Stand Establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    EL54 (PI 654357) is a sugarbeet germplasm derived from wild beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) accession WB879 (PI 540625). EL54 is being released in the interest of broadening the genetic base of sugar beet. The parent accession WB879, collected in 1989 from Port-de-Houet, France (3 m elevation), w...

  10. 15 CFR Appendix II to Part 921 - Typology of National Estuarine Research Reserves

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mineral encrusting Schiuzothrix, and the vascular plant Ruppia maritima. Characteristic fauna which... faces exposed to salt spray. There is a diversity of plant species including mosses, lichens, liverworts, and “higher” plant representatives. Group II—Transition Areas A. Coastal marshes. These are...

  11. 15 CFR Appendix II to Part 921 - Typology of National Estuarine Research Reserves

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mineral encrusting Schiuzothrix, and the vascular plant Ruppia maritima. Characteristic fauna which... faces exposed to salt spray. There is a diversity of plant species including mosses, lichens, liverworts, and “higher” plant representatives. Group II—Transition Areas A. Coastal marshes. These are...

  12. Molecular and Morpho-Physiological Characterization of Sea, Ruderal and Cultivated Beets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta vulgaris genetic resources are essential for broadening genetic base of sugar beet and developing cultivars adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Wild beets (sea beets, B. vulgaris spp. maritima and their naturalized introgressions with cultivated beets known as ruderal beets) harbor su...

  13. Beet curly top resistance of USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System plant introductions, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-six wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) and other closely related Curtovirus species in 2010. The curly top evaluation was...

  14. A tale of two spartinas: Climatic, photobiological and isotopic insights on the fitness of non-indigenous versus native species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, B.; Baeta, A.; Rousseau-Gueutin, M.; Ainouche, M.; Marques, J. C.; Caçador, I.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes are facing a new threat: the invasion by non-indigenous species (NIS), Although its introduction time is not established yet, in 1999 Spartina versicolor was already identified as a NIS in the Mediterranean marshes, significantly spreading its area of colonization. Using the Mediterranean native Spartina maritima as a reference, the present research studied the ecophysiological fitness of this NIS in its new environment, as a tool to understand its potential invasiveness. It was found that Spartina versicolor had a stable photobiological pattern, with only minor fluctuations during an annual cycle, and lower efficiencies comparated to S. maritima. The NIS seems to be rather insensitive to the observed abiotic factors fluctuations (salinity and pH of the sediment), and thus contrasts with the native S. maritima, known to be salinity dependent with higher productivity values in higher salinity environments. Most of the differences observed between the photobiology of these species could be explained by their nitrogen nutrition (here evaluated by the δ15N stable isotope) and directly related with the Mediterranean climate. Enhanced by a higher N availability during winter, the primary production of S. maritima which lead to dilution of the foliar δ15N concentration in the newly formed biomass, similarly to what is observed along a rainfall gradient. On the other hand, S. versicolor showed an increased δ15N in its tissues along the annual rainfall gradient, probably due to a δ15N concentration effect during low biomass production periods (winter and autumn). Together with the photobiological traits, these isotopic data point out to a climatic misfit of S. versicolor to the Mediterranean climate compared to the native S. maritima. This appears to be the major constrain shaping the ecophysiological fitness of this NIS, its primary production and consequently, its spreading rate along the Mediterranean marshes.

  15. Gene Transfer & Hybridization Studies in Hyperthermophilic Species

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karen E.

    2005-10-14

    A. ABSTRACT The importance of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microbial species has become increasingly evident with each completed microbial genome sequence. Most significantly, the genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8, a hyperthermophilic bacterium isolated by Karl Stetter and workers from Vulcano Italy in 1986, and sequenced at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville Maryland in 1999, revealed extensive LGT between % . this bacterium and members of the archaeal domain (in particular Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyracoccus frcriosus species). Based on whole genome comparisons, it was estimated that 24% of the genetic information in this organism was acquired by genetic exchange with archaeal species, Independent analyses including periodicity analysis of the T. maritimu genomic DNA sequence, phylogenetic reconstruction based on genes that appear archaeal-like, and codon and amino acid usage, have provided additional evidence for LGT between T. maritima and the archaea. More recently, DiRuggiero and workers have identified a very recent LGT event between two genera of hyperthermophilic archaea, where a nearly identical DNA fragment of 16 kb in length flanked by insertion sequence (IS) elements, exists. Undoubtedly, additional examples of LGT will be identified as more microbial genomes are completed. For the present moment however, the genome sequence of T. maritima and other hyperthermophiles including P. furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Pyrococcus abyssi, A. fulgidus, and Aquifex aeolicus, have significantly increased out awareness of evolution being a web of life rather than a tree of life, as suggested by single gene phylogenies. In this proposal, we will aim to determine the extent of LGT across the hyperthemophiles, employing iY maritima as the model organism. A variety of biochemical techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions will allow for a detailed and thorough characterization of the extent of LGT in this species. The

