Sample records for east molokai volcano

  1. Evaluation of Ground-Water Resources From Available Data, 1992, East Molokai Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, Stephen S.

    1995-01-01

    Available ground-water data for East Molokai Volcano consist of well-construction information and records of ground-water pumpage, water levels, and chloride concentrations. Ground-water pumpage records are available for ten wells. Seventeen long-term (10 years or more) records of water-level and/or chloride concentration are available for eleven wells; however, only seven of these records are for observation wells. None of the available data show significant long-term changes in water level or chloride concentration; however, short-term changes due to variations in the quantity of water pumped, and rainfall are evident. Evaluation of the historical distribution and rates of ground-water pumpage, and variations in water levels and chloride concentrations is constrained by the scanty distribution of spatial and temporal data. Data show a range in water levels from greater than 850 feet above mean sea level in wells located in the windward valley of Waikolu to about 10 feet in wells located east of Kualapuu to 1 to 5 feet in the wells located along the south shore of East Molokai Volcano. An accurate contour map of water levels and chloride concentrations at the surface of the basal-water body cannot be constructed for any time period. Because water-level and chloride data are not collected at regular time intervals, many long-term records are incomplete. Information on the variation in chloride concentration with depth through the freshwater part of the basal-water body and into the zone of transition between freshwater and saltwater does not exist.

  2. The distribution of geochemical heterogeneities in the source of Hawaiian shield lavas as revealed by a transect across the strike of the Loa and Kea spatial trends: East Molokai to West Molokai to Penguin Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangping; Huang, Shichun; Frey, Frederick A.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Abouchami, Wafa; Clague, David A.; Cousens, Brian; Moore, James G.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    2014-05-01

    An important feature of <2 Ma Hawaiian volcanoes is that they define two sub-parallel spatial trends known as the Loa- and Kea-trends. On the Island of Hawaii, the <1.5 Ma shield lavas on the Loa and Kea spatial trends have distinctive geochemical characteristics that are designated as Loa-type and Kea-type. These geochemical differences are clearly expressed in Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb isotopic ratios, major element contents, and ratios of incompatible elements. They are interpreted to reflect varying proportions of sediment, basalt, gabbro and peridotite in subducted oceanic lithosphere. Pb isotopic ratios indicate that the Loa-type component reflects ancient subduction, >2.5 Ga, whereas the Kea-type component reflects younger subduction, <1.5 Ga. To evaluate the temporal persistence of these geochemical differences in the source of Hawaiian shield lavas, we analyzed lavas from the ˜1.5 to 2 Ma Molokai Island volcanoes, East and West Molokai, and the adjacent submarine Penguin Bank. The three volcanoes form a nearly east-west trend that crosscuts the Loa and Kea spatial trends at a high angle; consequently we can determine if these older lavas are Kea-type in the east and Loa-type in the west. All lavas collected from the subaerial flanks of East Molokai, a Kea-trend volcano, have Kea-type geochemical characteristics; however, dive samples collected from Wailau landslide blocks, probably samples of the East Molokai shield that are older than those exposed on the subaerial flanks, include basalt with Loa-type geochemical features. Shield lavas from West Molokai and Penguin Bank, both on the Loa-trend, are dominantly Loa-type, but samples with Kea-type compositions also erupted at these Loa-trend volcanoes. The Loa-trend volcanoes, Mahukona, West Molokai, Penguin Bank, and Koolau, have also erupted lavas with Kea-type geochemical characteristics, and the Kea-trend volcanoes, Mauna Kea, Kohala, Haleakala, and East Molokai, have erupted lavas with Loa-type geochemical characteristics. The presence of both Loa- and Kea-type lavas in a volcano provides constraints on the distribution of geochemical heterogeneities in the source of Hawaiian shield basalts. Two plausible models are: (1) source components with Loa- and Kea-type geochemical characteristics are present in the sources of all <2 Ma shields, but the Kea-to-Loa proportion is higher beneath Kea-trend than Loa-trend volcanoes, or (2) the magma source contains a uniform proportion of Loa- and Kea-type components, but these components have different solidi. Magmas derived from the low-temperature regions of the source preferentially sample the component with the lower solidus temperature and form Loa-type lavas. In contrast, magmas derived from the relatively high-temperature regions of the source sample both low and high solidus components in the source and form Kea-type lavas. This model is supported by the linear correlations between isotopic ratios and calculated temperatures of estimated primary magmas.

  3. Penguin Bank: A Loa-Trend Hawaiian Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Clague, D. A.; Cousens, B.; Frey, F. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes along the Hawaiian Ridge from Molokai Island in the northwest to the Big Island in the southeast, define two parallel trends of volcanoes known as the Loa and Kea spatial trends. In general, lavas erupted along these two trends have distinctive geochemical characteristics that have been used to define the spatial distribution of geochemical heterogeneities in the Hawaiian plume (e.g., Abouchami et al., 2005). These geochemical differences are well established for the volcanoes forming the Big Island. The longevity of the Loa- Kea geochemical differences can be assessed by studying East and West Molokai volcanoes and Penguin Bank which form a volcanic ridge perpendicular to the Loa and Kea spatial trends. Previously we showed that East Molokai volcano (~1.5 Ma) is exclusively Kea-like and that West Molokai volcano (~1.8 Ma) includes lavas that are both Loa- and Kea-like (Xu et al., 2005 and 2007).The submarine Penguin Bank (~2.2 Ma), probably an independent volcano constructed west of West Molokai volcano, should be dominantly Loa-like if the systematic Loa and Kea geochemical differences were present at ~2.2 Ma. We have studied 20 samples from Penguin Bank including both submarine and subaerially-erupted lavas recovered by dive and dredging. All lavas are tholeiitic basalt representing shield-stage lavas. Trace element ratios, such as Sr/Nb and Zr/Nb, and isotopic ratios of Sr and Nd clearly are Loa-like. On an ?Nd-?Hf plot, Penguin Bank lavas fall within the field defined by Mauna Loa lavas. Pb isotopic data lie near the Loa-Kea boundary line defined by Abouchami et al. (2005). In conclusion, we find that from NE to SW, i.e., perpendicular to the Loa and Kea spatial trend, there is a shift from Kea-like East Molokai lavas to Loa-like Penguin Bank lavas with the intermediate West Molokai volcano having lavas with both Loa- and Kea-like geochemical features. Therefore, the Loa and Kea geochemical dichotomy exhibited by Big Island volcanoes existed at ~2.2 Ma when the Molokai Island volcanoes formed and has persisted until the present. References: Abouchami et al., 2005 Nature, 434:851-856 Xu et al., 2005 G3, doi: 10.1029/2004GC000830 Xu et al., 2007 G3, doi: 10.1029/2006GC001554

  4. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Akutan Volcano east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Power, John A.; Richter, Donlad H.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is a 1100-meter-high stratovolcano on Akutan Island in the east-central Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The volcano is located about 1238 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 56 kilometers east of Dutch Harbor/Unalaska. Eruptive activity has occurred at least 27 times since historical observations were recorded beginning in the late 1700?s. Recent eruptions produced only small amounts of fine volcanic ash that fell primarily on the upper flanks of the volcano. Small amounts of ash fell on the Akutan Harbor area during eruptions in 1911, 1948, 1987, and 1989. Plumes of volcanic ash are the primary hazard associated with eruptions of Akutan Volcano and are a major hazard to all aircraft using the airfield at Dutch Harbor or approaching Akutan Island. Eruptions similar to historical Akutan eruptions should be anticipated in the future. Although unlikely, eruptions larger than those of historical time could generate significant amounts of volcanic ash, fallout, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that would be hazardous to life and property on all sectors of the volcano and other parts of the island, but especially in the major valleys that head on the volcano flanks. During a large eruption an ash cloud could be produced that may be hazardous to aircraft using the airfield at Cold Bay and the airspace downwind from the volcano. In the event of a large eruption, volcanic ash fallout could be relatively thick over parts of Akutan Island and volcanic bombs could strike areas more than 10 kilometers from the volcano.

  5. The East Java mud volcano (2006 to present): An earthquake or drilling trigger?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J. Davies; Maria Brumm; Michael Manga; Rudi Rubiandini; Richard Swarbrick; Mark Tingay

    2008-01-01

    On May 29th 2006 a mud volcano, later to be named ‘Lusi’, started to form in East Java. It is still active and has displaced >30,000 people. The trigger mechanism for this, the world's largest and best known active mud volcano, is still the subject of debate. Trigger mechanisms considered here are (a) the May 27th 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake, (b)

  6. Lava Flow From Fissure Eruption on Kilauea Volcano's East Rift Zone

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A new fissure eruption in September 2011 on the east flank of Pu‘u ‘?‘? on K?lauea Volcano's east rift zone reminds us of the need to be aware of our ever-changing volcanic environment on Hawai‘i Island. The fissure—the source of the lava flow—is sh...

  7. Extreme alteration by hyperacidic brines at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia: II

    E-print Network

    Long, Bernard

    Extreme alteration by hyperacidic brines at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia: II, Yogyakarta Office, Java, Indonesia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 April and Banyu Pahit river, East Java, Indonesia, induce an intense alteration on their magmatic host rock

  8. Crustal structure of east central Oregon: relation between Newberry Volcano and regional crustal structure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Catchings; W. D. Mooney

    1988-01-01

    A 180-km-long seismic refraction transect from the eastern High Cascades, across Newberry Volcano, to the eastern High Lava Plains is used to investigate the subvolcanic crustal and upper mantle velocity structure there. Near-surface volcanic flows and sedimentary debris (1.6-4.7 km\\/s), ranging from 3 to 5 km in thickness, overlie subvolcanic Basin and Range structures. East and west of Newberry Volcano,

  9. Crustal structure of east central Oregon: relation between Newberry Volcano and regional crustal structure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Catchings; W. D. Mooney

    1988-01-01

    A 180-km-long seismic refraction transect from the eastern High Cascades, across Newberry Volcano, to the eastern High Lava Plains is used to investigate the subvolcanic crustal and upper mantle velocity structure there. Near-surface volcanic flows and sedimentary debris (1.6--4.7 km\\/s), ranging from 3 to 5 km in thickness, overlie subvolcanic Basin and Range structures. East and west of Newberry Volcano,

  10. New geophysical views of Mt.Melbourne Volcano (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armadillo, E.; Gambetta, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Corr, H.; Bozzo, E.

    2009-05-01

    Mt. Melbourne volcano is located along the transition between the Transantarctic Mountains and the West Antarctic Rift System. Recent volcanic activity is suggested by the occurrence of blankets of pyroclastic pumice and scoria fall around the eastern and southern flanks of Mt Melbourne and by pyroclastic layers interbedded with the summit snows. Geothermal activity in the crater area of Mount Melbourne may be linked to the intrusion of dykes within the last 200 years. Geophysical networks suggest that Mount Melbourne is a quiescent volcano, possibly characterised by slow internal dynamics. During the 2002-2003 Italian Antarctic campaign a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was performed within the TIMM (Tectonics and Interior of Mt. Melbourne area) project. This helicopter-borne survey was flown at low-altitude and in drape-mode configuration (305 m above terrain) with a line separation less than 500 m. Our new high-resolution magnetic maps reveal the largely ice-covered magmatic and tectonic patters in the Mt. Melbourne volcano area. Additionally, in the frame of the UK-Italian ISODYN-WISE project (2005-06), an airborne ice-sounding radar survey was flown. We combine the sub-ice topography with images and models of the interior of Mt. Melbourne volcano, as derived from the high resolution aeromagnetic data and land gravity data. Our new geophysical maps and models also provide a new tool to study the regional setting of the volcano. In particular we re-assess whether there is geophysical evidence for coupling between strike-slip faulting, the Terror Rift, and Mount Melbourne volcano.

  11. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program is the continuous series of international volcanological field schools organized in partnership with the Kamchatka State University. Each year more than 40 students and young scientists participate in our annual field trips to Katmai, Alaska and Mutnovsky, Kamchatka.

  12. New K-Ar age determinations of Kilimanjaro volcano in the North Tanzanian diverging rift, East Africa.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    insu-00304458,version1-23Jul2008 #12;1. Introduction The Eastern Branch of the East African Rift System local stress field. Keywords: Kilimanjaro, East African Rift, K-Ar dating, volcanic history, Tanzania 2New K-Ar age determinations of Kilimanjaro volcano in the North Tanzanian diverging rift, East

  13. Stratigraphic framework of Holocene volcaniclastic deposits, Akutan Volcano, east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc, but until recently little was known about its history and eruptive character. Following a brief but sustained period of intense seismic activity in March 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory began investigating the geology of the volcano and evaluating potential volcanic hazards that could affect residents of Akutan Island. During these studies new information was obtained about the Holocene eruptive history of the volcano on the basis of stratigraphic studies of volcaniclastic deposits and radiocarbon dating of associated buried soils and peat. A black, scoria-bearing, lapilli tephra, informally named the 'Akutan tephra,' is up to 2 m thick and is found over most of the island, primarily east of the volcano summit. Six radiocarbon ages on the humic fraction of soil A-horizons beneath the tephra indicate that the Akutan tephra was erupted approximately 1611 years B.P. At several locations the Akutan tephra is within a conformable stratigraphic sequence of pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits that are all part of the same eruptive sequence. The thickness, widespread distribution, and conformable stratigraphic association with overlying pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits indicate that the Akutan tephra likely records a major eruption of Akutan Volcano that may have formed the present summit caldera. Noncohesive lahar and pyroclastic-flow deposits that predate the Akutan tephra occur in the major valleys that head on the volcano and are evidence for six to eight earlier Holocene eruptions. These eruptions were strombolian to subplinian events that generated limited amounts of tephra and small pyroclastic flows that extended only a few kilometers from the vent. The pyroclastic flows melted snow and ice on the volcano flanks and formed lahars that traveled several kilometers down broad, formerly glaciated valleys, reaching the coast as thin, watery, hyperconcentrated flows or water floods. Slightly cohesive lahars in Hot Springs valley and Long valley could have formed from minor flank collapses of hydrothermally altered volcanic bedrock. These lahars may be unrelated to eruptive activity.

  14. Shaded Relief with Height as Color, Virunga and Nyiragongo Volcanoes and the East African Rift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Volcanic, tectonic, erosional and sedimentary landforms are all evident in this comparison of two elevation models of a region along the East African Rift at Lake Kivu. The area shown covers parts of Congo, Rwanda and Uganda.

    These two images show exactly the same area. The image on the left was created using the best global topographic data set previously available, the U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30. In contrast, the much more detailed image on the right was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which collected enough measurements to map 80 percent of Earth's landmass at this level of precision. Elevation is color coded, progressing from green at the lower elevations through yellow to brown at the higher elevations. A false sun in the northwest (upper left) creates topographic shading.

    Lake Kivu is shown as black in the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission version (southwest corner). It lies within the East African Rift, an elongated tectonic pull-apart depression in Earth's crust. The rift extends to the northeast as a smooth lava- and sediment-filled trough. Two volcanic complexes are seen in the rift. The one closer to the lake is the Nyiragongo volcano, which erupted in January 2002, sending lava toward the lake shore and through the city of Goma. East of the rift, even more volcanoes are seen. These are the Virunga volcano chain, which is the home of the endangered mountain gorillas. Note that the terrain surrounding the volcanoes is much smoother than the eroding mountains that cover most of this view, such that topography alone is a good indicator of the extent of the lava flows. But this clear only at the higher spatial resolution of the shuttle mission's data set.

    For some parts of the globe, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission measurements are 30 times more precise than previously available topographical information, according to NASA scientists. Mission data will be a welcome resource for national and local governments, scientists, commercial enterprises, and members of the public alike. The applications are as diverse as earthquake and volcano studies, flood control, transportation, urban and regional planning, aviation, recreation, and communications. The data's military applications include mission planning and rehearsal, modeling, and simulation.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11,2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect 3-D measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Size: 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude (about 111 x 111 kilometers or 69 x 69 miles) Location: 1.5 degrees South latitude, 29.5 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image: Elevation data, colored height with shaded relief Original Data Resolution: SRTM 1 arcsecond (about 30 meters or 98 feet), GTOPO30 no greater than 30 arcseconds (about 925 meters or 3000 feet) Date Acquired: February 2000 (SRTM), Unknown (GTOPO30)

  15. Evolution and dynamics of magmatic processes below Gede volcano, East-Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimer, Daniel; Costa, Fidel

    2014-05-01

    Subduction-zone volcanism produces a large variety of compositions and eruption styles, but silica-rich explosive eruptions from arc volcanoes are those that pose the most direct threat for those living on and around the volcanoes. The little known Gede volcano (East-Java, Indonesia) is a composite arc-volcano showing evidences of recurrent silicic explosive eruptions and it is a hazard to its 1 million residences settled on its flank also to the two most populated neighboring metropolises: Jakarta and Bandung. Here we present the results of a detailed petrological and geochemical study of Gede's deposits to untangle its magmatic evolution, the key magma reservoir processes, and try to use this information to better anticipate possible future eruptions at Gede. After field-work and dating of the main deposits we identified 5 pyroclastic units ranging from basaltic andesite to dacite, and of eruption ages from about 1 ky to > 45 ky. Bulk-rock major and trace element compositions can be explained as a combination of fractional crystallization and magma mixing/mingling. Crystallization trends evolve with time from wet (amphibole present and plagioclase delayed) to 'dry' (olivine and two pyroxenes, and plagioclase). Petrological and geochemical evidence for within-trend mixing/mingling are common and involve high-Si basalt and dacite end-members. Core to rim electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS trace element analysis of main phenocrysts (amphibole, plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxene) record the details of repetitive magma mixing and mingling events. Cores of amphibole, ortho- and clinopyroxene in the Holocene units have low Mg/Fe, high REEs and Eu-anomaly, and are rimmed Mg/Fe, low REEs and no Eu-anomaly zones. These minerals are thus recording the intrusions of mafic, water-richer and crystal-poor magma into an evolved and partly crystallized magma reservoir. Modeling the diffusive re-equilibration between the crystal cores and rims provides the time elapsed since the intrusion of the primitive magmas, interaction between end-member magmas, and eruption, and this is less than a few years. Our study shows that Gede volcano has evolved in the last 50 ky from a water-rich to a water-poor fractionation series. Many eruptions of both series are probably triggered by injection of mafic magma in evolved magma reservoirs. This suggest that if new unrest occurs below Gede the eruptions are likely to be explosive but the time between new intrusion and eruption would be long enough for proper response for mitigating its potential hazards.

  16. Site Selection for a Deep Monitor Well, Kualapuu, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2000-01-01

    Management of the ground-water resources near Kualapuu on the island of Molokai, Hawaii, is hindered by the uncertainty in the vertical salinity structure in the aquifer. In the State of Hawaii, vertical profiles of ground-water salinity are commonly obtained from deep monitor wells, and these profiles are used to estimate the thicknesses of the freshwater part of the ground-water flow system and the freshwater-saltwater transition zone. Information from a deep monitor well would improve the understanding of the ground-water flow system and the ability to effectively manage the ground-water resources near Kualapuu; however, as of mid-1999 no deep monitor wells had been drilled on the island of Molokai. Selection of an appropriate site for drilling a deep monitor well in the Kualapuu area depends partly on where future ground-water development may occur. Simulations using an areally two-dimensional, steady-state, sharp-interface ground-water flow model previously developed for the island of Molokai, Hawaii, indicate that the southeastern part of the Kualapuu area is a possible area of future ground-water development because (1) withdrawals from this area have a small effect on water levels at existing wells in the Kualapuu area (relative to effects from withdrawals in other parts of the Kualapuu area that are outside of the dike complex), and (2) model-calculated water levels in this part of the Kualapuu area are high relative to water levels in other parts of the Kualapuu area that are outside of the dike complex. Additional site-selection criteria include (1) ground-water level, (2) ground-surface altitude, (3) land classification, ownership, and accessibility, (4) geology, (5) locations of existing production wells, and (6) historical ground-water quality information. A deep monitor well in the Kualapuu area will likely be most useful for management purposes if it is located (1) in the vicinity of future ground-water development, (2) in an area where water levels are between about 8 and 12 feet above sea level, (3) at a ground-surface altitude that is between about 1,000 and 1,100 feet, (4) on government-owned land, (5) outside of the dike complex and as far from known volcanic vents as possible, (6) at least about 1,000 feet from, but within the same hydrogeologic setting as, existing or proposed production wells, and (7) east of well 0902-01. A viable area for drilling a deep monitor well is about a half mile southeast of existing wells 0801-01 to -03 and a half mile north of a known volcanic vent, Puu Luahine.

  17. U-series Chronology of volcanoes in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron, L. M.; Ma, L.; Deino, A.; Anthony, E. Y.

    2012-12-01

    We are studying the East African Rift System (EARS) in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province (CKPP), and specifically the young volcanoes Mt. Suswa, Longonot, and Menengai. Ar dates by Al Deino on K-feldspar phenocrysts show a strong correlation between older Ar ages and decreasing 230Th/232Th, which we interpret to reflect the age of eruption. This system has been the subject of recent research done by several UTEP alumni including Antony Wamalwa using potential field and magnetotelluric (MT) data to identify and characterize fractures and hydrothermal fluids. Also research on geochemical modeling done by John White, Vanessa Espejel and Peter Omenda led to the hypothesis of possible disequilibrium in these young, mainly obsidian samples in their post eruptive history. A pilot study of 8 samples, (also including W-2a USGS standard and a blank) establish the correlation that was seen between the ages found by Deino along with the 230/232Th ratios. All 8 samples from Mt. Suswa showed a 234U/238U ratio of (1) which indicates secular equilibrium or unity and that these are very fresh samples with no post-eruptive decay or leaching of U isotopes. The pilot set was comprised of four samples from the ring-trench group (RTG) with ages ranging from 7ka-present, two samples from the post-caldera stage ranging from 31-10ka, one sample from the syn-caldera stage dated at 41ka, and one sample from the pre-caldera stage dated at 112ka. The young RTG had a 230/232Th fractionation ratio of 0.8 ranging to the older pre-caldera stage with a 230/232Th ratio of 0.6. From this current data and research of 14C ages by Nick Rogers, the data from Longonot volcano was also similar to the 230/232Th ratio we found. Rogers' data places Longonot volcano ages to be no more than 20ka with the youngest samples also roughly around 0.8 disequilibrium. These strong correlations between the pilot study done for Mt. Suswa, 40Ar ages by Deino, along with 14C ages from Rogers have led to the exploration of present U-series data set of the youngest samples from the rest of the CKPP volcanoes including: Menengai, more from Longonot, and Olkaria. And since it is observed that there is the presence of lateral migration along an axial dike swarm that has operated in other parts of the EARS, we have chosen to run samples from the adjacent mafic fields of Elmenteita, Tandamara, and Ndabibi to see if there is a trend in the correlation of the 230/232Th ratios at the time of eruption as well as observing how close these samples get to unity. This would answer questions as to whether similar 230/232Th ratios imply that the mafic fields feed the calderas.

  18. Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes using marine sediments in the Japan Sea/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungwan; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Ikehara, Ken; Peate, David W.

    2013-07-01

    Only Ulleung and Baegdusan volcanoes have produced alkaline tephras in the Japan Sea/East Sea during the Quaternary. Little is known about their detailed tephrostratigraphy, except for the U-Oki and B-Tm tephras. Trace element analysis of bulk sediments can be used to identify alkaline cryptotephra because of the large compositional contrast. Five sediment cores spanning the interval between the rhyolitic AT (29.4 ka) and Aso-4 (87 ka) tephras were analyzed using an INAA scanning method. Source volcanoes for the five detected alkaline cryptotephra were identified from major element analyses of hand-picked glass shards: Ulleung (U-Ym, and the newly identified U-Sado), and Baegdusan (B-J, and the newly identified B-Sado and B-Ym). The eruption ages of the U-Ym, U-Sado, B-J, B-Sado, and B-Ym tephras are estimated to be 38 ka, 61 ka, 26 ka, 51 ka, 68-69 ka, and 86 ka, respectively, based on correlations with regional-scale TL (thinly laminated) layer stratigraphy (produced by basin-wide changes in bottom-water oxygen levels in response to millennium-scale paleoclimate variations). This study has allowed construction of an alkaline tephrostratigraphical framework for the late Quaternary linked to global environmental changes in the Japan Sea/East Sea, and improves our knowledge of the eruptive histories of Ulleung and Baegdusan volcanoes.

  19. Puhimau thermal area: a window into the upper east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Doukas, M.P.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of two soil CO2 efflux surveys by the closed chamber circulation method at the Puhimau thermal area in the upper East Rift Zone (ERZ) of  volcano, Hawaii. The surveys were undertaken in 1996 and 1998 to constrain how much CO2 might be reaching the ERZ after degassing beneath the summit caldera and whether the Puhimau thermal area might be a significant contributor to the overall CO2 budget of  . The area was revisited in 2001 to determine the effects of surface disturbance on efflux values by the collar emplacement technique utilized in the earlier surveys. Utilizing a cutoff value of 50 g m?2 d?1 for the surrounding forest background efflux, the CO2 emission rates for the anomaly at Puhimau thermal area were 27 t d?1 in 1996 and 17 t d?1 in 1998. Water vapor was removed before analysis in all cases in order to obtain CO2 values on a dry air basis and mitigate the effect of water vapor dilution on the measurements. It is clear that Puhimau thermal area is not a significant contributor to  CO2 output and that most of  CO2 (8500 t d?1) is degassed at the summit, leaving only magma with its remaining stored volatiles, such as SO2, for injection down the ERZ. Because of the low CO2emission rate and the presence of a shallow water table in the upper ERZ that effectively scrubs SO2 and other acid gases, Puhimau thermal area currently does not appear to be generally well suited for observing temporal changes in degassing at  .

  20. Selected time-lapse movies of the east rift zone eruption of K?lauea Volcano, 2004–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has used mass-market digital time-lapse cameras and network-enabled Webcams for visual monitoring and research. The 26 time-lapse movies in this report were selected from the vast collection of images acquired by these camera systems during 2004–2008. Chosen for their content and broad aesthetic appeal, these image sequences document a variety of flow-field and vent processes from K?lauea's east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983 and is still (as of 2011) ongoing.

  1. The mythos of dwelling : a settlement at Kalaupapa, Molokai

    E-print Network

    Ries, Paul R

    1989-01-01

    This thesis is the exploration of the physical and metaphorical potential of one of the most beautiful and poignant places in the world. It is Kalaupapa, a peninsula on the North Shore of Molokai, Hawaii, and the site of ...

  2. Reconnaissance gas measurements on the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jefferson; Doukas, Michael P.; Zemek, Peter G.; Gerlach, Terrence M.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of a set of measurements of volcanic gases on two small ground level plumes in the vicinity of Pu`u `O`o cone on the middle East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kilauea volcano, Hawai`i on 15 June 2001 using open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The work was carried out as a reconnaissance survey to assess the monitoring and research value of FTIR measurements at this volcano. Despite representing emissions of residual volatiles from lava that has undergone prior degassing, the plumes contained detectable amounts of CO2, CO, SO2, HCl, HF and SiF4. Various processes, including subsurface cooling, condensation of water in the atmospheric plume, oxidation, dissolution in water, and reactions with wall rocks at plume vents affect the abundance of these gases. Low concentrations of volcanic CO2 measured against a high ambient background are not well constrained by FTIR spectroscopy. Although there appear to be some differences between these gases and Pu`u `O`o source gases, ratios of HCl/SO2, HF/SO2 and CO/SO2 determined by FTIR measurements of these two small plumes compare reasonably well with earlier published analyses of ERZ vent samples. The measurements yielded emission rate estimates of 4, 11 and 4 t d-1

  3. Quantitative morphology of a fringing reef tract from high-resolution laser bathymetry: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Logan, J.B.; Field, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution Scanning Hydrographic Operational Airborne Lidar Survey (SHOALS) laser-determined bathymetric data were used to define the morphology of spur-and-groove structures on the fringing reef off the south coast of Molokai, Hawaii. These data provide a basis for mapping and analyzing morphology of the reef with a level of precision and spatial coverage never before attained. An extensive fringing coral reef stretches along the central two-thirds of Molokai's south shore (???40 km); along the east and west ends there is only a thin veneer of living coral with no developed reef complex. In total, ???4800 measurements of spur-and-groove height and the distance between adjacent spur crests (wavelength) were obtained along four isobaths. Between the 5m and 15m isobaths, the mean spur height increased from 0.7 m to 1.6 m, whereas the mean wavelength increased from 71 m to 104 m. Reef flat width was found to exponentially decrease with increasing wave energy. Overall, mean spur-and-groove height and wavelength were shown to be inversely proportional to wave energy. In high-energy environments, spur-and-groove morphology remains relatively constant across all water depths. In low-energy environments, however, spur-and-groove structures display much greater variation; they are relatively small and narrow in shallow depths and develop into much larger and broader features in deeper water. Therefore, it appears that waves exert a primary control on both the small and large-scale morphology of the reef off south Molokai.

  4. Impacts of the eruption of Miyakejima Volcano on air quality over far east Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mizuo Kajino; Hiromasa Ueda; Hikaru Satsumabayashi; Junling An

    2004-01-01

    A regional-scale Eulerian Model System for Soluble Particles (MSSP) was constructed to simulate environmental changes caused by a SO42? increase as the result of the eruption of Miyakejima Volcano in the northwest Pacific Ocean. The measured volcanic SO2 emission was 9 Tg yr?1 for a year from the beginning of the eruption, July 2000. It is equivalent to 70% of

  5. Stress and mass changes during the 2011-2012 unrest at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudron, C.; Lecocq, T.; Syahbana, D.; Camelbeeck, T.; Bernard, A. M.; Surono, S.

    2013-12-01

    Kawah Ijen volcano (East Java, Indonesia) has been equipped since June 2010 with 3 broadband seismometers, temporary and permanent short-period seismometers. While the volcano did not experience any magmatic eruption for more than a century, several types of unrests occurred during the last years. Apart from the seismometers, temperature and leveling divers have been immerged in the extremely acidic volcanic lake (pH ~ 0). While finding instruments capable of resisting in such extreme conditions has been particularly challenging, the coupling of lake monitoring techniques with seismic data improves the understanding and monitoring of the volcanic-hydrothermal system. To detect small velocity changes, the approach developed by Brenguier et al. (2008) and Clarke et al. (2011) has been implemented to monitor Ijen volcano. First, the influence of several parameters detrimental to the recovering of the cross correlation function will be discussed (i.e.: different types of seismometers and their azimuthal distribution, presence of volcanic tremor in different frequency bands). At Kawah Ijen, the frequency band that is less affected by the volcanic tremor and the seasonal fluctuations at the source ranges between 0.5-1.0 Hz. Moreover, a stack of 5 days for the current CCF gives reliable results with low errors and allows to detect fluctuations which are missed using a 10-day stack. We will then present the results of this technique compared to other seismic parameters (e.g.: seismo volcanic events spectral analysis) and temporal changes in lake temperature, color or lake levels that occurred during 2011-2012 crises that were the strongest ever recorded by the seismic monitoring network. An unrest commenced in October 2011 with heightened VT (Volcano Tectonic) earthquakes and low frequency events activity, which culminated mid-December 2011. This unrest was correlated with an enhanced heat and hydrothermal fluids discharge to the crater and significant variations of the relative velocities (-1%). This suggests an important build-up of stress into the system. VT earthquakes opened pathways for the fluids to ascend, by increasing the permeability of the system, which latter allowed the initiation of monochromatic tremor (MT) when the steam/gases interacted with the shallow portions of the aquifer. Our calculations evidence a higher contribution of steam in March 2012 that might explain the increase of the MT frequency when bubbles were observed at the lake surface. This period was also characterized by short-lived but strong velocity variations, related to water level rises containing important amount of bubbles, and important heat and mass discharges into the lake (2100 kJ/kg and 255 kg/s, respectively).

  6. Seismic image and origin of the Changbai intraplate volcano in East Asia: Role of big mantle wedge above the stagnant Pacific slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Tian, You; Lei, Jianshe; Liu, Lucy; Zheng, Sihua

    2009-04-01

    We determined P-wave tomography of the crust and upper mantle under the Changbai volcanic area in Northeast Asia by using 289,318 arrival-time data from 4802 local earthquakes and 9599 teleseismic events. A prominent low-velocity anomaly is clearly imaged in the crust and upper mantle down to about 410 km depth beneath the Changbai volcano. A broad high-velocity anomaly is revealed in the mantle transition zone and deep earthquakes occurred actively there, suggesting that the subducting Pacific slab is stagnating in the mantle transition zone under East Asia. Our results suggest that the formation of the Changbai and other intraplate volcanoes in Northeast Asia is related to the upwelling of hot and wet asthenospheric materials in the big mantle wedge above the stagnant Pacific slab. Hence the active intraplate volcanoes in Northeast Asia are not hotspots related to deep mantle plumes but are caused by plate tectonic processes in the upper mantle.

  7. Mud volcanoes at the shelf margin of the East China Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Yin; S Berné; P Vagner; B Loubrieu; Z Liu

    2003-01-01

    Roughly circular sediment mounds, varying from tens to hundreds of meters in diameter and from a few meters up to 40 m in height, have been mapped for the first time at the shelf edge of the East China Sea (ECS). High-resolution seismic profiles, together with swath bathymetric and acoustic data, indicate that these features are common on the ECS

  8. Molokai Community Needs Assessment for Agriculture Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzoli, Jean A.

    In order to assess the needs of agriculture (AG) education and ascertain the potential employment demand for pre-service and in-service training in agriculture over the next 5 years, Maui Community College (MCC) sent questionnaires to Molokai community businesses, inquiring about their agricultural labor demand. In December 1997, 68 questionnaires…

  9. Multibeam Bathymetry of Haleakala Volcano, Maui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, B. W.; Robinson, J.

    2002-12-01

    The submarine northeast flank of Haleakala Volcano, Maui was mapped in detail during the summers of 2001 and 2002 by a joint team from the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Hawaii, and the U.S. Geological Survey. JAMSTEC instruments used included SeaBeam 2112 hull-mounted multibeam sonar (bathymetry and sidescan imagery), manned submersible Shinkai 6500 and ROV Kaiko (bottom video, photographs and sampling of Hana Ridge), gravimeter, magnetometer, and single-channel seismic system. Hana Ridge, Haleakala's submarine east rift zone, is capped by coral-reef terraces for much of its length, which are flexurally tilted towards the axis of the Hawaiian Ridge and delineate former shorelines. Its deeper, more distal portion exhibits a pair of parallel, linear crests, studded with volcanic cones, that suggest lateral migration of the rift zone during its growth. The northern face of the arcuate ridge terminus is a landslide scar in one of these crests, while its southwestern prong is a small, constructional ridge. The Hana slump, a series of basins and ridges analogous to the Laupahoehoe slump off Kohala Volcano, Hawaii, lies north of Hana Ridge and extends down to the Hawaiian moat. Northwest of this slump region a small, dual-crested ridge strikes toward the Hawaiian moat and is inferred to represent a fossil rift zone, perhaps of East Molokai Volcano. A sediment chute along its southern flank has built a large submarine fan with a staircase of contour-parallel folds on its surface that are probably derived from slow creep of sediments down into the moat. Sediments infill the basins of the Hana slump [Moore et al., 1989], whose lowermost layers have been variously back-tilted by block rotation during slumping and flexural loading of the Hawaiian Ridge; the ridges define the outer edges of those down-dropped blocks, which may have subsided several kilometers. An apron of volcaniclastic debris shed from subaerial Haleakala smoothes the upper slopes of the slump complex. The slump and apron do not extend beyond the formerly-subaerial portion of Hana Ridge, implying that supply of subaerially-erupted volcaniclastic sediments may be a necessary precondition to massive slope failure.

  10. Magma Recharge and Mixing Processes That Triggered the Eruption of Trachytes and Phonolites at Suswa Volcano, Kenya Rift, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejel-Garcia, V.; Anthony, E. Y.; Ren, M.; MacDonald, R.; White, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    Suswa Volcano, one of a series of Holocene central vent volcanoes located in the central part of the Kenya Rift, is divided into four major stages: 1) pre-caldera; 2) syn-caldera; 3) post-caldera I; and 4) post-caldera II. In addition to central vent volcanoes are basalt and basaltic-trachyandesite (BTA) flows (e.g. Tandamara and Elmenteita) that occur in low-lying areas adjacent to the central volcanoes. Both pre- and syn-caldera rocks include trachyte to phonolite. Syn-caldera rocks also include BTA similar to Tandamara. Matrix glass in pre-caldera samples is similar to whole-rock. However, for syn-caldera samples, light and dark mixed glasses are observed petrographically and compositions range from trachyandesite to trachyte. Pre-caldera samples have a phenocryst assemblage of anorthoclase (An0-5Ab50-60Or30-45), clinopyroxene (En27Fs28Wo45) and Fe-Ti oxide. Syn-caldera trachyte-phonolite contain this same assemblage but also plagioclase (An52Ab45Or3), with a composition identical to BTA samples. Clearly, the syn-caldera event represents magma mixing between BTA and trachyte. With the developing East Africa rifting, introduction of mafic magmas into the Suswa trachytic chamber was possible, similar to the rupture events in Ethiopia in 2005 (Wright et al., 2006). Post-caldera rocks have phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, olivine (Fa70), clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides. Post-caldera II alkali feldspars are zoned and contain two different core compositions, one with low anorthite content similar to pre- and syn-caldera samples (An3Ab64Or33) and the other with higher anorthite content (An17Ab69Or14). They exhibit oscillatory zoning, with compositional variation between Ca2O and K2O and have thin rims with composition similar to the matrix feldspars. The thin rims may represent magma recharge that triggered eruption of the phonolite. Matrix glass in post-caldera rocks includes both trachyandesite and phonolite, indicating that hybridization of the contrasting magmas is still ongoing. Processes in addition to mixing contribute to this dynamic volcanic setting. Post-caldera rocks have compositions of essentially all elements that are intermediate between BTA and trachyte, as appropriate to mixing. However, samples show variable Na20 content at constant K20, Fe0, MgO, and CaO. A possible explanation for this variable Na2O content is assimilation of sodalite-bearing syenite roof and sidewall rocks into the evolving magma chamber. References: Wright, T.J., et al., 2006, Magma-maintained rift segmentation at continental rupture in the 2005 Afar dyking episode. Nature, 442: 291-294.

  11. Preliminary Analytical Results for a Mud Sample Collected from the LUSI Mud Volcano, Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Wibowo, Handoko T.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Johnson, Craig A.; Breit, George N.; Lowers, Heather A.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Hageman, Philip L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Anthony, Michael W.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Fey, David L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Morman, Suzette A.

    2008-01-01

    On May 29, 2006, mud and gases began erupting unexpectedly from a vent 150 meters away from a hydrocarbon exploration well near Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia. The eruption, called the LUSI (Lumpur 'mud'-Sidoarjo) mud volcano, has continued since then at rates as high as 160,000 m3 per day. At the request of the United States Department of State, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been providing technical assistance to the Indonesian Government on the geological and geochemical aspects of the mud eruption. This report presents initial characterization results of a sample of the mud collected on September 22, 2007, as well as inerpretive findings based on the analytical results. The focus is on characteristics of the mud sample (including the solid and water components of the mud) that may be of potential environmental or human health concern. Characteristics that provide insights into the possible origins of the mud and its contained solids and waters have also been evaluated.

  12. Multispectral thermal infrared mapping of sulfur dioxide plumes: A case study from the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Realmuto, V.J.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.

    1997-01-01

    The synoptic perspective and rapid mode of data acquisition provided by remote sensing are well suited for the study of volcanic SO2 plumes. In this paper we describe a plume-mapping procedure that is based on image data acquired with NASA's airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) and apply the procedure to TIMS data collected over the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, on September 30, 1988. These image data covered the Pu'u 'O'o and Kupaianaha vents and a skylight in the lava tube that was draining the Kupaianaha lava pond. Our estimate of the SO2 emission rate from Pu'u 'O'o (17 - 20 kg s-1) is roughly twice the average of estimates derived from correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) measurements collected 10 days prior to the TIMS overflight (10 kg s-1). The agreement between the TIMS and COSPEC results improves when we compare SO2 burden estimates, which are relatively independent of wind speed. We demonstrate the feasibility of mapping Pu'u 'O'o - scale SO2 plumes from space in anticipation of the 1998 launch of the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflectance radiometer (ASTER). Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.17.99...islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.(a)...

  14. Full Vector Studies of the Last 10 Thousand Years Derived From The East Maui Volcano Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Bervera, E.; Dekkers, M. J.; Bohnel, H.; Hagstrum, J. T.; Champion, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    We have determined the paleointensity of nine lavas flows that recorded the last 10 kyrs of geomagnetic field behavior from the youngest and largest of the two edifices of the island of Maui (i.e. Hana Volcanics, East Maui) with the multispecimen parallel differential pTRM method [Dekkers and Böhnel, EPSL, 248, 508-517, 2006]. The flows are characterized by irreversible Curie curves indicating two kinds of magnetic carriers: one almost pure magnetite and the second one Ti-rich magnetite with possible traces of titanomaghemite. The coercivity of remanence (Hcr) suggests that low-coercivity grains carry the NRM. Magnetic minerals from all of these flows are scattered within the PSD range with the exception of site HKAM (age 4.07±+0.09 ka) that lies in the SD range. The multispecimen method involves giving a laboratory pTRM to pristine specimens in different field strengths parallel to the original TRM; note that all pTRMs are given within the same range. From an existing sample collection for paleosecular variation studies [Herrero-Bervera and Valet, PEPI, 161, 267-280, 2007] we processed samples from 9 flows for paleointensity determinations ranging in age from 0.830.06 ka to 8.19±0.06 ka. pTRMs were given by in-field heating and cooling from 175 and to 260°C to avoid alteration. Low-field susceptibility variation appeared to be less than 10%, and sample sets from a few flows were heated to two different temperatures to check for consistency of results. All flows yielded good quality data. The paleointensity values increase to ~46 microTesla at ~ 2.2 ka and drop to ~22 microTesla at ~3.5 ka. At ~8.2 ka, ~39 microTesla is obtained, i.e. slightly higher than the present-day value (36 microTesla). Our paleointensity results (at least 7 flows) correlate well with the absolute paleointensity global determinations. The influence of a recently proposed domain-state correction [Fabian and Leonhardt, 2010, EPSL] on the paleointensity values will be investigated and shown.

  15. SO2 from episode 48A eruption, Hawaii: Sulfur dioxide emissions from the episode 48A East Rift Zone eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andres, R.J.; Kyle, P.R.; Stokes, J.B.; Rose, William I., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An SO2 flux of 1170??400 (1??) tonnes per day was measured with a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) in October and November 1986 from the continuous, nonfountaining, basaltic East Rift Zone eruption (episode 48A) of Kilauea volcano. This flux is 5-27 times less than those of highfountaining episodes, 3-5 times greater than those of contemporaneous summit emissions or interphase Pu'u O'o emissions, and 1.3-2 times the emissions from Pu'u O'o alone during 48A. Calculations based on the SO2 emission rate resulted in a magma supply rate of 0.44 million m3 per day and a 0.042 wt% sulfur loss from the magma upon eruption. Both of these calculated parameters agree with determinations made previously by other methods. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  16. 77 FR 2019 - Security Zone; Passenger Vessel SAFARI EXPLORER Arrival/Departure, Kaunakakai Harbor, Molokai, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ...USCG-2011-1159] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Passenger Vessel SAFARI EXPLORER Arrival/ Departure, Kaunakakai Harbor, Molokai, HI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary interim rule with request for...

  17. 77 FR 24381 - Security Zone; Passenger Vessel SAFARI EXPLORER Arrival/Departure, Kaunakakai Harbor, Molokai, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ...USCG-2011-1159] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Passenger Vessel SAFARI EXPLORER Arrival/ Departure, Kaunakakai Harbor, Molokai, HI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary interim rule; reopening of comment...

  18. Growth History of Kaena Volcano, the Isolated, Dominantly Submarine, Precursor Volcano to Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, J. M.; Eason, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    The construction of O'ahu began with the recently recognized, ~3.5-4.9 Ma Ka'ena Volcano, as an isolated edifice in the Kaua'i Channel. Ka'ena remained submarine until, near the end of its lifetime as magma supply waned and the volcano transitioned to a late-shield stage of activity, it emerged to reach a maximum elevation of ~1000 m above sea level. We estimate that Ka'ena was emergent only for the last 15-25% of its lifespan, and that subaerial lavas make up < 5% of the total volume (20-27 x 103 km3). O'ahu's other volcanoes, Wai'anae (~3.9-2.85 Ma) and Ko'olau (~3.0-1.9 Ma), were built at least partly on the flanks of earlier edifices and both were active subaerial volcanoes for at least 1 Ma. The constructional history of Ka'ena contrasts with that of Wai'anae, Ko'olau, and many other Hawaiian volcanoes, which likely emerge within a few hundred kyr after inception, and with subaerial lavas comprising up to 35 volume % of the volcano. These relations suggest that volcano growth history and morphology are critically dependent on whether volcanic initiation and growth occur in the deep ocean floor (isolated), or on the flanks of pre-existing edifices. Two other volcanoes that likely formed in isolation are West Moloka'i and Kohala, both of which have long submarine rift zones, and neither attained great heights above sea level despite having substantial volume. The partitioning of volcanism between submarine and subaerial volcanism depends on the distance between volcanic centers, whether new volcanoes initiate on the flanks of earlier ones, and the time over which neighboring volcanoes are concurrently active. Ka'ena might represent an end-member in this spectrum, having initiated far from its next oldest neighbor and completed much of its evolution in isolation.

  19. 23. DETAIL OF PIPELINE PIERS, LOOKING EAST. FOREGROUND IS SLOPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. DETAIL OF PIPELINE PIERS, LOOKING EAST. FOREGROUND IS SLOPED TYPE, NEXT ONE IS PERPENDICULAR TYPE A COMPRESSION COUPLING, USED TO REPAIR A BROKEN PIPE SECTION, CAN BE SEEN AT BOTTOM. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  20. 21. VIEW EAST ALONG PALI TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF ELEVATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW EAST ALONG PALI TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF ELEVATED PIPELINE ON CONCRETE PIERS. PIPE IS BURIED AT THIS POINT. NOTE REMAINS OF WOOD FRAMEWORK FOR CATWALK (DESTROYED). - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  1. 22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. EYE BOLTS IN ROCK FACE AT RIGHT WERE USED BRIEFLY IN PLACE OF PIERS TO SUSPEND PIPE BY CHAIN BECAUSE THE CONCRETE PIERS WERE SUSCEPTIBLE TO HEAVY WAVE ACTION IN THIS AREA. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  2. The flight of Arcadia: spatial CO2/SO2 variations in a cross section above the Nord East crater of Etna volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffrida, Giovanni; Calabrese, Sergio; Bobrowski, Nicole; Finkenzeller, Henning; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Scaglione, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The CO2/SO2 ratio in volcanic plumes of open conduit volcanoes can provide useful information about the magma depth inside a conduit and the possible occurrence of an eruptive event. Moreover, the same CO2 measurement when combined with a SO2 flux measurement, commonly carried out at many volcanoes nowadays, is used to contribute to an improved estimate of global volcanic CO2 budget. Today worldwide at 13 volcanoes automated in-situ instruments (known as Multi-GAS stations) are applied to continuously determine CO2/SO2 ratios and to use this signal as additional parameter for volcanic monitoring. Usually these instruments carry out measurements of half an hour 4 - 6 times/day and thus provide continuous CO2/SO2 values and their variability. The stations are located at crater rims in a position that according to the prevailing winds is invested by the plume. Obviously, although the stations are carefully positioned, it is inevitable that other sources than the plume itself, e.g. soil degassing and surrounding fumaroles, contribute and will be measured as well, covering the 'real' values. Between July and September 2014 experiments were carried out on the North East crater (NEC) of Mount Etna, installing a self-made cable car that crossed the crater from one side to the other. The basket, called "Arcadia", was equipped with an automated standard Multi-GAS station and a GPS, which acquired at high frequency (0.5 Hz) the following parameters : CO2, SO2, H2S, Rh, T, P and geo-coordinates. The choice of NEC of the volcano Etna was based on its accessibility, the relative small diameter (about 230 m) and the presence of a relatively constant and rather concentrated plume. Actually, NEC belongs also to the monitoring network EtnaPlume (managed by the INGV of Palermo). The aim of these experiments was to observe variations of each parameter, in particular the fluctuation of the CO2/SO2 ratio within the plume, moving from the edge to the center of the crater. The gained results give a first possibility to understand if common measurements carried out at the edge of a crater are subject to over- or underestimation and about the order of derivations caused by other sources than the plume. A preliminary analysis results in a lower CO2/SO2 ratio in the central part of the crater versus the more peripheral one. The deviation between the average CO2/SO2 ratio and the center of the plume ranges from a minimum of 58% up to a maximum of 74%. An increased CO2/SO2 emission could be caused by the influence of soil and/or fumarolic degassing at the crater rim. This interpretation leads us to the conclusion that measurements by fixed installed stations might overestimate the CO2/SO2 ratio compared to values originating from the "pure" plume. Further on, it means that variations of up to 74 % (in our experiment) don't necessarily correlate with volcanic activity changes.

  3. Perspective View, Radar Image, Color as Height, Molokai, Lanai and Maui, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows three Hawaiian islands: Molokai (lower left), Lanai (right), and the northwest tip of Maui (upper left). Data such as these will be useful for studying the history of volcanic activity on these now extinct volcanoes. SRTM data also will help local officials evaluate and mitigate natural hazards for islands throughout the Pacific. For example, improved elevation data will make it easier for communities to plan for tsunamis (tidal waves generated by earthquakes around the perimeter of the Pacific) by helping them identify evacuation routes and areas prone to flooding.

    This perspective view combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains 1800 meters (5900 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: 60 by 70 kilometers (37 by 43 miles) Location: 20.8 deg. North lat., 156.7 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking southeast Original Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 18, 2000

  4. Volcano-hazard zonation for San Vicente volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Vicente volcano, also known as Chichontepec, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. This composite volcano, located about 50 kilometers east of the capital city San Salvador, has a volume of about 130 cubic kilometers, rises to an altitude of about 2180 meters, and towers above major communities such as San Vicente, Tepetitan, Guadalupe, Zacatecoluca, and Tecoluca. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and major transportation routes are located near the lowermost southern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The population density and proximity around San Vicente volcano, as well as the proximity of major transportation routes, increase the risk that even small landslides or eruptions, likely to occur again, can have serious societal consequences. The eruptive history of San Vicente volcano is not well known, and there is no definitive record of historical eruptive activity. The last significant eruption occurred more than 1700 years ago, and perhaps long before permanent human habitation of the area. Nevertheless, this volcano has a very long history of repeated, and sometimes violent, eruptions, and at least once a large section of the volcano collapsed in a massive landslide. The oldest rocks associated with a volcanic center at San Vicente are more than 2 million years old. The volcano is composed of remnants of multiple eruptive centers that have migrated roughly eastward with time. Future eruptions of this volcano will pose substantial risk to surrounding communities.

  5. Crystallization, Fluid Exsolution, and Eruption of Extremely Volatile-rich Silicate Magma at Oldoinyo Lengai Volcano, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moor, J.; Fischer, T. P.; King, P. L.; Hervig, R. L.; Hilton, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Oldoinyo Lengai volcano (OL) is famous for producing natrocarbonatite (NC) lava flows, yet its magmatic products are volumetrically dominated by silicate pyroclastic deposits [1]. After ~25 years of NC effusion, OL erupted explosively in 2007-2008 to produce nephelinite ash. NC effusion resumed in 2009, completing the typical historical eruptive cycle observed at OL [2]. Here we investigate the processes of magma differentiation and volatile exsolution resulting in this behavior through the study of major, trace, and volatile element compositions of nepheline-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and matrix glass (MG) in nephelinite scoria erupted in 2007-2008. The nephelinite scoria are extremely crystal rich, with nepheline and clinopyroxene dominating the phenocryst assemblage. Other phenocryst and accessory minerals include garnet, wollastonite, combeite, melilite, and sulfides. The glasses span a wide range in composition and define a cohesive evolutionary trend of decreasing SiO2 from ~46 wt% in the MI to ~38 wt% in the MG. The decrease in SiO2 is accompanied by strong enrichment in alkalis and depletion in Al2O3, resulting in extremely peralkaline MG. Rare earth elements and other incompatible elements are also strongly enriched in the MG relative to the MI. For example, the least evolved MI contain ~55 ppm Ce whereas the MG attains concentrations of >1000 ppm. Fractional crystallization modeling indicates that the evolutionary trends observed in the major element data are consistent with ~90% crystallization of the melt between the time of MI entrapment and eruption. The MI are exceptionally rich in volatiles and contain the highest CO2 concentrations (up to 2.5 wt%) ever measured in natural silicate glass, high H2O (up to 6 wt%), and high S (0.3-1.3 wt%). Immiscible NC coexists with nephelinite glass in many MI, providing clear evidence that the NC lavas and nephelinitic pyroclastics at OL are derived from a common magma [3]. The silicate MI are extremely CO2-rich, however CO2/Nb ratios are much lower than depleted upper mantle values indicating that the magma experienced prior exsolution of C-rich fluid. The MI display a trend of decreasing H2O and increasing CO2 with evolution of the melt. This trend is interpreted to reflect crystallization-driven melt evolution in a stream of C-rich fluid percolating from deeper in the magma system. Melt evolution to higher alkali and lower SiO2 contents resulted in less polymerized melt compositions and increasing CO2 solubility, whereas H2O was partitioned into the fluid phase. Crystallization and degassing of H2O led to increasing magma viscosity, which ultimately inhibited gas-magma separation and triggered the explosive eruption. Once the viscous apex of the magma chamber was expelled then quiescent degassing and NC effusion were able to resume. [1] Klaudius, J., and Keller, J. (2006) Lithos, 91: 173-190. [2] Dawson, J.B., et al. (1995) IAVCEI Proc. in Volc., 4: 70-86. [3] Mitchell, R.H. (2009) Contrib. Min. Pet.,158: 589-598.

  6. A Practical Framework for Evaluating a Culturally Tailored Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Programme in Molokai, Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelley M. Withy; Wayde Lee; Ralph F. Renger

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Successful substance abuse treatment requires many changes in behavior, attitude and skills. Culturally tailored approaches to substance abuse treatment have shown initial success, but are not yet accepted as best practice models. In order to document programme effectiveness of a new culturally tailored substance abuse treatment programme on the rural island of Molokai, Hawaii, the authors worked to develop

  7. Virtual Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Discovery Channel's website has several interactive features on volcanoes to complement its programs on Pompeii. At the homepage, visitors can explore a virtual volcano, by clicking on "Enter". The virtual volcano has several components. The first is a quickly revolving globe with red triangles and gray lines on it that represent active volcanoes and plate boundaries. Clicking on "Stop Rotation", located next to the globe, will enable a better look. Visitors can also click one of the topics below the globe, to see illustrations of "Tectonic Plates", "Ring of Fire" (no, not the Johnny Cash song), and "Layers Within". Visitors can click on "Build your Own Volcano and Watch it Erupt" on the menu on the left side of the page, where they will be given a brief explanation of two factors that affect the shape and explosiveness of volcanoes: viscosity and gas. Then they must choose, and set, the conditions of their volcano by using the arrows under the viscosity and gas headings, and clicking on "Set Conditions", underneath the arrows. Once done, a description of the type of volcano created will be given, and it's time to "Start Eruption". While the lava flows, and the noise of an eruption sounds, terms describing various features of the volcano are superimposed on the virtual volcano, and can be clicked on for explanations.

  8. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The central caldera is visible in the lower right corner of the center map, outlined by the black dashed line. The caldera collapsed about 75,000 years ago when massive explosions sent volcanic ash as far as the San Francisco Bay area and created a 3,000-ft-deep hole in the center of the volcano. The caldera is now partly refilled by Paulina and East Lakes, and the byproducts from younger eruptions, including Newberry Volcano’s youngest rhyolitic lavas, shown in red and orange. The majority of Newberry Volcano’s many lava flows and cinder cones are blanketed by as much as 5 feet of volcanic ash from the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama that created Crater Lake caldera approximately 7,700 years ago. This ash supports abundant tree growth and obscures the youthful appearance of Newberry Volcano. Only the youngest volcanic vents and lava flows are well exposed and unmantled by volcanic ash. More than one hundred of these young volcanic vents and lava flows erupted 7,000 years ago during Newberry Volcano’s northwest rift zone eruption.

  9. Application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to volcano mapping in the humid tropics: a case study in East Java, Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon A. Carn

    1999-01-01

    Volcanoes in humid tropical environments are frequently cloud covered, typically densely vegetated and rapidly eroded. These\\u000a factors complicate field and laboratory studies and even the basic identification of potentially active volcanoes. Numerous\\u000a previous studies have highlighted the potential value of radar remote sensing for volcanology in equatorial regions. Here,\\u000a cloud- and vegetation-penetrating LHH-band (??24?cm) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from

  10. Volcano Hazards Assessment for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Nathenson, Manuel; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ewert, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is a very large shield-shaped volcano located in northern California where it forms part of the southern Cascade Range of volcanoes. It has erupted hundreds of times during its half-million-year history, including nine times during the past 5,200 years, most recently 950 years ago. This record represents one of the highest eruptive frequencies among Cascade volcanoes and includes a wide variety of different types of lava flows and at least two explosive eruptions that produced widespread fallout. Compared to those of a typical Cascade stratovolcano, eruptive vents at MLV are widely distributed, extending 55 km north-south and 40 km east-west. The total area covered by MLV lavas is >2,000 km2, about 10 times the area of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Judging from its long eruptive history and its frequent eruptions in recent geologic time, MLV will erupt again. Although the probability of an eruption is very small in the next year (one chance in 3,600), the consequences of some types of possible eruptions could be severe. Furthermore, the documented episodic behavior of the volcano indicates that once it becomes active, the volcano could continue to erupt for decades, or even erupt intermittently for centuries, and very likely from multiple vents scattered across the edifice. Owing to its frequent eruptions, explosive nature, and proximity to regional infrastructure, MLV has been designated a 'high threat volcano' by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System assessment. Volcanic eruptions are typically preceded by seismic activity, but with only two seismometers located high on the volcano and no other USGS monitoring equipment in place, MLV is at present among the most poorly monitored Cascade volcanoes.

  11. Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Ascending eruption cloud from Redoubt Volcano as viewed to the west from the Kenai Peninsula. The mushroom-shaped plume rose from avalanches of hot debris (pyroclastic flows) that cascaded down the north flank of the volcano. A smaller, white steam plume rises from the summit crater. ...

  12. The pre-eruptive magma plumbing system of the 2007-2008 dome-forming eruption of Kelut volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, A. J.; Gertisser, R.; Troll, V. R.; Jolis, E. M.; Dahren, B.; Harris, C.; Tindle, A. G.; Preece, K.; O'Driscoll, B.; Humaida, H.; Chadwick, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    Kelut volcano, East Java, is an active volcanic complex hosting a summit crater lake that has been the source of some of Indonesia's most destructive lahars. In November 2007, an effusive eruption lasting approximately 7 months led to the formation of a 260-m-high and 400-m-wide lava dome that displaced most of the crater lake. The 2007-2008 Kelut dome comprises crystal-rich basaltic andesite with a texturally complex crystal cargo of strongly zoned and in part resorbed plagioclase (An47-94), orthopyroxene (En64-72, Fs24-32, Wo2-4), clinopyroxene (En40-48, Fs14-19, Wo34-46), Ti-magnetite (Usp16-34) and trace amounts of apatite, as well as ubiquitous glomerocrysts of varying magmatic mineral assemblages. In addition, the notable occurrence of magmatic and crustal xenoliths (meta-basalts, amphibole-bearing cumulates, and skarn-type calc-silicates and meta-volcaniclastic rocks) is a distinct feature of the dome. New petrographical, whole rock major and trace element data, mineral chemistry as well as oxygen isotope data for both whole rocks and minerals indicate a complex regime of magma-mixing, decompression-driven resorption, degassing and crystallisation and crustal assimilation within the Kelut plumbing system prior to extrusion of the dome. Detailed investigation of plagioclase textures alongside crystal size distribution analyses provide evidence for magma mixing as a major pre-eruptive process that blends multiple crystal cargoes together. Distinct magma storage zones are postulated, with a deeper zone at lower crustal levels or near the crust-mantle boundary (>15 km depth), a second zone at mid-crustal levels (~10 km depth) and several magma storage zones distributed throughout the uppermost crust (<10 km depth). Plagioclase-melt and amphibole hygrometry indicate magmatic H2O contents ranging from ~8.1 to 8.6 wt.% in the lower crustal system to ~1.5 to 3.3 wt.% in the mid to upper crust. Pyroxene and plagioclase ?18O values range from 5.4 to 6.7 ‰, and 6.5 to 7.6 ‰, respectively. A single whole rock analysis of the 2007-2008 dome lava gave a ?18O value of 7.6 ‰, whereas meta-basaltic and calc-silicate xenoliths are characterised by ?18O values of 6.2 and 10.3 ‰, respectively. Magmatic ?18O values calculated from individual pyroxene and plagioclase analyses range from 5.7 to 7.0 ‰, and 6.2 to 7.4 ‰, respectively. This range in O-isotopic compositions is explained by crystallisation of pyroxenes in the lower to mid-crust, where crustal contamination is either absent or masked by assimilation of material having similar ?18O values to the ascending melts. This population is mixed with isotopically distinct plagioclase and pyroxenes that crystallised from a more contaminated magma in the upper crustal system. Binary bulk mixing models suggest that shallow-level, recycled volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks together with calc-silicates and/or limestones are the most likely contaminants of the 2007-2008 Kelut magma, with the volcaniclastic sediments being dominant.

