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Sample records for eastern spruce structural

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF EASTERN U.S. SPRUCE-FIR SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    he spruce-fir forest of the eastern United States encompasses a diverse range of edaphic conditions due to differences in surficial geology, mineralogy, elevation, and climate. his chapter will describe the characteristics of soils supporting eastern spruce-fir ecosystems, includ...

  2. Characterization of eastern US spruce-fir soils. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, I.J.

    1992-01-01

    The spruce-fir forest of the eastern United States encompasses a diverse range of edaphic conditions due to differences in surficial geology, mineralogy, elevation, and climate. This chapter describes the characteristics of soils supporting eastern spruce-fir ecosystems, including soil properties that are important in understanding forest function and the consequences of atmospheric deposition to forested ecosystems. Chapter 1 describes the silvical characteristics of the spruce-fir forest. The Spruce-Fir Research Cooperative included six intensive study sites; five were high-elevation research sites located from western North Carolina to New Hampshire, with one low-elevation site in Maine. Information gained from research at these sites, and other relevant research from these regions, provides the basis for this description of eastern U. S. spruce-fir soils.

  3. AmeriFlux CA-Qfo Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Mature Black Spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, Hank A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Qfo Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Mature Black Spruce. Site Description - 49.69247° N / 74.34204° W, elevation of 387 mm, 90 - 100 yr old Black Spruce, Jack Pine, feather moss

  4. Availability of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi to Black Spruce above the Present Treeline in Eastern Labrador

    PubMed Central

    Reithmeier, Laura; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECMF) are an important biotic factor in the survival of conifer seedlings under stressful conditions and therefore have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment into alpine and tundra habitats. In order to assess patterns of ectomycorrhizal availability and community structure above treeline, we conducted soil bioassays in which Picea mariana (black spruce) seedlings were grown in field-collected soils under controlled conditions. Soils were collected from distinct alpine habitats, each dominated by a different ectomycorrhizal host shrub: Betula glandulosa, Arctostaphylos alpina or Salix herbacaea. Within each habitat, half of the soils collected contained roots of ectomycorrhizal shrubs (host+) and the other half were free of host plants (host−). Forest and glacial moraine soils were also included for comparison. Fungi forming ectomycorrhizae during the bioassays were identified by DNA sequencing. Our results indicate that ECMF capable of colonizing black spruce are widespread above the current tree line in Eastern Labrador and that the level of available inoculum has a significant influence on the growth of seedlings under controlled conditions. Many of the host− soils possessed appreciable levels of ectomycorrhizal inoculum, likely in the form of spore banks. Inoculum levels in these soils may be influenced by spore production from neighboring soils where ectomycorrhizal shrubs are present. Under predicted temperature increases, ectomycorrhizal inoculum in soils with host shrubs as well as in nearby soils without host shrubs have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment above the present tree line. PMID:24204858

  5. AmeriFlux CA-Qcu Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Black Spruce/Jack Pine Cutover

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, Hank A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Qcu Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Black Spruce/Jack Pine Cutover. Site Description - The ground is gently rolling with a weak slope (<5%). In mesic areas (designated as well to moderately well drained areas, according to the Canadian System of Soil Classification (Agriculture Canada Expert Committee on Soil Survey, 1983)), the soil is a ferro-humic to humic podzol covered by an organic layer having an average depth of 26 cm (Fig. 1). In humid areas, the soil is organic (imperfectly to poorly drained) with an average organic layer of 125 cm. Mesic areas accounted for approximately 75% of the total surface area of the footprint and humid areas accounted for 25%. Full-time continuous measurements eneded in 2011. Intermittent measurements are on-going as resources permit.

  6. Total and pyrogenic carbon stocks in black spruce forest floors from eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Quideau, Sylvie; MacKenzie, M. Derek; Munson, Alison; Boiffin, Juliette; Bernard, Guy; Wasylishen, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    In boreal forests, pyrogenic carbon (PyC), a by-product of recurrent wildfires, is an important component of the global soil C pool, although precise assessment of boreal PyC stock is scarce. In this study including 14 fire sites spreading over 600 km in the Quebec province, our aim was to better estimate total C stock and PyC stock in forest floors of Eastern Canada boreal forests. We also investigated the environmental conditions controlling the stocks and characterized the composition of the various forest floor layers. We analyzed the forest floor samples that were collected from mesic black spruce sites recently affected by fire (3-5 years) using elemental analysis and solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. PyC content was further estimated using a molecular mixing model on the 13C NMR data. Total C stock in forest floors averaged 5.7 ± 2.9 kg C/m2 and PyC stock 0.6 ± 0.3 kg C/m2. Total C stock was under control of the position in the landscape, with a greater accumulation of organic material on northern aspects and lower slope positions. In addition, total stock was significantly higher in spruce-dominated forest floors than in stands where jack pine was dominant. The PyC stock was significantly related to the atomic H/C ratio (R2 = 0.84) of the different organic layers. 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed a large increase in aromatic carbon in the deepest forest floor layer (humified H horizon) at the organic-mineral soil interface. The majority of the PyC stock was located in this horizon and had been formed during past high severity fires rather than during the most recent fire event. Conversely, the superficial "fresh" PyC layer, produced by early-season wildfires in 2005-2007, had NMR spectra fairly similar to unburned forest floors and comparatively low PyC stocks.

  7. Soil-mediated effects of atmospheric deposition on eastern US spruce-fir forests. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Fernandez, I.J.

    1992-01-01

    The coincident observation of Waldsterben in Germany and red spruce decline in the northeastern U.S. has naturally led to some speculation that similar mechanisms may be involved. In the German situation, soil-mediated hypotheses played (and still play) a major role; namely, soil acidification and aluminum toxicity and base cation deficiencies. In the red spruce case, there has been much concern that cation deficiencies and/or aluminum toxicity may also play a major role. The purpose of this chapter is to: (1) review some of the basic properties of soils, nutrition, and nutrient cycling in spruce-fir and fir ecosystems, both in the polluted and in the relatively unpolluted regions of the U.S. and Canada, and (2) to evaluate several soil acidity-related hypotheses for red spruce decline.

  8. SOIL-MEDIATED EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION ON EASTERN US SPRUCE-FIR FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coincident observation of Waldsterben in Germany and red spruce decline in the northeastern U. S. has naturally led to some speculation that similar mechanisms may be involved. n the German situation, soil-mediated hypotheses played (and still play) a major role; namely, soil...

  9. Interactions between vegetation and hydrology: 1) Forest structure and throughfall 2) Spruce expansion following wetland drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeltz, T. Scott

    Chapter 1: We developed a non-linear regression model from first principals to predict the percent of precipitation interception from forest canopies using lidar as a measure of forest structure. To find the best parameters for the model, we measured thoroughfall of rain (n = 21), fresh snow (n = 21), and old snow (n = 26) on plots in the boreal forest of the upper Eklutna Valley, Alaska. We calculated a set of twelve lidar metrics for each plot, and found the combined metric of mean height * cover to be the lidar metric most highly correlated to ln(throughfall) for rain (r = -0.81), fresh snow (r = -0.79), and old snow (r = -0.73). Using mean height * cover in the interception model, we predicted mean interception for rainfall (20% +/- 3%), fresh snow (29% +/- 4%), and old snow (20% +/- 3%) across the vegetated portion of the upper Eklutna Valley. Chapter 2: Climate changes and subsequent landscape-level responses have been documented throughout Alaska. We investigated the expansion of black (Picea mariana) and white spruce (Picea glauca) into open, herbaceous palustrine wetlands on Joint Base Elemendorf-Richardson (JBER) in south-central Alaska. We classified random points in wetlands across JBER using imagery from 1950, 1981, and 2012 to identify the extent and rate of spruce expansion. Additionally, we sampled 75 field plots in wetlands to age spruce trees and survey understory vegetation. We found tree cover in wetlands to have increased substantially from 1950-2012 (44% to 87%) with expansion over time fitting a logistic growth model well. Aged tree cores showed a recruitment pulse beginning the in 1930's and had a cumulative age distribution matching the logistic growth model of tree cover over time. The logistic growth model suggest spruce expansion began slowly in the early 1800's, coincident with the start of the current warming trend in Alaska. Using one representative wetland, we classified points on a 10 m spaced regular grid in 1950, 1981, and 2012 to

  10. BVOC emission in Norway spruce: the effect of stand structure, high temperature and ozone levels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Večeřová, Kristýna; Esposito, Raffaela; Lusini, Ilaria; Juráň, Stanislav; Urban, Otmar; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) is a widely distributed conifer species in the boreal zone and mountain areas of central Europe and is a moderate emitter of volatile organic compounds (BVOC). Although the vaporization and diffusion processes from resin ducts were generally considered to be the main processes for monoterpene emissions in conifers, recently it has been showed that a significant portion (up to one third) of monoterpene emissions of Norway spruce can originate from novel biosynthesis, thus depending on photosynthetic processes. For this reason, both biosynthesis and emission are strongly influenced by the environment and the stand structure. They increase with both increasing light and temperature during the warmer periods, although those are the periods with the higher ozone concentration that usually act as an inhibitor of both assimilation and isoprenoids synthesis and emission. On the other hand, stand structure can play an important role, because the photosynthetic capacity is influenced by temperature and light conditions through the canopy. In order to assess the effects of stand structure, temperature and ozone on isoprenoids emission of Norway spruce we carried out field and laboratory experiments. In the experimental field campaigns we measured: assimilation and BVOC emission from needles of sun and shade layers within the canopy of the spruce forest present at the Bily Kriz experimental research site (Moravian-Silesian Beskydy Mountains, 49° 33' N, 18° 32' E, NE of Czech Republic, 908 m a.s.l.). Moreover in the same layers we measured continuously concentration of BVOCs in the air using a PTR-TOF-MS. In laboratory we analyzed the effects of short-term exposure to high temperature and high ozone concentrations on branches of spruce trees collected at the Bily Kriz experimental research site. Preliminary results show that in Norway spruce both stand structure and environmental conditions influenced the gas exchange and BVOC emission rates

  11. Response of aluminum solubility to elevated nitrification in soil of a red spruce stand in eastern Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of soluble Al can impair tree growth and be toxic to aquatic biota, but effects of acidic deposition on Al solubility in forest soils are only partially understood because of complex interactions with H+ and organic matter. We therefore evaluated Al solubility in two red spruce stands in eastern Maine, one of which received dry (NH4)2SO4 at a rate of 1800 equiv ha-1 yr-1 during 19891995. Samples of soil (Spodosol Oa and Bh horizons) and soil solution were collected on five dates from 1992 to 1995. The treatment elevated nitrification, causing an increase in acid input that led to inorganic Al concentrations of greater than 60 ??mol L-1 in both the Oa and Bh horizons. Solubility of Al was also lower in the Bh horizon of the treated stand than in the reference stand, a response related to higher DOC concentrations in the treated stand. Concentrations of CuCl2 and pyrophosphate-extractable Al were higher in the Oa horizon of the treated watershed than the reference stand, a result of accelerated weathering of mineral particles caused by lower solution pH in the treated stand (3.47) than in the reference stand (3.69). Dissolved Al concentrations in these soils are the result of complex mechanisms through which mineral matter, organic matter, and pH interact to control Al solubility; mechanisms that are not incorporated in current Al solubility models.

  12. Structure and Carbon Distribution of Well- and Poorly-Drained Black Spruce Fire Chronosequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Gower, S. T.

    2002-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine structure changes along a boreal black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) fire chronosequence in northern Manitoba, Canada; (2) quantify temporal dynamics in C content across the chronosequence; and (3) compare the C distribution for these stands on contrasting soil drainages. The experimental design was a well-drained (dry) and poorly-drained (wet) black spruce fire chronosequences comprised of seven stands that burned between 1998 and 1870. Tree species diversity was greater in the younger stands, and by 71 years after fire black spruce comprised >88% and 83% of total basal area for the dry and wet stands, respectively. Feather moss replaced sphagnum during succession in the dry stands, whereas there were no clear patterns in the wet chronosequence. Total vegetation C content (aboveground + belowground) increased with forest succession, ranging from 1.3 to 83.3 t C ha-1 for the dry stands and 0.6 to 37.4 t C ha-1 for the wet stands. Mean annual aboveground C accumulation rates (Δ CA) peaked in the 71- and 36-year-old dry and wet stands, respectively. Overstory and live moss C contents increased with stand age. The total root : shoot ratio was fairly consistent (0.235 +/- 0.046) after 37 years following fire. The basal area, vegetation C content, and Δ CA were significantly greater (α = 0.05) in the dry than wet stands, but the C contents in bryophyte and forest floor were significantly less in the dry stands. Our results emphasize the need to incorporate disturbance and soil drainage in large-scale boreal forest C models.

  13. The effects of partial cutting on stand structure and growth of western hemlock-Sitka spruce stands in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deal, R.L.; Tappeiner, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of partial cutting on species composition, new and residual-tree cohorts, tree size distribution, and tree growth was evaluated on 73 plots in 18 stands throughout southeast Alaska. These partially cut stands were harvested 12-96 years ago, when 16-96% of the former stand basal area was removed. Partial cutting maintained stand structures similar to uncut old-growth stands, and the cutting had no significant effects on tree species composition. The establishment of new-tree cohorts was positively related to the proportion of basal-area cut. The current stand basal area, tree species composition, and stand growth were significantly related to trees left after harvest (p < 0.001). Trees that were 20-80 cm dbh at the time of cutting had the greatest tree-diameter and basal-area growth and contributed the most to stand growth. Diameter growth of Sitka spruce and western hemlock was similar, and the proportion of stand basal-area growth between species was consistent for different cutting intensities. Concerns about changing tree species composition, lack of spruce regeneration, and greatly reduced stand growth and vigor with partial cuts were largely unsubstantiated. Silvicultural systems based on partial cutting can provide rapidly growing trees for timber production while maintaining complex stand structures with mixtures of spruce and hemlock trees similar to oldgrowth stands.

  14. Diurnal changes in the dielectric properties and water status of eastern hemlock and red spruce from Howland, ME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, W. A.; Ranson, K. J.; Rock, B. N.; Moss, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    The diurnal characteristics of microwave dielectric properties and water potential of two conifer species were investigated in July and September, 1990. P-band and C-band radial dielectric profiles of hemlock and red spruce, as well as hemlock diurnal water potential and dielectric profiles, are presented. The resulting radial dielectric profiles matched the regions of the functional sapwood (water transport component of the active xylem) in both species such that the sapwood was characterized by a higher dielectric than the bark and heartwood tissues. This is probably due to characteristic differences in the water content of each tissue. As the hemlocks progressed through their diurnal water potential pattern, the dielectric profile remained static until mid-afternoon. As the tension in the water column relaxed (2 to 3 bars) the dielectric constant decreased by 30 to 40 percent. There are several possible explanations for this phenomenon, and these may relate to the dependency of the dielectric measurements on temperature, salinity, and volumetric water content.

  15. Organised Motion in a Tall Spruce Canopy: Temporal Scales, Structure Spacing and Terrain Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the organised motion near the canopy-atmosphere interface of a moderately dense spruce forest in heterogeneous, complex terrain. Wind direction is used to assess differences in topography and surface properties. Observations were obtained at several heights above and within the canopy using sonic anemometers and fast-response gas analysers over the course of several weeks. Analysed variables include the three-dimensional wind vector, the sonic temperature, and the concentration of carbon dioxide. Wavelet analysis was used to extract the organised motion from time series and to derive its temporal scales. Spectral Fourier analysis was deployed to compute power spectra and phase spectra. Profiles of temporal scales of ramp-like coherent structures in the vertical and longitudinal wind components showed a reversed variation with height and were of similar size within the canopy. Temporal scales of scalar fields were comparable to those of the longitudinal wind component suggesting that the lateral scalar transport dominates. The existence of a 1 power law in the longitudinal power spectra was confirmed for a few cases only, with a majority showing a clear 5/3 decay. The variation of effective scales of organised motion in the longitudinal velocity and temperature were found to vary with atmospheric stability, suggesting that both Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and attached eddies dominate the flow with increasing convectional forcing. The canopy mixing-layer analogy was observed to be applicable for ramp-like coherent structures in the vertical wind component for selected wind directions only. Departures from the prediction of m = Λ w L {/s -1} = 8 10 (where Λ w is the streamwise spacing of coherent structures in the vertical wind w and L s is a canopy shear length scale) were caused by smaller shear length scales associated with large-scale changes in the terrain as well as the vertical structure of the canopy. The occurrence of linear

  16. Coherent structures and trace gases fluxes and concentrations in and above a heterogeneous spruce forest (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foken, T.

    2013-12-01

    Near the FLUXNET site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) three intensive measuring periods took place in 2007, 2008, and 2011 within the EGER project (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions). The main focus of all three experiments was the investigation of turbulent structures and their influence on the energy exchange and trace gas fluxes as well as trace gas reactions. Due to a tornado-like storm event an approximately 300 m long forest edge between a 25 m high spruce forest and a clearing was generated about 150 m south of the DE-Bay site. The investigation of processes at these forest edge was the main issue of the 2011 experiment. A main topic of all experiments was the investigation of the coupling between the atmosphere, the crowns and the trunk space as well as the horizontal coupling. This coupling algorithm is based on the analysis of coherent structures at three levels. While a complete coupling was only observed during daytime, at night well-coupled events were found in connection with low-level jets. The change of inert (CO2) or reactive (O3, NO, NO2, HONO) trace gas concentration could be explained with the coupling situation. It was also found that at the forest edge, coherent structures contribute less to total turbulent flux than within the forest. Accordingly, these coherent motions do not ensure that there is better vertical coupling between the forest stand and the overlying atmosphere at the forest edge. The relative contributions of sweeps and ejections to coherent flux reveal that there might be even larger circulations that cause better ventilation at the forest edge. Ejections dominate during the daytime, whereas sweeps contribute more during nighttime. Thus, there is systematic outflow during the daytime and inflow of fresh air directly at the forest edge during the nighttime. To underline these findings perpendicular to the edge, a mobile measuring system investigated the horizontal gradients of temperature, moisture, radiation, carbon

  17. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    SciTech Connect

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground

  18. Can nutrient limitations explain low and declining white spruce growth near the Arctic treeline in the eastern Brooks Range, Alaska?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, S.; Sullivan, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    The position of the Arctic treeline is of critical importance for global carbon cycling and surface energy budgets. However, controls on tree growth at treeline remain uncertain. In the Alaskan Brooks Range, 20th century warming has caused varying growth responses among treeline trees, with trees in the west responding positively, while trees in the east have responded negatively. The prevailing explanation of this trend ascribes the negative growth response to warming-induced drought stress in the eastern Brooks Range. However, recent measurements of carbon isotope discrimination in tree rings, xylem sap flow and needle gas exchange suggest that drought stress cannot explain these regional growth declines. Additionally, evidence from the western Brooks Range suggests that nutrient availability, rather than drought stress, may be the proximate control on tree growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that low and declining growth of eastern Brooks Range trees is due to low and declining soil nutrient availability, which may continue to decrease with climate change as soils become drier and microbial activity declines. We compared microclimate, tree performance, and a wide range of proxies for soil nutrient availability in four watersheds along a west-east transect in the Brooks Range during the growing seasons of 2013 and 2014. We hypothesized that soil nutrient availability would track closely with the strong west-east precipitation gradient, with higher rainfall and greater soil nutrient availability in the western Brooks Range. We expected to find that soil water contents in the west are near optimum for nitrogen mineralization, while those in the east are below optimum. Needle nitrogen concentration, net photosynthesis, branch extension growth, and growth in the main stem are expected to decline with the hypothesized decrease in soil nutrient availability. The results of our study will elucidate the current controls on growth of trees near the

  19. Elicitor-Induced Spruce Stress Lignin (Structural Similarity to Early Developmental Lignins).

    PubMed Central

    Lange, B. M.; Lapierre, C.; Sandermann, H.

    1995-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Picea abies (L.) Karst released polymeric material into the culture medium when treated with an elicitor preparation from the spruce needle pathogen Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii. The presence of lignin (about 35%, w/w) was demonstrated by phloroglucinol/HCI reactivity and quantitation with thioglycolic acid. Carbohydrate (about 14%, w/w) and protein (about 32%, w/w) were also detected. Amino acid analysis revealed that hydroxyproline and proline predominated. Thioacidolysis and subsequent Raney nickel desulfurization allowed the analysis of lignin-building units and interunit bonds. Compared with spruce wood lignin, an approximately 20-fold higher relative amount of p-hydroxyphenyl units was determined. A high content of p-hydroxyphenyl units is typical for certain developmental lignins, such as conifer compression wood and middle lamella lignins, as well as all induced cell culture lignins so far analyzed. Cross-linkages of the pinoresinol type ([beta]-[beta]) in the excreted cell culture lignin were markedly increased, whereas [beta]-1 interunit linkages were decreased relative to spruce wood lignin. The amount and nature of cross-linkages were shown to be intermediate between those in wood lignin and in enzymatically prepared lignins. In summary, the elicitor-induced stress lignin was excreted as a lignin-extensin complex that closely resembled early developmental lignins. PMID:12228544

  20. Crustal Structure in Central-Eastern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, A.; Thybo, H.

    2013-12-01

    We present the seismic structure in the interior of Greenland based on the first measurements by the seismic refraction/wide angle reflection method. Previous seismic surveys have only been carried out offshore and near the coast of Greenland, where the crustal structure is affected by oceanic break-up and may not be representative of the interior of the island. Acquisition of geophysical data onshore Greenland is logistically complicated by the presence of an up to 3.4 km thick ice sheet, permanently covering most of the land mass. The seismic data was acquired by a team of six people during a two-month long experiment in summer of 2011 on the ice cap in the interior of central-eastern Greenland. The EW-trending profile extends 310 km inland from the approximate edge of the stable ice cap near Scoresby Sund across the centre of the ice cap. The planned extension of the profile by use of OBSs and air gun shooting in Scoresbysund Fjord to the east coast of Greenland was unfortunately cancelled, because navigation was prevented by ice drift. 350 Reftek Texan receivers recorded high-quality seismic data from 8 equidistant shots along the profile. Explosive charge sizes were 1 ton at the ends and ca. 500 kg along the profile, loaded with about 100 kg at 35-85 m depth in individual boreholes. Two-dimensional velocity model based on forward ray tracing and tomography modelling shows a decrease of crustal thickness from 47 km below the centre of Greenland in the western part to 40 km in the eastern part of the profile. Earlier studies show that crustal thickness further decreases eastward to ca. 30 km below the fjord system, but details of the changes are unknown. Relatively high lower crustal velocities (Vp 6.8 - 7.3) in the western part of the TopoGreenland profile may indicate past collision tectonics or may be related or to the passage of the Iceland mantle plume. The origin of the pronounced circum-Atlantic mountain ranges in Norway and eastern Greenland, which have

  1. Seismogenic Structures in Hualien Region, eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuochen, H.; Wu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chen, R.; Kuo, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Due to extremely high seismicity and abundant tectonic-influenced geomorphic features, eastern Taiwan has long been known as a tectonically active region. The geological model of an on-going arc-continent collision was successfully proposed to explain the arrangement of the tectonic entities and their interaction. The convergent situation between Eurasia plate and Philippine Sea plate is believed still being existing because of no geomorphic evidence directly related to significant subsidence of the backbone mountain range. However, in the north of the Coastal Range, the Philippine Sea plate is moving northerly downward by the subduction mechanism. Accordingly the fault systems on-land and offshore should be significantly different. With an attempt to answer the puzzle mentioned above we therefore analyze the seismogenic structures in northern part of eastern Taiwan. We adopt the double difference (hypoDD) method to relocate earthquakes, apply the GOCAD (Geologic Computer Aided Design) to visually image the 3D subsurface structures, and determine the rupture plane by the Finite Dimension Source Model (FDSM) from first motion focal mechanisms. Selected earthquakes are (1) located within region between 121.2 ˜122° E and 23.5 ˜24.5° N; (2) M{ L }≥3; (3) and showing clearly P or S arrived time at least 6 recorded stations. Additionally, we determine the M { L } ≥4 focal mechanisms by using the first P wave polarities to examine the reliability of rupture planes determined above. A few of seismogenic structures are clearly identified in this study. Looking at the E-W profile, a major reverse fault dipping 60° to the east is found in depth of 20-40 km beneath the Coastal Range, which is probably the subsurface image of the plate boundary. On the other hand, within the Central Range several N-S oriented high-angle normal faults are found near the surface in the western part of the study area. The second one from the west reflects the subsurface extension of

  2. Geologic and structural map of eastern Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Letouzey, J.; Sage, L.

    1986-07-01

    A synthesis of the onshore and offshore geologic data of eastern Asia, prepared by the Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), has allowed the construction of geologic and structural maps for this region. These maps include three color sheets (scale = 1:2.5 million) and three plates of geologic and structural cross sections. Located between lat. 4/sup 0/ and 35/sup 0/N, and long. 106/sup 0/ and 132/sup 0/E, the maps cover the following geographic areas: East and South China Sea, Sulu Sea, West Philippine basin and onshore neighboring terrains, Kyushu and Ryukyu Islands, the China margin, Taiwan Island, Vietnam, North West Borneo, and the Philippines. The maps synthesize seismic interpretations, oil well data, geologic work in south Japan, Taiwan, Borneo, and the Philippines, and recent data published between 1976 and 1985. Twenty-four geologic cross sections (scale = 1:1.25 million, vertical exaggeration x 6) intersect ocean margins, important basins, and the different structural domains. They are based on seismic profiles, well data, and available onshore and offshore geologic data. These cross sections show basement composition and structures, different tectonic and sedimentary domains, and the structure and thickness of different sedimentary deposits (such as age, unconformities, and geologic structures). Maps and cross sections will be published in early 1987.

  3. Norway spruce embryogenesis: changes in carbohydrate profile, structural development and response to polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Hudec, Lukáš; Konrádová, Hana; Hašková, Anna; Lipavská, Helena

    2016-05-01

    Two unrelated, geographically distinct, highly embryogenic lines of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were analysed to identify metabolic traits characteristic for lines with good yields of high-quality embryos. The results were compared with corresponding characteristics of a poorly productive line (low embryo yield, scarce high-quality embryos). The following carbohydrate profiles and spectra during maturation, desiccation and germination were identified as promising characteristics for line evaluation: a gradual decrease in total soluble carbohydrates with an increasing sucrose : hexose ratio during maturation; accumulation of raffinose family oligosaccharides resulting from desiccation and their rapid degradation at the start of germination; and a decrease in sucrose, increase in hexoses and the appearance of pinitol with proceeding germination. We propose that any deviation from this profile in an embryonic line is a symptom of inferior somatic embryo development. We further propose that a fatty acid spectrum dominated by linoleic acid (18 : 2) was a common feature of healthy spruce somatic embryos, although it was quite different from zygotic embryos mainly containing oleic acid (18 : 1). The responses of the lines to osmotic stress were evaluated based on comparison of control (without osmoticum) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-exposed (PEG 4000) variants. Although genetically distinct, both highly embryogenic lines responded in a very similar manner, with the only difference being sensitivity to high concentrations of PEG. At an optimum PEG concentration (3.75 and 5%), which was line specific, negative effects of PEG on embryo germination were compensated for by a higher maturation efficiency so that the application of PEG at an appropriate concentration improved the yield of healthy germinants per gram of initial embryonal mass and accelerated the process. Polyethylene glycol application, however, resulted in no improvement of the poorly

  4. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  5. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  6. Specific impacts of beech and Norway spruce on the structure and diversity of the rhizosphere and soil microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Uroz, S.; Oger, P.; Tisserand, E.; Cébron, A.; Turpault, M.-P.; Buée, M.; De Boer, W.; Leveau, J. H. J.; Frey-Klett, P.

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of plant species on the microbial communities and physico-chemical characteristics of soil are well documented for many herbs, grasses and legumes but much less so for tree species. Here, we investigate by rRNA and ITS amplicon sequencing the diversity of microorganisms from the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota:Fungi) in soil samples taken from the forest experimental site of Breuil-Chenue (France). We discovered significant differences in the abundance, composition and structure of the microbial communities associated with two phylogenetically distant tree species of the same age, deciduous European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and coniferous Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst), planted in the same soil. Our results suggest a significant effect of tree species on soil microbiota though in different ways for each of the three microbial groups. Fungal and archaeal community structures and compositions are mainly determined according to tree species, whereas bacterial communities differ to a great degree between rhizosphere and bulk soils, regardless of the tree species. These results were confirmed by quantitative PCR, which revealed significant enrichment of specific bacterial genera, such as Burkholderia and Collimonas, known for their ability to weather minerals within the tree root vicinity. PMID:27302652

  7. Specific impacts of beech and Norway spruce on the structure and diversity of the rhizosphere and soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Uroz, S; Oger, P; Tisserand, E; Cébron, A; Turpault, M-P; Buée, M; De Boer, W; Leveau, J H J; Frey-Klett, P

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of plant species on the microbial communities and physico-chemical characteristics of soil are well documented for many herbs, grasses and legumes but much less so for tree species. Here, we investigate by rRNA and ITS amplicon sequencing the diversity of microorganisms from the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota:Fungi) in soil samples taken from the forest experimental site of Breuil-Chenue (France). We discovered significant differences in the abundance, composition and structure of the microbial communities associated with two phylogenetically distant tree species of the same age, deciduous European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and coniferous Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst), planted in the same soil. Our results suggest a significant effect of tree species on soil microbiota though in different ways for each of the three microbial groups. Fungal and archaeal community structures and compositions are mainly determined according to tree species, whereas bacterial communities differ to a great degree between rhizosphere and bulk soils, regardless of the tree species. These results were confirmed by quantitative PCR, which revealed significant enrichment of specific bacterial genera, such as Burkholderia and Collimonas, known for their ability to weather minerals within the tree root vicinity. PMID:27302652

  8. Red spruce dynamics in an old southern Appalachian forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    By the late 1980s the composition and structure of forest stands in the southern Appalachian spruce-fir zone were altered by insect infestations to Fraser fir. The response of red spruce, the sole remaining coniferous forest dominant, to this disturbance was followed over twenty years (1983-2003) in an old spruce-fir forest at Mt. Collins, Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Although diameter growth of canopy red spruce (>30 cm dbh) at six plot sites was considerable (mean 10-yr increment 2.1 cm; 1993-2003), red spruce mortality increased sharply (mean 4% yr-1; 1993-2003). Wind-related mortality of canopy red spruce was substantial after the loss of Fraser fir from the canopy circa 1985 (>70% of the dead spruce had broken or uprooted boles; 1983-2003). Wind damage to red spruce was observed at most plot sites, but it was most pronounced on exposed topographic positions, where canopy gap expansion was extensive. The elevated mortality of red spruce at Mt. Collins was not associated with reduced diameter growth. Altered canopy structure has left large red spruce vulnerable to high winds. With the loss of canopy fir and the subsequent increase in mortality of canopy spruce, total live basal area has declined to about half of its pre-disturbance level.

  9. Identifying the pollen of an extinct spruce species in the Late Quaternary sediments of the Tunica Hills region, south-eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luke Mander; Jacklyn Rodriguez; Pietra G. Mueller; Jackson, Stephen T.; Surangi W. Punyasena

    2014-01-01

    Late Quaternary fluvial deposits in the Tunica Hills region of Louisiana and Mississippi are rich in spruce macrofossils of the extinct species Picea critchfieldii, the one recognized plant extinction of the Late Quaternary. However, the morphology of P. critchfieldii pollen is unknown, presenting a barrier to the interpretation of pollen spectra from the last glacial of North America. To address this issue, we undertook a morphometric study of Picea pollen from Tunica Hills. Morphometric data, together with qualitative observations of pollen morphology using Apotome fluorescence microscopy, indicate that Picea pollen from Tunica Hills is morphologically distinct from the pollen of P. glauca, P. mariana and P. rubens. Measurements of grain length, corpus width and corpus height indicate that Picea pollen from Tunica Hills is larger than the pollen of P. mariana and P. rubens, and is slightly larger than P. glauca pollen. We argue that the morphologically distinctive Tunica Hills Picea pollen was probably produced by the extinct spruce species P. critchfieldii. These morphological differences could be used to identify P. critchfieldii in existing and newly collected pollen records, which would refine its paleoecologic and biogeographic history and clarify the nature and timing of its extinction in the Late Quaternary.

  10. [Species composition and community structure of a spruce-fir forest and a larch forest on the northern slope of Changbai Mountains, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xu; Xing, Ding-Liang; Zhang, Zhao-Chen; Song, Hou-Juan; Wang, Yun-Yun; Fang, Shuai; Yuan, Zuo-Qiang; Ye, Ji; Lin, Fei; Wang, Xu-Gao; Hao, Zhan-Qing

    2014-08-01

    Spruce-fir forest is the best protected forest vegetation, while larch forest is intrazonal vegetation on the northern slope of Changbai Mountains. To further understand their species composition and community structure, we established a 4 hm2 forest permanent plot in each of these two forests in 2010. All free-standing plant species with DBH (diameter at breast height) ≥ 1 cm were mapped, tagged, and identified to species. The results showed that there were 9257 stems belonging to 8640 genotype individuals, 22 species, 6 genera and 12 families in the spruce-fir forest plot, while 4060 stems belonging to 3696 genotype individuals, 22 species, 8 genera and 16 families in the larch forest plot. Species composition in the two plots was very similar. Most of the species belonged to the Changbai Mountains plant flora. The analysis of species' importance values showed that there were dominant species in both communities. The spruce-fir forest was dominated by Abies nephrolepis and Larix olgensis, whose importance values accounted for 38.7% and 23.9% of the sum of importance values over all species in the plot, respectively. The larch forest was dominated solely by L. olgensis, whose importance value accounted for 61.9% of the sum of importance values over all species in the plot. Both forests were in good condition of regeneration and showed a reversed 'J' type in tree size distributions, at community level. However, different species showed different shapes in size distribution in the two forests. A. nephrolepis showed a reversed 'J' type size distribution in the spruce-fir forest, while L. olgensis with DBH ≥ 10 cm showed a hump-shaped distribution in the larch forest. Spatial distribution patterns of the main species changed differently with size class and spatial scales. Common species had different spatial distribution patterns in the two plots. PMID:25509062

  11. Legacy of Pre-Disturbance Spatial Pattern Determines Early Structural Diversity following Severe Disturbance in Montane Spruce Forests

    PubMed Central

    Bače, Radek; Svoboda, Miroslav; Janda, Pavel; Morrissey, Robert C.; Wild, Jan; Clear, Jennifer L.; Čada, Vojtěch; Donato, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe canopy-removing disturbances are native to many temperate forests and radically alter stand structure, but biotic legacies (surviving elements or patterns) can lend continuity to ecosystem function after such events. Poorly understood is the degree to which the structural complexity of an old-growth forest carries over to the next stand. We asked how pre-disturbance spatial pattern acts as a legacy to influence post-disturbance stand structure, and how this legacy influences the structural diversity within the early-seral stand. Methods Two stem-mapped one-hectare forest plots in the Czech Republic experienced a severe bark beetle outbreak, thus providing before-and-after data on spatial patterns in live and dead trees, crown projections, down logs, and herb cover. Results Post-disturbance stands were dominated by an advanced regeneration layer present before the disturbance. Both major species, Norway spruce (Picea abies) and rowan (Sorbus aucuparia), were strongly self-aggregated and also clustered to former canopy trees, pre-disturbance snags, stumps and logs, suggesting positive overstory to understory neighbourhood effects. Thus, although the disturbance dramatically reduced the stand’s height profile with ~100% mortality of the canopy layer, the spatial structure of post-disturbance stands still closely reflected the pre-disturbance structure. The former upper tree layer influenced advanced regeneration through microsite and light limitation. Under formerly dense canopies, regeneration density was high but relatively homogeneous in height; while in former small gaps with greater herb cover, regeneration density was lower but with greater heterogeneity in heights. Conclusion These findings suggest that pre-disturbance spatial patterns of forests can persist through severe canopy-removing disturbance, and determine the spatial structure of the succeeding stand. Such patterns constitute a subtle but key legacy effect, promoting structural

  12. Eastern Boundary Effects on General Circulation Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewar, William K.

    1997-01-01

    My NASA proposal included plans to examine the dynamics of the eastern oceanic boundary, with a view towards those processes important to the interior. Several relevant tasks have been completed and either have appeared or will appear soon in the refereed literature.