  16. Response of primary producers to nutrient enrichment in a shallow estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, E.H.; Roman, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    Shallow coastal systems worldwide are exhibiting increased algal growth in response to nutrient enrichment. This study evaluates primary production patterns in an estuarine system (Bass Harbor Marsh, ME, USA) receiving low levels of anthropogenic nitrogen. Biomass, areal coverage and in situ oxygen production of green macroalgae, Ruppia Maritima, and Phytoplankton were measured over a growing season to determine net ecosystem production. Macroalgae and R. maritima exhibited seasonal biomass curves with early summer peaks; however, peak biomass of macroalgae [150 g dry weight (wt) m-2] was substantially greater that R. maritima (33 g dry wt m-2) Phytoplankton biomass, measured as chlorophyll a, was low (<1 ??g 1-1) early in the season and peaked (11 ??g 1-1) following a mid-summer decline in macroalgal biomass, suggesting a competitive interaction with macroalgae. Instantaneous net production rates varied over the growing season for all 3 primary producers. R. maritima net production ranged from near zero to 2.7 mg C g-1 dry wt h-1, with higher rates during summer and much of the seasonal variability explained by temperature. Macroalgal (0.88 to 5.0 mg C g-1 dry wt h-1) and phytoplankton (0 to 28 mg C m-3 h-1) net production did not exhibit any clear seasonal signal. Net primary production calculated on an areal basis demonstrated macroalgae's dominance in the lower basin of Bass Harbor Marsh, with peak summer rates (400 mg C m-2 h-1) greatly exceeding maximum rates for both R maritima (70 mg C m-2h-1) and phytoplankton (12 mg C m-2 h-1). When compared to other New England estuarine sites with short residence times, nutrient loading and peak green macroalgal biomass in Bass Harbor Marsh are relatively low; however, the strong dominance of opportunistic green macroalgae is a pattern that is characteristic of shallow coastal systems undergoing eutrophication.

  17. Embryos of the Viviparous Dermapteran, Arixenia esau Develop Sequentially in Two Compartments: Terminal Ovarian Follicles and the Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Tworzydlo, Waclaw; Kisiel, Elzbieta; Bilinski, Szczepan M.

    2013-01-01

    Three main reproductive strategies have been described among insects: most common oviparity, ovoviviparity and viviparity. In the latter strategy, the embryonic development takes place within the body of the mother which provides gas exchange and nutrients for embryos. Here we present the results of histological and EM analyses of the female reproductive system of the viviparous earwig, Arixenia esau, focusing on all the modifications related to the viviparity. We show that in the studied species the embryonic development consists of two “physiological phases” that take place in two clearly disparate compartments, i.e. the terminal ovarian follicle and the uterus. In both compartments the embryos are associated with synthetically active epithelial cells. We suggest that these cells are involved in the nourishment of the embryo. Our results indicate that viviparity in arixeniids is more complex than previously considered. We propose the new term “pseudoplacento-uterotrophic viviparity” for this unique two-phase reproductive strategy. PMID:23667700

  18. Embryos of the viviparous dermapteran, Arixenia esau develop sequentially in two compartments: terminal ovarian follicles and the uterus.

    PubMed

    Tworzydlo, Waclaw; Kisiel, Elzbieta; Bilinski, Szczepan M

    2013-01-01

    Three main reproductive strategies have been described among insects: most common oviparity, ovoviviparity and viviparity. In the latter strategy, the embryonic development takes place within the body of the mother which provides gas exchange and nutrients for embryos. Here we present the results of histological and EM analyses of the female reproductive system of the viviparous earwig, Arixenia esau, focusing on all the modifications related to the viviparity. We show that in the studied species the embryonic development consists of two "physiological phases" that take place in two clearly disparate compartments, i.e. the terminal ovarian follicle and the uterus. In both compartments the embryos are associated with synthetically active epithelial cells. We suggest that these cells are involved in the nourishment of the embryo. Our results indicate that viviparity in arixeniids is more complex than previously considered. We propose the new term "pseudoplacento-uterotrophic viviparity" for this unique two-phase reproductive strategy. PMID:23667700

  19. Directed Evolution of a Pyruvate Aldolase to Recognize A Long Chain Acyl Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Walters, Matthew J.; Kang, Brian D.; Anzaldi, Laura L.; Toone, Eric J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of biological catalysts for industrial scale synthetic chemistry is highly attractive, given their cost effectiveness, high specificity that obviates the need for protecting group chemistry, and the environmentally benign nature of enzymatic procedures. Here we evolve the naturally occurring 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolases from Thermatoga maritima and Escherichia coli, into enzymes that recognize a non-functionalized electrophilic substrate, 2-keto-4-hydroxyoctonoate (KHO). Using an in vivo selection based on pyruvate auxotrophy, mutations were identified that lower the KM value up to 100-fold in E. coli KDPG aldolase, and that enhance the efficiency of retro-aldol cleavage of KHO by increasing the value of kcat/KM up to 25-fold in T. maritima KDPG aldolase. These data indicate that numerous mutations distal from the active site contribute to enhanced “uniform binding” of the substrates, which is the first step in the evolution of novel catalytic activity. PMID:21944547

  20. A variable-temperature direct electrochemical study of metalloproteins from hyperthermophilic microorganisms involves in hydrogen production from pyruvate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.T.; Blamey, J.; Zhou, Z.Z.; Adams, M.W.W.