  13. Chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic characteristics of mud from the LUSI mud volcano, Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia: implications for the environment, public health, and eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Casadevall, T. J.; Wibowo, H. T.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Breit, G. N.; Hageman, P. L.; Wolf, R. E.; Morman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    On May 29, 2006, mud and gases began erupting from a vent 150 meters away from a gas exploration well near Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia. The eruption, called the LUSI mud volcano, has continued at rates as high as 160,000 m3 per day. At the request of the United States Department of State, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been providing technical assistance to the Indonesian Government on the geological and geochemical aspects of the mud eruption. This paper will present analytical results of mud samples collected in Sept. 2007 and Nov. 2008, and interpretive findings based on the analytical results. The 2007 mud sample contains high proportions of particles that could be ingestible by hand-mouth transmission (~98 vol % <250 microns,), inhalable into the upper respiratory tract (~80 vol % <10 microns), and respirable into the lung alveoli (~ 40 vol % <2.5 microns), so the mud and dust from the dried mud could be readily taken up by exposed individuals. Our results confirm those of a previous study that the levels of potentially toxic heavy metals or metalloids in the mud are low. A complex mixture of organic compounds in the mud is likely derived from petroleum source rocks. Although the 2007 mud sample contains several percent iron sulfides, net acid production tests indicate that enough carbonate material is also present to prevent the mud from becoming acid-generating due to weathering and sulfide oxidation in the near-surface environment. Water derived from settling mud deposits may have the potential to adversely affect the quality of surface- or groundwater sources for drinking water, due to high levels of fluoride, nitrate, iron, manganese, aluminum, sulfate, chloride, and total dissolved solids. The very high nitrate levels in the waters contained within the mud may present a source of nutrients that could enhance algal blooms and resulting adverse impacts such as hypoxia in fresh-water and marine ecosystems into which some of the mud is being discharged. In agreement with previous studies, water separated from the 2007 mud sample is compositionally and isotopically compatible with an origin as sedimentary formation water. The iron disulfide fraction of the mud sample is isotopically light, and likely formed by bacterial sulfate reduction during diagenesis of clay-rich rocks from which the mud was derived. A smaller, isotopically heavy monosulfide fraction likely formed later by thermogenic reduction of formation-water sulfate to sulfide and reaction of the resulting sulfide with reactive iron in the mud. Additional linked earth science and public health studies are needed to more fully understand eruption processes, and the potential environmental and health consequences of the erupting mud, waters, and gases, and of the accumulating mud deposits.

  14. Seismic reflection study of acoustic basement in the South Korea Plateau, the Ulleung Interplain Gap, and the northern Ulleung Basin: Volcano-tectonic implications for Tertiary back-arc evolution in the southern East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. B.; Yoon, S. H.; Chough, S. K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Ryu, B. J.

    2011-05-01

    In order to understand the volcano-tectonic evolution history of the East Sea back-arc basin, this study focuses on the seismic characteristics of acoustic basement, based on the multi-channel seismic reflection data acquired from the South Korea Plateau, the northern Ulleung Basin, and the Ulleung Interplain Gap. According to the seismic reflection characteristics, the "acoustic basement" in the study area can be classified into three types. Type-A acoustic basement is a remnant of rifted continental crust comprising relatively shallow-seated continental margin platforms, elongated ridges, and equidimensional blocks in the South Korea Plateau and its vicinities. Type-B acoustic basement is volcanic sills/flows-sediments complexes infilling the rift-controlled basement lows in the South Korea Plateau, the Ulleung Interplain Gap, and the northern Ulleung Basin. Type-C acoustic basement is a cluster or chain of volcanic edifices which shows internal facies variation from main body to apron slope facies. Volcanic activities identified in the types-B and -C acoustic basements can be classified into three stages based on the volcano-stratigraphic correlation with the existing stratigraphic framework. Stage-1 volcanism is characterized by a fissure-type eruption represented by scattering volcanic cones and mounds (type-C), and volcanic sills and lava flows interlayering with syn-rift sedimentary units (type-B). Early-stage continental rifting prior to the Middle Miocene most likely controlled this volcanism. Stage-2 volcanism is characterized by ENE-WSW trending chain of volcanic edifices (type-C) along the northern margin of the Ulleung Basin and Ulleung Interplain Gap. During the Middle Miocene, the weakening of back-arc extension might have resulted in limited volcanic eruption, which formed elongate volcanic fields across the Ulleung and Yamato basins. Stage-3 volcanism is represented by highly peaked volcanic islands and seamounts (type-C) showing vertically stacked apron slopes in seismic cross-sections. This vertical stacking pattern is indicative of multiple eruption events from a single eruption center at least from the Late Miocene to the Quaternary. Expanded volcanic age-control, based on volcano-stratigraphic and isotopic age dating, reveals that the volcanic activities in the southwestern and southeastern East Sea show similar spatio-temporal variations. This implies that the entire southern East Sea has experienced almost same volcano-tectonic evolution during the Cenozoic back-arc evolution. Especially, the stage-2 volcanic chain along the northern Ulleung Basin and the Yamato Seamount Chain in the Yamato Basin matches in their eruption timing (ca. 12 Ma) and geomorphic properties (i.e., direction of the volcanic chains and distances from subduction zone), which strongly suggests the existence of regional-scale chain volcanism across the southern East Sea. Considering the chemical properties of volcanic rock samples from the volcanic chain in association with the suggested tectonic frameworks during the Tertiary, the remnant magma source derived from the waning mantle convection most likely fed the volcanic chain in the terminal stage of back-arc opening.

  15. Spreading volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borgia, A.; Delaney, P.T.; Denlinger, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    As volcanoes grow, they become ever heavier. Unlike mountains exhumed by erosion of rocks that generally were lithified at depth, volcanoes typically are built of poorly consolidated rocks that may be further weakened by hydrothermal alteration. The substrates upon which volcanoes rest, moreover, are often sediments lithified by no more than the weight of the volcanic overburden. It is not surprising, therefore, that volcanic deformation includes-and in the long term is often dominated by-spreading motions that translate subsidence near volcanic summits to outward horizontal displacements around the flanks and peripheries. We review examples of volcanic spreading and go on to derive approximate expressions for the time volcanoes require to deform by spreading on weak substrates. We also demonstrate that shear stresses that drive low-angle thrust faulting from beneath volcanic constructs have maxima at volcanic peripheries, just where such faults are seen to emerge. Finally, we establish a theoretical basis for experimentally derived scalings that delineate volcanoes that spread from those that do not.

  16. Volcano Baseball

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-12

    In this game, learners are volcanoes that must complete several steps to erupt. Starting at home plate, learners draw cards until they have enough points to move to first base. This process repeats for each learner at each base, and each base demonstrates a different process in a volcano's eruption. The first learner to make it back to home plate erupts and is the winner. This is a good introduction to volcanoes. When learners set up a free account at Kinetic City, they can answer bonus questions at the end of the activity as a quick assessment. As a larger assessment, learners can complete the Smart Attack game after they've completed several activities.

  17. Mud Volcanoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Yuen Wang; Michael Manga

    \\u000a \\u000a Mud volcanoes\\u000a are surface structures formed by the eruption of mud from the subsurface. Figure 3.1 shows a typical examples. The erupted\\u000a materials are usually fine grained sediment, water, and gases, dominantly CO2 and methane. Fragments of country rock are also sometimes entrained. They range in size from <1 m, typical of mud volcanoes\\u000a formed by liquefaction\\u000a at shallow depths,

  18. Multiphase modelling of mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon, classically considered as the surface expression of piercement structures rooted in deep-seated over-pressured sediments in compressional tectonic settings. The release of fluids at mud volcanoes during repeated explosive episodes has been documented at numerous sites and the outflows resemble the eruption of basaltic magma. As magma, the material erupted from a mud volcano becomes more fluid and degasses while rising and decompressing. The release of those gases from mud volcanism is estimated to be a significant contributor both to fluid flux from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere, and to the atmospheric budget of some greenhouse gases, particularly methane. For these reasons, we simulated the fluid dynamics of mud volcanoes using a newly-developed compressible multiphase and multidimensional transient solver in the OpenFOAM framework, taking into account the multicomponent nature (CH4, CO2, H2O) of the fluid mixture, the gas exsolution during the ascent and the associated changes in the constitutive properties of the phases. The numerical model has been tested with conditions representative of the LUSI, a mud volcano that has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. The activity of LUSI mud volcano has been well documented (Vanderkluysen et al., 2014) and here we present a comparison of observed gas fluxes and mud extrusion rates with the outcomes of numerical simulations. Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E. & Smekens, J.-F. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 15, 2932-2946

  19. Internet Geography: Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site is part of GeoNet Internet Geography, a resource for pre-collegiate British geography students and their instructors. This page focuses on various aspects of volcanoes, including the main features of a volcano, types of volcanoes, the Ring of Fire, locations of volcanoes, volcanic flows, and case studies about specific volcanoes.

  20. Michigan Tech Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Michigan Tech Volcanoes Page encourages collaborative, interdisciplinary work on active volcanos, and links to resources for the Santa Maria Decade Volcano in Guatemala and for Central America's most frequently active volcano, Fuego. Also includes images of Pinatubo Volcano [one nice one taken from the Space Shuttle Endeavor] and some movies of laharic activity.

  1. Volcanoes in Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Indonesian island of Java (8.0S, 112.0) has over 35 active volcanoes, some of which are the most explosive in the world, and form an east/west line of peaks the length of the island. Five are in this image and at least one is thought to be currently active. The plume flowing north from Welirang (just east of the central cloud mass) is believed to be steam emissions. Also, the lack of vegetation at the peak indicates volcanic activity.

  2. Volcanic hazards at Atitlan volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haapala, J.M.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Griswold, J.P.; Schilling, S.P.; Ewert, J.W.; Mota, M.

    2006-01-01

    Atitlan Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlan caldera, which contains Lake Atitlan. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes--San Pedro, Toliman, and Atitlan--have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlan is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlan Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs. Eruptions of Atitlan began more than 10 ka [1] and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400's, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826-1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano's behavior is documented prior to the 1800's. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano's behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlan Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period. Because of Atitlan's moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlan and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlan Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness.

  3. The LUSI mud volcano triggering controversy: Was it caused by drilling?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nurrochmat Sawolo; Edi Sutriono; Bambang P. Istadi; Agung B. Darmoyo

    2009-01-01

    Following the Yogyakarta earthquake on May 27th, 2006, the subsequent eruption of a mud volcano has been closely observed and analyzed by the geological community. The mud volcano, known as LUSI, began erupting near the Banjarpanji-1 exploration well in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia. LUSI offers a unique opportunity to study the genesis and development of a mud volcano.For the first

  4. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Orr, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Lava from Kilauea volcano flowing through a forest in the Royal Gardens subdivision, Hawai'i, in February 2008. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitors the volcanoes of Hawai'i and is located within Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. HVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Kilauea and HVO at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  5. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) resource provides links to news and current events regarding volcanoes and current activities and a summary for the Cascade Range and its volcanoes. Other links connect to information about living with volcanoes, visiting a volcano, educational outreach, and hazards assessment reports and maps. There are also extensive menus for links to the USGS volcano hazards program, individual volcano information, and a FAQ site along with a menu of interests list and a miscellaneous list of sites.

  6. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  7. Scoping Meeting Summary, Kaunakakai, Moloka'i, March 12, 1992, 2 PM Session

    SciTech Connect

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.

    1992-06-01

    The meeting began with presentations by the facilitator, Mr. Spiegel, and Dr. Lewis, the program manager from DOE. The facilitator introduced those on the podium. He then described the general structure of the meeting and its purpose: to hear the issues and concerns of those present regarding the proposed Hawaiian Geothermal Project. He described his role as assuring the impartiality and fairness of the meeting. Dr. Lewis of DOE further defined the scope of the project, introduced members of the EIS team, and briefly described.the EIS process. The overwhelming concerns of the meeting were Native Hawaiian issues. The presenters [more than 70%, most of whom addressed no other issue] want the EIS to respect Native Hawaiian religion, race, rights, language, and culture, noting that they believe that geothermal development is a desecration of Pele [{approx}60% of all presenters]. They expressed concern that their ancestors and burials should not be desecrated. The EIS should address Native Hawaiian concerns that the HGP would negatively impact Native Hawaiian fisheries, subsistence lifestyles, and religious practices. Virtually all the speakers expressed frustration with government. Most (> 70%) of the speakers voiced concern and frustration regarding lack of consideration for Native Hawaiians by government and lack of trust in government. One commenter requested that the EIS should consider the international implications of the U.S allowing their rainforests to be cleared, when the U.S. government asks other nations to preserve theirs. Nearly 30% of the commenters want the EIS to address the concern that people on Moloka'i will bear major environmental consequences of the HGP, but not gain from it. The commenters question whether it is right for Moloka'i to pay for benefits to Oahu, particularly using an unproven technology. After questioning the reliability and feasibility of the marine cable:, nearly 30% of the presenters were concerned about the impacts of the submarine cable. In specific, they suggested that the EIS investigate the impacts the cable would have on fisheries and marine life due to electromagnetic fields, dredging, and oil-release. The EIS should study the impacts of the HGP on the humpback whale and other marine species, particularly their birthing grounds, noting whales' hypersensitivity to emf and sound. One commenter suggested that the EIS examine the economics of the cable, including the need to build specialized ships to lay it, harbour(s), and the cable itself. One commenter was concerned about the future uses of the cable suggesting that the EIS should address the impacts that would result if the cable connecting Moloka'i to Oahu is used to transmit power from large coal or other types of power generation facilities constructed on Moloka'i. Commenters questioned the reliability of geothermal development in a region that is both seismically and volcanically active. One suggested that the EIS examine the merits of projects that conserve energy. With respect to land use, commenters asked that the EIS examine the propriety of using Native Hawaiian homelands and ceded lands for the HGP, questioning specifically the land exchange in Puna [Campbell Estate for Wao Kele o Puna]. The commenters want the EIS to address the issue of air, water and sail quality preservation. More than 20% of the commenters asked that the EIS examine concerns about the environmental consequences of the HGP to the rainforest, including possible species extinction. In particular, the EIS should address the impacts of roads associated with the HGP in the rainforest, including the resulting importation of exotic species (for example banana poko), which successfully compete against native species; and the effects of noise and fumes which negatively impact plants, birds, animals, and insects.

  8. Understanding Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Frank Weisel

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on the three types of volcanoes: shield, cinder cone, and composite. Students research each type and then make models of each one to learn the distinctive properties of each type. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, an audio-enhanced vocabulary list, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  9. Coral proxy record of decadal-scale reduction in base flow from Moloka'i, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, N.G.; Jupiter, S.D.; Field, M.E.; McCulloch, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater is a major resource in Hawaii and is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, and industrial use. With a growing population, a long-term downward trend in rainfall, and the need for proper groundwater management, a better understanding of the hydroclimatological system is essential. Proxy records from corals can supplement long-term observational networks, offering an accessible source of hydrologie and climate information. To develop a qualitative proxy for historic groundwater discharge to coastal waters, a suite of rare earth elements and yttrium (REYs) were analyzed from coral cores collected along the south shore of Moloka'i, Hawaii. The coral REY to calcium (Ca) ratios were evaluated against hydrological parameters, yielding the strongest relationship to base flow. Dissolution of REYs from labradorite and olivine in the basaltic rock aquifers is likely the primary source of coastal ocean REYs. There was a statistically significant downward trend (-40%) in subannually resolved REY/Ca ratios over the last century. This is consistent with long-term records of stream discharge from Moloka'i, which imply a downward trend in base flow since 1913. A decrease in base flow is observed statewide, consistent with the long-term downward trend in annual rainfall over much of the state. With greater demands on freshwater resources, it is appropriate for withdrawal scenarios to consider long-term trends and short-term climate variability. It is possible that coral paleohydrological records can be used to conduct model-data comparisons in groundwater flow models used to simulate changes in groundwater level and coastal discharge. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. An autogamous rainforest species of Schiedea (Caryophyllaceae) from East Maui, Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, W.L.; Weller, S.G.; Sakai, A.K.; Medeiros, A.C.

    1999-01-01

    A new autogamous species of Schiedea is described and illustrated. It is known only from cliff habitat in rainforest on a single ridge in the Natural Area Reserve, Hanawi, East Maui. With the addition of this species there are 28 species in this endemic Hawaiian genus. The new species appears to be most closely related to Schiedea nuttallii, a species of mesic habitats on O'ahu, Moloka'i, and Maui.

  11. Distribution of differentiated tholeiitic basalts on the lower east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: a possible guide to geothermal exploration.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Geological mapping of the lower east rift zone indicates that >100 eruptions have extruded an estimated 10 km3 of basalt during the past 2000 yr; six eruptions in the past 200 yr have extruded approx 1 km3. The eruptive recurrence interval has ranged 1-115 yr since the middle of the 18th century and has averaged 20 yr or less over the past 2000 yr. New chemical analyses (100) indicate that the tholeiites erupted commonly differentiated beyond olivine control or are hybrid mixtures of differentiates with more mafic (olivine-controlled) summit magmas. The distribution of vents for differentiated lavas suggests that several large magma chambers underlie the lower east rift zone. Several workers have recognized that a chamber underlies the area near a producing geothermal well, HGP-A; petrological and 14C data indicate that it has existed for at least 1300 yr. Stratigraphy, petrology and surface-deformation patterns suggest that two other areas, Heiheiahulu and Kaliu, also overlie magma chambers and show favourable geothermal prospects.-A.P.

  12. Geologic map of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano forms a broad, seemingly nondescript highland, as viewed from any angle on the ground. Seen from an airplane, however, treeless lava flows are scattered across the surface of this potentially active volcanic edifice. Lavas of Medicine Lake volcano, which range in composition from basalt through rhyolite, cover more than 2,000 km2 east of the main axis of the Cascade Range in northern California. Across the Cascade Range axis to the west-southwest is Mount Shasta, its towering volcanic neighbor, whose stratocone shape contrasts with the broad shield shape of Medicine Lake volcano. Hidden in the center of Medicine Lake volcano is a 7 km by 12 km summit caldera in which nestles its namesake, Medicine Lake. The flanks of Medicine Lake volcano, which are dotted with cinder cones, slope gently upward to the caldera rim, which reaches an elevation of nearly 8,000 ft (2,440 m). The maximum extent of lavas from this half-million-year-old volcano is about 80 km north-south by 45 km east-west. In postglacial time, 17 eruptions have added approximately 7.5 km3 to its total estimated volume of 600 km3, and it is considered to be the largest by volume among volcanoes of the Cascades arc. The volcano has erupted nine times in the past 5,200 years, a rate more frequent than has been documented at all other Cascades arc volcanoes except Mount St. Helens.

  13. Terrestrial analogs to lunar sinuous rilles - Kauhako Crater and channel, Kalaupapa, Molokai, and other Hawaiian lava conduit systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Coombs; B. R. Hawke; L. Wilson

    1990-01-01

    Two source vents, one explosive and one effusive erupted to form a cinder cone and low lava shield that together compose the Kalaupapa peninsula of Molokai, Hawaii, A 50-100-m-wide channel\\/tube system extends 2.3 km northward from kauhako crater in the center of the shield. Based on modeling, a volume of up to about 0.2 cu km of lava erupted at

  14. Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

    1988-09-10

    Newberry, Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7--0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data.

  15. Types of Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This volcano resource introduces the six-type classification system and points out weaknesses of the classic three-type system. The six types of volcanoes are shield volcanoes, strato volcanoes, rhyolite caldera complexes, monogenetic fields, flood basalts, and mid-ocean ridges. For each type of volcano there is a description of both structure and dynamics along with examples of each. You can account for more than ninty percent of all volcanoes with these six types. Additionally, any system will be more useful if you use modifiers from the other potential classification schemes with the morphological types.

  16. Interactions Between Separated Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, A. T.; Sacks, I. S.; Kamigaichi, O.

    2002-05-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency installed and operates a network of borehole strainmeters in south-east Honshu. One of these instruments is on Izu-Oshima, a volcanic island at the northern end of the Izu-Bonin arc. That strainmeter recorded large strain changes associated with the 1986 eruption of Miharayama on the island. Miyake-jima, about 70 km south of Izu-Oshima, erupted in 1983. No deformation monitoring was available on Miyake-jima but several changes occurred in the strain record at Izu-Oshima. There was a clear change in the long-term strain rate 2 days before the Miyake eruption. Frequent short period events recorded by the strainmeter showed a marked change in their character. The Izu-Oshima strainmeter showed that, over the period from 1980 to the 1986 eruption, the amplitude of the solid earth tides increased by almost a factor of two. At the time of the Miyake eruption, the rate of increase of the tidal amplitude also changed. While all of these changes were observed on a single instrument, they are very different types of change. From a number of independent checks, we can be sure that the strainmeter did not experience any change in performance at that time. Thus it recorded a change in deformation behavior in three very different frequency bands: over very long term, at tidal periods ( ~ day) and at very short periods (minutes). It appears that the distant eruption in 1984 had an effect on the magmatic system under Izu-Oshima. More recent tomographic and seismic attenuation work in the Tohoku (northern Honshu) area has show the existence of a low velocity, high attenuation horizontally elongated structure under the volcanic front. If such a structure exists in the similar tectonic setting for these volcanoes, it could provide a mechanism for communication between the volcanoes.

  17. Diurnal variability in turbidity and coral fluorescence on a fringing reef flat: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piniak, Gregory A.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2008-03-01

    Terrigenous sediment in the nearshore environment can pose both acute and chronic stresses to coral reefs. The reef flat off southern Molokai, Hawaii, typically experiences daily turbidity events, in which trade winds and tides combine to resuspend terrigenous sediment and transport it alongshore. These chronic turbidity events could play a role in restricting coral distribution on the reef flat by reducing the light available for photosynthesis. This study describes the effects of these turbidity events on the Hawaiian reef coral Montipora capitata using in situ diurnal measurements of turbidity, light levels, and chlorophyll fluorescence yield via pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorometry. Average surface irradiance was similar in the morning and the afternoon, while increased afternoon turbidity resulted in lower subsurface irradiance, higher fluorescence yield (? F/ Fm'), and lower relative electron transport rates (rETR). Model calculations based on observed light extinction coeffecients suggest that in the absence of turbidity events, afternoon subsurface irradiances would be 1.43 times higher than observed, resulting in rETR for M. capitata that are 1.40 times higher.

  18. Slopes of Martian Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallianpur, K.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    2001-03-01

    We use MOLA data to derive slope maps of 9 volcanoes on Mars. Tharsis volcanoes have the same shape as Galapagos volcanoes with deep calderas. Alba Patera is very similar to Tyrrhena Patera. Slopes greater than 7 degrees are common on Elysium Mons.

  19. Monitoring Active Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Tilling

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication discusses the historic and current monitoring of active volcanoes around the globe. Techniques to measure deviations in pressure and stress induced by subterranean magma movement, as well as other technologies, explain the ways in which researchers monitor and predict volcanoes. Case studies of volcanoes such as Mt. St. Helens, El Chichon, Mauna Loa, and others are discussed.

  20. How Volcanoes Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This educational resource describes the science behind volcanoes and volcanic processes. Topics include volcanic environments, volcano landforms, eruption dynamics, eruption products, eruption types, historical eruptions, and planetary volcanism. There are two animations, over 250 images, eight interactive tests, and a volcano crossword puzzle.

  1. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is perched on the rim of Kilauea Volcano's summit caldera (next to the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park), providing a spectacular view of the active vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater....

  2. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes and Forecast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, E.

    2009-04-01

    EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (CAUSES AND FORECAST) ELIAS TSIAPAS RESEARCHER NEA STYRA, EVIA,GREECE TEL.0302224041057 tsiapas@hol.gr The earthquakes are caused by large quantities of liquids (e.g. H2O, H2S, SO2, ect.) moving through lithosphere and pyrosphere (MOHO discontinuity) till they meet projections (mountains negative projections or projections coming from sinking lithosphere). The liquids are moved from West Eastward carried away by the pyrosphere because of differential speed of rotation of the pyrosphere by the lithosphere. With starting point an earthquake which was noticed at an area and from statistical studies, we know when, where and what rate an earthquake may be, which earthquake is caused by the same quantity of liquids, at the next east region. The forecast of an earthquake ceases to be valid if these components meet a crack in the lithosphere (e.g. limits of lithosphere plates) or a volcano crater. In this case the liquids come out into the atmosphere by the form of gasses carrying small quantities of lava with them (volcano explosion).

  3. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  4. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO). The site features news and events, updates on current activity of Cascade Range volcanoes, and information summaries on each of the volcanoes in the range. There are also hazard assessment reports, maps, and a 'Living with Volcanoes' feature that provides general interest information. A set of menus provides access to more technical information, such as a glossary, information on volcano hydrology, monitoring information, a photo archive, and information on CVO research projects.

  5. Geology of Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    1990-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is located in an E-W extensional environment on the Modoc Plateau just east of the main arc of the Cascades. It consists mainly of mafic lavas, although drillhole data indicate that a larger volume of rhyolite is present than is indicated by surface mapping. The most recent eruption was rhyolitic and occurred about 900 years ago. At least seventeen eruptions have occurred since 12,000 years ago, or between 1 and 2 eruptions per century on average, although activity appears to be strongly episodic. The calculated eruptive rate is about 0.6 km3 per thousand years during the entire history of the volcano. Drillhole data indicate that the plateau surface underlying the volcano has been downwarped by 0.5 km under the center of MLV. The volcano may be even larger than the estimated 600 km3, already the largest volcano by volume in the Cascades.

  6. Chaiten Volcano, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    On May 2, 2008 Chile's Chaiten Volcano erupted after 9,000 years of inactivity. Now, 4 weeks later, the eruption continues, with ash-, water-, and sulfur-laden plumes blowing hundreds of kilometers to the east and north over Chile and Argentina. On May 24, ASTER captured a day-night pair of thermal infrared images of the eruption, displayed here in enhanced, false colors. At the time of the daytime acquisition (left image) most of the plume appears dark blue because it is too thick for upwelling ground radiation to penetrate. At the edges it appears orange, indicating the presence of ash and sulfur dioxide. In the nighttime image (right), the plume is orange and red near the source, and becomes more yellow-orange further away from the vent. The possible cause is that ash is settling out of the plume further downwind, revealing the dominant presence of sulfur dioxide.

    The images were acquired May 24, 2008, cover an area of 37 x 26.5 km, and are located near 42.7 degrees south latitude, 72.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Coastal circulation and water column properties off Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Molokai, Hawaii, 2008-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Presto, Katherine; Brown, Eric K.

    2011-01-01

    More than 2.2 million measurements of oceanographic forcing and the resulting water-column properties were made off U.S. National Park Service's Kalaupapa National Historical Park on the north shore of Molokai, Hawaii, between 2008 and 2010 to understand the role of oceanographic processes on the health and sustainability of the area's marine resources. The tides off the Kalaupapa Peninsula are mixed semidiurnal. The wave climate is dominated by two end-members: large northwest Pacific winter swell that directly impacts the study site, and smaller, shorter-period northeast trade-wind waves that have to refract around the peninsula, resulting in a more northerly direction before propagating over the study site. The currents primarily are alongshore and are faster at the surface than close to the seabed; large wave events, however, tend to drive flow in a more cross-shore orientation. The tidal currents flood to the north and ebb to the south. The waters off the peninsula appear to be a mix of cooler, more saline, deeper oceanic waters and shallow, warmer, lower-salinity nearshore waters, with intermittent injections of freshwater, generally during the winters. Overall, the turbidity levels were low, except during large wave events. The low overall turbidity levels and rapid return to pre-event background levels following the cessation of forcing suggest that there is little fine-grained material. Large wave events likely inhibit the settlement of fine-grained sediment at the site. A number of phenomena were observed that indicate the complexity of coastal circulation and water-column properties in the area and may help scientists and resource managers to better understand the implications of the processes on marine ecosystem health.

  8. Sediment resuspension and transport patterns on a fringing reef flat, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogston, A.S.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Presto, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    Corals are known to flourish in various turbid environments around the world. The quantitative distinction between clear and turbid water in coral habitats is not well defined nor are the amount of sediment in suspension and rates of sedimentation used to evaluate the condition of reef environments well established. This study of sediment resuspension, transport, and resulting deposition on a fringing reef flat off Molokai, Hawaii, uses a year of time-series data from a small, instrumented tripod. It shows the importance of trade winds and ocean wave heights in controlling the movement of sediment. Sediment is typically resuspended daily and the dominant controls on the magnitude of events (10-25 mg/l) are the trade-wind-generated waves and currents and tidal elevation on the reef flat. The net flux of sediment on this reef is primarily along the reef flat in the direction of the prevailing trade winds (to the west), with a secondary direction of slightly offshore, towards a zone of low coral abundance. These results have application to reef studies and reef management in other areas in several ways. First, the observed resuspension and turbidity results from fine-grained terrigenous sediment that appears to be trapped and recycled on the reef flat. Thus corals are subjected to light attenuation by the same particles repeatedly, however small the amount. Secondly, the measurements show high temporal variability (from daily to seasonal scales) of sediment resuspension, indicating that single measurements are inadequate to accurately describe conditions on a reef flat. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  9. Muria Volcano, Island of Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the north coast of central Java, Indonesia centers on the currently inactive Muria Volcano (6.5S, 111.0E). Muria is 5,330 ft. tall and lies just north of Java's main volcanic belt which runs east - west down the spine of the island attesting to the volcanic origin of the more than 1,500 Indonesian Islands.

  10. Lahar Hazards at Casita and San Cristóbal Volcanoes, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.; Reid, M.E.; Howell, M.M.; Brien, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Casita and San Cristóbal volcanoes are part of a volcano complex situated at the eastern end of the Cordillera de los Maribios. Other centers of volcanism in the complex include El Chonco, Cerro Moyotepe, and La Pelona. At 1745 m, San Cristóbal is the highest and only historically active volcano of the complex. The volcano’s crater is 500 to 600 m across and elongate east to west; its western rim is more than 100 m higher than its eastern rim. The conical volcano is both steep and symmetrical. El Chonco, which lies west of San Cristóbal, is crudely conical but has been deeply dissected by streams. Cerro Moyotepe to the northeast of San Cristóbal is even more deeply incised by erosion than El Chonco, and its crater is breached by erosion. Casita volcano, about 5 km east of San Cristóbal volcano, comprises a broad ridge like form, elongate along an eastwest axis, that is deeply dissected. Nested along the ridge are two craters. The younger one, La Ollada crater, truncates an older smaller crater to the east near Casita’s summit (1430 m). La Ollada crater is about 1 km across and 100 m deep. Numerous small fumarole fields occur near the summit of Casita and on nearby slopes outside of the craters. Casita volcano overlaps the 3-km-wide crater of La Pelona to the east. Stream erosion has deeply incised the slopes of La Pelona, and it is likely the oldest center of the Casita-San Cristóbal volcano complex. In late October and early November 1998, torrential rains of Hurricane Mitch caused numerous slope failures in Central America. The most catastrophic occurred at Casita volcano, on October 30, 1998. At Casita, five days of heavy rain triggered a 1.6-million-cubic-meter rock and debris avalanche that generated an 2- to 4- million-cubic-meter debris flow that swept down the steep slopes of the volcano. The debris flow spread out across the volcano’s apron, destroyed two towns, and killed more than 2500 people. In prehistoric time, Casita erupted explosively to form ash-fall deposits (tephra), debris avalanches, lava flows, and hot flowing mixtures of ash and rock (called pyroclastic flows). The chronology of activity at Casita is rather poorly known. Its last documented eruption occurred 8300 years ago, and included a pyroclastic flow. Tephra deposits exposed in the east crater suggest the possibility of subsequent eruptions. Work prior to Hurricane Mitch suggested that a part of the volcano’s apron that included the area inundated during the 1998 event south of Casita was a lahar pathway. Erosion during Hurricane Mitch revealed that at least three large lahars descended this pathway to distances of up to 10 km. This report describes the hazards of landslides and lahars in general, and discusses potential hazards from future landslides and lahars at San Cristóbal and Casita volcanoes in particular. The report also shows, in the accompanying lahar hazard-zonation maps, which areas are likely to be at risk from future landslides and lahars at Casita and San Cristóbal.

  11. Northern Arizona Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Northern Arizona is best known for the Grand Canyon. Less widely known are the hundreds of geologically young volcanoes, at least one of which buried the homes of local residents. San Francisco Mtn., a truncated stratovolcano at 3887 meters, was once a much taller structure (about 4900 meters) before it exploded some 400,000 years ago a la Mt. St. Helens. The young cinder cone field to its east includes Sunset Crater, that erupted in 1064 and buried Native American homes. This ASTER perspective was created by draping ASTER image data over topographic data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Data.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 20.4 by 24.6 kilometers (12.6 by 15.2 miles) Location: 35.3 degrees North latitude, 111.5 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: Landsat 30 meters (24.6 feet); ASTER 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 21, 2003

  12. Submersible study of mud volcanoes seaward of the Barbados accretionary wedge: sedimentology, structure and rheology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sophie Lance; Pierre Henry; Xavier Le Pichon; Siegfried Lallemant; Hervé Chamley; Frauke Rostek; Jean-Claude Faugères; Eliane Gonthier; Karine Olu

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, the Nautile went to a mud volcano field located east of the Barbados accretionary wedge near 13 ° 50N. Using nannofossil analysis on cores, we determined the sedimentation rate, and provided a new estimation of the age of the mud volcanoes (750,000 years for the oldest one). Six structures have been explored with the submersible Nautile, and manifestations

  13. Alaska Volcano Observatory Monitoring Station

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    An Alaska Volcano Observatory Monitoring station with Peulik Volcano behind. This is the main repeater for the Peulik monitoring network located on Whale Mountain, Beecharaof National Wildlife Refuge....

  14. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  15. Volcano Resources for Educators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides an up-to-date list of textual and video educational materials pertaining to volcanoes. The online pamphlets and books, hardcopy books, rental films and videos cover all levels of interest regarding volcanoes. The site furnishes the information or links to information needed to obtain these materials.

  16. Habits of a glacier-covered volcano: seismicity patterns and velocity structure of Katla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Tryggvason, Ari; Roberts, Roland; Lund, Björn; Soosalu, Heidi; Böðvarsson, Reynir

    The Katla volcano, overlain by the Mýrdalsjökull glacier, is one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in Iceland. Earthquakes show anomalous magnitude-frequency behaviour and mainly occur in two distinct areas: within the oval caldera and around Goðabunga, a bulge on its western flank. The seismicity differs between the areas; earthquakes in Goðabunga are low frequency and shallow whereas those beneath the caldera occur at greater depths and are volcano-tectonic. The seismicity shows seasonal variations but the rates peak at different times in the two areas. A snow budget model, which gives an estimate of the glacial loading, shows good correlation with seismic activity on an annual scale. Data recorded by the permanent network South Iceland Lowland (SIL), as well as by a temporary network, are used to invert for a 3D seismic velocity model underneath Eyjafjallajökull, Goðabunga and the Katla caldera. The tomography resolves a 15 km wide, aseismic, high-velocity structure at a depth of more than 4 km between the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in the west and the Katla volcano in the east. Anomalously low velocities are observed beneath the Katla caldera, which is interpreted as being a significantly fractured area of anomalously high temperature.

  17. Demise of reef-flat carbonate accumulation with late Holocene sea-level fall: Evidence from Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engels, M.S.; Fletcher, C.H.; Field, M.; Conger, C.L.; Bochicchio, C.

    2008-01-01

    Twelve cores from the protected reef-flat of Molokai revealed that carbonate sediment accumulation, ranging from 3 mm year-1 to less than 1 mm year-1, ended on average 2,500 years ago. Modern sediment is present as a mobile surface veneer but is not trapped within the reef framework. This finding is consistent with the arrest of deposition at the end of the mid-Holocene highstand, known locally as the "Kapapa Stand of the Sea," ???2 m above the present datum ca. 3,500 years ago in the main Hawaiian Islands. Subsequent erosion, non-deposition, and/or a lack of rigid binding were probable factors leading to the lack of reef-flat accumulation during the late Holocene sea-level fall. Given anticipated climate changes, increased sedimentation of reef-flat environments is to be expected as a consequence of higher sea level. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Thermal and mechanical development of the East African Rift System

    E-print Network

    Ebinger, Cynthia Joan

    1988-01-01

    The deep basins, uplifted flanks, and volcanoes of the Western and Kenya rift systems have developed along the western and eastern margins of the 1300 km-wide East African plateau. Structural patterns deduced from field, ...

  19. Vent of Sand Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Vent of sand volcano produced by liquefaction is about 4 ft across in strawberry field near Watsonville. Strip spanning vent is conduit for drip irrigation system. Furrow spacing is about 1.2 m (4 ft) on center....

  20. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1) Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2) Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3) The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is going to be, when we know the record of specific earthquakes and the routes they have followed towards the East. For example, to foresee an earthquake in the Mediterranean region, we take starting point earthquakes to Latin America (0°-40°).The aforementioned elements will reach Italy in an average time period of 49 days and Greece in 53 days. The most reliable preceding phenomenon to determine the epicenter of an earthquake is the rise of the crust's temperature at the area where a large quantity of elements is concentrated, among other phenomena that can be detected either by instruments or by our senses. When there is an active volcano along the route between the area where the "starting-point" earthquake occurred and the area where we expect the same elements to cause a new earthquake, it is possible these elements will escape through the volcano's crater, carrying lava with them. We could contribute to that end, nullifying earthquakes that might be triggered by these elements further to the east, by using manmade resources, like adequate quantities of explosives at the right moment.

  1. Preliminary Geologic Map of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Ramsey, D. W.; Jensen, R. A.; Champion, D. E.; Calvert, A. T.

    2010-12-01

    The late Pleistocene and Holocene rear-arc Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon east of the Cascades arc axis. Total area covered by the broad, shield-shaped edifice and its accompanying lava field is about 3,200 square kilometers, encompassing all or part of 38 U.S.G.S. 1:24,000-scale quadrangles. Distance from the northernmost extent of lava flows to the southernmost is about 115 km; east-west maximum width is less than 50 km. A printed version of the preliminary map at its intended publication scale of 1:50,000 is 8 ft high by 4 ft wide. More than 200 units have been identified so far, each typically consisting of the lava flow(s) and accompanying vent(s) that represent single eruptive episodes, some of which extend 10’s of kilometers across the edifice. Vents are commonly aligned north-northwest to north-northeast, reflecting a strong regional tectonic influence. The largest individual units on the map are basaltic, some extending nearly 50 km to the north through the cities of Bend and Redmond from vents low on the northern flank of the volcano. The oldest and most distal of the basalts is dated at about 350 ka. Silicic lava flows and domes are confined to the main edifice of the volcano; the youngest rhyolite flows are found within Newberry Caldera, including the rhyolitic Big Obsidian Flow, the youngest flow at Newberry Volcano (~1,300 yr B.P.). The oldest known rhyolite dome is dated at about 400 ka. Andesite units (those with silica contents between 57% and 63%) are the least common, with only 13 recognized to date. The present 6.5 by 8 km caldera formed about 75 ka with the eruption of compositionally-zoned rhyolite to basaltic andesite ash-flow tuff. Older widespread silicic ash-flow tuffs imply previous caldera collapses. Approximately 20 eruptions have occurred at Newberry since ice melted off the volcano in latest Pleistocene time. The mapping is being digitally compiled as a spatial geodatabase in ArcGIS. Within the geodatabase, feature classes have been created representing geologic lines (contacts, faults, lava tubes, etc.), geologic unit polygons, and volcanic vent location points. The geodatabase can be queried to determine the spatial distributions of different rock types, geologic units, and other geologic and geomorphic features. Map colors are being used to indicate compositions. Some map patterns have been added to distinguish the youngest lavas and the ash-flow tuffs. Geodatabase information can be used to better understand the evolution, growth, and potential hazards of the volcano.

  2. Mangroves and shoreline change on Molokai, Hawaii: Assessing the role of introduced Rhizophora mangle in sediment dynamics and coastal change using remote sensing and GIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret Mary D'Iorio

    2003-01-01

    The Florida red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, was introduced to the high volcanic island of Molokai, Hawaii in 1902 to trap sediment and stabilize eroding coastal mudflats along the island's reef-fringed south coast. This prolific invasive species now occupies 2.4 km2 of inter-tidal land and borders approximately 20% of the south coast shoreline. Integrating the fundamentals of remote sensing and Geographical

  3. Living With Volcanoes: The USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This report summarizes the Volcano Hazards Program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Topics include its goals and activities, some key accomplishments, and a plan for future operations. There are also discussions of active and potentially active volcanoes in the U.S., the role of the USGS volcano observatories, prediction of eruptions, and potential danger to aircraft from volcanic plumes.

  4. ConcepTest: Oldest Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Examine the diagram below. The lettered objects represent volcanoes formed on an oceanic plate above a hot spot. The arrow illustrates the direction of plate motion. Which volcano is the oldest? a. b. c. d.

  5. CO32- concentration and pCO2 thresholds for calcification and dissolution on the Molokai reef flat, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    The severity of the impact of elevated atmospheric pCO2 to coral reef ecosystems depends, in part, on how sea-water pCO2 affects the balance between calcification and dissolution of carbonate sediments. Presently, there are insufficient published data that relate concentrations of pCO 2 and CO32- to in situ rates of reef calcification in natural settings to accurately predict the impact of elevated atmospheric pCO2 on calcification and dissolution processes. Rates of net calcification and dissolution, CO32- concentrations, and pCO2 were measured, in situ, on patch reefs, bare sand, and coral rubble on the Molokai reef flat in Hawaii. Rates of calcification ranged from 0.03 to 2.30 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 and dissolution ranged from -0.05 to -3.3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1. Calcification and dissolution varied diurnally with net calcification primarily occurring during the day and net dissolution occurring at night. These data were used to calculate threshold values for pCO2 and CO32- at which rates of calcification and dissolution are equivalent. Results indicate that calcification and dissolution are linearly correlated with both CO32- and pCO2. Threshold pCO2 and CO32- values for individual substrate types showed considerable variation. The average pCO2 threshold value for all substrate types was 654??195 ??atm and ranged from 467 to 1003 ??atm. The average CO32- threshold value was 152??24 ??mol kg-1, ranging from 113 to 184 ??mol kg-1. Ambient seawater measurements of pCO2 and CO32- indicate that CO32- and pCO2 threshold values for all substrate types were both exceeded, simultaneously, 13% of the time at present day atmospheric pCO2 concentrations. It is predicted that atmospheric pCO2 will exceed the average pCO2 threshold value for calcification and dissolution on the Molokai reef flat by the year 2100.

  6. Michigan Technological University Volcanoes Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site offers links to current volcanic activity reports, volcanic hazards mitigation, information on Central American volcanoes, remote sensing of volcanoes, volcanologic research in online journals, and more. There are also links to a site with information on becoming a volcanologist, and a comics page of volcano humor.

  7. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  8. Hawaii's volcanoes revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Smith, John R.; Takahashi, Eiichi; Clague, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes typically evolve in four stages as volcanism waxes and wanes: (1) early alkalic, when volcanism originates on the deep sea floor; (2) shield, when roughly 95 percent of a volcano's volume is emplaced; (3) post-shield alkalic, when small-volume eruptions build scattered cones that thinly cap the shield-stage lavas; and (4) rejuvenated, when lavas of distinct chemistry erupt following a lengthy period of erosion and volcanic quiescence. During the early alkalic and shield stages, two or more elongate rift zones may develop as flanks of the volcano separate. Mantle-derived magma rises through a vertical conduit and is temporarily stored in a shallow summit reservoir from which magma may erupt within the summit region or be injected laterally into the rift zones. The ongoing activity at Kilauea's Pu?u ?O?o cone that began in January 1983 is one such rift-zone eruption. The rift zones commonly extend deep underwater, producing submarine eruptions of bulbous pillow lava. Once a volcano has grown above sea level, subaerial eruptions produce lava flows of jagged, clinkery ?a?a or smooth, ropy pahoehoe. If the flows reach the ocean they are rapidly quenched by seawater and shatter, producing a steep blanket of unstable volcanic sediment that mantles the upper submarine slopes. Above sea level then, the volcanoes develop the classic shield profile of gentle lava-flow slopes, whereas below sea level slopes are substantially steeper. While the volcanoes grow rapidly during the shield stage, they may also collapse catastrophically, generating giant landslides and tsunami, or fail more gradually, forming slumps. Deformation and seismicity along Kilauea's south flank indicate that slumping is occurring there today. Loading of the underlying Pacific Plate by the growing volcanic edifices causes subsidence, forming deep basins at the base of the volcanoes. Once volcanism wanes and lava flows no longer reach the ocean, the volcano continues to submerge, while erosion incises deep river valleys, such as those on the Island of Kaua?i. The edges of the submarine terraces that ring the islands, thus, mark paleocoastlines that are now as much as 2,000 m underwater, many of which are capped by drowned coral reefs.

  9. Augustine Volcano Sampling

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Students climb out of ravine on north flank of Augustine Volcano during descent from sampling the 2006 lava flow during 2010 summer field campaign. From left: Laurel Morrow (junior geology major at CSUF), Matthew Bidwell (Science teacher at South Junior High School in Anaheim, CA), Ashley Melendez (...

  10. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  11. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Plume Heights     View Larger ... among the best constraints for aerosol plume evolution modeling. These data are being used in continuing studies of the ... data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, VA. Image credit: ...

  12. Digital Geologic Map Database of Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Felger, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Medicine Lake volcano, located in the southern Cascades ~55 km east-northeast of Mount Shasta, is a large rear-arc, shield-shaped volcano with an eruptive history spanning nearly 500 k.y. Geologic mapping of Medicine Lake volcano has been digitally compiled as a spatial database in ArcGIS. Within the database, coverage feature classes have been created representing geologic lines (contacts, faults, lava tubes, etc.), geologic unit polygons, and volcanic vent location points. The database can be queried to determine the spatial distributions of different rock types, geologic units, and other geologic and geomorphic features. These data, in turn, can be used to better understand the evolution, growth, and potential hazards of this large, rear-arc Cascades volcano. Queries of the database reveal that the total area covered by lavas of Medicine Lake volcano, which range in composition from basalt through rhyolite, is about 2,200 km2, encompassing all or parts of 27 U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000-scale topographic quadrangles. The maximum extent of these lavas is about 80 km north-south by 45 km east-west. Occupying the center of Medicine Lake volcano is a 7 km by 12 km summit caldera in which nestles its namesake, Medicine Lake. The flanks of the volcano, which are dotted with cinder cones, slope gently upward to the caldera rim, which reaches an elevation of nearly 2,440 m. Approximately 250 geologic units have been mapped, only half a dozen of which are thin surficial units such as alluvium. These volcanic units mostly represent eruptive events, each commonly including a vent (dome, cinder cone, spatter cone, etc.) and its associated lava flow. Some cinder cones have not been matched to lava flows, as the corresponding flows are probably buried, and some flows cannot be correlated with vents. The largest individual units on the map are all basaltic in composition, including the late Pleistocene basalt of Yellowjacket Butte (296 km2 exposed), the largest unit on the map, whose area is partly covered by a late Holocene andesite flow. Silicic lava flows are mostly confined to the main edifice of the volcano, with the youngest rhyolite flows found in and near the summit caldera, including the rhyolitic Little Glass Mountain (~1,000 yr B.P.) and Glass Mountain (~950 yr B.P.) flows, which are the youngest eruptions at Medicine Lake volcano. In postglacial time, 17 eruptions have added approximately 7.5 km3 to the volcano’s total estimated volume of 600 km3, which may be the largest by volume among Cascade Range volcanoes. The volcano has erupted nine times in the past 5,200 years, a rate more frequent than has been documented at all other Cascade volcanoes except Mount St. Helens.

  13. Space Radar Image of Sakura-Jima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The active volcano Sakura-Jima on the island of Kyushu, Japan is shown in the center of this radar image. The volcano occupies the peninsula in the center of Kagoshima Bay, which was formed by the explosion and collapse of an ancient predecessor of today's volcano. The volcano has been in near continuous eruption since 1955. Its explosions of ash and gas are closely monitored by local authorities due to the proximity of the city of Kagoshima across a narrow strait from the volcano's center, shown below and to the left of the central peninsula in this image. City residents have grown accustomed to clearing ash deposits from sidewalks, cars and buildings following Sakura-jima's eruptions. The volcano is one of 15 identified by scientists as potentially hazardous to local populations, as part of the international 'Decade Volcano' program. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 9, 1994. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered at 31.6 degrees North latitude and 130.6 degrees East longitude. North is toward the upper left. The area shown measures 37.5 kilometers by 46.5 kilometers (23.3 miles by 28.8 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is the average of L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received and C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received.

  14. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals and current monitoring level; associated hazards; and detailed descriptions of possible eruption scenarios. Where data allows, the likelihood of different eruption scenarios will also be depicted by probabilistic event trees. The chapters are illustrated with a number of figures, interactive maps and photographs.

  15. Multiparameter Volcano Surveillance of Villarrica Volcano (South-Central Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, Kristin; Peña, Paola; Dzierma, Yvonne; Hansteen, Thor; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Gil, Fernando

    2010-05-01

    Villarrica is one of the most active volcanoes in Chile and one of the few in the world known to have an active lava lake within its crater. This snow-covered volcano generates frequent strombolian eruptions and lava flows and, at times, the melting of snow can cause massive lahars. Besides this, continuous degassing and high-level seismicity are the most common types of activity recorded at the volcano. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving the persistent degassing and seismic activity at the volcano, we use a multiparameter approach based on the combined study of high time-resolved gas and seismic data. These data are respectively acquired by means of 3 stationary NOVAC-type scanning Mini-DOAS and 7 additional seismometers (short period and broad bands), installed at the volcano since March 2009, that complement the existing OVDAS (Observatorio Volcanológico de los Andes del Sur) volcano monitoring network. On the basis of the combination of gas and seismological measurements we aim at gaining insight into volcano-magmatic processes, and factors playing a role on onset of volcanic unrest and eruptive activity. Since the gas monitoring network has been installed at the volcano a correlation between SO2 emissions and seismic activity (LP events) has been recognized. A possible role played by regional tectonics on detected changes in volcano degassing and seismicity, and consequently on the volcanic activity, is also investigated.

  16. Swift snowmelt and floods (lahars) caused by great pyroclastic surge at Mount St Helens volcano, Washington, 18 May 1980

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard B. Waitt

    1989-01-01

    The initial explosions at Mount St. Helens, Washington, on the moring of 18 May 1980 developed into a huge pyroclastic surge that generated catastrophic floods off the east and west flanks of the volcano. Near-source surge deposits on the east and west were lithic, sorted, lacking in accretionary lapilli and vesiculated ash, not plastered against upright obstacles, and hot enough

  17. The LUSI mud volcano triggering controversy: Was it caused by drilling? Nurrochmat Sawolo, Edi Sutriono, Bambang P. Istadi*, Agung B. Darmoyo

    E-print Network

    Manga, Michael

    volcano LUSI Underground blowout Earthquake East Java Watukosek a b s t r a c t Following the Yogyakarta earthquake on May 27th, 2006, the subsequent eruption of a mud volcano has been closely observed and analyzed relief wells (Sonan and temperature log runs). This study offers a different alternative to earlier

  18. Geologists on Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Two HVO geologists are standing on the east rim of Pu`u `? `? cone, triangulating the depth of several degassing vents inside the crater. An infrared camera is being used to see the vents through the fume. The plume in the background is coming from the east wall vent....

  19. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. It features news articles, monitoring information, status reports and information releases, and information on the volcanic history of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field. Users can access monthly updates with alert levels and aviation warning codes and real-time data on ground deformation, earthquakes, and hydrology. There is also a list of online products and publications, and an image gallery

  20. Gelatin Volcanoes: Student Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the Student Page of an activity that teaches students how and why magma moves inside volcanoes by injecting colored water into a clear gelatin cast. The Student Page contains the activity preparation instructions and materials list, key words, and a photograph of the experimental setup. There is also an extension activity question that has students predict what will happen when the experiment is run using an elongated model. This activity is part of Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Volcanology section.

  1. Earthquakes and Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Medina, Philip

    This unit provides an introduction for younger students on earthquakes, volcanoes, and how they are related. Topics include evidence of continental drift, types of plate boundaries, types of seismic waves, and how to calculate the distance to the epicenter of an earthquake. There is also information on how earthquake magnitude and intensity are measured, and how seismic waves can reveal the Earth's internal structure. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  2. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. (National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  3. Explosive Eruptions of Kamchatkan Volcanoes in 2013 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Demyanchuk, Yury; Petrova, Elena

    2014-05-01

    There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka, and three of them (Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, and Karymsky) continuously active. In 2013, five of the Kamchatkan volcanoes - Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Karymsky, Zhupanovsky, and Mutnovsky - had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2013: on June 26, on October 18, and on December 03: ash plumes rose up to 10 km a.s.l. and extended about 200-400 km, respectively, to the south-west, south-southeast, and north of the volcano. A form of pyroclastic flow deposits with run-out 12 km accompanied these explosive eruptions. Ashfalls occurred at Klyuchi Village (on June 26) and Ivashka Village (on December 03). Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Klyuchevskoy volcano had two eruptions in 2013: moderate Strombolian explosive eruption from October 14, 2012, till January 15, 2013; and strong Strombolian-Vulcanian explosive and effusive eruption from August 15, 2013, till December 20, 2013. There were four lava flows to effuse on the north-west, west and south-western volcanic flanks. Probably a flank eruption began at the pass between Klyuchevskoy volcano and Kamen volcano on October 06. Culmination of strong Vulcanian explosive activity of the volcano occurred on October 15-20: ash column rose up to 10-12 km a.s.l. and ash plumes extended to the different directions of the volcano according to cyclonic activity in the this area. Phreatic ash plumes on the fronts of lava flows rose up to 5 km a.s.l. Weak ash falls were noted at Klyuchi Village on October 09 and 13, and Mayskoe Village on October 16. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Karymsky volcano has been in a state of explosive eruption since 1996. The moderate explosive eruption continued during all 2013. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to local aviation. Moderate explosive phreatic eruption of Zhupanovsky volcano occurred on October 23-24, 2013. Ash explosions rose up to 5 km a.s.l. and ash plumes extended for about 120 km mainly to the east and south-east of the volcano. A thickness of ash was about 10 cm at the volcano summit. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to local aviation. Several moderate phreatic explosions were noted by observers at Active crater of Mutnovsky volcano on July 03. Ash plumes were not noted at satellite images.

  4. EAST AFRICA EAST AFRICA

    E-print Network

    Denham, Graham

    in rwanda Helped review and develop nurse training curriculum and overall medical education in Rwanda.7+million SHARCNET Access granted to all partner universities in East Africa CIDA UPCD project, Rebuilding Star grant for diabetes diagnostics project in Kenya led by Jin Zhang (2011) $100thousand Formation

  5. Multiple explosive rhyolite/trachyte eruptions of alkaline-peralkaline Nemrut and dacite/rhyolite eruptions of neighboring subduction zone-related Süphan volcano over 600 000 years: the East Anatolian tephra province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmincke, H.-U.; Sumita, M.; Paleovan scientific Team

    2012-04-01

    The active Nemrut stratovolcano (2918 m asl) (Eastern Anatolia) is topped by a spectacular caldera and dominates the area west of huge Lake Van that covers its lower flanks. The stratovolcano has been active explosively for at least ca. 600 ka based on drilling evidence (ICDP Paleovan project). We have identified, correlated and compositionally characterized some 40 fallout sheets on land - none previously known - the largest ones probably with magma volumes exceeding 30 km3(DRE). The alkaline to peralkaline tephras are dominated by anorthoclase, Fe-rich clinopyroxene and fayalite with quartz and aenigmatite in some. Large-volume comenditic to pantelleritic rhyolite eruptions occurred in intervals of 20 000 - 40 000 years with smaller volume trachytic tephra deposits in between reflecting overall fairly constant magma transfer rates periodically fractionating to highly evolved rhyolite in larger magma reservoirs. Many of the ca. 10 widespread ignimbrite sheets, nearly all newly recognized, commonly followed on the heels of rhyolitic fallout sheets. They are more mafic than the underlying fallout deposits, magma mixing being common. Widespread spectacular agglutinates represent a late phase of the youngest large-volume fallout/ignimbrite eruption at ca. 30 ka. Active Süphan stratovolcano (4158 m asl), some 50 km NE of Nemrut and bordering Lake Van to the north, is dominated in contrast by subduction-related chemistry and mineralogy, smaller-volume eruptions and more advanced crystallization of magmas prior to eruption. Chief phenocrysts comprise complex disequilibrium assemblages of clinopyroxene, hypersthene, olivine, strongly zoned plagioclase, biotite and/or amphibole and common clots of fractionating phases. Many of the highly viscous and crystal-laden Süphan magmas were emplaced as domes and debris avalanches next to fallout sheets and ignimbrites. The dominant NE direction of fan axes of partial isopach maps of ca. 15 major fallout deposits reflecting prevailing wind directions for more than half a million years suggest that well-dated tephra markers of alkaline/peralkaline Nemrut, and sofar less well-dated "calcalkaline" Süphan and Ararat volcanoes represent a major tephrostratigraphic framework that should provide for excellent tephra markers in neighboring countries (e.g. Iran, Armenia, Aserbeidschan) and the Caspian Sea.

  6. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability of coverage by future lava flows.

  7. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Cameron; J. Dehn; J. E. Bailey; P. Webley

    2009-01-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO's remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's

  8. Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page consists of two maps of the world, showing how earthquakes define the boundaries of tectonic plates. Volcanoes are also distributed at plate boundaries (the "Ring of Fire" in the Pacific) and at oceanic ridges. It is part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory website, which features written material, images, maps, and links to related topics.

  9. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  10. Gelatin Volcanoes: Teacher Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the Teacher Page of an activity that teaches students how and why magma moves inside volcanoes by injecting colored water into a clear gelatin cast. Activity preparation instructions are on the Student Page, while the Teacher Page has background, preparation, and in-class information. An extension activity has the students repeat the experiment using a square bread pan to simulate the original research that was done using elongate models with triangular cross-sections. This activity is part of Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Volcanology section.

  11. Volcanoes, Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The island of Java (8.0S, 112.0E), perhaps better than any other, illustrates the volcanic origin of Pacific Island groups. Seen in this single view are at least a dozen once active volcano craters. Alignment of the craters even defines the linear fault line of Java as well as the other some 1500 islands of the Indonesian Archipelago. Deep blue water of the Indian Ocean to the south contrasts to the sediment laden waters of the Java Sea to the north.

  12. Migration of a Caldera Eruptive Center, Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frone, Z.; Waibel, A.; Blackwell, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in Deschutes County, Oregon about 35 km south of the city of Bend. It is a bi-modal Quaternary volcano and is one of the largest volcanos in the Cascade Range. The volcano is positioned near the junction of three geologic provinces: the Cascade Range to the west, the High Lava Plains portion of the Basin and Range to the south and east, and the Blue Mountains to the northeast. Newberry Volcano has been active for the past 600,000 years and has had at least two caldera-forming eruptions. The most recent major caldera-related eruptions, resulting in significant silicic ash and pyroclastic deposits, occurred approximately 300,000 and 80,000 years ago. A large-volume basaltic eruption that occurred about 72,000 years ago is represented by the widespread Bend Lavas which extend approximately 70 km to the north of the central caldera. About 6,000 years ago numerous basaltic eruptions occurred along a northwest fracture zone. The most recent eruption, a silicic obsidian flow and associated pumice fall that vented from within the caldera, has been dated at 1,300 ybp. Newberry has been the site of multiple rounds of geothermal exploration over the past 30 years. Geophysical data including gravity, resistivity, and seismic studies collected in the 1980s in early exploration of the volcano have identified anomalous features beneath the west flank of the volcano. Four deep (<2.8km) wells have been drilled on the northern half of the west flank; all of the wells have encountered temperatures in excess of 300°C, however, three of the wells have low permeability and unconnected fractures. The fourth well showed evidence of a hydrothermal system, but the well caved before a flow test could be completed. Recent geophysical analysis coupled with well geochemistry has identified evidence for older nested caldera related eruptive events buried under younger west flank lavas. A strong gravity gradient, a sharp MT boundary, and arcuate surface features from LIDAR coupled with 300-1200m offsets in units between wells is evidence that the caldera has migrated to the east over time. Buried silicic lavas are observed on the west flank; these lavas include McKay Butte, West Flank Dome, and Southwest Flank Dome. If this conclusion is correct, buried volcanic features similar to those observed in the present caldera could be expected under portions of the west flank, now buried by subsequent volcanic units. Hydrothermal systems, as exposed by erosion in older caldera mineral deposits, may be found associated with these features at Newberry.