  13. Quantitative structure-property relationships on photolysis of PCDD/Fs adsorbed to spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) needle surfaces under sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Junfeng; Huang, Liping; Chen, Jingwen; Yu, Gang; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2005-02-01

    By partial least squares (PLS) regression, quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were developed for photolysis half-life (t1/2) of PCDD/Fs and PAHs sorbed to spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) needle surfaces and irradiated by sunlight. Quantum chemical descriptors computed by PM3 Hamiltonian were used predictor variables. PLS analysis for the PCDDs and PAHs respectively resulted in no correlation by our statistical methods. The cross-validated Qcum2 value for the optimal QSPR model of PCDFs is 0.722, indicating a good predictive ability for logt1/2 of PCDFs adsorbed to spruce needle surfaces. The QSPR results show that the number of chlorine atoms bonded to the parent structure and (E(LUMO)-E(HOMO))2 has a dominant effect on t1/2 values of PCDFs. Increasing the number of chlorine atoms and (E(LUMO)-E(HOMO))2 values leads to increase of logt1/2 values of PCDFs. PMID:15639263

  14. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Keller, G. R.; Thybo, H.

    2010-04-01

    During the last decade, a series of controlled source seismic experiments brought new insight into the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps and their adjacent tectonic provinces. A fragmentation of the lithosphere into three blocks, Europe (EU), Adria (AD), and the new Pannonian fragment (PA), was interpreted and a triple junction was inferred. The goal of this study has been to relate these deep crustal structures to active tectonics. We used elastic plate modeling to reconsider the Moho fragmentation. We interpret subduction of EU below AD and PA from north to south and underthusting of AD mantle below PA from southwest to northeast. The Moho fragmentation correlates well with major upper crustal structures and is supported by gravity, seismic, and geodetic data. An analysis of crustal thickening suggests that active convergence is associated with continued thrusting and lateral extrusion in the central Eastern Alps and thickening of the Adriatic indenter under the Southern Alps. According to the velocity relations at the triple junction, PA moves relative to EU and AD along ENE and SE striking faults, mainly by strike slip. An eastward directed extensional component is compensated by the lateral extrusion of the central Eastern Alps. The Periadriatic (Insubric) line east of the triple junction and the mid-Hungarian fault zone have relatively recently lost their role as first-order active structures. We favor the idea that the Pannonian fragment and the TISZA block merged to a "soft" microplate surrounded by the Eastern and Southern Alpine, Carpathian, and Dinaric orogens.

  15. Structure, production and resource use in some old-growth spruce/fir forests in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Binkley, D.; Olsson, U.; Rochelle, R.; Stohlgren, T.; Nikolov, N.

    2003-01-01

    Old-growth forests of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex. Engelm.) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) dominate much of the landscape of the Rocky Mountains. We characterized the structure, biomass and production of 18 old-growth (200-450-year-old) spruce/fir forests in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, as well as the stand-level supply and use of light and nitrogen. Stands were chosen to span a broad range of elevation, aspect, and topography. Aboveground tree biomass in these old-growth forests averaged 253 Mg/ha (range 130-488 Mg/ha), with aboveground net primary production of 3700 kg ha-1 yr-1 (range from 2700 to 5200 kg ha-1 yr-1). Within stands, trees >35 cm in diameter accounted for 70% of aboveground biomass, but trees <35 cm contributed 70% of the production of woody biomass. Differences in slope and aspect among sites resulted in a range of incoming light from 58 to 74 TJ ha-1 yr-1, and tree canopies intercepted an average of 71% of incoming light (range 50-90%). Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of trees did not relate to the supply of light or N, but ANPP correlated strongly with the amount of light and N used (r2 = 0.45-0.54, P < 0.01). Uptake of 1 kg of N was associated with about 260 kg of ANPP, and one TJ of intercepted shortwave radiation produced about 78 kg of ANPP. Across these old-growth stands, stands with greater biomass showed higher rates of both ANPP and resource use; variation in aboveground biomass was associated with 24% of the variation in N use (P = 0.04), 44% of the light use (P = 0.003), and 45% of the ANPP (P = 0.002). ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. New interpretation of the deep mantle structure beneath eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pengfei; Liu, Shaofeng; Lin, Chengfa; Yao, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    Recent study of high resolution seismic tomography presents a large mass of high velocity abnormality beneath eastern China near the phase change depth, expanding more than 1600km-wide in East-west cross-section across the North China plate. This structure high is generally believed to be the subducted slab of Pacific plate beneath the Eurasia continent, while its origin and dynamic effect on the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of eastern China remain to be controversial. We developed a subduction-driven geodynamic mantle convection model that honors a set of global plate reconstruction data since 230Ma to help understand the formation and evolution of mantle structure beneath eastern China. The assimilation of plate kinematics, continuous evolving plate margin, asymmetric subduction zone, and paleo seafloor age data enables the spatial and temporal consistency between the geologic data and the mantle convection model, and guarantees the conservation of the buoyancy flux across the lithosphere and subducted slabs. Our model achieved a first order approximation between predictions and the observed data. Interestingly, the model suggests that the slab material stagnated above discontinuity didn't form until 15Ma, much later than previous expected, and the fast abnormality in the mid-mantle further west in the tomographic image is interpreted to be the remnants of the Mesozoic Izanagi subduction. Moreover, detailed analysis suggests that the accelerated subduction of Philippine Sea plate beneath Eurasia plate along the Ryukyu Trench and Nankai Trough since 15Ma may largely contribute to extending feature above 670km discontinuity. The long distance expansion of the slab material in the East-west direction may be an illusion caused by the approximate spatial perpendicularity between the cross-section and the subduction direction of the Philippine Sea plate. Our model emphasizes the necessity of the re-examination on the geophysical observation and its tectonic and

  17. Investigation of upper crustal structure beneath eastern Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martha, Agustya Adi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Cummnins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc; Masturyono

    2016-05-01

    The complexity of geology structure in eastern Java causes this region has many potential resources as much as the disasters. Therefore, the East Java province represents an interesting area to be explored, especially regarding its upper crustal structure. To investigate this structure, we employ the Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) method. We have used seismic waveform data from 25 Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) stationary seismographic stations and 26 portable seismographs installed for 2 to 8 weeks. Inter-station cross-correlation produces more than 800 Rayleigh wave components, which depict the structure beneath eastern Java. Based on the checkerboard resolution test, we found that the optimal grid size is 0.25ox0.25o. Our inversion results for the periods of 1 to 10 s indicate a good agreement with geological and Bouguer anomaly maps. Rembang high depression, most of the southern mountains zone, the northern part of Rembang zone and the central part of the Madura Island, the area of high gravity anomaly and areas dominated with igneous rocks are associated with high velocity zones. On the other hand, Kendeng zone and most of the basin in the Rembang zone are associated with low velocity zones.

  18. Full Genome of Phialocephala scopiformis DAOMC 229536, a Fungal Endophyte of Spruce Producing the Potent Anti-Insectan Compound Rugulosin

    PubMed Central

    Frasz, Samantha L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Miller, J. David; Mondo, Stephen J.; LaButti, Kurt; Lipzen, Anna; Dockter, Rhyan B.; Kennedy, Megan C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    We present the full genome of Phialocephala scopiformis DAOMC 229536 (Helotiales, Ascomycota), a foliar endophyte of white spruce from eastern Quebec. DAOMC 229536 produces the anti-insectan compound rugulosin, which inhibits a devastating forestry pest, the spruce budworm. This genome will enable fungal genotyping and host-endophyte evolutionary genomics in inoculated trees. PMID:26950333

  19. Full Genome of Phialocephala scopiformis DAOMC 229536, a Fungal Endophyte of Spruce Producing the Potent Anti-Insectan Compound Rugulosin.

    PubMed

    Walker, Allison K; Frasz, Samantha L; Seifert, Keith A; Miller, J David; Mondo, Stephen J; LaButti, Kurt; Lipzen, Anna; Dockter, Rhyan B; Kennedy, Megan C; Grigoriev, Igor V; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2016-01-01

    We present the full genome of Phialocephala scopiformis DAOMC 229536 (Helotiales, Ascomycota), a foliar endophyte of white spruce from eastern Quebec. DAOMC 229536 produces the anti-insectan compound rugulosin, which inhibits a devastating forestry pest, the spruce budworm. This genome will enable fungal genotyping and host-endophyte evolutionary genomics in inoculated trees. PMID:26950333

  20. Upper mantle anisotropy structure beneath eastern Tibet and its exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wen, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continental collision between the Indian and the Eurasian plates resulted in uplift of the Tibetan plateau and the thickening of the crust. A lot of work has been done on the crust structures beneath Tibet, and several tectonic models are proposed to explain the mechanism of the uplift and thickening. But due to the absence of the upper mantle structures, those models are still under debate. Fine upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures can help us understand the dynamic process of the Tibetan plateau. Waveform modeling of upper mantle triplication phases can provide a good vertical resolution of upper mantle velocity structures, but present methods for calculating synthetic seismograms cannot process anisotropic media. We develop a method based on the generalized reflection and transmission method (GRTM) to calculate synthetic seismograms for wave propagating in stratified VTI media, so we can waveform model upper mantle triplications propagating in anisotropic media. In this study, we waveform model the tangential and radial seismic triplication data recorded in Chinese digital seismic stations at a epicentral distance of 10-30 degree for one events occurring in middle Tibet to constrain fine upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures beneath eastern Tibet. The result shows that horizontal S wave velocity is larger than vertical S wave velocity in the upper mantle beneath eastern Tibet. We also build a mineral physics modeling method, which can calculate upper mantle anisotropy structures based on mantle temperatures, compositions and directions of mantle flow, and use this method to explore compositional and dynamic models that would explain the inferred seismic structures. The results suggest that in our sampling region, the water content is lower than 0.4 wt%, and there is vertical mantle flow beneath the lithospheric lid.

  1. Lithospheric thermal structure and rheology of the eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Cheng, Su-Hua

    2012-03-01

    the eastern half of the North China Craton, which has low-to-moderate geotherm and/or thinner crust. In general, thermal age of the tectonic province controls the present-day thermal structure and rheology of the lithosphere of the eastern China.

  2. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M.; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota. PMID:26636571

  3. Combined effect of elevated UVB, elevated temperature and fertilization on growth, needle structure and phytochemistry of young Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Virjamo, Virpi; Sutinen, Sirkka; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2014-07-01

    Simultaneously with warming climate, other climatic and environmental factors are also changing. Here, we investigated for the first time the effects of elevated temperature, increased ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation, fertilization and all combinations of these on the growth, secondary chemistry and needle structure of 1-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings in an outdoor experiment. After one growing season, elevated temperature increased root : shoot ratio and concentrations of needle piperidine alkaloids, while concentrations of needle catechins and acetophenones and bark flavonoids decreased compared with ambient temperature seedlings. UVB-radiation increased concentrations of bark condensed tannins, while fertilization increased total biomass and concentrations of needle catechins. In addition to the main effects, concentrations of some individual phenolic compounds showed UV × temperature or UV × temperature × fertilization interactions, and fertilization modified temperature response on root : shoot ratio. All the treatments described here affected the defence chemistry profiles of the seedlings, which may imply some changes in plant-herbivore interactions in connection with changing climate. The interactions between treatments indicate a need for further experiments involving several simultaneously affecting environmental changes. PMID:24804850

  4. Profiling functions of ectomycorrhizal diversity and root structuring in seedlings of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Rajala, Tiina; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Taylor, Andy F S; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of taxonomical and functional ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal diversity in root formation and nutrient uptake by Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes. Seedlings were grown with an increasing ECM fungal diversity gradient from one to four species and sampled before aboveground growth differences between the two phenotypes were apparent. ECM fungal colonization patterns were determined and functional diversity was assayed via measurements of potential enzyme activities of eight exoenzymes probably involved in nutrient mobilization. Phenotypes did not vary in their receptiveness to different ECM fungal species. However, seedlings of slow-growing phenotypes had higher fine-root density and thus more condensed root systems than fast-growing seedlings, but the potential enzyme activities of ectomycorrhizas did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively. ECM species richness increased host nutrient acquisition potential by diversifying the exoenzyme palette. Needle nitrogen content correlated positively with high chitinase activity of ectomycorrhizas. Rather than fast- and slow-growing phenotypes exhibiting differing receptiveness to ECM fungi, our results suggest that distinctions in fine-root structuring and in the belowground growth strategy already apparent at early stages of seedling development may explain later growth differences between fast- and slow-growing families. PMID:24117652

  5. Genetic Structure of Daphnia galeata Populations in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wolinska, Justyna; Ma, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhong; Hu, Wei; Yin, Mingbo

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first examination of the genetic structure of Daphnia longispina complex populations in Eastern China. Only one species, D. galeata, was present across the eight investigated lakes; as identified by taxon assignment using allelic variation at 15 microsatellite loci. Three genetically differentiated D. galeata subgroups emerged independent of the type of statistical analysis applied. Thus, Bayesian clustering, discriminant analysis based on results from factorial correspondence analysis, and UPGMA clustering consistently showed that populations from two neighbouring lakes were genetically separated from a mixture of genotypes found in other lakes, which formed another two subgroups. Clonal diversity was high in all D. galeata populations, and most samples showed no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, indicating that clonal selection had little effect on the genetic diversity. Overall, populations did not cluster by geographical origin. Further studies will show if the observed pattern can be explained by natural colonization processes or by recent anthropogenic impact on predominantly artificial lakes. PMID:25768727

  6. Cretaceous combined structure in eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Liu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Eastern Sichuan Basin is confined by two thin-skinned fold-thrust belt, NW-trending Southern Daba Shan (Shan=Mountain) (SDB) in the northeast and NNE- or NE-trending Western XueFeng Shan (WXF) in the southeast, which constitute two convergent salients convex to the inner basin respectively. Although many factors can lead to the formation of fold-thrust belt salients, the eastern Sichuan salients would be attributed to the combined structure (firstly nominated by Chinese geologist, Li Siguang), which means the interaction of two structural belts in the same period. By field surveying and geological map interpreting, we found that WXF deformation began in Late Jurassic along the eastern side of structral belt, where the synclines cored by Upper-Middle Jurassic rock. The initial time of SDB deformation remains poorly determined, however our palaeocurrent data of Lower Cretaceous rock in adjecent foreland basin indicate the provenance from northeast or east. Hence we considered the two fold-thrust belt started interactive in Late Jurassic and mainly combined during Cretaceous. In Early Cretaceous, the front belt of WXF salient arrived near KaiXian where NEE-trending arc-shape folds converged with the NWW-trending arc-shape folds of SDB.The two salients shaped like an westward "open mouth", east of which EW-trending folds of two structural belts juxtaposed. Particularly in the middle belt of WXF (FengJie - WuFeng) the earlier NEE-trending folds were refolded by later NNE-trending folds. We interpret the NEE-trending folds as the front belt of earlier (maybe Late Jurassic) WXF salient. When the two combined fold belts propagated westward together, the original NNE-trending front belt of WXF constrained by the front belt of SDB and formed the curved fold trend lines convex to NNW. Then as WXF deformation continued but SDB gradually terminated, the consequent NNE-trending folds could not be curved and would superpose on the earlier NEE-trending folds.In Late Cretaceous

  7. Genetic structure of Daphnia galeata populations in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenzhi; Gießler, Sabine; Wolinska, Justyna; Ma, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhong; Hu, Wei; Yin, Mingbo

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first examination of the genetic structure of Daphnia longispina complex populations in Eastern China. Only one species, D. galeata, was present across the eight investigated lakes; as identified by taxon assignment using allelic variation at 15 microsatellite loci. Three genetically differentiated D. galeata subgroups emerged independent of the type of statistical analysis applied. Thus, Bayesian clustering, discriminant analysis based on results from factorial correspondence analysis, and UPGMA clustering consistently showed that populations from two neighbouring lakes were genetically separated from a mixture of genotypes found in other lakes, which formed another two subgroups. Clonal diversity was high in all D. galeata populations, and most samples showed no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, indicating that clonal selection had little effect on the genetic diversity. Overall, populations did not cluster by geographical origin. Further studies will show if the observed pattern can be explained by natural colonization processes or by recent anthropogenic impact on predominantly artificial lakes. PMID:25768727

  8. SPRUCE experiment data infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krassovski, M.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T.; Riggs, J.; Nettles, W. R.; Hook, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data activities CDIAC performs are design and implementation of the data systems. One current example is the data system and network for SPRUCE experiment. The SPRUCE experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. Experimental work in the 8.1-ha S1 bog will be a climate change manipulation focusing on the combined responses to multiple levels of warming at ambient or elevated CO2 (eCO2) levels. The experiment provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The manipulation will evaluate the response of the existing biological communities to a range of warming levels from ambient to +9°C, provided via large, modified open-top chambers. The ambient and +9°C warming treatments will also be conducted at eCO2 (in the range of 800 to 900 ppm). Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses. SPRUCE provides wide range continuous and discrete measurements. To successfully manage SPRUCE data flow

  9. Vertical fine structure observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.P.

    1981-11-20

    Measurements of vertical displacement and horizontal velocity finestructure near the equator at 110/sup 0/W in the eastern Pacific Ocean are reported. Profiles were scaled to a constant Bruent-Vaeisaelae frequency ocean (N/sub 0/ = 1 cph) in accordance with a WKBJ approximation. A total of 57 CTD casts between 3/sup 0/N and 3/sup 0/S taken during five cruises in 1979 were analyzed. Results show an equatorial enhancement of vertical displacement is similar variance for vertical wavelengths longer than 50 sdbar (stretched decibars). This enhancement is similar to that which has been reported at 125/sup 0/W and 179/sup 0/E. Difference between locations can be accounted for by the observed temporal variability at 110/sup 0/W. Coherence between vertical displacement profiles separated in time by dealys of 2 hours to 120 hour indicate that the high wave number structures were largely associated with time scales of 4 days and less. Meridionally, vertical structures longer than 300 sdbar were coherent within 50 km of the equator. We interpret this vertical displacement fine structure enhancement as high wave number equatorially trapped inertial-gravity waves. The velocity fine structure measurements in July 1979 also indicate equatorially enhanced horizontal kinetic energy for vertical wave lengths longer than 100 sdbar. The velocity structures persisted over the 56 hour of measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy exceeded zonal energy; however, the two components were coherent. We interpret these velocity structures as inertial-gravity waves which were produced off the equator and are propagating through the equatorial region.

  10. Crustal structure of the Levant Basin, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Ginzburg, Avihu; Makris, Jannis; Eppelbaum, Lev

    2002-02-01

    A seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection experiment was undertaken in the Levant Basin, eastern Mediterranean. Two roughly east-west profiles extend from the continental shelf of Israel toward the Levant Basin. The northern profile crosses the Eratosthenes Seamount and the southern profile crosses several distinct magnetic anomalies. The marine operation used 16 ocean bottom seismometers deployed along the profiles with an air gun array and explosive charges as energy sources. The results of this study strongly suggest the existence of oceanic crust under portions of the Levant Basin and continental crust under the Eratosthenes Seamount. The seismic refraction data also indicate a large sedimentary sequence, 10-14 km thick, in the Levant Basin and below the Levant continental margin. Assuming the crust is of Cretaceous age, this gives a fairly high sedimentation rate. The sequence can be divided into several units. A prominent unit is the 4.2 km/s layer, which is probably composed of the Messinian evaporites. Overlying the evaporitic layer are layers composed of Plio-Pleistocene sediments, whose velocity is 2.0 km/s. The refraction profiles and gravity and magnetic models indicate that a transition from a two layer continental to a single-layer oceanic crust takes place along the Levant margin. The transition in the structure along the southern profile is located beyond the continental margin and it is quite gradual. The northern profile, north of the Carmel structure, presents a different structure. The continental crust is much thinner there and the transition in the crustal structure is more rapid. The crustal thinning begins under western Galilee and terminates at the continental slope. The results of the present study indicate that the Levant Basin is composed of distinct crustal units and that the Levant continental margin is divided into at least two provinces of different crustal structure.

  11. Upper Mantle Structure of Eastern Africa from Body Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulibo, G.; Nyblade, A.; Fredinand, R.

    2010-12-01

    This study presents preliminary results of the upper mantle structure beneath the east Africa from body wave tomography. This work is part of an on-going study aimed at investigating the origin and structure of the African Superplume. The available global tomographic studies suggest that the African Superplume is a low velocity-anomaly extending from the core-mantle boundary upward into the mid mantle beneath southern Africa and may reach the upper mantle beneath eastern Africa. However, the limited vertical resolution of global tomographic models makes it difficult to confirm a connection from the lower to the upper mantle. Previous regional studies of upper mantle structure in east Africa have found evidence of a low velocity anomaly beneath the region that has been suggested as the upper mantle expression of the Superplume. Models from previous tomographic studies in east Africa have limited resolution below ~400 km beneath the eastern rift and are less well resolved beneath the western part of the rift due to less data coverage. This study uses teleseismic data from a wider region in east Africa than previously used. Data for this study are from a 3-year (2007-2010) deployment of 40 broadband seismic stations in Uganda and Tanzania. The dataset is supplemented by data from the 1994-1995 Tanzania broadband seismic experiment, the 2001-2002 Kenya broadband seismic experiment, the permanent AfricaArray seismic stations and IRIS/GSN stations. The data have been used for body wave tomography by computing relative travel time delays using a multi-channel cross-correlation technique and then inverting them for a 3D wave speed model. Preliminary results from the inversion of the relative delay times show that there is a broad low wave speed anomaly beneath east Africa extending from shallow upper mantle depths to at least 500 km into the mantle transition zone. The appearance and size of the low wave speed anomaly in the region indicates the presence of broad thermal

  12. Vegetation structure in cerrado physiognomies in south-eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Batalha, M A; Mantovani, W; de Mesquita Júnior, H N

    2001-08-01

    We studied three cerrado physiognomies (campo cerrado, a savanna woodland; cerrado sensu stricto, a woodland; and cerradão, a tall woodland) in a reserve with 1,225 ha, in Santa Rita do Passa-Quatro (21 degrees 36-38'S and 47 degrees 36-39'W), São Paulo State, South-eastern Brazil, to compare plant communities structure. As descriptors of the vegetation structure, we used richness, density, basal area, cylindrical volume, and diversity. Ten 40 m2 quadrats were placed randomly in each physiognomy, in which we sampled the woody plants with stem diameter equal or larger than 1 cm (woody component), and ten 2.5 m2 quadrats, in which we sampled the woody plants with stem diameter smaller than 1 cm and all the non-woody individuals (herbaceous component). In the woody component, we found significant differences among the physiognomies for richness, density and cylindrical volume. Cylindrical volume increased from campo cerrado to cerradão, but richness and density were higher in cerrado sensu stricto. In the herbaceous component, we detected differences for all variables, which were higher in the savanna physiognomies, campo cerrado and cerrado sensu stricto, than in the forest physiognomy, cerradão. Cylindrical volume was the best variable to distinguish the physiognomies. Floristic similarity followed the campo cerrado-cerrado sensu stricto-cerradão gradient, and beta diversity was higher in the herbaceous component. PMID:11706576

  13. Crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwafor, Emeka

    The Gulf of Mexico initiated in the Late Triassic as South America and Africa separated from North America during the break up of Pangea. Previous studies indicate three models for the opening of the GOM. These include counter clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block, rotation of the Yucatan Block about the same pole of rotation as those describing seafloor spreading in the central North Atlantic, and clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block. There is much debate about the margin type and the crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico (EGOM), especially below the depth of 6 km where crustal structure is poorly imaged on seismic reflection data. Two 2.5-D forward gravity and magnetic models across the margin are presented. These are constrained by basement picks from sparse seismic reflection and refraction data, spectral analysis of gravity data to determine the depth to source, magnetic susceptibility derived from results from other margins, the empirical relationship between P-wave velocity and density, and crustal scale isostatic modeling. The models, combined with a kinematic reconstruction of the GOM, show that: 1) it is a rifted margin; 2) the point where the Moho deepens downward from ˜17 km to ˜32 km is approximately 50 km outboard of the topographic shelf edge; 3) the carbonate bank retreated by several kilometers from its original termination due to the action of contourite currents; 4) extension and subsidence was accommodated with little shallow brittle faulting; 5) oceanic lithosphere is possibly outboard of the EGOM continental slope.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of rice landraces from Eastern and North Eastern States of India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptations to different habitats across the globe and consequent genetic variation within rice have resulted in more than 120,000 diverse accessions including landraces, which are vital genetic resources for agronomic and quality traits. In India the rice landraces of the states West Bengal, Assam, Mizoram, Manipur and Nagaland are worthy candidates for genetic assessment. Keeping the above in view, the present study was conducted with the aim to (i) calculate the genetic distances among the accessions of 83 landraces collected from these states along with 8 check accessions (total 91 accessions) using 23 previously mapped SSR markers and (ii) examine the population structure among the accessions using model-based clustering approach. Results Among the 91 accessions, 182 alleles were identified which included 51 rare and 27 null alleles. The average PIC value was 0.7467/marker. The non-aromatic landraces from West Bengal was most diverse with 154 alleles and an average PIC value of 0.8005/marker, followed by the aromatic landraces from West Bengal with 118 alleles and an average PIC value of 0.6524/marker, while the landraces from North East ranked third with 113 alleles and an average PIC value of 0.5745/marker. In the dendrogram distinct clusters consisting of predominantly aromatic landraces and predominantly North East Indian landraces were observed. The non-aromatic landraces from West Bengal were interspersed within these two clusters. The accessions were moderately structured, showing four sub-populations (A-D) with an Fst value of 0.398, 0.364, 0.206 and 0.281, respectively. The assigned clustering of accessions was well in agreement in both distance-based and model-based approaches. Conclusions Each of the accessions could be identified unequivocally by the SSR profiles. Genetically the non aromatic landraces from West Bengal were most diverse followed by the aromatic landraces from the same state. The North Eastern accessions ranked third

  15. Structural Model of the Tucupita Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, L. A.

    2013-05-01

    The Tucupita Field has an area of 73,51 Km2, is located between the states of Monagas and Delta Amacuro, geologically is located at the greater Temblador area in the Eastern Venezuela Basin, where the Oficina Formation's sands represent the main hydrocarbons reservoirs. From the results of the seismic reprocessing realized by Fusion Petroleum Technologies, Inc., the structural model of this field was done as initial step to the geocellular model of the Oficina-40 Reservoir, which was defined as a Faulted Relay Ramp, where the normal faults are dominant with NE-SW orientation Introduction The Tucupita Field is a mature oilfield at the greater Temblador area, however most of the wells were completed in the upper sands, therefore the main study is focused in the geological characterization of the Oficina-40 Reservoir's lower sands, starting by the structural model Previous Studies 1. Proyecto Tucupita 3D The seismic data of the Tucupita Field were adquired in 1996 by Western Atlas of Venezuela for the Benton Vinccler Company. The UTM coordinates of the wells used in this project, have been taken to make this geological model 2. Soporte Geofísico Integrado The seismic project Tucupita was processed by Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc., in Houston and consisted of reprocessing and pre-stack migration in time (PSTM) and pre-stack migration in depth (PSDM), this data belong to the Petrodelta Company Based on the regional stratigraphy, were validated the "picks" to make the structural sections to support research with hard data. After, it proceeded to interpret the structural style of the field from the seismic amplitude cube. Then, it was done the faults modelling and the stratigraphic horizons to carry out the geocellular model Three structural sections were realized, which was interpreted like a faulted monocline, whose peak is located southward, where justly the wells are located. The contact oil-water was interpreted to -5648'. Echelon faults were interpreted in a

  16. Warm Eddy Structure Observed During EPIC in Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L. K.; Jaimes, B.; Brewster, J.

    2007-05-01

    During the NSF/NOAA sponsored Eastern Pacific Investigation of Climate (EPIC) field program in Sept. and Oct. 2001, oceanic current, temperature and salinity profiles were acquired by deploying expendable profilers from research aircraft flights above the warm pool grid centered on the TAO mooring at 10oN 95oW and the R/V Ron Brown, and along the 95oW transect from the NOAA WP-3D and the NCAR WC-130, respectively. Analyses of mooring, ship and aircraft observations suggest the propagation of a wind-forced, warm eddy in accord with remotely sensed fields from radar altimetry and TRMM microwave imager (TMI) measurements. This anti- cyclonically rotating warm eddy, consistent with Rossby wave dynamics, impacted both the oceanic and atmospheric mixed layer structure. To examine the evolving characteristics of this oceanic feature, SSTs, isotherm depths and oceanic heat content variations (relative to the 26oC isotherm depth referred to as OHC) were compared at the TAO buoy. Satellite- based OHC variations were estimated by inferring isotherm depths (20oC, 26oC) from blended and objectively mapped, altimeter-derived surface height anomaly (SHA) fields based on climatology and TMI-derived SSTs. Based on sequential maps of the SHA, the observed warm eddy had SHA elevation of 12 to 14 cm that indicated a propagation speed of 13 cm s-1 towards the southwest. Inferred isotherm depths and OHC variations agreed with those from the TAO mooring and profiler measurements. For example, the 26oC isotherm depth ranged from 35 to 40 m with OHC values of 40 kJ cm-2. Understanding the evolving 3-D structure of these features is central to assessing the upper ocean's role in hurricane intensity fluctuations in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This approach is now being applied to several years of in situ and remotely sensed measurements in this regime to assess uncertainties in satellite retrievals to build climatology for use with hurricane intensity forecast models as in the Atlantic Ocean

  17. Climate-induced mortality of spruce stands in Belarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Golukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is an analysis of the causes of spruce (Picea abies L.) decline and mortality in Belarus. The analysis was based on forest inventory and Landsat satellite (land cover classification, climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, evaporation, vapor pressure deficit, SPEI drought index)), and GRACE-derived soil moisture estimation (equivalent of water thickness anomalies, EWTA). We found a difference in spatial patterns between dead stands and all stands (i.e., before mortality). Dead stands were located preferentially on relief features with higher water stress risk (i.e., higher elevations, steeper slopes, south and southwestern exposure). Spruce mortality followed a series of repeated droughts between 1990 and 2010. Mortality was negatively correlated with air humidity (r = -0.52), and precipitation (r = -0.57), and positively correlated with the prior year vapor pressure deficit (r = 0.47), and drought increase (r = 0.57). Mortality increased with the increase in occurrence of spring frosts (r = 0.5), and decreased with an increase in winter cloud cover (r = -0.37). Spruce mortality was negatively correlated with snow water accumulation (r = -0.81) and previous year anomalies in water soil content (r = -0.8). Weakened by water stress, spruce stands were attacked by pests and phytopathogens. Overall, spruce mortality in Belarussian forests was caused by drought episodes and drought increase in synergy with pest and phytopathogen attacks. Vast Picea abies mortality in Belarus and adjacent areas of Russia and Eastern Europe is a result of low adaptation of that species to increased drought. This indicates the necessity of spruce replacement by drought-tolerant indigenous (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Querqus robur) or introduced (e.g., Larix sp. or Pseudotsuga menzieslii) species to obtain sustainable forest growth management.