    1995-05-30

    The hyperthomophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima and the hyperthermolic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grow optimally at 80{degrees} and 100{degrees}C, respectively, by the fermentation of carbohydrates to organic acids, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. Pyruvate is a major source of reductant for H{sub 2} production during fermentation, and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), a 4Fe-type ferredoxin, and hydrogenase have been previously purified from both species. P. furiosus utilizes copper-iron-containing POR and a nickel-iron-containing hydrogenase, whereas the POR of T. maritima lacks copper and its hydrogenase lacks nickel. For all four enzymes and for the two ferredoxins, we have determined their reproduction potentials (E{degrees}` and, where possible, thermodynamic parameters associated with electron transfer {Delta}S{degrees} and {Delta}H{degrees}), using differential pulse voltammetry at temperatures ranging from 25 to 95{degrees}C. 55 refs., 7 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  2. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-11-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  3. Effect of habitat quality on diet flexibility in Barbary macaques.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Nelly; Motsch, Peggy; Delahaye, Alexia; Saintvanne, Alice; Le Flohic, Guillaume; Dupé, Sandrine; Vallet, Dominique; Qarro, Mohamed; Tattou, Mohamed Ibn; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-07-01

    Barbary macaques live in extreme temperate environments characterized by strongly seasonal resource availability. They are mainly terrestrial while foraging, harvesting food from the herbaceous layer. These monkeys are threatened mainly because of anthropogenic habitat degradation. We studied the adaptive capacities of wild groups of Barbary macaques that lived in different cedar forests undergoing varying extents of grazing pressure from domestic livestock. In all three sites, diet varied seasonally. Heavy grazing led to a significant decrease in herbaceous production and species richness. As a consequence, the monkeys' diet in this poor habitat showed a decreased plant species richness. Moreover, it incorporated fewer above-ground herbaceous resources, and a greater proportion of subterranean resources (especially hypogeous fungi and subterranean invertebrates such as earthworms, eggs and adults of earwigs, and ant's larvae) than the diet of monkeys inhabiting ungrazed forest. Cedar bark, cedar strobiles, earthworms, and earwigs were part of the monkeys' diet only in grazed forest. Monkeys in heavily grazed forest compensated for a lack of herbaceous foods by eating subterranean foods preferentially to tree and shrub products. The foods they consumed take longer to harvest and process than the seeds or leaves consumed by Barbary macaques in less heavily grazed forest habitats. Our results suggest that monkeys do differ in their diets according to the degree of habitat change induced by human activities. They also highlight the dietary flexibility of Barbary macaques as a key element that allows them to cope with degraded habitats. We later compare the dietary adjustments of Barbary macaques facing environmental change to dietary strategies of other macaques and temperate-zone primates. PMID:24573596

  4. Thermostable cellulases, and mutants thereof, capable of hydrolyzing cellulose in ionic liquid

    DOEpatents

    Sapra, Rajat; Datta, Supratim; Chen, Zhiwei; Holmes, Bradley M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2016-04-26

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an ionic liquid and a thermostable cellulose, and a method of hydrolyzing a cellulose, comprising: (a) providing a composition comprising a solution comprising an ionic liquid and a cellulose, and (b) introducing a thermostable cellulase to the solution, such that the cellulose is hydrolyzed by the cellulase. The present invention also provides for a Thermatoga maritima thermostable cellulase mutant with increased cellulase activity.

  5. Structural insights into the interaction between the bacterial flagellar motor proteins FliF and FliG.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Robert; Zhou, Hongjun; Dahlquist, Frederick W

    2012-06-26

    The binding of the soluble cytoplasmic protein FliG to the transmembrane protein FliF is one of the first interactions in the assembly of the bacterial flagellum. Once established, this interaction is integral in keeping the flagellar cytoplasmic ring, responsible for both transmission of torque and control of the rotational direction of the flagellum, anchored to the central transmembrane ring on which the flagellum is assembled. Here we isolate and characterize the interaction between the N-terminal domain of Thermotoga maritima FliG (FliG(N)) and peptides corresponding to the conserved C-terminal portion of T. maritima FliF. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other techniques, we show that the last ~40 amino acids of FliF (FliF(C)) interact strongly (upper bound K(d) in the low nanomolar range) with FliG(N). The formation of this complex causes extensive conformational changes in FliG(N). We find that T. maritima FliG(N) is homodimeric in the absence of the FliF(C) peptide but forms a heterodimeric complex with the peptide, and we show that this same change in oligomeric state occurs in full-length T. maritima FliG, as well. We relate previously observed phenotypic effects of FliF(C) mutations to our direct observation of binding. Lastly, on the basis of NMR data, we propose that the primary interaction site for FliF(C) is located on a conserved hydrophobic patch centered along helix 1 of FliG(N). These results provide new detailed information about the bacterial flagellar motor and support efforts to understand the cytoplasmic ring's precise molecular structure and mechanism of rotational switching. PMID:22670715

  6. Accumulation, distribution and cellular partitioning of mercury in several halophytes of a contaminated salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rita; Pereira, Sofia; Lima, Ana; Corticeiro, Sofia; Válega, Mónica; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando; Figueira, Etelvina

    2009-09-01

    This work evaluates the role of a plant community in mercury (Hg) stabilization and mobility in a contaminated Portuguese salt marsh. With this aim, the distribution of Hg in below and aboveground tissues, as well as the metal partitioning between cellular fractions (soluble and insoluble) in four different species (Triglochin maritima L., Juncus maritimus Lam, Sarcocornia perennis (Miller) A.J. Scott, and Halimione portulacoides (L.) Aellen) was assessed. Mercury accumulation, translocation and compartmentation between organs and cellular fractions were related to the plant species. Results showed that the degree of Hg absorption and retention was influenced both by environmental parameters and metal translocation/partitioning strategies. Different plant species presented different allocation patterns, with marked differences between monocots (T. maritima and J. maritimus) and dicots (S. perennis, H. portulacoides). Overall, the two monocots, in particular T. maritima showed higher Hg retention in the belowground organs whereas the dicots, particularly S. perennis presented a more pronounced translocation to the aboveground tissues. Considering cellular Hg partitioning, all species showed a higher Hg binding to cell walls and membranes rather than in the soluble fractions. This strategy can be related to the high degree of tolerance observed in the studied species. These results indicate that the composition of salt marsh plant communities can be very important in dictating the Hg mobility within the marsh ecosystem and in the rest of the aquatic system as well as providing important insights to future phytoremediation approaches in Hg contaminated salt marshes. PMID:19595432