  13. Explosive Eruptions of Kamchatkan Volcanoes in 2012 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Demyanchuk, Yury; Petrova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka and 6 active volcanoes in the Northern Kuriles, and 4 of them continuously active. In 2012 seven strong explosive eruptions of the Kamchatkan and the Northern Kuriles volcanoes Sheveluch, Bezymianny, Kizimen, Tolbachik, Klyuchevskoy, and Karymsky took place. In addition, higher fumarolic activity of Gorely volcano was observed. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2012: on January 22-23; on March 16-17; March 25-30 - June 03; and on September 18: ash plumes rose up to 10 km a.s.l. and extended about 200-2000 km to the different directions of the volcano. The eruptive activity of Bezymianny volcano began since 1955, and is continuing at present as growth of the lava dome. Two paroxysmal explosive phases of the eruption occurred on March 08 and September 01: ash plumes rose up to 8-12 km a.s.l. and extended about 1500 km to the east-north-east of the volcano. Eruption of Kizimen volcano began on December 09, 2010, and continues. Strong explosive eruption began in mid-December, 2010, - ash plumes rose up to 10 km a.s.l. and extended > 800 km from the volcano. There are several stages of the eruption: explosive (from 09 December 2010 to mid-January 2011); explosive-effusive (mid-January to mid-June 2011); effusive (mid-January 2011 to September 2012). Extrusive-effusive phase of eruption of the volcano continues at present. Strombolian explosive eruption of Klyuchevskoy volcano began on October 14, 2012, and continues at present. Tolbachik. Explosive-effusive fissure eruption at Tolbachinsky Dol began on November 27, 2012, and continues. Four cinder cones grew at the fissure; lava flows extended about 20 km of vents. Karymsky volcano has been in a state of explosive eruption since 1996. The moderate explosive eruption continued during all 2012. The eruptive activity of Alaid volcano began on October 06 and probably finished in mid- December, 2012. Gas-steam plumes containing small amount of ash rose up to 3 km a.s.l., a small cinder cone grew into summit volcanic crater. Satellite data showed a weak thermal anomaly over the volcano on October-November. Strong fumarolic activity of Gorely volcano began to noting from June 2010 and continues at present. A new vent on the wall of the volcanic active crater was discovered on June 17, 2010. The crater lake disappeared to Summer 2012.

  14. Active submarine volcano sampled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Brian

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh olivine basalt were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, from water depths of 400 and 900 m. The shallower dredge site was within one-half mile of the active submarine vent evidenced at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano located on the ‘trench-slope break’ or ‘outer-arc high’ of the New Georgia Group, approximately 35 km seaward of the main volcanic line and only 30 km landward of the base of the trench inner wall. The volcano has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see cover photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978, but in each case it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982.

  15. Active Monitoring for Active Volcanoes - A challenge at Sakurajima volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Watanabe, T.; Michishita, T.; Miyamachi, H.; Iguchi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative monitoring of magma transport process is essentially important for understanding the volcanic process and prediction of volcanic eruptions. To realize this monitoring, a project, deployment of an active source called ACROSS in Sakurajima volcano, is being underway. In this study, we assessed the feasibility of the capability of monitoring using ACROSS vibrator system for Sakurajima volcano in terms of detectability of signal and its temporal variation due to reasonable change in volcanic structure. Sakurajima volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the world, which erupts more than a thousand times in 2010, and has been intensively monitored by a research observatory. We chose Sakurajima volcano as a first test site for volcano monitoring with ACROSS because of its well-deployed seismic network and repeating volcanic eruptions. First we assess the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the case in which we use the same source as deployed in the Tokai area. The detectability of temporal change in the signal from the source is simply dependent on the SNR at the receivers. As the SNR increases with the length of data-stacking, we estimate the reasonable stacking length and the distance range that ACROSS signal can be recorded with enough SNR. We use a general distance dependent attenuation model including geometrical spreading and internal energy dissipation to estimate the parameters describing source strength and internal energy dissipation. We use a attenuation relation that is estimated by existing ACROSS source in the Tokai area to estimate the source strength. As for the internal energy dissipation we use the data of explosion experiment that was carried out around Sakurajima volcano in 2008. The result shows that the signal of an ACROSS vibrator can be recorded with good SNR for the whole area of Sakurajima island for the staking length of 3 months. Next we assess the effect of attenuation (Q) on the detectability of structure change for the realistic volcano structure. We created a structure model of Sakurajima volcano with existing structure model and calculated the change in spectral signal by a small change of structure model. The result shows that the low-Q nature of volcano has little effect on the ACROSS signal in low frequency band (3.5-7.5Hz). These results will be compared with the actual observation experiment in the coming years. Acknowledgement: We use the data-set of the exploration experiment in Sakurajima volcano which is carried out by Volcano eruption prediction group in 2008.

  16. Elysium Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On July 4, 1998--the first anniversary of the Mars Pathfinder landing--Mars Global Surveyor's latest images were radioed to Earth with little fanfare. The images received on July 4, 1998, however, were very exciting because they included a rare crossing of the summit caldera of a major martian volcano. Elysium Mons is located at 25oN, 213oW, in the martian eastern hemisphere. Elysium Mons is one of three large volcanoes that occur on the Elysium Rise-- the others are Hecates Tholus (northeast of Elysium Mons) and Albor Tholus (southeast of Elysium Mons). The volcano rises about 12.5 kilometers (7.8 miles) above the surrounding plain, or about 16 kilometers (9.9 miles) above the martian datum-- the 'zero' elevation defined by average martian atmospheric pressure and the planet's radius.

    Elysium Mons was discovered by Mariner 9 in 1972. It differs in a number of ways from the familiar Olympus Mons and other large volcanoes in the Tharsis region. In particular, there are no obvious lava flows visible on the volcano's flanks. The lack of lava flows was apparent from the Mariner 9 images, but the new MOC high resolution image--obtained at 5.24 meters (17.2 feet) per pixel--illustrates that this is true even when viewed at higher spatial resolution.

    Elysium Mons has many craters on its surface. Some of these probably formed by meteor impact, but many show no ejecta pattern characteristic of meteor impact. Some of the craters are aligned in linear patterns that are radial to the summit caldera--these most likely formed by collapse as lava was withdrawn from beneath the surface, rather than by meteor impact. Other craters may have formed by explosive volcanism. Evidence for explosive volcanism on Mars has been very difficult to identify from previous Mars spacecraft images. This and other MOC data are being examined closely to better understand the nature and origin of volcanic features on Mars.

    The three MOC images, 40301 (red wide angle), 40302 (blue wide angle), and 40303 (high resolution, narrow angle) were obtained on Mars Global Surveyor's 403rd orbit around the planet around 9:58 - 10:05 p.m. PDT on July 2, 1998. The images were received and processed at Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) around 4:00 p.m. PDT on July 4, 1998.

    This image: MOC image 40303, shown at 25% of its original size. North is approximately up, illumination is from the right. Resolution of picture shown here is 21 meters (69 feet) per pixel. Image was received with bright slopes saturated at DN=255.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  17. Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 1111

    E-print Network

    Rose, William I.

    Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 11111 Open-File Report 01­431Open-File Report 01

  18. Volcano-tectonic activity along structures of the unstable NE flank of Mt. Etna (Italy) and their possible origin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alessandro Tibaldi; Gianluca Groppelli

    2002-01-01

    We describe the prehistoric–historic activity of the main and minor volcano-tectonic structures of the northeastern flank of Mt. Etna, giving new data which provide a clearer view of how destabilized volcanoes react to magma pressure and gravity forces. Data are mostly based on new lithostratigraphic surveys and on offset measurements of late Pleistocene–Holocene deposits and historic man-made features. The North-East

  19. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  20. Groundwater Flow System of Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazahaya, K.; Yasuhara, M.; Inamura, A.; Sumii, T.; Hoshizumi, H.; Kohno, T.; Ohsawa, S.; Yusa, Y.; Kitaoka, K.; Yamaguchi, K.

    2001-12-01

    Unzen volcano (peak 1486 m) is developed on the western part of Beppu-Shimabara Graben (20 km NS wide and 200 km EW long) located at Kyushu island, SW Japan. We have been studied groundwater system of the volcano using geochemical and hydrological technique in order to estimate flux of magmatic volatiles through the groundwater. We have collected over 150 sample waters from springs, rivers, and wells, and they are analyzed for major chemistry and stable isotope ratios. Over 50 pore waters were extracted from 100-1200m-deep drilled cores at the eastern flank of the volcano by a centrifugal separator. The results are summarized as follows: 1) Flow rates of springs and rivers indicate that most of the groundwater recharged at Unzen volcano flew down the slope directed to the east, which is restricted by graben structure. 2) All the groundwaters and spring waters collected inside the graben area are isotopically homogeneous, i. e., -48~-45 permil for hydrogen isotope ratio, indicating that the groundwater is well mixed during flowing. 3) In spite of the isotopic homogeneity, the groundwaters are chemically different from each other. In particular, bicarbonate concentration ranged from 20 to 180 mg/l, and it is inconsistent with the isotopic results. There are some active faults parallel to the graben, and bicarbonate anomalies are found close to the faults. Therefore, the chemical variation is likely to be made due to the addition of deep-seated CO2 ascending through the faults. 4) Linear relation between 1/DIC and carbon isotope ratio of DIC indicates that the DIC in groundwater is explained by simple mixing with two source, magmatic and organic matters. Combining the flow rate data, DIC concentrations and carbon isotope ratios, we estimated the magmatic CO2 flux as 30 t/d through the fault system. 5) Pore waters at 100-300m deep have similar isotopic composition to the present shallow groundwater and river waters, suggesting that those pore waters occupy a part of the shallowest aquifer. On the other hand, pore waters collected from the drilled core at greater than 500m show isotopic discontinuity in the vertical variation, indicating that stagnant aquifers formed at deeper levels.

  1. Types and Effects of Volcano Hazards

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website discusses volcano hazards by type (gas, lahars, landslides, lava flows, pyroclastic flows, and tephra) and by the effect volcanoes have on people and land. This site gives an overview of volcano hazards and links to selected case studies listed by country, volcano, year, and type of hazard. Links to more USGS information about volcanoes, such as a photo glossary, a site index, observatories, and an educator's page are also provided.

  2. Mangroves and shoreline change on Molokai, Hawaii: Assessing the role of introduced Rhizophora mangle in sediment dynamics and coastal change using remote sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Iorio, Margaret Mary

    The Florida red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, was introduced to the high volcanic island of Molokai, Hawaii in 1902 to trap sediment and stabilize eroding coastal mudflats along the island's reef-fringed south coast. This prolific invasive species now occupies 2.4 km2 of inter-tidal land and borders approximately 20% of the south coast shoreline. Integrating the fundamentals of remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems, this research investigates the effects of mangrove introduction on sediment dynamics and coastal change on south Molokai throughout the 20th century and provides a baseline of mangrove distribution, a detailed record of shoreline change rates, and a chronological history of island land use and environmental change. Monitoring of coastal change associated with mangroves is essential to understanding how natural coastal ecosystems react to alien species introductions and adapt overall to changing climatic regimes. Comparing the accuracy of various remote sensing instruments and processing techniques, this study has shown that the remote sensing with modern airborne and satellite sensors offers an effective management tool for mapping baseline conditions and monitoring change in remote island environments like that on the south coast of Molokai. Shoreline change assessment found that shoreline change rates on the island's south coast varied both alongshore and through time and that the dominant change has been one of progradation. Rates of change peaked in the early part of the 20th century and have since decayed exponentially over time. Changing land use practices coupled with the introduction of invasive species may have strongly influenced observed variability in rates of coastal change. Field observations and sediment analysis suggest that sediment transfer across the coastal boundary on the mangrove-fringed south coast is relatively limited and appears to be mainly event-driven. For shallow, reef-fringed, coastal regions vulnerable to submergence with a scenario of rising sea level and where land use practices and variable seasonal climate affect sediment delivery to the coast, mangroves are instrumental in trapping terrestrial sediment at the shoreline, play an important role in determining local sources and sinks of coastal sediment, and may contribute to the overall health and sustainability of nearshore reef resources.

  3. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet.

    Size: 40.5 x 40.5 km (25.1 x 25.1 miles) Location: 16.7 deg. North lat., 62.2 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: October 29, 2002

  4. Space Radar Image of Kiluchevskoi, Volcano, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the area of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the blue triangular peak in the center of the image, towards the left edge of the bright red area that delineates bare snow cover. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 88th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 75 kilometers by 100 kilometers (46 miles by 62 miles) that is centered at 56.07 degrees north latitude and 160.84 degrees east longitude. North is toward the bottom of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the recent activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In addition to Kliuchevskoi, two other active volcanoes are visible in the image. Bezymianny, the circular crater above and to the right of Kliuchevskoi, contains a slowly growing lava dome. Tolbachik is the large volcano with a dark summit crater near the upper right edge of the red snow covered area. The Kamchatka River runs from right to left across the bottom of the image. The current eruption of Kliuchevskoi included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 15,000 meters (50,000 feet). Melting snow mixed with volcanic ash triggered mud flows on the flanks of the volcano. Paths of these flows can be seen as thin lines in various shades of blue and green on the north flank in the center of the image. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  5. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T.L.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Ramsey, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ??? 55??km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ??? 2000??km2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ??? 475 to 300??ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ??? 300??ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300??ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ??? 200 to ??? 180??ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ??? 100??ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100??ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200??years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ??? 600??km3, giving an overall effusion rate of ??? 1.2??km3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100??kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline basalts erupted together in close temporal and spatial proximity. Petrologic studies indicate that the HAOT magmas were derived by dry melting of spinel peridotite mantle near the crust mantle boundary. Subduction-derived H2O-rich fluids played an important role in the generation of calcalkaline magmas. Petrology, geochemistry and proximity indicate that MLV is part of the Cascades magmatic arc and not a Basin and Range volcano, although Basin and Range extension impinges on the volcano and strongly influences its eruptive style. MLV may be analogous to Mount Adams in southern Washington, but not, as sometimes proposed, to the older distributed back-arc Simcoe Mountains volcanic field.

  6. Monitoring Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Don

    Monitoring volcanoes is a surprisingly controversial enterprise. Some volcanologists argue that monitoring promises too much and delivers too little for risk mitigation. They trust only strict land-use measures (and accompanying high insurance premiums in risky zones) and urge that funds be used for public education and awareness rather than for instrumental monitoring. Others claim that monitoring is more akin to Brownian motion than to science: lots of action but little net progress. Still other volcanologists acknowledge the potential value of monitoring for prediction and warning but despair at the difficulty of it all. And, finally, some shy from surveillance, fearing the legal consequences of a failed monitoring effort during these litigious times. They wonder, “Will I be sued if an eruption is not foreseen or if an instrument fails at a critical time?”

  7. Drilling, Construction, Water-Level, and Water-Quality Information for the Kualapuu Deep Monitor Well, 4-0800-01, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Bauer, Glenn R.

    2001-01-01

    A monitor well was completed in January 2001 by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Kualapuu area of central Molokai, Hawaii that allows for monitoring the thicknesses of the freshwater body and the upper part of the underlying freshwater-saltwater transition zone. The well was drilled in cooperation with the State Department of Hawaiian Home Lands and the Maui County Department of Water Supply, and is located near the area that supplies much of the drinking water on Molokai. The well is at a ground-surface elevation of about 982 feet and penetrated a 1,585-foot section of soil and volcanic rock to a depth of 603 feet below sea level. Prior to casing, a cave-in caused the bottom 55 feet of the well to be filled with rocks originating from a zone above. Thus, the final well depth reported by the driller was 1,530 feet. Measured water levels in the well during the period from February 1 to July 13, 2001 range from 8.68 to 9.05 feet above sea level. The most recent available water-conductivity profile from July 13, 2001 indicates that the lowest salinity water in the well is in the upper zone from the water table to a depth of about 220 feet below sea level. Below this upper zone, water salinity increases with depth. The water-temperature profile from July 13, 2001 indicates that the lowest temperature water (20.2 degrees Celsius) in the well is located in the upper zone from the water table to a depth of about 200 feet below sea level. Water temperature increases to 24.5 degrees Celsius near the bottom of the measured profile, 507 feet below sea level.

  8. Cascades Volcano Observatory: Educational Outreach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to educational materials produced by the Cascades Volcano Observatory. The items include news and current events, information on current activity of the Cascades volcanoes, and emergency information in the event of an eruption. There are also frequently-asked-questions features, a glossary, and links to reading materials such as fact sheets and reports of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). For educators and students, there are activities, special features, posters, videos, and slide shows.

  9. Anomalous earthquakes associated with Nyiragongo Volcano: Observations and potential mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, Ashley; Ekström, Göran

    2009-04-01

    A series of five unusual earthquakes (4.6 ? M ? 5.3) has been recently located near Nyiragongo volcano (D. R. Congo) in the Western Rift Valley of the East African Rift. Despite their moderate size, these earthquakes do not appear in global seismicity catalogs, but were located using long-period surface waves primarily recorded on the Global Seismographic Network. Three of the events occurred in the week following the January 2002 eruption of Nyiragongo, while the final two occurred in 2003 and 2005 respectively, and are not linked to a major eruption at Nyiragongo or its neighboring volcano, Nyamuragira. Several common techniques were used to investigate the characteristics of these seismic sources in the context of the volcanic activity of the region. The frequency content of the five anomalous earthquakes was compared to that from local events found in global catalogs, and the newly detected earthquakes were shown to be slow events, being greatly depleted in frequencies above 0.1 Hz. Each of the newly detected earthquakes was modeled by a series of forces and by a centroid-moment tensor. A deviatoric moment tensor was shown to provide a better fit to the data. The newly detected earthquakes are highly non-double-couple in nature, each having a large compensated-linear-vector-dipole component of the moment tensor. Drawing on models based on similar observations from other active volcanoes, we propose that the earthquakes are caused by slip on non-planar faults beneath the volcano. We suggest a mechanism in which these newly detected earthquakes are generated by the collapse of the roof of a shallow magma chamber along an inward-dipping cone-shaped ring fault. Diking events, which result in magma evacuation from shallow magma chambers, could trigger such earthquakes. Our results provide new constraints on the dynamics of the poorly understood magma system beneath Nyiragongo, an active volcano that is a significant threat to life and property.

  10. Effects of Ground-Water Withdrawal on Kaunakakai Stream Environmental Restoration Plan, Moloka`i, Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the County of Maui Department of Public Works and Environmental Management, has proposed to construct 2.75 acres of shallow ponds and mudflats near the mouth of Kaunakakai Stream, Moloka`i, Hawai`i to restore habitat for the endangered native Hawaiian Stilt. Kaunakakai Stream is ephemeral upstream from the habitat-restoration site. Where the pond and wetland bottoms are below the water table, the ponds and wetland will be sustained by ground-water discharge during dry-weather conditions. Because ground water is the main source of water for the proposed ponds and wetland, a reduction of ground-water levels and discharge near the mouth of Kaunakakai Stream will have an effect on the availability of habitat. In response to concerns about the possible effects of ground-water withdrawal on the habitat restoration project near the mouth of Kaunakakai Stream, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook the present investigation to estimate, using an existing numerical ground-water-flow model, the changes in ground-water level and coastal discharge caused by redistributed and additional ground-water withdrawals. Steady-state water-level and coastal-discharge changes, relative to recent base-case conditions, were estimated for each of six withdrawal scenarios. Redistributed and additional ground-water withdrawals in the six scenarios were simulated from selected sites in the area between Kualapu`u and `Ualapu`e. For the scenarios tested, model results indicate that withdrawals from existing and proposed wells cause a water-level decline of about 0.1 ft in the vicinity of the Kaunakakai habitat-restoration site. In addition, model results indicate a reduction of ground-water discharge, ranging from 98,000 to 170,000 gal/d, to the model element containing the habitat-restoration site, although the existing spatial discretization in the model is too coarse to reliably estimate the reduction of ground-water discharge to the stream. Reduction in discharge to the habitat-restoration site is likely less than the total indicated by the model element because the site covers a small fraction (about 5 percent) of the area of a model element. Ground-water-level declines near the habitat-restoration site will reduce (1) the available wetted habitat area by an amount that is dependent on the bottom slope of the ponds near their edges, (2) the maximum water depth of the ponds by about 0.1 ft, and (3) the average water depth by an amount that is dependent on the bottom shape of the ponds. The salinity of ground-water discharging into the wetland area likely will increase by an unknown amount in response to increased withdrawals upgradient from the site. A numerical model capable of simulating density-dependent flow and transport is needed to evaluate the effects of withdrawal on salinity in the area.

  11. US Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website presents its objectives "to advance the scientific understanding of volcanic processes and to lessen the harmful impacts of volcanic activity." The public can explore information on volcano monitoring, warning schemes, and emergency planning. Students and educators can find out about the types, effects, location, and history of volcano hazards. The website offers recent online volcano reports and maps, volcano factsheets, videos, and a photo glossary. Teachers can find online versions of many educational volcano-related books and videos. The website features the volcanic observatories in Alaska, the Cascades, Hawaii, Long Valley, and Yellowstone.

  12. Resistivity Changes of Sakurajima Volcano by Magnetotelluric Continuous Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, K.; Kanda, W.; Ogawa, Y.; Iguchi, M.; Yokoo, A.

    2009-12-01

    In order to predict volcano eruptions and to contribute to hazard mitigation, monitoring of subsurface magma movement is the most essential approach. Recent study of time change of seismic structure (4D tomography) in Etna volcano clearly imaged time change of Vp/Vs structure, [Patanè et al., 2006]. They showed that structure changes not only on the location of magma intrusion but widely around the intrusion. They attributed Vp/Vs change to subsurface magma movement and fluids migration from the intrusion zone. Another method using seismic noise records are proposed to monitor the subsurface seismic structure [Brenguier et al., 2008]. These seismic methods have a great potential to reliable prediction of volcano eruption, though the method need densely deployed seismometer network. Monitoring electric resistivity structure is also the promising tools for imaging the subsurface magma movement, because magma and degassed volatile is highly conductive. Indeed, by repeated DC electric measurement using active source field, significant resistivity change is detected before and after the 1986 eruption of Izu-Oshima volcano, and the subsurface magma movement is deduced [Yukutake et al., 1990; Utada, 2003]. In this study, we show the first results of the long term continuous magnetotellurics (MT) observation to monitor the resistivity structure. Because MT impedance is stable and high time resolution [Eisel and Egbert, 2001; Hanekop and Simpson, 2006], the continuous MT observation is suitable to detect subsurface resistivity changes. We conducted long-term MT continuous measurements since May, 2008 to July, 2009 at Sakurajima, which is the most active volcano in Japan. Two observation sites were set up at 3.3km east, and 3km WNW of the summit crater. The obtained MT impedance shows significant apparent resistivity changes, which continues 20~50 days, in the frequency range between 300-1 Hz at the both observation sites. This frequency range corresponds to the depth around sea level, where groundwater is likely to exist. The start of the resistivity changes roughly coincide with the start of the uplift of the summit detected by the underground tunnel tiltmeter, which is one of the most reliable indicators of the subsurface magma intrusion of Sakurajima volcano. A possible cause of the apparent resistivity change is the volatile degassed from rising magma. In this study, we will carefully investigate the cause of the resistivity change of showing various data of volcano activities.

  13. Geometry and structure of the andesitic volcano-detritic deposits: The Merapi case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selles, A.; Deffontaines, B.; Hendrayana, H.; Violette, S.

    2013-12-01

    Several geological studies have been performed on the volcano-detritic deposits but finally the global overview of the geometry of those is still poorly known. The quick alteration enhances the high heterogeneity of these formations, especially under tropical climate. Better knowledge of the structure of the volcano-sedimentary edifices is capital to understand:i) the geomorphological impacts, as landslides ii) or the hydrogeological processes. The Merapi Mount is an andesitic strato-volcano, located in Central Java and is one of the most active volcanoes in Indonesia. About 500,000 people live in the immediate vicinity of the volcano and are directly subject, not only to the volcanic eruptions but also to the landslide hazards. The East flank of the Merapi presents a complex history and has been relatively spared by the recent volcanic activity; thus, the geomorphology and the structure of the deposit have been driven by the erosion and remobilization processes under equatorial climate. This work contributes to understand the processes of construction, destruction and sedimentation of a complex active strato-volcano and shed light to its geological and geomorphological history. Based on field observations and literature, the specific deposits have been identified. The lithological facies have been described and several cross sections have been done to precise the distinct phases of building edifice, due to old eruptions. Recent field surveys allowed characterizing the dismantling steps and processes of the volcano by erosion and the local to distal sedimentation associated. The East flank has been split in four zones where each formation presents a lateral facies variation depending on the distance from the summit and the age of deposits. Based on the collected data, the size and the three dimensional extension of each deposits has been delimitated. The geological and geomorphological interpretation is proposed through a conceptual model.

  14. Ejecta and Landslides from Augustine Volcano Before 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    A late Wisconsin volcano erupted onto the Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock of Augustine Island in lower Cook Inlet in Alaska. Olivine basalt interacting with water erupted explosively. Rhyolitic eruptive debris then swept down the south volcano flank while late Wisconsin glaciers from mountians on western mainland surrounded the island. Early to middle Holocene deposits probably erupted onto the island but are now largely buried. About 5,200, 3,750, 3,500 and 2,275 yr B.P. Augustine ash fell 70 to 110 km away. Since about 2,300 yr B.P. several large eruptions deposited coarse-pumice fall beds on the volcano flanks; many smaller eruptions dropped sand and silt ash. The steep summit erupting viscous andesite domes has repeatedly collapsed into rocky avalanches that flowed into the sea. After a collapse, new domes rebuilt the summit. One to three avalanches shed east before about 2,100 yr B.P., two large ones swept east and southeast between about 2,100 and 1,700 yr B.P., and one shed east and east-northeast between 1,700 and 1,450 yr B.P. Others swept into the sea on the volcano's south, southwest, and north-northwest between about 1,450 and 1,100 yr B.P., and pyroclastic fans spread southeast and southwest. Pyroclastic flows and surges poured down the west and south flanks and a debris avalanche plowed into the western sea between about 1,000 and 750 yr B.P. A small debris avalanche shed south-southeast between about 750 and 390 yr B.P., and large lithic pyroclastic flows went southeast. From about 390 to 200 yr B.P., three rocky avalanches swept down the west-northwest, north-northwest, and north flanks. The large West Island avalanche reached far beyond a former sea cliff and initiated a tsunami. Augustine's only conspicuous lava flow erupted on the north flank. In October 1883 a debris avalanche plowed into the sea to form Burr Point on the north-northeast; then came ashfall, pyroclastic surge, and pyroclastic flows. Eruptions in 1935 and 1963-64 grew summit lava domes that shed coarse rubbly lithic pyroclastic flows down the southwest and south flanks. Eruptions in 1976 and 1986 grew domes that shed large pyroclastic flows northeast, north, and north-northwest. The largest debris avalanches off Augustine sweep into

  15. Space Radar Image of Karisoke & Virunga Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color composite of Central Africa, showing the Virunga volcano chain along the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. This area is home to the endangered mountain gorillas. The image was acquired on October 3, 1994, on orbit 58 of the space shuttle Endeavour by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). In this image red is the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received) polarization; green is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization; and blue is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The area is centered at about 2.4 degrees south latitude and 30.8 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area 56 kilometers by 70 kilometers (35 miles by 43 miles). The dark area at the top of the image is Lake Kivu, which forms the border between Zaire (to the right) and Rwanda (to the left). In the center of the image is the steep cone of Nyiragongo volcano, rising 3,465 meters (11,369 feet) high, with its central crater now occupied by a lava lake. To the left are three volcanoes, Mount Karisimbi, rising 4,500 meters (14,800 feet) high; Mount Sabinyo, rising 3,600 meters (12,000 feet) high; and Mount Muhavura, rising 4,100 meters (13,500 feet) high. To their right is Nyamuragira volcano, which is 3,053 meters (10,017 feet) tall, with radiating lava flows dating from the 1950s to the late 1980s. These active volcanoes constitute a hazard to the towns of Goma, Zaire and the nearby Rwandan refugee camps, located on the shore of Lake Kivu at the top left. This radar image highlights subtle differences in the vegetation of the region. The green patch to the center left of the image in the foothills of Karisimbi is a bamboo forest where the mountain gorillas live. The vegetation types in this area are an important factor in the habitat of mountain gorillas. Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund in London will use this data to produce vegetation maps of the area to aid in their studies of the last 650 mountain gorillas in the world. The faint lines above the bamboo forest are the result of agricultural terracing by the people who live in the region. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  16. Modeling Secular Deformation of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, D. K.; Montgomery-Brown, E. D.; Casu, F.; Segall, P.; Fukushima, Y.; Miklius, A.; Poland, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, is a dynamic volcanic and tectonic system that hosts rift intrusions and eruptions, summit inflation/deflation and eruptions, flank earthquakes and slow slip events, as well as quasi-steady flank motion. We seek to identify and characterize the actively deforming structures on Kilauea and study their interactions using a combination of GPS, InSAR, and seismic data. In addition we examine whether the change from summit subsidence to inflation in 2003, led to changes elsewhere in the volcano. We begin by modeling velocities of 16 continuous GPS and 28 campaign GPS sites and mean velocities from three ENVISAT tracks (T93 ascending: 10 acquisitions from 20030120 to 20041115; T200 descending: 13 acquisitions from 20030127 to 20041122, T429 descending: 10 acquisitions from 20030212 to 20041103) between 2003 and 2004, a period lacking major episodic events. We use triangular dislocations to mesh the curving rift zones and décollement. The southwest and east rift zones are continuous through the summit caldera area, where we also include a point center of dilatation beneath the southwest caldera. A décollement beginning about 12 km offshore at seven km depth dips approximately eight degrees northwest to achieving a depth of nine kilometers beneath the summit/rift zone. The décollement mesh continues at a shallower dip beneath the north flank of Kilauea reaching a final depth of 9.5 km beneath the north flank of Kilauea/south flank of Mauna Loa. Kinematic constraints enforce that opening at the base of the rift equal the differential décollement slip across the rift. Future modeling will include tests of Koae and Hilina fault geometries as well as time-dependent modeling of the deformation field.

  17. Ash and Steam, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Monserrat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    International Space Station crew members are regularly alerted to dynamic events on the Earth's surface. On request from scientists on the ground, the ISS crew observed and recorded activity from the summit of Soufriere Hills on March 20, 2002. These two images provide a context view of the island (bottom) and a detailed view of the summit plume (top). When the images were taken, the eastern side of the summit region experienced continued lava growth, and reports posted on the Smithsonian Institution's Weekly Volcanic Activity Report indicate that 'large (50-70 m high), fast-growing, spines developed on the dome's summit. These spines periodically collapsed, producing pyroclastic flows down the volcano's east flank that sometimes reached the Tar River fan. Small ash clouds produced from these events reached roughly 1 km above the volcano and drifted westward over Plymouth and Richmond Hill. Ash predominately fell into the sea. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remained high. Theodolite measurements of the dome taken on March 20 yielded a dome height of 1,039 m.' Other photographs by astronauts of Montserrat have been posted on the Earth Observatory: digital photograph number ISS002-E-9309, taken on July 9, 2001; and a recolored and reprojected version of the same image. Digital photograph numbers ISS004-E-8972 and 8973 were taken 20 March, 2002 from Space Station Alpha and were provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  18. Monitoring Volcanic Gases on Kilauea's East Rift Zone

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea's east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur...

  19. Monitoring Volcanic Gases on Kilauea's East Rift Zone II

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea's east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious su...

  20. Redoubt Volcano Summit Crater During Eruption

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Redoubt Volcano summit crater during eruption. This was taken just after explosive activity at redoubt ceased. There were still significant gas and steam emissions occurring. Iliamna Volcano to the south of Redoubt is visible in the background....

  1. Seismic signals from Lascar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.

    1999-03-01

    Lascar, the most active volcano in northern Chile, lies near the center of the region studied during the Proyecto de Investigación Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental 94 (PISCO '94). Its largest historical eruption occurred on 19 April 1993. By the time of the PISCO '94 deployment, its activity consisted mainly of a plume of water vapor and SO 2. In April and May 1994, three short-period, three-component seismometers were placed on the flanks of the volcano, augmenting the broadband seismometer located on the NW flank of the volcano during the entire deployment. In addition to the usual seismic signals recorded at volcanoes, Lascar produced two unique tremor types: Rapid-fire tremor and harmonic tremor. Rapid-fire tremor appears to be a sequence of very similar, but independent, "impulsive" events with a large range of amplitudes. Harmonic tremor, on the other hand, is a continuous, cyclic signal lasting several hours. It is characterized by a spectrum with peaks at a fundamental frequency and its integer multiples. Both types of tremor seem to be generated by movement of fluids in the volcano, most probably water, steam or gas.

  2. Thomas A. Jaggar, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Thomas A. Jaggar founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912 and served as its Director until 1940.  Shown here in 1925, Jaggar is at work in HVO's first building, which, at the time, was located on the northeast rim of K?lauea Volcano’s summit caldera, near the present-day Volc...

  3. Venus small volcano classification and description

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Aubele

    1993-01-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described

  4. Surfing for Earthquakes and Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patty Coe

    This resource is part of the Science Education Gateway (SEGway) project, funded by NASA, which is a national consortium of scientists, museums, and educators working together to bring the latest science to students, teachers, and the general public. In this lesson, students use the Internet to research data on earthquakes and volcanoes and plot locations to determine plate boundaries. Extensions include interpretation of interaction between plate boundaries, causes of earthquakes and volcanoes, and the comparison of the formation of Olympus Mons on Mars and the Hawaiian volcanic chain. There are worksheets, references, assessment ideas, and vocabulary available for educators.

  5. Using multiplets to track volcanic processes at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiplets, or repeating earthquakes, are commonly observed at volcanoes, particularly those exhibiting unrest. At Kilauea, multiplets have been observed as part of long period (LP) earthquake swarms [Battaglia et al., 2003] and as volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes associated with dike intrusion [Rubin et al., 1998]. The focus of most previous studies has been on the precise location of the multiplets based on reviewed absolute locations, a process that can require extensive human intervention and post-processing. Conversely, the detection of multiplets and measurement of multiplet parameters can be done in real-time without human interaction with locations approximated by the stations that best record the multiplet. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is in the process of implementing and testing an algorithm to detect multiplets in near-real time and to analyze certain metrics to provide enhanced interpretive insights into ongoing volcanic processes. Metrics such as multiplet percent of total seismicity, multiplet event recurrence interval, multiplet lifespan, average event amplitude, and multiplet event amplitude variability have been shown to be valuable in understanding volcanic processes at Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens, Washington and thus are tracked as part of the algorithm. The near real-time implementation of the algorithm can be triggered from an earthworm subnet trigger or other triggering algorithm and employs a MySQL database to store results, similar to an algorithm implemented by Got et al. [2002]. Initial results using this algorithm to analyze VT earthquakes along Kilauea's Upper East Rift Zone between September 2010 and August 2011 show that periods of summit pressurization coincide with ample multiplet development. Summit pressurization is loosely defined by high rates of seismicity within the summit and Upper East Rift areas, coincident with lava high stands in the Halema`uma`u lava lake. High percentages, up to 100%, of earthquakes occurring during summit pressurization were part of a multiplet. Percentages were particularly high immediately prior to the March 5 Kamoamoa eruption. Interestingly, many multiplets that were present prior to the Kamoamoa eruption were reactivated during summit pressurization occurring in late July 2011. At a correlation coefficient of 0.7, 90% of the multiplets during the study period had populations of 10 or fewer earthquakes. Between periods of summit pressurization, earthquakes that belong to multiplets rarely occur, even though magma is flowing through the Upper East Rift Zone. Battaglia, J., Got, J. L. and Okubo, P., 2003. Location of long-period events below Kilauea Volcano using seismic amplitudes and accurate relative relocation. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, v.108 (B12) 2553. Got, J. L., P. Okubo, R. Machenbaum, and W. Tanigawa (2002), A real-time procedure for progressive multiplet relative relocation at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 92(5), 2019. Rubin, A. M., D. Gillard, and J. L. Got (1998), A reinterpretation of seismicity associated with the January 1983 dike intrusion at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 103(B5), 10003.

  6. Mount St. Helens VolcanoCam

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This webcam shows a static image of Mount St. Helens taken from the Johnston Ridge Observatory. The Observatory and VolcanoCam are located at an elevation of approximately 4,500 feet, about five miles from the volcano. The observer is looking approximately south-southeast across the North Fork Toutle River Valley. The VolcanoCam image automatically updates approximately every five minutes. Other features include current conditions reports, weather updates, an image achive, and eruption movies. In addition, there are frequently asked questions, and information about using the VolcanoCam image and funding for the VolcanoCam.

  7. Early growth of Kohala volcano and formation of long Hawaiian rift zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Transitional-composition pillow basalts from the toe of the Hilo Ridge, collected from outcrop by submersible, have yielded the oldest ages known from the Island of Hawaii: 1138 ?? 34 to 1159 ?? 33 ka. Hilo Ridge has long been interpreted as a submarine rift zone of Mauna Kea, but the new ages validate proposals that it is the distal east rift zone of Kohala, the oldest subaerial volcano on the island. These ages constrain the inception of tholeiitic volcanism at Kohala, provide the first measured duration of tholeiitic shield building (???870 k.y.) for any Hawaiian volcano, and show that this 125-km-long rift zone developed to near-total length during early growth of Kohala. Long eastern-trending rift zones of Hawaiian volcanoes may follow fractures in oceanic crust activated by arching of the Hawaiian Swell in front of the propagating hotspot. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  8. Remote sensing and tectonic analysis of active volcanoes in continental arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Rick Lee

    Variations in arc volcano spatial distribution and morphology are influenced by the crustal structure beneath the arc. In Colombia and Ecuador, most of the active volcanoes lie on or near regional arc-parallel fault zones, and many of the major volcanoes are aligned or elongated parallel to the faults. Two dominant volcano-fault geometry patterns exist: (1) From north to south, the orientation of the fractures and volcano-shapes changes along the arc from primarily north-northwest trending to east-northeast trending; and (2) From west to east, the fault and volcano alignment patterns vary from north-northwest trends at the outer edges of the arc to east-northeast trending in the middle of the arc. The fault and volcano orientation patterns are related to the age and type of crust being faulted during oblique subduction. The regionally active strike-slip faults in the Northern Andes and other arcs provide long-lasting paths for magma ascent that penetrate much deeper through the lithosphere than the secondary features. Local zones of extension and pre-existing fractures in the last several kilometers of lithosphere provide the plumbing that diverts magma slightly away from the primary linear volcanic front. The dissertation also describes a technique for merging multiple remote sensing data sets over the extremely rough terrain of silicic volcanoes. The major focus of this work was on overcoming coregistration errors from geometric distortion induced by local topography. The geometric distortion was compensated for by first creating an accurate base image with a combination of global positioning system (GPS) ground control, high resolution digital elevation models (DEM), and orthorectified aerial photographs. The individual sensor data were then rectified to the new reference base using triangulation geocoding. The final multi-layered, geocoded product is being used to enhance an existing thermal infrared technique for mapping complex textural patterns in silicic domes. Changes in the surface texture of volcanic domes may indicate changes in volatile content or lava extrusion rates. Textural changes on active domes have been difficult to directly observe due to the dangers of continued activity. Mapping the dome textures with remote sensing provides a measure of safety for field investigators.

  9. Io Volcano Observer (IVO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.; Thomas, N.; Johnson, T.; Christensen, P.; Wurz, P.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Shinohara, C.; Girard, T.

    2009-04-01

    In early FY2008, NASA solicited study concepts for Discovery/Scout-class missions that would be enabled by use of 2 Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs). We proposed an Io Volcano Observer (IVO) study concept, because the ASRGs enable pointing flexibility and a high data rate from a low-cost mission in Jupiter orbit. Io presents a rich array of inter-connected orbital, geophysical, atmospheric, and plasma phenomena and is the only place in the Solar System (including Earth) where we can watch very large-scale silicate volcanic processes in action. Io is the best place to study tidal heating, which greatly expands the habitable zones of planetary systems. The coupled orbital-tidal evolution of Io and Europa is key to understanding the histories of both worlds. IVO utilizes an elliptical orbit inclined > 45° to Jupiter's orbital plane with repeated fast flybys of Io. Io will have nearly constant illumination at each flyby, which facilitates monitoring of changes over time. The view of Io on approach and departure will be nearly polar, enabling unique measurement and monitoring of polar heat flow (key to tidal heating models), equatorial plumes, and magnetospheric interactions. We expect to collect and return 20 Gbits per flyby via 34-m DSN stations, >1000 times the Io data return of Galileo. The minimal payload we considered included (1) a narrow-angle camera, (2) a thermal mapper, (3) an ion and neutral mass spectrometer, and (4) a pair of fluxgate magnetometers. The camera will acquire global km-scale monitoring and sampling down to 10 m/pixel or better. One key objective is to acquire nearly simultaneous (<0.1 s) multispectral measurements to determine the peak lava temperatures, which in turn constrains the temperature and rheology of Io's mantle and whether or not the heat flow is in equilibrium with tidal heating. The thermal mapper will be similar to THEMIS on Mars Odyssey, but with bandpasses designed to monitor volcanic activity, measure heat flow, and constrain silicate lava compositions. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer, to be contributed by the University of Bern and the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, will determine the composition of Io's escaping species, atmosphere, and volcanic plumes. Two Fluxgate Magnetometers are to be contributed by the Institut für Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik of the Technische Universität Braunschweig, to characterize magnetospheric interactions with Io, and perhaps place tighter constraints on whether or not Io has an internally generated magnetosphere. Various science enhancement options are being considered.

  10. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Magma transport in volcanic plumbing systems induces surface deformation, which can be monitored by geodetic techniques, such as GPS and InSAR. These geodetic signals are commonly analyzed through geodetic models in order to constrain the shape of, and the pressure in, magma plumbing systems. These models, however, suffer critical limitations: (1) the modelled magma conduit shapes cannot be compared with the real conduits, so the geodetic models cannot be tested nor validated; (2) the modelled conduits only exhibit shapes that are too simplistic; (3) most geodetic models only account for elasticity of the host rock, whereas substantial plastic deformation is known to occur. To overcome these limitations, one needs to use a physical system, in which (1) both surface deformation and the shape of, and pressure in, the underlying conduit are known, and (2) the mechanical properties of the host material are controlled and well known. In this contribution, we present novel quantitative laboratory results of shallow magma emplacement. Fine-grained silica flour represents the brittle crust, and low viscosity vegetable oil is an analogue for the magma. The melting temperature of the oil is 31°C; the oil solidifies in the models after the end of the experiments. At the time of injection the oil temperature is 50°C. The oil is pumped from a reservoir using a volumetric pump into the silica flour through a circular inlet at the bottom of a 40x40 cm square box. The silica flour is cohesive, such that oil intrudes it by fracturing it, and produces typical sheet intrusions (dykes, cone sheets, etc.). During oil intrusion, the model surface deforms, mostly by doming. These movements are measured by an advanced photogrammetry method, which uses 4 synchronized fixed cameras that periodically image the surface of the model from different angles. We apply particle tracking method to compute the 3D ground deformation pattern through time. After solidification of the oil, the intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  11. Space Radar Image of Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Taal volcano, near Manila on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The black area in the center is Taal Lake, which nearly fills the 30-kilometer-diameter (18-mile) caldera. The caldera rim consists of deeply eroded hills and cliffs. The large island in Taal Lake, which itself contains a crater lake, is known as Volcano Island. The bright yellow patch on the southwest side of the island marks the site of an explosion crater that formed during a deadly eruption of Taal in 1965. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 78th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 56 kilometers by 112 kilometers (34 miles by 68 miles) that is centered at 14.0 degrees north latitude and 121.0 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Since 1572, Taal has erupted at least 34 times. Since early 1991, the volcano has been restless, with swarms of earthquakes, new steaming areas, ground fracturing, and increases in water temperature of the lake. Volcanologists and other local authorities are carefully monitoring Taal to understand if the current activity may foretell an eruption. Taal is one of 15 'Decade Volcanoes' that have been identified by the volcanology community as presenting large potential hazards to population centers. The bright area in the upper right of the image is the densely populated city of Manila, only 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of the central crater. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  12. Papers about Volcanoes and Tsunamis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Steven N. Ward

    Steven N Ward, a Earth Sciences professor at UC-Santa Cruz, provides downloadable PDF versions of his numerous publications about volcanoes and tsunamis as a part of his homepage. Topics include tsunamis caused by earthquakes, underwater landslides, volcanic eruptions, and asteroid impacts, as well as risk assessment and modeling.

  13. Infrared science of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, William A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, R.C.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs is- suing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  14. Seismic energy releases from volcanoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Izumi Yokoyama

    1988-01-01

    Seismic energy release during the precursory, eruptive and declining stages of volcanic activities provides various information about the mechanisms of volcanic eruptions and the temporary developments of their activities. Hitherto the energy release patterns from precursory earthquake swarms were used to predict the eruption times, especially of andesitic or dacitic volcanoes. In this paper the discussion is expanded to quantify

  15. What Happened to Our Volcano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an investigative approach to "understanding Earth changes." The author states that students were familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in other regions of the world but never considered how the land beneath their feet had experienced changes over time. Here, their geology unit helped them understand and…

  16. Volcanic rifts bracketing volcanoes: an analogue answer to an old unsolved problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussetti, Giulio; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Corti, Giacomo; Hagos, Miruts

    2015-04-01

    It has been observed in Central America that many volcanoes have volcanic alignments and faults at their east and west feet. A quick look at many rifts indicates that this also occurs elsewhere. While this feature has been noted for at least 30 years, no explanation has ever really been convincingly put forward. During analogue experiments on rifting volcanoes we have mixed the presence of a volcanic edifice with an underlying intrusive complex. The models use a rubber sheet that is extended and provides a broad area of extension (in contrast to many moving plate models that have one localised velocity discontinuity). This well suits the situation in many rifts and diffuse strike-slip zones (i.e. Central America and the East African Rift). We have noted the formation of localised extension bracketing the volcano, the location of which depends on the position of the analogue intrusion. Thus, we think we have found the answer to this long standing puzzle. We propose that diffuse extension of a volcano and intrusive complex generates two zones of faulting at the edge of the intrusion along the axis of greatest extensional strain. These serve to create surface faulting and preferential pathways for dykes. This positioning may also create craters aligned along the axis of extension, which is another notable feature of volcanoes in Central America. Paired volcanoes and volcanic uplifts in the Danakil region of Ethiopia may also be a consequence of such a process and lead us to draw some new preliminary cross sections of the Erta Ale volcanic range.

  17. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  18. Far East

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, G.L.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum activity throughout the Far East region was on the upswing during 1980. In spite of increased interest in many parts of the Far East, no major new discoveries were reported. From India to Indonesia, old fields are being rehabilitated and previously uneconomic areas are being looked at again. Indonesia set a new record in 1980 for the number of exploratory wells drilled. Peninsular Malaysia set a record for oil production. Overall, however, 1980 was a banner year for petroleum exploration in the Far East. Sri Lanka saw its first foreign contractor interest in several years. India made major moves toward increasing exploration by offering offshore and onshore blocks to foreign contractors . Bangladesh and even Burma signed exploitation contracts with Japanese investors in order to increase production. Malaysia offered new acreage blocks for the first time in several years. Indonesia and the Philippines also actively encouraged exploration by offering new contract areas. One country in the Far East that did not participate in the 1980 oil boom was China. Taiwan also carried on, as in previous years with the Chinese Petroleum Corporation as the only operator. Japanese and South Korean activities were at approximately the same level as in previous years, although drilling did start in the joint development zone. Total production of the Far East reporting region declined slightly. One significant aspect of 1980 petroleum activities throughout the Far East region is the growing acceptance by various Far East countries of Asian investment for developing and exploring for hydrocarbons. Japan is the major investor, but South Korean interests and the Chinese Petroleum Corporation also began to invest in petroleum rights in other Asian countries. The main area for investment continued to be Indonesia. 39 figures, 9 tables.

  19. Coral Ba/Ca records of sediment input to the fringing reef of the southshore of Moloka'i, Hawai'i over the last several decades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, N.G.; Field, M.E.; Stock, J.D.; Jupiter, S.D.; McCulloch, M.

    2010-01-01

    The fringing reef of southern Moloka’i is perceived to be in decline because of land-based pollution. In the absence of historical records of sediment pollution, ratios of coral Ba/Ca were used to test the hypothesis that sedimentation has increased over time. Baseline Ba/Ca ratios co-vary with the abundance of red, terrigenous sediment visible in recent imagery. The highest values at One Ali’i are near one of the muddiest parts of the reef. This co-varies with the lowest growth rate of all the sites, perhaps because the upstream Kawela watershed was historically leveed all the way to the nearshore, providing a fast-path for sediment delivery. Sites adjacent to small, steep watersheds have ?decadal periodicities whereas sites adjacent to mangrove forests have shorter-period fluctuations that correspond to the periodicity of sediment transport in the nearshore, rather than the watershed. All four sites show a statistically significant upward trend in Ba/Ca.

  20. Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Moloka?i, Hawai?i

    PubMed Central

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Field, Michael E.; Lager, Claire V.; Lager, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Moloka?i, Hawai?i. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l?1 (inshore) to 3 mg l?1 (offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l?1 as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawai?i. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance. PMID:25653896

  1. Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Moloka'i, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Jokiel, Paul L; Rodgers, Ku?ulei S; Storlazzi, Curt D; Field, Michael E; Lager, Claire V; Lager, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Moloka'i, Hawai'i. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l(-1) (inshore) to 3 mg l(-1) (offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l(-1) as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawai'i. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance. PMID:25653896

  2. Morne aux Diables. a potentially active volcano in northern Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheubottom, A. N.; Smith, A. L.; Roobol, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    The island of Dominica, which is located near the center of the Lesser Antilles island arc, comprises at least 8 potentially active volcanoes. One of these is Morne aux Diables, an isolated composite cone situated at the extreme northern end of the island. Age dating suggests that the main cone building activity occurred between 1.5 and 1.0 million years ago. Exposed on the volcano's flanks however are a number of unconsolidated valley-fill block and ash flow deposits suggesting more recent activity. One of these deposits, on the north-east flank of the volcano, has been recently dated at > 46,000 years B.P. Other evidence of potential activity from this center includes the presence of warm (27°C), acidic (pH 1.6), sulfate-rich springs on the summit of the volcano, hot springs on the coast, and the occurrence in 2002 and 2003 of shallow earthquake swarms partially located beneath the volcano. Morne aux Diables is dominantly composed of deposits of block and ash flows and associated domes from Pelean-style activity, however, semi-vesicular andesite block and ash flows and surges (Asama-style activity) and pumiceous lapilli falls (Plinian-style activity) are locally abundant. The Pelean domes are located both in the summit region and along the southern flanks of the volcano. Petrologically, the volcano is composed of a monotonous series of porphyritic andesites and dacites containing phenocrysts of plagioclase+augite-hypersthene with very sparse crystals of hornblende and quartz. Petrological models suggest the Morne aux Diables andesites and dacites can be produced by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma (such as those erupted from centers such as Morne Anglais and Morne Plat Pays in the south). Minor variations within this suite of andesites and dacites can be related to upper crustal fractionation of phenocryst phases.

  3. Temporal changes in electrical resistivity at Sakurajima volcano from continuous magnetotelluric observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koki Aizawa; Wataru Kanda; Yasuo Ogawa; Masato Iguchi; Akihiko Yokoo; Hiroshi Yakiwara; Takayuki Sugano

    2011-01-01

    Continuous magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were conducted from May 2008 to July 2009 at Sakurajima, one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. Two observation sites were established at locations 3.3km east and 3km west–northwest of the summit crater. At both observation sites, the high-quality component of the impedance tensor (Zyx) showed variations in apparent resistivity of approximately ±20% and phase

  4. Communication Between Volcanoes: a Possible Path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, A. T.; Sacks, I. S.

    2002-12-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency installed and operates a network of Sacks-Evertson type borehole strainmeters in south-east Honshu. One of these instruments is on Izu-Oshima, a volcanic island at the northern end of the Izu-Bonin arc. That strainmeter recorded large strain changes associated with the 1986 eruption of Miharayama on the island and, over the period from 1980 to the 1986 eruption, the amplitude of the solid earth tides changed by almost a factor of two. Miyake-jima, about 75 km south of Izu-Oshima, erupted in October 1983. No deformation monitoring was available on Miyake but several changes occurred in the strain record at Izu-Oshima. There was a clear decrease in amplitude of the long-term strain rate. Short period (~hour) events recorded by the strainmeter became much more frequent about 6 months before the Miyake eruption and ceased following the eruption. At the time of the Miyake eruption, the rate of increase of the tidal amplitude also decreased. While all of these changes were observed on a single instrument, they are very different types of change. From a number of independent checks, we can be sure that the strainmeter did not experience any change in performance at that time. Thus it recorded a change in deformation behavior in three very different frequency bands: over very long term, at tidal periods (~day) and at very short periods (~hour). It appears that the distant eruption in 1983 had an effect on the magmatic system under Izu-Oshima. It is likely that these changes were enhanced to the observed level because Izu-Oshima was itself close to eruption failure. More recent tomographic and seismic attenuation work in the Tohoku (northern Honshu) area has shown the existence of a low velocity, high attenuation horizontally elongated structure under the volcanic front. This zone, likely to contain partial melt, is horizontally continuous along the front. If such a structure exists in the similar tectonic setting for these volcanoes, it could provide a mechanism for communication between the volcanoes.

  5. Continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes using thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Antolik, L.; Lee, R.; Kamibayashi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal cameras are becoming more common at volcanoes around the world, and have become a powerful tool for observing volcanic activity. Fixed, continuously recording thermal cameras have been installed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in the last two years at four locations on Kilauea Volcano to better monitor its two ongoing eruptions. The summit eruption, which began in March 2008, hosts an active lava lake deep within a fume-filled vent crater. A thermal camera perched on the rim of Halema`uma`u Crater, acquiring an image every five seconds, has now captured about two years of sustained lava lake activity, including frequent lava level fluctuations, small explosions , and several draining events. This thermal camera has been able to "see" through the thick fume in the crater, providing truly 24/7 monitoring that would not be possible with normal webcams. The east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983, has chiefly consisted of effusion through lava tubes onto the surface, but over the past two years has been interrupted by an intrusion, lava fountaining, crater collapse, and perched lava lake growth and draining. The three thermal cameras on the east rift zone, all on Pu`u `O`o cone and acquiring an image every several minutes, have captured many of these changes and are providing an improved means for alerting observatory staff of new activity. Plans are underway to install a thermal camera at the summit of Mauna Loa to monitor and alert to any future changes there. Thermal cameras are more difficult to install, and image acquisition and processing are more complicated than with visual webcams. Our system is based in part on the successful thermal camera installations by Italian volcanologists on Stromboli and Vulcano. Equipment includes custom enclosures with IR transmissive windows, power, and telemetry. Data acquisition is based on ActiveX controls, and data management is done using automated Matlab scripts. Higher-level data processing, also done with Matlab, includes automated measurements of lava lake level and surface crust velocity, tracking temperatures and hot areas in real-time, and alerts which notify users of notable temperature increases via text messaging. Lastly, real-time image and processed data display, which is vital for effective use of the images at the observatory, is done through a custom Web-based environment . Near real-time webcam images are displayed for the public at hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams. Thermal cameras are costly, but have proven to be an extremely effective monitoring and research tool at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

  6. Volcanoes: Local Hazard, Global Issue

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this module, students can explore two ways that volcanoes affect Earth: by directly threatening people and the environments adjacent to them, and by ejecting aerosols into the atmosphere. The module consists of three investigations in which they will study the local effects of volcanism using images of Mount St. Helens, examine how the effects of volcanic activity can be remotely sensed and monitored from space using NASA data for Mount Spurr in Alaska, and see how geography and spatial perspective are useful in addressing global issues in the tracking and mapping of aerosol hazards such as the ash cloud emitted by the 1989 eruption on Redoubt Volcano. Each investigation is complete with overview, a list of materials and supplies, content preview, classroom procedures, worksheets, background, and evaluation.

  7. Seismicity at Baru Volcano, Western Panama, Panama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Camacho; D. A. Novelo-Casanova; A. Tapia; A. Rodriguez

    2008-01-01

    The Baru volcano in Western Panama (8.808°N, 82.543°W) is a 3,475 m high strato volcano that lies at about 50 km from the Costa Rican border. The last major eruptive event at this volcano occurred c.1550 AD and no further eruptive activity from that time is known. Since the 1930´s, approximately every 30 years a series of seismic swarms take

  8. Composite Volcanoes, Stratovolcanoes, and Subduction-Zone Volcanoes (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource defines and describes composite volcanoes, stratovolcanoes, subduction-zone volcanoes and composite cones. The information is from different sources and therefore the site gives a broad picture of these forms. The shape of the volcano is described as a function of the type and frequency of eruption and its proximity to plate boundaries.

  9. Glacial cycles and the growth and destruction of Alaska volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, M. L.; Calvert, A. T.; Bacon, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers have affected profoundly the growth, collapse, preservation, and possibly, eruptive behavior of Quaternary stratovolcanoes in Alaska. Holocene alpine glaciers have acted as effective agents of erosion on volcanoes north of ~55 °N and especially north of 60 °N. Cook Inlet volcanoes are particularly vulnerable as they sit atop rugged intrusive basement as high as 3000 m asl. Holocene glaciers have swept away or covered most of the deposits and dome lavas of frequently active Redoubt (60.5 °N); carved through the flanks of Spurr's active vent, Crater Peak (61.3 °N); and all but obscured the edifice of Hayes (61.6 °N), whose Holocene eruptive history is known almost exclusively though far-traveled tephra and flowage deposits. Relationships between Pleistocene eruptive histories, determined by high-precision Ar-Ar dating of lava flows, and marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 2-8 (Bassinot et al., 1994, EPSL, v. 126, p. 91­-108) vary with a volcano's latitude, size, and elevation. At Spurr, 26 ages cluster in interglacial periods. At Redoubt, 28 ages show a more continual eruptive pattern from the end of MIS 8 to the present, with a slight apparent increase in output following MIS 6, and almost no preservation before 220 ka. Veniaminof (56.2 °N) and Emmons (55.5°N), large, broad volcanoes with bases near sea level, had voluminous eruptive episodes during the profound deglaciations after MIS 8 and MIS 6. At Akutan (54.1 °N), many late Pleistocene lavas show evidence for ice contact; ongoing dating will be able to pinpoint ice thicknesses. Furthest south and west, away from thick Pleistocene ice on the Alaska Peninsula and mainland, the Tanaga volcanic cluster (51.9 °N) has a relatively continuous eruptive record for the last 200 k.y. that shows no clear-cut correlation with glacial cycles, except a possible hiatus during MIS 6. Finally, significant edifice collapse features have been temporally linked with deglaciations. A ~10-km3 debris-avalanche deposit from Spurr directly overlies bedrock, suggesting that edifice collapse closely followed MIS 2. The geologic history of Veniaminof suggests possible massive edifice collapse following MIS 6. A stack of westward-dipping lavas and breccias on the east flank of Redoubt Volcano erupted during MIS 6, and may have also failed during the major deglaciation of MIS 5.5.

  10. Update of the volcanic risk map of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez Cornu, F. J.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Colima volcano, located in western Mexico (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W) began its current eruptive process in February 10, 1999. This event was the basis for the development of two volcanic hazard maps: one for ballistics (rock fall) lahars, and another one for ash fall. During the period of 2003 to 2008 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-Plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano thanks to the low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time The current volcanic activity has triggered ballistic projections, pyroclastic and ash flows, and lahars, all have exceeded the maps limits established in 1999. Vulnerable elements within these areas have gradually changed due to the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano. On the slopes of the northwest side, new blue agave Tequilana weber and avocado orchard crops have emerged along with important production of greenhouse tomato, alfalfa and fruit (citrus) crops that will eventually be processed and dried for exportation to the United States and Europe. Also, in addition to the above, large expanses of corn and sugar cane have been planted on the slopes of the volcano since the nineteenth century. The increased agricultural activity has had a direct impact in the reduction of the available forest land area. Coinciding with this increased activity, the 0.8% growth population during the period of 2000 - 2005, - due to the construction of the Guadalajara-Colima highway-, also increased this impact. The growth in vulnerability changed the level of risk with respect to the one identified in the year 1999 (Suarez, 2000), thus motivating us to perform an update to the risk map at 1:25,000 using vector models of the INEGI, SPOT images of different dates, and fieldwork done in order to obtain new agricultural development and socioeconomic status data.

  11. Modeling an Active (!!) Explosive Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is an active simulation of an explosive volcanic eruption. The model volcano is a plastic 35 mm film cannister that erupts (the lid blows off) when gas pressure generated by dissolving alka seltzer is sufficiently high. It is realistic in that the timing of the eruption is difficult to predict precisely and in that the eruption occurs when the pressure of the gas exceeds the confining pressure of the lid. The experiment can be modified to show that an eruption will not occur if there is not enough gas pressure generated or if gas is allowed to escape gradually. Students will explain how the build-up of gas from dissolving alka seltzer causes the lid of a film cannister to blow off, explain that build-up of gas pressure causes eruption of explosive volcanoes, and that the pressure comes from heating of dissolved gases in the magma, and they will delineate the similarities and differences between the model and an actual volcano.

  12. Preparing for Routine Satellite Global Volcano Deformation Observations: The Volcano Deformation Database Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Cooper, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Delgado, F.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has greatly expanded the number volcanoes that can be monitored for ground deformation - the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased almost five-fold since 1997 (to more than 213 volcanoes in 2014). However, from 1992-2014, there are still gaps in global volcano surveillance and only a fraction of the 1400 subaerial Holocene volcanoes have frequent observations in this time period. Starting in 2014, near global observations of volcano deformation should begin with the Sentinel satellites from the European Space Agency, ALOS-2 from the Japanese Space Agency, and eventually NISAR from the Indian Space Agency and NASA. With more frequent observations, more volcano deformation episodes are sure to be observed, but evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how can we determine if deformation will lead to eruption? To answer this question, an international task force has been formed to create an inventory of volcano deformation events as part of the Global Volcano Model (http://globalvolcanomodel.org/gvm-task-forces/volcano-deformation-database/). We present the first results from our global study focusing on volcanoes that have few or no previous studies. In some cases, there is a lack of SAR data (for example, volcanoes of the South Sandwich Islands). For others, observations either show an absence of deformation or possible deformation that requires more data to be verified. An example of a deforming volcano that has few past studies is Pagan, an island in the Marianas Arc comprised of 2 stratovolcanoes within calderas. Our new InSAR measurements from both the ALOS and Envisat satellites show deformation near the 1981 May VEI 4 lava flow eruption on North Pagan at 2-3 cm/year between 2004-2010. Another example of a newly observed volcano is Karthala volcano in the Comoros. InSAR observations between 2004-2010 span four eruptions, only one of which is accompanied by deformation.