  18. How to interpret upper mantle structure under the Eastern Alps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückl, Ewald; Keller, G. Randy; Mitterbauer, Ulrike

    2013-04-01

    Recent controlled source seismic investigations, supplemented by potential field studies, have substantially improved our knowledge about the lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps. Crustal structures due to collision and escape tectonics were imaged and an improved Moho map revealed the fragmentation of the mantle lithosphere into three blocks, the European plate (EU), the Adriatic micro-plate (AD), and a newly interpreted Pannonian domain (PA) comprising the mantle lithosphere below ALCAPA, Tisza, and the Dinarides. The EU, AD, and PA blocks compose a triple junction near the southeastern border of the Tauern window. Images of the upper mantle supplied by seismic tomography provide a better understanding of plate tectonic processes. These studies identified a slab below the EU-AD plate boundary, with its eastern termination near the triple junction. We interpret the European lithospheric mantle to be connected to this slab (East Alpine slab, EAS), and thus, identify it as former lower European lithosphere. Another interpretation has been proposed based on an apparent NE directed dip of the EAS resolved by teleseismic tomography carried out as part of the TRANSALP project. In this interpretation, the EAS is connected to the Adriatic mantle lithosphere thus inferring a subduction polarity flip near the Brenner normal fault terminating the Tauern window in the west. However, we conclude that arguments based only on the slab geometry are not sufficient to determine the nature of the EAS. We suggest a plate tectonic model of the East Alpine collision and extrusion processes based on the structure of the lithospheric mantle and the slab geometry. We reconstruct the passive EU margin of the Penninic Ocean (Alpine Tethys) by restoration of the EAS to the EU plate. The Adriatic domain, including ALCAPA, represents the active margin. Collision of the Adriatic domain with EU starts at the southern end of the restored EAS. After subduction of the entire Penninic Ocean

  19. Gravity anomalies and deep structure of eastern Hudson bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Manoj; Gibb, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The Cape Smith and Belcher foldbelts of Lower Proterozoic (Aphebian) rocks form parts of the proposed Circum-Superior suture which separates the Superior and Churchill structural provinces of the Canadian Shield. Recent marine gravity surveys in eastern Hudson Bay (1976-1979) show that the distinctive linear gravity pattern of paired positive and negative anomalies along the Cape Smith foldbelt of northern Ungava extends southwards into Hudson Bay to the Belcher Islands. Interpretation of five gravity profiles across the Cape Smith and Belcher foldbelts suggests that the Churchill crust is thicker and denser than the Superior. The boundary between the two contrasting crustal blocks is interpreted as a collisional suture. The rocks of the foldbelts which are progressively more volcanic northwards are the source of a residual positive anomaly associated with the Cape Smith foldbelt and a series of discontinuous positive residual anomalies in the Bay. To the north the thicknesses of the foldbelt rocks are estimated to be between 4 and 9 km with a local maximum of 13 km in the northernmost profile. To the south in the Belcher Islands, where geological estimates of formation thickness and measured rock densities provide more constraints on the interpretation of the residual anomalies, the foldbelt rocks are generally 6-7 km thick with a local maximum thickness of about 9 km. One possible interpretation of paleomagnetic results for Belcher Islands rocks in terms of a two-plate model lends support to the collision hypothesis.

  20. Densities of breeding birds and changes in vegetation in an alaskan boreal forest following a massive disturbance by spruce beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuoka, S.M.; Handel, C.M.; Ruthrauff, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    We examined bird and plant communities among forest stands with different levels of spruce mortality following a large outbreak of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Spruce beetles avoided stands with black spruce (Picea mariana) and selectively killed larger diameter white spruce (Picea glauca), thereby altering forest structure and increasing the dominance of black spruce in the region. Alders (Alnus sp.) and crowberry (Empetrum nigrum) were more abundant in areas with heavy spruce mortality, possibly a response to the death of overstory spruce. Grasses and herbaceous plants did not proliferate as has been recorded following outbreaks in more coastal Alaskan forests. Two species closely tied to coniferous habitats, the tree-nesting Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) and the red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), a major nest predator, were less abundant in forest stands with high spruce mortality than in low-mortality stands. Understory-nesting birds as a group were more abundant in forest stands with high levels of spruce mortality, although the response of individual bird species to tree mortality was variable. Birds breeding in stands with high spruce mortality likely benefited reproductively from lower squirrel densities and a greater abundance of shrubs to conceal nests from predators.

  1. The 3D geological model of the Eastern Romania tectonics and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necula, Nicusor; Sorin Baciu, Dorin; Niculita, Mihai; Dumitriu, Tony-Cristian

    2016-04-01

    3D geologic modelling is a modern tool which allow the conceptualization of geologic relations in an interactive environment, strengthening the ability to understand and present tectonic and structural geologic models. We integrated the data available in the literature (wells, maps, cross-sections) for the geological structure of the Eastern Romania, comprising the Eastern Carpathians Orogen and its foreland. The subducting East European plate generated the Eastern Carphatians thrusts. Under the Eastern Carpathians, beside East European plate, the Tornquist-Teysseire zone is caught. East European Craton (Proterozoic), Scythian Platform (Paleozoic), North Dobrogean Orogen (Paleozoic) and Moesian Platform (Paleozoic), all neighbor Tornquist-Teysseire zone (Paleozoic), playing the role of foreland for the Eastern Carpathian Orogen. The Eastern Carphatians Orogen has two flysch belts, the Inner Carpathian called Dacides formed in Cretacic deformations and the Outer Carpathian called Moldavides and formed in Late Badenian to Sarmatian deformations. The modelling was performed in Midland Valley's Move software. The boundaries of all the structural units presented above were modelled, together with the faults which are represented on the various osurces used. The created 3D geological model is seen as a tool to better understand and represent the tectonic and structural model of the Eastern ROmania and will also allow a better quantification of the relations between geology and landforms in Eastern Romania.

  2. 1. 20472009 SPRUCE ST. RUNS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT. SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 2047-2009 SPRUCE ST. RUNS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT. SOUTH (FRONT) FACADES. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST - Spruce Street Area Study, 2009-2045 Spruce Street (Houses), Spruce Street, north side, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Structure and tectonic setting of the eastern Tehachapi Range, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.J.; Saleeby, J.B.; Silver, L.T. . Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    In the easternmost Tehachapi mountains a moderately SE dipping fault zone with an irregular trace juxtaposes high grade ductilely deformed footwall gneisses against a cataclastically deformed granitic hanging wall complex from Tehachapi Valley to the Garlock FZ. The fault zone exhibits evidence of both ductile and brittle deformation. Moderately SE plunging stretching lineations and sense of shear indicators in the footwall suggest normal displacement and the sole of the hanging wall consists of a chloritic breccia. The footwall consists of garnet-amphibolite grade orthogneiss, paragneiss, and marble, locally protomylonitic, folded into presently SW vergent isoclinal folds with a penetrative, NW trending, moderately NE dipping foliation. This gneiss complex hosts a 0.2 to 0.8 km wide, NW tending, shallow NE dipping ductile shear zone, called here the eastern Tehachapi shear zone (ETSZ). The ETSZ appears to post-date much of the isoclinal folding in the gneisses. The ETSZ is inferred to continue north of Tehachapi valley (Ross, 1989) where it steepens and swings to a more northerly trend into the Lake Isabella region where it has been called the proto-Kern Canyon fault zone. A post ETSZ deformation refolded the gneisses into open, upright folds with moderately NE plunging axes. Juxtaposition of the gneisses and the cataclastically deformed granitic hanging wall rocks occurred during and/or after this post ETSZ folding event. In the structurally lowest levels of the gneiss complex exposed along the Garlock fault, quartz diorite orthogneiss becomes increasingly deformed downward with an NE striking, moderately NW dipping mylonitic fabric. The youngest deformation in the areas is a series of WNW trending, regional scale antiforms and synforms which exert a first order control on the topography of the region.

  4. Fire severity unaffected by spruce beetle outbreak in spruce-fir forests in southwestern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Andrus, Robert A; Veblen, Thomas T; Harvey, Brian J; Hart, Sarah J

    2016-04-01

    Recent large and severe outbreaks of native bark beetles have raised concern among the general public and land managers about potential for amplified fire activity in western North America. To date, the majority of studies examining bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire severity in the U.S. Rocky Mountains have focused on outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests, but few studies, particularly field studies, have addressed the effects of the severity of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) infestation on subsequent fire severity in subalpine Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forests. In Colorado, the annual area infested by spruce beetle outbreaks is rapidly rising, while MPB outbreaks are subsiding; therefore understanding this relationship is of growing importance. We collected extensive field data in subalpine forests in the eastern San Juan Mountains, southwestern Colorado, USA, to investigate whether a gray-stage (< 5 yr from outbreak to time of fire) spruce beetle infestation affected fire severity. Contrary to the expectation that bark beetle infestation alters subsequent fire severity, correlation and multivariate generalized linear regression analysis revealed no influence of pre-fire spruce beetle severity on nearly all field or remotely sensed measurements of fire severity. Findings were consistent across moderate and extreme burning conditions. In comparison to severity of the pre-fire beetle outbreak, we found that topography, pre-outbreak basal area, and weather conditions exerted a stronger effect on fire severity. Our finding that beetle infestation did not alter fire severity is consistent with previous retrospective studies examining fire activity following other bark beetle outbreaks and reiterates the overriding influence of climate that creates conditions conducive to large, high-severity fires in the subalpine zone of Colorado

  5. ASSOCIATIONS OF EASTERN REDCEDAR AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF SMALL MAMMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased abundance of eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginianas), a native but invasive species in the Great Plains, has been associated with several changes in ecosystem function. It can lead to a reduction in herbaceous biomass in the canopy zone, alter species composition, and...

  6. Social Structure and Social Change in Eastern Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, George; Schenkel, Walter

    This specialized bibliography of scholarly writings since 1945 on Eastern Europe covers the countries of Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Yugoslavia. Distinct entries number about 700 and cover works published in English in the United States and Great Britain and also sources in French and German published…

  7. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. ); Adams, H.S. )

    1987-10-01

    In this letter, the authors take issue with Zedaker, Hyink, and Smith who have indicated that observed red spruce growth declines can be expected based on growth trends for even-aged stands of red spruce as documented in Meyer (1929). Recently, an examination was made of stand stocking levels at 750 sites where red spruce were cored and neither the rate of growth decline nor the extent of mortality were found to be related to stand stocking levels or previous disturbance history. The authors conclude that the Meyer data do not represent an appropriate model for stand dynamics of old-growth, high-elevation stands and no not adequately explain the growth declines observed at many of those sites.

  8. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Zedaker, S.M.; Hyink, D.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades second-growth red spruce stands in the Northeast have demonstrated declines in radial increment. Some observers are implicating air pollution as a primary cause of the declines, based on recently acquired increment cores from dominant trees. Various forms of air pollution (O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, and trace metals) are known to reduce growth and development of tree species, but few studies have provided concrete evidence of regional pollution-caused declines in forest ecosystems. Recently published evidence of a synchronous, consistent, and unprecedented regional decline in red spruce should be weighed against the realization that radial increment in red spruce declines naturally as stands age. Separating anthropogenic stress-caused growth patterns from natural stand dynamics requires an in-depth knowledge of forest growth and yield, tree silvics, and forest ecosystem processes. Detailed analyses of growth by stand characteristics - site index, density, elevation, stand history - will be necessary to implicate air pollution as a primary cause of red spruce decline.

  9. Red spruce decline---Winter injury and air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T.M. )

    1989-10-01

    There has been a widespread decline in growth of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) since 1960 in the eastern United States. There is evidence that this decline is at least partly attributable to age- and density-related growth patterns, particularly at lower elevations. Mortality has been severe at high elevation sites where similar episodes have occasionally occurred in the last 100 years. At these sites, periods of low growth preceding 1960 were related to periods with warm late summers and cold early winters. Since 1960, this relationship no longer holds, although there is an association with unusual deviations from mean temperatures. There are field reports that one of the main causes of reduced growth and mortality is apical dieback induced by severe winter conditions. Preliminary observations suggest that high elevation red spruce may not be sufficiently hardened to tolerate low autumn temperatures. However, appearance of injury in the spring, association of injury with wind exposure and correlation of provenance susceptibility with cuticular transpiration rates, including the importance of desiccation injury. Sensitivity to both types of winter injury may be increased by air pollutants (particularly ozone and less probably, acid mist or excess nitrogen deposition). Nutrient deficiency (particularly magnesium and to a lesser extent potassium) may also increase cold sensitivity. The nature and extent of these interactions are being actively researched for red spruce. 48 refs.

  10. Spatial patterns in forest composition and standing dead red spruce in montane forests of the Adirondacks and northern Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Craig, B W; Friedland, A J

    1991-08-01

    The decline of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) in montane forests of the northeastern United States has been previously reported. The objective of this study was to assess spatial patterns, if any, in standing dead red spruce stems in the Adirondacks of New York and northern Appalachians of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. A stratified random sample of 19 mountains along a west to east transect in the Adirondacks and the northern Appalachians showed that the live basal area of all species was highest in the White Mountains (34.6 m(2) ha(-1)) and lowest in the Adirondack Mountains (23.7 m(2) ha(-1)) in the Green Mountains was significantly lower than in any other region. Intact standing dead red spruce in the Adirondack and Green Mountains (30%) was significantly higher than that in the three eastern clusters (14%). The amount of intact standing dead red spruce trees increased with elevation in only the western part of the region. With the exception of the Adirondacks, there was a greater average percent dead red spruce on the west side than on the east side of each mountain. The sum of standing dead for other tree species (average 13%) showed no statistically significant patterns with region, elevation or aspect, and was significantly lower than the amount of total dead red spruce (average 42%). The standing dead red spruce patterns we observed cannot be associated with any specific causal factors at this time. PMID:24233751

  11. Effects of artificial defoliation of pines on the structure and physiology of the soil fungal community of a mixed pine-spruce forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, Ken; Raleigh, Christopher; New, Michael H.; Henson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Loss of photosynthetic area can affect soil microbial communities by altering the availability of fixed carbon. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Biolog filamentous-fungus plates to determine the effects of artificial defoliation of pines in a mixed pine-spruce forest on the composition of the fungal community in a forest soil. As measured by DGGE, two fungal species were affected significantly by the defoliation of pines (P < 0.001); the frequency of members of the ectomycorrhizal fungus genus Cenococcum decreased significantly, while the frequency of organisms of an unidentified soil fungus increased. The decrease in the amount of Cenococcum organisms may have occurred because of the formation of extensive hyphal networks by species of this genus, which require more of the carbon fixed by their host, or because this fungus is dependent upon quantitative differences in spruce root exudates. The defoliation of pines did not affect the overall composition of the soil fungal community or fungal-species richness (number of species per core). Biolog filamentous-fungus plate assays indicated a significant increase (P < 0.001) in the number of carbon substrates utilized by the soil fungi and the rate at which these substrates were used, which could indicate an increase in fungal-species richness. Thus, either small changes in the soil fungal community give rise to significant increases in physiological capabilities or PCR bias limits the reliability of the DGGE results. These data indicate that combined genetic and physiological assessments of the soil fungal community are needed to accurately assess the effect of disturbance on indigenous microbial systems.

  12. Magnetic structure of polluted soil profiles from Eastern Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleńska, Maria; Hasso-Agopsowicz, Agata; Kądziałko-Hofmokl, Magdalena; Kopcewicz, Barbara; Sukhorada, Anatoliy; Bondar, Ksenija; Matviishina, Zhanna

    2008-12-01

    Our study concerned magnetic properties of soil profiles taken from polluted regions of Eastern Ukraine around the industrial centres Krivyj Rig, Mariupol and Komsomolsk. Soils represent chernozem and podzoluvisol. The low-field magnetic susceptibility shows enhancement in the topsoil caused by contamination by coarse-grain magnetite connected with industrial pollution. Magnetic mineralogy was determined by means of thermal demagnetisation of SIRM, monitoring of susceptibility changes during warming from -196°C to room temperature and heating to 700°C, and Mössbauer analysis. Granulometry of magnetic particles was investigated by determination of hysteresis parameters, susceptibility, M s, SIRM and ARM ratios and frequency dependence of susceptibility. The chemical parameters, namely pH, organic carbon and iron content in different pedogenic and lithogenic minerals, measured for particular horizons determined pedogenic characteristic of soil profiles. Our study showed that differences in magnetic parameters of non-polluted and polluted soil profiles are not limited to the topsoil, but reach deep layers of the parent material. Industrial pollution promotes formation of the so-called "pedogenic" SP and SD particles in these layers.

  13. Red spruce physiology and growth in response to elevated CO[sub 2], water stress and nutrient limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Spruce-fir ecosystems of the eastern United States interest scientists because of reported changes in population growth. This research examined the growth and physical responses of red spruce seedlings (Picea rubens Sarg.) to change in atmospheric CO[sub 2], water and nutrient availability to determine the response of this species to potential climatic changes. Red spruce seedlings were grown from seed for 1 year in ambient (374 ppm) or elevated (713 ppm) CO[sub 2] in combination with low or high soil fertility treatment, and well-watered or water-stressed conditions. Red spruce seedlings grown with limited nutrient and water availability increased growth in elevated CO[sub 2] as did seedlings grown with high soil fertility treatment and ample water. At 12 months of age, elevated CO[sub 2]-grown seedlings had greater dry weight, height, diameter and specific leaf weight than ambient CO[sub 2[minus

  14. The Social Consequences of Postcommunist Structural Change: An Analysis of Suicide Trends in Eastern Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minagawa, Yuka

    2013-01-01

    Guided by Durkheim's classic theory of suicide, this article examines suicide trends and determinants in Eastern European countries for the period of 1989-2006, with particular attention given to the association between postcommunist social change and suicide mortality. I find that countries characterized by more drastic structural change…

  15. Virulence structure of the eastern U.S. wheat powdery mildew population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the population structure of wheat powdery mildew in the eastern 2 U.S., and the most recent report on virulence in this pathogen population involved isolates 3 collected in 1993-94. In the present study, wheat leaves naturally infected with powdery mildew 4 were collected from ...

  16. Ammonium assmilation in spruce ectomycorrhizas

    SciTech Connect

    Chalot, M.; Brun, A.; Botton, B. ); Stewart, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Assimilation of labelled NH{sub 4}{sup +} into amino acids has been followed in ectomycorrhizal roots of spruce. Over an 18 h period of NH{sub 4}{sup +} feeding, Gln, Glu and Ala became the most abundant amino acids. Gln was also the most highly labelled amino acid during the experiment, followed by Glu and Ala. This result indicates that Gln synthesis is an important ammonium utilization reaction in spruce mycorrhizas. Addition of MSX to NH{sub 4}{sup +} fed mycorrhizas caused an inhibition of Gln accumulation with a corresponding increase in Glu, Ala and Asn levels. The supply of MSX induced a sharp diminution of {sup 15}N enrichment in both amino and amido groups of glutamine. In contrast, the {sup 15}N incorporation into Glu and derivatives (Ala and Asp) remained very high. This study demonstrates that the fungal glutamate dehydrogenase is quite operative in spruce ectomycorrhizas since it is able to sustain ammonium assimilation when glutamine synthetase is inhibited.

  17. An overview on geophysical structures in the Eastern Alps revealed by recent seismic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, M.; Brueckl, E. P.; Grad, M.

    2009-12-01

    CELEBRATION 2000 and ALP 2002 were two large seismic wide-angle experiments which targeted the lithospheric structure of Central Europe. This presentation highlights crustal features of the Eastern Alps and their transition into adjacent tectonic provinces (Bohemian Massif, Carpathians, Pannonian Basin, Southern Alps and Dinarides) which were unknown prior to these experiments. The Eastern Alps result from the collision of the European platform with the Adriatic plate which got initiated in the Eocene. From the late Oligocene on, escape tectonics towards the unconstrained eastern margin contributed to the evolution of the Eastern Alps. Both processes left their imprints on the surface geology which differs significantly from the Western Alps. Considering the layout of the experiments, an innovative 3D processing scheme was implemented and supplemented by traditional 2D interpretation techniques. The 3D approach provides robust models with large spatial coverage, while the evaluation of 2D profiles allows resolving details at locations of particular interest. The P-wave velocity distribution of crust shows a clear separation into a low-velocity European plate and a high-velocity Adriatic plate. Crustal velocities below the Pannonian Basin are moderate to low. Velocity structures in the uppermost crust correlate well with surface geology and tectonic divisions. One of the most important results is a new map of the Moho discontinuity. Its depth varies between 52 and 24 km, and from its structure we deduce the new crustal fragment Pannonia. Pannonia has shallow crust and is underthrusted by both the European Moho in the North and the Adriatic Moho in the South-West. Although solely vertical component receivers were used, strong S-waves can be observed on some seismograms. Their evaluation confirms the separation into three crustal fragments and provides constraints on Poisson’s ratio. A subhorizontal mantle reflector in a depth range from approximately 55 km is found

  18. Organic matter characteristics in boreal forest soils under stands of silver birch, Norway spruce, and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, A.; Kitunen, V.

    2012-04-01

    The aim was to study how tree species and a tree species mixture affect microbial C and N transformations and two major plant secondary compound groups, terpenes and phenolic compounds in soil. The study site was a tree-species experiment in middle-eastern part of Finland containing plots of 43-year-old silver birch, Norway spruce and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch (22 and 37 % birch of the total stem number). Soil was podzol and humus type mor. Samples were taken from the organic layer. C and N in the microbial biomass, rates of C mineralization (CO2 evolution), net N mineralization and nitrification, and concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds, condensed tannins and different kind of terpenes were measured. Amounts of C and N in the microbial biomass and the rates of C mineralization and net N mineralization were all lower under spruce than birch, and particularly net N mineralization was stimulated by birch mixture. Concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds were on a similar level, irrespective of tree species. However, there were less low-molecular-weight phenolics and more high-molecular-weight phenolics under spruce than birch. Concentrations of condensed tannins and both sesqui- and diterpenes were all higher under spruce than birch but the concentrations of triterpenes were similar in all soils. The difference between tree species was greatest with monoterpenes which were measured from both organic layer and soil atmosphere: high concentrations under spruce and negligible under birch. Birch mixture tended to decrease the concentrations of condensed tannins and mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes.

  19. Integrating remote sensing and magnetic data for structural geology investigation in pegmatite areas in eastern Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Ratib; Saadi, Nureddin M.; Khalil, Ahmed; Watanabe, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    This study used an integrated approach to investigate pegmatite areas in eastern Afghanistan. The analysis of surface data, including a digital elevation model (DEM), and Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images, was combined with airborne magnetic data to better understand three-dimensional geology in the area. The ETM+ and DEM data were used to map geological structures at the surface, which indicate that the area consists of two main fault systems that trend NNE and E-W. The two trends represent the remnants of reactivated structures that formed under the stress regimes generated during the tectonic evolution of eastern Afghanistan. Magnetic data indicate an NE-SW trending basin. A two-dimensional schematic model shows that the basin gradually deepens toward the SW with depths to the magnetic basement ranging between 2 and 11.5 km. The integration of the results gave new insight into the tectonic evolution and structure patterns near the pegmatites area.

  20. Hierarchical analysis of genetic structure in the habitat-specialist Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida)

    PubMed Central

    Ginson, Robert; Walter, Ryan P; Mandrak, Nicholas E; Beneteau, Courtney L; Heath, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying spatial genetic structure can reveal the relative influences of contemporary and historic factors underlying localized and regional patterns of genetic diversity and gene flow – important considerations for the development of effective conservation efforts. Using 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci, we characterize genetic variation among populations across the range of the Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida), a small riverine percid that is highly dependent on sandy substrate microhabitats. We tested for fine scale, regional, and historic patterns of genetic structure. As expected, significant differentiation was detected among rivers within drainages and among drainages. At finer scales, an unexpected lack of within-river genetic structure among fragmented sandy microhabitats suggests that stratified dispersal resulting from unstable sand bar habitat degradation (natural and anthropogenic) may preclude substantial genetic differentiation within rivers. Among-drainage genetic structure indicates that postglacial (14 kya) drainage connectivity continues to influence contemporary genetic structure among Eastern Sand Darter populations in southern Ontario. These results provide an unexpected contrast to other benthic riverine fish in the Great Lakes drainage and suggest that habitat-specific fishes, such as the Eastern Sand Darter, can evolve dispersal strategies that overcome fragmented and temporally unstable habitats. PMID:25691991

  1. Main structural lineaments of north-eastern Morocco derived from gravity and aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gout, Radia; Khattach, Driss; Houari, Mohammed-Rachid; Kaufmann, Olivier; Aqil, Hicham

    2010-09-01

    Many years ago, geophysical surveys (gravity and aeromagnetic) were initiated for economic investigation and recently the analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies are used as a powerful tool for the geological mapping. The present study is based on various filtered maps of gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies of north-eastern Morocco (NEM) in order to highlight its main structural features. Filtering techniques such as horizontal gradient, upward continuation and Euler deconvolution were used to map structural lineaments in NEM. The obtained structural map is consistent with many faults already recognized or supposed by traditional structural studies, and highlights new major accidents by specifying their layout and dips.

  2. Stand and landscape level effects of a major outbreak of spruce beetles on forest vegetation in the Copper River Basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Wesser, S.; Markon, C.J.; Winterberger, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    From 1989 to 2003, a widespread outbreak of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis) in the Copper River Basin, Alaska, infested over 275,000 ha of forests in the region. During 1997 and 1998, we measured forest vegetation structure and composition on one hundred and thirty-six 20-m ?? 20-m plots to assess both the immediate stand and landscape level effects of the spruce beetle infestation. A photo-interpreted vegetation and infestation map was produced using color-infrared aerial photography at a scale of 1:40,000. We used linear regression to quantify the effects of the outbreak on forest structure and composition. White spruce (Picea glauca) canopy cover and basal area of medium-to-large trees [???15 cm diameter-at-breast height (1.3 m, dbh)] were reduced linearly as the number of trees attacked by spruce beetles increased. Black spruce (Picea mariana) and small diameter white spruce (<15 cm dbh) were infrequently attacked and killed by spruce beetles. This selective attack of mature white spruce reduced structural complexity of stands to earlier stages of succession and caused mixed tree species stands to lose their white spruce and become more homogeneous in overstory composition. Using the resulting regressions, we developed a transition matrix to describe changes in vegetation types under varying levels of spruce beetle infestations, and applied the model to the vegetation map. Prior to the outbreak, our study area was composed primarily of stands of mixed white and black spruce (29% of area) and pure white spruce (25%). However, the selective attack on white spruce caused many of these stands to transition to black spruce dominated stands (73% increase in area) or shrublands (26% increase in area). The post-infestation landscape was thereby composed of more even distributions of shrubland and white, black, and mixed spruce communities (17-22% of study area). Changes in the cover and composition of understory vegetation were less evident in this study

  3. The extent and meaning of hybridization and introgression between Siberian spruce (Picea obovata) and Norway spruce (Picea abies): cryptic refugia as stepping stones to the west?

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Chen, Jun; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Sønstebø, Jørn Henrik; Parducci, Laura; Semerikov, Vladimir; Sperisen, Christoph; Politov, Dmitry; Ronkainen, Tiina; Väliranta, Minna; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Tollefsrud, Mari Mette; Lascoux, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Boreal species were repeatedly exposed to ice ages and went through cycles of contraction and expansion while sister species alternated periods of contact and isolation. The resulting genetic structure is consequently complex, and demographic inferences are intrinsically challenging. The range of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Siberian spruce (Picea obovata) covers most of northern Eurasia; yet their geographical limits and histories remain poorly understood. To delineate the hybrid zone between the two species and reconstruct their joint demographic history, we analysed variation at nuclear SSR and mitochondrial DNA in 102 and 88 populations, respectively. The dynamics of the hybrid zone was analysed with approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) followed by posterior predictive structure plot reconstruction and the presence of barriers across the range tested with estimated effective migration surfaces. To estimate the divergence time between the two species, nuclear sequences from two well-separated populations of each species were analysed with ABC. Two main barriers divide the range of the two species: one corresponds to the hybrid zone between them, and the other separates the southern and northern domains of Norway spruce. The hybrid zone is centred on the Urals, but the genetic impact of Siberian spruce extends further west. The joint distribution of mitochondrial and nuclear variation indicates an introgression of mitochondrial DNA from Norway spruce into Siberian spruce. Overall, our data reveal a demographic history where the two species interacted frequently and where migrants originating from the Urals and the West Siberian Plain recolonized northern Russia and Scandinavia using scattered refugial populations of Norway spruce as stepping stones towards the west. PMID:27087633

  4. SPRUCE: Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change

    DOE Data Explorer

    SPRUCE is an experiment to assess the response of northern peatland ecosystems to increases in temperature and exposures to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. It is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.[copied from http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/] While some data files are restricted to access by project members only, others are available for public download now, even as research is being actively conducted.

  5. Turbulence parameter inside and above a tall spruce site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, T.; Staudt, K.; Serafimovich, A.; Foken, T.

    2009-04-01

    In the EGER (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions) project, different physical, chemical and biological processes in the soil-vegetation-boundary-layer system were investigated. Field experiments were performed at the BayCEER research site Waldstein/Weidenbrunnen, a spruce site located in the Fichtelgebirge Mountains in North-Eastern Bavaria, which are challenging for their heterogeneity and orographically structured terrain. Turbulence structure, advection, flux gradients of meteorological and chemical quantities were observed within the first intensive observation period (IOP 1) in September and October 2007. Observations of turbulence structure were obtained by a vertical profile of sonic anemometers covering all parts of the forest up to the lower part of the roughness sub layer. Field observations are complemented by simulations of ACASA model (Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm). Integral turbulence characteristics, the normalized standard deviation of a turbulent quantity, can be used to describe the structure of turbulence. A comparison between measured and predicted values shows whether turbulence is fully developed or not and is therefore used in quality assessment. For this quality control and as an input for models, when measurements are not available, parameterizations for profiles are needed. Since there is no uniform theory for those parameterizations inside a forest available, different approaches were tested with data collected during the EGER IOP1. In order to parameterize the integral turbulence characteristics of the wind components inside the roughness sub layer a dimensionless height ζ = hc L-1 should be used instead of ζ = z L-1, which is used above short vegetation. Profiles of integral turbulence characteristics from different ecosystems show that the decrease inside the roughness sub layer is similar but that parameterizations of profiles can not be generalized due to different stand structures. Selecting the profiles of the

  6. Plate Reconstructions And Mantle Structure In The Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafkenscheid, E.; Wortel, M. J. R.; Spakman, W.

    The subduction of the Tethys Ocean has dominated the history of large areas in the Mediterranean and Southern Asia. Tectonic reconstructions for these complex regions inevitably show significant differences. Also Greece and Turkey, at the western end of the Tethyan area, are relatively well studied but still not completely understood. For example, for the several suture zones in Turkey it is not clear whether they once have accommodated the convergence between the African and Eurasian plates, or just the convergence resulting from the closure of smaller back-arc basins. We incorporate independent tomographic images of the present mantle structure in our analysis to put further constraints on the geodynamic evolution here. From tectonic reconstructions, we calculate the Mesozoic-Cenozoic plate velocities and convergence. For the Greece-Turkey region, we use the Northeast-African and Eurasian plate rotations. The deformation of the Aegean trench system is added to these motions. The Volumes of subducted lithosphere estimated from the reconstruc- tions are then compared to those inferred from seismic tomography. Our first results suggest that the convergence between the Northeast African and Eurasian plates has been accommodated by one continuous process of subduction, in spite of the different trench systems that are proposed in the reconstructions. We also investigate whether the location and geometry of the subducted material within the mantle might allow us to assess the absolute motion of the plates involved.

  7. Eastern rim of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater: Morphology, stratigraphy, and structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.

    2005-01-01

    This study reexamines seven reprocessed (increased vertical exaggeration) seismic reflection profiles that cross the eastern rim of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater. The eastern rim is expressed as an arcuate ridge that borders the crater in a fashion typical of the "raised" rim documented in many well preserved complex impact craters. The inner boundary of the eastern rim (rim wall) is formed by a series of raterfacing, steep scarps, 15-60 m high. In combination, these rim-wall scarps represent the footwalls of a system of crater-encircling normal faults, which are downthrown toward the crater. Outboard of the rim wall are several additional normal-fault blocks, whose bounding faults trend approximately parallel to the rim wall. The tops of the outboard fault blocks form two distinct, parallel, flat or gently sloping, terraces. The innermost terrace (Terrace 1) can be identified on each profile, but Terrace 2 is only sporadically present. The terraced fault blocks are composed mainly of nonmarine, poorly to moderately consolidated, siliciclastic sediments, belonging to the Lower Cretaceous Potomac Formation. Though the ridge-forming geometry of the eastern rim gives the appearance of a raised compressional feature, no compelling evidence of compressive forces is evident in the profiles studied. The structural mode, instead, is that of extension, with the clear dominance of normal faulting as the extensional mechanism. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  8. Clinal variation at phenology-related genes in spruce: parallel evolution in FTL2 and Gigantea?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Xu, Nannan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Huotari, Tea; Semerikov, Vladimir L; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Parallel clines in different species, or in different geographical regions of the same species, are an important source of information on the genetic basis of local adaptation. We recently detected latitudinal clines in SNPs frequencies and gene expression of candidate genes for growth cessation in Scandinavian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we test whether the same clines are also present in Siberian spruce (P. obovata), a close relative of Norway spruce with a different Quaternary history. We sequenced nine candidate genes and 27 control loci and genotyped 14 SSR loci in six populations of P. obovata located along the Yenisei river from latitude 56°N to latitude 67°N. In contrast to Scandinavian Norway spruce that both departs from the standard neutral model (SNM) and shows a clear population structure, Siberian spruce populations along the Yenisei do not depart from the SNM and are genetically unstructured. Nonetheless, as in Norway spruce, growth cessation is significantly clinal. Polymorphisms in photoperiodic (FTL2) and circadian clock (Gigantea, GI, PRR3) genes also show significant clinal variation and/or evidence of local selection. In GI, one of the variants is the same as in Norway spruce. Finally, a strong cline in gene expression is observed for FTL2, but not for GI. These results, together with recent physiological studies, confirm the key role played by FTL2 and circadian clock genes in the control of growth cessation in spruce species and suggest the presence of parallel adaptation in these two species. PMID:24814465

  9. Reconstructing the landscape structure of the Lena-Angara interfluve (south part of Eastern Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutova, Zhanna

    2015-04-01

    Historical-geographical reconstructions of the landscape structure of territories developed in the remote past constitute the necessary element in the chain of research into the dynamics and the degree of transformation of geosystems caused by the influence of the natural regularities and anthropogenic factors. The objective of this study is to determine the specific features of the territory of the Lena-Angara interfluve in the late 19th - early 20th centuries in the interest of a subsequent different-time comparative analysis of the landscape situation. An analysis of the features inherent in the functioning of the geosystems of the Lena-Angara interfluve was made by using, as an example, an elevated plateau with the sources of the Kuda river as well as of the Ilga and Kuda rivers. The relief is represented by a tableland with narrow crests of the watersheds, heavily dissected by a dense network of the valleys of rivers. The denudation processes created planate table-shaped elevations and plateaus whose range of absolute altitudes varies between 400 and 1000 m. The analysis of the landscape structure showed that the study territory was the home for mountain-taiga dark-coniferous and deciduous classes of facies. Larch, spruce-larch and, in places, pine-larch subshrub-grass-moss forests grew within the basins of the Ilga and Kulenga rivers. The watershed spaces of the Ilga-Kuda interfluve, and also the slopes of the upper reaches of the Kuda river were occupied by Siberian stone pine and larch-spruce subshrub-moss groups of facies. In spite of the ubiquitous occurrence of taiga-forest ranges, most of them transformed to derivative groups of facies. Forest fires gave impetus to a widespread occurrence of coniferous/small-leaved complexes in burned-over areas. The study area was poorly populated at the period under investigation; therefore, cultivated lands occupied very small territories. The upper reaches of the Kulenga river included small tracts of arable land

  10. P-Wave Velocity Structure beneath Eastern Eurasia from Finite Frequency Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Shen, Y.; Yang, X.