  7. Part II: defining and quantifying individual and co-cultured intracellular proteomes of two thermophilic microorganisms by GeLC-MS2 and spectral counting.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Genna; Lewis, Derrick; Notey, Jaspreet; Kelly, Robert; Muddiman, David

    2010-09-01

    Probing the intracellular proteome of Thermotoga maritima and Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus in pure and co-culture affords a global investigation into the machinery and mechanisms enduring inside the bacterial thermophilic cell at the time of harvest. The second of a two part study, employing GeLC-MS(2) a variety of proteins were confidently identified with <1% false discovery rate, and spectral counts for label-free relative quantification afforded indication of the dynamic proteome as a function of environmental stimuli. Almost 25% of the T. maritima proteome and 10% of the C. saccharolyticus proteome were identified. Through comparison of growth temperatures for T. maritima, a protein associated with chemotaxis was uniquely present in the sample cultivated at the non-optimal growth temperature. It is suspected that movement was induced due to the non-optimal condition as the organism may need to migrate in the culture to locate more nutrients. The inventory of C. saccharolyticus proteins identified in these studies and attributed to spectral counting, demonstrated that two CRISPR-associated proteins had increased expression in the pure culture versus the co-culture. Further focusing on this relationship, a C. saccharolyticus phage-shock protein was identified in the co-culture expanding a scenario that the co-culture had decreased antiviral resistance and accordingly an infection-related protein was present. Alterations in growth conditions of these bacterial thermophilic microorganisms offer a glimpse into the intricacy of microbial behavior and interaction. PMID:20582400

  8. Productivity and nutrient cycling in salt marshes: Contribution to ecosystem health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Ana I.; Lillebø, Ana I.; Pardal, Miguel A.; Caçador, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the contribution of different salt marsh halophytes ( Spartina maritima, Scirpus maritimus, Halimione portulacoides, Sarcocornia fruticosa, and Sarcocornia perennis) to nutrient cycling and sequestration in warm-temperate salt marshes. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in plant organs and rhizosediment, as well as plant biomass were monitored every two months during one year. Results show that the C retained in the rhizosediment does not seem to be species or site specific. However, some halophytes seem to have a higher contribution to retain C from external sources, namely S. perennis and S. maritima. Regarding N, halophytes colonizing the upper and middle marsh areas had the highest NBPP (net belowground primary production) as well as the retention of N in the rhizosediment. Yet, excluding S. maritimus, all halophytes seem to contribute to the retention of N from external sources. The P retained in the rhizosediment does not seem to be species or site specific. Still, only S. maritima colonizing the lower marsh areas, which also had comparatively lower NBPP, seem to have a higher contribution to retain P from external sources. Additionally, it seems that there is no relation between plants sequestration capacity for nutrients and plant photosynthetic pathway. This work shows that nutrient cycling and accumulation processes by salt marsh halophytes contribute to reduce eutrophication (N and P retention) and also to reduce atmospheric CO 2 (C retention), highlighting salt marsh ecosystems services and the crucial role of halophytes in maintaining ecosystem functions and health.

  9. Improved protein identification using automated high mass measurement accuracy MALDI FT-ICR MS peptide mass fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, David M.; Peters, Eric C.; Klock, Heath; Meyers, Andrew; Brock, Ansgar

    2004-11-01

    A comparison between automated peptide mass fingerprinting systems using MALDI-TOF and MALDI FT-ICR MS is presented using 86 overexpressed proteins from Thermotoga maritima. The high mass measurement accuracy of FT-ICR MS greatly reduces the probability of an incorrect assignment of a protein in peptide mass fingerprinting by significantly decreasing the score and peptide sequence coverage of the highest ranked random protein match from the database. This improved mass accuracy led to the identification of all 86 proteins with the FT-ICR data versus 84 proteins using the TOF data against the T. maritima database. The beneficial effect of mass accuracy becomes much more evident with the addition of variable modifications and an increase in the size of the database used in the search. A search of the same data against the T. maritima database with the addition of a variable modification resulted in 77 identifications using MALDI-TOF and 84 identifications using MALDI FT-ICR MS. When searching the NCBInr database, the FT-ICR based system identified 82 of 86 proteins while the TOF based system could only identify 73. The MALDI FT-ICR based system has the further advantage of producing fewer unassigned masses in each peptide mass fingerprint, resulting in greatly reduced sequence coverage and score for the highest ranked random match and improving confidence in the correctly assigned top scoring protein. Finally, the use of rms error as a measure for instrumental mass accuracy is discussed.

  10. Genes for the Major Structural Components of Thermotogales Species' Togas Revealed by Proteomic and Evolutionary Analyses of OmpA and OmpB Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Petrus, Amanda K.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Ranjit, Chaman R.; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Noll, Kenneth M.

    2012-06-29

    The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell, often called a toga. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been identified in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (previously termed Ompα) and the porin OmpB (previously termed Ompβ). The gene encoding OmpA (ompA1) was assigned in the genome sequence to TM0477, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB) was not annotated. Here we identify the ompB gene as TM0476, determined by LC/MS/MS analysis of the native OmpB protein purified from T. maritima cells. The purified OmpB had β-sheet secondary structure as determined by circular dichroism. Analysis of the sequence of ompB product shows it has porin characteristics including a carboxy terminus anchoring motif and a porin-specific amino acid composition. Orthologs of ompB were found in the genomes of some, but not all, Thermotogales. Those without orthologs have putative analogs. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one to three OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1(TM0477) and ompA2 (TM1729), both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath.