  13. Predictions of turbidity due to enhanced sediment resuspension resulting from sea-level rise on a fringing Coral Reef: Evidence from Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogston, A.S.; Field, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Accelerating sea-level rise associated with global climate change will affect sedimentary processes on coral reefs and other shoreline environments by increasing energy and sediment resuspension. On reefs, sedimentation is known to increase coral stress and bleaching as particles that settle on coral surfaces interfere with photosynthesis and feeding, and turbidity induced by suspended sediment reduces incident light levels. Using relationships developed from observations of wave orbital velocity, water-surface elevation, and suspended-sediment concentration on a fringing reef flat of Molokai, Hawaii, predictions of the average daily maximum in suspended-sediment concentration increase from ~11 mg/l to ~20 mg/l with 20 cm sea-level rise. The duration of time concentrations exceeds 10 mg/l increases from 9 to 37. An evaluation of the reduction of wave energy flux through breaking and frictional dissipation across the reef flat shows an increase of ~80 relative to the present will potentially reach the shoreline as sea level increases by 20 cm. Where the shoreline exists on low, flat terrain, the increased energy could cause significant erosion of the shoreline. Considering the sediment budget, the sediment flux is predicted to increase and removal of fine-grained sediment may be expedited on some fringing reefs, and sediment in storage on the inner reef could ultimately be reduced. However, increased shoreline erosion may add sediment and offset removal from the reef flat. The shifts in sediment availability and transport that will occur as result of a modest increase in sea level have wide application to fringing coral reefs elsewhere, as well as other shoreline environments. ?? 2010 the Coastal Education & Research Foundation (CERF).

  14. East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows the East African nations of Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia, as well as portions of Kenya, Sudan, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia. Dominating the scene are the green Ethiopian Highlands. With altitudes as high as 4,620 meters (15,157 feet), the highlands pull moisture from the arid air, resulting in relatively lush vegetation. In fact, coffee-one of the world's most prized crops-originated here. To the north (above) the highlands is Eritrea, which became independent in 1993. East (right) of Ethiopia is Somalia, jutting out into the Indian Ocean. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) captured this true-color image on November 29, 2000. Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  15. Holocene recurrent explosive activity at Chimborazo volcano (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Diego; Robin, Claude; Samaniego, Pablo; Eissen, Jean-Philippe

    2008-09-01

    Ice-capped Chimborazo is one of the large composite Ecuadorian volcanoes whose recent eruptive activity is poorly known. This paper presents the characteristics and the ages of a newly discovered Holocene sequence of pyroclastic deposits on the east and north sides of the cone. Lying upon a moraine of the Late-Glacial period, the most complete section of ~ 4.5 m in thickness is located 5 km from the present summit crater. It consists of seven massive or diffusely stratified ash flow layers and four fallout layers interbedded with seven paleosoils. Based on field study, most flow deposits were assessed as surge layers, and six radiocarbon analyses obtained from charcoal fragments and paleosoils indicate that eruptions occurred at quite regular intervals between about 8000 and 1000 years ago. The first two and most potent events generated thick lahars over the north and west flanks of the cone. Surface textures of volcanic clasts were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Blocky and blocky/fluidal vitric clasts indicate fragmentation during vulcanian explosions of a quite solidified shallow magma body. In addition, aggregates either cemented at a cooling stage (with surface fluidal textures), or consisting of fine particles (moss-looking aggregates), form a large part of the surge deposits. These characteristics indicate powerful explosions and intense fragmentation due to phreatic water reaching the conduit, probably from the ice-cap. Since the last eruption occurred between the early part of the 5th century (~ AD 420) and the end of the 7th century, these results highlight that Chimborazo is a potentially active volcano. Given its dominating presence over the densely populated Ambato and Riobamba basins, and owing its large ice-cap, Chimborazo should be considered a dangerous volcano.

  16. Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O. (Mobil Oil Corp., New York, NY); Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  17. Magnetotelluric Investigations of the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Hoversten; G. A. Newman; E. Gasperikova; J. P. Kauahikaua

    2002-01-01

    A collaborative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Electromagnetic Instruments and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has undertaken a three-dimensional (3D) magnetotelluric (MT) study of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. The survey objectives are 1): to produce a high quality 3D MT data set over the central caldera and the eastern and southwestern rift zones, 2) to

  18. Global Volcano Mortality Risk Distribution Projection: Robinson

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    Global Volcano Mortality Risk Distribution Projection: Robinson Mortality risk is found disasters. The mortality weights are applied to population exposure to obtain mortality risks. The weights and Development/The World Bank and Columbia University. Volcano Mortality Risk Deciles 1 st ­4 th 5 th ­7 th 8 th

  19. Groundwater Flow System of Unzen Volcano, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kazahaya; M. Yasuhara; A. Inamura; T. Sumii; H. Hoshizumi; T. Kohno; S. Ohsawa; Y. Yusa; K. Kitaoka; K. Yamaguchi

    2001-01-01

    Unzen volcano (peak 1486 m) is developed on the western part of Beppu-Shimabara Graben (20 km NS wide and 200 km EW long) located at Kyushu island, SW Japan. We have been studied groundwater system of the volcano using geochemical and hydrological technique in order to estimate flux of magmatic volatiles through the groundwater. We have collected over 150 sample

  20. Automating the hunt for volcanoes on Venus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Burl; U. M. Fayyad; P. Perona; P. Smyth; M. P. Burl

    1994-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to develop a trainable tool for locating patterns of interest in large image databases. Toward this goal we have developed a prototype system, based on classical filtering and statistical pattern recognition techniques, for automatically locating volcanoes in the Magellan SAR database of Venus. Training for the specific volcano-detection task is obtained by synthesizing feature templates (via

  1. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards in the Crater Lake Region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Bacon, C.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, K.E.; Nathenson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake lies in a basin, or caldera, formed by collapse of the Cascade volcano known as Mount Mazama during a violent, climactic eruption about 7,700 years ago. This event dramatically changed the character of the volcano so that many potential types of future events have no precedent there. This potentially active volcanic center is contained within Crater Lake National Park, visited by 500,000 people per year, and is adjacent to the main transportation corridor east of the Cascade Range. Because a lake is now present within the most likely site of future volcanic activity, many of the hazards at Crater Lake are different from those at most other Cascade volcanoes. Also significant are many faults near Crater Lake that clearly have been active in the recent past. These faults, and historic seismicity, indicate that damaging earthquakes can occur there in the future. The USGS Open-File Report 97-487 (Bacon and others, 1997) describes the various types of volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake area, estimates of the likelihood of future events, recommendations for mitigation, and a map of hazard zones. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Crater Lake earthquake and volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-487 are included in this data set. USGS scientists created one GIS data layer, c_faults, that delineates these faults and one layer, cballs, that depicts the downthrown side of the faults. Additional GIS layers chazline, chaz, and chazpoly were created to show 1)the extent of pumiceous pyroclastic-flow deposits of the caldera forming Mount Mazama eruption, 2)silicic and mafic vents in the Crater Lake region, and 3)the proximal hazard zone around the caldera rim, respectively.

  2. Plume composition and volatile flux from Nyamulagira volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Sergio; Bobrowski, Nicole; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Scaglione, Sarah; Liotta, Marcello; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Arellano, Santiago; Yalire, Matiew; Galle, Bo; Tedesco, Dario

    2015-04-01

    Nyamulagira, in the Virunga volcanic province (VVP), Democratic Republic of Congo, is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. The volcano is located about 25 km north-northwest of Lake Kivu in the Western Branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). The activity is characterized by frequent eruptions (on average, one eruption every 2-4 years) which occur both from the summit crater and from the flanks (31 flank eruptions over the last 110 years). Due to the peculiar low viscosity of its lava and its location in the floor of the rift, Nyamulagira morphology is characterized by a wide lava field that covers over 1100 km2 and contains more than 100 flank cones. Indeed, Nyamulagira is a SiO2- undersaturated and alkali-rich basaltic shield volcano with a 3058 m high summit caldera with an extension of about 2 km in diameter. In November 2014 a field expedition was carried out at Nyamulagira volcano and we report here the first assessment of the plume composition and volatile flux from Nyamulagira volcano. Helicopter flights and field observations allowed us to recognize the presence of lava fountains inside an about 350-meter wide pit crater. The lava fountains originated from an extended area of about 20 to 40 m2, in the northeast sector of the central caldera. A second smaller source, close to the previous described one, was clearly visible with vigorous spattering activity. There was no evidence of a lave lake but the persistence of intense activity and the geometry of the bottom of the caldera might evolve in a new lava lake. Using a variety of in situ and remote sensing techniques, we determined the bulk plume concentrations of major volatiles, halogens and trace elements. We deployed a portable MultiGAS station at the rim of Nyamulagira crater, measuring (at 0.5 Hz for about 3 hours) the concentrations of major volcanogenic gas species in the plume (H2O, CO2, SO2, H2S). Simultaneously, scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy instruments were applied inside the crater as well as downwind the volcano and active alkaline traps (Raschig-Tube and Drechsel bottle) were exposed. The alkaline solution traps acidic species (CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF, HBr, HI) due to the acid-base reactions. Moreover, filter packs technique have also been used to collect both the volatile phase of the plume (sulphur and halogen species) and the particulate phase (major and trace metals) emitted from the volcano. These new results will add to our lacking knowledge of volcanic degassing in VVP, and will increase constraints on the abundances and origins of volatiles from the mantle source which feeds volcanism in the western branch of the EARS.

  3. Volcanic gas impacts on vegetation at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, R.; Jenkins, M.; Pushnik, J.; Houpis, J. L.; Brown, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Turrialba volcano is an active composite stratovolcano that is located approximately 40 km east of San Jose, Costa Rica. Seismic activity and degassing have increased since 2005, and gas compositions reflect further increased activity since 2007 peaking in January 2010 with a phreatic eruption. Gas fumes dispersed by trade winds toward the west, northwest, and southwest flanks of Turrialba volcano have caused significant vegetation kill zones, in areas important to local agriculture, including dairy pastures and potato fields, wildlife and human populations. In addition to extensive vegetative degradation is the potential for soil and water contamination and soil erosion. Summit fumarole temperatures have been measured over 200 degrees C and gas emissions are dominated by SO2; gas and vapor plumes reach up to 2 km (fumaroles and gases are measured regularly by OVSICORI-UNA). A recent network of passive air sampling, monitoring of water temperatures of hydrothermal systems, and soil pH measurements coupled with measurement of the physiological status of surrounding plants using gas exchange and fluorescence measurements to: (1) identify physiological correlations between leaf-level gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of plants under long term stress induced by the volcanic gas emissions, and (2) use measurements in tandem with remotely sensed reflectance-derived fluorescence ratio indices to track natural photo inhibition caused by volcanic gas emissions, for use in monitoring plant stress and photosynthetic function. Results may prove helpful in developing potential land management strategies to maintain the biological health of the area.

  4. The "Plus Side" of Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web page provides a brief guide to the benefits of living with volcanoes. The topics considered are: Fertile Soils; Geothermal Energy with examples from Newberry Caldera in Oregon and in California, The Geysers, Casa Diablo in Long Valley Caldera, and the Salton Sea geothermal field; Mineral Resources including metallic minerals; Industrial Products including construction materials, cleaning agents, and raw materials for many chemical and industrial uses; Business Opportunities; Spas and Resorts; and Recreation and Tourism in America's national parks and monuments. Included among the parks are Yellowstone National Park, Mount Rainier National Park, and Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.

  5. Isotopic and geochemical evidence for a heterogeneous mantle plume origin of the Virunga volcanics, Western rift, East African Rift system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramananda Chakrabarti; Asish R. Basu; Alba P. Santo; Dario Tedesco; Orlando Vaselli

    2009-01-01

    Virunga volcanics in the western rift of the East African Rift system (EARS) show silica-undersaturated, ultra-alkaline, alkalic-mafic compositions. The two active Virunga volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira, are 15 km apart. Nyiragongo shows unusual compositions not seen globally and has the lowest recorded viscosity among terrestrial magmas while Nyamuragira is unusually effusive. These volcanoes occur along the fringes of a topographic uplift

  6. 25. First floor, east wall bathroom, looking east Veterans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. First floor, east wall bathroom, looking east - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  7. The deep structure of Axial Volcano Michael West

    E-print Network

    West, Michael

    available on Web #12;The deep structure of Axial Volcano IV. Magma Reservoir beneath Axial Volcano AxialThe deep structure of Axial Volcano Michael West Thesis defense, June 4, 2001 #12;Motivation What at Axial may be interpreted (NeMO, Neptune) #12;The deep structure of Axial Volcano IV. Magma Reservoir

  8. Density Imaging of Volcanoes with Atmospheric Muons using GRPCs

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Density Imaging of Volcanoes with Atmospheric Muons using GRPCs Cristina Cârloganu Clermont of volcanoes with high-resolution tracking detectors. By exploiting Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPCs of Volcanoes with Atmospheric Muons Cristina Cârloganu 1. Puy de Dôme as a reference site for volcano imaging

  9. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for the Tanaga Volcanic Cluster, Tanaga Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary of Volcano Hazards at Tanaga Volcanic Cluster The Tanaga volcanic cluster lies on the northwest part of Tanaga Island, about 100 kilometers west of Adak, Alaska, and 2,025 kilometers southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The cluster consists of three volcanoes-from west to east, they are Sajaka, Tanaga, and Takawangha. All three volcanoes have erupted in the last 1,000 years, producing lava flows and tephra (ash) deposits. A much less frequent, but potentially more hazardous phenomenon, is volcanic edifice collapse into the sea, which likely happens only on a timescale of every few thousands of years, at most. Parts of the volcanic bedrock near Takawangha have been altered by hydrothermal activity and are prone to slope failure, but such events only present a local hazard. Given the volcanic cluster's remote location, the primary hazard from the Tanaga volcanoes is airborne ash that could affect aircraft. In this report, we summarize the major volcanic hazards associated with the Tanaga volcanic cluster.

  10. Geodetic evidence for en echelon dike emplacement and concurrent slow slip during the June 2007 intrusion and eruption at K?lauea volcano, Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. K. Montgomery-Brown; D. K. Sinnett; M. Poland; P. Segall; T. Orr; H. Zebker; A. Miklius

    2010-01-01

    A series of complex events at K?lauea Volcano, Hawaii, 17 June to 19 June 2007, began with an intrusion in the upper east rift zone (ERZ) and culminated with a small eruption (1500 m3). Surface deformation due to the intrusion was recorded in unprecedented detail by Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt networks as well as interferometric synthetic aperture radar

  11. Overview of the 1990 1995 eruption at Unzen Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Setsuya; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Ohta, Kazuya

    1999-04-01

    Following 198 years of dormancy, a small phreatic eruption started at the summit of Unzen Volcano (Mt. Fugen) in November 1990. A swarm of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes had begun below the western flank of the volcano a year before this eruption, and isolated tremor occurred below the summit shortly before it. The focus of VT events had migrated eastward to the summit and became shallower. Following a period of phreatic activity, phreatomagmatic eruptions began in February 1991, became larger with time, and developed into a dacite dome eruption in May 1991 that lasted approximately 4 years. The emergence of the dome followed inflation, demagnetization and a swarm of high-frequency (HF) earthquakes in the crater area. After the dome appeared, activity of the VT earthquakes and the summit HF events was replaced largely by low-frequency (LF) earthquakes. Magma was discharged nearly continuously through the period of dome growth, and the rate decreased roughly with time. The lava dome grew in an unstable form on the shoulder of Mt. Fugen, with repeating partial collapses. The growth was exogenous when the lava effusion rate was high, and endogenous when low. A total of 13 lobes grew as a result of exogenous growth. Vigorous swarms of LF earthquakes occurred just prior to each lobe extrusion. Endogenous growth was accompanied by strong deformation of the crater floor and HF and LF earthquakes. By repeated exogenous and endogenous growth, a large dome was formed over the crater. Pyroclastic flows frequently descended to the northeast, east, and southeast, and their deposits extensively covered the eastern slope and flank of Mt. Fugen. Major pyroclastic flows took place when the lava effusion rate was high. Small vulcanian explosions were limited in the initial stage of dome growth. One of them occurred following collapse of the dome. The total volume of magma erupted was 2.1×10 8 m 3 (dense-rock-equivalent); about a half of this volume remained as a lava dome at the summit (1.2 km long, 0.8 km wide and 230-540 m high). The eruption finished with extrusion of a spine at the endogenous dome top. Several monitoring results convinced us that the eruption had come to an end: the minimal levels of both seismicity and rockfalls, no discharge of magma, the minimal SO 2 flux, and cessation of subsidence of the western flank of the volcano. The dome started slow deformation and cooling after the halt of magma effusion in February 1995.

  12. Analysis of Vulnerability Around The Colima Volcano, MEXICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, S. P.

    2001-12-01

    The Colima volcano located in the western of the Trasmexican Volcanic Belt, in the central portion of the Colima Rift Zone, between the Mexican States of Jalisco and Colima. The volcano since January of 1998 presents a new activity, which has been characterized by two stages: the first one was an effusive phase that begin on 20 November 1998 and finish by the middle of January 1999. On February 10of 1999 a great explosion in the summit marked the beginning of an explosive phase, these facts implies that the eruptive process changes from an effusive model to an explosive one. Suárez-Plascencia et al, 2000, present hazard maps to ballistic projectiles, ashfalls and lahars for this scenario. This work presents the evaluation of the vulnerability in the areas identified as hazardous in the maps for ballistic, ashfalls and lahars, based on the economic elements located in the middle and lower sections of the volcano building, like agriculture, forestry, agroindustries and communication lines (highways, power, telephonic, railroad, etc). The method is based in Geographic Information Systems, using digital cartography scale 1:50,000, digital orthophotos from the Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, SPOT and Landsat satellite images from 1997 and 2000 in the bands 1, 2 and 3. The land use maps obtained for 1997 and 2000, were compared with the land use map reported by Suárez in 1992, from these maps an increase of the 5 porcent of the sugar cane area and corn cultivations were observed compared of those of 1990 (1225.7 km2) and a decrease of the forest surface, moving the agricultural limits uphill, and showing also some agave cultivation in the northwest and north hillslopes of the Nevado de Colima. This increment of the agricultural surface results in bigger economic activity in the area, which makes that the vulnerability also be increased to different volcanic products emitted during this phase of activity. The degradation of the soil by the agriculture and forestry, mainly in the east hillslope of the volcano is another factor that generate remoulded material that in the event of an extraordinary rainsfall during an explosive events, could increase the size of the lahar or generate flows of mud that may affect the towns, villages (like Atenquique, which has been affected in 1957 by a large lahar), and could generate strong damages to the communication lines affecting distant places as Guadalajara city and the Port of Manzanillo.

  13. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at midlatitude or high-latitude volcanoes; (c) safety factors during unrest, which can limit where new instrumentation can safely be installed (particularly at near-vent sites that can be critical for precursor detection and eruption forecasting); and (d) the remoteness of many U.S. volcanoes (particularly those in the Aleutians and the Marianas Islands), where access is difficult or impossible most of the year. Given these difficulties, it is reasonable to anticipate that ground-based monitoring of eruptions at U.S. volcanoes will likely be performed primarily with instruments installed before unrest begins. 2. Given a growing awareness of previously undetected 2. phenomena that may occur before an eruption begins, at present the types and (or) density of instruments in use at most U.S. volcanoes is insufficient to provide reliable early warning of volcanic eruptions. As shown by the gap analysis of Ewert and others (2005), a number of U.S. volcanoes lack even rudimentary monitoring. At those volcanic systems with monitoring instrumentation in place, only a few types of phenomena can be tracked in near-real time, principally changes in seismicity, deformation, and large-scale changes in thermal flux (through satellite-based remote sensing). Furthermore, researchers employing technologically advanced instrumentation at volcanoes around the world starting in the 1990s have shown that subtle and previously undetectable phenomena can precede or accompany eruptions. Detection of such phenomena would greatly improve the ability of U.S. volcano observatories to provide accurate early warnings of impending eruptions, and is a critical capability particularly at the very high-threat volcanoes identified by Ewert and others (2005). For these two reasons, change from a reactive to a proactive volcano-monitoring strategy is clearly needed at U.S. volcanoes. Monitoring capabilities need to be expanded at virtually every volcanic center, regardless of its current state of

  14. A global database of composite volcano morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Euillades, Pablo A.; Euillades, Leonardo D.; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We present a global database on the subaerial morphometry of composite volcanoes. Data was extracted from the 90-m resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM). The 759 volcanoes included in the database are the composite (i.e., polygenetic) volcanoes listed in the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program (GVP) database that are covered by the SRTM DEM, have a constructional topography and a basal width larger than 2 km. The extent of each volcano edifice was defined using the NETVOLC algorithm, which computes outlines by minimizing a cost function based on breaks in slope around the edifices. Morphometric parameters were then calculated using the MORVOLC algorithm. The parameters characterize and quantify volcano size (basal width, summit width, height, and volume), profile shape (height/basal width and summit width/basal width ratios), plan shape (ellipticity and irregularity indexes), and slopes. In addition, 104 well-defined and relatively large summit craters/calderas were manually delineated and specific parameters were computed. Most parameters show large variation without clear separations, indicating a continuum of volcano morphologies. Large overlap between the main GVP morphologic types highlights the need for a more rigorous quantitative classification of volcano morphology. The database will be maintained and updated through a website under construction.

  15. Lahar Hazards at Concepción volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Concepción is one of Nicaragua’s highest and most active volcanoes. The symmetrical cone occupies the northeastern half of a dumbbell shaped island called Isla Ometepa. The dormant volcano, Maderas, occupies the southwest half of the island. A narrow isthmus connects Concepción and Maderas volcanoes. Concepción volcano towers more than 1600 m above Lake Nicaragua and is within 5 to 10 km of several small towns situated on its aprons at or near the shoreline. These towns have a combined population of nearly 5,000. The volcano has frequently produced debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas. Concepción volcano has erupted more than 25 times in the last 120 years. Its first recorded activity was in AD 1883. Eruptions in the past century, most of which have originated from a small summit crater, comprise moderate explosions, ash that falls out of eruption plumes (called tephra), and occasional lava flows. Near the summit area, there are accumulations of rock that were emplaced hot (pyroclastic deposits), most of which were hot enough to stick together during deposition (a process called welding). These pyroclastic rocks are rather weak, and tend to break apart easily. The loose volcanic rock remobilizes during heavy rain to form lahars. Volcanic explosions have produced blankets of tephra that are distributed downwind, which on Isla Ometepe is mostly to the west. Older deposits at the west end of the island that are up to 1 m thick indicate larger explosive events have happened at Concepción volcano in prehistoric time. Like pyroclastic-flow deposits, loose tephra on the steep slopes of the volcano provides source material that heavy rainstorms and earthquakes can mobilize to trigger debris flow.

  16. Collapse of waterlogged volcanoes / Collapse of dry volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanoes may hold very different amounts of water, depending on their original construction, alteration and on the climate around them. The water can behave differently depending on the hydrological-hydrothermal conditions. Water also has a very strong influence on the stability of the edifice, and also may have a major role on how any resulting debris avalanche moves and how the avalanche material develops. In the edifice, the water can be variably distributed, depending on the internal structure. Using examples such as Mt Meager, Iriga, Mombacho, Socompa, La Réunion, I construct models of volcano structure and hydrology, and suggest different scenarios for debris avalanches that would develop from the collapse of these edifices. Then, taking the assumed make-up of the collapsing mass and its water content, I speculate on the behaviour of the developing mass in movement. Comparing with some observed field cases I discuss how water is held in the mass and how it may concentrate in parts and develop specific rheologies and behaviours. In particular, I will look at the relationship between the basal layer, the substrate (incorporated or not), hummocks and inter-hummocks, and a possible gloopy surface layer that may develop during or just after flow. It is likely that debris avalanches (dry frictional transport) and debris flows (saturated flow transport) have a complete gradation between them, and that in many cases the distinction is not really useful, as both types of motion probably operate at the same time in one event or may both operate in one mass, depending on the strain rate imposed.

  17. Lava Sampling on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This video segment shows how scientists collaborate to collect and chemically analyze samples of molten lava as part of their quest to learn more about how volcanoes work. Working at Kilauea volcano, scientists collect samples of lava before it has a chance to cool so they can study the chemical properties it had when it was deep within Earth's interior. The samples are sent to a laboratory where other scientists determine their chemical compositions. Questions such as whether two volcanoes share a common magma source can be answered through such analyses. The segment is five minutes forty-seven seconds in length. A background essay and list of discussion questions are also provided.

  18. The Lamongan volcanic field, East Java, Indonesia: physical volcanology, historic activity and hazards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon A Carn

    2000-01-01

    The Lamongan volcanic field (LVF) in East Java, Indonesia, consists of up to 61 basaltic cinder or spatter cones, a minimum of 29 prehistoric maars, and a central compound complex comprising three main vents including the historically active Lamongan volcano. The field lies on the Sunda volcanic arc and abuts onto the currently active Tengger caldera–Semeru complex to the west.

  19. One hundred volatile years of volcanic gas studies at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: Chapter 7 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, Andrew J.; Elias, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    The first volcanic gas studies in Hawai‘i, beginning in 1912, established that volatile emissions from K?lauea Volcano contained mostly water vapor, in addition to carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This straightforward discovery overturned a popular volatile theory of the day and, in the same action, helped affirm Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr.’s, vision of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) as a preeminent place to study volcanic processes. Decades later, the environmental movement produced a watershed of quantitative analytical tools that, after being tested at K?lauea, became part of the regular monitoring effort at HVO. The resulting volatile emission and fumarole chemistry datasets are some of the most extensive on the planet. These data indicate that magma from the mantle enters the shallow magmatic system of K?lauea sufficiently oversaturated in CO2 to produce turbulent flow. Passive degassing at K?lauea’s summit that occurred from 1983 through 2007 yielded CO2-depleted, but SO2- and H2O-rich, rift eruptive gases. Beginning with the 2008 summit eruption, magma reaching the East Rift Zone eruption site became depleted of much of its volatile content at the summit eruptive vent before transport to Pu‘u ‘?‘?. The volatile emissions of Hawaiian volcanoes are halogen-poor, relative to those of other basaltic systems. Information gained regarding intrinsic gas solubilities at K?lauea and Mauna Loa, as well as the pressure-controlled nature of gas release, have provided useful tools for tracking eruptive activity. Regular CO2-emission-rate measurements at K?lauea’s summit, together with surface-deformation and other data, detected an increase in deep magma supply more than a year before a corresponding surge in effusive activity. Correspondingly, HVO routinely uses SO2 emissions to study shallow eruptive processes and effusion rates. HVO gas studies and K?lauea’s long-running East Rift Zone eruption also demonstrate that volatile emissions can be a substantial volcanic hazard in Hawai‘i. From its humble beginning, trying to determine the chemical composition of volcanic gases over a century ago, HVO has evolved to routinely use real-time gas chemistry to track eruptive processes, as well as hazards.

  20. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  1. The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) - Past and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, J. W.; Pallister, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    For 24 years the U.S. Geological Survey and USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have supported a small team of scientists and the monitoring equipment required to respond to volcanic crises at short notice anywhere in the world. This VDAP team was founded following the 1985 tragedy at Nevado del Ruiz, where 23,000 perished following an eruption-triggered lahar that swept through the town of Armero, Colombia. Through its first two decades, VDAP has deployed teams and equipment to assist host-country counterparts in responding to volcanic eruptions and unrest at numerous volcanoes in Central and South America, the Caribbean, the Western Pacific and Africa and the Middle East. VDAP and the larger USGS Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) have a synergistic relationship. VDAP contributes to domestic eruption responses (e.g., Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Marianas Islands (2003-05), Mount St. Helens (2004) and several Alaskan eruptions). In turn, when VDAP lacks sufficient capability, the larger USGS Volcano Hazards Program provides a “backstop” of staff and expertise to support its international work. Between crises, VDAP conducts capacity-building projects, including construction of volcano-monitoring networks and education programs in monitoring, hazard assessment and eruption forecasting. Major capacity-building projects have focused on Central and South America (1998-present), Papua New Guinea (1998-2000) and Indonesia (2004-present). In all cases, VDAP scientists work in the background, providing support to counterpart agencies and representing the U.S. Government as scientist-diplomats. All VDAP monitoring equipment (whether used in crisis response or in capacity building) is donated to counterpart agencies as a form of U.S. foreign aid. Over the years, VDAP has helped build and sustain volcano observatories and monitoring programs in more than a dozen countries. As observatories, monitoring networks, and the science of volcanology and forecasting have advanced, the role of VDAP has changed. In the early years, VDAP served mainly as a “mobile volcano observatory” to the world. More recently, our role has shifted to include enhancing and modernizing monitoring infrastructure, advancing capabilities in eruption forecasting through experience gained during eruption responses, and sharing this experience through education and training programs. As capabilities of international partner observatories have grown, the traditional VDAP “mobile observatory” response is now reserved mainly for situations in which local capabilities and resources are exceeded. The future promises continued advances in eruption forecasting, emphasizing not only “when” an eruption will take place but also on “how big” it will be. An international focus on this problem, emphasizing both stochastic and deterministic methods, offers the best opportunity for advancement. For VDAP, we expect continued work with observatory partners around the Pacific Rim to improve monitoring, and an expanded role with a variety of agency and university partners to develop new monitoring technologies, as well as hazard assessment and forecasting methods. Overall, our focus will remain on working together with international partners to prevent volcanic crises from becoming volcanic disasters.

  2. Relationship between Kamen Volcano and the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes (Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churikova, Tatiana G.; Gordeychik, Boris N.; Ivanov, Boris V.; Wörner, Gerhard

    2013-08-01

    Data on the geology, petrography, mineralogy, and geochemistry of rocks from Kamen Volcano (Central Kamchatka Depression) are presented and compared with rocks from the neighbouring active volcanoes. The rocks from Kamen and Ploskie Sopky volcanoes differ systematically in major elemental and mineral compositions and could not have been produced from the same primary melts. The compositional trends of Kamen stratovolcano lavas and dikes are clearly distinct from those of Klyuchevskoy lavas in all major and trace element diagrams as well as in mineral composition. However, lavas of the monogenetic cones on the southwestern slope of Kamen Volcano are similar to the moderately high-Mg basalts from Klyuchevskoy and may have been derived from the same primary melts. This means that the monogenetic cones of Kamen Volcano represent the feeding magma for Klyuchevskoy Volcano. Rocks from Kamen stratovolcano and Bezymianny form a common trend on all major element diagrams, indicating their genetic proximity. This suggests that Bezymianny Volcano inherited the feeding magma system of extinct Kamen Volcano. The observed geochemical diversity of rocks from the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes can be explained as the result of both gradual depletion over time of the mantle N-MORB-type source due to the intense previous magmatic events in this area, and the addition of distinct fluids to this mantle source.

  3. Igneous rocks of the East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K2O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K2O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO2. Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts.The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 104.

  4. Volcanoes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is a vent in the Earth's crust. Hot rock, steam, poisonous gases, and ash reach the Earth's ... can also cause earthquakes, mudflows and flash floods, rock falls and landslides, acid rain, fires, and even ...

  5. Small Volcano in Terra Cimmeria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 26 June 2002) The Science This positive relief feature (see MOLA context) in the ancient highlands of Mars appears to be a heavily eroded volcanic center. The top of this feature appears to be under attack by the erosive forces of the martian wind. Light-toned streaks are visible, trending northeast to southwest, and may be caused by scouring of the terrain, or they may be dune forms moving sand. The northeast portion of the caldera area looks as though a layer of material is being removed to expose a slightly lighter-toned surface underneath. The flanks of this feature are slightly less cratered than the surrounding terrain, which could be explained in two ways: 1) this feature may be younger than the surrounding area, and has had less time to accumulate meteorite impacts, or 2) the slopes that are observed today may be so heavily eroded that the original, cratered surfaces are now gone, exposing relatively uncratered rocks. Although most of Terra Cimmeria has low albedo, some eastern portions, such as shown in this image, demonstrate an overall lack of contrast that attests to the presence of a layer of dust mantling the surface. This dust, in part, is responsible for the muted appearance and infill of many of the craters at the northern and southern ends of this image The Story This flat-topped volcano pops out from the surface, the swirls of its ancient lava flows running down onto the ancient highlands of Mars. Its smooth top appears to be under attack by the erosive forces of the martian wind. How can you tell? Click on the image above for a close-up look. You'll see some light-toned streaks that run in a northeast-southwest direction. They are caused either by the scouring of the terrain or dunes of moving sand. Either way, the wind likely plays upon the volcano's surface. Look also for the subtle, nearly crescent shaped feature at the northeast portion of the volcano's cap. It looks as if a layer of material has been removed by the wind, exposing a slightly lighter-toned surface underneath. The sides of the volcano are less cratered than the rest of the terrain. Perhaps that means it is younger than the surrounding area and has had less time to accumulate meteorite impacts. On the other hand, perhaps erosion has scrubbed away the original cratered surfaces. It's a little hard to tell which possibility holds the key to the history of this area. Although most of Terra Cimmeria can look relatively darker (has a low albedo or low 'reflective power') than some other Martian areas, its eastern portions sometimes have an overall lack of contrast as seen in the above image. A layer of dust blankets the surface here, causing it to look muted. Many of the craters in the northern and southern ends of the image also seem subdued, as dust has partly filled in the stark holes they once created. The Cimmerians who give their name to this region were an ancient, little-known people of southern Russia mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions and by Homer.

  6. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W.; Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2009-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO’s remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites, and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) data. AVHRR and MODIS data are collected by receiving stations operated by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska’s Geophysical Institute. An additional AVHRR data feed is supplied by NOAA’s Gilmore Creek satellite tracking station. GOES data are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Monterey Bay. The ability to visualize these images and their derived products is critical for the timely analysis of the data. To this end, AVORS has developed javascript web interfaces that allow the user to view images and metadata. These work well for internal analysts to quickly access a given dataset, but they do not provide an integrated view of all the data. To do this AVORS has integrated its datasets with Keyhole Markup Language (KML) allowing them to be viewed by a number of virtual globes or other geobrowsers that support this code. Examples of AVORS’ use of KML include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through KML to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits using polygons; and animated models of ash plumes, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages.

  7. Lahar hazards at Mombacho Volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.

    2001-01-01

    Mombacho volcano, at 1,350 meters, is situated on the shores of Lake Nicaragua and about 12 kilometers south of Granada, a city of about 90,000 inhabitants. Many more people live a few kilometers southeast of Granada in 'las Isletas de Granada and the nearby 'Peninsula de Aseses. These areas are formed of deposits of a large debris avalanche (a fast moving avalanche of rock and debris) from Mombacho. Several smaller towns with population, in the range of 5,000 to 12,000 inhabitants are to the northwest and the southwest of Mombacho volcano. Though the volcano has apparently not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce landslides and debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris -- also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas. -- Vallance, et.al., 2001

  8. Lahar hazards at Agua volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.; Matías, O.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    At 3760 m, Agua volcano towers more than 3500 m above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan highlands to the north. The volcano is within 5 to 10 kilometers (km) of Antigua, Guatemala and several other large towns situated on its northern apron. These towns have a combined population of nearly 100,000. It is within about 20 km of Escuintla (population, ca. 100,000) to the south. Though the volcano has not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas.

  9. Investigation of prototype volcano-surveillance network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. P. (principal investigator); Ward, P. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The equipment installed in the volcano surveillance network continues to work quite reliably and earthquakes are being recorded at all sites. A summary of platform receptions per day has been prepared.

  10. Background levels of atmospheric mercury in Kagoshima City, and influence of mercury emission from Sakurajima Volcano, Southern Kyushu, Japan

    PubMed

    Tomiyasu; Nagano; Sakamoto; Yonehara

    2000-10-01

    Vapor phase mercury concentration was determined daily for 1 year (Jan. 1996-Jan. 1997) in order to present the levels of atmospheric mercury in Kagoshima City and to estimate the influence of mercury emission from Sakurajima Volcano, southern Kyushu, Japan. The atmospheric mercury was collected on a porous gold collector at Kagoshima University and was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry; Kagoshima University of Kagoshima City is located approximately 11 km west of Sakurajima Volcano. The mercury concentration obtained was in the range 1.2-52.5 ng m(-3) (mean 10.8 ng m(-3), n = 169). The atmospheric concentration varied from season to season; the concentration was high in summer and lower in winter. A linear relation was obtained by plotting ln[Hg/ng m(-3)] vs. 1/T for the north, south and west winds with correlation coefficients of -0.76, -0.79 and -0.83, respectively, but no such dependency was found for the east wind (r = -0.035). When the wind is blowing from the east, Kagoshima City is on the leeward side of the volcano. The impact of the fumarolic activity of the volcano on ambient air in the city was evident in the disappearance of temperature dependency with the appearance of the east wind. Atmospheric mercury concentration except for the east wind was considered to be background levels of Kagoshima City. As background levels, 8.1 +/- 5.3 ng m(-3), 14.8 +/- 7.9 ng m(-3), 13.9 +/- 11.7 ng m(-3) and 4.4 +/- 1.6 ng m(-3) (mean +/- S.D.) were obtained for spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. PMID:11032152

  11. Electric structure of the Copahue Volcano (Neuquén Province, Argentina), from magnetotelluric soundings: 1D and 2D modellings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Maman??; E. Borzotta; J. E. Venencia; A. Maidana; C. E. Moyano; B. Castiglione

    2000-01-01

    Four magnetotelluric soundings were carried out in 1993 in the region of the Copahue active volcano located at the border between Chile and Argentina (37°45?S, 71°18?W). Three soundings were located inside the caldera of the ancient stratovolcano (east of Copahue) and the fourth outside it. The soundings inside the caldera were situated at about 6, 11, and 14 km from the

  12. Lahar-hazard zonation for San Miguel volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Chesner, C.A.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. The volcano, located in the eastern part of the country, rises to an altitude of about 2130 meters and towers above the communities of San Miguel, El Transito, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and the PanAmerican and coastal highways cross the lowermost northern and southern flanks of the volcano. The population density around San Miguel volcano coupled with the proximity of major transportation routes increases the risk that even small volcano-related events, like landslides or eruptions, may have significant impact on people and infrastructure. San Miguel volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in El Salvador; it has erupted at least 29 times since 1699. Historical eruptions of the volcano consisted mainly of relatively quiescent emplacement of lava flows or minor explosions that generated modest tephra falls (erupted fragments of microscopic ash to meter sized blocks that are dispersed into the atmosphere and fall to the ground). Little is known, however, about prehistoric eruptions of the volcano. Chemical analyses of prehistoric lava flows and thin tephra falls from San Miguel volcano indicate that the volcano is composed dominantly of basalt (rock having silica content

  13. Evolution of large shield volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Dufek, Josef; McGovern, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the geologic history, topographic expression, and gravity signature of 29 large Venusian shield volcanoes with similar morphologies in Magellan synthetic aperture radar imagery. While they appear similar in imagery, 16 have a domical topographic expression and 13 have a central depression. Typical dimensions for the central depression are 150 km wide and 500 m deep. The central depressions are probably not calderas resulting from collapse of a shallow magma chamber but instead are the result of a corona-like sagging of a previously domical volcano. The depressions all have some later volcanic filling. All but one of the central depression volcanoes have been post-dated by geologic features unrelated to the volcano, while most of the domical volcanoes are at the top of the stratigraphic column. Analysis of the gravity signatures in the spatial and spectral domains shows a strong correlation between the absence of post-dating features and the presence of dynamic support by an underlying plume. We infer that the formation of the central depressions occurred as a result of cessation of dynamic support. However, there are some domical volcanoes whose geologic histories and gravity signatures also indicate that they are extinct, so sagging of the central region apparently does not always occur when dynamic support is removed. We suggest that the thickness of the elastic lithosphere may be a factor in determining whether a central depression forms when dynamic support is removed, but the gravity data are of insufficient resolution to test this hypothesis with admittance methods.

  14. Pre-, Syn- and Post Eruptive Seismicity of the 2011 Eruption of Nabro Volcano, Eritrea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goitom, Berhe; Hammond, James; Kendall, Michael; Nowacky, Andy; Keir, Derek; Oppenheimer, Clive; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ayele, Atalay; Ibrahim, Said; Jacques, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Nabro volcano, located in south-east Eritrea, East Africa, lies at the eastern margin of the Afar Rift and the Danakil Depression. Its tectonic behaviour is controlled by the divergence of the Arabian, Nubian and Somali plates. Nabro volcano was thought to be seismically quiet until it erupted in June 2011 with limited warning. The volcano erupted on June 12, 2011 around 20:32 UTC, following a series of earthquakes on that day that reached a maximum magnitude of 5.8. It is the first recorded eruption of Nabro volcano and only the second in Eritrea, following the Dubbi eruption in 1861. A lava flow emerged from the caldera and travelled about 20 km from the vent and buried settlements in the area. At the time of this eruption there was no seismic network in Eritrea, and hence the volcano was not monitored. In this study we use ten Ethiopian, one Yemeni and one Djibouti stations to investigate the seismicity of the area before, during and after the eruption. Four Eritrean seismic stations deployed in June 2011, four days after the eruption, are also included in the dataset. Travel time picks supplied by colleagues from Djibouti were also incorporated into the dataset. Our analysis covers roughly three months before and after the eruption and shows that Nabro was seismically quiet before the eruption (nine events), with the exception of one major earthquake (4.8 magnitude) that occurred on March 31, 2011. In contrast, the region shows continued seismic activity after the eruption (92 events). During the eruption seismicity levels are high (123 events), with two days particularly active, June 12 and June 17 with 85 and 28 discrete events, respectively. Maximum magnitudes of 5.8 and 5.9 were recorded on these two days. The two days of increased seismicity are consistent with satellite observations of the eruption which show two distinct phases of the eruption. The period between these two phases was dominated by volcanic tremor. The tremor signal lasted for almost one month following the initiation of the eruption. In summary, we have shown that the volcano was relatively quiet before eruption but continued to be seismically active for an extended period of time afterwards.

  15. When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    E-print Network

    Svensen, Henrik

    When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan A Petroleum Research, Oslo Research Park, 0349 Oslo, Norway c Geology Institute Azerbaijan, Husein Avenue 29A, Baku, Azerbaijan d Moscow State University, Faculty of Geology, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow 119992, Russia e

  16. When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mazzini; H. Svensen; S. Planke; I. Guliyev; G. G. Akhmanov; T. Fallik; D. Banks

    2009-01-01

    The worlds >1500 mud volcanoes are normally in a dormant stage due to the short duration of eruptions. Their dormant stage activity is often characterized by vigorous seepage of water, gas, and petroleum. However, the source of the fluids and the fluid–rock interactions within the mud volcano conduit remain poorly understood. In order to investigate this type of activity, we

  17. Volcano-earthquake interaction at Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii Thomas R. Walter1,2

    E-print Network

    Amelung, Falk

    Volcano-earthquake interaction at Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii Thomas R. Walter1,2 and Falk Amelung1 into the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) or into the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) and by large earthquakes at the basal decollement fault. In this paper we examine the historic eruption and earthquake catalogues, and we test

  18. Research paper Living with volcanoes: The sustainable livelihoods approach for volcano-related opportunities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilan Kelman; Tamsin A. Mather

    Although the negative impacts of volcanism on society are well documented and accepted, many possible benefits from volcanoes are not always fully considered. This paper provides suggestions for understanding and implementing volcanoes' benefits by suggesting further application of existing risk management frameworks to volcanology: living with risk by using the sustainable livelihoods approach at the local level. This paper presents

  19. Living with volcanoes: The sustainable livelihoods approach for volcano-related opportunities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilan Kelman; Tamsin A. Mather

    2008-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of volcanism on society are well documented and accepted, many possible benefits from volcanoes are not always fully considered. This paper provides suggestions for understanding and implementing volcanoes' benefits by suggesting further application of existing risk management frameworks to volcanology: living with risk by using the sustainable livelihoods approach at the local level. This paper presents

  20. Radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: Initial deployment of a transportable Doppler radar system for volcano-monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoblitt, R. P.; Schneider, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid detection of explosive volcanic eruptions and accurate determination of eruption-column altitude and ash-cloud movement are critical factors in the mitigation of volcanic risks to aviation and in the forecasting of ash fall on nearby communities. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and it provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data that it captured during the Redoubt eruption. The volcano-monitoring Doppler radar operates in the C-band (5.36 cm) and has a 2.4-m parabolic antenna with a beam width of 1.6 degrees, a transmitter power of 330 watts, and a maximum effective range of 240 km. The entire disassembled system, including a radome, fits inside a 6-m-long steel shipping container that has been modified to serve as base for the antenna/radome, and as a field station for observers and other monitoring equipment. The radar was installed at the Kenai Municipal Airport, 82 km east of Redoubt and about 100 km southwest of Anchorage. In addition to an unobstructed view of the volcano, this secure site offered the support of the airport staff and the City of Kenai. A further advantage was the proximity of a NEXRAD Doppler radar operated by the Federal Aviation Administration. This permitted comparisons with an established weather-monitoring radar system. The new radar system first became functional on March 20, roughly a day before the first of nineteen explosive ash-producing events of Redoubt between March 21 and April 4. Despite inevitable start-up problems, nearly all of the events were observed by the radar, which was remotely operated from the Alaska Volcano Observatory office in Anchorage. The USGS and NEXRAD radars both detected the eruption columns and tracked the directions of drifting ash clouds. The USGS radar scanned a 45-degree sector centered on the volcano while NEXRAD scanned a full 360 degrees. The sector strategy scanned the volcano more frequently than the 360-degree strategy. Consequently, the USGS system detected event onset within less than a minute, while the NEXRAD required about 4 minutes. The observed column heights were as high as 20 km above sea level and compared favorably to those from NEXRAD. NEXRAD tracked ash clouds to greater distances than the USGS system. This experience shows that Doppler radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

  1. Update of map the volcanic hazard in the Ceboruco volcano, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Ceboruco Volcano (21° 7.688 N, 104° 30.773 W) is located in the northwestern part of the Tepic-Zacoalco graben. Its volcanic activity can be divided in four eruptive cycles differentiated by their VEI and chemical variations as well. As a result of andesitic effusive activity, the "paleo-Ceboruco" edifice was constructed during the first cycle. The end of this cycle is defined by a plinian eruption (VEI between 3 and 4) which occurred some 1020 years ago and formed the external caldera. During the second cycle an andesitic dome built up in the interior of the caldera. The dome collapsed and formed the internal caldera. The third cycle is represented by andesitic lava flows which partially cover the northern and south-southwestern part of the edifice. The last cycle is represented by the andesitic lava flows of the nineteenth century located in the southwestern flank of the volcano. Actually, moderate fumarolic activity occurs in the upper part of the volcano showing temperatures ranging between 20° and 120°C. Some volcanic high frequency tremors have also been registered near the edifice. Shows the updating of the volcanic hazard maps published in 1998, where we identify with SPOT satellite imagery and Google Earth, change in the land use on the slope of volcano, the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east sides of the Ceboruco volcano. The population inhabiting the area is 70,224 people in 2010, concentrated in 107 localities and growing at an annual rate of 0.37%, also the region that has shown an increased in the vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by highway, high road, railroad, and the construction of new highway to Puerto Vallarta, which is built in the southeast sector of the volcano and electrical infrastructure that connect the Cajon and Yesca Dams to Guadalajara city. The most important economic activity in the area is agriculture, with crops of sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum), corn, and jamaica (Hibiscus sabdariffa). Recently it has established tomato and green pepper crops in greenhouses. The regional commercial activities are concentrated in the localities of Ixtlán, Jala and Ahuacatlán. The updated hazard maps are: a) Hazard map of pyroclastic flows, b) Hazard map of lahars and debris flow, and c) Hazard map of ash-fall. The cartographic and database information obtained will be the basis for updating the Operational Plan of the Ceboruco Volcano by the State Civil & Fire Protection Unit of Nayarit, Mexico, and the urban development plans of surrounding municipalities, in order to reduce their vulnerability to the hazards of the volcanic activity.

  2. Evidence for two shield volcanoes exposed on the island of Kauai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Sawyer, N.-L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The island of Kauai has always been interpreted as a single shield volcano, but lavas of previously correlated reversed-to-normal magnetic-polarity transitions on opposite sides of the island differ significantly in isotopic composition. Samples from west Kauai have 87Sr/86Sr 18.25; samples from east Kauai have 87Sr/86Sr > 0.7037, ??Nd ??? 6.14, and 206Pb/204Pb < 18.25. Available data suggest that a younger eastern shield grew on the collapsed flank of an older western one.

  3. Climate model calculations of the effects of volcanoes on global climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95 percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  4. Merapi volcano (Java, Indonesia) and Merapi-type Nuée ardente

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Bardintzeff

    1984-01-01

    A particular nuée ardente type (Merapi-type avalanche nuée) has been defined at the Merapi volcano because of its prominent role in the recent activity of the volcano: gravity plays a significant role during the eruption.

  5. Kizimen volcano basaltic andesites: petrography and magmatic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusov, S.; Pletchov, P.; Ivanov, B.

    2003-04-01

    Kizimen volcano has unique geological position because it is located just between global active volcanic structures as East Volcanic Front (EVF) and Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD), but it still remains one of the pure studied volcanoes of Kamchatka. Several samples of basaltic andesites (53-54 wt.{%} SiO2) was studied. Microprobe analyses of olivine phenocryst cores show composition from Fo79 to Fo72. Olivine rims are strongly zoned and have Fe-rich composition (from Fo72 to Fo62). Phenocrysts of clinopyroxene are slightly zoned (En44 - 38 Fs15 - 10 Wo47 - 39). Orthopyroxene phenocrysts have nearly constant composition (En64 - 63 Fs35 - 34 Wo2 - 1). Apatite inclusions and silica-rich melt inclusions in orthopyroxene argues for their late crystallization. Plagioclase represented by two generations: An96 - 93 to An93 - 87 and An65 - 62 to An70 - 67. At the same time clinopyroxene+magnetite aggregates that have early amphibole morphology was founded. These aggregates have been produced by amphibole breakdown during magma ascending. Ferrous oxide phases have narrow range of compositions corresponding to Ti-magnetite. Solid inclusions of plagioclase in olivine show clear correlation between their compositions. High-Ca plagioclase (An97 - 92) coexists with relatively high-Mg olivine (Fo79 - 75). Such assemblage is very similar to allivalites (Ol-Pl cumulates of the eucritic composition). This assemblage has the most magnesian olivine for Kizimen volcano and probably is the earliest assemblage, known for these rocks. Initial magma composition of studied eruption was calculated using melt inclusion compositions from olivine of earliest Ol-Pl assemblage. Partially crystallized melt inclusions were heated experimentally, quenched, exposed to the grain surface and their compositions were measured. Reconstructed melts are corresponding to basalt composition (46-47 wt.{%} SiO2) and falls into the field of middle-K series. Temperatures of olivine crystallization are near 1110± 10r{} T. According to Frolova et al. (2001) allivalite assemblages were known only for low-K island arc tholeitic series and discovering of the earliest Ol-Pl assemblage can be applied for expanding of boundaries of allivalite-bearing rock compositions from low-K series to middle-K one.

  6. Three-dimensional Q for Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. E.; Lees, J. M.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Galapagos Islands volcanoes are some of the most rapidly deforming volcanoes on Earth, yet the magma storage chambers and migration pathways are poorly imaged. Three-dimensional tomographic inversion for seismic attenuation, 1/Q, is used to image variations in subsurface structure and heterogeneity associated with magma storage and volcanic construction at Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos Islands. P-wave power spectra were used to estimate t* (attenuation weighted, integrated slowness) in the frequency domain for local earthquakes recorded on the 15 station, broadband SIGNET array. The SIGNET network was deployed around Sierra Negra caldera and the southern part of Isabela Island between August 2009 and January 2011. A subset of 451 earthquakes was selected for attenuation analysis based on event location within the array and station coverage. The modelled spectra were used to calculate path attenuation and earthquake source parameters. The earthquake source parameters corresponding to amplitude at zero frequency (?0) and corner frequency (fc) relate to earthquake size and are therefore set constant across stations. Accordingly, we derive a single ?0 and fc for each event and fix them while allowing only t* to vary. Values of t* range between 8.89 x 10-15 and 0.0525. Preliminary results show an increase in attenuation beneath the caldera starting at 1 km depth. The zone of high attenuation is more pronounced at 2 km depth and extends laterally to the east and southeast beyond the extent of the 10 km-wide caldera. Gravity anomaly and InSAR data has been used previously to model the magma chamber at Sierra Negra. Deformation modelling requires a flat-topped sill at 2 km depth (Geist et. al., 2007; Jonsson, S., 2009; Yun et. al., 2006). Our shallow, high attenuation zone matches these results, but also indicates that the attenuating bodies extend beyond the limits of the caldera beneath the SE flank of Sierra Negra. Elongate zones of higher attenuation correlate with aligned chains of cinder cones and fissures, including the E-W trending 2005 eruptive vent system.

  7. Effects of Volcanoes on the Natural Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary focus of this project has been on the development of techniques to study the thermal and gas output of volcanoes, and to explore our options for the collection of vegetation and soil data to enable us to assess the impact of this volcanic activity on the environment. We originally selected several volcanoes that have persistent gas emissions and/or magma production. The investigation took an integrated look at the environmental effects of a volcano. Through their persistent activity, basaltic volcanoes such as Kilauea (Hawaii) and Masaya (Nicaragua) contribute significant amounts of sulfur dioxide and other gases to the lower atmosphere. Although primarily local rather than regional in its impact, the continuous nature of these eruptions means that they can have a major impact on the troposphere for years to decades. Since mid-1986, Kilauea has emitted about 2,000 tonnes of sulfur dioxide per day, while between 1995 and 2000 Masaya has emotted about 1,000 to 1,500 tonnes per day (Duffel1 et al., 2001; Delmelle et al., 2002; Sutton and Elias, 2002). These emissions have a significant effect on the local environment. The volcanic smog ("vog" ) that is produced affects the health of local residents, impacts the local ecology via acid rain deposition and the generation of acidic soils, and is a concern to local air traffic due to reduced visibility. Much of the work that was conducted under this NASA project was focused on the development of field validation techniques of volcano degassing and thermal output that could then be correlated with satellite observations. In this way, we strove to develop methods by which not only our study volcanoes, but also volcanoes in general worldwide (Wright and Flynn, 2004; Wright et al., 2004). Thus volcanoes could be routinely monitored for their effects on the environment. The selected volcanoes were: Kilauea (Hawaii; 19.425 N, 155.292 W); Masaya (Nicaragua; 11.984 N, 86.161 W); and Pods (Costa Rica; 10.2OoN, 84.233 W).

  8. Space Radar Image of Rabaul Volcano, New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the Rabaul volcano on the island of New Britain, Papua, New Guinea taken almost a month after its September 19, 1994, eruption that killed five people and covered the town of Rabaul and nearby villages with up to 75 centimeters (30 inches) of ash. More than 53,000 people have been displaced by the eruption. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 173rd orbit on October 11, 1994. This image is centered at 4.2 degrees south latitude and 152.2 degrees east longitude in the southwest Pacific Ocean. The area shown is approximately 21 kilometers by 25 kilometers (13 miles by 15.5 miles). North is toward the upper right. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Most of the Rabaul volcano is underwater and the caldera (crater) creates Blanche Bay, the semi-circular body of water that occupies most of the center of the image. Volcanic vents within the caldera are visible in the image and include Vulcan, on a peninsula on the west side of the bay, and Rabalanakaia and Tavurvur (the circular purple feature near the mouth of the bay) on the east side. Both Vulcan and Tavurvur were active during the 1994 eruption. Ash deposits appear red-orange on the image, and are most prominent on the south flanks of Vulcan and north and northwest of Tavurvur. A faint blue patch in the water in the center of the image is a large raft of floating pumice fragments that were ejected from Vulcan during the eruption and clog the inner bay. Visible on the east side of the bay are the grid-like patterns of the streets of Rabaul and an airstrip, which appears as a dark northwest-trending band at the right-center of the image. Ashfall and subsequent rains caused the collapse of most buildings in the town of Rabaul. Mudflows and flooding continue to pose serious threats to the town and surrounding villages. Volcanologists and local authorities expect to use data such as this radar image to assist them in identifying the mechanisms of the eruption and future hazardous conditions that may be associated with the vigorously active volcano. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  9. Geomagnetic variation related to Sakurajima volcano eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Geomagnetic field has been studied for measuring precursor signals to understand earthquake events by geoscientists. Furthermore, analysis of geomagnetic data helps detect symptom of volcanic eruption. In this study, we process geomagnetic data for Sakurajima volcano case which erupted on Aug 18, 2013 with a large scale of eruption in Japan. This volcanic activity has an effect on geomagnetic data not only geomagnetic observatory in Japan but also in Korea. This study carries out that the geomagnetic variation has been analyzed using geomagnetic data from Cheongyang observatory in Korea and several geomagnetic observatories in Japan. First, we compared the geomagnetic data directly from each component, then searching the difference by volcanic eruption. Secondly, we execute wavelet based semblance from geomagnetic data in order to confirm the correlation between geomagnetic data and effect from volcano activity. As a result, geomagnetic diurnal variation is generally about 50 nT. However, It hardly shows geomagnetic variation on z component and displays about 15 nT on total component before Sakurajima volcano eruption at Kanoya geomagnetic observatory. Moreover, we could confirm uncorrelated event by wavelet based semblance analysis what estimated to volcano activity. This study conducted to confirm geomagnetic variation related to volcano activity getting meaningful result.

  10. Volcanoes and volcanic provinces - Martian western hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The recognition of some Martian landforms as volcanoes is based on their morphology and geologic setting. Other structures, however, may exhibit classic identifying features to a varying or a less degree; these may be only considered provisionally as having a volcanic origin. Regional geologic mapping of the western hemisphere of Mars from Viking images has revealed many more probable volcanoes and volcanotectonic features than were recognized on Mariner 9 pictures. These abundant volcanoes have been assigned to several distinct provinces on the basis of their areal distribution. Although the Olympus-Tharsis region remains as the principle center of volcanism on Mars, four other important provinces are now also recognized: the lowland plains, Tempe Terra plateau, southern highlands (in the Phaethontis and Thaumasia quadrangles), and a probable ignimbrite province, situated along the highland-lowland boundary in Amazonis Planitia. Volcanoes in any one province vary in morphlogy, size, and age, but volcanoes in each province tend to have common characteristics that distinguish that particular group.

  11. Swift snowmelt and floods (lahars) caused by great pyroclastic surge at Mount St Helens volcano, Washington, 18 May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The initial explosions at Mount St. Helens, Washington, on the moring of 18 May 1980 developed into a huge pyroclastic surge that generated catastrophic floods off the east and west flanks of the volcano. Near-source surge deposits on the east and west were lithic, sorted, lacking in accretionary lapilli and vesiculated ash, not plastered against upright obstacles, and hot enough to char wood - all attributes of dry pyroclastic surge. Material deposited at the surge base on steep slopes near the volcano transformed into high-concentration lithic pyroclastic flows whose deposits contain charred wood and other features indicating that these flows were hot and dry. Stratigraphy shows that even the tail of the surge had passed the east and west volcano flanks before the geomorphically distinct floods (lahars) arrived. This field evidence undermines hypotheses that the turbulent surge was itself wet and that its heavy components segregated out to transform directly into lahars. Nor is there evidence that meters-thick snow-slab avalanches intimately mixed with the surge to form the floods. The floods must have instead originated by swift snowmelt at the base of a hot and relatively dry turbulent surge. Impacting hot pyroclasts probably transferred downslope momentum to the snow surface and churned snow grains into the surge base. Melting snow and accumulating hot surge debris may have moved initially as thousands of small thin slushflows. As these flows removed the surface snow and pyroclasts, newly uncovered snow was partly melted by the turbulent surge base; this and accumulating hot surge debris in turn began flowing, a self-sustaining process feeding the initial flows. The flows thus grew swiftly over tens of seconds and united downslope into great slushy ejecta-laden sheetfloods. Gravity accelerated the floods to more than 100 km/h as they swept down and off the volcano flanks while the snow component melted to form great debris-rich floods (lahars) channeled into valleys. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Operational Monitoring of Volcanoes Using Keyhole Markup Language

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Dehn; J. E. Bailey; P. Webley

    2007-01-01

    Volcanoes are some of the most geologically powerful, dynamic, visually appealing structures on the Earth's landscape. Volcanic eruptions are hard to predict, difficult to quantify and impossible to prevent, making effective monitoring a difficult proposition. In Alaska, volcanoes are an intrinsic part of the culture, with over 100 volcanoes and volcanic fields that have been active in historic time monitored

  13. Correlations between earthquakes and large mud volcano eruptions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Mellors; D. Kilb; A. Aliyev; A. Gasanov; G. Yetirmishli

    2007-01-01

    We examine the potential triggering relationship between large earthquakes and methane mud volcano eruptions. Our data set consists of a 191-year catalog (1810–2001) of eruptions from 77 volcanoes in Azerbaijan, central Asia, supplemented with reports from mud volcano eruptions in Japan, Romania, Pakistan, and the Andaman Islands. We compare the occurrence of historical regional earthquakes (M > 5) with the

  14. Correlations between earthquakes and large mud volcano eruptions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Mellors; D. Kilb; A. Aliyev; A. Gasanov; G. Yetirmishli

    2007-01-01

    We examine the potential triggering relationship between large earthquakes and methane mud volcano eruptions. Our data set consists of a 191-year catalog (1810-2001) of eruptions from 77 volcanoes in Azerbaijan, central Asia, supplemented with reports from mud volcano eruptions in Japan, Romania, Pakistan, and the Andaman Islands. We compare the occurrence of historical regional earthquakes (M > 5) with the

  15. Lab using Volcano Scenarios: Hazard Maps and Communicating Risk

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    LeeAnn Srogi

    This is a lab activity in which small groups of students work with maps, rocks, photographs of volcanic deposits, and textual data to construct a hazard map and a risk communication plan for a specific volcano. Each group is assigned a "volcano scenario," which is based on real volcanoes.