    2006-05-01

    Despite the recent extensive seismic studies, the detailed lithospheric structure and deep mantle dynamic processes beneath eastern Eurasia remain poorly constrained. In this study, we applied the Finite Frequency Seismic Tomography (FFST) method, which utilizes the 3D Fréchet sensitivity kernels of the travel times of finite frequency seismic waves to account for wavefront healing and off-ray scattering, to eastern Eurasia. Taking advantage of the broadband feature of seismic records, we measured P wave relative delays times by waveform cross-correlation in three frequency bands (0.03-0.1Hz, 0.1-0.5 Hz and 0.5 to 2.0 Hz), which were inverted jointly to constrain velocity heterogeneities with different distances from the central geometric rays. The effect of strong variations in crustal structure beneath this region on travel time data was removed by conducting a frequency dependent crustal correction. A comprehensive dataset, including waveforms from the publicly accessible sources and other seismic networks in the region, were collected for this study. Our preliminary results are consistent with the velocity models obtained in previous tomographic studies. A more complete dataset will further improve the resolution of the velocity structure beneath eastern Eurasia.

  11. Uppermost mantle structure beneath eastern China and its surroundings from Pn and Sn tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2016-04-01

    The Pn and Sn residuals from regional events provide strong constraints on the structure and lithological characteristics of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern China and its surroundings. With the dense Chinese Digital Seismic Network in eastern China, separate Pn and Sn tomographic inversions have been exploited to obtain P and S velocities at a resolution of 2° × 2° or better. The patterns of P velocities are quite consistent with the S velocities at depth of 50 and 60 km, but the amplitude of P wave speed anomalies are a little larger than those of S wave speed. The low P wave speed, high S wave speed, and low Vp/Vs ratio beneath the northern part of Ordos Basin are related to upwelling hot material. Abrupt changes in material properties are indicated from the rapid variations in the Vp/Vs ratio.

  12. Structural and tectonic evolution of the eastern Cayman Trough (Caribbean Sea) from seismic reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, S.; Mauffret, A.; Pubellier, M.

    1996-02-01

    The eastern Cayman Trough preserves a record of the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene Caribbean history that is largely affected by Neogene strike-slip tectonics of the current plate boundary. We conducted an analysis of seismic data within the eastern Cayman Trough, based upon single and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles collected during the Seacarib II cruise in 1987 and the Casis cruise in 1992. These data show that the basement of the eastern Cayman Trough can be divided into four domains from east to west, with distinct morphologic and sedimentary character and inferred older to younger ages: (1) a province of rifted Mesozoic continental crust exhibiting seven parallel horst blocks striking northeast-southwest; (2) a continent-ocean transition between provinces 1 and 3 that exhibits seamounts, small hills, and sedimentary basins; (3) an Eocene oceanic crust with rough basement but smoother relief than the rifted crust; basement trends are roughly north-south and oblique to the northwest trend in domain 1, and (4) the northern Jamaica slope, which forms an east-west-trending slope, with northward-dipping strata that flank the three deeper water domains of the Cayman Trough. The domains are interpreted to be the product of the Eocene east-west opening of the Cayman Trough as a pull-apart basin in a left-lateral strike-slip setting. Closure of the 1100 km of Eocene and younger oceanic crust of the Cayman Trough places the fault-block province adjacent to the Belize margin of Central America. A Neogene phase of transpression has reactivated structures in the four domains, along with on-land structures described by previous authors in Jamaica. The proximity of the eastern margin of the Cayman Trough to petroliferous, continental rocks in Central America suggests an improved possibility of hydrocarbon potential. Unfortunately, sediment thicknesses of less than 1 km probably are not conducive to hydrocarbon formation.

  13. Crustal structure beneath western and eastern Iceland from surface waves and receiver functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du, Z.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.; Allen, R.M.; Nolet, G.; Morgan, W.J.; Bergsson, B.H.; Erlendsson, P.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Ragnarsson, S.; Stefansson, R.; Vogfjord, K.

    2002-01-01

    We determine the crustal structures beneath 14 broad-band seismic stations, deployed in western, eastern, central and southern Iceland, using surface wave dispersion curves and receiver functions. We implement a method to invert receiver functions using constraints obtained from genetic algorithm inversion of surface waves. Our final models satisfy both data sets. The thickness of the upper crust, as defined by the velocity horizon Vs = 3.7 km s-1, is fairly uniform at ???6.5-9 km beneath the Tertiary intraplate areas of western and eastern Iceland, and unusually thick at 11 km beneath station HOT22 in the far south of Iceland. The depth to the base of the lower crust, as defined by the velocity horizon Vs = 4.1 km s-1 is ???20-26 km in western Iceland and ???27-33 km in eastern Iceland. These results agree with those of explosion profiles that detect a thinner crust beneath western Iceland than beneath eastern Iceland. An earlier report of a substantial low-velocity zone beneath the Middle Volcanic Zone in the lower crust is confirmed by a similar observation beneath an additional station there. As was found in previous receiver function studies, the most reliable feature of the results is the clear division into an upper sequence that is a few kilometres thick where velocity gradients are high, and a lower, thicker sequence where velocity gradients are low. The transition to typical mantle velocities is variable, and may range from being very gradational to being relatively sharp and clear. A clear Moho, by any definition, is rarely seen, and there is thus uncertainty in estimates of the thickness of the crust in many areas. Although a great deal of seismic data are now available constraining the structures of the crust and upper mantle beneath Iceland, their geological nature is not well understood.

  14. Factors affecting spruce establishment and recruitment near western treeline, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. E.; Sherriff, R.; Wilson, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Regional warming and increases in tree growth are contributing to increased productivity near the western forest margin in Alaska. The effects of warming on seedling recruitment has received little attention, in spite of forecasted forest expansion near western treeline. Here, we used stand structure and environmental data from white spruce (Picea glauca) stands (n = 95) sampled across a longitudinal gradient to explore factors influencing white spruce growth, establishment and recruitment in southwest Alaska. Using tree-ring chronologies developed from a subset of the plots (n = 30), we estimated establishment dates and basal area increment (BAI) for trees of all age classes across a range of site conditions. We used GLMs (generalized linear models) to explore the relationship between tree growth and temperature in undisturbed, low elevation sites along the gradient, using BAI averaged over the years 1975-2000. In addition, we examined the relationship between growing degree days (GDD) and seedling establishment over the previous three decades. We used total counts of live seedlings, saplings and live and dead trees, representing four cohorts, to evaluate whether geospatial, climate, and measured plot covariates predicted abundance of the different size classes. We hypothesized that the relationship between abundance and longitude would vary by size class, and that this relationship would be mediated by growing season temperature. We found that mean BAI for trees in undisturbed, low elevation sites increased with July maximum temperature, and that the slope of the relationship with temperature changed with longitude (interaction significant with 90% confidence). White spruce establishment was positively associated with longer summers and/or greater heat accumulation, as inferred from GDD. Seedling, sapling and tree abundance were also positively correlated with temperature across the study area. The response to longitude was mixed, with smaller size classes

  15. Upper Mantle Seismic Velocity Structure Beneath Eastern Africa and the Origin of Cenozoic Extensional Tectonism (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, A.; Julia, J.; Adams, A. N.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    The seismic structure of the upper mantle beneath eastern Africa will be reviewed using results from body wave tomography, surface wave tomography, and images of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. Most of the data used for obtaining these results come from temporary deployments of broadband seismic stations in Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania over the past decade. The ensemble of seismic results point to a deep-seated low velocity zone beneath the East African rift system that extends from the uppermost mantle, through the upper mantle, and into the mantle transition zone. The low velocity anomaly may also extend through the mantle transition zone and link with the low velocity zone in the lower mantle under southern Africa, commonly referred to as the African Superplume. This is in contrast to southern Africa, were there is little evidence for a pronounced low velocity anomaly in the upper mantle. The existence of a seismic low velocity zone beneath eastern African that extends to depths of more than 500 km supports the possibility that there is a geodynamic connection between the African Superplume and the origin of Cenozoic extensional tectonism in eastern Africa.

  16. Structurally controlled 'teleconnection' of large-scale mass wasting (Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, Marc; Sanders, Diethard

    2015-04-01

    In the Brenner Pass area (Eastern Alps) , closely ahead of the most northward outlier ('nose') of the Southern-Alpine continental indenter, abundant deep-seated gravitational slope deformations and a cluster of five post-glacial rockslides are present. The indenter of roughly triangular shape formed during Neogene collision of the Southern-Alpine basement with the Eastern-Alpine nappe stack. Compression by the indenter activated a N-S striking, roughly W-E extensional fault northward of the nose of the indenter (Brenner-normal fault; BNF), and lengthened the Eastern-Alpine edifice along a set of major strike-slip faults. These fault zones display high seismicity, and are the preferred locus of catastrophic rapid slope failures (rockslides, rock avalanches) and deep-seated gravitational slope deformations. The seismotectonic stress field, earthquake activity, and structural data all indicate that the South-Alpine indenter still - or again - exerts compression; in consequence, the northward adjacent Eastern Alps are subject mainly to extension and strike-slip. For the rockslides in the Brenner Pass area, and for the deep-seated gravitational slope deformations, the fault zones combined with high seismic activity predispose massive slope failures. Structural data and earthquakes mainly record ~W-E extension within an Eastern Alpine basement block (Oetztal-Stubai basement complex) in the hangingwall of the BNF. In the Northern Calcareous Alps NW of the Oetztal-Stubai basement complex, dextral faults provide defacement scars for large rockfalls and rockslides. Towards the West, these dextral faults merge into a NNW-SSE striking sinistral fault zone that, in turn, displays high seismic activity and is the locus of another rockslide cluster (Fern Pass cluster; Prager et al., 2008). By its kinematics dictated by the South-Alpine indenter, the relatively rigid Oetztal-Stubai basement block relays faulting and associated mass-wasting over a N-S distance of more than 60

  17. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  18. White Spruce Regeneration Following a Major Spruce Beetle Outbreak in Forests on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Between 1987 and 2000, a spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemic infested 1.19 million hectares of spruce (Picea spp.) forests in Alaska, killing most of the large diameter trees. We evaluated whether these forests would recover to their pre-outbreak density, and determined the site conditi...

  19. From glacial refugia to modern populations: new assemblages of organelle genomes generated by differential cytoplasmic gene flow in transcontinental black spruce.

    PubMed

    Gérardi, Sébastien; Jaramillo-Correa, Juan P; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2010-12-01

    Assessing species' range-wide cytoplasmic diversity provides valuable insights regarding their dispersal and adaptive potential in a changing environment. Transcontinental chloroplast (cpDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) population structures were compared to identify putative ancestral and new cytoplasmic genome assemblages in black spruce (Picea mariana), a North American boreal conifer. Mean within-population diversity and allelic richness for cpSSR markers were 0.80 and 4.21, respectively, and diminished westward. Population differentiation based on G(ST) was lower for cpDNA than for mtDNA (G(ST) =0.104 and 0.645, respectively) but appeared comparable when estimated using Jost differentiation index (D=0.459 and 0.537, respectively). Further analyses resulted in the delineation of at least three genetically distinct cpDNA lineages partially congruent with those inferred from mtDNA data, which roughly corresponded to western, central and eastern Canada. Additionally, the patterns of variation in Alaska for both cpDNA and mtDNA markers suggested that black spruce survived the last glacial maximum in this northern region. The range-wide comparison of the geographic extent of cytoplasmic DNA lineages revealed that extensive pollen gene flow between ancestral lineages occurred preferentially from west to east during the postglacial expansion of the species, while seed-mediated gene flow remained geographically restricted. This differential gene flow promoted intraspecific cytoplasmic capture that generated new assemblages of cpDNA and mtDNA genomes during the Holocene. Hence, black spruce postglacial colonization unexpectedly resulted in an increase in genetic diversity with possible adaptive consequences. PMID:21044193

  20. Black spruce growth forms as a record of a changing winter environment at treeline, Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Lavoie, C.; Payette, S. )

    1992-02-01

    The environmental conditions prevailing at treeline in subarctic Quebec have been reconstructed over the past 400 yr through a comparative analysis of tree rings and growth forms of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.). Because black spruce growth forms are closely associated with the winter environment, they are a direct response to conditions of low temperature and windblown snow abrasion affecting living tissues at the snow-air interface. The age structure of supranival shoot populations was closely associated with periods of higher stem survival in winter most likely under snowier and windless conditions. Spruce growth on slopes and in the valley revealed periods of low tree-ring growth between 1601 and 1663 and between 1700 and 1904, respectively. A long-lasting period of low radial growth 1697 and 1939 prevailed in the hilltop site. During the 20th century, spruce height increased from 0.8 to 1.6 m on slopes and in the valley, while the basal level of abrasion from windblown snow increased from 0.1 to 0.5 m, suggesting an increasing trend towards warmer and snowier conditions. Abraded spruces growing during the Little Ice Age (1570-1880) were replaced by symmetrical trees during the 20th century. Supranival skirted and whorled spruces which dominated on the hilltop site during the 16th century reverted to infranival cushion and mat growth forms during the Little Ice Age. These stunted spruces were unable to recover during the recent warming because of their inability to catch enough drifting snow to allow vertical growth.

  1. Seismic structure and stratigraphy of eastern New York-western Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Post, P.J.; Taff, D.L.

    1985-02-01

    A reconnaissance grid of 550 mi of Vibroseis data extending from northernmost Vermont to slightly north of Albany, New York, provides a framework for analyzing subsurface structure and stratigraphy of eastern New York and western Vermont. Regional stratigraphic analysis based on outcrop sections indicates northward and eastward thickening of the Cambrian-Ordovician shelf sequence. Synthetic seismograms from wells in Quebec and southwestern Washington County, New York, document this change in the subsurface and correlate the seismic stratigraphy. Seismic data indicate thickening occurs north of the Whitehall culmination, an approximately 40-mi long buttress area of Adirondack Grenville basement. Changes in thickness appear to be gradual and not fault controlled. Foreland thrust systems of New York and Vermont relate via a displacement transfer or lateral ramp zone associated with the Whitehall culmination. Both thrust systems accomplish final emplacement of metamorphic sheets, deform them, and transport shelf material, which is predominantly shale in New York with increased percentage of carbonates in Vermont. Deflection of several major structural elements illustrates the culmination's buttress effect. Subsurface structural elements in New York include western graben, central horst block, and eastern fault-zone trends. No analogous trends have been identified in Vermont where predominant faulting is down-to-the-east. Significantly, in southwestern Washington County, New York, preexisting horst blocks do not serve as ramps to deflect thrusts upward. Instead, the Snake Hill-Smiths basin and Schuylerville thrusts shear off the upper sedimentary sequence of the horst and transport it westward.

  2. Hydrodynamic and Thermohaline Seasonal Structures of Peninsular Malaysia's eastern continental shelf sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryabor, Farshid; Tangang, Fredolin; Juneng, Liew

    2010-05-01

    The seasonal ocean circulation and the seasonal thermal structure in Peninsular Malaysia's eastern continental shelf sea were studied numerically using the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) with 18-km horizontal resolution and 50 sigma levels conforming to a realistic bottom topography. A 10-year control run was performed using climatological monthly mean wind stresses, restoring-type surface salt, temp and heat, and observational oceanic inflow/outflow at the open boundaries. The seasonally averaged effects of isolated forcing terms are presented and analyzed from the following experiments: 1) heat fluxes effects removed and 2) wind effects removed. This procedure allowed analysis of the contribution of individual parameters to the general hydrology and specific features of the Peninsular Malaysia's eastern continental shelf sea: for example, coastal jets, mesoscale topographic gyres, and countercurrents. The results show that the ROMS model has the capability of simulating seasonal variations of the Peninsular Malaysia's eastern continental shelf sea circulation and thermohaline structure. The simulated Peninsular Malaysia's eastern continental shelf sea surface circulation is generally anticyclonic (cyclonic) during the summer (winter) monsoon period with a strong western boundary current, a mean maximum speed of 0.8 m s-1 (0.5 m s-1), and extending to a depth of around 30 m (40 m). During summer, the western boundary current splits and partially leaves the coast; the bifurcation point is at 40°N in Jun and shifts north to 70°N in July. A mesoscale eddy on the Sunda shelf, the southwest of Natuna Island at (2.50°N, 1060°E) and extending to two mesoscale eddy at (20°N, 1070°E) and (2.50°N, 1090°E) also on the Gulf of Thailand (7.50°N, 1040°E), was also simulated. These eddies are cyclonic (anticyclonic) with maximum swirl velocity of 0.3 m s-1 at the peak of the summer (winter) monsoon. The simulated thermohaline structure for summer and winter are

  3. Early Mesozoic structural evolution of the eastern West Qinling, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo-Li; Meng, Qing-Ren; Duan, Liang; Li, Lin

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to reconstruct Early Mesozoic structural development of the eastern West Qinling by integrating structural and geochronologic analyses. The results show that the eastern West Qinling experienced two-phase deformations, separated by a period of tectonic quiescence. Large-scale south-directed displacement of thrust sheets in association with folding characterized the first-phase deformation in Late Triassic time, leading to the formation of the West Qinling fold-and-thrust belt that is composed primarily of Paleozoic-Triassic strata. This fold-and-thrust belt is in general south-convexing arc-shaped, with an accumulated south-directed displacement being over 100 km. The folding and thrusting ended up during the Norian of the Late Triassic Epoch and were immediately followed by widespread granite intrusions. Marked uplift and erosion occurred in the Early Jurassic, resulting in exhumation of the Late Triassic granites. Transpressional deformation took place in the eastern West Qinling in the Middle Jurassic on account of occurrences of strike-slip faulting and refolding. In the easternmost part of the West Qinling exists a Permian-Triassic turbidite wedge that is bordered by a right-slip fault on the northeast and by a left-slip fault on the south, indicating a westward movement that was accommodated by slip faulting. It is argued that collision of the North and South China blocks was responsible for formation of the West Qinling fold-and-thrust belt in the Late Triassic, whereas Middle Jurassic transgression is considered as the result of westward extrusion of Permian-Triassic turbiditic materials from the East Qinling owing to renewed intracontinental convergence between the North and South China blocks. A tectonic model is advanced for Early Mesozoic tectonic development of the West Qinling.

  4. Structure along the eastern margin of the central Cordillera, upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K.; Schamel, S.

    The eastern margin of the Central Cordillera in the Colombian Andes is bounded by a narrow, east-verging, middle Tertiary foreland fold and thrust belt. Serialized balanced cross-sections reveal that structures within this belt are characterized by en echelon basement-cored domes carried eastward on low-angle to moderately steeply dipping basement-rooted thrust faults. Foreland folding and thrusting migrated eastward through time, but ended by latest Oligocene and crustal deformation shifted eastward to the Eastern Cordillera and the Garzón Massif during the early Miocene through Pliocene. The style and configuration of the foreland structures along the eastern margin of the Central Cordillera appear to be controlled by a polygonal array of pre-existing mechanical anisotropies in the pre-Cretaceous basement. In the northern portion of the Chusma fault system, N/S-trending, moderately dipping, basement-rooted thrusts flatten upward into detachment surfaces within a thick Upper Cretaceous shale unit, carry broad basement-cored ramp anticlines on their hanging walls, and splay upward into the pre-Miocene sedimentary cover forming trailing imbricate fans. To the south, the same basement faults exhibit a different style as they steepen, jog sharply to a northeast trend, and cut directly up through the sedimentary cover without forming associated imbricate thrusts. This retro-arc thrust belt differs from other cordilleran deformed belts, such as the Canadian Rockies and Foothills, in that basement directly influenced deformation of the sedimentary cover. The interplay of Oligocene crustal shortening with pre-existing basement weaknesses created a transitional terrane that developed features of both thin-skinned thrust belts and thick-skinned Laramide-style crustal uplifts.

  5. 9. LOOKING NORTH ON SPRUCE STREET, SHOWING MILLWRIGHT SHOP, FITTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING NORTH ON SPRUCE STREET, SHOWING MILLWRIGHT SHOP, FITTING SHOP, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AND ERECTING SHOP - UNION WORKS IN BACKGROUND. - Rogers Locomotive & Machine Works, Spruce & Market Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  6. Structural development of Saddlebag Lake pendant, eastern Sierra Nevada, California: Implications for crustal evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schweickert, R.A.; Lahren, M.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Saddlebag Lake pendant provides an important window into the structural development of wallrocks of the Sierra Nevada batholith, and provides constraints on a number of regional tectonic events. Sixteen mappable stratigraphic units crop out within ten major thrust sheets. Stratigraphic cutoffs and estimated 35-degree average ramp angles yield minimum total thrust displacements of 25 km. Adding displacements required by flats, thickness variations among stratigraphic units, internal folds, and internal strains within thrust sheets yields an estimate of 50--60 km of shortening. Although only estimates, these figures indicate that a significant zone of Triassic and Jurassic( ) contractional deformation exists within the pendant, offering little support for extensional tectonic scenarios for Sierran wallrocks that have been proposed. In addition, map and structural relations preclude the existence of intrabatholithic breaks with proposed dextral displacements of up to 210 km, along the eastern edge of the pendant. The authors conclude that this part of the eastern Sierra experienced only the following tectonic events: (1) Antler deformation; (2) Permo-Triassic( ) Golconda thrusting; (3) large-magnitude Late Triassic thrusting during arc volcanism and plutonism; (4) Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous east-vergent thrusting, folding, and cleavage development. Evidence also exists along the western edge of the pendant for pre-90 Ma dextral shear following the above events. They infer that the latter event may signal development of the Mojave-Snow Lake fault west of Saddlebag Lake pendant.

  7. Crustal structure beneath the eastern Nepal Himalayas and southern Tibet from receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Arjun Sharma

    The Himalayas are the results of continental collision between the Indian plate and the Eurasian plate and serve as a natural site to study the physical causes and process of mountain building. The crustal structure beneath the Himalayas has been subject to numerous geophysical studies and the variation in the velocity structure across the Himalayan region suggests significant differences in the crustal structure between the southern and northern portion in that region. In this research, a P receiver function analysis has been conducted on data collected for 14 years (2000-2014) from 211 different stations in Eastern Nepal and Southern Tibet, to better understand the seismic velocity structure in the region. The stations cover a large area encompassing the south eastern plains of Nepal, Lesser and Greater Himalayas and the Southern Tibetan Plateau and provide an excellent geometry for seismic structure research. Following the rotation of the two horizontal components to the radial and transverse components and the time iterative deconvolution to obtain the receiver functions the H-K stacking method of Zhu and Kanamori(Zhu and Kanamori, 2000) has been used to convert the time domain receiver functions into H-K domain and obtain the values of crustal thickness and the ratio of the P and S wave velocities. The main trend in the receiver function analysis across the Himalaya from our study reflects the deepening of the moho from about 40 km beneath southern Nepal in the foothills of the Himalaya to about 80 km in southern Tibet. A locally steeper moho deep is obtained in the high range of Himalayas.

  8. Distribution of Lepidopteran Larvae on Norway Spruce: Effects of Slope and Crown Aspect.

    PubMed

    Kulfan, Ján; Dvořáčková, Katarína; Zach, Peter; Parák, Michal; Svitok, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Lepidoptera associated with Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karsten, play important roles in ecosystem processes, acting as plant pests, prey for predators, and hosts for parasites and parasitoids. Their distribution patterns in spruce crowns and forests are only poorly understood. We examined how slope and crown aspect affect the occurrence and abundance of moth larvae on solitary spruce trees in a montane region in Central Europe. Moth larvae were collected from southern and northern crowns of trees growing on south- and north-facing slopes (four treatments) using emergence boxes at the end of winter and by the beating method during the growing season. Species responses to slope and crown aspect were not uniform. Treatment effects on moth larvae were stronger in the winter than during the growing season. In winter, the abundance of bud-boring larvae was significantly higher in northern than in southern crowns regardless of the slope aspect, while both slope and aspect had marginally significant effects on abundance of miners. During the growing season, the occurrence of free-living larvae was similar among treatments. Emergence boxes and beating spruce branches are complementary techniques providing valuable insights into the assemblage structure of moth larvae on Norway spruce. Due to the uneven distribution of larvae detected in this study, we recommend adoption of a protocol that explicitly includes sampling of trees from contrasting slopes and branches from contrasting crown aspect in all seasons. PMID:26795212

  9. Geological structures and deformation sequence of the eastern Gyeonggi massif, central Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, You Hong; Hwang, Jae Ha

    2010-05-01

    The Gyeonggi massif, situated between the Nangrim and Yeongnam massifs of the Korean Peninsula, is a Precambrian terrane consists primarily of Archean to Proterozoic crystalline basement. Although the Gyeonggi massif has been suspected as an eastern extension of the Qinling-Dabie collision belt of China, a structural data about the Gyeonggi massif are very short, especially about the eastern part of the Gyeonggi massif. This study focused the deformation sequence of the eastern part of Gyeonggi massif and comparison with that of western part of Gyeonggi massif. At least, five phases of deformational events can be recognized. The first phase of deformation produced gneissic and schistose structures with intrafolial and recumbent folds. During the second phase of deformation, mylonite, mineral lineation, intrafolial recumbent folds and irregular folds were formed. The Bangsan Anticline (BSA) and its sub-order folds were produced by the third phase of deformation. SE-vergent thrust and south-vergent kink folds resulted from the forth and fifth phases of deformation, respectively. Axis of the BSA can be traced over 5km and the representative orientations of two limbs of the BSA are N17°W/32°SE, N29°E/25°NW, respectively. Interlimb angle of the BSA is measured as 128° and can be classified into open fold. Structural transect analysis of regional foliation shows that axis of the BSA is located about 4.6km toward East from longitude 127°53'45″E. If the BSA is correlated with very large-scale NS-trending folds occurred in the western part of the Gyeonggi massif based on characteristics of fold structure, the third phase of deformation can be interpreted in age from the Late Proterozoic to the Early Paleozoic (750~390 Ma). Mylonite of the study area cannot be correlated to the Gyeonggi Shear Zone, which was suggested as post-collisional top-to-the-north extensional structure. The SE-vergent thrust of the forth phase of deformation is probably correlated to the

  10. The structure of the Ishtar Terra central and eastern parts and some tectonic problems of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazilevskiy, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    Moving from the Maxwell Montes to the eastern edge of Ishtar Terra there is a gradual shift in submeridional meandering folded ranges in the western section of the area to straight intersecting disjunctive systems of connected faults and sublatitudinal shifts. These disjunctive systems evidently transform older structures; the major axis of the stresses created by them is primarily oriented sublatitudinally. Relative to younger structures, in the western they occupy a higher hypsometric position. The reason for the formation of this entire system may be a large astenospheric flow wihch rise in the region of Lakashmi Planum and Maxwell Montes and which spreads and plunges in an easterly direction, taking with it deformed blocks of the lithosphere.

  11. A Contribution to the Understanding of the Regional Seismic Structure in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luccio, F.; Thio, H.; Pino, N.

    2001-12-01

    Regional earthquakes recorded by two digital broadband stations (BGIO and KEG) located in the Eastern Mediterranean have been analyzed in order to study the seismic structure in this region. The area consists of different tectonic provinces, which complicate the modeling of the seismic wave propagation. We have modeled the Pnl arrivals using the FK-integration technique (Saikia, 1994) along different paths at the two stations, at several distances, ranging from 400 to 1500 km. Comparing the synthetics obtained by using several models compiled by other authors, we have constructed a velocity model, considering the informations deriving from group velocity distribution, in order to determine the finer structure in the analyzed paths. The model has been perturbed by trial and error until a compressional velocity profile has been found producing the shape of the observed waveforms. The crustal thickness, upper mantle P-wave velocity and 410-km discontinuity determine the shape of the observed waveform portions.

  12. Crustal velocity structure of Central and Eastern Turkey from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Linda M.; Beck, Susan L.; Biryol, C. Berk; Zandt, George; Özacar, A. Arda; Yang, Yingjie

    2013-09-01

    In eastern Turkey, the ongoing convergence of the Arabian and African plates with Eurasia has resulted in the westward extrusion of the Anatolian Plate. To better understand the current state and the tectonic history of this region, we image crust and uppermost mantle structure with ambient noise tomography. Our study area extends from longitudes of 32° to 44°E. We use continuous data from two temporary seismic deployments, our 2006-2008 North Anatolian Fault Passive Seismic Experiment and the 1999-2001 Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment, as well as from additional seismographs in the region. We compute daily cross-correlations of noise records between all station pairs and stack them over the entire time period for which they are available, as well as in seasonal subsets, to obtain interstation empirical Green's functions. After selecting interstation cross-correlations with high signal-to-noise ratios and measuring interstation phase velocities, we compute phase velocity maps at periods ranging from 8 to 40 s. At all periods, the phase velocity maps are similar for winter and summer subsets of the data, indicating that seasonal variations in noise sources do not bias our results. Across the study area, we invert the phase velocity estimates for shear velocity as a function of depth. The shear velocity model, which extends to 50 km depth, highlights tectonic features apparent at the surface: the Eastern Anatolian Plateau is a prominent low-velocity anomaly whereas the Kirşehir Massif has relatively fast velocities. There is a large velocity jump across the Inner Tauride Suture/Central Anataolian Fault Zone throughout the crust whereas the North Anatolian Fault does not have a consistent signature. In addition, in the southeastern part of our study area, we image a high velocity region below 20 km depth which may be the northern tip of the underthrusting Arabian Plate.

  13. History of the spruce-fir forest in the Catskill Mountains of New York.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) were present by 13,700 years B.C.E. in the Catskills Mountains of southeastern New York State. These conifers were, and still are, largely confined to the eastern and far western portions of the region. A gap in the distribution exists between these populations. Both species are absent from the intervening East Branch Delaware River watershed. No red spruce macrofossils were found in this watershed, suggesting that this conifer never colonized the gap postglacially. Rare macrofossils of balsam fir were found in only three of the 24 peatlands in this watershed, the conifer having disappeared between 11,300 and 8,200 years B.C.E. PMID:25098490

  14. Influence of Mesozoic age structure on Miocene tectonic development in NE Anzoategui, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, P.; White, S.

    1996-08-01

    Structure within and surrounding the Quiamare-La Ceiba region, Eastern Venezuela Basin, is dominated by two major thrust fault systems. They were generated during Early-Middle Miocene time in response to oblique convergence of the Caribbean and South American plates. They are. respectively, the SE vergent NE-SW oriented Anaco fault system, and the SSE vergent ENE-WSW oriented Pirital fault system. The major structural feature associated with each fault system is a basement cored ramp anticline. New seismic data provides evidence that contributes to a better understanding of the sequence of tectonic development within and surrounding the Quiamare-La Ceiba region. Compressional structures in both the hanging wall and the footwall of the Pirital fault system appear to be inverted normal faults, that were previously active during Mesozoic time along the northern South America passive margin. A conjugate set of strike-slip faults is also present. They are oriented NNW-SSE, parallel to the Urica lineation, and SSW-NNE, respectively. A Mesozoic origin for these faults is suggested. Post-compressional relaxation during Plio-Pleistocene time resulted in the development of shallow, small scale normal faults. These normal faults appear to be localized by structural adjustments along the strike-slip fault sets. Existing oil and gas production within the Quiamare-La Ceiba region is from localized structural closures. Strike-slip faults dissect the prevailing structural grain, and may provide an additional hydrocarbon trapping mechanism.

  15. Tectonic Structures offshore Trabzon-Rize Area in the Eastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüz, Sermet; Okay, Seda; Çifçi, Günay; Dondurur, Derman; Kim, Dae-Choul; Bae, Sung-Ho

    2015-04-01

    Black Sea has attracted many researchers's attention due to the historical formation and geological structure and these are still under discussion. However general view suggest that Black Sea is a back arc basin model formed behind the Pontid volcanic arc. Even though there are many studies conducted by both Turkish and international researches and petroleum company, there are still unresolved scientific questions. To better understand the regional geology and investigate the geological formations and fault systems existing in the region, approximately 1700 km high resolution multi-channel seismic reflection data were collected in the Eastern Black Sea (around Rize and Trabzon) in 2010. This study was carried out within the scope of cooperation between Dokuz Eylul University Marine Science and Technology and Pukyong National University (PKNU). Collected lines include the continental slope and deep basin. After the data was processed by the data processing program, geological structures like slip structures, turbidity and sediment waves has attracted attention commonly seen in the Black Sea region. Location of the faults that exist in the region, their extension and characteristics were also investigated. Although the basin shows opening feature during the formation, many fold structures caused by compression structure was also observed around the continental slope. East-west trending fold belt observed by interpretation of the seismic lines was associated with Trabzon fault which is thought to exist in the region. In addition to these, mud volcanoes and volcanic dome structures were also observed in the study area.