  11. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus geosporum in European saline, sodic and gypsum soils.

    PubMed

    Landwehr, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Ulrich; Wilde, Petra; Nawrath, Kerstin; Tóth, Tibor; Biró, Borbála; Bothe, Hermann

    2002-08-01

    Plants of saline and sodic soils of the Hungarian steppe and of gypsum rock in the German Harz mountains, thus soils of high ionic strength and electric conductivity, were examined for their colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Roots of several plants of the saline and sodic soils such as Artemisia maritima, Aster tripolium or Plantago maritima are strongly colonized and show typical AMF structures (arbuscules, vesicles) whereas others like the members of the Chenopodiaceae, Salicornia europaea, Suaeda maritima or Camphorosma annua, are not. The vegetation of the gypsum rock is totally different, but several plants are also strongly colonized there. The number of spores in samples from the saline and sodic soils examined is rather variable, but high on average, although with an apparent low species diversity. Spore numbers in the soil adjacent to the roots of plants often, but not always, correlate with the degree of AMF colonization of the plants. As in German salt marshes [Hildebrandt et al. (2001)], the dominant AMF in the Hungarian saline and sodic soils is Glomus geosporum. All these isolates provided nearly identical restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of spore DNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cloning and sequencing of several PCR products of the ITS regions indicated that ecotypes of the G. geosporum/ Glomus caledonium clade might exist at the different habitats. A phylogenetic dendrogram constructed from the ITS or 5.8S rDNA sequences was nearly identical to the one published for 18S rDNA data (Schwarzott et al. 2001). It is tempting to speculate that specific ecotypes may be particularly adapted to the peculiar saline or sodic conditions in such soils. They could have an enormous potential in conferring salt resistance to plants. PMID:12189475

  12. Prokaryotes in salt marsh sediments of Ria de Aveiro: Effects of halophyte vegetation on abundance and diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Vanessa; Santos, Ana L.; Aguiar, Claúdia; Santos, Luisa; Salvador, Ângelo C.; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Silva, Helena; Rocha, Sílvia M.; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of monospecific colonization of sediment stands by Spartina maritima or Halimione portulacoides on benthic prokaryote assemblages in a salt marsh located in Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). The distribution of Bacteria, Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sediments with monospecific plant stands and in unvegetated sediments was characterized by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH). Total prokaryote abundance (0.4 × 109-1.7 × 109 cells gdw-1) was highest in sediments from the surface layer. The domain Bacteria comprised approximately 40% of total prokaryote communities with the highest percentages occurring in the surface layer. Archaeal cells corresponded to an average of 25% of total prokaryote population, with higher abundance in the vegetation banks, and displaying homogeneous vertical distribution. The relative abundance of SRB represented approximately 3% of total 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) stained cells at unvegetated sediment and H. portulacoides stand and 7% at S. maritima stand. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC-ToFMS) was used to analyse the volatile and semi-volatile fraction of root exudates. A total of 171 compounds were identified and Principal Component Analysis showed a clear separation between the chemical composition (volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds) of the exudates of the two plants. The patterns of vertical distribution and differences in the proportion of SRB and Archaea in the prokaryote communities developing in sediments colonized by Spartina maritima or Halimione portulacoides suggest the existence of plant-specific interactions between halophyte vegetation and estuarine sediment bacteria in Ria de Aveiro salt marshes, exerted via sediment lithology and root-derived exudates.

  13. Effects of migratory geese on plant communities of an Alaskan salt marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zacheis, A.; Hupp, J.W.; Ruess, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    1. We studied the effects of lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis) on two salt marsh plant communities in Cook Inlet, Alaska, a stopover area used during spring migration. From 1995 to 1997 we compared plant species composition and biomass on plots where geese were excluded from feeding with paired plots where foraging could occur. 2. Foraging intensity was low (650-1930 goose-days km-2) compared to other goose-grazing systems. 3. Canada geese fed mainly on above-ground shoots of Triglochin maritimum, Puccinellia spp. and Carex ramenskii, whereas the majority of the snow goose diet consisted of below-ground tissues of Plantago maritima and Triglochin maritimum. 4. Plant communities responded differently to goose herbivory. In the sedge meadow community, where feeding was primarily on above-ground shoots, there was no effect of grazing on the dominant species Carex ramenskii and Triglochin maritimum. In the herb meadow community, where snow geese fed on Plantago maritima roots and other below-ground tissues, there was a difference in the relative abundance of plant species between treatments. Biomass of Plantago maritima and Potentilla egedii was lower on grazed plots compared with exclosed, whereas biomass of Carex ramenskii was greater on grazed plots. There was no effect of herbivory on total standing crop biomass in either community. The variable effect of herbivory on Carex ramenskii between communities suggests that plant neighbours and competitive interactions are important factors in a species' response to herbivory. In addition, the type of herbivory (above- or below-ground) was important in determining plant community response to herbivory. 5. Litter accumulation was reduced in grazed areas compared with exclosed in both communities. Trampling of the previous year's litter into the soil surface by geese incorporated more litter into soils in grazed areas. 6. This study illustrates that even light herbivore