  16. QUANTIFICATION OF THE SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FAULTS AND VOLCANOES

    E-print Network

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    QUANTIFICATION OF THE SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FAULTS AND VOLCANOES Wetmore, Paul H of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 The perception that faults and volcanoes that most volcanoes and volcanic fields are spatially associated with faults, as well the occurrence

  17. Lab7: Volcanoes I. --Their Geographic Distribution Introduction

    E-print Network

    Chen, Po

    . Pacuritin Volcano, Mexico Active Volcanoes of the World South Sandwich Islands. Also known as the Scotia arc islands stretching from Alaska to Russia. The chain contains 80 major volcanoes with numerous smaller ones in the arc. Iceland. Sits astride the Mid-Atlantic ridge. The island covers 50,000 km2 and is made almost

  18. How Do Volcanoes Affect Human Life? Integrated Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton, Rebecca; Edwards, Carrie; Sisler, Michelle

    This packet contains a unit on teaching about volcanoes. The following question is addressed: How do volcanoes affect human life? The unit covers approximately three weeks of instruction and strives to present volcanoes in an holistic form. The five subject areas of art, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are integrated into…

  19. Ground deformation associated with the March 1996 earthquake swarm at Akutan volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.A.; Dzurisin, D.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1996 an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (???3000 felt by local residents, Mmax = 5.1, cumulative moment of 2.7 ??1018 N m) beneath Akutan Island in the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, produced extensive ground cracks but no eruption of Akutan volcano. Synthetic aperture radar interferograms that span the time of the swarm reveal complex island-wide deformation: the western part of the island including Akutan volcano moved upward, while the eastern part moved downward. The axis of the deformation approximately aligns with new ground cracks on the western part of the island and with Holocene normal faults that were reactivated during the swarm on the eastern part of the island. The axis is also roughly parallel to the direction of greatest compressional stress in the region. No ground movements greater than 2.83 cm were observed outside the volcano's summit caldera for periods of 4 years before or 2 years after the swarm. We modeled the deformation primarily as the emplacement of a shallow, east-west trending, north dipping dike plus inflation of a deep, Mogi-type magma body beneath the volcano. The pattern of subsidence on the eastern part of the island is poorly constrained. It might have been produced by extensional tectonic strain that both reactivated preexisting faults on the eastern part of the island and facilitated magma movement beneath the western part. Alternatively, magma intrusion beneath the volcano might have been the cause of extension and subsidence in the eastern part of the island. We attribute localized subsidence in an area of active fumaroles within the Akutan caldera, by as much as 10 cm during 1992-1993 and 1996-1998, to fluid withdrawal or depressurization of the shallow hydrothermal system. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carn, Simon A.; Zogorski, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  1. GlobVolcano: Earth Observation Services for global monitoring of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, L.; Ratti, R.; Borgström, S.; Seifert, F. M.; Solaro, G.

    2009-04-01

    The GlobVolcano project is part of the Data User Element (DUE) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The objective of the project is to demonstrate EO-based (Earth Observation) services able to support the Volcanological Observatories and other mandate users (Civil Protection, scientific communities of volcanoes) in their monitoring activities. The information service is assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of active volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. Users are directly and actively involved in the validation of the Earth Observation products, by comparing them with ground data available at each site. The following EO-based information services have been defined, harmonising the user requirements provided by a worldwide selection of user organizations. - Deformation Mapping - Surface Thermal Anomalies - Volcanic Gas Emission (SO2) - Volcanic Ash Tracking During the first phase of the project (completed in June 2008) a pre-operational information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations (i.e. Piton de la Fournaise in La Reunion Island, Karthala in Comore Islands, Stromboli, Volcano and Etna in Italy, Soufrière Hills in Montserrat Island, Colima in Mexico, Merapi in Indonesia). The second phase of the project (currently on-going) concerns the service provision on pre-operational basis. Fifteen volcanic sites located in four continents are regularly monitored and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. Based on user requirements, the GlobVolcano Information System has been developed following system engineering rules and criteria, besides most recent interoperability standards for geospatial data. The GlobVolcano Information System includes two main elements: 1. The GlobVolcano Data Processing System, which consists of seven of EO data processing subsystems located at each respective service centre. 2. The GlobVolcano Information Service, which is the provision infrastructure, including three elements: - GlobVolcano Products Archives, including two main functionalities: WMS (Web Map Service) for products visualization through the GVUI and products delivery. - GlobVolcano Metadata Catalogue, offering CS-W (Catalogue Service for Web) functionality. - GlobVolcano User Interface (GVUI), based on the Virtual Earth platform. Whereas product downloading is allowed to committed user organisations only, the Metadata Catalogue can be publicly accessed, thus providing a powerful tool for scientific interchanges and cooperation among the user organizations and scientific communities of volcanoes.

  2. Strongly Gliding Harmonic Tremor Preceding Eruptions of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotovec, A. J.; Prejean, S. G.; Vidale, J. E.; Gomberg, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    Occasionally volcanic tremor’s dominant frequency and its overtones change continuously with time, or ‘glide’. Gliding spectral lines have been described on volcanoes of varying sizes and compositions. During the most recent eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, gliding spectral lines appear prominently before five nearly consecutive explosions of the ~19 large explosions. The fundamental frequency glides upward from less than 1 Hz to as high as 30 Hz in the span of just a few minutes prior to eruption. Then, a relative seismic silence of a few tens of seconds precedes the eruption. Over the years, several different mechanisms have been invoked to explain occurrences of lower frequency gliding harmonic tremor on other volcanoes. The most popular explanations attribute the gliding to changing properties of a resonating crack, or to the repeated excitation of a source with gradually varying inter-event time intervals. Indeed, the first case of gliding at Redoubt was preceded by an 8 hour swarm of repeating high-frequency earthquakes in which the earthquakes comprising this swarm became gradually more frequent, eventually blending smoothly into tremor. This observation leads us to favor the explanation that the gliding harmonic tremor is created by the superposition of repeating earthquakes, likely driven by instability of the magma column. Velocity spectrogram of an example of gliding on Redoubt, recorded at a station located approximately 4 km east of the vent.

  3. Geophysical survey of a mud volcano seaward of the Barbados Ridge Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langseth, Marcus G.; Westbrook, Graham K.; Hobart, Michael A.

    1988-02-01

    A detailed geophysical investigation that included multibeam bathymetry, 3.5-kHz-channel and single-channel seismic profiles, 20 heat flow measurements and four piston cores was made of a mud volcano located about 8 km seaward of the toe of the Barbados Ridge Accretionary Complex in the northern Guiana Basin. The material erupted from the volcano covers an oval area about 3×9 km with its long axis oriented E-W, roughly perpendicular to the deformation front. A flat-topped mound on the western side of the feature is the currently active center. Acoustic stratigraphy suggests that mud volcanism began at the site about 200,000 Ma. A piston core taken on the flank of the active mound sampled deposits erupted 20,000-30,000 Ma that contain late Miocene nannofossils. Heat flow on the active mound is 4 times that in the surrounding basin. One-dimensional modeling of this anomaly supports a low-level continuing flux of mud and water at rates of 2-5 cm/yr. The mud volcanism appears to have arisen from the combined action of overpressured water that comes from beneath the accretionary prism and existing overpressures in the oceanic section. Large east-west trending basement escarpments underlie the two known mud volcanoes seaward of the Barbados Ridge Accretionary Complex, and they probably play an important role in developing vertical pathways for fluid to escape and in determining the location where mud volcanism starts.

  4. Gas analyses from the Pu'u O'o eruption in 1985, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic gas samples were collected from July to November 1985 from a lava pond in the main eruptive conduit of Pu'u O'o from a 2-week-long fissure eruption and from a minor flank eruption of Pu'u O'o. The molecular composition of these gases is consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium at a temperature slightly less than measured lava temperatures. Comparison of these samples with previous gas samples shows that the composition of volatiles in the magma has remained constant over the 3-year course of this episodic east rift eruption of Kilauea volcano. The uniformly carbon depleted nature of these gases is consistent with previous suggestions that all east rift eruptive magmas degas during prior storage in the shallow summit reservoir of Kilauea. Minor compositional variations within these gas collections are attributed to the kinetics of the magma degassing process. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Turrialba volcano: awaking indications of possible unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, G.; Ramirez, C. J.; Mora-Amador, R.; Rouwet, D.; Mora, R.; Alpizar, Y.; Picado, C.

    2012-12-01

    Based on historical descriptions and reports, Turrialba volcano has presented events like incandescence, SO2 combustion, phreatic eruptions, that preceded the only historical magmatic eruption (1864-1866), this VEI value 2 eruption covered a surface area of 3400 km2, successively the volcano enter in a period of calm. During most of the 80's and 90's the volcano was under low seismic activity and low temperature fumaroles (<100°C). At the end of the 90's and the firsts years of 00's there was a small changes on fumarole fields sizes and small increase on temperature and microquakes, but it was after 2005 that the volcano increased the seismicity from 10 to 100 diary microquakes, accompained by a higher degassing, acid rain and fumaroles over ?250°C. On January 5th, 2010 the volcano had a serial of phreatic eruptions, which formed an elongated intracrateric vent named "Boquete 2010", at the NW crater, which reached maximum temperatures of 560°C, also incandescence at night with sporadically emission of non-juvenile ashes. Later on June 2011, "Boquete 2010" temperature decreased to ?300°C, but some new fumaroles appeared in the NW intracrater with a maximum temperature of 531°C, also with incandescence and SO2 blue combustion gases. Finally on January 11, 2012 during a fieldwork caused by thermal images showing the increase on temperature of fumaroles (?250°C to ?450°C), a couple of active sulphur flows of at least 100m long appeared, that flows behaved like a newtonian liquid with similar setting of a pahoehoe lava. Next day on January 12, the volcano had a serial of phreatic eruptions with emission of non-juvenile ashes and formed a new vent ("Boquete 2012") in outer eastern wall of the NW crater, that reach temperatures of 780°C also with incandescence and SO2 combustion gases.

  6. A dynamic balance between magma supply and eruption rate at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denlinger, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic balance between magma supply and vent output at Kilauea volcano is used to estimate both the volume of magma stored within Kilauea volcano and its magma supply rate. Throughout most of 1991 a linear decline in volume flux from the Kupaianaha vent on Kilauea's east rift zone was associated with a parabolic variation in the elevation of Kilauea's summit as vent output initially exceeded then lagged behind the magma supply to the volcano. The correspondence between summit elevation and tilt established with over 30 years of data provided daily estimates of summit elevation in terms of summit tilt. The minimum in the parabolic variation in summit tilt and elevation (or zero elevation change) occurs when the magma supply to the reservoir from below the volcano equals the magma output from the reservoir to the surface, so that the magma supply rate is given by vent flux on that day. The measurements of vent flux and tilt establish that the magma supply rate to Kilauea volcano on June 19, 1991, was 217,000 ?? 10,000 m3/d (or 0.079 ?? 0.004 km3/yr). This is close to the average eruptive rate of 0.08 km3/yr between 1958 and 1984. In addition, the predictable response of summit elevation and tilt to each east rift zone eruption near Puu Oo since 1983 shows that summit deformation is also a measure of magma reservoir pressure. Given this, the correlation between the elevation of the Puu Oo lava lake (4 km uprift of Kupaianaha and 18 km from the summit) and summit tilt provides an estimate for magma pressure changes corresponding to summit tilt changes. The ratio of the change in volume to the change in reservoir pressure (dV/dP) during vent activity may be determined by dividing the ratio of volume erupted to change in summit tilt (dV/dtilt) by the ratio of pressure change to change in summit tilt (dP/dtilt). This measure of dV/dP, when combined with laboratory measurements of the bulk modulus of tholeitic melt, provides an estimate of 240 ?? 50 km3 for the volume of Kilauea's magma reservoir. This estimate is much larger than traditional estimates but consistent with seismic tomographic imaging and geophysical modeling of Kilauea's magma system. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, C.J.; Okubo, P.G.; Shearer, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (???13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  8. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-03-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep-sided domes or 'pancake domes', larger than 20 km in diameter, were included with the small volcanic domes. For the purposes of this study, only volcanic edifices less than 20 km in diameter are discussed. This forms a convenient cutoff since most of the steep-sided domes ('pancake domes') and scalloped margin domes ('ticks') are 20 to 100 km in diameter, are much less numerous globally than are the smaller diameter volcanic edifices (2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower in total global number), and do not commonly occur in large clusters or fields of large numbers of edifices.

  9. Seismic Structure Beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S. H.; Gung, Y.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Lin, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The very active Taal Volcano is situated 60 km south of Metro Manila in the southern part of Luzon Island. Based on its frequent explosive eruptions and high potential hazards to nearby population of several million, Taal Volcano is chosen as one of the 15 most dangerous "Decade Volcanoes" in the world. We deployed a temporary seismic network consisting of 8 stations since March 2008. The temporal network was operated from late March 2008 to mid March 2010 and recorded over 2270 local earthquakes. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified from ambient noise cross-correlation functions for a number of stations. The drifting rates of all problematic stations were determined as references to correct timing errors prior to further processing. Initial locations of earthquakes were determined from manually picking P- and S-phases arrivals with a general velocity model based on AK135. We used travel times of 305 well-located local events to derive a minimum 1-D model using VELEST. Two major earthquake groups were noticed from refined locations. One was underneath the western shore of Taal Lake with a linear feature, and the other spread at shallower depths showing a less compact feature around the eastern flank of Taal Volcano Island. We performed seismic tomography to image the 3D structure beneath Taal Volcano using a well-established algorithm, LOTOS. Some interesting features are noted in the tomographic results, such as a probable solidified past magma conduit below the northwestern corner of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by high Vp, Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio, and a potential large hydrothermal reservoir beneath the central of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by low Vs and high Vp/Vs ratio. Combining the results of seismicity and tomographic images, we also suggest the potential existence of a magma chamber beneath the southwestern Taal Lake, and a magma conduit or fault extending from there to the northwestern shore of Taal Lake. Such magmatic signatures have never been reported in previous studies, suggesting that new eruption centers might be forming in places away from the historical craters on Taal Volcano Island.

  10. Volcano monitoring using GPS: Developing data analysis strategies based on the June 2007 Klauea Volcano intrusion

    E-print Network

    ] The global positioning system (GPS) is one of the most common techniques, and the current state of the art, global positioning system (GPS) volcano monitoring systems must be installed on the ground and thus

  11. Galactic Super Volcano Similar to Iceland Volcano - Duration: 2 minutes, 2 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This composite image from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio data from the Very Large Array shows a cosmic volcano being driven by a black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy. This eruptio...

  12. Research Article Evolution of West Rota Volcano, an extinct submarine volcano in the

    E-print Network

    Stern, Robert J.

    submarine eruption. The youngest unit consists of 1­2 m diam- eter spheroids of rhyolite pumice, interpreted mineralization, Mariana Arc, pumice, Quaternary volcano, submarine caldera. INTRODUCTION The 3000-km long Izu

  13. Finite-difference simulation of seismic wave propagation for explosion earthquakes at Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, H.; Fujioka, A.; Nakamura, T.; Okamoto, T.

    2013-12-01

    Sakurajima volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, which is located in a part of Kagoshima bay, i.e. Aira caldera, in the south of Kyushu island, Japan. It has elevation of 1117 m and three main peaks; Kita-dake (1117 m), Naka-dake (1060 meters) and Minami-dake (1040 m). Sakurajima is connected to the Osumi peninsula in the east. We construct a fully three-dimensional model of Sakurajima volcano and conduct numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation for eruption earthquakes at Sakurajima volcano with the finite-difference method (FDM, Nakamura et al., 2012, BSSA). Our FDM model area is 12 km x 15 km wide, which includes Sakurajima volcano around the center. Mesh size (size of each cubic cell) of the FDM model is 20 m. Seismic wave propagation is strongly affected not only by subsurface structure but also by topography of land and seafloor. For the surface model construction we employ the 50m-mesh DEM provided by the Geographical Survey Institute of Japan for land surface, and nearly-250m-mesh topographic data of Kishimoto (1999) for seafloor, while for the subsurface structure model construction we exploit the Japan Integrated Velocity Structure Model provided by the Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion. To incorporate the topography of land and seafloor into the FDM, a simple and accurate fluid-solid boundary condition is implemented, where the seawater is included in the sea area of the FDM model. We employ a simple pulse point source of a vertical single force or explosive (isotropic) type around the sea level depth in the volcano to excite seismic waves. The modeled frequency range of the simulation is lower than about 5 Hz. Our simulation results show rather complicated waveform and long duration, of which may come from a scattering effect due to the topography and a site effect due to the shallow surface layers on the seismic wave propagation. It suggests that appropriate modeling of effects of the topography on seismic wave propagation is essential as well as effects of subsurface structure in order to investigate seismic structure of a volcanic area and source processes of earthquakes occurring in the volcanic area.

  14. Steady subsidence of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California, revealed by repeated leveling surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Poland, Michael P.; Burgmann, R.

    2002-01-01

    Leveling surveys of a 193-km circuit across Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) in 1954 and 1989 show that the summit area subsided by as much as 302 ?? 30 mm (-8.6 ?? 0.9 mm/yr) with respect to a datum point near Bartle, California, 40 km to the southwest. This result corrects an error in the earlier analysis of the same data by Dzurisin et al. [1991], who reported the subsidence rate as -11.1 ?? 1.2 mm/yr. The subsidence pattern extends across the entire volcano, with a surface area of nearly 2000 km2. Two areas of localized subsidence by as much as 20 cm can be attributed to shallow normal faulting near the volcano's periphery. Surveys of an east-west traverse across Lava Beds National Monument on the north flank of the volcano in 1990 and of a 23-km traverse across the summit area in 1999 show that subsidence continued at essentially the same rate during 1989-1999 as 1954-1989. Volcano-wide subsidence can be explained by either a point source of volume loss (Mogi) or a contracting horizontal rectangular dislocation (sill) at a depth of 10-11 km. Volume loss rate estimates range from 0.0013 to 0.0032 km3/yr, depending mostly on the source depth estimate and source type. Based on first-order quantitative considerations, we can rule out that the observed subsidence is due to volume loss from magma withdrawal, thermal contraction, or crystallizing magma at depth. Instead, we attribute the subsidence and faulting to: (1 gravitational loading of thermally weakened crust by the mass of the volcano and associated intrusive rocks, and (2) thinning of locally weakened crust by Basin and Range deformation. The measured subsidence rate exceeds long-term estimates from drill hole data, suggesting that over long timescales, steady subsidence and episodic uplift caused by magmatic intrusions counteract each other to produce the lower net subsidence rate.

  15. Characteristics and management of the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis at the Ubinas volcano (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Marco; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Mariño, Jersy; Berolatti, Rossemary; Fuentes, José

    2010-12-01

    Ubinas volcano is located 75 km East of Arequipa and ca. 5000 people are living within 12 km from the summit. This composite cone is considered the most active volcano in southern Peru owing to its 24 low to moderate magnitude (VEI 1-3) eruptions in the past 500 years. The onset of the most recent eruptive episode occurred on 27 March 2006, following 8 months of heightened fumarolic activity. Vulcanian explosions occurred between 14 April 2006 and September 2007, at a time ejecting blocks up to 40 cm in diameter to distances of 2 km. Ash columns commonly rose to 3.5 km above the caldera rim and dispersed fine ash and aerosols to distances of 80 km between April 2006 and April 2007. Until April 2007, the total volume of ash was estimated at 0.004 km 3, suggesting that the volume of fresh magma was small. Ash fallout has affected residents, livestock, water supplies, and crop cultivation within an area of ca. 100 km 2 around the volcano. Continuous degassing and intermittent mild vulcanian explosions lasted until the end of 2008. Shortly after the initial explosions on mid April 2006 that spread ash fallout within 7 km of the volcano, an integrated Scientific Committee including three Peruvian institutes affiliated to the Regional Committee of Civil Defense for Moquegua, aided by members of the international cooperation, worked together to: i) elaborate and publish volcanic hazard maps; ii) inform and educate the population; and iii) advise regional authorities in regard to the management of the volcanic crisis and the preparation of contingency plans. Although the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis has been moderate, its management has been a difficult task even though less than 5000 people now live around the Ubinas volcano. However, the successful management has provided experience and skills to the scientific community. This volcanic crisis was not the first one that Peru has experienced but the 2006-2008 experience is the first long-lasting crisis that the Peruvian civil authorities have had to cope with, including attempts to utilize a new alert-level scheme and communications system, and the successful evacuation of 1150 people. Lessons learned can be applied to future volcanic crises in southern Peru, particularly in the case of reawakening of El Misti volcano nearby Arequipa.

  16. Reevaluation of tsunami formation by debris avalanche at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.

    2000-01-01

    Debris avalanches entering the sea at Augustine Volcano, Alaska have been proposed as a mechanism for generating tsunamis. Historical accounts of the 1883 eruption of the volcano describe 6- to 9-meter-high waves that struck the coastline at English Bay (Nanwalek), Alaska about 80 kilometers east of Augustine Island. These accounts are often cited as proof that volcanigenic tsunamis from Augustine Volcano are significant hazards to the coastal zone of lower Cook Inlet. This claim is disputed because deposits of unequivocal tsunami origin are not evident at more than 50 sites along the lower Cook Inlet coastline where they might be preserved. Shallow water (<25 m) around Augustine Island, in the run-out zone for debris avalanches, limits the size of an avalanche-caused wave. If the two most recent debris avalanches, Burr Point (A.D. 1883) and West Island (<500 yr. B.P.) were traveling at velocities in the range of 50 to 100 meters per second, the kinetic energy of the avalanches at the point of impact with the ocean would have been between 1014 and 1015 joules. Although some of this energy would be dissipated through boundary interactions and momentum transfer between the avalanche and the sea, the initial wave should have possessed sufficient kinetic energy to do geomorphic work (erosion, sediment transport, formation of wave-cut features) on the coastline of lowwer Cook Inlet. Because widespread evidence of the effects of large waves cannot be found, it appears that the debris avalanches could not have been traveling very fast when they entered the sea, or they happened during low tide and displaced only small volumes of water. In light of these results, the hazard from volcanigenic tsunamis from Augustine Volcano appears minor, unless a very large debris avalanche occurs at high tide.

  17. Living with volcanoes: The sustainable livelihoods approach for volcano-related opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelman, Ilan; Mather, Tamsin A.

    2008-05-01

    Although the negative impacts of volcanism on society are well documented and accepted, many possible benefits from volcanoes are not always fully considered. This paper provides suggestions for understanding and implementing volcanoes' benefits by suggesting further application of existing risk management frameworks to volcanology: living with risk by using the sustainable livelihoods approach at the local level. This paper presents an overview bringing established paradigms into volcanic risk management where they are sometimes absent despite their advantages. The sustainable livelihoods approach is important in its application to volcanic scenarios in four ways: Understanding, communicating, and managing vulnerability and risk and local perceptions of vulnerability and risk beyond immediate threats to life. Maximising the benefits to communities of their volcanic environment, especially during quiescent periods, without increasing vulnerability. Managing crises. Managing reconstruction and resettlement after a crisis. An overview of case studies is provided showing how volcanic opportunities could be used for sustainable livelihoods. The approach of living with volcanic risks and benefits could be adopted and implemented as an integral part of changing perceptions of volcanoes and of managing volcano-related crisis and non-crisis situations. However, the sustainable livelihoods approach is not a panacea, so limitations are discussed along with why living near a volcano cannot solve all livelihood concerns. In particular, livelihood diversity and livelihood transferability to other locations assists in living with volcanoes.

  18. Lava Layering: Making and Mapping a Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners discover how geologists use stratigraphy, the study of layered rock, to understand the sequence of geological events. Learners use baking soda, vinegar, and different colored play dough to model how "lava" flows. This lesson plan includes background information, play dough recipes, student worksheets, and an optional volcano mapping extension activity.

  19. Taking the Pulse of Yellowstone's "Breathing" Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Beth Pratt-Sitaula

    In this activity, students learn about volcanism in Yellowstone National Park, focusing on its history of eruption, recent seismicity, hydrothermal events, and ground deformation. They learn how scientists monitor volcanoes (using Mount St. Helens as an example) and then apply that as an open-ended problem to Yellowstone; their problem is to identify a site for a research station.

  20. Learning to Recognize Volcanoes on Venus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael C. Burl; Lars Asker; Padhraic Smyth; Usama M. Fayyad; Pietro Perona; Larry Crumpler; Jayne Aubele

    1998-01-01

    .Dramatic improvements in sensor and image acquisition technology have createda demand for automated tools that can aid in the analysis of large image databases.We describe the development of JARtool, a trainable software system that learnsto recognize volcanoes in a large data set of Venusian imagery. A machine learningapproach is used because it is much easier for geologists to identify examples

  1. Continental basaltic volcanoes — Processes and problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Valentine; T. K. P. Gregg

    2008-01-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanoes are the most common volcanic landforms on the continents. They encompass a range of morphologies from small pyroclastic constructs to larger shields and reflect a wide range of eruptive processes. This paper reviews physical volcanological aspects of continental basaltic eruptions that are driven primarily by magmatic volatiles. Explosive eruption styles include Hawaiian and Strombolian (sensu stricto) and

  2. Volcano hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Matías, O.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fuego-Acatenango massif comprises a string of five or more volcanic vents along a north-south trend that is perpendicular to that of the Central American arc in Guatemala. From north to south known centers of volcanism are Ancient Acatenango, Yepocapa, Pico Mayor de Acatenango, Meseta, and Fuego. Volcanism along the trend stretches back more than 200,000 years. Although many of the centers have been active contemporaneously, there is a general sequence of younger volcanism, from north to south along the trend. This massive volcano complex towers more than 3500 meters (m) above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan Highlands to the north. The volcano complex comprises remnants of multiple eruptive centers, which periodically have collapsed to form huge debris avalanches. The largest of these avalanches extended more than 50 kilometers (km) from its source and covered more than 300 square km. The volcano has potential to produce huge debris avalanches that could inundate large areas of the Pacific coastal plain. In areas around the volcanoes and downslope toward the coastal plain, more than 100,000 people are potentially at risk from these and other flowage phenomena.

  3. Atmospheric influence on volcano-acoustic signals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robin Matoza; Catherine de Groot-Hedlin; Michael Hedlin; David Fee; Milton Garcés; Alexis Le Pichon

    2010-01-01

    Volcanoes are natural sources of infrasound, useful for studying infrasonic propagation in the atmosphere. Large, explosive volcanic eruptions typically produce signals that can be recorded at ranges of hundreds of kilometers propagating in atmospheric waveguides. In addition, sustained volcanic eruptions can produce smaller-amplitude repetitive signals recordable at >10 km range. These include repetitive impulsive signals and continuous tremor signals. The

  4. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  5. Mapping tremor at K?lauea volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, A.; Thelen, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping the magma pathway geometry beneath active volcanoes is vital to providing an understanding of how each system works, what drives its dynamics and what eventually controls the surface expression of volcanism. Seismicity can provide clues about the subsurface plumbing, but the seismic catalog is often incomplete. The broad spectrum of seismic phenomena at volcanoes, from discrete earthquakes to the continuous hum of tremor, hampers event identification, and there are no standard seismological tools to resolve this problem. Even at K?lauea, one of the best-instrumented and most studied volcanoes in the world, a detailed source geometry remains elusive. Here we present the first map of a volcano's deep plumbing system by taking a new approach to seismic monitoring. Using envelope cross-correlation, we systematically scan through 2.5 years of continuous seismic data to identify and locate thousands of undocumented volcanic sources, which we interpret to map the path of magma ascent from the deep mantle, offshore south of the Big Island, to the lava lake in K?lauea's crater. The results offer a fundamental insight into the source of K?lauea volcanism and generate a baseline understanding that increases our ability to interpret pre- and co-eruptive observations.

  6. Topics in Hydrogeology: Mud volcanoes and geysers

    E-print Network

    Manga, Michael

    and crustal stress New insight into #12;Wells Manga and Wang (2007) Photo by Hua Banghua #12;Coseismic strain stream flow responses to earthquakes Observed and known for thousands of years Manga and Wang (2007) #12;Liquefaction Manga and Wang (2007) #12;Mud volcanoes Manga and Brodsky (2006) Photo by Nakamukae Makoto #12

  7. Volcano geodesy and magma dynamics in Iceland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Sturkell; Páll Einarsson; Freysteinn Sigmundsson; Halldór Geirsson; Halldór Ólafsson; Rikke Pedersen; Elske de Zeeuw-van Dalfsen; Alan T. Linde; Selwyn I. Sacks; Ragnar Stefánsson

    2006-01-01

    Here we review the achievements of volcano geodesy in Iceland during the last 15 years. Extensive measurements of crustal deformation have been conducted using a variety of geodetic techniques, including leveling, electronic distance measurements, campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) geodesy, and interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar images (InSAR). Results from these measurements provide a comprehensive view of

  8. Seismicity at Baru Volcano, Western Panama, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, E.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Tapia, A.; Rodriguez, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Baru volcano in Western Panama (8.808°N, 82.543°W) is a 3,475 m high strato volcano that lies at about 50 km from the Costa Rican border. The last major eruptive event at this volcano occurred c.1550 AD and no further eruptive activity from that time is known. Since the 1930´s, approximately every 30 years a series of seismic swarms take place in the surroundings of the volcanic edifice. Theses swarms last several weeks alarming the population who lives near the volcano. The last of these episodes occurred on May 2006 and lasted one and a half months. More than 20,000 people live adjacent to the volcano and any future eruption has the potential to be very dangerous. In June 2007, a digital seismic monitoring network of ten stations, linked via internet, was installed around the volcano in a collaborative project between the University of Panama and the Panamanian Government. The seismic data acquisition at the sites is performed using LINUX-SEISLOG and the events are recorded by four servers at different locations using the Earth Worm system. In this work we analyze the characteristics of the volcano seismicity recorded from May 4th, 2006 to July 31st, 2008 by at least 4 stations and located at about 15 km from the summit. To determine the seismic parameters, we tested several crustal velocity models and used the seismic analysis software package SEISAN. Our final velocity model was determined using seismic data for the first four km obtained from a temporal seismic network deployed in 1981 by the British Geological Survey (BGS) as part of geothermal studies conducted at Cerro Pando, Western Panama Highlands. Our results indicate that all the events recorded in the quadrant 8.6-9.0°N and 82.2-82.7°W are located in the depth range of 0.1 to 8 km. Cross sections show vertical alignments of hypocenters below the summit although most of the seismicity is concentrated in its eastern flank reaching the town of Boquete. All the calculated focal mechanisms are of the strike slip type.

  9. Mechanism of explosive eruptions of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    A small explosive eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, occurred in May 1924. The eruption was preceded by rapid draining of a lava lake and transfer of a large volume of magma from the summit reservoir to the east rift zone. This lowered the magma column, which reduced hydrostatic pressure beneath Halemaumau and allowed groundwater to flow rapidly into areas of hot rock, producing a phreatic eruption. A comparison with other events at Kilauea shows that the transfer of a large volume of magma out of the summit reservoir is not sufficient to produce a phreatic eruption. For example, the volume transferred at the beginning of explosive activity in May 1924 was less than the volumes transferred in March 1955 and January-February 1960, when no explosive activity occurred. Likewise, draining of a lava lake and deepening of the floor of Halemaumau, which occurred in May 1922 and August 1923, were not sufficient to produce explosive activity. A phreatic eruption of Kilauea requires both the transfer of a large volume of magma from the summit reservoir and the rapid removal of magma from near the surface, where the surrounding rocks have been heated to a sufficient temperature to produce steam explosions when suddenly contacted by groundwater. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Characteristics of Different Types of Volcanoes and Features Type of Form of

    E-print Network

    Laske, Gabi

    Characteristics of Different Types of Volcanoes and Features Type of Form of Volcano Volcano Size eruption Columbia River slope 1,000,000 km2 from long fissures Iceland 1 to 3 km thick Shield volcano Slightly sloped Up to 9000 m Basalt Gentle, some Hawaii high fire fountains Iceland Composite volcano

  11. Common processes at unique volcanoes – a volcanological conundrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Biggs, Juliet

    2014-11-01

    An emerging challenge in modern volcanology is the apparent contradiction between the perception that every volcano is unique, and classification systems based on commonalities among volcano morphology and eruptive style. On the one hand, detailed studies of individual volcanoes show that a single volcano often exhibits similar patterns of behaviour over multiple eruptive episodes; this observation has led to the idea that each volcano has its own distinctive pattern of behaviour (or “personality”). In contrast, volcano classification schemes define eruption “styles” referenced to “type” volcanoes (e.g. Plinian, Strombolian, Vulcanian); this approach implicitly assumes that common processes underpin volcanic activity and can be used to predict the nature, extent and ensuing hazards of individual volcanoes. Actual volcanic eruptions, however, often include multiple styles, and type volcanoes may experience atypical eruptions (e.g., violent explosive eruptions of Kilauea, Hawaii1). The volcanological community is thus left with a fundamental conundrum that pits the uniqueness of individual volcanic systems against generalization of common processes. Addressing this challenge represents a major challenge to volcano research.

  12. Petrogenesis of a voluminous Quaternary adakitic volcano: the case of Baru volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Paulo J.; Rooney, Tyrone O.

    2014-09-01

    The origin of adakite magmas remains controversial because initially the term adakite had petrogenetic significance implying an origin by direct melting of the eclogitized subducting oceanic crust. Many models have been produced for their origin, and until now there has not been a straightforward method to discriminate between these models in a given adakite suite. Here, we use detailed chronological and geochemical studies of selected adakitic edifices that allows for the determination of the magmatic output rate parameter (Qe), which has been correlated with the rates of magma generation deep within subduction zones. By providing temporal and eruption rate estimates, we provide constraints on the possible petrogenetic processes involved in the generation of adakite-like signatures. Adakite magmas derived from the melting of the subducting slab should be volumetrically insignificant when compared to the adakite-like magmas produced by typical arc magma generation processes. In this study, we use this observation and the extraordinary stratigraphic exposure from Miocene to present in an adakitic volcano in Panama and to study the temporal and chemical variation in erupted magmas to estimate rates of magma generation. Detailed chemical and geochronological analyses of Baru volcano indicate that the volcanic edifice was constructed in its entirety during the Quaternary and magmas display adakite-like features such as steep rare earth elements patterns, pronounced depletions in the heavy rare earth elements, low Y, high Sr, and high Sr/Y. The magmatic output rates (Qe) that we have calculated show that compared to other typical adakitic volcanoes, most of the volcanic edifice of Baru volcano was constructed extremely rapidly (<~213 k.a.) and in time frames that are similar to typical arc volcanoes. The observed chemical and mineralogical variation, coupled with the high magma production rates, indicate that Baru volcano is more representative of a typical arc volcano than a small-volume melt of the subducting oceanic crust. The technique we outline may have broader application in determining the petrogenetic conditions of other adakite suites.

  13. Space Radar Image of Colombian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of a little known volcano in northern Colombia. The image was acquired on orbit 80 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The volcano near the center of the image is located at 5.6 degrees north latitude, 75.0 degrees west longitude, about 100 kilometers (65 miles) southeast of Medellin, Colombia. The conspicuous dark spot is a lake at the bottom of an approximately 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) volcanic collapse depression or caldera. A cone-shaped peak on the bottom left (northeast rim) of the caldera appears to have been the source for a flow of material into the caldera. This is the northern-most known volcano in South America and because of its youthful appearance, should be considered dormant rather than extinct. The volcano's existence confirms a fracture zone proposed in 1985 as the northern boundary of volcanism in the Andes. The SIR-C/X-SAR image reveals another, older caldera further south in Colombia, along another proposed fracture zone. Although relatively conspicuous, these volcanoes have escaped widespread recognition because of frequent cloud cover that hinders remote sensing imaging in visible wavelengths. Four separate volcanoes in the Northern Andes nations ofColombia and Ecuador have been active during the last 10 years, killing more than 25,000 people, including scientists who were monitoring the volcanic activity. Detection and monitoring of volcanoes from space provides a safe way to investigate volcanism. The recognition of previously unknown volcanoes is important for hazard evaluations because a number of major eruptions this century have occurred at mountains that were not previously recognized as volcanoes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companiesfor the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtange-legenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency,Agenzia SpazialeItaliana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft undRaumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science,operations, and data processing of X-SAR.

  14. Nabro and Mallahle Volcanoes, Eritrea and Ethiopia, SRTM Colored Height and Shaded Relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The area known as the Afar Triangle is located at the northern end of the East Africa Rift, where it approaches the southeastern end of the Red Sea and the southwestern end of the Gulf of Aden. The East African Rift, the Red Sea, and the Gulf of Aden are all zones where Earth's crust is pulling apart in a process known as crustal spreading. Their three-way meeting is known as a triple junction, and their spreading creates a triangular topographic depression for which the area was named.

    Not surprisingly, the topographic effects of crustal spreading are more dramatic in the Afar Triangle than anywhere else upon Earth's landmasses. The spreading is primarily evident as patterns of numerous tension cracks. But some of these cracks provide conduits for magma to rise to the surface to form volcanoes.

    Shown here are a few of the volcanoes of the Afar Triangle. The larger two are Nabro Volcano (upper right, in Eritrea) and Mallahle Volcano (lower left, in Ethiopia). Nabro Volcano shows clear evidence of multiple episodes of activity that resulted in a crater in a crater in a crater. Many volcanoes in this area are active, including one nearby that last erupted in 1990.

    This image was created directly from an SRTM elevation model. A shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. The shade image was then combined with a color coding of topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, orange, and red, up to purple at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 35.2 kilometers (21.8 miles) by 22.5 kilometers (14.0 miles) Location: 13.3 degrees North latitude, 41.7 degrees East longitude Orientation: North toward the top Image Data: Shaded and colored SRTM elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  15. Nyiragongo Volcano, Congo, Map View with Lava, Landsat / ASTER / SRTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This Landsat satellite image shows the volcano (right of center), the city of Goma, and surrounding terrain. Image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red overlay), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shore of Lake Kivu. The city airport parallels, and is just right (east) of, the larger lava flow. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but much broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the upper left.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on December 11, 2001, about a month before the eruption, and shows an unusually cloud-free view of this tropical terrain. Minor clouds and their shadows were digitally removed to clarify the view and topographic shading derived from the SRTM elevation model was added to the Landsat image. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and substantially helps in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive. This Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image was provided to the SRTM and ASTER projects by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, S.D.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) will image Earth for several years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy,Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. ASTER is providing scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter(approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's

  16. Lahar Hazard Modeling at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, O. E.; Rose, W. I.; Jaya, D.

    2003-04-01

    Tungurahua Volcano (Lat. 01^o28'S; Long. 78^o27'W), located in the central Ecuadorian Andes, is an active edifice that rises more than 3 km above surrounding topography. Since European settlement in 1532, Tungurahua has experienced four major eruptive episodes: 1641-1646, 1773-1781, 1886-1888 and 1916-1918 (Hall et al, JVGR V91; p1-21, 1999). In September 1999, Tungurahua began a new period of activity that continues to the present. During this time, the volcano has erupted daily, depositing ash and blocks on its steep flanks. A pattern of continuing eruptions, coupled with rainfall up to 28 mm in a 6 hour period (rain data collected in Baños at 6-hr intervals, 3000 meters below Tungurahua’s summit), has produced an environment conducive to lahar mobilization. Tungurahua volcano presents an immediate hazard to the town of Baños, an important tourist destination and cultural center with a population of about 25,000 residents located 8 km from the crater. During the current eruptive episode, lahars have occurred as often as 3 times per week on the northern and western slopes of the volcano. Consequently, the only north-south trending highway on the west side of Tungurahua has been completely severed at the intersection of at least ten drainages, where erosion has exceeded 10 m since 1999. The La Pampa quebrada, located 1 km west of Baños, is the most active of Tungurahua's drainages. At this location, where the slope is moderate, lahars continue to inundate the only highway linking Baños to the Pan American Highway. Because of steep topography, the conventional approach of measuring planimetric inundation areas to determine the scale of lahars could not be employed. Instead, cross sections were measured in the channels using volume/cross-sectional inundation relationships determined by (Iverson et al, GSABull V110; no. 8, p972-984, 1998). After field observations of the lahars, LAHARZ, a program used in a geographic information system (GIS) to objectively map lahar-hazard-zones using a digital elevation model (DEM), was used to construct a hazard map for the volcano. The 10 meter resolution DEM was constructed for Tungurahua Volcano using scanned topographic lines obtained from the GIS Department at the Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito, Ecuador. The steep topographic gradients and rapid downcutting of most rivers draining the edifice prevents the deposition of lahars on the lower flanks of Tungurahua. Modeling confirms the high degree of flow channelization in the deep Tungurahua canyons. Inundation zones observed and shown by LAHARZ at Baños yield identification of safe zones within the city which would provide safety from even the largest magnitude lahar expected.

  17. Global synthesis of volcano deformation: Results of the Volcano Deformation Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Delgado, F.

    2013-12-01

    Ground deformation in volcanic regions is being observed more frequently -- the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased from 44 in 1997 to more than 210 in 2013 thanks in large part thanks to the availability of satellite InSAR observations. With the launch of new SAR satellites in the coming years devoted to global deformation monitoring, the number of well-studied episodes of volcano deformation will continue to increase. But evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how often do deformation episodes lead to eruption? Are there certain characteristics of the deformation or the volcano that make the linkage between deformation and eruption more robust -- for example the duration or magnitude of the ground deformation and/or the composition and tectonic setting of the volcano? To answer these questions, a global database of volcano deformation events is needed. Recognizing the need for global information on volcano deformation and the opportunity to address it with InSAR and other techniques, we formed the Volcano Deformation Database Task force as part of Global Volcano Model. The three objectives of our organization are: 1) to compile deformation observations of all volcanoes globally into appropriate formats for WOVOdat and the Global Volcanism Program of the Smithsonian Institution. 2) document any relation between deformation events and eruptions for the Global assessment of volcanic hazard and risk report for 2015 (GAR15) for the UN. 3) to better link InSAR and other remote sensing observations to volcano observatories. We present the first results from our global study of the relation between deformation and eruptions, including case studies of particular eruptions. We compile a systematically-observed catalog of >500 volcanoes with observation windows up to 20 years. Of 90 volcanoes showing deformation, 40 erupted. The positive predictive value (PPV = 0.44) linking deformation and eruption on this timescale indicates ';strong' evidential worth. The negative predictive value (NPV = 0.94) linking non-deformation with non-eruption, is even stronger. But, linking individual deformation events to eruptions is unreliable with existing InSAR data that are rarely available in the critical days to weeks before the eruption of a volcano that has been dormant for decades to millenia. For example, while ground deformation was observed before the 2011 eruptions of Cordon Caulle and Cerro Hudson (both in Chile), the observations were too infrequent to see any change in the pattern or rate of deformation before the eruptions. Before 2011, Cordon Caulle and Cerro Hudson both erupted in the 20th century, but the 2008 eruption of Chaiten (also in Chile) was preceded by centuries of dormancy and still had no measured precursory deformation up to two weeks before eruption. New InSAR missions with more frequent observations along with ground observations from tiltmeters and GPS are essential to constrain whether there is a reliable deformation signal before eruption.

  18. SAR4Volcanoes: an international ASI funded research project on volcano deformation through new generation SAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansosti, E.; Pepe, S.; Solaro, G.; Casu, F.; Tizzani, P.; Acocella, V.; Ruch, J.; Nobile, A.; Puglisi, G.; Guglielmino, F.; Zoffoli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Volcano deformation monitoring is crucial to understand how magma emplaces, propagates and erupts. Therefore, volcano deformation research projects are particularly important opportunities to improve our understanding of volcano dynamics. SAR4Volcanoes is a 2-year research project funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) within the framework of a cooperation agreement with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). It focuses on volcano deformation analysis through Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques by means of COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS data, through the joint use of L-band and X-band SAR data. It also aims to the identification of methods and techniques to support decision making in emergency cases. Main target volcanoes in the projects are Etna, Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Stromboli (Italy) and Sakurajima and Kirishima (Japan). Secondary target volcanoes include recently or currently erupting volcanoes, as El Hierro (Spain), Nabro (Ethiopia) and Galapagos volcanoes (Ecuador). Since the project kickoff (July 2011) a large number of COSMO-SkyMed data has been acquired at these volcanoes; in some cases, the acquisitions are available almost at every satellite orbit, with an average interval down to 4 days. On these premises, the project represents an important opportunity to: (1) collect a significant amount of X-band data on active and erupting volcanoes and (2) study surface deformation to understand magma dynamics in different volcanic settings. We will present preliminary results on the ground deformation analysis of the main and secondary target volcanoes. In particular, target volcanoes without a pre-project archive are analyzed using single deformation maps, while those with archives are analysed through a time series approach, based on the SBAS technique.

  19. A Benthic Invertebrate Survey of Jun Jaegyu Volcano: An active undersea volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, G.; Brachfeld, S.; Gorring, M.; Prezant, R. S.; Domack, E.

    2005-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu volcano, an Antarctic submarine volcano, was dredged in May 2004 during cruise 04-04 of the RV Laurence M. Gould to determine rock, sediment composition and marine macroinvertebrate diversity. The objectives of this study are to examine the benthic assemblages and biodiversity present on a young volcano. The volcano is located on the continental shelf of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula, where recent changes in surface temperature and ice shelf stability have been observed. This volcano was originally swath-mapped during cruise 01-07 of the Research Vessel-Ice Breaker Nathaniel B. Palmer. During LMG04-04 we also studied the volcano using a SCUD video camera, and performed temperature surveys along the flanks and crest. Both the video and the dredge indicate a seafloor surface heavily colonized by benthic organisms. Indications of fairly recent lava flows are given by the absence of marine life on regions of the volcano. The recovered dredge material was sieved, and a total of thirty-three invertebrates were extracted. The compilation of invertebrate community data can subsequently be compared to other benthic invertebrate studies conducted along the peninsula, which can determine the regional similarity of communities over time, their relationship to environmental change and health, if any, and their relationship to geologic processes in Antarctic Sound. Twenty-two rock samples, all slightly weathered and half bearing encrusted organisms, were also analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Except for one conglomerate sample, all are alkali basalts and share similar elemental compositions with fresh, unweathered samples from the volcano. Two of the encrusted basalt samples have significantly different compositions than the rest. We speculate this difference could be due to water loss during sample preparation, loss of organic carbon trapped within the vesicles of the samples and/or elemental uptake by the organism. These results can establish a qualitative baseline survey for other young volcanoes, and be used to monitor changes in the benthic assemblages and biodiversity as a function of environmental change and environmental health.

  20. Eocene and younger biostratigraphy and lithofacies of the Cascade Seamount, East Tasman Plateau, southwest Pacific Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Quilty

    1997-01-01

    Six dredgings, five taken during fishing operations, have recovered sedimentary rocks from the volcanic framework of Cascade Seamount, which is built on thinned continental crust on the East Tasman Plateau off eastern Tasmania. The top of the original volcano is now about 600 m below sea?level. Planktonic foraminifers and supplementary calcareous nannofossils yielded Late Eocene?Early Oligocene, mid?Late Oligocene, Early\\/Middle Miocene,

  1. Monitoring Hekla Volcano with Shallow Background Microseismicity, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Eva P. S.; Bean, Christopher J.; Vogfjörd, Kristin

    2015-04-01

    Hekla is one of Iceland's most active volcanoes located at the connection between the South Iceland Seismic Zone striking east-west and the Eastern Volcanic Zone striking north-south. It erupted four times in the past 45 years with a repose time of about ten years and a period of quiescence of 14 years since the last eruption. The permanent monitoring network includes satellites, seismometers and strainmeters most of which are in at least 15 km distance of the volcano. Eruptions in 1970, 1980/81, 1991 and 2000 were detected by the network 25, 23, 28 and 80 minutes, respectively, before the visual onset. Based on measurements from this network, Hekla is thought to be in an inflated but seismically inactive state at the moment. We installed five seismometers temporarily within 4 km of the summit and detected high levels of background microseismicity in autumn 2012. Amplitude and travel-time based location methods were applied and located two populations of events at shallow depths on the northern flank, close to the summit. The recorded events were either short, high-frequency events with distinct arrivals located beneath the summit on the northern flank of Hekla or longer, emergent, low-frequency events about 4 km northeast of the summit in 200 - 400 m depth below the surface. Estimated moment magnitudes were MW=-1.1 to -0.1 and MW=-0.9 to -0.0 and local magnitudes ML=-0.5 to +0.3 and ML=-0.3 to+0.3, respectively. This seismicity does not show any correlation with gas output or deformation measurements but is located at the steepest slopes of the edifice. Hence we suggest that current shallow microseismicity at Hekla is structurally controlled. This offers a possible opportunity of using near summit microseismicity monitoring as a tool for monitoring emerging unrest at Hekla. The current detection threshold only allowed increased seismicity to be detected 23 to 80 minutes prior to full scale eruptions. Microseismicity monitoring can increase this time span as observed earthquakes are smaller.

  2. Are separated volcanoes connected through a horizontal partial melt zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, A.; Sacks, S.; Kamigaichi, O.

    2003-04-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency installed and operates a network of Sacks-Evertson borehole strainmeters in south-east Honshu. One of these instruments is on Izu-Oshima, a volcanic island at the northern end of the Izu-Bonin arc. That strainmeter recorded large strain changes associated with the 1986 Izu-Oshima eruption. Miyake-jima, about 75 km south of Izu-Oshima, erupted in 1983. No deformation monitoring was available on Miyake but several changes occurred in the strain record at Izu-Oshima. There was a clear change in the long-term strain rate beginning 2 days before the Miyake eruption. Short period events recorded by the strainmeter occurred more frequently in the months before the Miyake eruption and ceased completely following the eruption. The Izu-Oshima strainmeter showed that, over the period from 1980 to the 1986 eruption, the amplitude of the solid earth tides changed by almost a factor of two. At the time of the Miyake eruption, the rate of increase of the tidal amplitude also changed. While all of these changes were observed on a single instrument, they are very different types of change. From a number of independent checks, we can be sure that the strainmeter did not experience any change in performance at that time. Thus it recorded a change in deformation behavior in three very different frequency bands: over very long term, at tidal periods (~day) and at very short periods (minutes). It appears that the distant eruption in 1983 had an effect on the magmatic system under Izu-Oshima. More recently, tomographic and seismic attenuation work in the Tohoku (northern Honshu) area has show the existence of a low velocity, high attenuation horizontally elongated structure under the volcanic front. It is likely that this is a zone of partial melt and that this zone is a supply of magma for the volcanic activity. The tectonic setting for Miyake-jima and Izu-Oshima is very similar to that for Tohoku and we expect that these volcanoes are also underlain by a low Q, low velocity (i.e. partial melt) zone. If so, it could provide a mechanism for communication between the volcanoes.

  3. Origin of maar volcanoes: external water, internal volatiles, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, J.; Schmincke, H.-U.

    2012-04-01

    The origin of maar volcanoes has been interpreted as due to explosive magma-water interaction for more than 40 years (Fisher and Waters 1970; Lorenz 1973 and Fisher and Schmincke 1984). Earlier suspicions that CO2-degassing plays a role in maar formation (Schmincke 1977) are now followed up by re-examining maar deposits of four different compositions in the maar-type locality (Eifel, Germany). These four compositions comprise: (1) melilite-nephelinites (West Eifel), (2) leucitites/nephelinites (West Eifel), (3) Na-rich basanites (West Eifel), and (4) K-rich basanites (East Eifel). At present, we focus on high-resolution stratigraphy, sedimentology, grain-size distribution, component analysis (accidental vs. juvenile clasts), and morphological and textural particle studies, accompanied by standard glass and bulk chemical and mineralogical analyses. Interestingly, maar deposits of highly silica-undersaturated and - by inference - CO2-rich composition (melilite-nephelinites and leucitites/nephelinites) show features contrasting with the classical catalogue of criteria for hydroclastic fragmentation (Fisher and Schmincke 1984). Their deposits are medium- to coarse-grained (MdØ mainly: 2 - 8 mm), mostly moderate- to well-sorted (?Ø mainly: 1 - 2.5) and in some cases juvenile-rich (up to 50-70 wt. %). Transport and depositional mechanisms comprise a mixture of surge and fallout differing from the general assumption that maar deposits are dominated by surges. Additionally, features of juvenile clasts of highly silica-undersaturated composition largely differ from the features of "classic" hydroclastic particles (e.g.: dense, blocky, glassy shards). Juvenile clasts of highly silica-undersaturated composition show: (a) round- to semiround morphologies, (b) slight- to moderate vesicularities, (c) near absence of glassy material, (d) abundance of deep-seated xenoliths (mantle and lower crust), (e) agglutinated lava rinds enveloping the mantle- and crust-xenoliths, and (f) carbonate fragments, most probably of magmatic origin, within the groundmass. In contrast, basanitic maar deposits - by inference with low CO2 concentrations - and particularly their juvenile clasts show more conventional features of hydroclastic fragmentation processes. They are finer-grained, moderate- to poorly-sorted, extremely lithoclast-rich, and the juvenile clasts are generally angular, slightly- to non-vesicular and glassy. Moreover, deep-seated xenoliths and carbonate fragments are lacking. At this stage in our study we postulate that the high CO2 concentrations of highly silica-undersaturated maar volcanoes in the West Eifel could have played a significant role in maar-forming processes. These magmas may have undergone magmatic fragmentation due to rapid CO2-exsolution prior to shallow magma-water interaction resulting in explosive eruptions governed by both, magmatic and phreatomagmatic fragmentation and eruptive processes.

  4. Mud volcanism: Processes and implications Mud volcanoes: generalities and proposed mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Manga, Michael

    Editorial Mud volcanism: Processes and implications Mud volcanoes: generalities and proposed mechanisms Mud volcanoes can be large and long lived geological structures that morphologically resemble magmatic volcanoes. Because of their capricious behaviour and their spectacular morphology and landscapes

  5. Volcanoes in the Solar System Pictorial Tour

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roberta Johnson

    2000-07-01

    Volcanoes in the Solar System is a Windows to the Universe Exploratour and provides information and images about shield volcanoes, cinder cones, ash, lava, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Io, and the Moon. Windows to the Universe is a user-friendly learning system pertaining to the Earth and Space sciences. The objective of this project is to develop an innovative and engaging web site that spans the Earth and Space sciences and includes a rich array of documents, including images, movies, animations, and data sets that explore the Earth and Space sciences and the historical and cultural ties between science, exploration and the human experience. Links at the top of each page allow users to navigate between beginner, intermediate, and advanced options for each topic level.

  6. Investigation of prototype volcano surveillance network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. P. (principal investigator); Ward, P. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Earthquake counters in Guatemala were being installed between February 13 and 17. The volcano Fuego began erupting ash and ash flows on February 23. On February 17, 6 days before the eruption there were 80 earthquakes at two counters 5 and 15 km from the volcano. This was a substantial increase of a fairly constant level of events per day recorded for the previous four days. A counter 30 km away did not show an increase. Had the DCP been operating longer and had the data been sent immediately from Goddard, it might have been possible to warn of a possible eruption six days in advance.

  7. Adakitic volcanism in the eastern Aleutian arc: Petrology and geochemistry of Hayes volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K.; Hart, W. K.; Coombs, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Located in south-central Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, Hayes volcano is responsible for the most widespread tephra fall deposit in the regional Holocene record (~3,500 BP). Hayes is bounded to the west by the Cook Inlet volcanoes (CIV; Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and separated from the nearest volcanism to the east, Mount Drum of the Wrangell Volcanic Field (WVF), by a 400 km-wide volcanic gap. We report initial results of the first systematic geochemical and petrologic study of Hayes volcano. Hayes eruptive products are calc-alkaline dacites and rhyolites that have anomalous characteristics within the region. Major and trace element analyses reveal that the Hayes rhyolites are more silicic (~74 wt. % SiO2) than compositions observed in other CIV, and its dacitic products possess the distinctive geochemical signatures of adakitic magmas. Key aspects of the Hayes dacite geochemistry include: 16.03 - 17.54 wt. % Al2O3, 0.97 - 2.25 wt. % MgO, Sr/Y = 60 - 78, Yb = 0.9 - 1.2 ppm, Ba/La = 31 - 79. Such signatures are consistent with melting of a metamorphosed basaltic source that leaves behind a residue of garnet ± amphibole ± pyroxene via processes such as melting of a subducting oceanic slab or underplated mafic lower crust, rather than flux melting of the mantle wedge by dehydration of the down-going slab. Additionally, Hayes tephras display a distinctive mineralogy of biotite with amphibole in greater abundance than pyroxene, a characteristic not observed at other CIV. Furthermore, Hayes rhyolites and dacites exhibit little isotopic heterogeneity (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70384 - 0.70395, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.866 - 18.889) suggesting these lavas originate from the same source. Hayes volcano is approximately situated above the western margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane and where the dip of the Pacific slab beneath Cook Inlet shallows northward. Due to its position along the margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane, it is plausible that Hayes magmas are the result of partial melting of this slab where thermal erosion and weakening of the crust occurs along the Pacific plate-Yakutat terrane transition. Additionally, flat slab subduction may be responsible for producing adakitic magmas by equilibration of the hydrous slab with ambient mantle temperatures. In contrast, it is possible that the adakitic signature at Hayes is from underplated mafic lower crust that melted as the result of pooling mantle melt at depth. Two volcanoes within the WVF, Mt. Drum and Mt. Churchill, are adakitic with an abundance of biotite and amphibole similar to Hayes volcano and have been suggested to have slab melt origins. Mt. Drum lavas have less radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr but overlapping 206Pb/204Pb signatures while Mt. Churchill, which approximately overlies the eastern edge of the Yakutat terrane, has similar 87Sr/86Sr compositions, but more radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb than Hayes. Mt. Spurr, the nearest CIV to Hayes volcano (90 km south), does not share its adakitic signature but exhibits overlapping, more heterogeneous isotopic compositions. Thus, understanding the petrogenetic history of Hayes volcano is essential not only to explain the development of an adakitic volcanic system but how this relates to regional, arc-wide volcanism.

  8. Recent structural evolution of the Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands: volcanic rift zone reconfiguration as a precursor to volcano flank instability?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Day; J. C. Carracedo; H. Guillou; P. Gravestock

    1999-01-01

    The Cumbre Vieja volcano is the youngest component of the island of La Palma. It is a very steep-sided oceanic island volcano, of a type which may undergo large-scale lateral collapse with little precursory deformation. Reconfiguration of the volcanic rift zones and underlying dyke swarms of the volcano is used to determine the present degree of instability of the volcano.

  9. Magnetic monitoring at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnicki, J.; Bof, M.; Perdereau, L.; Yvetot, P.; Tjetjep, W.; Sukhyar, R.; Purbawinata, M. A.; Suharno

    2000-07-01

    Merapi volcano, located 30 km north of the heavily populated city of Yogjakarta, Java, is one of the most active of the 129 volcanoes in Indonesia. About every 2 years a new phase of activity is observed. Depending on the past activity the unrest gives rise either to an endogenous dome which partly collapses in the southwest direction or to pyroclastic flows which travel as far as 15 km. The 1990-1997 period has involved a plume emission on 30 August 1990, an extrusion on 20 January 1992, and a pyroclastic eruption on 22 November 1994. The intensity of the Earth magnetic field has been measured simultaneously and digitally recorded at four stations since 1990. Two Overhauser magnetometers with resolution of 0.01 nT have been installed in the summit area to strengthen the volcano monitoring. Outstanding magnetic changes appear to correlate with volcanic activity. Three types of volcanomagnetic signals can be identified: long-term trends up to 15 nT with period >10 years; medium-term cyclic variations, at most 3 nT in amplitude and with 1-2 years period; and small events, reaching 1.5 nT, lasting a few months, and associated with any remarkable volcanic activity. Merapi volcano began a new cycle of activity in 1995 leading to a dome growth in July 1996, and accompanied by 27 nuées ardentes in August. The comparison between magnetic data, seismicity, and surface phenomena suggests that some long-term trends of decade periods could be of thermomagnetic origin, while mid-term volcanomagnetic variations associated with the cycles of Merapi activity could be of piezomagnetic origin. Short-term variations of a few weeks duration, less than 1.5 nT, are well correlated with the 1995-1996 seismic activity.

  10. Radar Images of the Earth: Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site features links to thirty-five NASA radar images of the world's volcanoes, including brief descriptions of the respective processes and settings involved. The images were created with the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radar illuminates Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions.

  11. The Organic Chemistry of Volcanoes: Case Studies at Cerro Negro, Nicaragua and Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, A. J.; Seward, T. M.; Gize, A. P.; Hall, T.