  16. Patterns of Population Structure for Inshore Bottlenose Dolphins along the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Globally distributed, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) is found in a range of offshore and coastal habitats. Using 15 microsatellite loci and mtDNA control region sequences, we investigated patterns of genetic differentiation among putative populations along the eastern US shoreline (the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, and Charleston Harbor, South Carolina) (microsatellite analyses: n = 125, mtDNA analyses: n = 132). We further utilized the mtDNA to compare these populations with those from the Northwest Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean. Results showed strong differentiation among inshore, alongshore, and offshore habitats (ФST = 0.744). In addition, Bayesian clustering analyses revealed the presence of 2 genetic clusters (populations) within the 250 km Indian River Lagoon. Habitat heterogeneity is likely an important force diversifying bottlenose dolphin populations through its influence on social behavior and foraging strategy. We propose that the spatial pattern of genetic variation within the lagoon reflects both its steep longitudinal transition of climate and also its historical discontinuity and recent connection as part of Intracoastal Waterway development. These findings have important management implications as they emphasize the role of habitat and the consequence of its modification in shaping bottlenose dolphin population structure and highlight the possibility of multiple management units existing in discrete inshore habitats along the entire eastern US shoreline. PMID:24129993

  17. Upper Mantle Structure of the Eastern Africa from Body Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulibo, G. D.; Nyblade, A.; Ferdinand, R. W.; Reusch, A. M.; Adams, A. N.; Tugume, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    This study presents preliminary results of the upper mantle structure beneath the east Africa from body wave tomography. This work is part of an on-going study aimed at investigating the origin and structure of the African Superplume. The available global tomographic studies suggest that the African Superplume is a low velocity-anomaly extending from the core-mantle boundary upward into the mid mantle beneath southern Africa and may reach the upper mantle beneath eastern Africa. However, the limited vertical resolution of global tomographic models makes it difficult to confirm a connection from the lower to the upper mantle. Previous regional studies of upper mantle structure in east Africa have found evidence of a low velocity anomaly beneath the region that has been suggested as the upper mantle expression of the Superplume. Models from previous tomographic studies in east Africa have limited resolution below ~400 km beneath the eastern rift and are less well resolved beneath the western part of the rift due to less data coverage. This study uses teleseismic data from a wider region in east Africa than previously used. Data for this study are from a 3-year (2007-2010) deployment of 40 broadband seismic stations in Uganda and Tanzania. The dataset is supplemented by data from the 1994-1995 Tanzania broadband seismic experiment, the 2001-2002 Kenya broadband seismic experiment, the permanent AfricaArray seismic stations and IRIS/GSN stations. The data have been used for body wave tomography by computing relative travel time delays using a multi-channel cross-correlation technique and then inverting them for a 3D wave speed model. Preliminary results from the inversion of the relative delay times show that there is a low wave speed anomaly beneath east Africa extending from shallow upper mantle depths to at least 500 km.

  18. Structural evolution of an antiformal window: the Scheiblingkirchen Window (Eastern Alps, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingshofer, Ernst; Neubauer, Franz

    2002-10-01

    The Scheiblingkirchen window, a Lower Austroalpine tectonic window at the eastern margin of the Eastern Alps (Austria) was formed during Late Cretaceous continent-continent collision. Structural investigations including structural mapping, microstructural studies and texture analysis revealed a decompression-related three-stage tectonic history of Lower Austroalpine units during the formation of the Scheiblingkirchen window. (1) Intra-Lower Austroalpine nappe stacking was by top-to-the-N out-of-sequence thrusting of the Kirchberg fold nappe over the Wechsel nappe under lower greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. The structural expression of the stacking event (D 1) comprises a penetrative foliation containing a N-S trending stretching lineation, isoclinal recumbent folds trending subparallel to the stretching lineation and ultramylonites. Quartz and calcite microstructures indicate that dynamic recrystallization processes accompanied deformation. Their commonly moderately developed lattice preferred orientation record dominant slip on the prism and rhomb planes parallel to < a>. (2) Subsequent exhumation of previously stacked rocks is related to the formation of foliation-parallel mylonitic shear zones within an E-W extensional regime (D 2). Microstructures and textures suggest similar deformation temperatures during thrusting and extension. (3) A superimposed phase of NW-SE oriented horizontal shortening (D 3) was accommodated by large- and small-scale upright folding of the area around NE-SW trending axes and by backthrusting leading to the antiformal doming of the Scheiblingkirchen Window. Subsequent subvertical flattening resulting from the shortening phase led to the formation of NE-SW trending, outcrop-scale open recumbent folds. Low temperature deformation conditions as inferred from the low degree of recrystallization of quartz and calcite aggregates and the dominance of glide on the basal planes point to a cooling-related deformation event.

  19. Climate-mediated changes in zooplankton community structure for the eastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Lisa B.; Napp, Jeffrey M.; Mier, Kathryn L.; Pinchuk, Alexei I.; Andrews, Alexander G.

    2014-11-01

    Zooplankton are critical to energy transfer between higher and lower trophic levels in the eastern Bering Sea ecosystem. Previous studies from the southeastern Bering Sea shelf documented substantial differences in zooplankton taxa in the Middle and Inner Shelf Domains between warm and cold years. Our investigation expands this analysis into the northern Bering Sea and the south Outer Domain, looking at zooplankton community structure during a period of climate-mediated, large-scale change. Elevated air temperatures in the early 2000s resulted in regional warming and low sea-ice extent in the southern shelf whereas the late 2000s were characterized by cold winters, extensive spring sea ice, and a well-developed pool of cold water over the entire Middle Domain. The abundance of large zooplankton taxa such as Calanus spp. (C. marshallae and C. glacialis), and Parasagitta elegans, increased from warm to cold periods, while the abundance of gelatinous zooplankton (Cnidaria) and small taxa decreased. Biomass followed the same trends as abundance, except that the biomass of small taxa in the southeastern Bering Sea remained constant due to changes in abundance of small copepod taxa (increases in Acartia spp. and Pseudocalanus spp. and decreases in Oithona spp.). Statistically significant changes in zooplankton community structure and individual species were greatest in the Middle Domain, but were evident in all shelf domains, and in both the northern and southern portions of the eastern shelf. Changes in community structure did not occur abruptly during the transition from warm to cold, but seemed to begin gradually and build as the influence of the sea ice and cold water temperatures persisted. The change occurred one year earlier in the northern than the southern Middle Shelf. These and previous observations demonstrate that lower trophic levels within the eastern Bering Sea respond to climate-mediated changes on a variety of time scales, including those shorter than

  20. Shallow crustal structure of eastern-central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Ramón, V. M.; Lermo-Samaniego, J.

    2015-12-01

    Central-eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is featured by large basins (i.e., Toluca, Mexico, Puebla-Tlaxcala, Libres-Oriental). It has been supposed that major crustal faults limit these basins. Sierra de Las Cruces range separates the Toluca and Mexico basins. The Sierra Nevada range separates Mexico basin from the Puebla-Tlaxcala basin. Based in gravity and seismic data we inferred the Toluca basin is constituted by the Ixtlahuaca sub-basin, to the north, and the Toluca sub-basin to the south, which are separated by a relative structural high. The Toluca depression is more symmetric and bounded by sub-vertical faults. In particular its eastern master fault controlled the emplacement of Sierra de Las Cruces range. Easternmost Acambay graben constitutes the northern and deepest part of the Ixtlahuaca depression. The Toluca-Ixtlahuaca basin is inside the Taxco-San Miguel de Allende fault system, and limited to the west by the Guerrero terrane which continues beneath the TMVB up to the Acambay graben. Mexico basin basement occupies an intermediate position and featured by a relative structural high to the north-east, as established by previous studies. This relative structural high is limited to the west by the north-south Mixhuca trough, while to the south it is bounded by the east-west Copilco-Xochimilco-Chalco sub-basin. The Puebla-Tlaxcala basin basement is the shallowest of these 3 tectonic depressions. In general, features (i.e., depth) and relationship between these basins, from west to east, are controlled by the regional behavior of the Sierra Madre Oriental fold and thrust belt basement (i.e., Oaxaca Complex?). This study indicates that an active east-west regional fault system limits to the south the TMVB (from the Nevado de Toluca volcano through the Popocatepetl volcano and eastward along southern Puebla-Tlaxcala basin). The Tenango and La Pera fault systems constituting the western part of this regional fault system coincide with northern

  1. Structure of the Ninetyeast Ridge North of the Equator, Eastern Indian Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala Rao, D.; Sreekrishna, K.; Levchenko, O.; W. Sager, W.; Paul, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge in the eastern Indian Ocean is an aseismic volcanic ridge that marks the Keruguelen hotspot trace between 35°S and 17°N, depicting significant changes in morphology and crust/lithosphere structure. Age progression, younger ages in the south to older ages, 90 Ma (anomaly 34) in the north of the ridge has been reported from linear magnetic anomalies adjoining the ridge and rocks drilled from it during the DSDP/ODP cruises. The bathymetric expression of it is visible up to Lat. 10°N but seismic reflection data indicate its buried anticlinal shape beneath the Bengal Fan, extending up to about Lat.17°N. Gravity anomalies are strongly positive over the exposed segment of the ridge but are subdued over the buried portion. A prominent break in the continuity of the Sunda-trench gravity low reflects that the ridge impinges upon the island arc and seismic reflection data indicate that the ridge approaches close to the trench. The crest of the ridge consists of numerous peaks and sediment filled basins. The sediments are likely to be volcnoclastic and/or shallow water carbonates depending upon submarine to sub- aerial conditions of the parts of the ridge overlain by hemi-pelagic to turbidites of varied thickness. Seismic sequences of the sediments are < 2 km, < 6 km and > 6 km over the ridge, along the eastern flank and on the western flank respectively. The velocity structure of the sedimentary sequences, from top to bottom, consists of 1.6 to 1.9, 2.4 to 2.7, 3.2 to 3.4, 4.5 to 4,6 and 5.2 to 5.7 km/s layers along the western flank, 1.7 to 2.0, 2.3 to 3.2 and 4.6 to 5.7 km/s of Quaternary, pre-Miocene and pre-Paleocene respectively over the crest of the ridge and 2.3, 2.9 and 4.8 km/s velocity along the eastern flank of the ridge underlain by 6.4 km/s velocity oceanic layer 2. Tight folds and closely spaced faults (normal and reverse), some of them extending to the basement and deforming the crust of the ridge, have been imaged seismically. The en

  2. Anisotropy structure beneath the eastern edge of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Chen, X.

    2013-12-01

    The North China Craton is one of the most ancient craton which is considered as a perfect area to observe the craton basement destruction, replacement and reconstruction. But the mechanism and kinetics background of the lithospheric thinning of the North China Craton are still under debate. The upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures, temperature and chemical composition are important for us to understand the destruction process of the North China Craton. Most of previous studies used shear wave splitting or surface wave analysis to study anisotropy structure, which have a poor vertical resolution in upper mantle. Waveform modeling of upper mantle triplication phases can provide a high vertical resolution. We develop a method based on the generalized reflection and transmission method (GRTM) to calculate synthetic seismograms for wave propagating in stratified VTI media, so we can waveform model triplication phases to study the upper mantle anisotropy structures. In this study, we waveform model the tangential and radial seismic triplication data recorded in Chinese digital seismic stations at a epicentral distance of 10-30 degree for several events occurring in southeast of Russia to constrain the fine upper mantle velocity and anisotropy structures beneath the eastern edge of the North China Craton . We also use mineral physic simulation to explore thermal and compositional models that would explain the inferred seismic structures.

  3. Picein and piceol concentrations in Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Løkke, H

    1990-06-01

    The concentrations of the glucoside picein and its aglucone piceol (4-hydroxy acetophenone) in the needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten) are considered indicators of plant stress. By use of two clones and a natural population of Norway spruce it was shown that the picein concentration was dependent on the site and the provenance of the trees. No effects were observed by normal treatment with the herbicides atrazine, glyphosate, and hexazinone, or by drought. The significance of different environmental factors is discussed. PMID:2364913

  4. Lenticular stretch structures in eastern Nevada - possible trapping mechanism in supposed graben

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.T.; Dennis, J.G.; Lumsden, W.W.

    1986-04-01

    Eastern Nevada is widely recognized as a region of tectonic extension. The dominant structures are generally agreed to be low-dipping, younger over older faults and steeper listric faults that are responsible for the basins (grabens) and ranges (horsts). In the Schell Creek-Duck Creek Range, east of Ely, and in the White Pine Range, southwest of Ely, small lenticular structures bounded by tectonic discontinuities can be clearly seen in the field. These lenticular units, or stretch structures, range in length from a few meters to more than 200 m. All lenticular stretch structures that can be clearly seen in the field are stratigraphically restricted; the stretched formations are the Eureka Quartzite, the Pilot Shale, the Joana Limestone, and the Chainman Shale. Still larger stretch structures, which may include several formations, are inferred, and the authors suggest that extension has created lenticular structures at all scales. The Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges east of Ely consist mostly of Devonian and older rocks. They are separated by a topographically lower area containing mostly Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks. This structure, which separates the ranges, has been referred to as a graben, but field evidence suggests that it is a large-scale lenticular stretch structure. Unlike a true graben, the structure does not extend downward. For example, in several places within the supposed graben, Cambrian and Ordovician rocks project through a cover of Carboniferous Chainman Shale and Ely Limestone, suggesting the Chainman-Ely is a thin sheet underlain by Cambrian-Ordovician rocks. Accordingly, they suggest that extension in the Duck Creek-Schell Creek Ranges stretched the formations into lenticular bodies. Between the Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges, the Cambrian-Ordovician is attenuated, and the resulting tectonic depression is occupied by a lenticular mass of Carboniferous rocks.

  5. Four New Sulfated Polar Steroids from the Far Eastern Starfish Leptasterias ochotensis: Structures and Activities

    PubMed Central

    Malyarenko, Timofey V.; Malyarenko (Vishchuk), Olesya S.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I.; Popov, Roman S.; Kicha, Alla A.

    2015-01-01

    Three new sulfated steroid monoglycosides, leptaochotensosides A–C (1–3), and a new sulfated polyhydroxylated steroid (4) were isolated from the alcoholic extract of the Far Eastern starfish Leptasterias ochotensis. The structures of compounds 1–4 were established by extensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) analyses and chemical transformations. Although the isolated compounds did not show any apparent cytotoxicity against melanoma RPMI-7951 and breast cancer T-47D cell lines, leptaochotensoside A (1) demonstrated inhibition of T-47D cell colony formation in a soft agar clonogenic assay at nontoxic doses. In addition, this compound decreased the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced colony formation of mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells. The cancer preventive action of 1 is realized through regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. PMID:26193286

  6. Structure of the lithosphere beneath the Eastern Alps (southern sector of the TRANSALP transect)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellarin, Alberto; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Fantoni, Roberto; Cantelli, Luigi; Sella, Mattia; Selli, Luigi

    2006-02-01

    supported by any significant uplifting of the Dolomites. The total average uplift of the Dolomites during the Neogene appears to be 6-7 times smaller than that recognized in the TW. Markedly the northward dip of the PL, reaching a depth of approximately 20 km, is proposed in our interpretation; finally, the Adriatic upper crustal evolution points to the late post-collision change in the tectonic grow-up of the Eastern Alps orogenic chain. The tectonic accretion of the northern frontal zone of the Eastern and Central Alps was interrupted from the Late Miocene (Serravallian-Tortonian) onward, as documented by the Molasse basin evolution. On the contrary, the structural nucleation along the S-vergent tectonic belt of the eastern Southern Alps ( Montello-Friuli thrust belt) severely continued during the Messinian and the Plio-Pleistocene. This structural evolution can be considered to be consistent with the deep under-thrusting and wedge indentation of the Adriatic lithosphere underneath the southern side of the Eastern Alps thrust-and-fold belt. Similarly, the significance of the magmatic activity for the construction of the Southern Alps crust and for its mechanical and geological differentiation, which qualified the evolution of the thrust-and-fold belt, is highlighted, starting with the Permian-Triassic magmatism and progressing with the Paleogene occurrences along the Periadriatic Lineament and in the Venetian Magmatic Province (Lessini-Euganei Hills).

  7. The Electrical Resistivity Structure of the Eastern Anatolian Collision Zone, Northeastern Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz, Özlem; Tuǧrul Başokur, Ahmet; Tolak Çiftçi, Elif

    2016-04-01

    The Northeastern Anatolia is located at the intensely deformed Eastern Anatolian Collision Zone (EACZ), and its tectonic framework is characterized by the collision of the Arabian plate with Eurasian. Although extensive attention is given to understand the crustal and upper mantle processes at this convergent boundary, there is still an ongoing debate over the geodynamic processes of the region. In this study, we were specifically interested in the geoelectric properties and thus geodynamics of the crust beneath the EACZ. Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were made on two profiles across the north of the EACZ in 1998 as part of a national project undertaken by the Turkish Petroleum Corporation (TPAO). MT data in the frequency range of 300-0.001 Hz were collected from 168 stations located along 78 km north to south and 47 km west to east profiles where direct convergence occurs between Arabian and Eurasian plates. Two and three-dimensional inversion algorithms were used to obtain resistivity models of the study area. According to these models, the upper crust consists of low resistivity sedimentary rocks (<30 Ωm) that are underlain by highly resistive (~500-1000 Ωm) crystalline basement rocks of the Eastern Anatolian Accretionary Complex and Pontides. While the upper and lower crustal resistivity at the northern part of the study area shows a layered structure, significant horizontal and vertical variations for the rest of the EACZ exists on resistivity models. The broad low resistivity zones (<50 Ωm) observed at mid and lower crustal levels throughout the EACZ. These fluid-rich regions along with high temperatures could indicate weak zones representing the locations of active deformation induced by continent-continent collision and correlate with volcanic centers in the region. The variation in the resistivity structure supports the southward subduction model with the resistive continental block and the deep conductive zones presumably corresponding to the

  8. P-Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Eastern Eurasia From Finite Frequency Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Shen, Y.; Yang, X.

    2005-12-01

    Eastern Eurasia is one of the most tectonically complex regions in the world. While the evolution history of continental lithosphere has been well recognized, the fine structure associated with the complicated deformation in this region is far from clear, and deep mantle processes that accompanied shallower lithosphere deformations are poorly understood. In order to improve the resolution of the velocity structure in the region, we applied the newly-developed Finite Frequency Seismic Tomography (FFST) method, which utilizes the 3D Frechet-Born sensitivity kernels of the travel times of finite frequency seismic waves to account for wavefront healing and off-ray scattering, to eastern Eurasia. In addition to the new technique, we obtained a comprehensive finite-frequency body wave travel time data set from cross-correlation of broadband waveforms. Datasets used in this study include waveforms from the publicly accessible sources (e.g. IRIS, GSN, PASSCAL, and IMS stations) and other seismic networks in the region such as the Japanese Broadband Seismograph Network (F-net), the Japanese International Seismic Network (JISNET), the Taiwan Broadband Seismic Network and China National Digital Seismic Network. Taking advantage of broadband waveforms, we measured relative delays times by waveform cross-correlation in three frequency bands between 0.03 to 2 Hz for P waves. The travel times in the three frequency bands were inverted jointly to take advantage of the `data fusion' made possible by the finite-frequency kernels and separately to understand the resolving power of each data set. Preliminary results are comparable to the velocity models obtained in previous tomographic studies.

  9. Unexpectedly Low Rangewide Population Genetic Structure of the Imperiled Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene c. carolina

    PubMed Central

    Kimble, Steven J. A.; Rhodes Jr., O. E.; Williams, Rod N.

    2014-01-01

    Rangewide studies of genetic parameters can elucidate patterns and processes that operate only over large geographic scales. Herein, we present a rangewide population genetic assessment of the eastern box turtle Terrapene c. carolina, a species that is in steep decline across its range. To inform conservation planning for this species, we address the hypothesis that disruptions to demographic and movement parameters associated with the decline of the eastern box turtle has resulted in distinctive genetic signatures in the form of low genetic diversity, high population structuring, and decreased gene flow. We used microsatellite genotype data from (n = 799) individuals from across the species range to perform two Bayesian population assignment approaches, two methods for comparing historical and contemporary migration among populations, an evaluation of isolation by distance, and a method for detecting barriers to gene flow. Both Bayesian methods of population assignment indicated that there are two populations rangewide, both of which have maintained high levels of genetic diversity (HO = 0.756). Evidence of isolation by distance was detected in this species at a spatial scale of 300 – 500 km, and the Appalachian Mountains were identified as the primary barrier to gene flow across the species range. We also found evidence for historical but not contemporary migration between populations. Our prediction of many, highly structured populations across the range was not supported. This may point to cryptic contemporary gene flow, which might in turn be explained by the presence of rare transients in populations. However these data may be influenced by historical signatures of genetic connectivity because individuals of this species can be long-lived. PMID:24647580

  10. Structural and petrologic evolution of the Lihue basin and eastern Kauai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Izuka, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    The topography of the eastern part of the Hawaiian island of Kauai is dominated by the Lihue basin, a large (???110 km2) semicircular depression bounded by steep cliffs and partly filled by late rejuvenated-stage (or post-erosional stage) volcanic material. As with other large, semicircular basins on ocean-island volcanoes, the subsurface geology and origin (e.g., structural collapse vs. fluvial erosion) of the Lihue basin are poorly understood. New analyses of samples collected from eastern Kauai and drill holes within the basin document several important features of the late-stage geologic evolution of Kauai. First, thick (>300 m) sequences of rejuvenated-stage Koloa Volcanics in the Lihue basin show systematic, basin-wide geochemical trends of increasingly incompatible elements with time, indicating a gradual decrease in the extent of partial melting of mantle sources with time. Second, beneath the rejuvenated-stage volcanics in the basin, a thin layer of postshield alkalic stage lavas (e.g., hawaiites and mugearites) overlies older shield-stage tholeiitic lavas of the Napali Member, indicating that the Lihue basin formed by structural collapse, not fluvial erosion. Third, a large (???2-5 km3) matrix-supported breccia, interpreted as deposits of one or more debris flows, is within the rejuvenated-stage volcanics throughout the basin, and correlates with surficial exposures of the Palikea Breccia west of the basin. Isotopic compositions of the bulk breccia are similar to those of tholeiites from the east side of Kauai, and distinct from those of west Kauai tholeiites. Clasts within the breccia are dominantly hawaiite and alkali gabbro. The source region of the breccia in the steep cliffs and highlands of the central massif to the west of the basin must contain magmatic products of an extensive postshield alkalic stage, including hawaiite flows and one or more large intrusive bodies or ponded sequences of alkali gabbro.

  11. Uppermost mantle P wavespeed structure beneath eastern China and its surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2016-06-01

    Pn travel-time tomography provides a way of improving structural information on the uppermost mantle across eastern China exploiting recent developments of dense seismic networks with well recorded seismic events. We used waveforms from 2009 at Chinese stations, supplemented by bulletin arrival times. An initial P wave model was constructed using the crustal model from CRUST1.0 coupled to a P wave model in the mantle derived from the SL2013sv model to capture the broad-scale features. This starting model enables us to compensate for the large contrasts in crustal thickness across the region. All events were relocated using the initial 3-D P model, and after relocation, consistent patterns of travel-time residuals are obtained. We extract Pn as the first arrival in the distance range 1.8 ∘ to 12 ∘. We use the FMTOMO (Fast Marching TOMOgraphy) approach to invert the travel-time results to generate a P wavespeed structure with a resolution of 2 ∘× 2 ∘ down to 75 km. There are considerable variations in Pn wavespeed in the uppermost mantle across the region. The central portion of the North China craton is imaged with particularly slow P wavespeeds, whilst most of the neighbouring Ordos block is fast. Fast P wavespeeds extend through much of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern Central Asia Orogen, northeast China and beneath the Korean peninsula. In the south, the Sichuan Block and the western Yangtze craton show rather fast P wavespeeds. The Tanlu fault system appears to cut through the crust into the mantle with marked slow P wavespeed at its southern end.

  12. Unexpectedly low rangewide population genetic structure of the imperiled eastern box turtle Terrapene c. carolina.

    PubMed

    Kimble, Steven J A; Rhodes, O E; Williams, Rod N

    2014-01-01

    Rangewide studies of genetic parameters can elucidate patterns and processes that operate only over large geographic scales. Herein, we present a rangewide population genetic assessment of the eastern box turtle Terrapene c. carolina, a species that is in steep decline across its range. To inform conservation planning for this species, we address the hypothesis that disruptions to demographic and movement parameters associated with the decline of the eastern box turtle has resulted in distinctive genetic signatures in the form of low genetic diversity, high population structuring, and decreased gene flow. We used microsatellite genotype data from (n = 799) individuals from across the species range to perform two Bayesian population assignment approaches, two methods for comparing historical and contemporary migration among populations, an evaluation of isolation by distance, and a method for detecting barriers to gene flow. Both Bayesian methods of population assignment indicated that there are two populations rangewide, both of which have maintained high levels of genetic diversity (HO = 0.756). Evidence of isolation by distance was detected in this species at a spatial scale of 300-500 km, and the Appalachian Mountains were identified as the primary barrier to gene flow across the species range. We also found evidence for historical but not contemporary migration between populations. Our prediction of many, highly structured populations across the range was not supported. This may point to cryptic contemporary gene flow, which might in turn be explained by the presence of rare transients in populations. However these data may be influenced by historical signatures of genetic connectivity because individuals of this species can be long-lived. PMID:24647580

  13. Extension-related structural traps in fault basins of eastern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.T.; Dennis, J.G.; Lumsden, W.W.

    1989-04-01

    Low-angle younger-over-older faults have been widely reported in eastern Nevada, although no general agreement exists on their origin. Three preferred models are (1) local gravity sliding, (2) mid-crustal ductile extension, and (3) a master detachment possibly extending into the mantle. None are fully supported by field evidence. Some low-angle faults in the White Pine, Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges involve ductile extension along incompetent sedimentary units and brittle extension of intercalated competent units to form lenticular stretch structures. Upper crustal extension may be an indirect response to midcrustal ductile extension that occurred during a Tertiary heating event. Between the Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges, extension attenuated the pre-carboniferous section, creating a depression in which Carboniferous rocks were preserved. Since this structure, termed a pseudograben, can be traced northward into a typical graben, basins may be initiated by attenuation, with rifting occurring later. In such basins, subsurface detachments should be expected. Some low-angle faults resemble megalandslides because fragmented competent units slid into depressions created by attenuation. With retreat of the geotherms, ductile extension was confined to deep crustal levels and rifting replaced low-angle faulting at higher levels. Potential extension traps in basins are large-scale stretch structures, porous and permeable units truncated and sealed by detachment, and tilted blocks cut by steep faults. Best prospects are likely to occur in basins subjected only to Tertiary heating because oil generated at that time would be tapped in developing extension structures.

  14. Stable Isotopes Provide Insight into Population Structure and Segregation in Eastern North Atlantic Sperm Whales

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, Asunción; Velásquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M.; Kinze, Carl; Lockyer, Christina H.; Vighi, Morgana; Aguilar, Alex

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly highly mobile, shows indication of structuring in the eastern North Atlantic, an ocean basin in which a single population is believed to occur. To do so, we examined stable isotope values in sequential growth layer groups of teeth from individuals sampled in Denmark and NW Spain. In each layer we measured oxygen- isotope ratios (δ18O) in the inorganic component (hydroxyapatite), and nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (δ15N: δ13C) in the organic component (primarily collagenous). We found significant differences between Denmark and NW Spain in δ15N and δ18O values in the layer deposited at age 3, considered to be the one best representing the baseline of the breeding ground, in δ15N, δ13C and δ18O values in the period up to age 20, and in the ontogenetic variation of δ15N and δ18O values. These differences evidence that diet composition, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted. PMID:24324782

  15. Stable isotopes provide insight into population structure and segregation in eastern North Atlantic sperm whales.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Asunción; Velásquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M; Kinze, Carl; Lockyer, Christina H; Vighi, Morgana; Aguilar, Alex

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly highly mobile, shows indication of structuring in the eastern North Atlantic, an ocean basin in which a single population is believed to occur. To do so, we examined stable isotope values in sequential growth layer groups of teeth from individuals sampled in Denmark and NW Spain. In each layer we measured oxygen- isotope ratios (δ(18)O) in the inorganic component (hydroxyapatite), and nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (δ(15)N: δ(13)C) in the organic component (primarily collagenous). We found significant differences between Denmark and NW Spain in δ(15)N and δ(18)O values in the layer deposited at age 3, considered to be the one best representing the baseline of the breeding ground, in δ(15)N, δ(13)C and δ(18)O values in the period up to age 20, and in the ontogenetic variation of δ(15)N and δ(18)O values. These differences evidence that diet composition, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted. PMID:24324782

  16. Crustal structure in eastern Kazakh, U. S. S. R. from teleseismic receiver functions

    SciTech Connect

    Priestley, K.F.; Zandt, G.; Randall, G.E.

    1988-06-01

    Broadband receiver functions determined from teleseismic P-waveforms recorded at two seismic stations in eastern Kazakh, U.S.S.R., are inverted for the vertical velocity structure beneath the stations. The detailed broadband receiver functions are obtained by stacking source-equalized radial components of teleseismic P-waveforms. A time-domain inversion of the radial receiver function is used to determine the structure assuming a crustal model parameterized by flat-lying, homogeneous layers. The general features of the inversion results are: a complex shallow crust, velocities less than 6 km/s in the upper curst, a high velocity (6.9--7.5 km/s) lower crust, and a Moho that varies between 47 and 57 km depth. These results compare favorably with a composite velocity model from Deep Seismic Sounding data, but show lower velocities in the upper curst, and higher velocities in the lower crust. The results indicate that the crust in this region is relatively uniform, however the nature and depth of the Moho changes significantly across the region. The receiver function inversion structure for the Kazakh sites is similar to a published receiver function structure for a site on the Canadian Shield. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  17. Crustal structure of the Central-Eastern Greenland: results from the TopoGreenland refraction profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Until present, seismic surveys have only been carried out offshore and near the coasts of Greenland, where the crustal structure is affected by oceanic break-up. We present the deep seismic structure of the crust of the interior of Greenland, based on the new and the only existing so far seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile. The seismic data was acquired by a team of six people during a two-month long experiment in summer of 2011 on the ice cap in the interior of central-eastern Greenland. The presence of an up to 3.4 km thick ice sheet, permanently covering most of the land mass, made acquisition of geophysical data logistically complicated. The profile extends 310 km inland in E-W direction from the approximate edge of the stable ice cap near the Scoresby Sund across the center of the ice cap. 350 Reftek Texan receivers recorded high-quality seismic data from 8 equidistant shots along the profile. Explosive charge sizes were 1 ton at the ends and ca. 500 kg along the profile, loaded with about 125 kg at 35-85 m depth in individual boreholes. Given that the data acquisition was affected by the thick ice sheet, we questioned the quality of seismic records in such experiment setup. We have developed an automatic routine to check the amplitudes and spectra of the selected seismic phases and to check the differences/challenges in making seismic experiments on ice and the effects of ice on data interpretation. Using tomographic inversion and forward ray tracing modelling we have obtained the two-dimensional velocity model down to a 50 km depth. The model shows a decrease of crustal thickness from 47 km below the centre of Greenland in the western part of the profile to 40 km in its eastern part. Relatively high lower crustal velocities (Vp 6.8 - 7.3 km/s) in the western part of the TopoGreenland profile may result from past collision tectonics or, alternatively, may be related to the speculated passage of the Iceland mantle plume. Comparison of our results

  18. Negative Feedbacks on Bark Beetle Outbreaks: Widespread and Severe Spruce Beetle Infestation Restricts Subsequent Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Sarah J.; Veblen, Thomas T.; Mietkiewicz, Nathan; Kulakowski, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Understanding disturbance interactions and their ecological consequences remains a major challenge for research on the response of forests to a changing climate. When, where, and how one disturbance may alter the severity, extent, or occurrence probability of a subsequent disturbance is encapsulated by the concept of linked disturbances. Here, we evaluated 1) how climate and forest habitat variables, including disturbance history, interact to drive 2000s spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) infestation of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) across the Southern Rocky Mountains; and 2) how previous spruce beetle infestation affects subsequent infestation across the Flat Tops Wilderness in northwestern Colorado, which experienced a severe landscape-scale spruce beetle infestation in the 1940s. We hypothesized that drought and warm temperatures would promote infestation, whereas small diameter and non-host trees, which may reflect past disturbance by spruce beetles, would inhibit infestation. Across the Southern Rocky Mountains, we found that climate and forest structure interacted to drive the 2000s infestation. Within the Flat Tops study area we found that stands infested in the 1940s were composed of higher proportions of small diameter and non-host trees ca. 60 years later. In this area, the 2000s infestation was constrained by a paucity of large diameter host trees (> 23 cm at diameter breast height), not climate. This suggests that there has not been sufficient time for trees to grow large enough to become susceptible to infestation. Concordantly, we found no overlap between areas affected by the 1940s infestation and the current infestation. These results show a severe spruce beetle infestation, which results in the depletion of susceptible hosts, can create a landscape template reducing the potential for future infestations. PMID:26000906

  19. Negative feedbacks on bark beetle outbreaks: widespread and severe spruce beetle infestation restricts subsequent infestation.

    PubMed

    Hart, Sarah J; Veblen, Thomas T; Mietkiewicz, Nathan; Kulakowski, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Understanding disturbance interactions and their ecological consequences remains a major challenge for research on the response of forests to a changing climate. When, where, and how one disturbance may alter the severity, extent, or occurrence probability of a subsequent disturbance is encapsulated by the concept of linked disturbances. Here, we evaluated 1) how climate and forest habitat variables, including disturbance history, interact to drive 2000s spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) infestation of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) across the Southern Rocky Mountains; and 2) how previous spruce beetle infestation affects subsequent infestation across the Flat Tops Wilderness in northwestern Colorado, which experienced a severe landscape-scale spruce beetle infestation in the 1940s. We hypothesized that drought and warm temperatures would promote infestation, whereas small diameter and non-host trees, which may reflect past disturbance by spruce beetles, would inhibit infestation. Across the Southern Rocky Mountains, we found that climate and forest structure interacted to drive the 2000s infestation. Within the Flat Tops study area we found that stands infested in the 1940s were composed of higher proportions of small diameter and non-host trees ca. 60 years later. In this area, the 2000s infestation was constrained by a paucity of large diameter host trees (> 23 cm at diameter breast height), not climate. This suggests that there has not been sufficient time for trees to grow large enough to become susceptible to infestation. Concordantly, we found no overlap between areas affected by the 1940s infestation and the current infestation. These results show a severe spruce beetle infestation, which results in the depletion of susceptible hosts, can create a landscape template reducing the potential for future infestations. PMID:26000906

  20. Canopy gap dynamics of second-growth red spruce-northern hardwood stands in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rentch, J.S.; Schuler, T.M.; Nowacki, G.J.; Beane, N.R.; Ford, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Forest restoration requires an understanding of the natural disturbance regime of the target community and estimates of the historic range of variability of ecosystem components (composition, structure, and disturbance processes). Management prescriptions that support specific restoration activities should be consistent with these parameters. In this study, we describe gap-phase dynamics of even-aged, second-growth red spruce-northern hardwood stands in West Virginia that have been significantly degraded following early Twentieth Century harvesting and wildfire. In the current stage of stand development, gaps tended to be small, with mean canopy gap and extended canopy gap sizes of 53.4m2 and 199.3m2, respectively, and a canopy turnover rate of 1.4%year-1. The majority of gaps resulted from the death of one or two trees. American beech snags were the most frequent gap maker, partially due to the elevated presence of beech-bark disease in the study area. Gaps ranged in age from 1 to 28 years, had a mean of 13 years, and were unimodal in distribution. We projected red spruce to be the eventual gap filler in approximately 40% of the gaps. However, we estimated that most average-sized gaps will close within 15-20 years before red spruce canopy ascension is projected (30-60 years). Accordingly, many understory red spruce will require more than one overhead release - an observation verified by the tree-ring record and consistent with red spruce life history characteristics. Based on our observations, silvicultural prescriptions that include overhead release treatments such as thinning from above or small gap creation through selection harvesting could be an appropriate activity to foster red spruce restoration in the central Appalachians. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Fine Seismic Velocity Structure of the Lowermost Outer Core (F-layer) Beneath the Eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtaki, T.; Kaneshima, S.