  14. Opening a can of centipedes: new insights into mechanisms of body segmentation.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Guillaume; Oates, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    The search for a common developmental genetic mechanism of body segmentation appears to become more difficult, and more interesting, as new segmented organisms are added to the roster. Recent work in this journal by Brena and Akam on segmentation of the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima, an arthropod distantly related to the standard insect models, contains developmental and evolutionary surprises that highlight the importance of a wider sampling of phyla.See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/11/112. PMID:24289333

  15. Traditional medicine in health care.

    PubMed

    Sayed, M D

    1980-03-01

    The state of research on plants used in traditional medicine and its development in Egypt is indicated by the number of scientific institutions devoted to this problem: Universities, the National Research Centre, the Desert Institute and the Horticulture Department of the Ministry of Agriculture. Moreover, the use of certain medicinal plants has been "industrialised', e.g., Ammi visnaga, Cymbopogon proximus, Nigella sativa and Aloe vera. Other plants are under investigation: Urginea maritima, Phytolacca americana and Euphorbia sp. (known for its claimed antitumour properties), Glycyrrhiza glabra, Cynara scolymus and Solanum laciniatum. PMID:7464176

  16. Valve, compressor contracts awarded for Western Hemisphere projects

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-19

    Major valve and compressor contracts have been let for projects in the Western Hemisphere. Petrobras has awarded Nuovo Pignone, Florence, a $10.5 million contract to supply 400 valves for the 1,975-mile natural-gas pipeline being constructed from Bolivia into Brazil. Additionally, Brazilian company Maritima Petroleo and TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., Calgary, have awarded Nuovo Pignone separate contracts to supply turbocompressor packages. The Brazilian contract is for offshore Campos Basin; the Canadian, for a major expansion of TCPL`s system delivering natural gas out of Alberta. The paper discusses the Bolivia-Brazil pipeline, compressor orders, and the companies.

  17. Recombinant expression and purification of "virus-like" bacterial encapsulin protein cages.

    PubMed

    Rurup, W Frederik; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Koay, Melissa S T

    2015-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules and organelles, the rate of migration can be used as a tool for purification. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of recently discovered virus-like assemblies called bacterial encapsulins from Thermotoga maritima and Brevibacterium linens. PMID:25358773

  18. Structure of Csm2 elucidates the relationship between small subunits of CRISPR-Cas effector complexes.

    PubMed

    Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-05-01

    Type I and type III CRISPR-Cas effector complexes share similar architecture and have homologous key subunits. However, the relationship between the so-called small subunits of these complexes remains a contentious issue. Here, it is shown that the recently solved structure of Thermotoga maritima Csm2 represents a dimer with the extensive structure swapping between monomers. Unswapping the structure generates a compact globular monomer which shares similar structure and surface properties with Cmr5, the small subunit of a related Cmr complex. Detailed analysis of available structures of small subunits reveals that they all have a common fold suggesting their common origin. PMID:27091242

  19. Antineoplastic agents, 301. An investigation of the Amaryllidaceae genus Hymenocallis.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Pettit, G R; Groszek, G; Backhaus, R A; Doubek, D L; Barr, R J; Meerow, A W

    1995-05-01

    Seven species (and one cultivated variety) of Hymenocallis (Amaryllidaceae) and the related Pancratium maritima, representing a broad geographical selection, were investigated as sources of pancratistatin [1] now undergoing preclinical development as an anticancer agent. Pancratistatin [1] was found to be a constituent of H. speciosa (Singapore), H. variegated (Singapore), H. pedalis (Seychelles), H. expansa (Bermuda), H. sonoranensis (Mexico), and P. maritimum (Israel). Only two species of Hymenocallis failed to yield one or more of the related cell-growth inhibitory isocarbostyrils such as narciclasine [3a], 7-deoxynarciclasine [3b], and 7-deoxy-trans-dihydronarciclasine [2]. PMID:7623049

  20. Antioxidant activity of wild plants collected in Beni-Sueif governorate, Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abouzid, S; Elshahaat, A; Ali, S; Choudhary, M I

    2008-10-01

    Antioxidant activity of a selection of commonly occurring wild plants growing in Beni-Sueif governorate, Upper Egypt, has been tested. The plants selected are Tamarix nilotica, Ambrosia maritima, Zygophyllum coccenium, Conyza dioscoridis, Chenopodium ambrosioides, and Calotropis procera. The in vitro antioxidant assays used in this study were 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, superoxide anion scavenging activity and iron chelating activity. Extracts prepared from the leaves and flowers of Tamarix nilotica have shown the highest antioxidant activity in the three kinds of assay. PMID:22504722

  1. Induced Changes in the Amino Acid Profile of Biomphalaria alexandrina Molluscan Host to Schistosoma mansoni Using Sublethal Concentrations of Selected Plant Molluscicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanad Soliman, Mahmoud; El-Ansary, Afaf

    Amino acid profiles of control and Solanum nigrum, Ambrosia maritima, Thymelaea hirsute, Sinapis arvensis, Peganum haramala and Callistemon lanceolatus-treated Biomphalaria alexandrina snails were investigated in a trial to correlate the amino acid profile of treated snails to their previously reported molluscicidal and biological effects. Amino acid profiles of the snails were greatly manipulated with the treatment of dry powdered sublethal concentrations of the six studied plant molluscicides. The disturbed amino acid profiles of treated snails were discussed in relation to the decrease in snail's egg laying capacity, reduction of their compatibility for the development of the schistosome larvae and cercarial penetration of mammalian skin.