    2005-12-01

    Though it has long been known that volcanoes emit organic compounds within their fumarolic gases, it is only in recent years that a concerted attempt has been made to catalogue and quantify the species and fluxes. Two general lines of interest dominate this study. Firstly, volcanic gases represent some of the most likely environments in which the precursor molecules necessary for the origin of life were synthesised. The existence of an active, abiotic, organic chemistry in such settings today is fundamental to our understanding of the early Earth. Secondly, the presence of halogenated organic compounds is of interest to the atmospheric sciences, particularly with respect to their ozone depleting potential. It is clear that natural sources of halocarbons must exist, and though current natural fluxes are low with respect to the anthropogenic signature, volcanogenic halocarbons may have proved to be significant during the eruption of supervolcanoes and continental flood basalts. In this study, gases were collected from fumaroles in the craters of two, very different, active volcanoes. Cerro Negro, a young basaltic cinder cone belonging to the Central American Volcanic Belt, could be defined as a typical subduction zone volcano. Gases were collected from Cerro Negro during March 2003 and 2004 from a single fumarole discharging close to the crater floor. In contrast, Oldoinyo Lengai is the world's only active carbonatite volcano and represents the most extreme case of alkali volcanism in the East African Rift system. Fieldwork was conducted in the northern summit crater of Lengai over 8 days in October 2003. In this period, the volcano was in near continuous eruption and gases were sampled from two fumaroles situated within 20m of the eruptive centre, though measured gas temperatures were low at around 195°C. Organic compounds were collected using a variety of activated carbon, molecular sieve type adsorbents, packed into glass cartridges. The water and acid matrix of the gas was first removed using a pair of condensation flasks cooled in ice/water slush. The gas was then passed through the adsorbent cartridges using a low flow battery powered pump. The gases were analysed using GCMS techniques. At Oldoinyo Lengai a wide variety of simple biomolecules such as acetic acid, pyrole and ethanol is noted. However, the low gas temperatures imply that these compounds are the result of bacterial activity within the system rather than abiotic synthesis. At Cerro Negro a rich organic chemistry was found. Alkanes, alkenes and aromatics are present in significant concentrations up to C12. Additionally, halogenated compounds such as trichlorofluoromethane (CFC11), chlorobenzene and tetrachloroethene were discovered in concentrations of up to 10ppbv, permitting revised estimates of the global volcanogenic flux of such halocarbons.

  12. New insights on Panarea volcano from terrestrial, marine and airborne data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The Panarea volcano belongs to the Aeolian arc system and its activity, which recently produced impacts on the environment as well as on human settlements, is known since historical times. This volcano, which includes Panarea island and its archipelago, is the emergent portion of submarine stratovolcano more than 2000 m high and 20 Km across. In November 2002 a submarine gas eruption started offshore 3 Km east of Panarea on top of a shallow rise of 2.3 km2 surrounded by the islets of Lisca Bianca, Bottaro and Lisca Nera. This event has posed new concern on a volcano generally considered extinct. Soon after the submarine eruption, this area has been surveyed under multidisciplinary programs funded by the Italian Department of the Civil Protection and INGV. Monitoring programs included subaerial and sea bottom DEM of Panarea volcano by merging aerial digital photogrammetry, aerial laser scanning and multibeam bathymetry. A GPS ground deformation network (PANANET) was designed, set up and measured during time span December 2002 - October 2007. GPS data show rates of motion and strain values typical of volcanic areas which are in agreement with the NE-SW and NW-SE tectonic systems. The latter coincide with the main pathways for the upwelling of hydrothermal fluids. GPS data inferred a pre-event uplift followed by a general subsidence and shortening across the area that could be interpreted as the response to the surface of the inflation and deflation of the hydrothermal system reservoir which is progressively reducing its pressure after the 2002 gas eruption. Magnetic and gravimetric data depict the deep and shallow structure of the volcano. From geochemical surveys were calculated energetic conditions at craters. Data were coupled with the computed physic-chemical state of the fluids at the level of the deep reservoir and provided the boundary conditions of the occurred event, and suggesting that a low-energy explosion was responsible for producing the craters at the sea bottom. Finally, we provide a model constrained by GPS data and Okada formulation, which suggests that the degassing intensity and distribution are strongly influenced by geophysical-geochemical changes within the hydrothermal/geothermal system. These variations may be triggered by changes in the regional stress field as suggested by the geophysical and volcanological events which occurred in 2002 in the Southern Tyrrhenian area.

  13. Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua: A Terrestrial Analog for the Evolution of Martian Calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Harris, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    Like their terrestrial counterparts, Martian calderas are believed to be the surface products of the partial evacuation of a magma chamber at a few kilometers depth. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data show that sagging of the caldera center may exceed 1.6 km at Biblis Patera, 1.3 km at Olympus Mons, and 300 m at Alba Patera, suggesting post-eruption deflation of the magma chamber. In order to understand the physical structure of Martian volcanoes, we are conducting a detailed morphologic and topographic comparison of Olympus Mons caldera, Mars, and the Nindiri pit crater of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua. Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, is a persistently active basaltic volcano that comprises four main pit craters, which are named (from east to west) Masaya, Santiago, Nindiri, and San Pedro. Nindiri crater is partially filled by frozen lava lakes that formed between 1570 and 1670. The lava surface in the crater subsequently sagged downward plastically before failure in a brittle fashion along circular bounding faults, producing fractures that are morphologically similar to the circumferential fractures seen around the perimeter of the floor of Olympus Mons caldera. The walls of San Pedro and Santiago pit craters that formed following lava lake emplacement now cut these Nindiri features. Exposure of the lava lake pile in the pit crater wall allows a vertical section in excess of 300 m to be studied. Lava flows preserved in the eastern wall of Nindiri have sagged about 50 meters. A more recent lava lake was also erupted onto the sagged crater floor in 1852 where it ponded within the sag-structure. Our on-going study of Nindiri as a terrestrial analog to Martian calderas is focused on analysis of the structural features and on the timing of the eruptions and deformation events. Numerous features are common to both calderas, including extensional fractures around the perimeter of their floors, compressional ridges near the center of collapse, and ponded lava flows that have now been dissected by more recent collapse events. If we can show that one collapse event deformed plastically (as at Nindiri), then this suggests that the subsidence took place within a few years of lava lake emplacement so that the lava was still at a high enough temperature to allow plastic deformation. Brittle deformation is more likely to imply a longer time period between lava lake emplacement and collapse. In either case, extrapolation of these ideas to Mars has significance for inferring magma supply rates at the summit of Olympus Mons and other Martian volcanoes.

  14. A Teachers Guide to the Geology of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Mattox

    This guide is designed for teachers, other educators, and anyone interested in volcanoes. Topics covered by this guide include plate tectonics, hot spots and mantle plumes, the evolution of Hawaiian volcanoes, volcanic landforms, landforms of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, lava, tephra, calderas, pit craters, minerals, magma, volcanic rocks, monitoring volcanoes, eruption types and details about Kilauea. Although the guide focuses on Hawaiian volcanoes, similar processes and features are observed at volcanoes around the world.

  15. Electrical structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, D.V.; Stanley, W.D.; Bisdorf, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    From the interpretation of magnetotelluric, transient electromagnetic, and Schlumberger resistivity soundings, the electrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is found to consist of four units. From the surface downward, the geoelectrical units are 1) very resistive, young, unaltered volcanic rock, (2) a conductive layer of older volcanic material composed of altered tuffs, 3) a thick resistive layer thought to be in part intrusive rocks, and 4) a lower-crustal conductor. This model is similar to the regional geoelectrical structure found throughout the Cascade Range. Inside the caldera, the conductive second layer corresponds to the steep temperature gradient and alteration minerals observed in the USGS Newberry 2 test-hole. Drill hole information on the south and north flanks of the volcano (test holes GEO N-1 and GEO N-3, respectively) indicates that outside the caldera the conductor is due to alteration minerals (primarily smectite) and not high-temperature pore fluids. On the flanks of Newberry the conductor is generally deeper than inside the caldera, and it deepens with distance from the summit. A notable exception to this pattern is seen just west of the caldera rim, where the conductive zone is shallower than at other flank locations. The volcano sits atop a rise in the resistive layer, interpreted to be due to intrusive rocks. -from Authors

  16. Deep structure of Medicine Lake volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, J.R.R.; Evans, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) in northeastern California is the largest-volume volcano in the Cascade Range. The upper-crustal structure of this Quaternary shield volcano is well known from previous geological and geophysical investigations. In 1981, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a teleseismic tomography experiment on MLV to explore its deeper structure. The images we present, calculated using a modern form of the ACH-inversion method, reveal that there is presently no hint of a large (> 100 km3), hot magma reservoir in the crust. The compressional-wave velocity perturbations show that directly beneath MLV's caldera there is a zone of increased seismic velocity. The perturbation amplitude is +10% in the upper crust, +5% in the lower crust, and +3% in the lithospheric mantle. This positive seismic velocity anomaly presumably is caused by mostly subsolidus gabbroic intrusive rocks in the crust. Heat and melt removal are suggested as the cause in the upper mantle beneath MLV, inferred from petro-physical modeling. The increased seismic velocity appears to be nearly continuous to 120 km depth and is a hint that the original melts come at least partly from the lower lithospheric mantle. Our second major finding is that the upper mantle southeast of MLV is characterized by relatively slow seismic velocities (-1%) compared to the northwest side. This anomaly is interpreted to result from the elevated temperatures under the northwest Basin and Range Province.

  17. Atmospheric influence on volcano-acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hedlin, Michael; Fee, David; Garcés, Milton; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes are natural sources of infrasound, useful for studying infrasonic propagation in the atmosphere. Large, explosive volcanic eruptions typically produce signals that can be recorded at ranges of hundreds of kilometers propagating in atmospheric waveguides. In addition, sustained volcanic eruptions can produce smaller-amplitude repetitive signals recordable at >10 km range. These include repetitive impulsive signals and continuous tremor signals. The source functions of these signals can remain relatively invariant over timescales of weeks to months. Observed signal fluctuations from such persistent sources at an infrasound recording station may therefore be attributed to dynamic atmospheric propagation effects. We present examples of repetitive and sustained volcano infrasound sources at Mount St. Helens, Washington and Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, USA. The data recorded at >10 km range show evidence of propagation effects induced by tropospheric variability at the mesoscale and microscale. Ray tracing and finite-difference simulations of the infrasound propagation produce qualitatively consistent results. However, the finite-difference simulations indicate that low-frequency effects such as diffraction, and scattering from topography may be important factors for infrasonic propagation at this scale.

  18. GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION OF NEWBERRY VOLCANO, OREGON

    SciTech Connect

    Waibel, Albert F [Columbia Geoscience; Frone, Zachary S [Southern Methodist University; Blackwell, David D [Southern Methodist University

    2014-12-01

    Davenport Newberry (Davenport) has completed 8 years of exploration for geothermal energy on Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. Two deep exploration test wells were drilled by Davenport on the west flank of the volcano, one intersected a hydrothermal system; the other intersected isolated fractures with no hydrothermal interconnection. Both holes have bottom-hole temperatures near or above 315°C (600°F). Subsequent to deep test drilling an expanded exploration and evaluation program was initiated. These efforts have included reprocessing existing data, executing multiple geological, geophysical, geochemical programs, deep exploration test well drilling and shallow well drilling. The efforts over the last three years have been made possible through a DOE Innovative Exploration Technology (IET) Grant 109, designed to facilitate innovative geothermal exploration techniques. The combined results of the last 8 years have led to a better understanding of the history and complexity of Newberry Volcano and improved the design and interpretation of geophysical exploration techniques with regard to blind geothermal resources in volcanic terrain.

  19. Kamchatkan Volcanoes Explosive Eruptions in 2014 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka, and several of them are continuously active. In 2014, three of the Kamchatkan volcanoes - Sheveluch, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky - had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2014: on January 08 and 12, May 12, September 24, October 02 and 28, November 16, 22 and 26, and December 05, 17, 26 and 29: ash plumes rose up to 9-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the eastern and western directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Klyuchi Village (on January 12, June 11, and November 16). Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Karymsky volcano has been in a state of explosive eruption since 1996. The moderate ash explosions of this volcano were noting during 2014: from March 24 till April 02; and from September 03 till December 10. Ash plumes rose up to 5 km a.s.l. and extended more 300 km mainly to the eastern directions of the volcano. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to local aviation. Explosive eruption of Zhupanovsky volcano began on June 06, 2014 and continues in January 2015 too. Ash explosions rose up to 8-10 km a.s.l. on June 19, September 05 and 07, October 11, November 07 and 22; in the other days - up to 5-6 km a.s.l. Ash plumes extended for about 1000 km mainly to the eastern directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky on September 07. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation.

  20. The critical role of volcano monitoring in risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2008-01-01

    Data from volcano-monitoring studies constitute the only scientifically valid basis for short-term forecasts of a future eruption, or of possible changes during an ongoing eruption. Thus, in any effective hazards-mitigation program, a basic strategy in reducing volcano risk is the initiation or augmentation of volcano monitoring at historically active volcanoes and also at geologically young, but presently dormant, volcanoes with potential for reactivation. Beginning with the 1980s, substantial progress in volcano-monitoring techniques and networks - ground-based as well space-based - has been achieved. Although some geochemical monitoring techniques (e.g., remote measurement of volcanic gas emissions) are being increasingly applied and show considerable promise, seismic and geodetic methods to date remain the techniques of choice and are the most widely used. Availability of comprehensive volcano-monitoring data was a decisive factor in the successful scientific and governmental responses to the reawakening of Mount St. elens (Washington, USA) in 1980 and, more recently, to the powerful explosive eruptions at Mount Pinatubo (Luzon, Philippines) in 1991. However, even with the ever-improving state-of-the-art in volcano monitoring and predictive capability, the Mount St. Helens and Pinatubo case histories unfortunately still represent the exceptions, rather than the rule, in successfully forecasting the most likely outcome of volcano unrest.

  1. Mud volcanoes of the Orinoco Delta, Eastern Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aslan, A.; Warne, A.G.; White, W.A.; Guevara, E.H.; Smyth, R.C.; Raney, J.A.; Gibeaut, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Mud volcanoes along the northwest margin of the Orinoco Delta are part of a regional belt of soft sediment deformation and diapirism that formed in response to rapid foredeep sedimentation and subsequent tectonic compression along the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. Field studies of five mud volcanoes show that such structures consist of a central mound covered by active and inactive vents. Inactive vents and mud flows are densely vegetated, whereas active vents are sparsely vegetated. Four out of the five mud volcanoes studied are currently active. Orinoco mud flows consist of mud and clayey silt matrix surrounding lithic clasts of varying composition. Preliminary analysis suggests that the mud volcano sediment is derived from underlying Miocene and Pliocene strata. Hydrocarbon seeps are associated with several of the active mud volcanoes. Orinoco mud volcanoes overlie the crest of a mud-diapir-cored anticline located along the axis of the Eastern Venezuelan Basin. Faulting along the flank of the Pedernales mud volcano suggests that fluidized sediment and hydrocarbons migrate to the surface along faults produced by tensional stresses along the crest of the anticline. Orinoco mud volcanoes highlight the proximity of this major delta to an active plate margin and the importance of tectonic influences on its development. Evaluation of the Orinoco Delta mud volcanoes and those elsewhere indicates that these features are important indicators of compressional tectonism along deformation fronts of plate margins. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Erosion and aggradation on persistently active volcanoes—a case study from Semeru Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Oehler, Jean-François; Gupta, Avijit; Solikhin, Akhmad; Procter, Jonathan N.

    2014-10-01

    Erosion processes on active volcanoes in humid climates result in some of the highest sediment yields on Earth. Episodic sediment yields after large eruptions have been evaluated, but not the long-term and continuous patterns on persistently active volcanoes. We have used high-spatial resolution satellite imagery and DEMs/DSMs along with field-based geologic mapping to assess accurately sediment budgets for the active Semeru Volcano in Java, Indonesia. Patterns of aggradation and degradation on Semeru differ from that of other active volcanoes because (1) both episodic pyroclastic density currents (PDC) and continuous supplies of tephra generate pulses of sediment, (2) sediment is transferred via cycles of aggradation and degradation that continue for >15 years in river channels after each PDC-producing eruption, and (3) rain-triggered lahars remove much greater material than fluvial transport during long, intense rainfall events. The geomorphic response of two of Semeru's rivers to volcanic sediment migration indicates that (1) each river experiences alternating aggradation and degradation cycles following PDC-producing eruptions and (2) spatial patterns of sediment transfer are governed by geomorphic characteristics of the river reaches. Usually high degradation in the steep source reach is followed by a long bypassing middle reach. Aggradation predominates in the depositional reaches further down valley on the ring plain. Average sediment yields (103-105 t/km2/year) at persistently active volcanoes are two to three orders of magnitude lower than sediment yields after large and infrequent eruptions, but the continuous and steady sediment transfer in rivers removes more sediment on a mid-term (10 years) to long-term (30 years) basis. In contrast to the trend observed on composite cones after large and infrequent eruptions, decay of sediment yields is not exponential and river channels do not fully recover at steadily active volcanoes as episodic inputs from BAF eruptions, superimposed on the background remobilization of daily tephra, have a greater cumulative effect.

  3. 15. VIEW LOOKING EAST, SHOWING RETAINING WALL ON EAST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW LOOKING EAST, SHOWING RETAINING WALL ON EAST SIDE OF PARK, SOUTH OF ENGINE HOUSE (4' X 5' negative) - Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. 55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER HOUSE AND FLUME VISIBLE TO RIGHT, TAILRACE RUNNING THROUGH CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. CRADLE TO INCLINED PLANE 3 EAST IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND TO LEFT. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  5. EAST (TRACKSIDE) ELEVATION OF STATION. East Broad Top Railroad, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST (TRACKSIDE) ELEVATION OF STATION. - East Broad Top Railroad, Saltillo Station, Along the East Broad Top Railroad (at milepost 18.8) and PA Route 655 (South Main Street), Saltillo, Huntingdon County, PA

  6. 2. VIEW EAST, East Control Area, west radar tower in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW EAST, East Control Area, west radar tower in foreground, east radar lower in background - Newport NIKE Missile Battery D-57/58, Integrated Fire Control Area, Newport Road, Carleton, Monroe County, MI

  7. The petrological relationship between Kamen volcano and adjacent volcanoes of Klyuchevskaya group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churikova, Tatiana; Gordeychik, Boris; Wörner, Gerhard; Ivanov, Boris; Maximov, Alexander; Lebedev, Igor; Griban, Andrey

    2010-05-01

    The Klyuchevskaya Group (KG) of volcanoes has the highest magma production rate across the Kamchatka arc and in fact for any arc worldwide. However, modern geochemical studies of Kamen volcano, which is located between Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny and Ploskie Sopky volcanoes, were not carried out and its relation and petrogenesis in comparison to other KG volcanoes is unknown. Space-time proximity of KG volcanoes and the common zone of seismicity below them may suggest a common source and genetic relationship. However, the lavas of neighboring volcanoes are rather different: high-Mg and high-Al basalts occur at Klyuchevskoy volcano, Hbl-bearing andesites and d?cites dominate at Bezymianny and medium-high-K subalkaline rocks at Ploskie Sopky volcano. Moreover, previously it was shown that distinct fluid signatures were observed in different KG volcanoes. In this report we present geological, petrographical, mineralogical and petrochemical data on the rocks of Kamen volcano in comparison with other KG volcanoes. Three consecutive periods of volcano activity were recognized in geological history of Kamen volcano: stratovolcano formation, development of a dike complex and formation of numerous cinder and cinder-lava monogenetic cones. The rock series of volcano are divided into four groups: olivine-bearing (Ol-2Px and Ol-Cpx), olivine-free (2Px-Pl, Cpx-Pl and abundant Pl), Hb-bearing and subaphyric rocks. While olivine-bearing rocks are observed in all volcanic stages, olivine-free lavas are presented only in the stratovolcano edifice. Lavas of the monogenetic cones are presented by olivine-bearing and subaphyric rocks. Dikes are olivine-bearing and hornblende-bearing rocks. Olivines of the Kamen stratovolcano and dikes vary from Fo60 to Fo83, clinopyroxenes are augites in composition and plagioclases have a bimodal distribution with maximum modes at An50 and An86. Oxides are represented by high-Al spinel, magnetite and titaniferous magnetite. Mineral compositions of the rocks from monogenetic cones are systematically different from minerals of dikes and stratovolcano. Olivines in monogenetic cones varies from Fo70 to Fo92, Mg# of clinopyroxenes from 72 to 80 and plagioclases are represented by An60-80. All rocks of the volcano belong to medium-K calc-alkaline basalt-basaltic-andesitic series. The rocks of the stratovolcano are high-Al low-Mg (MgO?7%, SiO2~50÷56%) and form the stable trends on all petrological diagrams with increasing K2?, decreasing Al2O3, TiO2, CaO, FeO and MgO from basalts to andesites. The melts of the dike complex are likely the least fractionated members of the same mantle source which is confirms by the same mineral composition. Lavas of the monogenetic cones are high-Mg basalts (MgO>6%, SiO2~50.5÷52.5%). They systematically differ from the stratovolcano samples by mineral composition and by higher MgO and CaO and low FeO, TiO2, Al2O3 and P2O5 at similar SiO2 content. The rocks of Ploskie Sopky volcano are systematically different from stratovolcano Kamen in major elements and mineral composition and thus can not originate from the same mantle source by fractional crystallization. In contrast Kamen and Bezymianny stratovolcanoes form the narrow single geochemical trends, where Bezymianny data points comprise a more silica-rich part of the overall trend. Klyuchevskoy high-Mg cinder cones are similar to cinder cones of Kamen. However, Klyuchevskoy stratovolcano rocks differ in major elements and mineral composition from dikes and stratovolcano of Kamen. Thus, using petrological and mineralogical data we conclude that (1) Kamen and Bezymianny volcanoes have a common source; (2) monogenetic cones, which were erupted at Kamen volcano, belong to the group of high-Mg cones of Klyuchevskoy.

  8. Constraining volcano eruption dynamics with infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Aster, R. C.

    2003-12-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by exploding volcanoes provide an indispensable tool for understanding dynamics of diverse eruptions. Unlike the seismicity generated during eruption, which is a complex superposition of internal and surface source and wave propagation processes, the infrasonic pressure field can be unequivocally associated with the flux rate of gas released at the volcanic vent. Because the atmosphere does not support shear waves, and internal scattering, topographic echoes, site, and weather effects are substantially predictable, it is possible to objectively compare the infrasound, and assess degassing from diverse volcanic systems. With its utility for continuously tracking eruptive activity, even when line-of-sight view to the vent is obscured, infrasound greatly enhances the efficacy of volcano monitoring and interpretation of conduit processes / eruption dynamics. We showcase new results from Erebus, Fuego, Villarrica, and Santiaguito volcanoes to demonstrate the utility of infrasound for recovering quantitative parameters, such as eruption duration, source dimensions and mechanism, and explosive gas release. At Erebus, infrasound can constrain the physical dimension of enormous bubbles, with diameters up to 10 m and containing more than 1000 kg gas, that burst individually and infrequently from the lava lake surface. At Villarrica, longer-duration infrasonic transients reveal the eruptive mechanism to be a succession of gas slugs bursting from the free surface, occurring at 60-90 s intervals and representing a stable long-term mode of degassing. At Fuego, the infrasound associated with vigorous explosions is inferred to result from the fragmentation of a bubble foam layer, which continues for tens of seconds until the gas foam is depleted. And at Santiaguito, large eruptions, which generate low intensity infrasound, suggest a diffuse source region with dimensions comparable to the radiated infrasonic wavelength (vent radii > 100 m). The recorded infrasound from these 4 volcanoes complements our infrasound archives for an additional 6 volcanoes, which encompasses a wide range of eruptive behaviors. Infrasound recorded within a few km of a volcanic vent thus provides an ideal tool for objective comparison of associated degassing.

  9. Headless Debris Flows From Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGimsey, R. G.; Neal, C. A.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wessels, R.; Coombs, M. L.; Wallace, K. L.

    2004-12-01

    Sometime between June 20 and July 15, 2004-and contemporaneous with an increase of seismicity beneath the volcano, and elevated gas emissions-a sudden release of impounded water from the summit area of Mt. Spurr volcano produced about a dozen separate debris flow lobes emanating from crevasses and bergschrunds in the surface ice several hundred meters down the east-southeast flank from the summit. These debris flows were first observed by AVO staff on a July 15 overflight and appeared to represent a single flooding event; subsequent snow cover and limited accessibility have prevented direct investigation of these deposits. Observed from the air, they are dark, elongate lobate deposits, up to several hundred meters long and tens of meters wide, draping the steep (up to ~45 degree) slopes and cascading over and into crevasses. A water-rich phase from the flows continued down slope of the termini of several lobate deposits, eroding linear rills into the snow and ice down slope. We infer that the dark material composing these flows is likely remobilized coarse lapilli from the June 1992 tephra fall produced by an eruption of Crater Peak, a satellite vent of Mt. Spurr located 3.5 km to the south. Between 1 and 2 meters of basaltic andesite tephra fell directly on the Spurr summit during the 1992 eruption. The exact mechanism for sudden release of water-laden remobilized tephra flows from the summit basin is not clear. However, observations in early August, 2004, of an 80 m x 110-m-wide pit in the summit area snow and ice suggest the possibility of a partial roof collapse of a summit meltwater basin, likely associated with subglacial melting due to recent heat flux. Such a collapse could have led to the hydraulic surge of meltwater, and rapid mixing with tephra to produce slurries. These slurries traveled down slope beneath the ice surface to emerge through existing crevasses and other easy points of exit on the steep inclines. Mount Spurr is an ice- and snow covered, Quaternary andesitic volcanic complex, comprising a centrally located dome (or stratocone) in a breached, 5-km-wide, glacier-filled caldera that dissects ancestral Mt. Spurr volcano. The summit of Mt. Spurr is 130 km west of Anchorage, AK and reaches 3,374 m in elevation. The summit dome complex is topographically asymmetric, with a steeper southwest side and a more gradually sloping northeast flank To our knowledge, this is the first time such debris flows have been observed near the summit of Mt. Spurr. However, the existence of ponded water near the summit may not be unique to 2004. A review of historical photographs and descriptions of the Spurr summit area indicates a dynamic environment that responds to complex variations in snowfall accumulation, solar radiation, and geothermal heat flux. Other authors have noted variations in summit snow pack and the ephemeral appearance of a snow-filled depression and possibly a water-filled pit in 1964 aerial photographs of the summit. The formation of these debris flows near the summit of Mt. Spurr in conjunction with elevated seismicity below the summit and the development of a collapse pit in summit ice cap suggest that increasing geothermal heat flux, possibly in combination with above normal temperatures and long periods of clear, sunny weather in the region is responsible.

  10. The Middle East.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Virginia; And Others

    This sixth grade resource unit focuses on Middle East culture as seen through five areas of the social sciences: anthropology-sociology, geography, history, economics, and political science. Among objectives that the student is expected to achieve are the following: 1) given general information on the Middle East through the use of film, visuals,…

  11. East Providence: Aerial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chet Smolski

    1990-01-01

    This photograph shows industrial and commercial developments in East Providence along state highway 114. Just barely visible on the horizon is Narragansett bay. The containers on the bay have since been torn down and the area has largely returned natural growth along the East Bay Bike Path, which was completed in 1992.

  12. Multiple collapses at Mt Meru volcano, Tanzania: remote sensing and field evidences from debris avalanche deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcamp, Audray; Kwelwa, Shimba; Macheyeki, Athanas; Kervyn De Meerendre, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Mt Meru volcano is located in the Northern Tanzanian Divergence Zone where the East African rift splits into several branches. This 4565 m-high stratovolcano overlooks the highly populated city of Arusha and is breached on the east side by a 4x5 km horse-shoe shaped valley that was attributed to landslides associated with lahars deposits (Wilkinson et al., 1986; Dawson, 2008) and a major collapse (Wilkinson et al., 1986; Roberts, 2002; Dawson, 2008). An ash cone is growing up within the collapse scar, with its last eruption occurring in 1910. Remote sensing, detailed field mapping and facies/lithology description allowed the recognition of more than two collapse events originated from the main eastern scar, as well as at least one collapse from an almost buried scar on the North East flank. No evidence of syn-collapse eruption has been observed. The high distance and large area covered by the bigger deposit up to the foot of Kilimanjaro is partly due to local interaction with water, where debris avalanche behaves like a lahar. Mt Meru has been undergoing several phases of destabilisation events during its history and can be considered as still potentially hazardous, especially with the ongoing Ash Cone growth within the scar.

  13. Kilauea's Explosive Past: Understanding Violent Explosions at Hawai'i's most Active Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.; Swanson, D.

    2010-12-01

    A sequence of explosions that occurred from Kilauea caldera around 1790 A.D. includes the most deadly pyroclastic eruptions recorded in the USA. The products, the upper part of the Keanak?ko`i tephra formation, are believed to be responsible for the deaths of a Hawaiian war party on the summit of the volcano. Little is known about the parent eruptions or even how many explosions there were in or around 1790; also, no hazard maps exist at Kilauea for this type of violent yet short-lived activity, with few clear precursors. The c. 1790 deposits show both marked sectoral changes and also, on a finer length scale, rapid lateral variability over distances of less than 1 kilometer. In the southern sector, they form a series of striking alternating coarse-grained beds, cross-bedded pyroclastic density current deposits (pdc) and accretionary-lapilli-bearing fine ashes. This study focuses primarily on the coarse-grained units, which are largely absent west and east of the caldera. Through characterization of the beds in the field and analysis of grain size and dispersal data, the size and intensity of these eruptions have been defined. The coarse-grained units include both pyroclastic fall and pdc deposits. Unusually, only bedding characteristics, (and not grain size or dispersal) unequivocally distinguish between these two transport processes. This study offers a clearer, more quantitative picture of the c. 1790 events and advances the understanding of how explosive eruptions can occur at an otherwise gently effusive volcano. It also constrains the dynamics associated with these events and improves volcanic hazard mitigation at Kilauea and shield volcanoes worldwide.

  14. Volcano geodesy: The search for magma reservoirs and the formation of eruptive vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.; Dzurisin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Routine geodetic measurements are made at only a few dozen of the world's 600 or so active volcanoes, even though these measurements have proven to be a reliable precursor of eruptions. The pattern and rate of surface displacement reveal the depth and rate of pressure increase within shallow magma reservoirs. This process has been demonstrated clearly at Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Long Valley caldera, California; Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy; Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea; and Aira caldera and nearby Sakurajima, Japan. Slower and lesser amounts of surface displacement at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming, are attributed to changes in a hydrothermal system that overlies a crustal magma body. The vertical and horizontal dimensions of eruptive fissures, as well as the amount of widening, have been determined at Kilauea, Hawaii; Etna, Italy; Tolbachik, Kamchatka; Krafla, Iceland; and Asal-Ghoubbet, Djibouti, the last a segment of the East Africa Rift Zone. Continuously recording instruments, such as tiltmeters, extensometers, and dilatometers, have recorded horizontal and upward growth of eruptive fissures, which grew at rates of hundreds of meters per hour, at Kilauea; Izu-Oshima, Japan; Teishi Knoll seamount, Japan; and Piton de la Fournaise, Re??union Island. In addition, such instruments have recorded the hour or less of slight ground movement that preceded small explosive eruptions at Sakurajima and presumed sudden gas emissions at Galeras, Colombia. The use of satellite geodesy, in particular the Global Positioning System, offers the possibility of revealing changes in surface strain both local to a volcano and over a broad region that includes the volcano.

  15. Geomorphologic Analysis of Drainage Basins in Damavand Volcano Cone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareinejad, M.

    2011-12-01

    Damavand volcanic cone is located in the center of the Alborz chain, in the southern Caspian Sea in Iran. Damavand is a dormant volcano in Iran. It is not only the country's highest peak but also the highest mountain on the Middle East; its elevation is 5619 m. The main purpose of this paper is recognition and appraisement of drainage basins in Damavand cone from geomorphic point of view. Water causes erosion in nature in different forms and creates diverse forms on the earth surface depending on the manner of its appearance in nature. Although water is itself a former factor, it flows under morphological effect of earth surface. The difference of earth surface topography and as a result water movement on it, cause the formation of sub-basins. Identification of region drainage basins is considered as one of the requirements for Damavand cone morphometric. Thereupon, five drainage basins were identified in this research by relying on main criteria including topographic contours with 10 m intervals, drainage system, DEM map, slope map, aspect map and satellite images. (Fig 1) Area, perimeter, height classification for classifying morphological landforms in different levels, hypsometric calculations, drainage density, etc. were then calculated by using ArcGIS software. (Table 1) Damavand cone, with a height more than 5,000 meters from the sea surface, has very hard pass slopes and our purpose in this paper is to identify the effect of drainage basins conditions in the region on erosion and the formation of morphological landforms by using SPOT, ASTER, satellite images as well as papering of data in GIS environment.

  16. Active monitoring at an active volcano: amplitude-distance dependence of ACROSS at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Koshun; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Kunitomo, Takahiro; Michishita, Tsuyoshi; Ikuta, Ryoya; Iguchi, Masato

    2014-12-01

    First testing of volcanic activity monitoring with a system of continuously operatable seismic sources, named ACROSS, was started at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan. Two vibrators were deployed on the northwestern flank of the volcano, with a distance of 3.6 km from the main crater. We successfully completed the testing of continuous operation from 12 June to 18 September 2012, with a single frequency at 10.01 Hz and frequency modulation from 10 to 15 Hz. The signal was detected even at a station that is 28 km from the source, establishing the amplitude decay relation as a function of distance in the region in and around Sakurajima Volcano. We compare the observed amplitude decay with the prediction that was made before the deployment as a feasible study. In the prediction, we used the existing datasets by an explosion experiment in Sakurajima and the distance-dependent amplitude decay model that was established for the ACROSS source in the Tokai region. The predicted amplitude in Sakurajima is systematically smaller than that actually observed, but the dependence on distance is consistent with the observation. On the basis of the comparison of the noise level in Sakurajima Volcano, only 1-day stacking of data is necessary to reduce the noise to the level that is comparable to the signal level at the stations in the island.

  17. Receiver Function Analyses of Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia and Lastarria/Cordon Del Azufre Volcanoes, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcfarlin, H. L.; Christensen, D. H.; Thompson, G.; McNutt, S. R.; Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; West, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Uturuncu Volcano and a zone between Lastarria and Cordon del Azufre Volcanoes (also calledLazufre), have seen much attention lately because of significant and rapid inflation of one to twocentimeters per year over large areas. Uturuncu is located near the Bolivian-Chilean border, andLazufre is located near the Chilean-Argentine border. The PLUTONS Project deployed 28broadband seismic stations around Uturuncu Volcano, from April 2009 to Octobor 2012, and alsodeployed 9 stations around Lastarria and Cordon del Azufre volcanoes, from November, 2011 toApril 2013. Teleseismic receiver functions were generated using the time-domain iterativedeconvolution algorithm of Ligorria and Ammon (1999) for each volcanic area. These receiverfunctions were used to better constrain the depths of magma bodies under Uturuncu and Lazufre,as well as the ultra low velocity layer within the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (APMB). Thelow velocity zone under Uturuncu is shown to have a top around 10 km depth b.s.l and isgenerally around 20 km thick with regional variations. Tomographic inversion shows a well resolved,near vertical, high Vp/Vs anomaly directly beneath Uturuncu that correlates well with adisruption in the receiver function results; which is inferred to be a magmatic intrusion causing alocal thickening of the APMB. Preliminary results at Lazufre show the top of a low velocityzone around 5-10 km b.s.l with a thickness of 15-30 km.

  18. Volcano Monitor: Autonomous Triggering of In-Situ Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Davies, Ashley; Tran, Daniel Q.; Boudreau, Kate; Cecava, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    In-situ sensors near volcanoes would be alerted by the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) craft to take more frequent data readings. This project involves developing a sulfur-dioxide-sensing volcano monitor that will be able to transmit its readings through an Iridium modem.

  19. Global data collection and the surveillance of active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    Data relay systems on existing earth-orbiting satellites provide an inexpensive way to collect environmental data from numerous remote sites around the world. This technology could be used effectively for fundamental monitoring of most of the world's active volcanoes. Such global monitoring would focus attention on the most dangerous volcanoes that are likely to significantly impact the geosphere and the biosphere. ?? 1990.

  20. The chemical and hydrologic structure of PO& Volcano, Costa Rica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary L. Rowe Jr; Susan L. Brantley; Jose F. Fernandezb; Andrea Borgia

    1995-01-01

    Comparison of the chemical characteristics of spring and river water draining the flanks of PoQ Volcano, Costa Rica indicates that acid chloride sulfate springs of the northwestern flank of the volcano are derived by leakage and mixing of acid brines formed in the summit hydrothermal system with dilute flank groundwater. Acid chloride sulfate waters of the Rio Agrio drainage basin

  1. Methane emission from mud volcanoes in eastern Azerbaijan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Etiope; A. Feyzullayev; C. L. Baciu; A. V. Milkov

    2004-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux to the atmosphere was measured from gas vents and, for the first time, from soil microseepage at four quiescent mud volcanoes and one ``everlasting fire'' in eastern Azerbaijan. Mud volcanoes show different activity of venting craters, gryphons, and bubbling pools, with CH4 fluxes ranging from less than one to hundreds of tons per year. Microseepage CH4 flux

  2. Resistivity Changes of Sakurajima Volcano by Magnetotelluric Continuous Observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Aizawa; W. Kanda; Y. Ogawa; M. Iguchi; A. Yokoo

    2009-01-01

    In order to predict volcano eruptions and to contribute to hazard mitigation, monitoring of subsurface magma movement is the most essential approach. Recent study of time change of seismic structure (4D tomography) in Etna volcano clearly imaged time change of Vp\\/Vs structure, [Patanè et al., 2006]. They showed that structure changes not only on the location of magma intrusion but

  3. Broadband seismic observation at the Sakurajima Volcano, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hitoshi Kawakatsu; Takao Ohrninato; Hisao Ito; Yasuto Kuwahara; Takashi Kato; Kayoko Tsuruga; Satoru Honda; Kiyoshi Yomogida

    1992-01-01

    We installed a portable broadband seismometer (Streckeisen STS-2) at the Sakurajima volcano, which has been very active in the recent years. The recorded seismograms show a wide variety (both in temporal and spectral contents) of seismic events, from explosions to tremors, and exhibit the importance of such broadband seismometry at volcanos. We present examples of seismograms to show the potential

  4. Preliminary hyperspectral volcano observations using Airborne Radiative Spectral Scanner (ARTS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Jitsufuchi

    2008-01-01

    Airborne-imaging spectral systems can often efficiently identify volcanic phenomena that are difficult to detect by satellite imagery. Since 1990, the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has been developing our original airborne-imaging spectral systems for volcano observations. In 2006, we developed a new airborne hyperspectral sensor, the Airborne Radiative Transfer Spectral Scanner (ARTS), for hyperspectral volcano

  5. Broadband seismic observation at the Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hitoshi Kawakatsu; Takao Ohminato; Hisao Ito; Yasuto Kuwahara; Takashi Kato; Kayoko Tsuruga; Satoru Honda; Kiyoshi Yomogida

    1992-01-01

    We installed a portable broadband seismometer (Streckeisen STS-2) at the Sakurajima volcano, which has been very active in the recent years. The recorded seismograms show a wide variety (both in temporal and spectral contents) of seismic events, from explosions to tremors, and exhibit the importance of such broadband seismometry at volcanos. We present examples of seismograms to show the potential

  6. Rapid Deformation of the South Flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Owen; Paul Segall; Jeff Freymueller; Asta Miklius; Roger Denlinger; Thora Arnadottir; Maurice Sako; Roland Burgmann

    1995-01-01

    The south flank of Kilauea volcano has experienced two large [magnitude (M) 7.2 and M 6.1] earthquakes in the past two decades. Global Positioning System measurements conducted between 1990 and 1993 reveal seaward displacements of Kilauea's central south flank at rates of up to about 10 centimeters per year. In contrast, the northern side of the volcano and the distal

  7. Mercury and halogen emissions from Masaya and Telica volcanoes, Nicaragua

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. I. Witt; T. A. Mather; D. M. Pyle; A. Aiuppa; E. Bagnato; V. I. Tsanev

    2008-01-01

    We report measurements of Hg, SO2, and halogens (HCl, HBr, HI) in volcanic gases from Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, and gaseous SO2 and halogens from Telica volcano, Nicaragua. Mercury measurements were made with a Lumex 915+ portable mercury vapor analyzer and gold traps, while halogens, CO2 and S species were monitored with a portable multi gas sensor and filter packs. Lumex

  8. Volcano Ecology: Disturbance characteristics and assembly of biological communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volcanic eruptions are powerful expressions of Earth’s geophysical forces which have shaped and influenced ecological systems since the earliest days of life. The study of the interactions of volcanoes and ecosystems, termed volcano ecology, focuses on the ecological responses of organisms and biolo...

  9. Caldera collapse during the 2000 eruption of Miyakejima Volcano, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Geshi; T. Shimano; T. Chiba; S. Nakada

    2002-01-01

    A collapsed caldera, 1.6 km in diameter and 450 m in depth, was formed at the summit of Miyakejima Volcano during the 2000 eruption. The collapsed caldera appeared on 8 July, with a minor phreatic eruption, 12 days after seismic activity and magma intrusion occurred northwest of the volcano. Growth of the caldera took from 8 July to the middle

  10. Spreading volcanoes: the importance of strike-slip faults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. van Wyk de Vries; L. Wooller; E. Checci

    2003-01-01

    We know that volcanoes sitting on ductile substrata spread and sag. We also know that summit extension and basal compression have been observed in the field and in the laboratory. Many volcanoes that should have spreading features, because they stand on ductile rock, have summit grabens, but few have basal thrusts. This has caused problems in discussing the tectonics of

  11. Toothpaste lava from the Barren Island volcano (Andaman Sea)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hetu C. Sheth; Jyotiranjan S. Ray; Alok Kumar; Rajneesh Bhutani; Neeraj Awasthi

    2011-01-01

    Toothpaste lava is a basaltic lava flow type transitional between pahoehoe and aa and has been described from Paricutin, Kilauea and Etna volcanoes. Here we describe a spectacular example of toothpaste lava, forming part of a recent (possibly 1994–95) aa flow on the active volcano of Barren Island (Andaman Sea). This flow of subalkalic basalt shows abundant squeeze-ups of viscous

  12. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. 7.25 Section 7.25 Parks...REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.25 Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. (a) Fishing —(1)...

  13. Eruptions of Hawaiian Volcanoes: Past, Present, and Future

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Tilling

    The origin of the Hawaiian Islands, recorded eruptions, and eruption patterns are discussed in this United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The on-line book also covers volcano monitoring and research, landforms and structures, hazards and benefits, and a discussion of Loihi, Hawaii's newest volcano.

  14. Analysis and interpretation of volcano deformation in Alaska: Studies from Okmok and Mt. Veniaminof volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Thomas J.

    Four studies focus on the deformation at Okmok Volcano, the Alaska Peninsula and Mt. Veniaminof. The main focus of the thesis is the volcano deformation at Okmok Volcano and Mt. Veniaminof, but also includes an investigation of the tectonic related compression of the Alaska Peninsula. The complete data set of GPS observations at Okmok Volcano are investigated with the Unscented Kalman Filter time series analysis method. The technique is shown to be useful for inverting geodetic data for time dependent non-linear model parameters. The GPS record at Okmok from 2000 to mid 2007 shows distinct inflation pulses which have several months duration. The inflation is interpreted as magma accumulation in a shallow reservoir under the caldera center and approximately 2.51cm below sea level. The location determined for the magma reservoir agrees with estimates determined by other geodetic techniques. Smaller deflation signals in the Okmok record appear following the inflation pulses. A degassing model is proposed to explain the deflation. Petrologic observations from lava erupted in 1997 provide an estimate for the volatile content of the magma. The solution model VolatileCalc is used to determine the amount of volatiles in the gas phase. Degassing can explain the deflation, but only under certain circumstances. The magma chamber must have a radius between ˜1 and 21cm and the intruding magma must have less than approximately 500ppm CO2 . At Mt. Veniaminof the deformation signal is dominated by compression caused by the convergence of the Pacific and North American Plates. A subduction model is created to account for the site velocities. A network of GPS benchmarks along the Alaska Peninsula is used to infer the amount of coupling along the mega-thrust. A transition from high to low coupling near the Shumagin Islands has important implications for the seismogenic potential of this section of the fault. The Shumagin segment likely raptures in more frequent smaller magnitude quakes. The tectonic study provides a useful backdrop to examine the volcano deformation at Mt. Veniaminof. After being corrected for tectonic motion the sites velocities indicate inflation at the volcano. The deformation is interpreted as pressurization occurring beneath the volcano associated with eruptive activity in 2005.

  15. Volcano monitoring with an infrared camera: first insights from Villarrica Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas Sotomayor, Florencia; Amigo Ramos, Alvaro; Velasquez Vargas, Gabriela; Medina, Roxana; Thomas, Helen; Prata, Fred; Geoffroy, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    This contribution focuses on the first trials of the, almost 24/7 monitoring of Villarrica volcano with an infrared camera. Results must be compared with other SO2 remote sensing instruments such as DOAS and UV-camera, for the ''day'' measurements. Infrared remote sensing of volcanic emissions is a fast and safe method to obtain gas abundances in volcanic plumes, in particular when the access to the vent is difficult, during volcanic crisis and at night time. In recent years, a ground-based infrared camera (Nicair) has been developed by Nicarnica Aviation, which quantifies SO2 and ash on volcanic plumes, based on the infrared radiance at specific wavelengths through the application of filters. Three Nicair1 (first model) have been acquired by the Geological Survey of Chile in order to study degassing of active volcanoes. Several trials with the instruments have been performed in northern Chilean volcanoes, and have proven that the intervals of retrieved SO2 concentration and fluxes are as expected. Measurements were also performed at Villarrica volcano, and a location to install a ''fixed'' camera, at 8km from the crater, was discovered here. It is a coffee house with electrical power, wifi network, polite and committed owners and a full view of the volcano summit. The first measurements are being made and processed in order to have full day and week of SO2 emissions, analyze data transfer and storage, improve the remote control of the instrument and notebook in case of breakdown, web-cam/GoPro support, and the goal of the project: which is to implement a fixed station to monitor and study the Villarrica volcano with a Nicair1 integrating and comparing these results with other remote sensing instruments. This works also looks upon the strengthen of bonds with the community by developing teaching material and giving talks to communicate volcanic hazards and other geoscience topics to the people who live "just around the corner" from one of the most active volcanoes in Chile.

  16. SO2 camera measurements at Lastarria volcano and Lascar volcano in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Dinger, Florian; Klein, Angelika; Kuhn, Jonas; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The SO2 camera is a remote-sensing technique that measures volcanic SO2 emissions via the strong SO2 absorption structures in the UV using scattered solar radiation as a light source. The 2D-imagery (usually recorded with a frame rate of up to 1 Hz) allows new insights into degassing processes of volcanoes. Besides the large advantage of high frequency sampling the spatial resolution allows to investigate SO2 emissions from individual fumaroles and not only the total SO2 emission flux of a volcano, which is often dominated by the volcanic plume. Here we present SO2 camera measurements that were made during the CCVG workshop in Chile in November 2014. Measurements were performed at Lastarria volcano, a 5700 m high stratovolcano and Lascar volcano, a 5600 m high stratovolcano both in northern Chile on 21 - 22 November, 2014 and on 26 - 27 November, 2014, respectively. At both volcanoes measurements were conducted from a distance of roughly 6-7 km under close to ideal conditions (low solar zenith angle, a very dry and cloudless atmosphere and an only slightly condensed plume). However, determination of absolute SO2 emission rates proves challenging as part of the volcanic plume hovered close to the ground. The volcanic plume therefore is in front of the mountain in our camera images. An SO2 camera system consisting of a UV sensitive CCD and two UV band-pass filters (centered at 315 nm and 330 nm) was used. The two band-pass filters are installed in a rotating wheel and images are taken with both filter sequentially. The instrument used a CCD with 1024 x 1024 pixels and an imaging area of 13.3 mm x 13.3 mm. In combination with the focal length of 32 mm this results in a field-of-view of 25° x 25°. The calibration of the instrument was performed with help of a DOAS instrument that is co-aligned with the SO2 camera. We will present images and SO2 emission rates from both volcanoes. At Lastarria gases are emitted from three different fumarole fields and we will attempt to investigate the degassing behavior of the individual fumaroles. Lascar volcano only had a very weak plume originating from the active central crater with maximum SO2 column densities of only up to 5 × 1017[molecules/cm2] during our measurements. These low SO2 column densities in combination with the almost ideal measurements conditions will be used to assess the detection limit of our current SO2 camera system.

  17. Investigations of Anomalous Earthquakes at Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, Ashley Elizabeth

    This dissertation investigates the link between volcanic unrest and the occurrence of moderate-to-large earthquakes with a specific type of focal mechanism. Vertical compensated-linear-vector-dipole (vertical-CLVD) earthquakes have vertical pressure or tension axes and seismic radiation patterns that are inconsistent with the double-couple model of slip on a planar fault. Prior to this work, moderate-to-large vertical-CLVD earthquakes were known to be geographically associated with volcanic centers, and vertical-CLVD earthquakes were linked to a tsunami in the Izu-Bonin volcanic arc and a subglacial fissure eruption in Iceland. Vertical-CLVD earthquakes are some of the largest and most anomalous earthquakes to occur in volcanic systems, yet their physical mechanisms remain controversial largely due to the small number of observations. Five vertical-CLVD earthquakes with vertical pressure axes are identified near Nyiragongo volcano in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Three earthquakes occur within days of a fissure eruption at Nyiragongo, and two occur several years later in association with the refilling of the lava lake in the summit crater of the volcano. Detailed study of these events shows that the earthquakes have slower source processes than tectonic earthquakes with similar magnitudes and locations. All five earthquakes are interpreted as resulting from slip on inward-dipping ring-fault structures located above deflating shallow magma chambers. The Nyiragongo study supports the interpretation that vertical-CLVD earthquakes may be causally related to dynamic physical processes occurring inside the edifices or magmatic plumbing systems of active volcanoes. Two seismicity catalogs from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) Project are used to search for further examples of shallow earthquakes with robust vertical-CLVD focal mechanisms. CMT solutions for approximately 400 target earthquakes are calculated and 86 vertical-CLVD earthquakes are identified near active volcanoes. Together with the Nyiragongo study, this work increases the number of well-studied vertical-CLVD earthquakes from 14 to 101. Vertical-CLVD earthquakes have focal depths in the upper ˜10 km of the Earth's crust, and ˜80% have centroid locations within 30 km of an active volcanic center. Vertical-CLVD earthquakes are observed near several different types of volcanoes in a variety of geographic and tectonic settings, but most vertical-CLVD earthquakes are observed near basaltic-to-andesitic stratovolcanoes and submarine volcanoes in subduction zones. Vertical-CLVD earthquakes are linked to tsunamis, volcanic earthquake swarms, effusive and explosive eruptions, and caldera collapse, and approximately 70% are associated with documented volcanic eruptions or episodes of volcanic unrest. Those events with vertical pressure axes typically occur after volcanic eruptions initiate, whereas events with vertical tension axes commonly occur before the start of volcanic unrest. Both types of vertical-CLVD earthquakes have longer source durations than tectonic earthquakes of the same magnitude. The isotropic and pure vertical-CLVD components of the moment tensor cannot be independently resolved using our long-period seismic dataset. As a result, several physical mechanisms can explain the retrieved deviatoric vertical-CLVD moment tensors, including dip-slip motion on ring faults, volume exchange between two reservoirs, the opening and closing of tensile cracks, and volumetric sources. An evaluation of these mechanisms is performed using constraints obtained from detailed studies of individual vertical-CLVD earthquakes. Although no single physical mechanism can explain all of the characteristics of vertical-CLVD earthquakes, a ring-faulting model consisting of slip on inward- or outward-dipping ring faults triggered by the inflation or deflation of a shallow magma chamber can account for their seismic radiation patterns and source durations, as well as their temporal relationships with volcanic unrest. The observation that most vertical-CLVD earthquakes a

  18. Imaging magma plumbing beneath Askja volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Tim; White, Robert S.

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes during repose periods are not commonly monitored by dense instrumentation networks and so activity during periods of unrest is difficult to put in context. We have operated a dense seismic network of 3-component, broadband instruments around Askja, a large central volcano in the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland, since 2006. Askja last erupted in 1961, with a relatively small basaltic lava flow. Since 1975 the central caldera has been subsiding and there has been no indication of volcanic activity. Despite this, Askja has been one of the more seismically active volcanoes in Iceland. The majority of these events are due to an extensive geothermal area within the caldera and tectonically induced earthquakes to the northeast which are not related to the magma plumbing system. More intriguing are the less numerous deeper earthquakes at 12-24km depth, situated in three distinct areas within the volcanic system. These earthquakes often show a frequency content which is lower than the shallower activity, but they still show strong P and S wave arrivals indicative of brittle failure, despite their location being well below the brittle-ductile boundary, which, in Askja is ~7km bsl. These earthquakes indicate the presence of melt moving or degassing at depth while the volcano is not inflating, as only high strain rates or increased pore fluid pressures would cause brittle fracture in what is normally an aseismic region in the ductile zone. The lower frequency content must be the result of a slower source time function as earthquakes which are both high frequency and low frequency come from the same cluster, thereby discounting a highly attenuating lower crust. To image the plumbing system beneath Askja, local and regional earthquakes have been used as sources to solve for the velocity structure beneath the volcano. Travel-time tables were created using a finite difference technique and the residuals were used to solve simultaneously for both the earthquake locations and velocity structure. The 2014-15 Bárðarbunga dyke intrusion has provided a 45 km long, distributed source of large earthquakes which are well located and provide accurate arrival time picks. Together with long-term background seismicity these provide excellent illumination of the Askja volcano from all directions. We find a pronounced low-velocity anomaly beneath the caldera at a depth of ~7 km. The anomaly is ~10% slower than the initial best fitting 1D model and has a Vp/Vs ratio higher than the surrounding crust, suggesting the presence of increased temperature or partial melt. The body is unlikely to be entirely melt as S-waves are still detected at stations directly above the anomaly. This low-velocity body is slightly deeper than the depth range suggested by InSAR and GPS studies of a deflating source beneath Askja. Beneath the main low-velocity zone a region of reduced velocities extends into the lower crust and is coincident with deep seismicity. This is suggestive of a high temperature channel into the lower crust which could be a pathway for melt rising from the mantle.

  19. Infrasound from the 2007 fissure eruptions of K?lauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fee, D.; Garces, M.; Orr, T.; Poland, M.

    2011-01-01

    Varied acoustic signals were recorded at K?lauea Volcano in mid-2007, coincident with dramatic changes in the volcano's activity. Prior to this time period, Pu'u '?'? crater produced near-continuous infrasonic tremor and was the primary source of degassing and lava effusion at K?lauea. Collapse and draining of Pu'u '?'? crater in mid-June produced impulsive infrasonic signals and fluctuations in infrasonic tremor. Fissure eruptions on 19 June and 21 July were clearly located spatially and temporally using infrasound arrays. The 19 June eruption from a fissure approximately mid-way between K?lauea's summit and Pu'u 'O'o produced infrasound for ~30 minutes-the only observed geophysical signal associated with the fissure opening. The infrasound signal from the 21 July eruption just east of Pu'u '?'? shows a clear azimuthal progression over time, indicative of fissure propagation over 12.9 hours. The total fissure propagation rate is relatively slow at 164 m/hr, although the fissure system ruptured discontinuously. Individual fissure rupture times are estimated using the acoustic data combined with visual observations.

  20. Temporal changes in electrical resistivity at Sakurajima volcano from continuous magnetotelluric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Koki; Kanda, Wataru; Ogawa, Yasuo; Iguchi, Masato; Yokoo, Akihiko; Yakiwara, Hiroshi; Sugano, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Continuous magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were conducted from May 2008 to July 2009 at Sakurajima, one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. Two observation sites were established at locations 3.3 km east and 3 km west-northwest of the summit crater. At both observation sites, the high-quality component of the impedance tensor (Zyx) showed variations in apparent resistivity of approximately ± 20% and phase change of ± 2°, which continued for 20-180 days in the frequency range between 320 and 4 Hz. The start of the period of changes in apparent resistivity approximately coincided with the start of uplift in the direction of the summit crater, as observed by a tiltmeter, which is one of the most reliable pieces of equipment with which to detect magma intrusion beneath a volcano. A 2D inversion of MT impedance suggests that the resistivity change occurred at a depth around sea level. One of the possible implications of the present finding is that the degassed volatiles migrated not only vertically through the conduit but also laterally through a fracture network, mixing with shallow groundwater beneath sea level and thereby causing the observed resistivity change.

  1. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 1979-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.; Stokes, J.B.; Casadevall, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Casadevall and others, 1987; Greenland and others, 1985; Elias and others, 1993; Elias and Sutton, 1996). The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of Kilauea SO2 emission rate data from 1979 through 1997 with ancillary meteorological data (wind speed and wind direction). We have included measurements previously reported by Casadevall and others (1987) for completeness and to improve the usefulness of this current database compilation. Kilauea releases SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and rift zones (fig. 1). From 1979 through 1982, vehicle-based COSPEC measurements made within the summit caldera were adequate to quantify most of the SO2 emitted from the volcano. Beginning in 1983, the focus of SO2 release shifted from the summit to the east rift zone (ERZ) eruption site at Pu`u `O`o and, later, Kupaianaha. Since 1984, the Kilauea gas measurement effort has been augmented with intermittent airborne and tripod-based surveys made near the ERZ eruption site. In addition, beginning in 1992 vehicle-based measurements have been made along a section of Chain of Craters Road approximately 9 km downwind of the eruption site. These several types of COSPEC measurements continue to the present.

  2. Geologic map of Oldonyo Lengai (Oldoinyo Lengai) Volcano and surroundings, Arusha Region, United Republic of Tanzania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Magigita, Masota M.; Kwelwa, Shimba

    2013-01-01

    The geology of Oldonyo Lengai volcano and the southernmost Lake Natron basin, Tanzania, is presented on this geologic map at scale 1:50,000. The map sheet can be downloaded in pdf format for online viewing or ready to print (48 inches by 36 inches). A 65-page explanatory pamphlet describes the geologic history of the area. Its goal is to place the new findings into the framework of previous investigations while highlighting gaps in knowledge. In this way questions are raised and challenges proposed to future workers. The southernmost Lake Natron basin is located along the East African rift zone in northern Tanzania. Exposed strata provide a history of volcanism, sedimentation, and faulting that spans 2 million years. It is here where Oldonyo Lengai, Tanzania’s most active volcano of the past several thousand years, built its edifice. Six new radiometric ages, by the 40Ar/39Ar method, and 48 new geochemical analyses from Oldonyo Lengai and surrounding volcanic features deepen our understanding of the area. Those who prefer the convenience and access offered by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) may download an electronic database, suitable for most GIS software applications. The GIS database is in a Transverse Mercator projection, zone 36, New (1960) Arc datum. The database includes layers for hypsography (topography), hydrography, and infrastructure such as roads and trails.

  3. Moderate-magnitude earthquakes induced by magma reservoir inflation at K?lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wauthier, Christelle; Roman, Diana C.; Poland, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Although volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes often occur in response to magma intrusion, it is rare for them to have magnitudes larger than ~M4. On 24 May 2007, two shallow M4+ earthquakes occurred beneath the upper part of the east rift zone of K?lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. An integrated analysis of geodetic, seismic, and field data, together with Coulomb stress modeling, demonstrates that the earthquakes occurred due to strike-slip motion on pre-existing faults that bound K?lauea Caldera to the southeast and that the pressurization of K?lauea's summit magma system may have been sufficient to promote faulting. For the first time, we infer a plausible origin to generate rare moderate-magnitude VTs at K?lauea by reactivation of suitably oriented pre-existing caldera-bounding faults. Rare moderate- to large-magnitude VTs at K?lauea and other volcanoes can therefore result from reactivation of existing fault planes due to stresses induced by magmatic processes.

  4. Preeruptive inflation and surface interferometric coherence characteristics revealed by satellite radar interferometry at Makushin Volcano, Alaska: 1993-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Power, J.A.; McConnell, V.S.; Wicks, C., Jr.; Dzurisin, D.

    2002-01-01

    Pilot reports in January 1995 and geologic field observations from the summer of 1996 indicate that a relatively small explosive eruption of Makushin, one of the more frequently active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc of Alaska, occured on 30 January 1995. Several independent radar interferograms that each span the time period from October 1993 to September 1995 show evidence of ???7 cm of uplift centered on the volcano's east flank, which we interpret as preeruptive inflation of a ???7-km-deep magma source (??V = 0.022 km3). Subsequent interferograms for 1995-2000, a period that included no reported eruptive activity, show no evidence of additional ground deformation. Interferometric coherence at C band is found to persist for 3 years or more on lava flow and other rocky surfaces covered with short grass and sparsely distributed tall grass and for at least 1 year on most pyroclastic deposits. On lava flow and rocky surfaces with dense tall grass and on alluvium, coherence lasts for a few months. Snow and ice surfaces lose coherence within a few days. This extended timeframe of coherence over a variety of surface materials makes C band radar interferometry an effective tool for studying volcano deformation in Alaska and other similar high-latitude regions.