    2014-12-01

    Solidification or melting at the inner core boundary, the phenomena that have been suggested to occur reflecting the dynamical processes either of the inner core or of the outer core, might cause a Fe-rich or Fe-poor layer in the lowermost outer core (F-layer). Such a compositional anomaly might be detectable by investigating fine seismic structure of the F-layer. In our previous study we determined the overall Vp structure near the inner core boundary beneath Antarctica using differential traveltimes between PKIKP and PKPbc, waveform modeling of PKIKP and PKiKP, and amplitude ratios between PKIKP and PKPbc. But the fine structure of the F-layer remained poorly constrained.In this presentation, we examined the Vp structure of the F-layer beneath the eastern Pacific using differential traveltimes between PKiKP and PKPbc as well as frequency dependence of differential traveltimes between PKIKP and PKPbc, because these two analyses are particularly sensitive to the F-layer structure. We analyzed broadband seismograms of South American earthquakes observed at HI-NET in Japan. The differential traveltime residuals (observed minus calculated) between PKiKP and PKPbc are sensitive to the Vp excess relative to the reference model that is summed over the F-layer below the turning depth of PKPbc. For between 147 and 150 degrees the observed differential residuals show larger negative values and no noticeable dependence on distance compared to that for AK135. PREM that has larger Vp values in the F-layer than AK135 gives smaller differentials than the observations. On the other hand frequency dependence of differential traveltimes between PKIKP and PKPbc has unique sensitivity to the Vp slope in the F-layer, and low sensitivity to the Vp value on the ICB. We measured differential traveltimes for two different frequency bands for between 150 and 157 degrees, and then calculated the difference of the differentials between the two frequency bands. The observed differences show

  2. Forest dynamics after successive spruce budworm outbreaks in mixedwood forests.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Mathieu; Kneeshaw, Daniel; Bergeron, Yves

    2006-09-01

    In order to assess the long-term spatiotemporal influence of the spruce budworm in sub-boreal mixedwood forests, we studied the effect of three successive outbreaks in a region of western Quebec, Canada. We used dendrochronology to detect past outbreaks in three areas (111-185 ha), based on the recruitment age of balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and on growth patterns of white spruce (Picea glauca), the two main host species of this defoliating insect. We also used a series of aerial photographs taken between 1935 and 2003 to evaluate overstory mortality and post-outbreak succession patterns in these same areas. Individual outbreaks had a spatially homogenous impact on host species throughout the region, but successive outbreaks differed in intensity: the two outbreaks around 1910 and 1980 caused widespread mortality in the overstory, but an outbreak around 1945 had little impact, probably because the forest mosaic had not yet recuperated from the 1910 outbreak. No clear outbreak was detected in the later part of the 19th century. In portions of the study areas where the 1910 outbreak had a major impact, between 36% and 50% of the stands were reoccupied by balsam fir stands in the period up to the 1980 outbreak (cyclic succession), the rest being at least partly replaced by nonhost species such as Betula spp. Changes in forest composition after the 1910 outbreak were mostly associated with upper-slope positions in all study areas. The 1980 outbreak also had a higher impact than earlier outbreaks in lower-slope positions dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana)-balsam fir mixtures. These results suggest that, at the regional scale, the abundance of mature or over-mature balsam fir stands does not determine the outbreak cycle. When an outbreak occurs, however, its impact will be strongly constrained by forest characteristics such as stand composition and structure, which are themselves influenced by previous disturbances and slope position. PMID:16995632

  3. The conjugate passive margins of the eastern gulf of Aden : structure and oceanic initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.; Beslier, M. O.; Fournier, M.; Bellahsen, N.; Patriat, P.; Maia, M.

    2003-04-01

    The geophysical data set of the Encens-Sheba cruise in the eastern gulf of Aden allows us to define and compare the structure of the conjugate passive margins and to locate the continental ocean transition zone (COT). Between the Alula-Fartak and Socotra transform faults, the non-volcanic margins are segmented by two transfer fault zones trending N027°E. These transfer zones with left-lateral offsets define three N110°E trending segments. The two margins display titled blocks, horsts and grabens bounded by landward and seaward dipping faults, responsible for two syn-rift antithetic sequences observed on the seismic profile. Normal faulting prevails on the northern margin, with prominent basement rises and basins, and is less important on the southern margin. The latter being characterised by a deep basin at the toe of the continental slope in the vicinity of the continent-ocean transition. Moreover, the offsets along the transfer zones are greater on the northern margin than on the southern one. The conjugate margins are asymmetrical: the southern rifted domain is about twice as large as the northern one. This asymmetry could be due to reactivation of inherited faults. Indeed, the Jurassic rifting has affected the southern margin and not the northern one. The segmentation of the first oceanic spreading centre which is dated at least at 17.6 Ma by the magnetic anomaly An-5d identification seems to be directly related to the segmentation of the margins. The segmentation of the oceanic crust between the Alula-Fartak and Socotra transform faults evolves from three segments (an5d to an5) to two segments (an5 to an1). At the onset of the accretion process, the western segment propagated eastward at the expense of the eastern segment. Reconstruction of the oceanisation process suggests a complex non-uniform opening along the COT by punctiform initiation of seafloor spreading. Several arguments lead to propose a rifting model by mantle exhumation in the COT. The gravity

  4. Structural studies of TiO2/wood coatings prepared by hydrothermal deposition of rutile particles from TiCl4 aqueous solutions on spruce (Picea Abies) wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pori, Pavel; Vilčnik, Aljaž; Petrič, Marko; Sever Škapin, Andrijana; Mihelčič, Mohor; Šurca Vuk, Angela; Novak, Urban; Orel, Boris

    2016-05-01

    A low temperature approach was developed for the deposition of rutile TiO2 particles on a wood surface by hydrolysis of TiCl4 in aqueous solutions acidified with HCl, and crystallization at 75 and 90 °C (1 h). Prior to hydrothermal treatment, Picea Abies wood was first soaked in a 0.5 mmol/l aqueous solution containing anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, Sigma Aldrich) for 2 h at 80 °C. The crystal structure of the hydrothermally made rutile particles was determined with XRD, while the morphology of the deposited TiO2 particles and their distribution in the wood were examined with SEM and EDX measurements. The penetration and amount of deposited rutile particles could be modified by changing the deposition conditions. Thicker layers were obtained from more concentrated aqueous TiCl4 solutions with and without added HCl, and with longer deposition times and higher temperatures of the hydrothermal treatment. The interaction of TiO2 particles with hemicellulose and lignin in wood was established from infrared attenuated total reflection (FT-IR ATR) and Raman spectra measurements, from which the spectra of wood were subtracted. Analysis of the subtraction spectra showed the presence of titania particles on the wood surface, revealing also the establishment of TiO2-wood coordinative bonds of titanium ions with hemicellulose and lignin. The red frequency shift of the OH stretching modes suggested interaction of the TiO2 particles with water molecules of wood. TiO2 deposited on wood treated with SDS became hydrophobic (water contact angles (WCA) of 150°), contrasting the properties of untreated wood with a deposited TiO2 particle coating, which remained hydrophilic.

  5. On the structure and the transport of the eastern Weddell Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Michael; Fahrbach, Eberhard

    1999-01-01

    The circulation pattern and volume transports in the eastern Weddell Gyre are estimated on the basis of hydrographic data collected by R.V. Polarstern between 1989 and 1996. In the northeastern edge of the Weddell Gyre, eastward-flowing water masses from the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Weddell Sea converge. Due to the strong effect of topographic constraints on ocean currents in the weakly stratified waters of high latitudes, the wedge-like structure of the Southwest Indian Ridge can cause the convergence. The increased shear leads to instabilities of the current at the eastern end of the ridge, which produce an intense mesoscale eddy field between 15° and 30°E. In the eddies, water from the Weddell cold regime and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current waters mix and form the water masses of the Weddell warm regime. These waters are advected southward and flow towards the westward southern rim current, which is driven by the Antarctic eastwind band. Hence, there is not a continous flow from the northern to the southern rim, but a decay of the mean flow in the northeast and a reformation in the south. Volume transports across the Greenwich Meridian, estimated on the basis of a combined CTD/ADCP data set, result in an eastward flow of 61 Sv in the northern rim current and a westward return flow of 66 Sv in the southern part of the gyre. The transport is about twice as high as previous estimates between Kapp Norvegia and the northern tip of the Antarctic Pensinsula, indicating a significant gyre circulation north of 70°S.

  6. Trophic size-structure of sailfish Istiophorus platypterus in eastern Taiwan estimated by stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C-N; Chiang, W-C; Sun, C-L; Shao, K-T; Chen, S-Y; Yeh, S-Z

    2014-02-01

    To examine trophic dynamics over different size classes, an isotopic study of sailfish Istiophorus platypterus life-history stages was carried out. Samples were collected from eastern Taiwan and the South China Sea during April 2009 and February 2012. A total of 263 samples (111-245 cm, lower jaw fork length, LLJFL ) were examined for changes in trophic structure in relation to LLJFL by using stable isotope analysis of carbon (δ(13) C) and nitrogen (δ(15) N). The δ(15) N values for I. platypterus ranged from 7·51 to 14·19‰ (mean ± s.d. = 12·06 ± 1·16‰) and the δ(13) C values ranged from -22·04 to -15·48‰ (mean ± s.d. = -17·62 ± 1·10‰). The δ(15) N values were positively dependent on LLJFL (r(2)  = 0·377), whereas δ(13) C were negatively dependent on LLJFL (r(2)  = 0·063). There were significantly different seasonal changes in nitrogen and carbon isotopic concentration, but no significant differences in concentrations between eastern Taiwan and the South China Sea were reported. The trophic level (TL ) of each LLJFL class was correlated, starting from 2·84 TL for size class I (LLJFL  < 140 cm) and reaching 5·03 TL for size class VI (LLJFL > 221 cm). The mean ± s.d. TL was 4·43 ± 0·19 for all samples. The results reveal that I. platypterus occupies a wide range of trophic levels and different size classes occupy different trophic positions in the pelagic ecosystem. PMID:24447322

  7. The uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of eastern Africa from Rayleigh wave tomography: constraints on rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J. P.; Adams, A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.

    2013-08-01

    An expanded model of the 3-D shear wave velocity structure of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern Africa has been developed using earthquakes recorded by the AfricaArray East African Seismic Experiment in conjunction with data from permanent stations and previously deployed temporary stations. The combined data set comprises 331 earthquakes recorded on a total of 95 seismic stations spanning Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi. In this study, data from 149 earthquakes were used to determine fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 to 182 s using the two-plane wave method, and then combined with the similarly processed published measurements and inverted for a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the uppermost mantle. New features in the model include (1) a low-velocity region in western Zambia, (2) a high-velocity region in eastern Zambia, (3) a low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania and (4) low-velocity regions beneath the Lake Malawi rift. When considered in conjunction with mapped seismicity, these results support a secondary western rift branch striking southwestwards from Lake Tanganyika, likely exploiting the relatively weak lithosphere of the southern Kibaran Belt between the Bangweulu Block and the Congo Craton. We estimate a lithospheric thickness of ˜150-200 km for the substantial fast shear wave anomaly imaged in eastern Zambia, which may be a southward subsurface extension of the Bangweulu Block. The low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania suggests that the eastern rift branch trends southeastwards offshore eastern Tanzania coincident with the purported location of the northern margin of the proposed Ruvuma microplate. Pronounced velocity lows along the Lake Malawi rift are found beneath the northern and southern ends of the lake, but not beneath the central portion of the lake.

  8. Intra-annual variability of anatomical structure and δ13C values within tree rings of spruce and pine in alpine, temperate and boreal Europe

    PubMed Central

    Vaganov, Eugene A.; Skomarkova, Marina V.; Knohl, Alexander; Brand, Willi A.; Roscher, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Tree-ring width, wood density, anatomical structure and 13C/12C ratios expressed as δ13C-values of whole wood of Picea abies were investigated for trees growing in closed canopy forest stands. Samples were collected from the alpine Renon site in North Italy, the lowland Hainich site in Central Germany and the boreal Flakaliden site in North Sweden. In addition, Pinus cembra was studied at the alpine site and Pinus sylvestris at the boreal site. The density profiles of tree rings were measured using the DENDRO-2003 densitometer, δ13C was measured using high-resolution laser-ablation-combustion-gas chromatography-infra-red mass spectrometry and anatomical characteristics of tree rings (tracheid diameter, cell-wall thickness, cell-wall area and cell-lumen area) were measured using an image analyzer. Based on long-term statistics, climatic variables, such as temperature, precipitation, solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit, explained <20% of the variation in tree-ring width and wood density over consecutive years, while 29–58% of the variation in tree-ring width were explained by autocorrelation between tree rings. An intensive study of tree rings between 1999 and 2003 revealed that tree ring width and δ13C-values of whole wood were significantly correlated with length of the growing season, net radiation and vapor pressure deficit. The δ13C-values were not correlated with precipitation or temperature. A highly significant correlation was also found between δ13C of the early wood of one year and the late wood of the previous year, indicating a carry-over effect of the growing conditions of the previous season on current wood production. This latter effect may explain the high autocorrelation of long-term tree-ring statistics. The pattern, however, was complex, showing stepwise decreases as well as stepwise increases in the δ13C between late wood and early wood. The results are interpreted in the context of the biochemistry of wood formation and its linkage

  9. Carbon sequestration by young Norway spruce monoculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Rajsnerova, P.; Kubásek, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many studies have been focused on allometry, wood-mass inventory, carbon (C) sequestration, and biomass expansion factors as the first step for the evaluation of C sinks of different plant ecosystems. To identify and quantify these terrestrial C sinks, and evaluate CO2 human-induced emissions on the other hand, information for C balance accounting (for impletion of commitment to Kyoto protocol) are currently highly needed. Temperate forest ecosystems have recently been identified as important C sink. Carbon sink might be associated with environmental changes (elevated [CO2], air temperature, N deposition etc.) and large areas of managed fast-growing young forests. Norway spruce (Pice abies L. Karst) is the dominant tree species (35%) in Central European forests. It covers 55 % of the total forested area in the Czech Republic, mostly at high altitudes. In this contribution we present C sequestration by young (30-35 year-old) Norway spruce monocultures in highland (650-700 m a.s.l., AT- mean annual temperature: 6.9 ° C; P- annual amount of precipitation: 700 mm; GL- growing season duration: 150 days) and mountain (850-900 m a.s.l.; AT of 5.5 ° C; P of 1300 mm; and GL of 120 days) areas and an effect of a different type of thinning. However, the similar stem diameter at the breast height and biomass proportions among above-ground tree organs were obtained in the both localities; the trees highly differ in their height, above-ground organ's biomass values and total above ground biomass, particularly in stem. On the total mean tree biomass needle, branch and stem biomass participated by 22 %, 24 % and 54 % in highland, and by 19 %, 23 % and 58 % in mountain area, respectively. Silvicultural management affects mainly structure, density, and tree species composition of the stand. Therefore, dendrometric parameters of a tree resulted from genotype, growth conditions and from management history as well. Low type of thinning (LT; common in highland) stimulates rather tree

  10. A Spectroscopic Study of Hydra I: The Possible Progenitor of the Eastern Banded Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmig, Brian; Hargis, Jonathan R.; Willman, Beth; Caldwell, Nelson; Strader, Jay; Walker, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    We present initial results of an MMT/Hectochelle spectroscopic study of the Hydra I spatial overdensity located along the Eastern Banded Structure (EBS) stellar stream. The extended double-lobed structure and strength of the overdensity suggest that Hydra I may be the stream's progenitor and undergoing active disruption. With its distance of only ~10 kpc, Hydra I presents a unique opportunity to study the disruption of a star cluster or dwarf galaxy. In past work, SDSS/SEGUE velocities revealed Hydra I to be a kinematically cold structure. However, the small number of candidate members and the significant SEGUE velocity uncertainties (~10 - 15 km/s) precludes testing the nature of Hydra I. To better understand its chemo-dynamic properties, we have begun a spectroscopic survey of the Hydra I/EBS region in order to (i) obtain a robust, velocity-based selection of candidate member stars, (ii) use precise velocities to measure the velocity dispersion, (iii) study the spatial distribution of spectroscopic members, and (iv) measure its proper motion. At present, we have surveyed a ~3 deg x ~3 deg region, which encompasses the entire ~4 sq. deg spatial extent of Hydra I. We have obtained a total of 1354 spectra in this region, with RV uncertainties smaller than ~5 km/s at magnitudes brighter than g~21.6. This work presents our confirmation of Hydra I as a cold halo structure, as well as a more detailed analysis of the membership and spatial/velocity structure of Hydra I.

  11. Lithospheric dynamics in eastern Mediterranean: Insights from seismic structure and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Neenan, E.; Knapmeyer-Endrun, B.; Meier, T.; Agius, M. R.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Tirel, C.; Friederich, W.

    2012-04-01

    westward motion of Anatolia is localised at and near the North Anatolian Fault (NAF). Seismic-velocity profiles and upper-mantle tomography show that the lithosphere gets warmer and thinner from the Black Sea (north of NAF) to central Anatolia (south of NAF). This confirms that the fault is localised near the transition between the mechanically strong and weak lithospheric blocks. The ductile lower crust and mantle lithosphere beneath NAF show E-W, fault-parallel, distributed flow within an at least 100 km wide zone. NAF extends westward into the warm, mechanically weak lithosphere of the Aegean Sea, where it splits into a series of NE-SW oriented faults. Right-lateral slip on these faults, combined with their counter-clockwise rotation and with some stretching, accommodate the overall N-S extension in the northern Aegean. (The extension is evidenced by gradients between GPS vectors and occurs in addition to the NE-SW translational motion of the entire south-central Aegean block.) This N-S extension takes place, also, in the mantle lithosphere of northern Aegean, but the deformation changes in character with depth. The stretching within the deep part of the lithospheric plate is accommodated by a simple, N-S viscous flow, evidenced by the N-S orientation of the anisotropic fabric in the northern Aegean mantle lithosphere. The complex three-dimensional patterns of deformation in eastern Mediterranean are governed by three-dimensional variations in temperature and rheology. Seismic structure and anisotropy, together with geologic and geodetic data, reveal the patterns of lithospheric deformation and give us a glimpse into its fundamental mechanisms.

  12. Third year effects of cloudwater and ozone on red spruce seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Pier, P.A.; Thornton, F.C.; McDuffie, C. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    The reduction in growth of high elevation red spruce in the eastern US has been attributed in part to greater exposure to atmospheric pollution which occurs at high elevation. The authors objective was to evaluate the impact of ambient ozone and cloudwater deposition on the growth of red spruce seedlings at a high elevation site. Potted native and Phyton-grown (Phyton Technologies) red spruce seedlings were exposed in open-top field chambers at Whitetop Mountain, Virginia (elevation 1,680) for the third season to treatments of: (1) exclusion of clouds and 50% reduction in ambient O{sub 3} (COE), (2) O{sub 3} with clouds excluded (CO), (3) exposure to clouds and O{sub 3}, as control chambers (CC), and (4) open plots (AA). Plant biomass components and diameter increment growth for both seedling types were not affected by treatments. Photosynthesis was not enhanced by removal of cloudwater and O{sub 3}. Respiration (R{sub d}) generally was not affected by treatments; however, R{sub d} in native seedling needles of previous year and two-year previous growth was significantly greater in CC than CO and COE on several sampling dates, indicating that cloudwater and O{sub 3} may be causing higher R{sub d}.

  13. Structural features of eastern Tejon embayment from available seismic and subsurface data and field geology

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, E.D.; Malin, P.E.

    1988-03-01

    The temporal and spatial relationships of normal, thrust, and strikeslip faults in the eastern Tejon embayment were investigated, and an integrated study of new CALCRUST data, industrial seismic data, well data, and surface geology yielded a set of geologic cross sections and a detailed structure map. Buried normal faults, trending northeast, dominate the central embayment structure. At the basin margins, the normal faults are truncated by younger thrust faults. The Springs fault zone is a complex subvertical fault with branching reverse faults. The White Wolf fault is probably segmented and multistranded. The active, lower angle segment of the White Wolf fault may be related to buried thrust faults west of uplifted Comanche Point. Thrust faulting also may explain the presence of exhumed normal faults at Comanche Point and in the Tehachapi foothills. These exhumed normal faults are probably late Oligocene to Pliocene. The Tunis volcanics formed during a period of widespread late Oligocene-early Miocene volcanism in central California. Volcanism and the inception of normal faulting at Tejon embayment apparently predated the passing of the Mendocino triple junction. Younger volcanic rocks are also widely distributed, probably due to regional transtension that occurred south of the Mendocino triple junction. Seismic data suggest that the deepening of Tejon embayment occurred mainly during the late early and middle Miocene. Convergence beginning during the Pliocene-Pleistocene is consistent with other documented changes along the modern San Andreas fault.

  14. The formation processes and isotopic structure of continental crust of the Chingiz Range Caledonides (Eastern Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, K. E.; Shatagin, K. N.; Kovach, V. P.; Tretyakov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    According to this paper, the juvenile crust of the Chingiz Range Caledonides (Eastern Kazakhstan) was formed due to suprasubduction magmatism within the Early Paleozoic island arcs developed on the oceanic crust during the Cambrian-Early Ordovician and on the transitional crust during the Middle-Late Ordovician, as well as to the attachment to the arcs of accretionary complexes composed of various oceanic structures. Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks in all island-arc complexes are very similar and primitive (ɛNd(t) from +4.0 to +7.0) and point to a short crustal prehistory. Further increase in the mass and thickness of the crust of the Chingiz Range Caledonides was mainly due to reworking of island-arc complexes in the basement of the Middle and Late Paleozoic volcanoplutonic belts expressed by the emplacement of abundant granitoids. All Middle and Late Paleozoic granitoids have high positive values of ɛNd(t) (at least +4), which are slightly different from Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks in the Lower Paleozoic island-arc complexes. Granitoids are characterized by uniform Nd isotopic compositions (<2-3 ɛ units for granites with a similar age), and thus we can consider the Chingiz Range as the region of the Caledonian isotope province with an isotopically uniform structure of the continental crust.

  15. Biological structure and dynamics of fish assemblages in tributaries of eastern Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Interest in effective management of Great Lakes natural resources and restoration of native populations has stimulated interest in the conditions and ecological role of tributaries in the Great Lakes ecosystem. Rivers of Lake Ontario's eastern basin provide an excellent opportunity to examine important tributaries and their relationship to Lake Ontario. This paper reports on the results of an investigation of fish assemblage structure in lower reaches of the Salmon and Oswego Rivers and at their interfaces with Lake Ontario. These two systems represent conditions near the end points on a continuum from highly disturbed to pristine. They are also of great interest to resource managers for their important fisheries and other economic values. The objective was to identify distinct fish assemblages within these systems and relate their characteristics to biotic and abiotic conditions in an attempt to determine factors responsible for structuring and maintaining those species assemblages. This information is intended to provide baseline information for monitoring the status of these rivers and coastal systems and to aid in the development of models of ecological health.

  16. Spatial correlation structure of monthly rainfall at a mesoscale region of north-eastern Bohemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Vojtěch; Máca, Petr; Hanel, Martin; Pech, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    The spatial correlation structure of monthly rainfall was analysed using data from 38 rain gauges located in north-eastern Bohemia. Three different inter-station correlation measures—Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient and Kendall's tau rank correlation coefficient—were estimated using monthly rainfall records from a recent 31-year period. Six different theoretical parametric correlation models were identified using the nonlinear least squares method. The spatial correlation structure was described using the fitted parameters. Comparison of estimated correlation models showed that, as measured by standard error, the best fitted was a two-parameter exponential model. The relationships between parameters of the exponential two-parameter model were further explored and described. The temporal variability of correlation showed trends in the fitted parameters over the studied period. On a seasonal basis, the correlation between the stations was stronger in autumn and winter than in spring and summer. The spatial variability of estimated parameters revealed that parameters of Matérn and two-parameter exponential models were dependent on altitude.

  17. Inner Structure of Atmospheric Inversion Layers over Haifa Bay in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haikin, N.; Galanti, E.; Reisin, T. G.; Mahrer, Y.; Alpert, P.

    2015-09-01

    Capping inversions act as barriers to the vertical diffusion of pollutants, occasionally leading to significant low-level air pollution episodes in the lower troposphere. Here, we conducted two summer campaigns where global positioning system radiosondes were operated in Haifa Bay on the eastern Mediterranean coast, a region of steep terrain with significant pollution. The campaigns provided unique high resolution measurements related to capping inversions. It was found that the classical definition of a capping inversion was insufficient for an explicit identification of a layer; hence additional criteria are required for a complete spatial analysis of inversion evolution. Based on the vertical temperature derivative, an inner fine structure of inversion layers was explored, and was then used to track inversion layers spatially and to investigate their evolution. The exploration of the inner structure of inversion layers revealed five major patterns: symmetric peak, asymmetric peak, double peak, flat peak, and the zig-zag pattern. We found that the symmetric peak is related to the strongest inversions, double peak inversions tended to break apart into two layers, and the zig-zag pattern was related to the weakest inversions. Employing this classification is suggested for assistance in following the evolution of inversion layers.

  18. Predicting community structure in snakes on Eastern Nearctic islands using ecological neutral theory and phylogenetic methods.

    PubMed

    Burbrink, Frank T; McKelvy, Alexander D; Pyron, R Alexander; Myers, Edward A

    2015-11-22

    Predicting species presence and richness on islands is important for understanding the origins of communities and how likely it is that species will disperse and resist extinction. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography (ETIB) and, as a simple model of sampling abundances, the unified neutral theory of biodiversity (UNTB), predict that in situations where mainland to island migration is high, species-abundance relationships explain the presence of taxa on islands. Thus, more abundant mainland species should have a higher probability of occurring on adjacent islands. In contrast to UNTB, if certain groups have traits that permit them to disperse to islands better than other taxa, then phylogeny may be more predictive of which taxa will occur on islands. Taking surveys of 54 island snake communities in the Eastern Nearctic along with mainland communities that have abundance data for each species, we use phylogenetic assembly methods and UNTB estimates to predict island communities. Species richness is predicted by island area, whereas turnover from the mainland to island communities is random with respect to phylogeny. Community structure appears to be ecologically neutral and abundance on the mainland is the best predictor of presence on islands. With regard to young and proximate islands, where allopatric or cladogenetic speciation is not a factor, we find that simple neutral models following UNTB and ETIB predict the structure of island communities. PMID:26609083

  19. Seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocation for the magmatic system beneath Long Valley Caldera, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing

    2015-04-01

    A new three-dimensional (3-D) seismic velocity model and high-precision location catalog for earthquakes between 1984 and 2014 are presented for Long Valley Caldera and its adjacent fault zones in eastern California. The simul2000 tomography algorithm is applied to derive the 3-D Vp and Vp/Vs models using first-arrivals of 1004 composite earthquakes obtained from the original seismic data at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center. The resulting Vp model reflects geological structures and agrees with previous local tomographic studies. The simultaneously resolved Vp/Vs model is a major contribution of this study providing an important complement to the Vp model for the interpretation of structural heterogeneities and physical properties in the study area. The caldera is dominated by low Vp anomalies at shallow depths due to postcaldera fill. High Vp and low Vp/Vs values are resolved from the surface to ~ 3.4 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, corresponding to the structural uplift of the Resurgent Dome. An aseismic body with low Vp and high Vp/Vs anomalies at 4.2-6.2 km depth below the surface is consistent with the location of partial melt suggested by previous studies based on Vp models only and the inflation source locations based on geodetic modeling. The Sierran crystalline rocks outside the caldera are generally characterized with high Vp and low Vp/Vs values. The newly resolved velocity model improves absolute location accuracy for the seismicity in the study area and ultimately provides the basis for a high-precision earthquake catalog based on similar-event cluster analysis and waveform cross-correlation data. The fine-scale velocity structure and precise earthquake relocations are useful for investigating magma sources, seismicity and stress interaction and other seismological studies in Long Valley.

  20. The Rough Creek graben of western Kentucky: Some structures and hydrocarbon occurrences near the eastern terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, K.W. . Dept. of Geography and Geology)

    1994-04-01

    The southeastern flank of the Illinois Basin in western kentucky contains numerous structures of interest both for their tectonic history and hydrocarbon potential. Recent research and exploration has been focused upon relations between Illinois Basin structures and basement structures in a region known as the Rough Creek Graben (RCG). The RCG extends eastward from the Illinois-Kentucky border approximately 140 miles and is about 30 miles at its widest point north-to-south. It is a wedge-shaped aulacogen attributed to opening of the proto-Atlantic Ocean near the start of the Cambrian Period. Mixed clastic and carbonate basin-fill sequences accumulated as much as 16,000 feet within the RCG before deposition of the Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group platform carbonates. Though most of the Paleozoic permitted quiescent, epeirogenic adjustments within the RCG, post-Knox tectonic episodes caused the reactivation of older faults. Today, surface expression of the northern RCG boundary is marked by the rough Creek Fault System, a complex zone up to five miles wide comprising numerous normal, reverse, and wrench faults which have potential as hydrocarbon traps. Only nine wells have tested sub-Knox sequences within the RCG including two recently completed deep tests (TD about 14,000[prime]) in McLean and Grayson counties. Most oil and gas production in the region is from wells less than 3,000 feet completed in Devonian through Pennsylvanian strata. This paper contributes structure sections from portions of Edmonson and Grayson counties near the eastern terminus of the fault system which illustrate stratigraphic throw, trapping mechanisms, and the influence of fractures on shallow hydrocarbon production in this area.

  1. Significant role of structural fractures in Ren-Qiu buried-block oil field, eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Q.; Xie-Pei, W.

    1983-03-01

    Ren-qui oil field is in a buried block of Sinian (upper Proterozoic) rocks located in the Ji-zhong depression of the western Bohai Bay basin in eastern China. The main reservoir consists of Sinian dolomite rocks. It is a fault block with a large growth fault on the west side which trends north-northeast with throws of up to 1 km (0.6 mi) or more. The source rocks for the oil are Paleogene age and overlie the Sinian dolomite rocks. The structural fractures are the main factor forming the reservoir of the buried-block oil field. Three structural lines, trending northeast, north-northeast, and northwest, form the regional netted fracture system. The north-northeast growth fault controlled the structural development of the buried block. The block was raised and eroded before the Tertiary sediments were deposited. In the Eocene Epoch, the Ji-zhong depression subsided, but the deposition, faulting, and related uplift of the block happened synchronously as the block was gradually submerged. At the same time, several horizontal and vertical karst zones were formed by the karst water along the netted structural fractures. The Eocene oil source rocks lapped onto the block and so the buried block, with many developed karst fractures, was surrounded by a great thickness of source rocks. As the growth fault developed, the height of the block was increased from 400 m (1300 ft) before the Oligocene to 1300 m (4250 ft) after. As the petroleum was generated, it migrated immediately into the karst fractures of the buried block along the growth fault. The karst-fractured block reservoir has an 800-m (2600-ft) high oil-bearing closure and good connections developed between the karst fractures.

  2. Crustal structure of the Wharton Basin of the eastern Indian Ocean- Geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala Rao, D.; Krishna, K. S.; Levchenko, O. V.

    2012-12-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection, magnetic and bathymetric data along seven northwest-southeast regional profiles across the Wharton Basin (WB), eastern Indian Ocean between lat.18N to 14N and 98E to 112E collected as part of Trans Indian Ocean Geotraverse (TIOG) project studies together with earlier published data have been analyzed to interpret crustal structure. Varied geomorphic and crust features identified include; Investigator Ridge System (IRS), Abandoned Spreading Ridge System (ASRS), Western Plains (WP) and Eastern Plains (EP) from west to east. The N-S trending IRS and faults and prominent trough parallel to it and sediments are seismically imaged. The NNE-SSW trending ASRS, >100 km wide is segmented by four NW-SE Fracture Zones: between 108°E and 104E; 106E and 102E, 103.5E and 101E and 103E and 99.5E offsetting the ridge axis. Axial graben and associated magnetic low of it in the north and highs in the south and lack of geomorphic expression in further south imply varied spread rates. Absence of linear magnetic anomalies points to probable spreading during late Cretaceous Magnetic Quite Period. The WP is flanked by the dense tectonic elements and deformed sediments in between. Seismic images of the EP and plains have revealed numerous grabens bounded by vertical faults extend from basement through the sediments in the east, limited mostly to basement in west and turbidities along axial parts. Sediments, up to 0.8 S thick consisting of five seismic sequences carpet Cretaceous oceanic basement. Their acoustic character, stratal and on-lap pattern have revealed deformation of pelagic sediments of ASRS (in northeast), WP and EP during Paleogene and extension subsequently. The basin's crust, thus, depicts 1) north-south structural trends of IRS in east compared to northeast-southwest of WB. 2) Ocean crust is Mesozoic-Cretaceous in age, 3) northwest-southeast compression in contrast to east-west of the Central Indian Ocean Basin. 4) Most of the faults

  3. Detailed structure and stratigraphy of the eastern Marble Mountain terrane, Klamath Mountains, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.E.; Hacker, B.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Amphibolite-grade rocks in the eastern Marble Mountains (MM), N. California, consist of several fault-bounded, SSE-dipping lithotectonic units. Each unit is ca. 2 km thick and is characterized by differences in rock type, metamorphism, and structural style. The lowermost unit composed of well-foliated and lineated epidote amphibolite grading upward into clinopyroxene-bearing amphibolite with a consistent NE-SW lineation. Structurally overlying these rocks are andalusite- and staurolite-bearing, epidote-amphibolite facies rocks (Wright Lake assemblage (WLa)) that have variable foliation and lineation orientations. The WLa consists of meta-supracrustal rocks with well-preserved relict textures, and massive, meta-ultramafic rock. Supracrustal rocks include polymict conglomerate and breccia, fine- to medium-grained clastic rocks, alkalic pillow basalt, chert, and carbonate. Conglomerate clasts include partially recrystallized granitoids and quartzite. Previous studies have interpreted the WLa to represent a fragment of oceanic crust, but coeval coarse-grained sedimentation and alkalic volcanism, small volume of mafic volcanics, conglomerate composition, and lack of oceanic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks suggest deposition in an arc-related rift or transtensional basin. Previous studies have also described the terrane as melange, but recognition of local pseudostratigraphy allows mapping of multiply folded, isoclinal, nappe-like structures. Small-scale nappes are generally 100+ m thick and are imbricated with massive meta-ultramafic rocks along gently to steeply east-dipping shear zones. Shear zones are characterized by metamorphosed ultramafic fault rocks that suggest a range of brittle to ductile behavior. Regionally distributed, Ar/Ar hornblende ages of 149.9[+-]0.4, 150.3[+-]0.6, 152.1[+-]4.7, 152.5[+-]2.5 Ma and Ar/Ar biotite ages of 148.8[+-]2.6 and 149.9[+-]0.4 Ma indicate the MM terrane cooled rapidly through ca. 500--300 C in the Late Jurassic.