  2. Remote sensing of biomass of salt marsh vegetation in France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, M. F.; Klemas, V.; Levasseur, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data (gathered using a hand-held radiometer) and harvest data were collected from four salt marsh vegetation types in Brittany, France, to develop equations predicting live aerial biomass from spectral measurements. Remote sensing estimates of biomass of the general salt marsh community (GSM) and of Spartina alterniflora can be obtained throughout the growing season if separate biomass prediction equations are formulated for different species mixtures (for the GSM) and for different canopy types (for S. alterniflora). Results suggest that remote sensing will not be useful for predicting Halimione portulacoides biomass, but can be used to estimate Puccinellia maritima biomass early in the growing season.

  3. Differential ant exclusion from canopies shows contrasting top-down effects on community structure.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Laia; Piñol, J; Barrientos, J A; Espadaler, X

    2016-01-01

    Predators have far-reaching effects on communities by triggering top-down trophic cascades that influence ecosystem functioning. Omnivory and intraguild interactions between predators give rise to reticulate food webs and may either strengthen or dampen trophic cascades depending on context. Disentangling the effects of multiple predator species is therefore crucial for predicting the influence of predators on community structure. We focused on ants as dominant generalist predators in arthropod communities and set up a differential ant exclusion from canopies to examine its effects on assemblage species composition and densities of five arthropod groups (psocopterans, aphids, spiders, heteropterans and beetles). We coupled a glue band with tubes allowing only the ant Lasius grandis to reach the canopies to isolate its effect from the rest of crawling predators (ants, earwigs) and compared it against a full exclusion and a control. L. grandis alone had widespread effects on assemblage species composition, with contrasting species-specific responses within groups, where some species affected by L. grandis presence were not further affected by the presence of the whole crawling predator assemblage, and vice versa. Overall, L. grandis caused two- to threefold decreases of generalist predators and a threefold increase of aphids. However, it lacked further top-down effects on primary consumers, which only emerged when all crawling predators were present. This differential exclusion demonstrates the distinctive and widespread intraguild effects on community structure of a single ant species that contrast with the top-down effects exerted by the whole crawling predator assemblage. PMID:26376660

  4. Short-term benefits, but transgenerational costs of maternal loss in an insect with facultative maternal care.

    PubMed

    Thesing, Julia; Kramer, Jos; Koch, Lisa K; Meunier, Joël

    2015-10-22

    A lack of parental care is generally assumed to entail substantial fitness costs for offspring that ultimately select for the maintenance of family life across generations. However, it is unknown whether these costs arise when parental care is facultative, thus questioning their fundamental importance in the early evolution of family life. Here, we investigated the short-term, long-term and transgenerational effects of maternal loss in the European earwig Forficula auricularia, an insect with facultative post-hatching maternal care. We showed that maternal loss did not influence the developmental time and survival rate of juveniles, but surprisingly yielded adults of larger body and forceps size, two traits associated with fitness benefits. In a cross-breeding/cross-fostering experiment, we then demonstrated that maternal loss impaired the expression of maternal care in adult offspring. Interestingly, the resulting transgenerational costs were not only mediated by the early-life experience of tending mothers, but also by inherited, parent-of-origin-specific effects expressed in juveniles. Orphaned females abandoned their juveniles for longer and fed them less than maternally-tended females, while foster mothers defended juveniles of orphaned females less well than juveniles of maternally-tended females. Overall, these findings reveal the key importance of transgenerational effects in the early evolution of family life. PMID:26490790

  5. Insect phylogenomics: results, problems and the impact of matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Harald O; Meusemann, Karen; Wipfler, Benjamin; Schütte, Kai; Beutel, Rolf; Misof, Bernhard

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we investigated the relationships among insect orders with a main focus on Polyneoptera (lower Neoptera: roaches, mantids, earwigs, grasshoppers, etc.), and Paraneoptera (thrips, lice, bugs in the wide sense). The relationships between and within these groups of insects are difficult to resolve because only few informative molecular and morphological characters are available. Here, we provide the first phylogenomic expressed sequence tags data ('EST': short sub-sequences from a c(opy) DNA sequence encoding for proteins) for stick insects (Phasmatodea) and webspinners (Embioptera) to complete published EST data. As recent EST datasets are characterized by a heterogeneous distribution of available genes across taxa, we use different rationales to optimize the data matrix composition. Our results suggest a monophyletic origin of Polyneoptera and Eumetabola (Paraneoptera + Holometabola). However, we identified artefacts of tree reconstruction (human louse Pediculus humanus assigned to Odonata (damselflies and dragonflies) or Holometabola (insects with a complete metamorphosis); mayfly genus Baetis nested within Neoptera), which were most probably rooted in a data matrix composition bias due to the inclusion of sequence data of entire proteomes. Until entire proteomes are available for each species in phylogenomic analyses, this potential pitfall should be carefully considered. PMID:22628473

  6. Surveillance of Listeria monocytogenes in human and environmental specimens in Nova Scotia, 1974 to 1981.

    PubMed

    Embil, J A; Ewan, E P; MacDonald, S W

    1984-01-01

    We examined specimens for L. monocytogenes using the "cold enrichment" technique of Gray et al. (J. Bacteriol., 55: 471, 1948) and a nalidixic agar plate (Ann. Inst. Pasteur 111: 90, 1966). Between 1974 and May 1981, we isolated L. monocytogenes from four of 5,255 specimens (rectal, vaginal and placental swabs; blood; spinal fluid; semen; necropsy material) which came from eight human populations (neonates, children, adult men, and pregnant and nonpregnant women) and from 161 animals. Three of the isolated strains were type 1, and they came from a newborn born at 32 weeks' gestation, that child's mother, and another woman who had recently delivered. The fourth (type 4b) came from a newborn twin born at 36 1/2 weeks' gestation. In June through October 1981, in 529 specimens, we isolated L. monocytogenes type 1/2 from two of four larvae tested (four earwigs and five slugs were all negative) and from three of 27 samples of fresh chicken liver (however, 18 samples of coleslaw were negative). At the same time, we isolated L. monocytogenes (not yet typed) from a rectal swab from one of 112 dogs examined. Rectal swabs from 107 cats were negative, as were vaginal swabs from 144 women and urine samples from 108 newborns. PMID:6442655