  5. Mud Volcanoes of Trinidad as Astrobiological Analogs for Martian Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Beckles, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    Eleven onshore mud volcanoes in the southern region of Trinidad have been studied as analog habitats for possible microbial life on Mars. The profiles of the 11 mud volcanoes are presented in terms of their physical, chemical, mineralogical, and soil properties. The mud volcanoes sampled all emitted methane gas consistently at 3% volume. The average pH for the mud volcanic soil was 7.98. The average Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) was found to be 2.16 kg/mol, and the average Percentage Water Content was 34.5%. Samples from three of the volcanoes, (i) Digity; (ii) Piparo and (iii) Devil’s Woodyard were used to culture bacterial colonies under anaerobic conditions indicating possible presence of methanogenic microorganisms. The Trinidad mud volcanoes can serve as analogs for the Martian environment due to similar geological features found extensively on Mars in Acidalia Planitia and the Arabia Terra region. PMID:25370529

  6. Magma degassing triggered by static decompression at K?lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Jeff, Sutton A.; Gerlach, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    During mid-June 2007, the summit of K?lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, deflated rapidly as magma drained from the subsurface to feed an east rift zone intrusion and eruption. Coincident with the deflation, summit SO2 emission rates rose by a factor of four before decaying to background levels over several weeks. We propose that SO2 release was triggered by static decompression caused by magma withdrawal from K?lauea's shallow summit reservoir. Models of the deflation suggest a pressure drop of 0.5–3 MPa, which is sufficient to trigger exsolution of the observed excess SO2 from a relatively small volume of magma at the modeled source depth beneath K?lauea's summit. Static decompression may also explain other episodes of deflation accompanied by heightened gas emission, including the precursory phases of K?lauea's 2008 summit eruption. Hazards associated with unexpected volcanic gas emission argue for increased awareness of magma reservoir pressure fluctuations.

  7. Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mount St. Helens Volcano (46.0N, 122.0W) and its blast zone can be seen in this northeast looking infrared view. Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams can also be seen in the near area. The Columbia River can be seen at the bottom of the view. When Mt. St. Helens erupted on 18 May 80, the top 1300 ft. disappeared within minutes. The blast area covered an area of more than 150 sq. miles and sent thousands of tons of ash into the upper atmosphere.

  8. Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta; Wilson, J. David; Okubo, Paul G.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Segall, Paul; Brooks, Benjamin; Foster, James; Wolfe, Cecily; Syracuse, Ellen; Thurbe, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Early in the morning of 1 February 2010 (UTC; early afternoon 31 January 2010 local time), continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt instruments detected a slow slip event (SSE) on the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The SSE lasted at least 36 hours and resulted in a maximum of about 3 centimeters of seaward displacement. About 10 hours after the start of the slip, a flurry of small earthquakes began (Figure 1) in an area of the south flank recognized as having been seismically active during past SSEs [Wolfe et al., 2007], suggesting that the February earthquakes were triggered by stress associated with slip [Segall et al., 2006].

  9. Volcano and Hydrologic Hazards, Features, and Terminology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web site is a good place to start for anyone seeking information on the geology and management of natural hazards phenomena related to volcanoes and hydrologic and geothermal processes. Some information is included on landslides, earthquakes, faults, and tsunamis. In addition to a brief definition of the terms, the site provides background information on related terms; maps, graphics and images; items of interest - reports and case studies; and additional U. S. Geological Survey publications, abstracts, and fact sheets. Web sites of other agencies and other regional or global organizations responsible for monitoring and managing natural hazards are linked.

  10. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory 1956 Quarterly Administrative Reports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakata, Jennifer S., (compiler)

    2007-01-01

    The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Summaries have been published in the current format since 1956. The Quarterly Summaries (1956 through 1973) and the Annual Summaries (1974 through 1985) were originally published as Administrative Reports. These reports have been compiled and published as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports. The quarterly reports have been combined and published as one annual summary. All the summaries from 1956 to the present are now available as .pdf files at http://www.usgs.gov/pubprod. This report consists of four parts.

  11. Galactic Super-volcano in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A galactic "super-volcano" in the massive galaxy M87 is erupting and blasting gas outwards, as witnessed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NSF's Very Large Array. The cosmic volcano is being driven by a giant black hole in the galaxy's center and preventing hundreds of millions of new stars from forming. Astronomers studying this black hole and its effects have been struck by the remarkable similarities between it and a volcano in Iceland that made headlines earlier this year. At a distance of about 50 million light years, M87 is relatively close to Earth and lies at the center of the Virgo cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies. M87's location, coupled with long observations over Chandra's lifetime, has made it an excellent subject for investigations of how a massive black hole impacts its environment. "Our results show in great detail that supermassive black holes have a surprisingly good control over the evolution of the galaxies in which they live," said Norbert Werner of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, who led one of two papers describing the study. "And it doesn't stop there. The black hole's reach extends ever farther into the entire cluster, similar to how one small volcano can affect practically an entire hemisphere on Earth." The cluster surrounding M87 is filled with hot gas glowing in X-ray light, which is detected by Chandra. As this gas cools, it can fall toward the galaxy's center where it should continue to cool even faster and form new stars. However, radio observations with the Very Large Array suggest that in M87 jets of very energetic particles produced by the black hole interrupt this process. These jets lift up the relatively cool gas near the center of the galaxy and produce shock waves in the galaxy's atmosphere because of their supersonic speed. The scientists involved in this research have found the interaction of this cosmic "eruption" with the galaxy's environment to be very similar to that of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano, which forced much of Europe to close its airports earlier this year. With Eyjafjallajokull, pockets of hot gas blasted through the surface of the lava, generating shock waves that can be seen passing through the grey smoke of the volcano. The hot gas then rises up in the atmosphere, dragging the dark ash with it. This process can be seen in a movie of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano where the shock waves propagating in the smoke are followed by the rise of dark ash clouds into the atmosphere. In the analogy with Eyjafjallajokull, the energetic particles produced in the vicinity of the black hole rise through the X-ray emitting atmosphere of the cluster, lifting up the coolest gas near the center of M87 in their wake, much like the hot volcanic gases drag up the clouds of dark ash. And just like the volcano here on Earth, shockwaves can be seen when the black hole pumps energetic particles into the cluster gas. "This analogy shows that even though astronomical phenomena can occur in exotic settings and over vast scales, the physics can be very similar to events on Earth," said co-author Aurora Simionescu also of the Kavli Institute. In M87, the plumes of cooler gas being lifted upwards contain as much mass as all of the gas contained within 12,000 light years of the center of the galaxy cluster. This shows the black hole-powered volcano is very efficient at blasting the galaxy free of the gas that would otherwise cool and form stars. "This gas could have formed hundreds of millions of stars if the black hole had not removed it from the center of the galaxy. That seems like a much worse disruption than what the airline companies on Earth had to put up with earlier this year," said Evan Million, a graduate student at Stanford University and lead-author of the other paper to be published about this deep study of M87. The eruption in M87 that lifted up the cooler gas must have occurred about 150 million years earlie

  12. Tectonic Setting of Active Costa Rican Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark Abolins

    This 3D visualization provides the tectonic context for volcanic activity in Costa Rica. Active volcanoes are confined to northern Costa Rica because the subducted Cocos plate is relatively deep there. In contrast, almost no volcanic activity happens in the south because of processes directly or indirectly related to the subduction of the Cocos Ridge. Funding for this visualization was provided by the NASA Earth Observing System Higher Education Alliance. For more information, see http://gsdidocs.org/gsdiconf/GSDI-9/papers/TS57.3paper.pdf

  13. 160 East Asian Studies East asian studiEs (Eas)

    E-print Network

    Dresden, Gregory

    160 East Asian Studies East asian studiEs (Eas) CORE FaCuLtY: PROFESSORS O'MARA, SMITKA ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS LuBin, FU, IKEDA, UJIE ASSISTANT PROFESSORS BELLO, CHANG, ROBINSON The program in East Asian Studies is not a major. StudentsidentifiedbythechairoftheEastAsianStudies committee as having completed

  14. 1 East Asian Languages and Literatures EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    1 East Asian Languages and Literatures EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES UNDERGRADUATE Bachelor's programs · Bachelor of Arts with a major in Chinese language and literature (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/east-asian- languages-literatures/ba-chinese) · Bachelor of Arts with a major in Japanese language and literature (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/east-asian

  15. 157East Asian Studies EAST ASIAN STUDIES (EAS)

    E-print Network

    Dresden, Gregory

    157East Asian Studies EAST ASIAN STUDIES (EAS) CORE FACULTY: PROFESSORS O'MARA, SMITKA ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS LUBIN, FU, IKEDA, UJIE ASSISTANT PROFESSORS BELLO, ROBINSON The program in East Asian Studies is not a major. Students identified by the chair of the East Asian Studies committee as having completed

  16. 19. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM EAST. EAST CRUDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM EAST. EAST CRUDE ORE BIN IN FOREGROUND WITH DISCHARGE TO GRIZZLY AT BOTTOM OF VIEW. CONCRETE RETAINING WALL TO LEFT (SOUTH) AND BOTTOM (EAST EDGE OF EAST BIN). - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  17. Earth's Volcanoes and their Eruptions; the 3rd edition of the Smithsonian Institution's Volcanoes of the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, L.; Simkin, T.; Kimberly, P.

    2010-12-01

    The 3rd edition of the Smithsonian Institution’s Volcanoes of the World incorporates data on the world’s volcanoes and their eruptions compiled since 1968 by the Institution’s Global Volcanism Program (GVP). Published this Fall jointly by the Smithsonian and the University of California Press, it supplements data from the 1994 2nd edition and includes new data on the number of people living in proximity to volcanoes, the dominant rock lithologies at each volcano, Holocene caldera-forming eruptions, and preliminary lists of Pleistocene volcanoes and large-volume Pleistocene eruptions. The 3rd edition contains data on nearly 1550 volcanoes of known or possible Holocene age, including chronologies, characteristics, and magnitudes for >10,400 Holocene eruptions. The standard 20 eruptive characteristics of the IAVCEI volcano catalog series have been modified to include dated vertical edifice collapse events due to magma chamber evacuation following large-volume explosive eruptions or mafic lava effusion, and lateral sector collapse. Data from previous editions of Volcanoes of the World are also supplemented by listings of up to the 5 most dominant lithologies at each volcano, along with data on population living within 5, 10, 30, and 100 km radii of each volcano or volcanic field. Population data indicate that the most populated regions also contain the most frequently active volcanoes. Eruption data document lava and tephra volumes and Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) assignments for >7800 eruptions. Interpretation of VRF data has led to documentation of global eruption rates and the power law relationship between magnitude and frequency of volcanic eruptions. Data with volcanic hazards implications include those on fatalities and evacuations and the rate at which eruptions reach their climax. In recognition of the hazards implications of potential resumption of activity at pre-Holocene volcanoes, the 3rd edition includes very preliminary lists of Pleistocene volcanoes and large-volume Pleistocene eruptions, the latter in collaboration with the VOGRIPA project of Steve Sparks and colleagues. The GVP volcano and eruption data derive both from the retrospective perspective of the volcanological and other literature and documentation of contemporary eruptions and volcanic unrest in the Smithsonian’s monthly bulletin and Weekly Volcanic Activity Reports compiled since 2000 in collaboration with the USGS.

  18. Aeromagnetic and Resistive Evidence for a Concealed Depression Associated with a Past Flank Collapse of Fuji Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuma, S.; Nakatsuka, T.; Takakura, S.; Matsushima, N.; Nakano, S.

    2010-12-01

    Two helicopter-borne aeromagnetic surveys were conducted over Fuji Volcano, central Japan in 2003 and 2007 to better understand the subsurface structure of the volcano. The surveys were flown at an altitude of 150 m above terrain along north-south survey lines and east-west tie lines, spaced 200 - 250 m and 1,000 m respectively. The compiled high-resolution aeromagnetic anomaly map of the volcano clearly showed the heterogeneity of the subsurface structure of the volcano. The most significant characteristic is a pair of magnetic high and low elongated in the east-west direction, which ranges from the east-southeast of the summit crater to the eastern flank with an altitude of approximately 2,000 m above sea level or higher. Although there is no evidence on the surface to explain the anomaly, the aeromagnetic anomaly map implies the existence of subsurface structures such as a depression which contains thick lava accumulation overlain by pyroclastic rocks. This depression might be caused by a past flank collapse which triggered a debris avalanche such as the Gotemba Debris Avalanche of 2,900 yBP. Magnetic modeling for the anomaly was conducted to constrain the subsurface structure of the area. First, the horizontal dimension of the magnetic structure was assumed from the results of apparent magnetization intensity mapping. Then, the thickness of the structure was determined by a comparison between observed and synthetic magnetic anomalies by trial and error. The optimum model has a thickness of 400 m on the basis of the rock magnetic properties of volcanic rocks sampled from the volcano. Audio-frequency Magnetotelluric (AMT) surveys were conducted in 2008 and 2009 to confirm the buried structure suggested by the magnetic modeling. Measurements were performed at 9 sites each along two north-south profiles traversing the magnetic anomaly at altitudes of 2,100 m and 2,700 m, respectively. Induction vectors at all the sites point to the west, implying the existence of a conductor in the direction of the summit of the volcano. Preliminary 2-D inversion was done using the TM mode apparent resistivities, TM mode phases and TE mode phases. A resistivity model obtained shows subsurface specific resistive and conductive features down to the sea level. The two resistivity cross-sections indicate a shallow resistive layer of approximately 1,000 m in thickness underlain by a deep conductive layer. The shallow resistive layer and deep conductive layer are implied to correspond to products of Shin-Fuji (Younger Fuji) and Ko-Fuji (Older Fuji) Volcanoes, respectively. A U-shaped depression of the lower conductive layer was found in the upper cross-section at an altitude of 2,700 m, supporting the volcanic depression suggested by the magnetic modeling.

  19. Numerical modelling of mud volcanoes and their ows using constraints from the Gulf of Cadiz

    E-print Network

    Biggs, Juliet

    Numerical modelling of mud volcanoes and their £ows using constraints from the Gulf of Cadiz of submarine mud volcanoes is between 1000 and 100 000. Because many are associated with greenhouse gases and submarine mud volcanoes is highly significant. Clues to the processes forming submarine mud volcanoes can

  20. Seismicity and deformation induced by magma accumulation at three basaltic volcanoes

    E-print Network

    Seismicity and deformation induced by magma accumulation at three basaltic volcanoes O. Lengline´,1 of volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity and deformation at three basaltic volcanoes (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Piton de displays an accelerating evolution at the three studied volcanoes during the time of magma accumulation

  1. The Colima Volcano Database: an online tool for a global data access

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Capra; M. Manea; V. Manea; G. Norini

    2009-01-01

    The Colima Volcano is currently the most active Mexican volcano. After the 1913 plinian activity, the volcano presented scattered eruptive phases that lasted few years each, but since 1991 its activity became more persistent, with vulcanian eruptions, and extrusion of lava flows and domes. During the last 15 years the volcano suffered several eruptive episodes, as in 1991, 1994, 1998-1999,

  2. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island), Stromboli and Volcano (Italy), Hilo (Hawai), Mt. St. Helens (United States), CTM (Coherent Target Monitoring): Cumbre Vieja (La Palma) To generate products either Envisat ASAR, Radarsat 1or ALOS PALSAR data have been used. Surface Thermal Anomalies Volcanic hot-spots detection, radiant flux and effusion rate (where applicable) calculation of high temperature surface thermal anomalies such as active lava flow, strombolian activity, lava dome, pyroclastic flow and lava lake can be performed through MODIS (Terra / Aqua) MIR and TIR channels, or ASTER (Terra), HRVIR/HRGT (SPOT4/5) and Landsat family SWIR channels analysis. ASTER and Landsat TIR channels allow relative radiant flux calculation of low temperature anomalies such as lava and pyroclastic flow cooling, crater lake and low temperature fumarolic fields. MODIS, ASTER and SPOT data are processed to detect and measure the following volcanic surface phenomena: Effusive activity Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island); Mt Etna (Italy). Lava dome growths, collapses and related pyroclastic flows Soufrière Hills (Montserrat); Arenal - (Costa Rica). Permanent crater lake and ephemeral lava lake Karthala (Comores Islands). Strombolian activity Stromboli (Italy). Low temperature fumarolic fields Nisyros (Greece), Vulcano (Italy), Mauna Loa (Hawaii). Volcanic Emission The Volcanic Emission Service is provided to the users by a link to GSE-PROMOTE - Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The aim of the service is to deliver in near-real-time data derived from satellite measurements regarding SO2 emissions (SO2 vertical column density - Dobson Unit [DU]) possibly related to volcanic eruptions and to track the ash injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption. SO2 measurements are derived from different satellite instruments, such as SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The tracking of volcanic ash is accomplished by using SEVIRI-MSG data and, in particular, the following channels VIS 0.6 and IR 3.9, and along with IR8.7, IR 10.8 and IR 12.0. The GlobVolcano information system and its current experimentation represent a

  3. MEDiterranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) project: state of the art and main achievements after the first 18 months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Letizia; Allard, Patrick; Baills, Audrey; Briole, Pierre; D'Auria, Luca; Dingwell, Donald; Martini, Marcello; Kueppers, Ulrich; Marzocchi, Warner; Minet, Christian; Vagner, Amélie

    2015-04-01

    Taking account of the valuable resources and information available for Mt. Etna, Campi Flegrei, and Vesuvius Supersites, MED-SUV aims at exploiting the huge record of geophysical, geochemical and volcanological data available for the three Supersite volcanoes and carry out experiments to fill gaps in the knowledge of the structure of these volcanoes and of the processes driving their activity. The project's activities have focused on (1) gaining new insights into the inner structure of these volcanoes; (2) evaluating the suitability of the current EO and in-situ observations to track the dynamics of the volcano supply system and/or the eruptive phenomena, (3) making the access to observations easy; (4) defining the effects of magma ascent on the stress/strain field (and vice versa); (5) assessing the capability of the Earth science community to forecast the occurrence of eruptions in terms of both location and time of an eruption; (6) optimizing the chain from observations to end-users during an eruptive event; and (7) making the project outcomes "exportable" to other European volcanic areas and elsewhere. Indeed, the overall goal of the project is to apply the rationale of the Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories GEO-GEOSS initiative to the three volcanoes, in order to better assess the volcanic hazards they posed. In the first 18 months, MED-SUV consortium carried out activities relating to coordination, scientific/technological development, and dissemination. Coordination included mainly meetings organised in order to start the project and consortium activity and to strengthen the synergy with EC and international initiatives, such as geohazard activities of GEO-GEOSS, EPOS-PP and the other two FP7 Supersite projects, MARsite and FUTUREVOLC. The main scientific/technological results included the design and development of a prototype (NETVIS) for the optimization and implementation of processing tools for the analysis of Mt. Etna's camera network, design of the interoperable architecture of the e-Infrastructure of the project, preliminary results of the geophysical and geochemical campaigns carried out at Campi Flegrei and Vesuvius volcanoes, TOMO-ETNA seismic experiment, and multidisciplinary campaigns at Mt. Etna's North-East crater. Beside these results, key achievements were the definition of the guidelines for the consortium data policy, MED-SUV website and facebook webpage, MED-SUV video in cooperation with INGV and ESA, and educational activities in selected schools of countries involved in the project.

  4. Comparing Volcano Infrasound and Aeroacoustics Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, D. E.; Matoza, R. S.; Fee, D.

    2012-12-01

    The production of acoustic noise by fluid flows has been studied experimentally within engineering aeroacoustics for over 50 years. These works aim to correlate flow properties and dynamics with the produced acoustic spectra (i.e., patterns of frequencies and amplitude). These correlations are used to design flow fields in man-made jet engines and other machines to reduce the production of harmful acoustic signals and resulting hearing loss. Many of the flow fields in these man-made systems are analogous to those in volcanic eruptions. We postulate that the acoustic signals generated by these flows are also analogous and the aeroacoustics experimental results provide a starting point for modeling the noise generated by volcanic flow fields. Application of empirical results from these experiments to volcanic flow fields is non-trivial. Volcanic eruptions involve complexities not present in man-made experiments including but not limited to multiphase flow, buoyancy forces, and non-uniform atmosphere. This work explores methods by which some of the empirical results from aeroacoustics experiments can be modified for application to volcanic eruptions. Results are compared with observations of volcano infrasound. Preliminary comparison to numerical simulations of volcano infrasound may also be presented.

  5. Infrasound array observation at Sakurajima volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoo, A.; Suzuki, Y. J.; Iguchi, M.

    2012-12-01

    Showa crater at the southeastern flank of the Sakurajima volcano has erupted since 2006, accompanying intermittent Vulcanian eruptions with small scale ash emissions. We conducted an array observation in the last half of 2011 in order to locate infrasound source generated by the eruptions. The array located 3.5 km apart from the crater was composed of 5 microphones (1kHz sampling) aligned in the radial direction from the crater with 100-m-intervals, and additional 4 microphones (200Hz sampling) in tangential direction to the first line in December 2011. Two peaks, around 2Hz and 0.5Hz, in power spectrum of the infrasound were identified; the former peak would be related to the eigen frequency of the vent of Showa crater, but the latter would be related to ejection of eruption clouds. They should be checked by experimental studies. The first 10 s infrasound signal was made by explosion directly and the following small amplitude infrasound tremors for about 2 min were mostly composed of diffraction and reflection waves from the topography around the volcano, mainly the wall of the Aira Caldera. It shows propagation direction of infrasound tremor after the explosion signals should be carefully examined. Clear change in the height of the infrasound source was not identified while volcanic cloud grew up. Strong eddies of the growing volcanic cloud would not be main sources of such weak infrasound signals, thus, infrasound waves are emitted mainly from (or through) the vent itself.

  6. Pathology in East Timor.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Stephen R

    2002-10-01

    East Timor is the newest nation in Southeast Asia and, with its recent turbulent history, also one of the poorest. Infectious and parasitic diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria are endemic, and the poor infrastructure in the wake of Indonesia's sudden withdrawal has left the country with enormous health challenges. Australia's key role in the emergence of East Timor as an independent country brings with it a long-term interest in the future development of its health services, including pathology. PMID:12408349

  7. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Power, John

    2011-02-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data.

  8. Observed inflation-deflation cycles at Popocatepetl volcano using tiltmeters and its possible correlation with regional seismic activity in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G., Sr.; Jimenez Velazquez, J. C., Sr.; Valdes Gonzalez, C. M., Sr.; Reyes Pimentel, T. A.; Galaviz Alonso, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Popocatepetl, the smoking mountain, is a stratovolcano located in central Mexico with an elevation of 5450 masl. The active volcano, close to some of the largest urban centers in Mexico - 60 km and 30 km far from Mexico City and Puebla, respectively - poses a high hazard to an estimated population of 500 thousand people living in the vicinity of the edifice. Accordingly, in July 1994 the Popocatepetl Volcanological Observatory (POVO) was established. The observatory is operated and supported by the National Center for Disaster Prevention of Mexico (CENAPRED), and is equipped to fully monitor different aspects of the volcanic activity. Among the instruments deployed, we use in this investigation two tiltmometers and broad-band seismometers at two sites (Chipiquixtle and Encinos), which send the information gathered continuously to Mexico City.In this research, we study the characteristics of the tiltmeters signals minutes after the occurrence of certain earthquakes. The Popocatepetl volcano starts inflation-deflation cycles due to the ground motion generated by events located at certain regions. We present the analysis of the tiltmeters and seismic signals of all the earthquakes (Mw>5) occurred from January 2013 to June 2014, recorded at Chipiquixtle and Encinos stations. First, we measured the maximum tilt variation after each earthquake. Next, we apply a band-pass filter for different frequency ranges to the seismic signals of the two seismic stations, and estimated the total energy of the strong motion phase of the seismic record. Finally, we compared both measurements and observed that the maximum tilt variations were occurring when the maximum total energy of the seismic signals were in a specific frequency range. We also observed that the earthquake records that have the maximum total energy in that frequency range were the ones with a epicentral location south-east of the volcano. We conclude that our observations can be used set the ground for an early warning sytem of the Popocatepetl volcano.

  9. Three-dimensional stochastic adjustment of volcano geodetic network in Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.; van der Laat, R.; Cattin, P.-H.; Del Potro, R.

    2009-04-01

    Volcano geodetic networks are a key instrument to understanding magmatic processes and, thus, forecasting potentially hazardous activity. These networks are extensively used on volcanoes worldwide and generally comprise a number of different traditional and modern geodetic surveying techniques such as levelling, distances, triangulation and GNSS. However, in most cases, data from the different methodologies are surveyed, adjusted and analysed independently. Experience shows that the problem with this procedure is the mismatch between the excellent correlation of position values within a single technique and the low cross-correlation of such values within different techniques or when the same network is surveyed shortly after using the same technique. Moreover one different independent network for each geodetic surveying technique strongly increase logistics and thus the cost of each measurement campaign. It is therefore important to develop geodetic networks which combine the different geodetic surveying technique, and to adjust geodetic data together in order to better quantify the uncertainties associated to the measured displacements. In order to overcome the lack of inter-methodology data integration, the Geomatic Institute of the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (HEIG-VD) has developed a methodology which uses a 3D stochastic adjustment software of redundant geodetic networks, TRINET+. The methodology consists of using each geodetic measurement technique for its strengths relative to other methodologies. Also, the combination of the measurements in a single network allows more cost-effective surveying. The geodetic data are thereafter adjusted and analysed in the same referential frame. The adjustment methodology is based on the least mean square method and links the data with the geometry. Trinet+ also allows to run a priori simulations of the network, hence testing the quality and resolution to be expected for a determined network even before it is built. Moreover, a posterior analysis enables identifying, and hence dismissing, measurement errors (antenna height, atmospheric effects, etc.). Here we present a preliminary effort to apply this technique to volcano deformation. A geodetic network has been developed on the western flank of the Arenal volcano in Costa Rica. It is surveyed with GNSS, angular and EDM (Electronic Distance Measurements) measurements. Three measurement campaigns were carried out between February and June 2008. The results show consistent and accurate output of deformation and uncertainty for each of the 12 benchmarks surveyed. The three campaigns also prove the repeatability and consistency of the statistical indicators and the displacement vectors. Although, this methodology has only recently been applied to volcanoes, we suggest that due to its cost-effective high-quality results it has the potential to be incorporated into the design and analysis of volcano geodetic networks worldwide.

  10. Re-awakening of a Volcano: The 3. November 2002 eruption of El Reventador, NE Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischmann, T.; Toulkeridis, T.; Aguillera, E.

    2003-04-01

    At 3 Nov 2002, 7.15 after a repose of 26 years "El Reventador" exploded unexpectedly forming a vulcanian type eruption with a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 4. Ecuador's easternmost and second most active continental volcano covered with a few million tons of ash a huge area of Ecuador, parts of Colombia, Peru and Brazil reaching even the islands of Galapagos. Reventador belongs to the few stratovolcanoes on the western edge of the Amazonian platform well east of the principal volcanic axis of the North Andean Volcanic Zone. The ca. 20.000 year old andesitic steep-sloping cone of the active volcano Reventador III is situated within the western end of an older steep-walled horse-shoe shaped caldera, which is open to the ESE. This caldera was formed by the previous volcanoes Reventador I and II, which reached an estimated height of ca. 600 m high above the actual edifice before their activities terminated in a sector collapse and lateral blast to the ESE. Lavas, pyroclastic flows, debris flows and lahars of Reventador III then filled the ca. 4 km wide caldera. In the morning of 3 Nov, unpredicted and within seconds, the volcano's WNW flank slided away in a large landslide against the western caldera wall, triggering a destructive, lateral blast of hot gas, steam, ash and rock debris that swept across the landscape. More than a third of the actual cone disappeared in Ecuador's biggest explosion of the last 120 years. Ongoing decompression of the magma caused the continuing eruption and the formation of an eruption column reaching 16 km height. A few hours later another ca. 12 km high eruption followed. Further minor eruptions generated lavas and pyroclasitic flows until the end of November while the emission of ash and gases (mainly H_2O and SO_2) continued until January. The porphyric volcanic rocks contain plag (An 40--70%), cpx, opx, occasionally amphibole and Fe-Ti oxides. Ash and rock fragments of the pyroclasitic flows have almost identical andesitic composition with SiO_2 of ca. 58 wt%, 4.4 wt% Na_2O and 2.2 wt% K_2O. Incompatible trace elements such as Ba and Sr are enriched with 1190 ppm and 820--920 ppm, respectively. The eruption had a direct impact on life in Ecuador: State of emergency was declared, and Quito's international airport was closed. Pyroclastic flows and lahars blocked the main highway nearby, destroyed two bridges and the new oil pipeline. The unexpected eruption of Reventador demonstrates the necessity of a more efficient volcanic monitoring and more precise prediction.

  11. Monitoring Kilauea Volcano Using Non-Telemetered Time-Lapse Camera Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, T. R.; Hoblitt, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    Systematic visual observations are an essential component of monitoring volcanic activity. At the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the development and deployment of a new generation of high-resolution, non- telemetered, time-lapse camera systems provides periodic visual observations in inaccessible and hazardous environments. The camera systems combine a hand-held digital camera, programmable shutter-release, and other off-the-shelf components in a package that is inexpensive, easy to deploy, and ideal for situations in which the probability of equipment loss due to volcanic activity or theft is substantial. The camera systems have proven invaluable in correlating eruptive activity with deformation and seismic data streams. For example, in late 2005 and much of 2006, Pu`u `O`o, the active vent on Kilauea Volcano`s East Rift Zone, experienced 10--20-hour cycles of inflation and deflation that correlated with increases in seismic energy release. A time-lapse camera looking into a skylight above the main lava tube about 1 km south of the vent showed an increase in lava level---an indicator of increased lava flux---during periods of deflation, and a decrease in lava level during periods of inflation. A second time-lapse camera, with a broad view of the upper part of the active flow field, allowed us to correlate the same cyclic tilt and seismicity with lava breakouts from the tube. The breakouts were accompanied by rapid uplift and subsidence of shatter rings over the tube. The shatter rings---concentric rings of broken rock---rose and subsided by as much as 6 m in less than an hour during periods of varying flux. Time-lapse imagery also permits improved assessment of volcanic hazards, and is invaluable in illustrating the hazards to the public. In collaboration with Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, camera systems have been used to monitor the growth of lava deltas at the entry point of lava into the ocean to determine the potential for catastrophic collapse.

  12. Fernandina Volcano (Galápagos) ground deformation modeling via multi-orbits DInSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Vincenzo; Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; De Luca, Claudio; Casu, Francesco; Tizzani, Pietro; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    We study the temporal and spatial ground deformation at Fernandina Volcano (Galápagos) between 2004 and 2013, by using two different DInSAR data set, acquired by ENVISAT C-Band satellite and COSMO-SkyMed X-Band constellation, respectively; we use both ascending and descending orbits for each system. To this purpose, we use the SBAS-DInSAR approach and combine ascending and descending time series to produce vertical and E-W components of the mean deformation velocity and associated deformation time series. More specifically, the long-term components analysis, carried out by using the ENVISAT sensor, revealed a broad uplift phenomenon of about 4 cm on the SE slope of the volcano; similarly, a large subsidence with maximum vertical displacement of about 2 cm on NE flank, is found. For what concern the horizontal components, the performed analysis showed a westward displacement of the southeast flank of the island. The most relevant aspect, which arises from the analysis of the DInSAR vertical eformation time series, is a strong, high rate subsidence phenomenon, that followed the 2009 eruptive event. This tendency is localized in the region around the caldera rim where the circumferential structures border the summit caldera. The multi-orbits X-Band data processing showed a new uplift phenomenon: between March 2012 and July 2013 the vertical component is characterized by a radially symmetric deformation pattern with a maximum uplift of about 20 cm strongly concentrated inside the caldera rim. This symmetry is also observed in the E-W horizontal mean velocity map, showing a maximum displacement of about 12 cm towards East for the SE flank, and 12 cm towards West for the NW flank of the volcano. In particular, the deformation time series show a rather linear uplift trend from March to September 2012, interrupted by a low deformation rate interval lasting until January 2013. After this stage, the deformation shows again a linear behaviour with an increased uplift rate. In this context, we performed a 3D time dependent structural numerical model in creeping flow approximation, in order to evaluate the stress temporal evolution inside the volcano conduit during the unrest phenomena. The optimization results emphasize that: (i) the stress source responsible of the 2012-2013 unrest phenomena is the located at shallow depth; (ii) the temporal evolution of the deviatoric stress is characterized by a linear trend concentred in the areas corresponding to the circumferential eruptive fissures.

  13. Volcano hazards in the San Salvador region, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Sofield, D.J.; Escobar, C.D.; Pullinger, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    San Salvador volcano is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador (figure 1). This volcano, having a volume of about 110 cubic kilometers, towers above San Salvador, the country’s capital and largest city. The city has a population of approximately 2 million, and a population density of about 2100 people per square kilometer. The city of San Salvador and other communities have gradually encroached onto the lower flanks of the volcano, increasing the risk that even small events may have serious societal consequences. San Salvador volcano has not erupted for more than 80 years, but it has a long history of repeated, and sometimes violent, eruptions. The volcano is composed of remnants of multiple eruptive centers, and these remnants are commonly referred to by several names. The central part of the volcano, which contains a large circular crater, is known as El Boquerón, and it rises to an altitude of about 1890 meters. El Picacho, the prominent peak of highest elevation (1960 meters altitude) to the northeast of the crater, and El Jabali, the peak to the northwest of the crater, represent remnants of an older, larger edifice. The volcano has erupted several times during the past 70,000 years from vents central to the volcano as well as from smaller vents and fissures on its flanks [1] (numerals in brackets refer to end notes in the report). In addition, several small cinder cones and explosion craters are located within 10 kilometers of the volcano. Since about 1200 A.D., eruptions have occurred almost exclusively along, or a few kilometers beyond, the northwest flank of the volcano, and have consisted primarily of small explosions and emplacement of lava flows. However, San Salvador volcano has erupted violently and explosively in the past, even as recently as 800 years ago. When such eruptions occur again, substantial population and infrastructure will be at risk. Volcanic eruptions are not the only events that present a risk to local communities. Another concern is a landslide and an associated debris flow (a watery flow of mud, rock, and debris--also known as a lahar) that could occur during periods of no volcanic activity. An event of this type occurred in 1998 at Casita volcano in Nicaragua when extremely heavy rainfall from Hurricane Mitch triggered a landslide that moved down slope and transformed into a rapidly moving debris flow that destroyed two villages and killed more than 2000 people. Historical landslides up to a few hundred thousand cubic meters in volume have been triggered on San Salvador volcano by torrential rainstorms and earthquakes, and some have transformed into debris flows that have inundated populated areas down stream. Destructive rainfall- and earthquake-triggered landslides and debris flows on or near San Salvador volcano in September 1982 and January 2001 demonstrate that such mass movements in El Salvador have also been lethal. This report describes the kinds of hazardous events that occur at volcanoes in general and the kinds of hazardous geologic events that have occurred at San Salvador volcano in the past. The accompanying volcano-hazards-zonation maps show areas that are likely to be at risk when hazardous events occur again.

  14. Acoustic scattering from mud volcanoes and carbonate mounds.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Weber, Thomas C; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2006-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes occur in many parts of the world's oceans and form an aperture for gas and fluidized mud emission from within the earth's crust. Their characteristics are of considerable interest to the geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and underwater acoustics communities. For the latter, mud volcanoes are of interest in part because they pose a potential source of clutter for active sonar. Close-range (single-interaction) scattering measurements from a mud volcano in the Straits of Sicily show scattering 10-15 dB above the background. Three hypotheses were examined concerning the scattering mechanism: (1) gas entrained in sediment at/near mud volcano, (2) gas bubbles and/or particulates (emitted) in the water column, (3) the carbonate bio-construction covering the mud volcano edifice. The experimental evidence, including visual, acoustic, and nonacoustic sensors, rules out the second hypothesis (at least during the observation time) and suggests that, for this particular mud volcano the dominant mechanism is associated with carbonate chimneys on the mud volcano. In terms of scattering levels, target strengths of 4-14 dB were observed from 800 to 3600 Hz for a monostatic geometry with grazing angles of 3-5 degrees. Similar target strengths were measured for vertically bistatic paths with incident and scattered grazing angles of 3-5 degrees and 33-50 degrees, respectively. PMID:17225386

  15. Recent uplift and hydrothermal activity at Tangkuban Parahu volcano, west Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.; Matahelumual, J.; Okamura, A.T.; Said, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Mulyadi, D.

    1990-01-01

    Tangkuban Parahu is an active stratovolcano located 17 km north of the city of Bandung in the province west Java, Indonesia. All historical eruptive activity at this volcano has been confined to a complex of explosive summit craters. About a dozen eruptions-mostly phreatic events- and 15 other periods of unrest, indicated by earthquakes or increased thermal activity, have been noted since 1829. The last magmatic eruption occurred in 1910. In late 1983, several small phreatic explosions originated from one of the summit craters. More recently, increased hydrothermal and earthquake activity occurred from late 1985 through 1986. Tilt measurements, using a spirit-level technique, have been made every few months since February 1981 in the summit region and along the south and east flanks of the volcano. Measurements made in the summit region indicated uplift since the start of these measurements through at least 1986. From 1981 to 1983, the average tilt rate at the edges of the summit craters was 40-50 microradians per year. After the 1983 phreatic activity, the tilt rate decreased by about a factor of five. Trilateration surveys across the summit craters and on the east flank of the volcano were conducted in 1983 and 1986. Most line length changes measured during this three-year period did not exceed the expected uncertainty of the technique (4 ppm). The lack of measurable horizontal strain across the summit craters seems to contradict the several years of tilt measurements. Using a point source of dilation in an elastic half-space to model tilt measurements, the pressure center at Tangkuban Parahu is located about 1.5 km beneath the southern part of the summit craters. This is beneath the epicentral area of an earthquake swarm that occurred in late 1983. The average rate in the volume of uplift from 1981 to 1983 was 3 million m3 per year; from 1983 to 1986 it averaged about 0.4 million m3 per year. Possible causes for this uplift are increased pressure within a very shallow magma body or heating and expansion of a confined aquifier. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Subglacial melting associated with activity at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, explored using numerical reservoir simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Hannah I.; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Högnadóttir, Thórdís

    2015-04-01

    Increased seismic activity was observed within the caldera of Bárdarbunga, a central volcano beneath Vatnajökull glacier, on 16 August 2014. The seismicity traced the path of a lateral dyke, initially propagating to the south east of the volcano, before changing course and continuing beyond the northern extent of the glacier. A short fissure eruption occurred at the site of the Holuhraun lavas on 29 August, lasting for approximately 5 hours and producing less than 1 million cubic meters of lava, before recommencing in earnest on 31 August with the large effusive eruption, which is still ongoing at the time of writing. The glacier surface has been monitored aerially since the onset of heightened seismic activity, and the caldera and dyke propagation path surveyed using radar profiling. Ice cauldrons are shallow depressions which form on the glacier surface due to basal melting, as a manifestation of heat flux from below; the melting ice acts as a calorimeter, allowing estimations of heat flux magnitude to be made. Several cauldrons were observed outside the caldera, two to the south east of Bárdarbunga, and three located above the path of the dyke under the Dyngjujökull outlet glacier. The cauldrons range in volume from approximately 0.001 km3 to 0.02 km3. We present time series data of the development and evolution of these cauldrons, with estimates of the heat flux magnitudes involved. The nature of the heat source required to generate the aforementioned cauldrons is not obvious and two scenarios are explored: 1) small subglacial eruptions; or 2) increased geothermal activity induced by the dyke intrusion. We investigate these scenarios using analytical and finite element modelling, considering the surface heat flux produced, and timescales and spatial extent of associated surface anomalies. A range of permeabilities has been explored. It is found that an intrusion of a dyke or sill into rocks where the groundwater is near or at the boiling point curve can cause rapid increase in geothermal activity. However, a shallow intrusion into a cold groundwater reservoir will have a very muted thermal response even when an intrusion stops within a few tens of meters from the surface. Thus, our results indicate that minor subglacial eruptions, similar or slightly larger than the small eruption north of the glacier on the 29 August, are the most plausible explanation for the formation of the ice cauldrons observed. These results have implications for the understanding and interpretation of thermal signals observed at ice-covered volcanoes, highlighting the importance of reservoir/bedrock thermal state prior to intrusion.

  17. Magnetotelluric studies in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Since its introduction just over half a century ago, the magnetotelluric method has been used in a wide range of environments, both onshore and submarine, at a large number of length scales, and to tackle a huge variety of problems in the earth sciences, both applied and curiosity-driven. Electromagnetic fields are induced in the sub-surface by passive magnetic field sources originating from lightning strikes trapped in the ionospheric waveguide and from the solar wind interacting with the magnetosphere, which enables information on the sub-surface resistivity distribution to be derived. Measuring the tiny induced signals depends on the careful deployment of very sensitive equipment. These time series are then subject to careful selection and processing techniques in the frequency domain to make robust estimates of the tensor quantity embodying the resistivity information as a function of depth. Further processing and assessment of the data allows the practitioner to assess the minimum dimension of the underlying resistivity distribution consistent with the data. As if this wasn't enough, the inverse problem is extremely non-linear, even in the simplest case of resistivity purely a function of depth. Most modelling and interpretation thus proceeds by a combination of forward modelling and regularised inversion, with tests to assess the resolving depth of the data, and their sensitivity to certain features of the model, for example. After introducing the method, I will illustrate it with examples of experiments carried out in East Africa with which I've been involved, concentrating on two substantial inter-disciplinary studies in Ethiopia, one of the northern Main Ethiopian rift, and the other an on-going project studying magmatic and tectonic processes associated with a current rifting episode in Afar. The main target for magnetotellurics in these projects has been imaging partial melt and magma in the sub-surface. I will aim to show how the interpretation of the magnetotelluric results is aided by having access to complementary data, and how in turn the magnetotelluric information informs and assists in understanding other datasets and modelling.Dabbahu magmatic segment and volcano, Afar, Ethiopia

  18. Gravity and Geodetic Studies at Concepción volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saballos, J. A.; Malservisi, R.; Connor, C.

    2010-12-01

    Four gravity surveys were conducted in an area of 18.0 x 12.4 km2 between 2007 and 2010 on and around Concepción volcano, Ometepe Island, Nicaragua. The amplitude of the anomaly ranges from -15 to 45 mGal. The bulk average density of the volcano was estimated by minimizing the cross-correlation, on a 2-dimensional grid, between the simple Bouguer anomaly and topography of the volcanic edifice, yielding a value of 1.764 ± 0.004 g cm-3. This has a meaningful impact on models such as gravitational spreading, and volcano loading. The resulting complete Bouguer anomaly map shows that the upper part of the volcanic edifice has a lower density than the lower part, consistent with the fact that the upper part is made of pyroclastic materials and built upon a more consolidated base left after a Plinian eruption not later than 2,720 ± 60 years B.P. The upper part of the cone is the major source for the generation of debris flows, which is a significant hazard for about 15,000 inhabitants. A low Bouguer anomaly trending NE and running from the southern side of the volcano to its western side is interpreted as an inactive fault that may be related to a recently discovered fault, within the lake, using seismic data 15 km south of the island. Dual-frequency geodetic global positioning data recorded in episodic campaigns have been collected on five stations around the volcano’s base. The two stations with more occupations, 2001-2010, located N and SE side of the volcano show a baseline change rate of -7 ± 2 mm/yr. While another pair of stations on the eastern and southern side of the volcano have a baseline change rate of -6 ± 6 mm/yr. These results suggest that the volcano is not currently spreading by the action of gravity.

  19. ERS InSAR Observations of Mt. Etna Volcano: Magma Inflation and Radial Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Casu, F.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, A.; Berardino, P.; Sansosti, E.; Lanari, R.; Rosen, P.

    2004-06-01

    We present a synthesis of ERS-1 and ERS-2 differential SAR interferometry (InSAR) observations of Mt. Etna volcano over roughly the past ten years from 1002- 2002. Through this time period Mount Etna underwent a cycle of eruptive activity starting with a large flank eruption that ended in March 1993, followed by two years quiescence, with resumed summit activity starting in the summer of 1995, culminating in the recent large flank eruptions of 2001 and 2002/2003. InSAR observations reveal patterns of surface deformation that result from the changing magma and structural dynamics of the volcano. Individual interferograms spanning each of these major volcanic episodes during the last ten years reveal the essential deformation patterns. Similarities between groups of similar time-span interferograms for both ascending and descending ERS satellite passes show common fringe patterns among each group and distinctive differences between the ascending and descending interferograms are related to true ground deformation and are not dominated by atmospheric effects. In general the deformation patterns are related to a combination of magma chamber inflation/deflation plus nearly radial flank motion to the W, S, and E. To make sense of the large number of interferograms computed and the temporal behavior of Etna s deformation, we compute a time series of ground deformation from 1992-2001. We find that during this time interval Mt. Etna experienced magmatic deflation from thew initiation of measurements in 1992 through the spring of 1993, followed by major inflation from 1993-1995, with smaller deflation and inflation episodes from 1996-2000. During the entire time period Etna experienced varying amounts of radial spreading to the West, South, and East. Steady relative motion between the West and South flanks, and between the East and North flanks, during this time interval, suggests they are related to gravitational spreading of the volcanic edifice. In contrast, time series analysis shows that growth of a southeastern basal anticline began with the end of magma recharge in 1995, thus showing a direct link between deep-seated magma intrusions and edifice spreading. Together these observations support a complex mode of radial gravitational collapse underlain by deeper magma driven basal spreading, although ultimately the two must be related. The distinct ascending and descending interferograms accompanying the 2001 flank eruption support this model and demonstrate the direct connection between the magmatic and structural components of the volcano. Mt. Etna is a large, highly active volcano that is structurally complex (Fig. 1). It features two well-developed rift systems extending to the north and south from the summit craters through a series of fault systems as its eastern and southern flanks move away from the volcano s center [Rust and Neri, 1996; Borgia et al., 1992, 2000; Froger et al., 2001].

  20. Tweed Extinct Volcano, Australia, Stereo Pair of SRTM Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Australia is the only continent without any current volcanic activity, but it hosts one of the world's largest extinct volcanoes, the Tweed Volcano. Rock dating methods indicate that eruptions here lasted about three million years, ending about 20 million years ago. Twenty million years of erosion has left this landform deeply eroded yet very recognizable, appearing as a caldera with a central peak. The central peak is not an old remnant landform but is instead the erosional stub of the volcanic neck (the central pipe that carried the magma upward). It is surrounded by ring dikes, which are circular sheets of magma that solidified and now form erosion-resistant ridges. The central peak is named Mount Warning.

    Topography plays a central role in envisioning the volcano at its climax and in deciphering the landscape evolution that has occurred since then. Low-relief uplands interspersed between deeply eroded canyons form a radial pattern that clearly defines the shape and extent of the original volcanic dome. Erosion is most extensive on the eastern side because the eroding streams drained directly to the ocean and therefore had the steepest gradients. This asymmetry of erosion has been extreme enough that the volcano has been hollowed out by the east-flowing drainage, forming an 'erosional caldera'. Calderas usually form as the result of collapse where magmas retreat within an active volcano. If collapse occurred here, erosion may have removed the evidence, but it produced a similar landform itself.

    Three visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading, color coding, and synthetic stereoscopy. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye (see Figure 1). The image can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing) or by downloading, printing, and splitting the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Elevations range from sea level (shown in blue) to about 1340 meters (4400 feet) along the northwest caldera rim.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Size: 102 kilometers (63 miles) by 74 kilometers (46 miles) Location: 28.4 degrees South latitude, 153.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North toward the top, cylindrical projection Image Data: Shaded and colored SRTM elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  1. A volcano bursting at the seams: Inflation, faulting, and eruption at Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Geist, Dennis J.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Poland, Michael P.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Meertens, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    The results of geodetic monitoring since 2002 at Sierra Negra volcano in the Galápagos Islands show that the filling and pressurization of an ?2-km-deep sill eventually led to an eruption that began on 22 October 2005. Continuous global positioning system (CGPS) monitoring measured >2 m of accelerating inflation leading up to the eruption and contributed to nearly 5 m of total uplift since 1992, the largest precursory inflation ever recorded at a basaltic caldera. This extraordinary uplift was accommodated in part by repeated trapdoor faulting, and coseismic CGPS data provide strong constraints for improved deformation models. These results highlight the feedbacks between inflation, faulting, and eruption at a basaltic volcano, and demonstrate that faulting above an intruding magma body can relieve accumulated strain and effectively postpone eruption.

  2. Research on the Web: Deep Sea Volcanoes and Vents

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web research project gives students a close-up look at the dynamic forces at work in the deep seas. They'll work as scientists, making observations and recording their findings. Students begin by gathering background information on submarine volcanoes and mid-ocean ridges. They then compare volcanic activity on land with submarine volcanoes, noting the effects of near-freezing temperatures and incredibly intense pressure on volcanoes on the ocean floor. They end by viewing real-time videos of deep sea vents in motion.

  3. Magnetotelluric Investigations of the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoversten, G.; Newman, G. A.; Gasperikova, E.; Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2002-12-01

    A collaborative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Electromagnetic Instruments and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has undertaken a three-dimensional (3D) magnetotelluric (MT) study of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. The survey objectives are 1): to produce a high quality 3D MT data set over the central caldera and the eastern and southwestern rift zones, 2) to use this data set to drive the continued development of new 3D MT inversion algorithms and 3) to integrate existing gravity, seismic and electrical data with the new MT data to provide an improved understanding of the internal structure of the volcano. Data acquired over the currently active eastern rift zone are compared to that from the now dormant southwest rift zone. The first phase of data collection acquired 6 sites in February 2002 with a second phase acquiring 30 sites in August 2002. The survey was designed to make use of multiple remote reference sites and multi-station robust processing techniques with as many as eight acquisition systems operating simultaneously. Excellent quality data was obtained even in the harshest conditions, such as those encountered on the fresh lava flows of the eastern rift zone, where electrical contact resistances were extremely high. Most sites, which required helicopter access, were recorded with only electric (E) fields to reduce weight and setup time. Certain helicopter sites had magnetic (H) data and were processed with and without local H data demonstrating the validity of using remote H fields with local E fields for impedance calculations. 3-D inversion of the data assuming the data to be local impedance is compared to 3D inversion that explicitly models the locations of the measured E and H fields. Selected two-dimensional (2D) lines of sites are inverted with 2D algorithms and compared to previously obtained electrical structure from transient EM soundings. Early one-dimensional inversion of a site located near the caldera shows a conductor at 5km depth, which is consistent with the depth to magma as shown by seismic monitoring experiments. In addition, a shallower conductor at about 1km depth is indicated and is being investigated as a possible indicator of shallow magma. The site near the caldera was occupied in February and again in August 2002, giving a time-lapse view of the resistivity structure. Three dimensional modeling of the entire island of Hawaii shows that the costal effects of the sea-land interface on the MT data is greatly reduced compared to the effects observed at continental boundaries where the interface is more 2D in nature.

  4. Large-N in Volcano Settings: Volcanosri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. M.; Song, W.; Xing, G.; Vick, S.; Phillips, D.

    2014-12-01

    We seek a paradigm shift in the approach we take on volcano monitoring where the compromise from high fidelity to large numbers of sensors is used to increase coverage and resolution. Accessibility, danger and the risk of equipment loss requires that we develop systems that are independent and inexpensive. Furthermore, rather than simply record data on hard disk for later analysis we desire a system that will work autonomously, capitalizing on wireless technology and in field network analysis. To this end we are currently producing a low cost seismic array which will incorporate, at the very basic level, seismological tools for first cut analysis of a volcano in crises mode. At the advanced end we expect to perform tomographic inversions in the network in near real time. Geophone (4 Hz) sensors connected to a low cost recording system will be installed on an active volcano where triggering earthquake location and velocity analysis will take place independent of human interaction. Stations are designed to be inexpensive and possibly disposable. In one of the first implementations the seismic nodes consist of an Arduino Due processor board with an attached Seismic Shield. The Arduino Due processor board contains an Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU. This 32 bit 84 MHz processor can filter and perform coarse seismic event detection on a 1600 sample signal in fewer than 200 milliseconds. The Seismic Shield contains a GPS module, 900 MHz high power mesh network radio, SD card, seismic amplifier, and 24 bit ADC. External sensors can be attached to either this 24-bit ADC or to the internal multichannel 12 bit ADC contained on the Arduino Due processor board. This allows the node to support attachment of multiple sensors. By utilizing a high-speed 32 bit processor complex signal processing tasks can be performed simultaneously on multiple sensors. Using a 10 W solar panel, second system being developed can run autonomously and collect data on 3 channels at 100Hz for 6 months with the installed 16Gb SD card. Initial designs and test results will be presented and discussed.

  5. Structure of Uturuncu volcano from seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, M. E.; Kukarina, E.; Koulakov, I.

    2013-12-01

    The PLUTONS project is attempting to capture the process of magma intrusion and pluton formation in situ through the multi-disciplinary study of known magmatic inflation centers. The centerpiece of this study, Uturuncu volcano, is investigated here through seismic travel time tomography. Local seismicity is well distributed and provides constraints on the shallow crust. Ray paths from earthquakes in the subducting slab complement this with steep ray paths that sample the deeper crust. Together the shallow and deep earthquakes provide strong 3D coverage of Uturuncu and the surrounding region. Previous studies have demonstrated that this region is underlain by a broad sill of partial melt at depths below 15 km. It is widely believed that this sill sources the prodigious magmas in the surrounding volcanic complex. However, the connection between the sill and discrete overlying volcanoes, such as Uturuncu, is unknown. We do not know if Uturuncu exists because of higher magma flux from the deep crust, an aggregation of melt from the surrounding sill, or because hotter crust in this region facilitates the movement of existing magmas. The combination of P-wave and S-wave tomography offer some insights. Above the sill, we observe a region of low P velocities but relatively constant Vp/Vs ratios. These suggest a region of high temperatures or, perhaps, hydrothermal alteration. At the time of writing, we do not see strong evidence for the presence of partial melt in the shallow crust. At depths below the sill, however, we observe a combination of low P velocities but high Vp/Vs ratios. The strong depression in S velocities required to get these values is consistent with the presence of partial melt. Taken together these suggest a regime in which excess magma exists beneath Uturuncu at depth, either from a deeper crustal source or pooled from the sill. This magma provides additional heat to the shallow crust. This heat may drive the hydrothermal system at Uturuncu as well as reduce the rigidity of the surrounding crust. This reduced rigidity may help explain the high rates of crustal seismicity near the volcano that appear consistent with regional, and not volcanic, stresses.

  6. Instability of Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 4 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denlinger, Roger P.; Morgan, Julia K.

    2014-01-01

    All seaward flank movement occurs along a detachment fault, or décollement, that forms within the mixture of pelagic clays and volcaniclastic deposits on the old seafloor and pushes up a bench of debris along the distal margin of the flank. The offshore uplift that builds this bench is generated by décollement slip that terminates upward into the overburden along thrust faults. Finite strain and finite strength models for volcano growth on a low-friction décollement reproduce this bench structure, as well as much of the morphology and patterns of faulting observed on the actively growing volcanoes of Mauna Loa and K?lauea. These models show how stress is stored within growing volcano flanks, but not how rapid, potentially seismic slip is triggered along their décollements. The imbalance of forces that triggers large, rapid seaward displacement of the flank after decades of creep may result either from driving forces that change rapidly, such as magma pressure gradients; from resisting forces that rapidly diminish with slip, such as those arising from coupling of pore pressure and dilatancy within décollement sediment; or, from some interplay between driving and resisting forces that produces flank motion. Our understanding of the processes of flank motion is limited by available data, though recent studies have increased our ability to quantitatively address flank instability and associated hazards.

  7. Volcano-hydrothermal activity detected by precise levelling surveys at the Tatun volcano group in Northern Taiwan during 2006-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Masayuki; Lin, Cheng-Hong; Kimata, Fumiaki; Mori, Hitoshi; Pu, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    Precise levelling surveys were conducted from 2006 to 2013 on three levelling routes in the Tatun volcano group (TVG) located approximately 15 km northeast of Taipei, to detect deformation in relation to the volcano-hydrothermal activities of the TVG. Uplift was detected around the most active fumarole, Tayoukeng fumarole, throughout the period 2007 to 2011; the uplift rate throughout the period from March 2009 to March 2011 was reduced in comparison to the rate between 2007 and 2009. Following this, a dormant state or a small amount of subsidence was detected in the period March 2011 to March 2013. And throughout the period from June 2006 to March 2013, subsidence was centred on an area 0.5 km east of the summit of Mt. Cising, the highest peak in the TVG. A model of two spherical sources was therefore estimated from the deformation recorded from August 2007 to March 2011, using a genetic algorithm. A deflation source was obtained about 0.5 km northeast of Mt. Cising at a depth of 2 km; and an inflation source was situated approximately 1 km south of the Tayoukeng fumarole at a depth of 0.7 km. Based on previous seismic and AMT studies, the estimated sources are interpreted as being hydrothermal reservoirs. Because almost all the benchmarks around Mt. Cising show subsidence at a constant speed, we conclude that the deeper hydrothermal reservoir at a depth of 2 km may have been releasing hydrothermal fluid at a constant rate throughout the period from 2006 to 2013. However, it was suggested that in 2011 the shallower hydrothermal reservoir at a depth of 0.7 km changed from an inflation state to a dormant state (or small deflation) based on temporal vertical changes around Tayoukeng fumarole. A possible model for the volcano-hydrothermal system is therefore proposed. It is considered that the hydrothermal fluid may be supplied intermittently from the magma chamber to the deeper hydrothermal reservoir at a depth of 2 km (although this type of fluid input event may not have occurred during our research period), and that the hydrothermal fluid upwelling between Mt. Cising and Tayoukeng fumarole flows transversally into a highly cracked and fluid-saturated area that continues to Tayoukeng fumarole. The existence of a shallower hydrothermal reservoir at a depth of 0.7 km in the highly cracked and fluid-saturated area is therefore plausible.

  8. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, Judy; Hildreth, Wes

    2000-01-01

    The world’s largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century broke out at Novarupta (fig. 1) in June 1912, filling with hot ash what came to be called the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes and spreading downwind more fallout than all other historical Alaskan eruptions combined. Although almost all the magma vented at Novarupta, most of it had been stored beneath Mount Katmai 10 km away, which collapsed during the eruption. Airborne ash from the 3-day event blanketed all of southern Alaska, and its gritty fallout was reported as far away as Dawson, Ketchikan, and Puget Sound (fig. 21). Volcanic dust and sulfurous aerosol were detected within days over Wisconsin and Virginia; within 2 weeks over California, Europe, and North Africa; and in latter-day ice cores recently drilled on the Greenland ice cap. There were no aircraft in Alaska in 1912—fortunately! Corrosive acid aerosols damage aircraft, and ingestion of volcanic ash can cause abrupt jet-engine failure. Today, more than 200 flights a day transport 20,000 people and a fortune in cargo within range of dozens of restless volcanoes in the North Pacific. Air routes from the Far East to Europe and North America pass over and near Alaska, many flights refueling in Anchorage. Had this been so in 1912, every airport from Dillingham to Dawson and from Fairbanks to Seattle would have been enveloped in ash, leaving pilots no safe option but to turn back or find refuge at an Aleutian airstrip west of the ash cloud. Downwind dust and aerosol could have disrupted air traffic anywhere within a broad swath across Canada and the Midwest, perhaps even to the Atlantic coast. The great eruption of 1912 focused scientific attention on Novarupta, and subsequent research there has taught us much about the processes and hazards associated with such large explosive events (Fierstein and Hildreth, 1992). Moreover, work in the last decade has identified no fewer than 20 discrete volcanic vents within 15 km of Novarupta (Hildreth and others, 1999, 2000, 2001; Hildreth and Fierstein, 2000), only half of which had been named previously—the four stratovolcanoes Mounts Katmai, Mageik, Martin, and Griggs; the cone cluster called Trident Volcano; Snowy Mountain; and the three lava domes Novarupta, Mount Cerberus, and Falling Mountain. The most recent eruptions were from Trident Volcano (1953–74), but there have been at least eight other, probably larger, explosive events from the volcanoes of this area in the past 10,000 years. This report summarizes what has been learned about the volcanic histories and styles of eruption of all these volcanoes. Many large earthquakes occurred before and during the 1912 eruption, and the cluster of Katmai volcanoes remains seismically active. Because we expect an increase in seismicity before eruptions, seismic monitoring efforts to detect volcanic unrest and procedures for eruption notification and dissemination of information are included in this report. Most at risk from future eruptions of the Katmai volcanic cluster are (1) air-traffic corridors of the North Pacific, including those approaching Anchorage, one of the Pacific’s busiest international airports, (2) several regional airports and military air bases, (3) fisheries and navigation on the Naknek Lake system and Shelikof Strait, (4) pristine wildlife habitat, particularly that of the Alaskan brown bear, and (5) tourist facilities in and near Katmai National Park.

  9. Volcano-seismic activity before and after the Maule 2010 Earthquake (Southern Chile): a comparison between Llaima and Villarrica volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Stock, C.; Thorwart, M.; Wunderlich, T.; Bredemeyer, S.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    Llaima and Villarrica are two of the most actives volcanoes in the Southern Volcanic Zone in the Chilean Andes, with different type of activity and edifice. Llaima is a close vent volcano with constant seismic activity, while Villarrica is an open vent volcano with lava lake at the summit and constant degassing. The relation between volcano eruptions following a great earthquake has been studied in different cases around the world, and it has been the case for the 1960 Valdivia earthquake in southern Chile, where Llaima and Villarrica presented eruptions on the following months to years. This study is focused on characterizing the volcano-seismic activity in the months before and after the M8.8 Maule earthquake on the 27th February 2010. Time series for tremors, long period and volcano tectonic events were obtained from the catalogue of the Volcanic Observatory of the Southern Andes (OVDAS in Spanish) and from the continuous record of the SFB 574 temporary volcanic network. In Villarrica volcano, peaks of activity of tremor and long period events were observed months prior to and after the earthquake, followed by degassing activity, which is consistent with an increase in the activity related to fluids (gas and magma). While in Llaima volcano, a high increase in the volcano tectonic activity was observed directly after the earthquake, consistent with a possible structural adjustment response. The values for pressure change and normal stress were calculated for the Maule earthquake (M8.8) giving results two orders of magnitude lower in comparison to the ones obtained for Valdivia earthquake (M9.5). Finally, these changes in the seismic behavior had lasted over a year, than it is possible to state that the Maule earthquake affected Llaima and Villarrica in some way due to static stress, but given the location and the insufficient critical state of both edifices, it was not possible to generate a great eruption.