  4. Main eddy vertical structures observed in the four major Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegliasco, Cori; Chaigneau, Alexis; Morrow, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    In the four major Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS), mesoscale eddies are known to modulate the biological productivity and transport near-coastal seawater properties toward the offshore ocean, however little is known about their main characteristics and vertical structure. This study combines 10 years of satellite-altimetry data and Argo float profiles of temperature and salinity, and our main goals are (i) to describe the main surface characteristics of long-lived eddies formed in each EBUS and their evolution, and (ii) to depict the main vertical structure of the eddy-types that coexist in these regions. A clustering analysis of the Argo profiles surfacing within the long-lived eddies of each EBUS allows us to determine the proportion of surface and subsurface-intensified eddies in each region, and to describe their vertical structure in terms of temperature, salinity and dynamic height anomalies. In the Peru-Chile Upwelling System, 55% of the sampled anticyclonic eddies (AEs) have subsurface-intensified maximum temperature and salinity anomalies below the seasonal pycnocline, whereas 88% of the cyclonic eddies (CEs) are surface-intensified. In the California Upwelling System, only 30% of the AEs are subsurface-intensified and all of the CEs show maximum anomalies above the pycnocline. In the Canary Upwelling System, ˜40% of the AEs and ˜60% of the CEs are subsurface-intensified with maximum anomalies extending down to 800 m depth. Finally, the Benguela Upwelling System tends to generate ˜40-50% of weak surface-intensified eddies and ˜50-60% of much stronger subsurface-intensified eddies with a clear geographical distribution. The mechanisms involved in the observed eddy vertical shapes are discussed.

  5. Ancient trade routes shaped the genetic structure of horses in eastern Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, Vera M; Campana, Michael G; Eriksson, Anders; Bower, Mim; Barker, Graeme; Manica, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Animal exchange networks have been shown to play an important role in determining gene flow among domestic animal populations. The Silk Road is one of the oldest continuous exchange networks in human history, yet its effectiveness in facilitating animal exchange across large geographical distances and topographically challenging landscapes has never been explicitly studied. Horses are known to have been traded along the Silk Roads; however, extensive movement of horses in connection with other human activities may have obscured the genetic signature of the Silk Roads. To investigate the role of the Silk Roads in shaping the genetic structure of horses in eastern Eurasia, we analysed microsatellite genotyping data from 455 village horses sampled from 17 locations. Using least-cost path methods, we compared the performance of models containing the Silk Roads as corridors for gene flow with models containing single landscape features. We also determined whether the recent isolation of former Soviet Union countries from the rest of Eurasia has affected the genetic structure of our samples. The overall level of genetic differentiation was low, consistent with historically high levels of gene flow across the study region. The spatial genetic structure was characterized by a significant, albeit weak, pattern of isolation by distance across the continent with no evidence for the presence of distinct genetic clusters. Incorporating landscape features considerably improved the fit of the data; however, when we controlled for geographical distance, only the correlation between genetic differentiation and the Silk Roads remained significant, supporting the effectiveness of this ancient trade network in facilitating gene flow across large geographical distances in a topographically complex landscape. PMID:24118338

  6. Detectability of temporal changes in fine structures near the inner core boundary beneath the eastern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, W.

    2016-07-01

    The inner core boundary (ICB), where melting and solidification of the core occur, plays a crucial role in the dynamics of the Earth's interior. To probe temporal changes near the ICB beneath the eastern hemisphere, I analyze differential times of PKiKP (dt(PKiKP)), double differential times of PKiKP-PKPdf, and PKiKP coda waves from repeating earthquakes in the southwest Pacific subduction zones. dt(PKiKP) values are mostly within ±30 ms of one another, without systematic temporal dependence. Some observations of PKiKP coda waves have absolute time shifts of >50 ms relative to their main phases. The combination of temporal changes in PKiKP coda arrivals and negligible changes in PKiKP arrivals favors a smooth ICB with fine-scale structures in the upper inner core. dt(PKiKP) values are interpreted in the context of melting- or growth-induced ICB topography, based on dynamic models. Uncertainties in dt(PKiKP) prevent verification of ICB melting or growth on decadal time scales.

  7. Geological structure of the deep eastern Mediterranean Sea (east of 25 Degrees E)

    SciTech Connect

    Montadert, L.; Sage, L.; Letouzey, J. )

    1988-08-01

    The deformation fronts of the Cyprus arc and the Mediterranean ridge, extending from the Turkey-Syria boundary to north Cyrenacia, are the southernmost superficial expression of the convergence between the Eurasian and African plates. They separate the Eastern Mediterranean deep basin into two different structural units: (1) A thrust belt, northward, with the presence of Cenozoic sedimentary basins which could be considered piggy-back basins (Iskenderun, Adana, Cilicia, and Antalya basins). These basins, filled by 4,000 to 6,000 m of Cenozoic sediments, lie on a substratum composed of south-vergent nappes emplaced between the Late Cretaceous and the late Miocene. (2) A foreland area, southward, where the thick Herodotus and Levantine sedimentary basins, relatively undeformed, lie on the passive and subsident African continental margin initiated during Late Triassic or early Liassic time. Due to the still-active collision between the thrust belt and the Erathosthenes seamount, Cyprus was uplifted and today represents the emerged part of the deformation front. During the Messinian, with the isolation of the Mediterranean Sea, evaporitic deposits including a salt layer (sometimes more than 2,000 m thick) were widely distributed into the Iskenderun, Cilicia, Antalya, Levantine, and Herodotus basins. In these basins, the Messinian sedimentation was directly controlled by basin topography.

  8. Adria-Europe crustal structure relationship in the Eastern Alps (project EASI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetényi, György; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Bianchi, Irene; Kampfová Exnerová, Hana

    2016-04-01

    Project EASI is the first implemented Complementary Experiment within the AlpArray program (http://www.alparray.ethz.ch) and stands for Eastern Alpine Seismic Investigation. The seismological field experiment ran for one year, from Summer 2014 to Summer 2015, composed of 55 broadband stations deployed in zig-zag in a ca. 15 km-wide band along longitude 13.35°E, spanning 540 km from the Czech-German border to the Adriatic Sea. Here we present first results using P-to-S converted waves from teleseismic distances. The variation of Moho depth along the profile is analyzed and linked to the two colliding plates, Adria and Europe, as well as to the overlying lithospheric blocks of the Bohemian Massif. The suggested Moho "hole" between Adria and Europe is characterized. We investigate the anisotropic nature of the lower crust of both plates. We conclude on the structural relationship of Adria and Europe at the crustal level, and infer their respective positions at depth. Furthermore, preliminary S-to-P conversions illuminating the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary test the significant depth variation of this boundary along the EASI transect and complement our receiver function study.

  9. Thermocline Structure and ENSO Variability in the eastern equatorial Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.; Koutavas, A.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Rustic, G.

    2015-12-01

    The mean state and variability of the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are of great interest because of the region's role in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and global climate. We investigated changes in thermocline structure between the Late Holocene (LH) and LGM with stable isotopes of planktonic foraminifera in sediment cores from the Galápagos. We measured δ18O in two species—Globigerinoides ruber, inhabiting the surface mixed layer, and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, inhabiting the deep thermocline—in order to evaluate the vertical temperature contrast between the two species. We also measured δ18O of individual N. dutertrei from modern (late 20th century) and LGM sediments in order to assess thermocline temperature variability related to ENSO activity. Our data indicate a reduced vertical contrast in the upper ocean during the LGM, which is most consistent with a deeper thermocline and thicker mixed layer. Additionally, δ18O of individual N. dutertrei shells shows 2.5 times greater population variance in the LGM than in the modern sample. This large variance indicates that thermocline temperatures were more variable during the LGM than today, consistent with more active ENSO. Together, these results imply that the mean state of the EEP was characterized by a deeper thermocline and greater ENSO variability. The results further show the potential for reconstructing ENSO variability from deep-sea sediments of the EEP, where other geological archives of ENSO are currently extremely limited.

  10. Gas seepage and seismogenic structures along the North Anatolian Fault in the eastern Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, L.; Polonia, A.; Del Bianco, F.; Etiope, G.; Marinaro, G.; Favali, P.; Italiano, F.; ćAǧAtay, M. N.

    2012-10-01

    We carried out a combined geophysical and gas-geochemical survey on an active fault strand along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) system in the Gulf of İzmit (eastern Sea of Marmara), providing for the first time in this area data on the distribution of methane (CH4) and other gases dissolved in the bottom seawater, as well as the CH4isotopic composition. Based on high-resolution morphobathymetric data and chirp-sonar seismic reflection profiles we selected three areas with different tectonic features associated to the NAF system, where we performed visual and instrumental seafloor inspections, including in situ measurements of dissolved CH4, and sampling of the bottom water. Starting from background values of 2-10 nM, methane concentration in the bottom seawater increases abruptly up to 20 nM over the main NAF trace. CH4 concentration peaks up to ˜120 nM were detected above mounds related probably to gas and fluids expulsion. Methane is microbial (δ13CCH4: -67.3 and -76‰ versus VPDB), and was found mainly associated with pre-Holocene deposits topped by a 10-20 m thick draping of marine mud. The correlation between tectonic structures and gas-seepages at the seafloor suggests that the NAF in the Gulf of İzmit could represent a key site for long-term combined monitoring of fluid exhalations and seismicity to assess their potential as earthquake precursors.

  11. Stem analysis of a long-lived black spruce clone at treeline

    SciTech Connect

    Payette, S.; Delwaide, A.; Morneau, C.; Lavoie, C. )

    1994-02-01

    Because of its ability to layer and to produce different phenotypes, black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] BSP.) develops a complex clonal structure ensuring its survival and longevity. Here we report tree stem development and demise of a black spruce clone at treeline over the last 500 yr. Since the 16th century, the apical meristems of the clonal spruce experienced three periods of stem development associated with brief warmings and two periods of stem decline corresponding to known cold spells of the Little Ice Age. Ortet development was particularly vigorous in the 16th century, while the two layered stems slowly developed in the late 17th century and in the 20th century, respectively. Stem decline appeared as a progressive process lasting for several decades in the form of a basipetal death-gradient along the bole amplified by the above/below snow-pack position. Stem elongation was possibly facilitated by lesser winter-snow abrasion and/or thicker snowpack. Clonal stem development may have important implications for spruce spread in the arctic tundra in a warmer world. 26 refs. 2 figs.

  12. Invasive symbiont bearing (and other) foraminifera altering the community structure of eastern Mediterranean rocky reefs environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyams-Kaphzan, Orit; Perelis Grossowicz, Lydia; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva

    2015-04-01

    The rocky reefs of the Israeli eastern Mediterranean shelf constitute a highly diverse marine ecosystem rich in macroalgae and calcareous organisms. The benthic foraminiferal community living in this ecosystem is rapidly changing due to massive invasion of symbiont bearing foraminifera (SBF) as well as other foraminiferal species of tropical origin. This trend facilitated by the ongoing increase in temperature enables more tropical species to adjust to the eastern Mediterranean habitats. In order to document the status of the benthic foraminiferal community structure rocky reefs at Akhziv (AK) and Carmel Head (CH), northern Israel were sampled by scuba diving. Different macroalgae species, including invasive ones, accommodating the live epiphytic benthic foraminifera were sampled twice a year at AK and in each season at CH in three depth intervals between 5-20 m, during 2013-4. The numerical abundance of the group ranges between 170-3500 #/10cc (wet macroalgae volume) without any significant difference in standing stocks within regions, water depths or macroalgae preference. In total 77 benthic foraminiferal species were identified 71 in CH and only 43 at AK. Species richness per site varied between 3 and 42 with higher values at CH. 25% of all species were aliens, mostly Lessepsian, that comprise on average 70% - 84% of the numerical abundance of AK and CH respectively. Cluster analysis using benthic foraminifera relative abundance data did not correlate with the different macroalgae species, water depths or seasonality, indicating that the foraminiferal community in the two regions is quite homogenous. Amphistegina lobifera a Lessepsian migrant is by far the most common species on the Israeli rocky reefs occurring in all samples and comprising 18-93% of the foraminiferal community. Heterostegina depressa behaves similarly to A. lobifera though it occurs in lower numbers. Pararotalia calcariformata, a recently arriving SBF occupies mainly shallow water sites at CH

  13. Application of electrical resistivity tomography to map lithological differences and subsurface structures (Eastern Sudetes, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Dominika; Stan-Kłeczek, Iwona

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the subsurface lithological variability and thickness of each metamorphic rocks unit by means of geophysical methods, which were presented within the framework of SEDIBUD. Research was performed on the ridge and the steep eastern slope of the Orlik massif (1204 m) in the Hrubý Jesenik range of the Eastern Sudetes, the Czech Republic. To obtain a spatial image of a geological rock mass, the non-invasive and relatively rapid method of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used, which resulted in the creation of six profiles using the Dipole-Dipole and Wenner-Schlumberger arrays. As complementary methods, vertical electrical sounding (VES) and seismic refraction tomography were chosen. Fifteen measuring points along two profiles obtained by vertical electrical sounding allowed the determination of the following in the vertical section layers of different resistivity and thickness at direct points in contact primarily with Devonian quartzite rocks and weathered covers. In a series of field studies, a four-layered rock mass was examined in which the first layer is of fine-grained materials with medium- and large-size clasts, the second layer is quartzite, the third is gneiss and the fourth is phyllite. The five profiles measured by seismic refraction tomography made it possible to draw the boundary between the studied phyllites, gneisses and quartzites. In addition, geophysical surveys and the results of mineralogical composition analysis allowed us to determine the nature and thickness of the weathered layers present on the massif area, which, in the upper sections, are predominantly a clayey loam partially covered with blocks. The inclination of the slope is associated with an increase in the fraction of coarse material. The majority of the thickness of these layers is related to the local flattened surfaces and the presence of numerous streams, which contributed to the accumulation of the sediments that were also

  14. The Earth's crust deep structure of eastern Eurasia on evidence derived from deep seismic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikov, A.; Efimov, A.; Soloviev, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    Interest in investigations of the deep structure of the Earth's crust has quickened in the past few years. However, deep seismic sounding performed with the use of boreholes, big shots and less-than-conditioned spreads is connected with its technological inefficiency, high cost, risk and in many cases with impossibility of performance for reasons of ecology. We present an up-to-date DSS technology that is free from negative limitations, inherent in classical technologies, and so allows much room for its application under any conditions, including industrial estates, reserves, hydroelectric power stations, atomic power-stations, and so on. The technology is based on detailed deep seismic multiwave studies using multiple overlapping spreads and powerful seismic vibrators, which generate seismic waves of high radiation stability, and also remote self-contained recorders. Powerful 40-60 ton vibrators provide vibroseis records at 300 to 350 km that compare well with those of powerful 3 to 5 ton trotyl explosions in wells and basins. This technology is being profitably integrated into exploration practice. It was for the first time in the world that mobile powerful 40-60 t vibrators were used to measure four 300 km seismic lines and one 5 000 km lines in the Altai-Sayan fold area and Okhotsk-Kolyma region, respectively. In the Altai-Sayan area we measured the Novosibirsk-Novokuznetsk line more than 300 km in extent with 30 vibrators spaced at intervals of 5 to 10 km. We studied in details a wave field of the uphole vibrator at distances of 0 to 300 km, obtained fresh evidence on elastic P-wave and S-wave characteristics in the Earth's crust and upper mantle, and revealed the main structural elements of the region (Tom-Kolyvan folded zone, Salair Ridge, Kuznetsk trough). We also detected elastic anisotropy on the Moho and its almost complete absence in the upper Earth's crust. Eastern Eurasia remains worst studied as to deep seismic investigations. By the nature of

  15. Convection and Easterly Wave Structure Observed in the Eastern Pacific Warm-Pool during EPIC-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Walter A.; Cifelli, R.; Boccippio, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Fairall, C. W.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During September-October 2001, the East Pacific Investigation of Climate Processes in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System (EPIC-2001) ITCZ field campaign focused on studies of deep convection in the warm-pool region of the East Pacific. In addition to the TAO mooring array, observational platforms deployed during the field phase included the NOAA ship RN Ronald H. Brown, the NSF ship RN Horizon, and the NOAA P-3 and NCAR C-130 aircraft. This study combines C-band Doppler radar, rawinsonde, and surface heat flux data collected aboard the RN Brown to describe ITCZ convective structure and rainfall statistics in the eastern Pacific as a function of 3-5 day easterly wave phase. Three distinct easterly wave passages occurred during EPIC-2001. Wind and thermodynamic data reveal that the wave trough axes exhibited positively correlated U and V winds and a slight westward phase tilt with height. A relatively strong (weak) northeasterly deep tropospheric shear followed the trough (ridge) axis. Temperature and humidity perturbations exhibited mid-to upper level cooling (warming) and drying (moistening) in the northerly (trough and southerly) phase. At low levels warming (cooling) occurred in the northerly (southerly) phase with little change in the relative humidity, though mixed layer mixing ratios were larger during the northerly phase. When composited, radar, sounding, lightning and surface heat flux observations suggest the following systematic behavior as a function of wave phase: approximately zero to one quarter wavelength ahead of (behind) the wave trough in northerly (southerly) flow, larger (smaller) CAPE, lower (higher) CIN, weaker (stronger) tropospheric shear, higher (lower) conditional mean rain rates, higher (lower) lightning flash densities, and more (less) robust convective vertical structure occurred. Latent and sensible heat fluxes reached a minimum in the northerly phase and then increased through the trough, reaching a peak during the ridge phase

  16. Crustal structure beneath the eastern Swiss Alps derived from seismic refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Ansorge, J.; Kissling, E.; Mueller, St.

    1995-02-01

    The eastern part of the Swiss Central Alps is densely covered by a network of seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profiles recorded mostly parallel to the tectonic strike of the Alps and along the newly acquired N-S-oriented European Geotraverse (EGT). To obtain a well-constrained crustal transect along the EGT an initial model was constructed from information based mainly on the coincident reflection seismic profile of the Swiss National Research Program NFP20 and short-range observations of the EGT data for the shallow structure and on the along-strike wide-angle profiles for the deep structure. The refinement of the initial model by 2-D raytracing during the subsequent interpretation of the EGT data leads to a detailed P-wave velocity distribution of the crustal cross-section beneath the Central Swiss Alps and its adjacent areas. In general, the distinctly layered crustal structure below the Alpine foreland thickens considerably as the Alps are approached, reaching a maximum thickness of nearly 60 km below the Insubric Line. The upper and middle crust has velocities between 6.0 and 6.2 km/s. Except for the area below the southern part of the Molasse Basin and the Helvetic nappes a distinct lower crust with a relatively low velocity of 6.5-6.6 km/s is found. Below the Penninic nappes the lower crust thickens remarkably, merging probably with the high-velocity zone of 6.6 km/s at a depth of about 21 km, which has been interpreted as the top of the indenting lower crust of the Adriatic promontory of the African plate. A clear vertical offset between the smoothly south-dipping European and the more rapidly rising Adriatic crust-mantle boundaries is found. The complex structures of the upper crust beneath the Alps caused by the nappe tectonics can only be partly resolved by the refraction seismic data. A south-dipping high-velocity zone within the Penninic nappe pile and a reflector beneath the northern front of the Aar Massif can possibly be interpreted as

  17. EFFECTS OF EASTERN REDCEDAR ON SMALL MAMMAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN THE OKLAHOMA CROSSTIMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased abundance of eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginianus), a native but invasive species in the Great Plains, has been associated with reduced herbaceous biomass in the canopy zone, altered plant species composition, and reduced understory light and soil water content. By ...

  18. Structural and metamorphic evolution of western part of the Tauern Window, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovská, Z.; Jerabek, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Tauern Window in the Eastern Alps represent a tectonic window, where Penninic continental units and overlying Piemontais oceanic units crop out from below the Austroalpine crystalline nappes. The window is formed by Subpenninic nappe system composed of Variscan basement (Zentralgneiss) with Mesozoic cover sequences overlain by Penninic nappes. The studied nappes were previously recognized as Lower and Upper Schieferhülle and their P-T conditions of up to blueschist facies were determined by Selverstone (1988, 1993).Our detailed structural and petrological study focused mainly on tectono-metamorphic evolution of different nappes. The Zentralgneiss cover sequences consist mainly of schists, amphibolites and quartzites with originally subhorizontal - gently westward dipping fabric. Dominant fabric was later deformed during deformation stages D2 and D3 that are preserved in the form of folds and cleavages. The later one mainly in the W part of studied area. The Penninic nappes are composed of deformed greenschists, micaschists and marbles, which are together folded by large-scale open folds during D2. The metamorphic PT conditions were reconstructed by using the phase equilibrium modelling and chemical composition/zoning of garnets, which are mostly synkinematic to the formation of the main deformation fabric. The compositional zoning in garnets revealed an overall prograde PT evolution with PT increase up to 3.5 kbar and 100°C associated with the main deformation event. The structural and petrological record show the relation of nappe evolution and unroofing of the complex such as described in Jeřábek et al. (2012) from West Carpathians. The E-W stretching and prograde metamorphic evolution is associated with burial, while exhumation is associated with formation of subhorizontal cleavage and dip-slip kinematics towards W contrary to previously published studies.

  19. Deep Structure of The Eastern Nankai Trough From Multi-fold Wide-angle Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessa, J. X.; Operto, S.; Kodaira, S.; Nakanishi, A.; Uhira, K.; Kaneda, Y.; Pascal, G.; Hustedt, B.

    Multi-fold wide-angle seismic data were collected offshore the eastern Nankai trough (Tokai area) in July-august 2001 by JAMSTEC (Japan Marine Science and Tech- nology Center). One hundred 3C-OBSs were deployed with a 1km-spacing along a 140km-long shot profile that was orientated perpendicularly to the Nankai through. The experiment aims to illuminate the subduction system as deep as possible and to obtain tomographic models with the highest achievable resolution in order to propose and/or confirm hypothesis concerning the structural factors that control the nucleation of large subduction earthquakes. The present locking of the trough by subducted as- perities like the Paleo-Zenisu ridge in the Tokai area could be such a factor. The acquisition geometry involving densely sampled receiver spacings was designed to apply a two steps tomographic approach: first, a first arrival traveltime inversion provides a large-scale velocity structure of the crust. Second, this velocity model is used as a starting model to apply a frequency-domain linearized waveform inversion. This second inversion should yield a significant improvement in the resolution of the tomographic crustal models. The wavefield inversion is based on a frequency-domain finite-difference modelling of wave propagation with which complex phenomena oc- curing at wide angles are accurately reproduced. The frequency-domain approach is suited for this kind of applications on both the modelling and inversion aspects: the propagation of wavefields from numerous sources can be achieved at reasonable cost and the data volume to be inverted can be strongly decimated by taking advantage of the data redundancy provided by the wide apertures of the acquisition geometry. These two key points should allow to handle large datasets and models for crustal- scale imaging problems. The first results of this tomographic approach will be presented.

  20. The P and S wave velocity structure of the mantle beneath eastern Africa and the African superplume anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulibo, Gabriel D.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2013-08-01

    P and S relative arrival time residuals from teleseismic earthquakes recorded on over 60 temporary AfricaArray broadband seismic stations deployed in Uganda, Tanzania, and Zambia between 2007 and 2011 have been inverted, together with relative arrival time residuals from earthquakes recorded by previous deployments, for a tomographic image of mantle wave speed variations extending to a depth of 1200 km beneath eastern Africa. The image shows a low-wave speed anomaly (LWA) well developed at shallow depths (100-200 km) beneath the Eastern and Western branches of the Cenozoic East African rift system and northwestern Zambia, and a fast wave speed anomaly at depths ≤ 350 km beneath the central and northern parts of the East African Plateau and the eastern and central parts of Zambia. At depths ≥350 km the LWA is most prominent under the central and southern parts of the East African Plateau and dips to the southwest beneath northern Zambia, extending to a depth of at least 900 km. The amplitude of the LWA is consistent with a ˜150-300 K thermal perturbation, and its depth extent indicates that the African superplume, originally identified as a lower mantle anomaly, is likely a whole mantle structure. A superplume extending from the core-mantle boundary to the surface implies an origin for the Cenozoic extension, volcanism, and plateau uplift in eastern Africa rooted in the dynamics of the lower mantle.

  1. Eastern Olympus Mons Basal Scarp and Aureole lobe: Recent Structural Evidence for Formation and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, M. B.; McGovern, P. J.; Fournier, T.; Morgan, J. K.; Katz, O.

    2012-12-01

    The origin of the Olympus Mons (OM) basal scarp and the adjacent enigmatic aureole lobe deposits have long been controversial, with many hypotheses having been postulated for their linked formation, ranging from sub-glacial eruptions (e.g. Helgason, 1999), to numerous landslide and flank collapse models (e.g. Borgia, 1990; Lopes et al., 1980). While a landslide origin is compelling upon the examination of the OM basal scarp morphology, much of the controversy remains, and the subsurface structure of OM is not well understood. With the release of high resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) of Mars from High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) data, we examine a unique portion of the edifice, the Eastern OM Basal Scarp (EOMBS). The EOMBS exhibits two parallel bounding structures: a nearly 100 km-long up-slope extensional normal fault system, with associated offsets on the order of 10-100m, bordered by radial tear faults; and a 160-200 km-long down-slope contractional wrinkle ridge network of varying vergence, inferred to define the boundaries of a "pop-up" structure, associated offsets are on the order of 100m, and were last inferred to be active in recent geologic time at < 45 Ma (Basilevsky et al., 2006). The wrinkle ridge network extends an additional 60-100 km south of the identified normal fault system. We suggest that these fault systems, within the region of the radial tear faults, may be linked by failure surfaces, that their displacements accommodate downslope movement of the flank, and may be direct evidence linking the "East" aureole lobe to the EOMBS. Calculations based on limit equilibrium principles, and matched to the observed faulting locations and slope geometries, suggests a mechanically weak, pore-fluid saturated detachment layer (e.g. similar to phyllosilicates), at a depth of 0 to -3km below the reference datum, underlies eastern OM, consistent with models of OM as a spreading volcanic edifice (Borgia, 1990; McGovern and Morgan, 2009). Our

  2. Space-time structure of the 2003 geomagnetic jerk at Mid-Eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jiaming; Du, Aimin; Xu, Wenyao; Yang, Dongmei

    2015-04-01

    The 2003 jerk has an abrupt change in the geomagnetic secular variation (SV), and was recognized as a local phenomenon of internal origin from the satellite observations (Olsen and Mandea, 2007). Notable strength of the 2003 jerk is located at Mid-Eastern Asia. The temporal and spatial features at this area are important to resolve the Earth's core fluid flow dynamics at local scale (e.g. Wardinski et al., 2008). We investigate the temporal-spatial development of the 2003 jerk in more detail at Mid-Eastern Asia with the ground-based observations and CHAOS-3 core field model. We select the data in the international geomagnetic quiet days to calculate the monthly means. In order to reduce the influence of the external field, we adopt a function comprising the terms associated with the indices of the geomagnetic activity, and the terms of the periodic signals on the observatory monthly means data (Stewart and Whaler, 1992). We then use an empirical AR-2 model to represent the internal field signals in the observatory data. The extreme detection is applied to identify the jerk in the SV time series. The onset time and the strength of the 2003 jerk are obtained through the detection for geomagnetic field component, X, Y and Z. The maximum of the strength of the 2003 jerk is located under the Indian mainland. The onset time of this jerk propagates approximately southeastward. Two jerks in 2001 and 2003 for the Z component are further compared and they are confirmed as independent processes. We suggest the jerk in 2001 identical to the well known 1999 jerk in Europe (Mandea et al., 2000). Our results reveal the fine structures of the 2003 jerk that corroborate the conclusions in previous studies. The larger scale time-spatial structure given by the AR-2 model constructed from ground observatory data (monthly values) is consistent with the results from the CHAOS-3 model. This structure can be applied for further inversion of the local core surface fluid flow motions

  3. Residual circulation in eastern Long Island Sound: Observed transverse-vertical structure and exchange transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codiga, Daniel L.; Aurin, Dirk A.

    2007-01-01

    Residual currents in eastern Long Island Sound (LIS) are investigated using direct velocity measurements from an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a ferry. Circulation at the site has major influence on exchange of water and water-borne materials between LIS and the coastal ocean. Ferry sampling enables sufficient averaging to isolate the residual motion from stronger tidal currents, and captures its spatial structure. Mean along-estuary currents based on about 2 years of sampling reveal a vigorous estuarine exchange circulation (peak 25-30 cm s -1 at depth), with flow eastward out of the estuary in the upper water column of the southern half and inward westward movement strengthening with depth over the central and north section. Application of volume conservation implies there is a strong eastward current out of the estuary in the shallowest 7 m where no measurements were made, as expected for estuarine exchange flow. Water from the Connecticut River, entering LIS on the north shore nearby to the west, does not appear to exit the estuary directly eastward along the north shore unless this occurs wholly in the shallow layer not sampled. Transverse currents have complex structure with generally northward (southward) flow where shallow outward (deep inward) motion occurs. An idealized semi-analytic solution for transverse-vertical structure of along- and across-estuary flow has limited success accounting for observed currents, despite inclusion of bathymetric, frictional, and rotational influences; this suggests the importance in LIS of dynamics it omits, in particular stratification, or does not represent with sufficient realism, such as complex bathymetry. Estimated annual-mean exchange volume transport, based on the better-sampled deep inward component, is 22,700±5000 m 3 s -1. This is comparable to previous estimates from some salt budget and hydrographic analyses, and implies advection contributes substantially to the total salt transport, contrary

  4. Structure and evolution of the eastern Gulf of Aden conjugate margins from seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acremont, Elia; Leroy, Sylvie; Beslier, Marie-Odile; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Fournier, Marc; Robin, Cécile; Maia, Marcia; Gente, Pascal

    2005-03-01

    The Gulf of Aden is a young and narrow oceanic basin formed in Oligo-Miocene time between the rifted margins of the Arabian and Somalian plates. Its mean orientation, N75°E, strikes obliquely (50°) to the N25°E opening direction. The western conjugate margins are masked by Oligo-Miocene lavas from the Afar Plume. This paper concerns the eastern margins, where the 19-35 Ma breakup structures are well exposed onshore and within the sediment-starved marine shelf. Those passive margins, about 200 km distant, are non-volcanic. Offshore, during the Encens-Sheba cruise we gathered swath bathymetry, single-channel seismic reflection, gravity and magnetism data, in order to compare the structure of the two conjugate margins and to reconstruct the evolution of the thinned continental crust from rifting to the onset of oceanic spreading. Between the Alula-Fartak and Socotra major fracture zones, two accommodation zones trending N25°E separate the margins into three N110°E-trending segments. The margins are asymmetric: offshore, the northern margin is narrower and steeper than the southern one. Including the onshore domain, the southern rifted margin is about twice the breadth of the northern one. We relate this asymmetry to inherited Jurassic/Cretaceous rifts. The rifting obliquity also influenced the syn-rift structural pattern responsible for the normal faults trending from N70°E to N110°E. The N110°E fault pattern could be explained by the decrease of the influence of rift obliquity towards the central rift, and/or by structural inheritance. The transition between the thinned continental crust and the oceanic crust is characterized by a 40 km wide zone. Our data suggest that its basement is made up of thinned continental crust along the southern margin and of thinned continental crust or exhumed mantle, more or less intruded by magmatic rocks, along the northern margin.

  5. Basement structural control on Cretaceous pull-apart basins of the central Eastern Egypt Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, K.; El Kazzaz, Y.; Holdsworth, B.

    2006-12-01

    The present-day Red Sea / Gulf of Suez rift system is attributed to extensional block faulting with along-axis segmentation into sub-basins with different dip polarities. The northwestern margin of the Red Sea - Gulf of Suez rift system is exposed for about 400 km along the northwestern Red Sea coast near Quseir to the tip of the Gulf of Suez at Suez City. This area contains elements of the pre-Red Sea structural pattern which has been viewed in similar terms as one of fault-related basin formation. Four distinct depocenters (sub-basins) separated by complex accommodation zones are present containing 500-700m thick section ranging in age from the Late Cretaceous to the Middle Eocene. Each sub-basin is asymmetric, bounded on one side by a major NW-trending border fault system with large throws (3-6 km in general) with a dominant strata dip direction toward the border fault system. These basins are arranged in en echelon patterns and now form separate elongated ridges surrounded by basement rocks. Our study of the tectonic evolution of the central eastern section of the Gulf of Suez rift and the Northwestern Red Sea has focused on the interaction of pre-existing basement fabrics with the pre-Red Sea structural development. The study involved analysis of LandsatTM images and aerial photographs integrated with results from reconnaissance geological mapping. Our provisional results indicate that the Gebel Um Hammad/Duwi and Hammadat sub-basins were sited in pull-apart structures created by dextral reactivation of E-W to ENE-WSW trending basement fault zones. We show how the basin-bounding fault systems, lower order normal faults and folds in both hangingwall sequences and in basement are compatible with a Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene strike-slip regime. In contrast, the main Red Sea Gulf of Suez rift shows no evidence for strike-slip influence with the main boundary faults cutting across basement fabrics, however, as pointed out by previous authors, rift segmentation

  6. Functional group biodiversity in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystems questions the wasp-waist trophic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fréon, Pierre; Arístegui, Javier; Bertrand, Arnaud; Crawford, Robert J. M.; Field, John C.; Gibbons, Mark J.; Tam, Jorge; Hutchings, Larry; Masski, Hicham; Mullon, Christian; Ramdani, Mohamed; Seret, Bernard; Simier, Monique

    2009-12-01

    The species diversity of the four major Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystems (EBUEs) is studied and compared with the aim of better understanding their functioning. Functional groups (FGs) of organisms were defined according to their taxonomy, body size and trophic level (TL), and span from plankton to top predators. Four large sub-divisions are defined in each system: two latitudinal sub-divisions (north and south) and two zonal sub-divisions (inshore and offshore), resulting in four sub-ecosystems per EBUE. A semi-quantitative approach is used in which only the dominant species (contributing 90% of overall biomass) are considered. EBUEs are compared in regard to their species composition, dominant species richness and evenness within FGs. The data are interpreted, focusing on latitudinal, zonal and depth gradients of diversity. Trophic flows (inflow and outflow) through the small pelagic fish FG are derived from different Ecopath models. This analysis of the four ecosystems and their sub-divisions does not provide support for the expected wasp-waist food web structure and functioning, with a single or several species of small pelagic fish primarily channelling the energy flow from lower to higher TL. Instead, similar low levels of richness were observed in many FGs of intermediate TL, allowing several energy transfer pathways. The gamma diversity is high due to the geographical distance between EBUEs and the presence or absence of rivers, but not to differences in their latitudinal position. The beta diversity is also high, due to the same factors plus the variation in shelf width and the contrast between inshore and offshore sub-divisions. The differences in richness and evenness among EBUEs are minor and do not explain the higher secondary and tertiary productivity of the Humboldt ecosystem.