  7. Parent–offspring conflict and the genetic trade-offs shaping parental investment

    PubMed Central

    Kölliker, Mathias; Boos, Stefan; Wong, Janine W.Y.; Röllin, Lilian; Stucki, Dimitri; Raveh, Shirley; Wu, Min; Meunier, Joël

    2015-01-01

    The genetic conflict between parents and their offspring is a cornerstone of kin selection theory and the gene-centred view of evolution, but whether it actually occurs in natural systems remains an open question. Conflict operates only if parenting is driven by genetic trade-offs between offspring performance and the parent's ability to raise additional offspring, and its expression critically depends on the shape of these trade-offs. Here we investigate the occurrence and nature of genetic conflict in an insect with maternal care, the earwig Forficula auricularia. Specifically, we test for a direct response to experimental selection on female future reproduction and correlated responses in current offspring survival, developmental rate and growth. The results demonstrate genetic trade-offs that differ in shape before and after hatching. Our study not only provides direct evidence for parent–offspring conflict but also highlights that conflict is not inevitable and critically depends on the genetic trade-offs shaping parental investment. PMID:25880586

  8. Insect phylogenomics: results, problems and the impact of matrix composition

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Harald O.; Meusemann, Karen; Wipfler, Benjamin; Schütte, Kai; Beutel, Rolf; Misof, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationships among insect orders with a main focus on Polyneoptera (lower Neoptera: roaches, mantids, earwigs, grasshoppers, etc.), and Paraneoptera (thrips, lice, bugs in the wide sense). The relationships between and within these groups of insects are difficult to resolve because only few informative molecular and morphological characters are available. Here, we provide the first phylogenomic expressed sequence tags data (‘EST’: short sub-sequences from a c(opy) DNA sequence encoding for proteins) for stick insects (Phasmatodea) and webspinners (Embioptera) to complete published EST data. As recent EST datasets are characterized by a heterogeneous distribution of available genes across taxa, we use different rationales to optimize the data matrix composition. Our results suggest a monophyletic origin of Polyneoptera and Eumetabola (Paraneoptera + Holometabola). However, we identified artefacts of tree reconstruction (human louse Pediculus humanus assigned to Odonata (damselflies and dragonflies) or Holometabola (insects with a complete metamorphosis); mayfly genus Baetis nested within Neoptera), which were most probably rooted in a data matrix composition bias due to the inclusion of sequence data of entire proteomes. Until entire proteomes are available for each species in phylogenomic analyses, this potential pitfall should be carefully considered. PMID:22628473

  9. Diet of western Burrowing Owls wintering in southern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Littles, C.J.; Williford, D.; Skoruppa, M.K.; Woodin, M.C.; Hickman, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    Winter diets of the western Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) are little known. We determined the diet of western Burrowing Owls wintering in southern Texas by analyzing the contents of 182 pellets collected over four winters (1999-2000, 2001-2002, 2002-2003, and 2003-2004) in three habitat types (agricultural, mainland grassland, and barrier island). Remains of a total of 7476 prey items were recovered, 98% of which were arthropods. Gryllidae (crickets) formed the largest component (50%) of the prey, followed by lepidopteran larvae (13%), beetles (8%), spiders (7%), and earwigs (6%). Although vertebrates, primarily small mammals and birds, represented only 2% of prey items by number, they represented most (71%) of the biomass. Northern pygmy mice (Baiomys taylori) and fulvous harvest mice (Reithrodontomys fulveccens) were the two most frequently consumed vertebrate species. In all habitats, arthropods, especially orthopterans, were the primary prey item by number, whereas vertebrates, primarily small mammals, were the most important by biomass. Greater consumption of arthropods by Burrowing Owls in agricultural areas may be a factor contributing to owl use of these highly altered environments. ?? 2007 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  10. Conformational Flexibility and Peptide Interaction of the Translocation ATPase SecA

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jochen; Rapoport, Tom A.; Harvard-Med

    2010-09-21

    The SecA ATPase forms a functional complex with the protein-conducting SecY channel to translocate polypeptides across the bacterial cell membrane. SecA recognizes the translocation substrate and catalyzes its unidirectional movement through the SecY channel. The recent crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima SecA-SecYEG complex shows the ATPase in a conformation where the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) have closed around a bound ADP-BeFx complex and SecA's polypeptide-binding clamp is shut. Here, we present the crystal structure of T. maritima SecA in isolation, determined in its ADP-bound form at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. SecA alone has a drastically different conformation in which the nucleotide-binding pocket between NBD1 and NBD2 is open and the preprotein cross-linking domain has rotated away from both NBDs, thereby opening the polypeptide-binding clamp. To investigate how this clamp binds polypeptide substrates, we also determined a structure of Bacillus subtilis SecA in complex with a peptide at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. This structure shows that the peptide augments the highly conserved {beta}-sheet at the back of the clamp. Taken together, these structures suggest a mechanism by which ATP hydrolysis can lead to polypeptide translocation.