  10. Mariner 9 views of shield volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A Martian shield volcano, approximately 25 miles across at the crater, photographed consecutively by Mariner 9 with the wide-angle and telephoto lenses. The summit crater and groves down the flank probably were produced by subsidence flowing subsurface movement of magma.

    Mariner 9 was the first spacecraft to orbit another planet. The spacecraft was designed to continue the atmospheric studies begun by Mariners 6 and 7, and to map over 70% of the Martian surface from the lowest altitude (1500 kilometers [900 miles])and at the highest resolutions (1 kilometer per pixel to 100 meters per pixel) of any previous Mars mission

    Mariner 9 was launched on May 30, 1971 and arrived on November 14, 1971.

  11. Thematic mapper studies of central Andean volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Peter W.

    1987-01-01

    A series of false color composite images covering the volcanic cordillera was written. Each image is 45 km (1536 x 1536 pixels) and was constructed using bands 7, 4, and 2 of the Thematic Mapper (TM) data. Approximately 100 images were prepared to date. A set of LANDSAT Multispectral Scanner (MSS) images was used in conjunction with the TM hardcopy to compile a computer data base of all volcanic structure in the Central Andean province. Over 500 individual structures were identified. About 75 major volcanoes were identified as active, or potentially active. A pilot study was begun combining Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) data with TM for a test area in north Chile and Bolivia.

  12. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a deformation map of the south flank of Kilauea volcano on the big island of Hawaii, centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.25 degrees west longitude. The map was created by combining interferometric radar data -- that is data acquired on different passes of the space shuttle which are then overlayed to obtain elevation information -- acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar during its first flight in April 1994 and its second flight in October 1994. The area shown is approximately 40 kilometers by 80 kilometers (25 miles by 50 miles). North is toward the upper left of the image. The colors indicate the displacement of the surface in the direction that the radar instrument was pointed (toward the right of the image) in the six months between images. The analysis of ground movement is preliminary, but appears consistent with the motions detected by the Global Positioning System ground receivers that have been used over the past five years. The south flank of the Kilauea volcano is among the most rapidly deforming terrains on Earth. Several regions show motions over the six-month time period. Most obvious is at the base of Hilina Pali, where 10 centimeters (4 inches) or more of crustal deformation can be seen in a concentrated area near the coastline. On a more localized scale, the currently active Pu'u O'o summit also shows about 10 centimeters (4 inches) of change near the vent area. Finally, there are indications of additional movement along the upper southwest rift zone, just below the Kilauea caldera in the image. Deformation of the south flank is believed to be the result of movements along faults deep beneath the surface of the volcano, as well as injections of magma, or molten rock, into the volcano's 'plumbing' system. Detection of ground motions from space has proven to be a unique capability of imaging radar technology. Scientists hope to use deformation data acquired by SIR-C/X-SAR and future imaging radar missions to help in better understanding the processes responsible for volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  13. Pulsed oil discharge from a mud volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ian R.; Buthman, David B.; Sager, William W.; Peccini, Michael B.; Guinasso, Norman L., Jr.

    2000-10-01

    In this paper we document instances where change in the magnitude of natural oil seepage coincided with fluctuations of fluid temperature in a seafloor mud volcano. Oil slicks were detected floating near commercial oil fields in the northern Gulf of Mexico in a time series of six satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images collected over a 10 month interval. The oil escaped naturally from a complex of fluid expulsion features at seafloor depths of about 600 m. One of these features was a 50-m-wide, mud- and brine-filled crater. Temperature in the crater fluctuated rapidly during an interval of ˜1 yr (minimum 6.1 °C, maximum 48.3 °C, mean 26.1 °C, standard deviation 9.07). The areas of the oil slicks in the SAR images fluctuated repeatedly between <10 and >1000 ha. The largest oil slicks detected by SAR occurred along with the fastest increase in fluid temperature.

  14. The implementation of a volcano seismic monitoring network in Sete Cidades Volcano, São Miguel, Açores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallenstein, N.; Montalvo, A.; Barata, U.; Ortiz, R.

    2003-04-01

    Sete Cidades is one of the three active central volcanoes of S. Miguel Island, in the Azores archipelago. With a 5 kilometres wide caldera, it has the highest eruptive record in the last 5000 years with 17 intracaldera explosive events (Queiroz, 1997). Only submarine volcanic eruptions occurred in Sete Cidades volcano-tectonic system since the settlement of the island, in the 15th century. Small seismic swarms, some of which were interpreted as being related with magmatic and/or deep hydrothermal origin, characterize the most recent seismo-volcanic activity of Sete Cidades volcano. To complement the regional seismic network, operating since the early 80's, a new local seismic network was designed and installed at Sete Cidades Volcano. It includes 5 digital stations being one 5-seconds three-component station located inside the caldera and four 10-seconds one-component stations placed on the caldera rim. The solution found for the digital telemetry is based on UHF 19,2 Kbps radio modems linking four of the seismic stations to a central point, where the fifth station is installed. At this site, signals are synchronised with a GPS receiver, stored in a PC and re-transmitted to the Azores University Volcanological Observatory by an 115,2 Kbps Spread Spectrum 2.4 Ghz Radio Modem Network. Seismic signal tests carried out in all the area showed that cultural and sea noise, as well as some scattering effects due to the geological nature of the terrain (composed by thick pumice and ash deposits) and the topographic effects are factors that can not be avoidable and will be present in future records. This low cost network with locally developed and assembled components, based on short-period sensors without signal filtering in the field and digital telemetry, will improve the detection and location of low magnitude events in the Sete Cidades volcano area. Future developments of this program will include the installation of a seismic array inside the caldera to identify and characterize LP events and volcanic tremor signals.

  15. Volcano Flank Structures on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, B.; Byrne, P. K.; Mathieu, L.; Murray, J. B.; Troll, V. R.

    2007-12-01

    Shield volcanoes on Earth and Mars share common features, including calderas and pit crater chains. A set of structures present on the sides of several of the large shields on Mars are not regarded as having Earth analogues, however. Flank terraces are topographically subtle structures, characterised by a gentle convex profile and a distinctive "fish scale" imbricate distribution pattern. Magma chamber inflation, lithospheric flexure, flank relaxation, or gravitational slumping have been suggested as terrace formation mechanisms. Terraces on both Mars and Earth are clearly visible only in slope maps, and may thus escape visual detection in the field. We show that both Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Etna (Sicily) display the same characteristic "fish scale" terrace pattern. This pattern delineates structures that we contend are terrestrial flank terraces. Heterogeneities in volcano geometry, due to buttressing or extension, result in terrace distributions that are not as evenly circumferential as those on Mars. Plan and cross-sectional profiles, however, parallel those of the Martian structures. These structures may also be present on Alayta (Ethiopia), Santa Cruz (Galapagos), and Tendürek Dagi (Turkey). Another type of structure, larger and steeper than flank terraces but sharing a similar plan-view morphology, is also present on Mauna Lau and Etna. These "flank bulges" appear to correlate with structures on Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion), Cosiguina (Nicaragua), and Karthala (Comoros) on Earth, and Apollinaris Patera and Tharsis Tholus on Mars. Elsewhere (Paul K. Byrne et al., this volume) we argue that lithospheric flexure is a likely formation mechanism for Martian terraces. Flexure is active beneath Mauna Loa, and possibly under Etna, and so may also be responsible for terrestrial flank terraces. Scaled analogue models suggest that the larger flank bulges are due to magma intrusions derived from large chambers within these edifices. There is thus a strong morphological link between deformation, intrusion, and surface topography. Additionally, as these structures occur on both planets, the governing tectonic and volcanological processes are fundamentally the same for Earth and Mars.

  16. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional image of the volcano Kilauea was generated based on interferometric fringes derived from two X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data takes on April 13, 1994 and October 4, 1994. The altitude lines are based on quantitative interpolation of the topographic fringes. The level difference between neighboring altitude lines is 20 meters (66 feet). The ground area covers 12 kilometers by 4 kilometers (7.5 miles by 2.5 miles). The altitude difference in the image is about 500 meters (1,640 feet). The volcano is located around 19.58 degrees north latitude and 155.55 degrees west longitude. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR. The Instituto Ricerca Elettromagnetismo Componenti Elettronici (IRECE) at the University of Naples was a partner in the interferometry analysis.

  17. Continental basaltic volcanoes — Processes and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G. A.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2008-11-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanoes are the most common volcanic landforms on the continents. They encompass a range of morphologies from small pyroclastic constructs to larger shields and reflect a wide range of eruptive processes. This paper reviews physical volcanological aspects of continental basaltic eruptions that are driven primarily by magmatic volatiles. Explosive eruption styles include Hawaiian and Strombolian ( sensu stricto) and violent Strombolian end members, and a full spectrum of styles that are transitional between these end members. The end-member explosive styles generate characteristic facies within the resulting pyroclastic constructs (proximal) and beyond in tephra fall deposits (medial to distal). Explosive and effusive behavior can be simultaneous from the same conduit system and is a complex function of composition, ascent rate, degassing, and multiphase processes. Lavas are produced by direct effusion from central vents and fissures or from breakouts (boccas, located along cone slopes or at the base of a cone or rampart) that are controlled by varying combinations of cone structure, feeder dike processes, local effusion rate and topography. Clastogenic lavas are also produced by rapid accumulation of hot material from a pyroclastic column, or by more gradual welding and collapse of a pyroclastic edifice shortly after eruptions. Lava flows interact with — and counteract — cone building through the process of rafting. Eruption processes are closely coupled to shallow magma ascent dynamics, which in turn are variably controlled by pre-existing structures and interaction of the rising magmatic mixture with wall rocks. Locations and length scales of shallow intrusive features can be related to deeper length scales within the magma source zone in the mantle. Coupling between tectonic forces, magma mass flux, and heat flow range from weak (low magma flux basaltic fields) to sufficiently strong that some basaltic fields produce polygenetic composite volcanoes with more evolved compositions. Throughout the paper we identify key problems where additional research will help to advance our overall understanding of this important type of volcanism.

  18. The 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Rebecca; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2015-04-01

    The 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland, was much more explosive than previous eruptions, specifically its 2004 eruption. This research examines the degassing processes of the 2011 eruption, through density and vesicule analyses, to help uncover the reasons for the more vigorous eruption. Over 1200 collected tephra samples from the 2011 sequences are measured for density and vesicularity. Several samples are chosen to be representative of eruptive phases; samples from the beginning of the eruption, the mid-eruption and the end phases are chosen. These pumice samples are impregnated with epoxy and made into plugs for use in a Scanning Electron Microscope with which, a nested image approach is taken to image the vesicules of the samples at different magnifications. Each backscatter image is converted to binary and corrected using GIMP. Using ImageJ software, quantitative vesicularity analysis of the images is performed and results are converted to volume. The density, quantitative vesicularity, and volume results are assessed for patterns and the processes of the magma during the ascent in the conduit and eruptive phases are inferred. The objective of this research is to use the microscopic vesicularity analyses of the eruptive products to theorize the larger scale magmatic and degassing processes and to understand why the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption was uncharacteristically explosive. Currently, the results are being examined and have not been included in this abstract, however the research will be finalized in time for presentation at the EGU 2015 conference. Keywords: Grímsvötn volcano, quantitative vesicularity analysis, bubble size distribution, volcanic degassing, conduit processes

  19. Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration - Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect

    William L. Osborn, Susan Petty, Trenton T. Cladouhos, Joe Iovenitti, Laura Nofziger, Owen Callahan, Douglas S. Perry and Paul L. Stern

    2011-10-23

    Phase I of the Newberry Volcano Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration included permitting, community outreach, seismic hazards analysis, initial microseismic array deployment and calibration, final MSA design, site characterization, and stimulation planning. The multi-disciplinary Phase I site characterization supports stimulation planning and regulatory permitting, as well as addressing public concerns including water usage and induced seismicity. A review of the project'Ã?Â?Ã?Â?s water usage plan by an independent hydrology consultant found no expected impacts to local stakeholders, and recommended additional monitoring procedures. The IEA Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems was applied to assess site conditions, properly inform stakeholders, and develop a comprehensive mitigation plan. Analysis of precision LiDAR elevation maps has concluded that there is no evidence of recent faulting near the target well. A borehole televiewer image log of the well bore revealed over three hundred fractures and predicted stress orientations. No natural, background seismicity has been identified in a review of historic data, or in more than seven months of seismic data recorded on an array of seven seismometers operating around the target well. A seismic hazards and induced seismicity risk assessment by an independent consultant concluded that the Demonstration would contribute no additional risk to residents of the nearest town of La Pine, Oregon. In Phase II of the demonstration, an existing deep hot well, NWG 55-29, will be stimulated using hydroshearing techniques to create an EGS reservoir. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is allowing geothermal industry and academic experts to develop, validate and enhance geoscience and engineering techniques, and other procedures essential to the expansion of EGS throughout the country. Successful development will demonstrate to the American public that EGS can play a significant role in reducing foreign energy dependence, and provide clean, renewable, baseload geothermal power generation in the State of Oregon.

  20. The Volcano Listserv and its use in Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, E.; Fink, J. H.

    2002-05-01

    Volcano Listserv (volcano@asu.edu) is an electronic mailing list created in 1984 to encourage volcanologists' use of the then-new electronic communication medium. It is used for the distribution of volcanic activity reports, conference and field trip announcements, employment opportunities, and other items of interest to the volcanologic community. Today there are over 2500 subscribers from 56 nations; list members include university faculty and students, members of various geological surveys, aviation officials, newspaper and television reporters, researchers from a range of industries, program directors from federal granting agencies, and interested members of the public. Volcano Listserv also acts as the official IAVCEI mailing list. Here we discuss the role of Volcano Listserv in higher education, focusing on its use in university courses that have volcanological content.

  1. Evidence for explosive volcanic density currents on certain Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, C. E.; Komar, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The morphologies of certain of the smaller Martian volcanoes are discussed as possible results of explosive volcanic density currents. An examination of newly-photographed flank and caldera features of the Martian volcanoes Ceraunius Tholus, Uranius Tholus, Uranius Patera and Hecates Tholus, including steep slope angles, Krakatoa-type caldera morphologies, erosional features (radial channels and anastamosing gullies) and constructional features (blanketed flanks and possible lava deltas) reveals their similarity to terrestrial cones and composite volcanoes such as Barcena Volcano. Crater age data from the surface of Martian domes and shields indicates that such explosive activity occurred more frequently early in Martian geologic history, consistent with the view that the volcanic density currents were base surges rather than nuees ardentes, with the melting of permafrost supplying the water required in base surge generation.

  2. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Poland, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Klauea volcano (Figure 1)one of the most active volcanoes on Earthhas provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  3. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, Jim; Poland, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Kilauea volcano (Figure 1)—one of the most active volcanoes on Earth—has provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  4. Threat of Flank Collapse at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Case Example

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barb Tewksbury

    Students evaluate fault and earthquake data plus focal mechanism solutions, and develop a picture of on-going deformation of the south flank of Kilauea Volcano that might one day transition to catastrophic flank collapse.

  5. The 1960 Kapoho Eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Frances Kakugawa

    This web page covers the progress of the early 1960 Kapoho eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and the damage it caused. The eruption caused havoc in lower Puna, an idyllic rural paradise until the lava fountains and flows covered farm land and villages including Kapoho Village and parts of Koa`e Village. During this time, the volcano's summit deflated and eventually collapsed. This page is part of a web series on major Kilauea eruptions. The user can view a series of maps for mid- to late January 1960, showing lava coverage, faults, and lava barriers. A memorial poem for Kapoho village is included. Other links include a photo gallery of volcanoes, and a resource on how volcanoes work.

  6. Chasing lava: a geologist's adventures at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, Wendell A.

    2003-01-01

    A lively account of the three years (1969-1972) spent by geologist Wendell Duffield working at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at Kilauea, one of the world's more active volcanoes. Abundantly illustrated in b&w and color, with line drawings and maps, as well. Volcanologists and general readers alike will enjoy author Wendell Duffield's report from Kilauea--home of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanoes. Duffield's narrative encompasses everything from the scientific (his discovery that the movements of cooled lava on a lava lake mimic the movements of the earth's crust, providing an accessible model for understanding plate tectonics) to the humorous (his dog's discovery of a snake on the supposedly snake-free island) to the life-threatening (a colleague's plunge into molten lava). This charming account of living and working at Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, is sure to be a delight.

  7. Operation of a digital seismic network on Mount St. Helens volcano and observations of long period seismic events that originate under the volcano

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Fehler; Bernard Chouet

    1982-01-01

    During 1981 we operated, with the cooperation of the U. S. Geological Survey, a 9 station digital seismic array on Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington State. One of our stations was placed inside the crater of the volcano, six were located on the flanks of the volcano within two km of the crater and two were approximately ten km

  8. The Middle East Institute

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dedicated to "keeping the public objectively informed about the Middle East," the Middle East Institute provides a number of resources to this end. Visitors to the site can access the table of contents, abstracts, and some complete articles from The Middle East Journal; read online policy briefs about current events in the region; review descriptions of the Institute's published monographs; and consult an online searchable catalog of over 2,400 scholarly works in Middle Eastern studies published in the 1990s. The XML-based catalog can be searched by keyword, title, author, or any of the cataloged fields. Two online texts are also posted here: An Introduction to Islam (see the September 3, 1999 Scout Report) and, in the rare books section of the library, Mehemet the Kurd and Other Tales by Charles Wells (requires multidoc pro to view TEI (SGML)).

  9. British Museum: Middle East

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website from the British Museum lets visitors explore the Middle East in an online tour. The main page of the Middle East section allows the visitor to explore the Middle East via the themes of "Agatha Christie and archaeology", "The kingdoms of ancient South Arabia", "The Queen of Sheba", and "Iran before Islam: The Sasanians". After the visitor clicks on a theme, they will see thumbnails of artifacts to click on, which when chosen, will be accompanied by an explanation of the artifact. Related photos, drawings, charts, etc. may also appear below the photo of the artifact, and can be enlarged by clicking on it directly. Visitors should not miss the "Queen of Sheba" theme to see some works of art that have depicted this austere leader throughout recorded history.

  10. Reconnaissance seismology at nine volcanoes of the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Krzesni, D.; Button, N.; Welch, M.; Jay, J.; Henderson, S.; Glass, B.; Soler, V.; Amigo, A.; Sunagua, M.; Minaya, E.; Clavero, J. E.; Barrientos, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    The seismicity of the volcanoes of the central Andes of Bolivia and Chile is poorly constrained. We have deployed small temporary networks (1 to 5 stations each) of short and intermediate period seismometers for several months to years at eight potentially active volcanoes in Chile and Bolivia between the years 2004 and 2011. We record background seismicity at these volcanoes for the first time in order to compare it with other manifestations of volcanic activity like fumaroles, ground deformation, and satellite observed thermal anomalies as well as setting a baseline for future episodes of unrest. Seismometers were deployed near the volcanoes Irruputuncu, Olca, Olla\\:{u}e, Parinacota, Isluga, Guallatiri, Putana, all near the Chile-Bolivia border, Láscar volcano, Chile, and the hydrothermal field Sol de Manana, Bolivia. All of these areas were selected because they have thermal anomalies in nighttime satellite ASTER infrared observations, active fumaroles, or recent eruptive activity. The seismic data were used to create a catalog for the region containing more than 5000 local and regional earthquake locations. All phase arrivals were picked manually by visually inspecting waveforms and locations were determined using the generalized earthquake-location (GENLOC) program that is part of the Antelope software package. Over the course of 4 months, Ollag\\:{u}e volcano was found to be most active with an average of 1.5 earthquakes per day within 25km, and sometimes as many as 10 per day. Over the course of 10 months, Guallatiri volcano was found to the be most active of the volcanoes monitored in Chile with an average of 0.7 earthquakes per day within 25km, and sometimes as many as 7 per day. Earthquake swarms were identified near Ollag\\:{u}e, Guallatiri, Puchuldiza Geysers, Putana, and potentially Parinacota. The swarms at Puchuldiza were recorded on at least two different days, one swarm consisted of more than 20 earthquakes in a time period of about about 5 hours. Swarms at Putana volcano in late 2009 may correspond in time with a pulse of ground uplift observed by satellite InSAR, but the other swarms do not appear to have measurable deformation associated with them. Putana also appears to have numerous small local earthquakes triggered by the 27 February 2010 M_{w} 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake (about 1600 km distant) as did the nearby Uturuncu volcano in Bolivia. On the other hand, Láscar volcano in Chile did not have significant triggered local seismicity from the 2010 earthquake in spite of having many more recent eruptions than Putana and Uturuncu.

  11. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, an Update: 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Greenland and others, 1985; Casadevall and others, 1987; Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and Sutton, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). Compilations of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 2001 are available on the web. (Elias and others, 1998 and 2002). This report updates the database through 2006, and documents the changes in data collection and processing that have occurred during the interval 2002-2006. During the period covered by this report, Kilauea continued to release SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and east rift zone (ERZ) (Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and others, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). These two distinct sources are always measured independently (fig.1). Sulphur Banks is a minor source of SO2 and does not contribute significantly to the total emissions for Kilauea (Stoiber and Malone, 1975). From 1979 until 2003, summit and east rift zone emission rates were derived using vehicle- and tripod- based Correlation Spectrometry (COSPEC) measurements. In late 2003, we began to augment traditional COSPEC measurements with data from one of the new generation of miniature spectrometer systems, the FLYSPEC (Horton and others, 2006; Elias and others, 2006, Williams-Jones and others, 2006).

  12. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, an Update: 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jefferson

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Greenland and others, 1985; Casadevall and others, 1987; Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001). A compilation of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 1997 is available as Open-File Report 98-462 (Elias and others, 1998) and on the web at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/products/OF98462/. The purpose of this report is to update the existing database through 2001. Kilauea releases SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and east rift zone (ERZ) (fig. 1), as described in previous reports (Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001). These two distinct sources are quantified independently. The summit and east rift zone emission rates reported here were derived using vehicle-based Correlation Spectrometry (COSPEC) measurements as described in Elias and others (1998). In 1998 and 1999, these measurements were augmented with airborne and tripod-based surveys.

  13. Lidar observations of Nabro volcano aerosol layers in the stratosphere over Gwangju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D.; Müller, D.; Lee, K.; Shin, S.; Kim, Y. J.; Song, C. K.; Noh, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first Raman lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosol layers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Korea. The data were taken with the multiwavelength aerosol Raman lidar at Gwangju (35.10° N, 126.53° E), Korea. The volcanic ash particles and gases were released around 12 June 2011 during the eruption of the Nabro volcano (13.37° N, 41.7° E) in Eritrea, east Africa. Forward trajectory computations show that the volcanic aerosols were advected from North Africa to East Asia. The first observation of the stratospheric aerosol layers over Korea was on 19 June 2011. The stratospheric aerosol layers appeared between 15 and 17 km height a.s.l. The aerosol layers' maximum value of the backscatter coefficient and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm were 1.5 ± 0.3 Mm-1 sr-1 and 2.2%, respectively. We found these values at 16.4 km height a.s.l. 44 days after this first observation, we observed the stratospheric aerosol layer again. We continuously probed the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for this aerosol layer during the following 5 months, until December 2011. The aerosol layers typically occurred between 10 and 20 km height a.s.l. The stratospheric aerosol optical depth and the maximum backscatter coefficient at 532 nm decreased during these 5 months.

  14. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2013 East African Rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin; Jones, Eric S.; Stadler, Timothy J.; Barnhart, William D.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rifting in East Africa is not all coeval; volcanism and faulting have been an ongoing phenomenon on the continent since the Eocene (~45 Ma). The rifting began in northern East Africa, and led to the separation of the Nubia (Africa) and Arabia plates in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, and in the Lake Turkana area at the Kenya-Ethiopia border. A Paleogene mantle superplume beneath East Africa caused extension within the Nubia plate, as well as a first order topographic high known as the African superswell which now includes most of the eastern and southern sectors of the Nubia plate. Widespread volcanism erupted onto much of the rising plateau in Ethiopia during the Eocene-Oligocene (45–29 Ma), with chains of volcanoes forming along the rift separating Africa and Arabia. Since the initiation of rifting in northeastern Africa, the system has propagated over 3,000 km to the south and southwest, and it experiences seismicity as a direct result of the extension and active magmatism.

  15. The volcano-tectonic evolution of Concepción, Nicaragua

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Borgia; Benjamin van Wyk de Vries

    2003-01-01

    We describe the evolution of Concepción volcano by integrating regional geology, eruptive activity, morphology, stratigraphy,\\u000a petrology, structure and active deformation data. This Nicaraguan volcano is set close to the back limb of the northwest-trending\\u000a Tertiary Rivas anticline, a regional structure that bounds the southwest side of Lake Nicaragua. Concepción rises 1,600 m\\u000a above a 1-km-thick sequence of Quaternary lacustrine mud-stones.

  16. The structure and geomorphology of the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Hovland; Andrew Hill; David Stokes

    1997-01-01

    The large-scale and small-scale (< 10 m) structure and geomorphology of the active Dashgil mud volcano in central Azerbaijan, have been studied. Through historical records it is known that this mud volcano has major eruptions every 6–32 years. The activity observed during two field trips in 1995, consisted of low-energy venting and debouching of mud, water, oil, and gas from

  17. Chapopote Asphalt Volcano may have been generated by supercritical water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hovland; I. R. MacDonald; H. Rueslåtten; H. K. Johnsen; T. Naehr; G. Bohrmann

    2005-01-01

    Asphalt volcanoes and lava-like flows of solidified asphalt on the seafloor (Figure 1) were first discovered and described by MacDonald et al. [2004]. The flows covered more than one square kilometer of a dissected salt dome at abyssal depths (˜3000 m) in the southern Gulf of Mexico. ``Chapopote'' (93°26'W, 21°54'N) was one of two asphalt volcanoes they discovered. MacDonald et

  18. Volcanic geology of Furnas Volcano, São Miguel, Azores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E Guest; J. L Gaspar; P. D Cole; G Queiroz; A. M Duncan; N Wallenstein; T Ferreira; J.-M Pacheco

    1999-01-01

    Furnas is the easternmost of the three active central volcanoes on the island of São Miguel in the Azores. Unlike the other two central volcanoes, Sete Cidades and Fogo, Furnas does not have a well-developed edifice, but consists of a steep-sided caldera complex 8×5 km across. It is built on the outer flanks of the Povoação\\/Nordeste lava complex that forms

  19. A Dynamic Bayesian Network for Mt. Etna Volcano State Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavo', Flavio; Cassisi, Carmelo; Aliotta, Marco; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido; Prestifilippo, Michele

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, the real-time monitoring of Mt. Etna volcano is mostly delegated to one or more human experts in volcanology, who interpret the data coming from different kind of monitoring networks. Among their duties, the evaluation of the volcano state is one of the most critical task for civil protection purposes. Unfortunately, the coupling of highly non-linear and complex volcanic dynamic processes leads to measurable effects that can show a large variety of different behaviors. Moreover, due to intrinsic uncertainties and possible failures in some recorded data the volcano state needs to be expressed in probabilistic terms, thus making the fast volcano state assessment sometimes impracticable for the personnel on duty at the 24h control room. With the aim of aiding the personnel on duty in volcano monitoring, here we present an expert system approach based on Bayesian networks to estimate automatically the ongoing volcano state from all the available different kind of measurements. A Bayesian network is a static probabilistic graphical model that represents a set of random variables and their conditional dependencies via a directed acyclic graph. We consider model variables both the measurements and the possible states of the volcano. In order to include the time in the model, we use a Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) which relates variables to each other over adjacent time steps. The model output consists of an estimation of the probability distribution of the feasible volcano states. We build the model by considering the long record of data from 2011 to 2014 and we cross-validate it by considering 3 years for parameter estimation and 1 year for testing in simulated real-time mode.

  20. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawaii

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christina Heliker

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) on-line publication highlights the volcanic hazards facing the people living on the Island of Hawaii. These hazards include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, earthquakes and tsunamis. This report discusses these hazards, the volcanoes of Mauna Loa and Kilauea, and the work of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to monitor and issue warnings to the people affected by these hazards.

  1. Study of volcano/ice interactions gains momentum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Mary G.; Smellie, John L.; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Gulick, Virginia C.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; Skilling, Ian P.

    2001-01-01

    Observations of recent volcanic eruptions in Iceland and detailed studies of sub-glacially erupted deposits and the interaction of lava and pyroclastic flows with snow and ice have provided important new data that should lead to significant advances in the understanding of volcano/ice interaction on Earth and Mars. A conference on this subject, the first of its kind, recently brought together geologists, geophysicists, glaciologists, and planetary scientists studying various aspects of volcano-ice interaction.

  2. Estimates of elastic plate thicknesses beneath large volcanos on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Patrick J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    Megellan radar imaging and topography data are now available for a number of volcanos on Venus greater than 100 km in radius. These data can be examined to reveal evidence of the flexural response of the lithosphere to the volcanic load. On Earth, flexure beneath large hotspot volcanos results in an annual topographic moat that is partially to completely filled in by sedimentation and mass wasting from the volcano's flanks. On Venus, erosion and sediment deposition are considered to be negligible at the resolution of Magellan images. Thus, it may be possible to observe evidence of flexure by the ponding of recent volcanic flows in the moat. We also might expect to find topographic signals from unfilled moats surrounding large volcanos on Venus, although these signals may be partially obscured by regional topography. Also, in the absence of sedimentation, tectonic evidence of deformation around large volcanos should be evident except where buried by very young flows. We use analytic solutions in axisymmetric geometry for deflections and stresses resulting from loading of a plate overlying an inviscid fluid. Solutions for a set of disk loads are superimposed to obtain a solution for a conical volcano. The deflection of the lithosphere produces an annular depression or moat, the extent of which can be estimated by measuring the distance from the volcano's edge to the first zero crossing or to the peak of the flexural arch. Magellan altimetry data records (ARCDRs) from data cycle 1 are processed using the GMT mapping and graphics software to produce topographic contour maps of the volcanos. We then take topographic profiles that cut across the annular and ponded flows seen on the radar images. By comparing the locations of these flows to the predicted moat locations from a range of models, we estimate the elastic plate thickness that best fits the observations, together with the uncertainty in that estimate.

  3. East Sakhalin island arc paleosystem of the Sea of Okhotsk region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannik, V. M.

    2012-08-01

    It has been established that volcanic rocks of the Schmidt, Rymnik, and Terpeniya terranes are fragments of the compound Early to Late Cretaceous-Paleogene East Sakhalin island arc system of the Sea of Okhotsk region. This island arc paleosystem was composed of back-arc volcano-plutonic belt, frontal volcanic island arc, fore-arc, inter-arc, and back-arc basins, and the Sakhalin marginal paleobasin. The continental volcanic rocks dominate in the back-arc volcano-plutonic belt and frontal volcanic island arc. The petrochemical composition of basalts, basaltic andesites, andesites, and trachytes from the frontal island arc formed in submarine conditions are typical of oceanic island arc or marginal sea rocks (IAB). The petrochemical composition of volcanic rocks from the island arc structures indicates its formation on the heterogeneous basement including the continental and oceanic blocks.

  4. East wing. Elevation of east side along Presidio Avenue, as ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East wing. Elevation of east side along Presidio Avenue, as seen from the rooftop of the Laurel Inn across the street. - Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 29. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR. ALUMINUMFRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR. ALUMINUM-FRAME SLIDING-GLASS WINDOWS ARE REPLACEMENTS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  6. 35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front of powerhouse and car barn. 'Annex' is right end of building. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. Perspective view looking from the east to the east northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view looking from the east to the east northeast facade, with Swiss Chalet in background, to replicate the view shown in MD-1109-J-18 - National Park Seminary, Japanese Pagoda, 2805 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  8. 3. East side, details of north half of east web; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. East side, details of north half of east web; also details of roadway, railing and overhead bracing; looking northeast - Dodd Ford Bridge, County Road 147 Spanning Blue Earth River, Amboy, Blue Earth County, MN

  9. 11. VIEW EAST, DETAIL OF EAST TRUSS AND SIDEWALK HANDRAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW EAST, DETAIL OF EAST TRUSS AND SIDEWALK HANDRAIL - Osborn Avenue Bridge, Spanning New Jersey Transit Raritan Valley Line at Tuttle Parkway (formerly Osborn Avenue), Westfield, Union County, NJ

  10. INTERIOR VIEW OF EAST SIDE WALL AND DOOR, FACING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF EAST SIDE WALL AND DOOR, FACING EAST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Wing & Fuselage Assembly Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 10. BUILDING: SECOND FLOOR (East Section), VIEW SOUTH: EAST, SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. BUILDING: SECOND FLOOR (East Section), VIEW SOUTH: EAST, SOUTH AND WEST WALLS OF COLD STORAGE, ALSO SHOWING REMNANTS OF COOLING PIPES - Boston Beer Company, 225-249 West Second Street, South Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. 12. Detail from east river bank, showing east abutment and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail from east river bank, showing east abutment and pylons and truss geometry under roadway, looking upward and northeast - French King Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River on State Highway 2, Erving, Franklin County, MA

  13. 2. VIEW SOUTHEAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHEAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  14. 12. VIEW EAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 130 SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW EAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 130 SOUTH ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  15. 48. AUXILIARY CHAMBER (EAST END), VIEW LOOKING EAST SHOWING ELECTRICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. AUXILIARY CHAMBER (EAST END), VIEW LOOKING EAST SHOWING ELECTRICAL PENETRATION AND AIR LOCK (LOCATION GGG) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  16. Unearthing The Eruptive Personality Of El Salvador's Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano Though In-depth Stratigraphic Analysis Of Pre-1904 Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Martinez-Hackert, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) volcano (2384 m) in densely populated El Salvador Central America presents serious volcanic hazard potential. The volcano is a prevalent part of every day life in El Salvador; the sugarcane and coffee belt of the country are to its Southern and Western flanks, recreational areas lies to its East, and second and third largest cities of El Salvador exist within its 25 km radius. Understanding the eruptive characteristics and history is imperative due to the volcano's relative size (the highest in the country) and it's explosive, composite nature. Historical records indicate at least 9 potential VEI 3 eruptions since 1521 AD. The volcano's relative inaccessibility and potential hazards do not promote a vast reservoir of research activity, as can be seen in the scarcity of published papers on topics prior to the 1904 eruption. This research represents the first steps towards creating a comprehensive stratigraphic record of the crater and characterizing its eruptive history, with an eventual goal of recreating the volcanic structure prior to its collapse. Samples of pre-1904 eruptive material were taken from the southern wall of an E-W oriented fluvial gully located within the SSW of the tertiary crater. These were analyzed using thin sections and optical microscopy, grain size distribution techniques, and scanning electron microscopy. The 15-layer sequence indicates an explosive history characterized by intense phreatomagmatic phases, plinian, sub-plinian and basaltic/andesitic composition strombolian activity. Another poster within the session will discuss an older sequence within the walls of the secondary crater. Further detailed studies will be required to gain a better understanding of the characteristics of Santa Ana Volcano.

  17. Investigation of the Dashigil mud volcano (Azerbaijan) using beryllium-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. J.; Baskaran, M.; Jweda, J.; Feyzullayev, A. A.; Aliyev, C.; Matsuzaki, H.; Jull, A. J. T.

    2013-01-01

    We collected and analyzed five sediments from three mud volcano (MV) vents and six suspended and bottom sediment samples from the adjoining river near the Dashgil mud volcano in Azerbaijan for 10Be. These three MV are found among the 190 onshore and >150 offshore MV in this region which correspond to the western flank of the South Caspian depression. These MVs overlie the faulted and petroleum-bearing anticlines. The 10Be concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are comparable to the values reported for mud volcanoes in Trinidad Island. It appears that the stable Be concentrations in Azerbaijan rivers are not perturbed by anthropogenic effects and are comparable to the much older sediments (mud volcano samples). The 10Be and 9Be concentrations in our river sediments are compared to the global data set and show that the 10Be values found for Kura River are among the lowest of any river for which data exist. We attribute this low 10Be concentration to the nature of surface minerals which are affected by the residual hydrocarbon compounds that occur commonly in the study area in particular and Azerbaijan at large. The concentrations of 40K and U-Th-series radionuclides (234Th, 210Pb, 226Ra, and 228Ra) indicate overall homogeneity of the mud volcano samples from the three different sites. Based on the 10Be concentrations of the mud volcano samples, the age of the mud sediments could be at least as old as 4 myr.

  18. Experimental study of volcanoes and hydrothermal reservoirs triggered by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Thomas R.; Woith, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    Evidences are increasing that tectonic earthquakes may trigger volcanic activity. Some volcanoes erupt immediately after a tectonic earthquake occurred. Other volcanoes merely show signs of unrest, but no eruption. Still other volcanoes show no response, even though they are in a state of a generally high activity. The problem in volcano-earthquake interaction research is that the physical processes of the triggering are only poorly understood. Some recent studies suggest a combination of (quasi)static and dynamic triggering, associated with permanent crustal strain or the short term passing of seismic waves, respectively. However, no consensus exists concerning the type of waveform most effective for the triggering process, or about the time delays often observed between the passage of the seismic waves and unrest occurrence. In order to better understand the way earthquakes may trigger volcanoes, we first collected empirical data and re-evaluate the empirical database. Second, we designed laboratory experiments to simulate selected real scenarios as recorded by geophysical instruments. Our analog reservoir is situated on an earthquake simulator, constructed to allow systematic exploration and scenario simulation of empirical observables. For instance, we evaluate how the frequency and amplitude of seismic waves affects a bubbling fluid, leading to fluid mobilization, mixing and ultimately to the increase of a reservoir pressure. The implications of the results are wide, and may apply to volcanoes triggered by earthquakes, as well as other fluid reservoirs containing different fluids and/or gaseous phases.

  19. Identification of a potential monogenetic volcano using seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Denis; Bataille, Klaus; Cembrano, Jose; Pavez, Andres; Bashkar, Kundu; Gahalaut, Vineet; Perez, Raul

    2014-05-01

    Some monogenetic volcano fields are very close to cities, such as in New Zealand or in México. A new monogenetic volcano may appear at any place and at any time, which could be potentially hazardous for nearby regions. The ability to detect a new one in advance is obviously very important and challenging. The existence of nearby seismometers may help for such detection. Magma sometimes reaches the surface with the birth of a volcano which can be monogenetic, but in other cases the magma does not reach the surface How to detect such movements? How to be sure the magma will reach the surface? Some observations may detect them, such as seismicity which is distributed as a swarm, with a very peculiar distribution in time and magnitudes. In particular, it is important to distinguish between a tectonic swarm and a volcanic swarm. Scaling laws of seismicity in magnitude and time help to perform such a distinction. We show three cases: a seismic swarm in Chile, in the 2007 Aysen crisis, corresponding to an aborted birth of a monogenetic volcano; a seismic swarm triggered after the 2004 great Mw~9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake over an old monogenetic volcano; and a spatial study of monogenetic volcanoes in Mexico (Michoacán) showing the difficulty to forecast the place and time of the birth of a monogenetic cone without seismological records.

  20. Operational Monitoring of Volcanoes Using Keyhole Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanoes are some of the most geologically powerful, dynamic, visually appealing structures on the Earth's landscape. Volcanic eruptions are hard to predict, difficult to quantify and impossible to prevent, making effective monitoring a difficult proposition. In Alaska, volcanoes are an intrinsic part of the culture, with over 100 volcanoes and volcanic fields that have been active in historic time monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). Observations and research are performed using a suite of methods and tools in the fields of remote sensing, seismology, geodesy and geology, producing large volumes of geospatial data. Keyhole Markup Language (KML) offers a context in which these different, and in the past disparate, data can be displayed simultaneously. Dynamic links keep these data current, allowing it to be used in an operational capacity. KML is used to display information from the aviation color codes and activity alert levels for volcanoes to locations of thermal anomalies, earthquake locations and ash plume modeling. The dynamic refresh and time primitive are used to display volcano webcam and satellite image overlays in near real-time. In addition a virtual globe browser using KML, such as Google Earth, provides an interface to further information using the hyperlink, rich- text and flash-embedding abilities supported within object description balloons. By merging these data sets in an easy to use interface, a virtual globe browser provides a better tool for scientists and emergency managers alike to mitigate volcanic crises.

  1. Implications for eruptive processes as indicated by sulfur dioxide emissions from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, 1979-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Gerlach, T.M.; Stokes, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Ki??lauea Volcano, Hawai'i, currently hosts the longest running SO2 emission-rate data set on the planet, starting with initial surveys done in 1975 by Stoiber and his colleagues. The 17.5-year record of summit emissions, starting in 1979, shows the effects of summit and east rift eruptive processes, which define seven distinctly different periods of SO2 release. Summit emissions jumped nearly 40% with the onset (3 January 1983) of the Pu'u 'O??'o??-Ku??paianaha eruption on the east rift zone (ERZ). Summit SO2 emissions from Ki??lauea showed a strong positive correlation with short-period, shallow, caldera events, rather than with long-period seismicity as in more silicious systems. This correlation suggests a maturation process in the summit magma-transport system from 1986 through 1993. During a steady-state throughput-equilibrium interval of the summit magma reservoir, integration of summit-caldera and ERZ SO2 emissions reveals an undegassed volume rate of effusion of 2.1 ?? 105 m3/d. This value corroborates the volume-rate determined by geophysical methods, demonstrating that, for Ki??lauea, SO2 emission rates can be used to monitor effusion rate, supporting and supplementing other, more established geophysical methods. For the 17.5 years of continuous emission rate records at Ki??lauea, the volcano has released 9.7 ?? 106 t (metric tonnes) of SO2, 1.7 ?? 106 t from the summit and 8.0 ?? 106 t from the east rift zone. On an annual basis, the average SO2 release from Ki??lauea is 4.6 ?? 105 t/y, compared to the global annual volcanic emission rate of 1.2 ?? 107 t/y. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Remote Monitoring of Persistent Thermal Features at Volcanoes: A Survey of Alaskan Volcanoes Using Satellite and Airborne Thermal Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, R.; Vaughan, R.; Patrick, M. R.; Ramsey, M.

    2012-12-01

    Repeat thermal imaging of volcanoes is important for describing baseline thermal behavior in order to detect future volcanic unrest or eruption precursors. Over 15,000 ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) day and night thermal infrared (TIR) views of Alaskan volcanoes have been acquired since early 2000 revealing many persistent thermal features. This presentation will report results of our ongoing assessment of TIR data for detecting and measuring small (<100m) and/or low-temperature (30 - 100°C) thermal features on volcanoes. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors the status of volcanoes throughout Alaska and relies heavily on satellite remote sensing. AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensors provide frequent (10-20/day), low-resolution (1 - 8km/pixel) TIR data which are used to detect volcanic emissions and elevated surface temperatures. While these low-resolution data are critical for detecting eruptions and ash clouds, smaller low-temperature features, such as fumaroles, are typically not detected by AVHRR and MODIS TIR. This work augments the existing AVO long-term temperature measurements of background and eruption thermal features observed in low-resolution satellite data by using much higher spatial resolution satellite and ground-based TIR data. ASTER is programmed to acquire several images per year at every volcano on Earth. The ASTER Urgent Request Protocol (URP) provides additional acquisitions via a rapid response system that semi-automates additional volcano views when AVHRR or MODIS detects increased thermal output. ASTER is the only instrument that routinely acquires multiband (5 TIR bands, 8 -12 ?m) high spatial resolution (90-meter) TIR data over volcanic targets. Cloud-free level 2 kinetic temperature products from ASTER acquired from 2000 to 2012 allow us to produce thermal maps and temperature vs. time plots for each target volcano in Alaska. Retrospective analysis of archived ASTER TIR data has revealed subtle, small-scale variations in thermal activity at several Alaskan volcanoes. For example, ASTER TIR data of Pavlof Volcano and Mount Hague, 7 km to the west, show patterns of independent thermal activity. Temperatures slowly increased at Pavlof Volcano before the August 2007 eruption, while temperature slowly decreased on average in the intermittently water-filled Mount Hague crater. ASTER TIR of the Redoubt Volcano summit area detects a gradual increase in both the area and temperature of small gaps in the ice beginning nearly 16 months before the 2009 eruption. Thermal features at several other volcanoes persist at a fairly constant temperature within the error of atmospheric effects. While in some cases infrequent ASTER TIR views are able to detect subtle anomalies, robust, automated detection and early identification of thermal precursors at active volcanoes requires better spatial and temporal resolution. Field-based TIR sensors at select volcanoes provide these data and help validate satellite TIR data. However, new high-resolution multispectral TIR satellite sensors with frequent, at least daily, night and day acquisitions are needed to provide a consistent, long-term synoptic thermal view of every volcano and eruptive activity. The multispectral TIR sensor described in NASA's HyspIRI mission concept could provide essential spaceborne TIR that would help to meet this requirement.

  3. 4. Engine room, east end looking east toward engine #4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Engine room, east end looking east toward engine #4 (Enterprise Diesel; reduction gear in foreground; in left rear, two D.C. generators with Ames Ironworks horizontal engine and sturtevant vertical engine - East Boston Pumping Station, Chelsea Street at Chelsea Creek, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  4. East Coast -Suez Canal 15 East Coast -Strait of Hormuz 24

    E-print Network

    Bases Places Crossroads East Coast - Suez Canal 15 East Coast - Strait of Hormuz 24 East Coast deployed (Avg Last 90 Days) 8 Sep 14 ~190 ships #12;Bases Places Crossroads East Coast - Suez Canal 15 East

  5. Small-scale volcanoes on Mars: distribution and types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Petr; Hauber, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes differ in sizes, as does the amount of magma which ascends to a planetary surface. On Earth, the size of volcanoes is anti-correlated with their frequency, i.e. small volcanoes are much more numerous than large ones. The most common terrestrial volcanoes are scoria cones (volcano size might be expected. Martian small-scale volcanoes were not intensely studied for a long time due to a lack of high-resolution data enabling their proper identification; however their existence and basic characteristics were predicted on theoretical grounds. Streams of new high-resolution images now enable discovering and studying kilometer-size volcanoes with various shapes in unprecedented detail. Several types of small-scale volcanoes in various regions on Mars were recently described. Scoria cones provide a record of magmatic volatile content and have been identified in Tharsis (Ulysses Colles), on flanks of large volcanoes (e.g., Pavonis Mons), in the caldera of Ulysses Patera, in chaotic terrains or other large depressions (Hydraotes Colles, Coprates Chasma) and in the northern lowlands. Tuff rings and tuff cones, formed as a result of water-magma interaction, seem to be relatively rare on Mars and were only tentatively identified in three locations (Nepenthes/Amenthes region, Arena Colles and inside Lederberg crater), and alternative interpretations (mud volcanoes) seem possible. Other relatively rare volcanoes seem to be lava domes, reported only from two regions (Acracida Planitia and Terra Sirenum). On the other hand, small shields and rootless cones (which are not primary volcanic landforms) represent widely spread phenomena recognized in Tharsis and Elysium. Based on these new observations, the distribution of small volcanoes on Mars seems to be much more widespread than anticipated a decade ago. There are sometimes significant differences in the final morphologies between Martian hypothesized and possible terrestrial analogs, despite fact that the physical processes behind volcano formation should be similar on both planets. For example, Martian scoria cones are ~2.6 times wider than terrestrial analogues, as lower gravity and atmospheric pressure enable wider dispersion of pyroclasts from the vent. In addition, exit velocities of ejected particles should be increased on Mars because the lower atmospheric pressure favors more rapid exsolution of dissolved gases from the magma, which also favors a wider dispersion of ejected particles. Therefore, care must be taken when applying terrestrial morphometric relationships to the interpretation of hypothesized volcanic features on Mars and other terrestrial bodies. As on Earth, small-scale volcanoes on Mars display diverse shapes and hence provide insight into diverse volcanic processes responsible for such variations. Those diverse processes may point to various mechanisms of magma ascent and eruption styles in dependency on magma properties (e.g., amount of volatiles) and the paleo-environment at the time of formation. Hence the investigation of small-scale volcanoes provides useful tool enabling us to deepen our knowledge about the variety and richness of volcanism on Mars.

  6. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    MedlinePLUS

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a severe respiratory illness. It causes fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. About 30% of people who have gotten ...

  7. East Texas Storytellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Brandi, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Written and published by the students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, "Loblolly Magazine" is published twice a year. Issues are frequently devoted to a distant theme. The theme of this issue, "East Texas Storytellers," attempts to capture some of the local color and regional history of eastern Texas. The first article, "Timothy Griffith, Master…

  8. Understanding the Middle East.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Evelyn C.

    This nine-week unit on the Middle East for sixth graders was developed as part of a series by the Public Education Religion Studies Center at Wright State University. A major objective is to help students understand and appreciate sacred times and sacred places within this cultural setting. They learn how beliefs and practices cause the people to…

  9. Test Well, East River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS test well 10 34h363 in the East River, Brunswick, Ga. The U.S. Geological Survey drilled this test well in the early 1970's and at the time it was on the edge of the marsh at Andrews Island. It is now only accessible by boat or canoe at high tide. Despite being surrounded by saltwater the artes...

  10. Role of the structural inheritance of the oceanic lithosphere in the magmato-tectonic evolution of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Laurent; Saint-Ange, Francky; Bachelery, Patrick; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Staudacher, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    La Réunion Island is located east of Madagascar, on the eastern rim of the tectonically inactive Mascarene Basin. This island is composed of three shield volcanoes of which only Piton de la Fournaise is currently active. Although the magmatic activity is restricted to Piton de la Fournaise, a scattered seismicity occurs on the whole 200 km wide volcanic edifice and in the underlying oceanic crust. We carried out a multiscale analysis to understand (1) the origin of the seismicity in the geodynamic context and (2) the role of the oceanic lithosphere in the deformation of Piton de la Fournaise and La Réunion Island. Analysis of the magmatic system suggests that the magma ascent is controlled by large N25-30 and N125-130 fracture zones located below the Enclos depression. We also show that the orientation difference between the eruptive fissures and the related dykes result from a rotation of the main principal stress ?1 from vertical to downslope through the surface. Combining a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) analysis, field observations and the geophysical data reveals that the volcano is affected by large fault zones. The fault distribution indicates the predominance of a main N70-80 trend. Magnetic data show the same N80 orientation characterizing the remnant part of the Alizés volcano. Such parallel alignment suggests a control exerted by the underlying Alizés volcano on Piton de la Fournaise. Furthermore, the alignment between the crustal orientations and the structures determined on the island suggests a control of the crustal structures in La Réunion's volcano-tectonic activity. Contrary to several volcanic islands such as Hawaii and Tenerife, La Réunion volcanoes lie on an upbending crust. Then, we interpret the reactivation of the crustal faults as resulting from a crustal uplift related to the thermal erosion of the base of the lithosphere and/or to strong underplating. The upward deformation may prevent the spreading of the volcanoes, as no evidence of such a mechanism is observed in the bathymetry and the seismic data around the island.

  11. Time-averaged SO2 fluxes of subduction-zone volcanoes: Example of a 32-year exhaustive survey for Japanese volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Toshiya; Shinohara, Hiroshi; Kazahaya, Kohei; Hirabayashi, Jun-Ichi; Matsushima, Takeshi; Mori, Takehiko; Ohwada, Michiko; Odai, Masanobu; Iino, Hideki; Miyashita, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    All available SO2 flux data for 32 years (1975-2006) of Japanese volcanoes, accounting for about 10% of the world's arc volcanoes, were compiled to evaluate the temporal variation of the flux of each volcano and to estimate the time-averaged SO2 flux. The compiled data revealed that 6 volcanoes (Tokachi, Asama, Aso, Sakurajima, Satsuma-Iwojima, and Suwanosejima volcanoes) out of 17 significantly degassing volcanoes usually contributed more than 94% of the total flux. The time-averaged annual flux was 2.2 Tg a-1, which includes intense degassing of Miyakejima volcano after 2000, which raised the figure from 1.4 Tg a-1, indicating that a single huge emitter is capable of significantly skewing regional time-averaged degassing totals and indicating that the time-averaged flux assessments for infrequent huge emitters are important for accurate estimation. The regional SO2 flux distribution in cumulative frequency-flux plot does not obey a power law distribution. It shows a roll-off curve bending at about 500 t d-1, implying that it is misleading to assume the power law distribution for estimation of the global flux. Because the contribution of the major degassing volcanoes including the six volcanoes and additional sporadically degassing volcanoes during eruptive and posteruptive periods to the total flux is more than 95%, measurement of all large flux volcanoes can approximate the global flux.

  12. A seismological comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia, and Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Weston Albert

    Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens, Washington are examples of eruptions involving the sector collapse of a volcano. The study and comparison of Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny has led to a better understanding of the precursory seismicity prior to eruptions. The shallow moment release prior to an eruption is dependent on the time since the last eruption at both volcanoes. This relationship is independent of the type of eruption that ensues, suggesting that overcoming the strength of the plug in shallow conduit must occur prior to the initiation of an eruption. This finding has obvious implications for forecasting eruptions, and more importantly, for forecasting failed eruptions. The comparison of multiplets at Bezymianny and Mount St. Helens suggests that the physical properties of magma in the shallow conduit controlled the occurrence and behavior of multiplets. When there is shallow crystallization and active degassing of the plug within the conduit, multiplets are abundant. Alternatively, when there is no shallow crystallization in a semi-open system, as at Bezymianny, multiplets were less abundant. At both volcanoes prior to an explosion, the multiplet percentage of total seismicity drops, and the average amplitude of each multiplet increases. Multiplet characteristics such as the multiplet percentage of total seismicity, multiplet durations, and the number of contemporaneous multiplets can be tracked prior to an eruption to forecast the type of eruption that will ensue. The future volcanic activity at Mount St. Helens will likely diverge from the current explosive activity at Bezymianny. Without any additional input of mafic material or additional gas content, intermittent viscous dome building at Mount St. Helens will likely continue. In general, the high gas content of the magmas at Bezymianny compared to Mount St. Helens has driven more explosivity during eruptions despite the lower silica content and resultant lower viscosity magma at Bezymianny compared to Mount St. Helens. In future eruptions at Bezymianny and Mount St. Helens, the seismic energy release prior to eruptions will be dictated by the time since the last eruption. Stronger seismicity can be expected in cases where the conduit bends around existing dome.

  13. Constraining Volcano-Hydrologic Interaction at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua Through Continuous Temperature Monitoring and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, S. C.; Connor, C.; Sanford, W. E.; Kiyosugi, K.; Lehto, H.

    2009-12-01

    Flank fumaroles are a direct result of the interaction between groundwater and magma, and therefore have good potential for monitoring volcanoes. At Masaya volcano in Nicaragua, Tough2 models of fluid transport through porous media show that three fumarole zones observed on the flank of Masaya volcano can be explained by convection within the saturated zone when a uniform heat source is applied at depth. 5 days before the formation of a small lava lake in the active crater, temperatures increased by up to 5°C in the further fumarole zone, 3-4 km away. However, magnetic modeling shows that an anomaly of up to 6000 nT corresponds extremely well with topographic offset of a fault and fracture system on the flank of the volcano that is an important control on local fluid flux. Comparisons between Tough2 models of these structures, self-potential and CO2 data show that elevated fluid flux occurs in the hanging wall of relatively impermeable faults, and flow is inhibited in the footwall. Local geological structures like faults are therefore a dominant factor in the location and response of these fumaroles. Although the fundamental source of fumaroles is groundwater-magma interaction, the response of the groundwater system to volcanic activity is on the order of months to years and is hard to resolve with current monitoring techniques. Therefore the source for variations in fumarole degassing is not simple, and a good conceptual model of the system is vital. Continuous monitoring of CO2 for 3 years has shown that there is a distinct structure to the temperature signal of fumarole gases prior to and during volcanic activity. 10-15 cycles were recorded during 4 10-day periods, two of which were associated with surficial volcanic activity. Rainfall also showed a significant, albeit imperfect, correlation with these signals. The frequency spectrum proved to be an extremely useful tool in identifying the beginning and end of the anomalous episodes. Using Tough2 to create numerical models of the system we have determined that flow of fluids from the water table is too slow to explain these responses. A pressure pulse originating from the active crater is however a possible mechanism. We are now creating models to see what magnitude and time- and spatial-scale changes can create the signals observed. Models allow us to see whether changes in diffuse degassing can emanate from variations below the water table, or are due to a shallow source like shallow fluid injection or a pressure pulse traveling through the system. This is extremely important when interpreting diffuse degassing variations in light of changes in volcanic activity.

  14. Broadband moment-tensor inversion of long-period events on volcanoes: example from Turrialba volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokmer, Ivan; Thun, Johannes; Bean, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Seismic events on volcanoes form a spectral continuum, from the high-frequency (> 10 Hz) tectonic-like events to ultra long period events with dominant periods longer than 100s of seconds. Long-period events (LP) are characterised by the dominant frequencies between 0.5 and 2Hz and relatively simple waveforms. They are mainly located within the first several hundred meters below volcano summit and are thought to reflect the dynamics of the shallow magmatic and/or hydrothermal plumbing system. It is still puzzling if they are generated by the pressure perturbations within fluid-filled cracks and conduits, or by a more classical faulting model in the extremely weak material, where the role of fluid is to modulate overall stress rather than being directly involved in the source generation process. So far, several moment-tensor (MT) inversions of LP events have been performed. A typical MT solution comprises a tensile crack source mechanism, and a pulsing or resonating source-time function (STF). However, due to generally small magnitudes of these events (a small S/N ratio), only the most energetic part of the signal is used in inversions. More precisely, the low frequency limit of the STF is determined by the lowest frequency of the most energetic part of the recorded waveform (usually about 0.3 - 0.5 Hz). Since it is extremely difficult to recover longer period ground displacements from such small-amplitude velocity records by using classical instrument response removal approach, it is almost impossible to infer if the obtained STF represents the real displacement in the source or it is just its band-limited representation. Here we used a good-quality dataset recorded near the summit of Turrialba volcano and applied some of the techniques used for the "baseline correction" in the strong motion seismology. In this way we managed to recover very low frequency part of LP signals, i.e. much lower than usual 0.3-0.5 Hz. Although the velocity records processed in this way did not differ significantly to the classically processed waveforms, the striking difference can be observed in the displacement, where the static shift was successfully recovered at the stations close to the source. Consequently, the obtained MT solution was the classical earthquake "ramp" function, rather than a pulsing or oscillating waveform. This is the first result of this kind, which will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of these puzzling events. In addition, extending inversions towards very low frequencies makes the solutions less sensitive to large uncertainties in the shallow velocity models (which is a huge problems in volcano seismology).

  15. Volcano surveillance by ACR silver fox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, M.C.L.; Mulligair, A.; Douglas, J.; Robinson, J.; Pallister, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Recent growth in the business of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) both in the US and abroad has improved their overall capability, resulting in a reduction in cost, greater reliability and adoption into areas where they had previously not been considered. Uses in coastal and border patrol, forestry and agriculture have recently been evaluated in an effort to expand the observed area and reduce surveillance and reconnaissance costs for information gathering. The scientific community has both contributed and benefited greatly in this development. A larger suite of light-weight miniaturized sensors now exists for a range of applications which in turn has led to an increase in the gathering of information from these autonomous vehicles. In October 2004 the first eruption of Mount St Helens since 1986 caused tremendous interest amoUg people worldwide. Volcanologists at the U.S. Geological Survey rapidly ramped up the level of monitoring using a variety of ground-based sensors deployed in the crater and on the flanks of the volcano using manned helicopters. In order to develop additional unmanned sensing methods that can be used in potentially hazardous and low visibility conditions, a UAV experiment was conducted during the ongoing eruption early in November. The Silver Fox UAV was flown over and inside the crater to perform routine observation and data gathering, thereby demonstrating a technology that could reduce physical risk to scientists and other field operatives. It was demonstrated that UAVs can be flown autonomously at an active volcano and can deliver real time data to a remote location. Although still relatively limited in extent, these initial flights provided information on volcanic activity and thermal conditions within the crater and at the new (2004) lava dome. The flights demonstrated that readily available visual and infrared video sensors mounted in a small and relatively low-cost aerial platform can provide useful data on volcanic phenomena. This was made possible by utilizing GPS and computer-controlled flight direction and stabilization to acquire and track target areas within the Mount St. Helens crater. It was also determined that additional light-weight sensor development will be needed to enable autonomous measurements of volcanic gasses and imaging in poor-weather conditions. Copyright ?? 2005 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Advances in volcano monitoring and risk reduction in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCausland, W. A.; White, R. A.; Lockhart, A. B.; Marso, J. N.; Assitance Program, V. D.; Volcano Observatories, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    We describe results of cooperative work that advanced volcanic monitoring and risk reduction. The USGS-USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) was initiated in 1986 after disastrous lahars during the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz dramatizedthe need to advance international capabilities in volcanic monitoring, eruption forecasting and hazard communication. For the past 28 years, VDAP has worked with our partners to improve observatories, strengthen monitoring networks, and train observatory personnel. We highlight a few of the many accomplishments by Latin American volcano observatories. Advances in monitoring, assessment and communication, and lessons learned from the lahars of the 1985 Nevado del Ruiz eruption and the 1994 Paez earthquake enabled the Servicio Geológico Colombiano to issue timely, life-saving warnings for 3 large syn-eruptive lahars at Nevado del Huila in 2007 and 2008. In Chile, the 2008 eruption of Chaitén prompted SERNAGEOMIN to complete a national volcanic vulnerabili