  7. Population and Demographic Structure of Ixodes scapularis Say in the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Joyce M.; Goddard, Jerome; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The most significant vector of tick-borne pathogens in the United States is Ixodes scapularis Say (the blacklegged tick). Previous studies have identified significant genetic, behavioral and morphological differences between northern vs. southern populations of this tick. Because tick-borne pathogens are dependent on their vectors for transmission, a baseline understanding of the vector population structure is crucial to determining the risks and epidemiology of pathogen transmission. Methods We investigated population genetic variation of I. scapularis populations in the eastern United States using a multilocus approach. We sequenced and analyzed the mitochondrial COI and 16S genes and three nuclear genes (serpin2, ixoderin B and lysozyme) from wild specimens. Results We identified a deep divergence (3–7%) in I. scapularis COI gene sequences from some southern specimens, suggesting we had sampled a different Ixodes species. Analysis of mitochondrial 16S rRNA sequences did not support this hypothesis and indicated that all specimens were I. scapularis. Phylogenetic analysis and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) supported significant differences between northern vs. southern populations. Demographic analysis suggested that northern populations had experienced a bottleneck/expansion event sometime in the past, possibly associated with Pleistocene glaciation events. Conclusions Similar to other studies, our data support the division of northern vs. southern I. scapularis genetic lineages, likely due to differences in the demographic histories between these geographic regions. The deep divergence identified in some COI gene sequences highlights a potential hazard of relying solely on COI for species identification (“barcoding”) and population genetics in this important vector arthropod. PMID:25025532

  8. Orogenic structure of the Eastern Alps, Europe, from TRANSALP deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüschen, Ewald; Lammerer, Bernd; Gebrande, Helmut; Millahn, Karl; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Transalp Working Group

    2004-09-01

    The TRANSALP Group, comprising of partner institutions from Italy, Austria and Germany, acquired data on a 340 km long deep seismic reflection line crossing the Eastern Alps between Munich and Venice. Although the field work was split into four campaigns, between fall 1998 and summer 2001, the project gathered for the first time a continuous profile across the Alps using consistent field acquisition and data processing parameters. These sections span the orogen itself, at its broadest width, as well as the editor Fred Davey and the two adjacent basins. Vibroseis and explosion data, complementary in their depth penetration and resolution characteristics, were obtained along with wide-angle and teleseismic data. The profile shows a bi-vergent asymmetric structure of the crust beneath the Alpine axis which reaches a maximum thickness of 55 km, and 80-100 km long transcrustal ramps, the southward dipping 'Sub-Tauern-Ramp' and the northward-dipping 'Sub-Dolomites-Ramp'. Strongly reflective patterns of these ramps can be traced towards the north to the Inn Valley and towards the south to the Valsugana thrust belt, both of which show enhanced seismicity in the brittle upper crust. The seismic sections do not reveal any direct evidence for the presence of the Periadriatic Fault system, the presumed equivalent to the Insubric Line in the Western Alps. According to our new evolutionary model, the Sub-Tauern-Ramp is linked at depth with remnants of the subducted Penninic Ocean. The 'crocodile'-type model describes an upper/lower crustal decoupling and wedging of both the European and the Adriatic-African continents.

  9. Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Janice Gillespie

    2004-11-01

    Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top of the stratigraphic section even though the measured fault displacement is greatest in this zone. Bacterial gas is not present in the west in the deeper LSOZ which

  10. Geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap was postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde County, and its existence was based on a series of numerical simulations of groundwater flow in the aquifer. To better understand the function of the area known as the Knippa Gap as it pertains to its geology and structure, the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the area were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Fort Worth District. The principal structural feature in the San Antonio area is the Balcones Fault Zone, which is the result of Miocene age faulting. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone and extends westward and below land surface from Seco Creek. Groundwater flow paths in the Edwards aquifer are influenced by faulting and geologic structure. Some faults act as barriers to groundwater flow paths where the aquifer is offset by 50 percent or more and result in flow moving parallel to the fault. The effectiveness of a fault as a barrier to flow changes as the amount of fault displacement changes. The structurally complex area of the Balcones Fault Zone contains relay ramps, which form in extensional fault systems to allow for deformation changes along the fault block. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone. Groundwater moving down the relay ramp in northern Medina County flows downgradient (downdip) to the structural low (trough) from the northeast to the southwest. In Uvalde County, the beds dip from a structural high known as the Uvalde Salient. This results in groundwater moving from the structural high and downgradient (dip

  11. Acetylation and characterization of spruce (Picea abies) galactoglucomannans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunlin; Leppänen, Ann-Sofie; Eklund, Patrik; Holmlund, Peter; Sjöholm, Rainer; Sundberg, Kenneth; Willför, Stefan

    2010-04-19

    Acetylated galactoglucomannans (GGMs) are the main hemicellulose type in most softwood species and can be utilized as, for example, bioactive polymers, hydrocolloids, papermaking chemicals, or coating polymers. Acetylation of spruce GGM using acetic anhydride with pyridine as catalyst under different conditions was conducted to obtain different degrees of acetylation on a laboratory scale, whereas, as a classic method, it can be potentially transferred to the industrial scale. The effects of the amount of catalyst and acetic anhydride, reaction time, temperature and pretreatment by acetic acid were investigated. A fully acetylated product was obtained by refluxing GGM for two hours. The structures of the acetylated GGMs were determined by SEC-MALLS/RI, (1)H and (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. NMR studies also indicated migration of acetyl groups from O-2 or O-3 to O-6 after a heating treatment in a water bath. The thermal stability of the products was investigated by DSC-TGA. PMID:20144827

  12. Geology of the Plumtree area, Spruce Pine district, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brobst, Donald Albert

    1953-01-01

    This report describes the results of study and geologic mapping (1:12,000) in the 70-square-mile Plumtree area in the northeastern part of the Spruce Pine pegmatite district, on the Blue Ridge upland in western North Carolina. The district has been the chief domestic source of feldspar and sheet mica. The mining belt just west of the Blue Ridge Front trends northeast and is 25 miles long and 10 miles wide. The center of the Plumtree area lies 10 miles northeast of Spruce Pine pegmatite district, on the Blue Ridge upland in western North Carolina. The district has been the chief domestic source of feldspar and sheet mica. The mining belt just west of the Blue Ridge Front trends northeast and is 25 miles long and 10 miles wide. The center of the Plumtree area lies 10 miles northeast of Spruce Pine and includes parts of Mitchell and Avery Counties shown on the portions of the 7.5-minute Spruce Pine, Linville Falls, Newland, North Carolina, and Carvers Gap, North Carolina and Tennessee quadrangle. The topography varies from rugged mountains to rounded or flat topped hills near the entrenched, meandering master streams. Old erosion surfaces are approximately 600,1,100, 1,500, and 2,500 feet above the present master stream level. The area is in late youth or early maturity after rejuvenation.. The regionally metamorphosed rocks of the amophibolite facies form three mappable units: mica gneiss, mica schist, and hornblende rock. These rocks, perhaps of Precambrian age, are intimately interlayered with thicknesses of the individual layers ranging from less than one inch to several tons of feet. Field relationships and chemical data suggest that the mica (Carolina-type) rocks were derived from sandstones, graywackes, and shales and that the hornblende-rich (Roan-type) layers were derived from impure carbonate rocks. The igneous rocks include alaskite and associated pegmatite of early Paleozoic age (?), dunite and associated soapstone of a prepegmatite age, and a few diabasic

  13. SPRUCE Discovery Manual, 169 Investigations Indoors and Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    Contained are instructional materials developed by the Science Project Related to Upgrading Conservation Education ("SPRUCE"). It is designed for use with the SPRUCE "Discovery Box" and contains twenty-one sets of investigations based on the twenty-one packets of specimens in the box; three sets are recommended for each of Grades K through 6. Each…

  14. Deep resistivity structure along the Longmen Mountain fault zone in the eastern Tibetan plateau of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhang, G.; Luo, W.; Luo, H.; Cai, X.; Zhou, Y.; Zhang, W.; Qin, Q.

    2012-12-01

    1.Introduction Many researchers (e.g.,Wang et al.,2009) have proposed the relevant knowledge of tectonic evolution and dynamic characteristics of the Longmen Mountain belt as well as the Songpan-Ganzi and Yangtze blocks in the past few decades, the knowledge of shallow thrust nappe tectonic along the belt has then been generally recognized. It's, however, still difficult to image the deep crust and mantle structures and reveal the dynamic mechanism of the crustal formation under the Longmen Mountain. In this study, we carried out the MT experiments along and across the Longmen mountain region and investigated the relationships between the crust structure and seismic activity basing on the latest MT geological results. 2. Field observations We conducted three MT experiment profiles in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. One is along the Mingshan-Guangyuan profile parallel with the structural direction, and another two profiles (Maqu-Gaoliangzhen and Luqu-Hechuan) perpendicular to the Longmen Mountain fault zone. In this study, we use the conventional magnetotelluric (MT) data combine with the long-period magnetotelluric (LMT) data to observe electromagnetic response. The MT and LMT data was observed by using the V8 instrument and LEMI-417, respectively. 3. Conclusion (1) According to the results of MT inversion, we find that the high concentration of stress process along the Songpan-Ganzi block and the Yangtze block colliding zone might result from the deep crust-mantle tough shear Zone of Longmen Mountain expanded to mid-upper crust, and finally leads to a new rupture. This could be one of the focal mechanisms of the Wenchuan earthquake (Ms 8.0) generating. The deep resistivity structure along the Longmen Mountain fault zone can be divided into southern,middle and northern segments from southwest to northeast. The total resistivity of southern segment is lower than the middle and northern portions. We suggest that the upper crust of the Longmen Mountain, south of Dayi

  15. Black carbon characterization in Quebec black spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Quideau, Sylvie; Wasylishen, Roderick; MacKenzie, M. Derek

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC), an important component of the global soil carbon pool, is a major by-product of wildfires in Quebec black spruce forests. However, BC characteristics vary depending on the environmental conditions under which it is formed and this may further affect its resistance to degradation. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and physical properties of BC formed under variable fire severity to assess its potential for recalcitrance as a passive carbon pool. Samples (n = 267) of BC produced by early season wildfires in 2005-2007 were collected from the surface of black spruce forest floors to cover the range of severity encountered in these fire-affected forests. Representative samples (n = 33) were then analyzed using elemental analysis, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and surface area analysis (BET method). Properties of BC sampled in the field were compared with those of samples produced under a range of controlled formation conditions in the laboratory. The NMR spectra of the BC collected on sites affected by low fire severity showed a distribution of total intensity between the different spectral regions very similar to those of unburned fuels, and were dominated by peaks indicative of cellulose, while spectra for BC from higher fire severity sites were dominated by a broad peak assigned to aromatic carbons. Atomic H/C and O/C ratios decreased along the fire severity gradient, confirming that increasing severity was associated with an increase in condensation. By comparing field- to laboratory-produced samples, we concluded that the temperature of formation in the field ranged between 75 and 250 ° C. In all analyzed BC samples, the fraction of aromatic carbon:total carbon was low, suggesting that the freshly produced BC in this boreal forest environment may be susceptible to rapid physical alteration and chemical degradation. Nevertheless, it is important to highlight

  16. Structures, microfabrics and textures of the Cordilleran-type Rechnitz metamorphic core complex, Eastern Alps☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Liu, Junlai; Genser, Johann

    2013-01-01

    Rechnitz window group represents a Cordilleran-style metamorphic core complex, which is almost entirely located within nearly contemporaneous Neogene sediments at the transition zone between the Eastern Alps and the Neogene Pannonian basin. Two tectonic units are distinguished within the Rechnitz metamorphic core complex (RMCC): (1) a lower unit mainly composed of Mesozoic metasediments, and (2) an upper unit mainly composed of ophiolite remnants. Both units are metamorphosed within greenschist facies conditions during earliest Miocene followed by exhumation and cooling. The internal structure of the RMCC is characterized by the following succession of structure-forming events: (1) blueschist relics of Paleocene/Eocene age formed as a result of subduction (D1), (2) ductile nappe stacking (D2) of an ophiolite nappe over a distant passive margin succession (ca. E–W to WNW–ESE oriented stretching lineation), (3) greenschist facies-grade metamorphism annealing dominant in the lower unit, and (4) ductile low-angle normal faulting (D3) (with mainly NE–SW oriented stretching lineation), and (5) ca. E to NE-vergent folding (D4). The microfabrics are related to mostly ductile nappe stacking to ductile low-angle normal faulting. Paleopiezometry in conjunction with P–T estimates yield high strain rates of 10− 11 to 10− 13 s− 1, depending on the temperature (400–350 °C) and choice of piezometer and flow law calibration. Progressive microstructures and texture analysis indicate an overprint of the high-temperature fabrics (D2) by the low-temperature deformation (D3). Phengitic mica from the Paleocene/Eocene high-pressure metamorphism remained stable during D2 ductile deformation as well as preserved within late stages of final sub-greenschist facies shearing. Chlorite geothermometry yields two temperature groups, 376–328 °C, and 306–132 °C. Chlorite is seemingly accessible to late-stage resetting. The RMCC underwent an earlier large-scale coaxial

  17. Upper Mantle Discontinuity Structure Beneath the Western Atlantic Ocean and Eastern North America from SS Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerr, N. C.; Beghein, C.; Kostic, D.; Baldridge, A. M.; West, J. D.; Nittler, L. R.; Bull, A. L.; Montesi, L.; Byrne, P. K.; Hummer, D. R.; Plescia, J. B.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Lekic, V.; Schmidt, B. E.; Elkins, L. J.; Cooper, C. M.; ten Kate, I. L.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Parai, R.; Glass, J. B.; Ni, J.; Fuji, N.; McCubbin, F. M.; Michalski, J. R.; Zhao, C.; Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Koelemeijer, P.; Courtier, A. M.; Dalton, H.; Waszek, L.; Bahamonde, J.; Schmerr, B.; Gilpin, N.; Rosenshein, E.; Mach, K.; Ostrach, L. R.; Caracas, R.; Craddock, R. A.; Moore-Driskell, M. M.; Du Frane, W. L.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic discontinuities within the mantle arise from a wide range of mechanisms, including changes in mineralogy, major element composition, melt content, volatile abundance, anisotropy, or a combination of the above. In particular, the depth and sharpness of upper mantle discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth are attributed to solid-state phase changes sensitive to both mantle temperature and composition, where regions of thermal heterogeneity produce topography and chemical heterogeneity changes the impedance contrast across the discontinuity. Seismic mapping of this topography and sharpness thus provides constraint on the thermal and compositional state of the mantle. The EarthScope USArray is providing unprecedented access to a wide variety of new regions previously undersampled by the SS precursors. This includes the boundary between the oceanic plate in the western Atlantic Ocean and continental margin of eastern North America. Here we use a seismic array approach to image the depth, sharpness, and topography of the upper mantle discontinuities, as well as other possible upper mantle reflectors beneath this region. This array approach utilizes seismic waves that reflect off the underside of a mantle discontinuity and arrive several hundred seconds prior to the SS seismic phase as precursory energy. In this study, we collected high-quality broadband data SS precursors data from shallow focus (< 30 km deep), mid-Atlantic ridge earthquakes recorded by USArray seismometers in Alaska. We generated 4th root vespagrams to enhance the SS precursors and determine how they sample the mantle. Our data show detection of localized structure on the discontinuity boundaries as well as additional horizons, such as the X-discontinuity and a potential reflection from a discontinuity near the depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. These structures are related to the transition from predominantly old ocean lithosphere to underlying continental lithosphere, as while

  18. Gravity verification of 3-D crustal structure (CRUST2) for the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M.

    2009-12-01

    CRUST2 - a global 3-D tomography model of the seismic velocity and density structure of the Earth's crust and uppermost mantle (Bassin, C., Laske, G. and Masters, G., The Current Limits of Resolution for Surface Wave Tomography in North America, EOS Trans AGU, 81, F897, 2000) is now public domain data set available from http:// mahi. ucsd.edu/ Gabi/rem.dir/crust/crust2.html.The data are extremely important for various purposes e. g. the seismic monitoring of nuclear explosions etc. Therefore the validity and quality of the CRUST2 should be verified by using the external data such as gravity observations. By extracting the data for the Eastern Mediterranean region (20-40 East and 26-40 North) the set of deep surfaces and densities maps for each layer (2 x 2 degree cell ~250*250km for study region) was compiled. It should be noted that the crust separation was made into three layers (upper, middle and lower crust) instead of usual separation for granite and basalt sub crust. The maps were compared with the existing structural compilations of Cornel University (Seber et al., 2001), Rybakov and Segev, 2004, Segev et al., 2006. The main subjects of comparison were the top of the crystalline basement and Moho surface. That shows the CRUST2.0 model is at a small enough scale to resolve significant lateral variations in crustal properties. Gravity effect of the CRUST2.0 model was calculated using 3-D forward modeling program from three rectangular grids which define the distribution of mass: the top surface (e. g. sea bottom), the bottom surface (e. g. base of soft sediments) and the density of the soft sediments. Calculated gravity was compared with observed gravity data and one can see good coincidence of the subglobal scale gravity pattern. There is no need to mention that regional scale anomalies can’t be seen in the calculated gravity. At whole the 3-D CRUST2 model provides uniform valuable data (e.g. mantle density etc), which can not be obtained by any other way

  19. Gravity field and structure of the Sorong Fault Zone, eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardjono

    Gravity surveys along coastlines of islands in the region Banggai-Sula, Eastern Sulawesi, Halmahera, Bacan and Obi were carried out as part of the Sorong Fault Zone Project. Results of the Surveys were integrated with gravity data previously acquired by other projects, including on-land gravity data from the Bird Head area Irian Jaya (Dow et al 1986), Seram Island (Milsom 1977), Buru Island (Oemar and Reminton 1993) and Central Sulawesi (Silver et al. 1983) as well as marine gravity information within and surrounding the Sorong Fault Zone (Bowin et al. 1980). Gravity expeditions of the Sorong Fault Zone Project also include measurements in Mayu Island and the island group of Talaud, situated further north in the Central Molucca Sea region. A total of one hundred and forty two gravity data were acquired in the region of Banggai-Sula islands, forty seven in eastern part of Central Sulawesi, about four hundred in Halmahera, Bacan and Obi, and seventy nine in Mayu and Talaud. Surveys in the eastern part of Central Sulawesi were carried out for the purpose of tieing the older gravity data obtained from Silver et al. (1983) and the more recent data of the Sorong Fault Zone Project. About one thousand thirty hundred and thirty gravity data were acquired as part of the Irian Jaya Geological Mapping Project (IJGMP) in the period of 1978-1983, a project commissioned by the Indonesian Geological Research and Development Centre (GRDC) and the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR). The remoteness of the survey areas of the Sorong Fault Zone Project necessitated a careful planning for travel arrangements and provision of logistics. A wide range of magnitude of gravity field was observed in the Sorong Fault Zone, extending from values below -250 mGal recorded in the southern part of the Molucca Sea to values in excess of +320 mGal measured near to sea level in the coastal areas south of Mangole and north of Sulabesi, the two islands of the Sula Group. Steep gradients of

  20. The Structural Disempowerment of Eastern European Migrant Farm Workers in Norwegian Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, Johan Fredrik; Andrzejewska, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Since the 2004 EU enlargement established one European common labour market, a large number of Eastern Europeans have taken up seasonal employment as hired farm workers in Norwegian agriculture. Much attention in the public has been given to the potential for "social dumping" of these migrating workers, as they are considered prone to exploitation…

  1. Structural Dimensions of Roma School Desegregation Policies in Central and Eastern Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostas, Iulius; Kostka, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Scrutiny of the socio-economic exclusion of the Roma in Central and Eastern Europe has brought attention to the widespread practice of school segregation of Romani children who are automatically placed in classes for the mentally disabled or shunted into separate and inferior schools and classrooms. It is now widely recognised that such practices…

  2. Analyses of Great Smoky Mountain red spruce tree-ring data. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Deusen, P.C.

    1988-05-01

    Contents include: Southern Appalachian Red Spruce--Fraser Fir Forests; A tree ring analysis of Red Spruce in the Southern Appalachian Mountains; Utilizing time series models and spatial analysis of forecast residuals for tree-ring analysis of Red Spruce; A fractal approach to analysis of tree-ring increments; Red Spruce Tree Ring Analysis using a Kalman Filter.

  3. Kinematics, crustal structure and seismotectonics of the subducting northernmost Luzon arc in eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jian-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Yu; Chen, Rou-Fei; Chen, Yue-Gau; Chen, Horng-Yue

    2015-04-01

    The Coastal Range in eastern Taiwan belongs to the northernmost Luzon arc system, which sits on the western edge of the NW-moving Philippine Sea plates (PSP). As the PSP subducting and colliding with the Eurasian continental margin in Taiwan, the northern part of the Coastal Range provides a crucial key for better understand the geological structures and processes at tectonic transition from collision to subduction at plate corner. In this study, we conducted a dense network of GPS measurements at the northern tip of the Coastal Range and compiled available geological and geophysical information, including surface geomorphic features, geological structures, seismological data, seismic tomography, in order to provide insights on kinematics, crustal structure and seismotectonics of the transition from waning collision to subduction of the northern Luzon arc system and its vicinity. Regional short-term geodetic data, including GPS and levelling, and long-term thousand-year scale geological vertical rates indicate that the Coastal Range is going down toward the north, which we interpret it as being pulling down by the north- subduction PSP. Combing with the local GPS measurements carried out at the northern tip of the Longitudinal Valley, the plate suture, which shows a significant clockwise rotation at a rate of 33° M/yr, we interpret the tectonic escape of the northernmost Longitudinal Valley as being initiated locally by the northwest indentation of the Coastal Range, which pushed the northern Longitudinal Valley to move upward and eastward to form a 2-km-wide, 8-km-long, 100-m-high Milun Tableland. No significant deformation was observed across the surface trace of the major active Milun fault on the western side of the tableland, which has been ruptured during the 1951 M=7.1 Hualien earthquake, indicating that the Milun fault is now probably locked in the near surface. As for the crustal structure, we anticipate that there exists a fore-arc basement of the Luzon

  4. Low temperature thermochronology in the Eastern Alps: Implications for structural and topographic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wölfler, Andreas; Stüwe, Kurt; Danišík, Martin; Evans, Noreen J.

    2012-01-01

    According to new apatite fission track, zircon- and apatite (U–Th)/He data, we constrain the near-surface history of the southeastern Tauern Window and adjacent Austrolapine units. The multi-system thermochronological data demonstrate that age-elevation correlations may lead to false implications about exhumation and cooling in the upper crust. We suggest that isothermal warping in the Penninic units that are in the position of a footwall, is due to uplift, erosion and the buildup of topography. Additionally we propose that exhumation rates in the Penninic units did not increase during the Middle Miocene, thus during the time of lateral extrusion. In contrast, exhumation rates of the Austroalpine hangingwall did increase from the Paleogene to the Neogene and the isotherms in this unit were not warped. The new zircon (U–Th)/He ages as well as zircon fission track ages from the literature document a Middle Miocene exhumation pulse which correlates with a period of enhanced sediment accumulation during that time. However, enhanced sedimentation- and exhumation rates at the Miocene/Pliocene boundary, as observed in the Western- and Central Alps, cannot be observed in the Eastern Alps. This contradicts a climatic trigger for surface uplift, and makes a tectonic trigger and/or deep-seated mechanism more obvious to explain surface uplift in the Eastern Alps. In combination with already published geochronological ages, our new data demonstrate Oligocene to Late Miocene fault activity along the Möll valley fault that constitutes a major shear zone in the Eastern Alps. In this context we suggest a geometrical and temporal relationship of the Katschberg-, Polinik–Möll valley- and Mur–Mürz faults that define the extruding wedge in the eastern part of the Eastern Alps. Equal deformation- and fission track cooling ages along the Katschberg–Brenner- and Simplon normal faults demonstrate overall Middle Miocene extension in the whole alpine arc. PMID:27065501

  5. Genetic population structure of spotted seatrout Cynoscion nebulosus along the south-eastern U.S.A.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, T P; Denson, M R; Darden, T L

    2014-08-01

    Analyses of the genetic population structure of spotted seatrout Cynoscion nebulosus along the south-eastern U.S. coast using 13 microsatellites suggest significant population differentiation between fish in North Carolina (NC) compared with South Carolina (SC) and Georgia (GA), with New River, NC, serving as an area of integration between northern and southern C. nebulosus. Although there is a significant break in gene flow between these areas, the overall pattern throughout the sampling range represents a gradient in genetic diversification with the degree of geographic separation. Latitudinal distance and estuarine density appear to be main drivers in the genetic differentiation of C. nebulosus along the south-eastern U.S. coast. The isolation-by-distance gene-flow pattern creates fine-scale differences in the genetic composition of proximal estuaries and dictates that stocking must be confined to within 100 km of the location of broodstock collection in order to maintain the natural gradient of genetic variation along the south-eastern U.S. coast. PMID:24890601

  6. Total OH reactivity emissions from Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, Anke; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Forest emissions represent a strong potential sink for the main tropospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). In forested environments, the comparison of the directly determined overall sink of OH radicals, the total OH reactivity, and the individually measured OH sink compounds often exposes a significant gap. This "missing" OH reactivity can be high and influenced by both direct biogenic emissions and secondary photo-oxidation products. To investigate the source of the missing OH sinks in forests, total OH reactivity emission rates were determined for the first time from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) throughout spring, summer and autumn 2011. The total OH reactivity was measured inside a branch enclosure using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) as the detector. In parallel, separate volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission rates were monitored by a second PTR-MS, including the signal of isoprene, acetaldehyde, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes. The comparison of known and PTR-MS detected OH sink compounds and the directly measured total OH reactivity emitted from Norway spruce revealed unmeasured and possibly unknown primary biogenic emissions. These were found to be highest in late summer during daytime coincident with highest temperatures and ozone levels.

  7. Crustal S-wave structure beneath Eastern Black Sea Region revealed by Rayleigh-wave group velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Hakan; Alkan, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the crustal S-wave structure beneath the Eastern Black Sea Region (including the Eastern Black Sea Basin (EBSB) and Eastern Pontides (EP)) has been revealed using inversion of single-station, fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group velocities in the period range of 4-40 seconds. We used digital broadband recordings of 13 regional earthquakes that recently occurred in the easternmost EBSB recorded at stations of the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI). The average group-velocity-dispersion curves were generated from 26 paths for the EBSB, and 16 paths for the EP, and they were inverted to determine the average 1-D shear-wave structure of the region. We have created a pseudo-section, roughly depicting the crustal structure of the region based on the group velocity inversion results of all station-earthquake paths. The thickness of the sedimentary layer reaches 12 km in the center of EBSB (Vs = 2.5-3.1 km/s) and decreases 4 km in the EP. There is a thin sedimentary layer in the EP (Vs = 2.7 km/s). A consolidated thin crust that exists in the EBSB possesses a high seismic velocity (Vs = 3.8 km/s). While a thin (∼26 km) and transitional crust exists beneath the EBSB, a thick (about 42 km) continental crust exists beneath the EP where the Conrad is clearly seen at about a 24 km depth. Thick continental crust in the EP region is clearly distinguished from a gradational velocity change (Vs = 3.4-3.8 km/s). The Moho dips approximately southwards, and the Vs velocity (4.25-4.15 km/s) beneath the Moho discontinuity decreases from the EBSB to the EP in the N-S direction. This may be an indication of a southward subduction.

  8. Structural coloration signals condition, parental investment, and circulating hormone levels in Eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis).

    PubMed

    Grindstaff, Jennifer L; Lovern, Matthew B; Burtka, Jennifer L; Hallmark-Sharber, Alesia

    2012-08-01

    Many of the brilliant plumage coloration displays of birds function as signals to conspecifics. One species in which the function of plumage ornaments has been assessed is the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis). Studies of a population breeding in Alabama (USA) have established that plumage ornaments signal quality, parental investment, and competitive ability in both sexes. Here we tested the additional hypotheses that (1) Eastern bluebird plumage ornamentation signals nest defense behavior in heterospecific competitive interactions and (2) individual variation in plumage ornamentation reflects underlying differences in circulating hormone levels. We also tested the potential for plumage ornaments to signal individual quality and parental investment in a population breeding in Oklahoma (USA). We found that Eastern bluebirds with more ornamented plumage are in better condition, initiate breeding earlier in the season, produce larger clutches, have higher circulating levels of the stress hormone corticosterone, and more ornamented males have lower circulating androgen levels. Plumage coloration was not related to nest defense behavior. Thus, plumage ornamentation may be used by both sexes to assess the physiological condition and parental investment of prospective mates. Experimental manipulations of circulating hormone levels during molt are needed to define the role of hormones in plumage ornamentation. PMID:22622467

  9. Skate assemblage on the eastern Patagonian Shelf and Slope: structure, diversity and abundance.

    PubMed

    Arkhipkin, A; Brickle, P; Laptikhovsky, V; Pompert, J; Winter, A

    2012-04-01

    The eastern Patagonian Shelf and continental slope of the south-west Atlantic Ocean support a high biodiversity and abundance of skates. In this study, meso-scale differences in the assemblages, spatial and seasonal distributions of skates are revealed among six habitat zones of the eastern Patagonian Shelf characterized by distinctive oceanographic conditions. Most skates belonged to temperate fauna, and their abundance was much greater in habitats occupied by temperate waters (north-western outer shelf) or mixed waters (northern slope) than in habitats occupied by sub-Antarctic waters (SASW) (south-eastern outer shelf and southern slope). Sub-Antarctic skates were not abundant on the shelf even in habitats occupied by SASW, occurring mainly in deep areas of the lower continental slope. The majority of temperate skates migrated seasonally, shifting northward in winter and spreading southward with warming waters in summer. Most temperate species had two peaks in female maturity (mainly spring and autumn) and spawned in the same habitats where they fed. It is hypothesized that the high biodiversity and abundance of skates on the Patagonian Shelf and Slope are due to the practical absence of their natural competitors, flatfishes, which occupy similar eco-niches elsewhere. PMID:22497404

  10. Status of the spruce; Fir cooperative research program

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, G.D.; Zarnoch, S.J.; Arre, T. ); Eager, C. ); Mohnen, V. ); MedLarz, S. )

    1987-01-01

    Aside from the mixed conifer forest in the San Bernadino National Forest near the Los Angeles Basin, the only significant visible decline and mortality of a U.S. forest possibly caused by regional air pollution is found in the high elevation spruce/fir forests of the Appalachians (VA, NC, TN, W VA), Adirondacks (NY), Green Mountains (VT), and the White Mountains (NH). In January, most of the scientists that have or are currently studying Spruce-Fir conditions met in Philadelphia. They came to a consensus on the regional condition of the Spruce-Fir forests. The results of that meeting are summarized.

  11. The genetic structure of wild Orobanche cumana Wallr. (Orobanchaceae) populations in eastern Bulgaria reflects introgressions from weedy populations.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Martos, Rocío; Pujadas-Salvà, Antonio J; Fernández-Martínez, José M; Stoyanov, Kiril; Velasco, Leonardo; Pérez-Vich, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    Orobanche cumana is a holoparasitic plant naturally distributed from central Asia to south-eastern Europe, where it parasitizes wild Asteraceae species. It is also an important parasitic weed of sunflower crops. The objective of this research was to investigate genetic diversity, population structure, and virulence on sunflower of O. cumana populations parasitizing wild plants in eastern Bulgaria. Fresh tissue of eight O. cumana populations and mature seeds of four of them were collected in situ on wild hosts. Genetic diversity and population structure were studied with SSR markers and compared to weedy populations. Two main gene pools were identified in Bulgarian populations, with most of the populations having intermediate characteristics. Cross-inoculation experiments revealed that O. cumana populations collected on wild species possessed similar ability to parasitize sunflower to those collected on sunflower. The results were explained on the basis of an effective genetic exchange between populations parasitizing sunflower crops and those parasitizing wild species. The occurrence of bidirectional gene flow may have an impact on wild populations, as new physiological races continuously emerge in weedy populations. Also, genetic variability of wild populations may favour the ability of weedy populations to overcome sunflower resistance mechanisms. PMID:25143963

  12. STRUCTURAL AND HYDROGEOLOGIC APPLICATIONS OF REMOTE SENSING DATA, EASTERN YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, C. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Landsat and Seasat satellite images and aerial photographs of eastern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, were analyzed to delineate geologic controls of ground water. Significant interpretation results include the delineation of linear topographic swales, interpreted as fractures, extending more than 50 km along strike from the previously known limit of the Holbox fracture system; the alignment of sink holes (cenotes) and inlets (caletas) on strike with existing faults and fracture systems; and the identification of tonal anomalies in Ingles Lagoon suggesting fresh-water discharge from a submarine spring.

  13. 42. VIEW OF THE DUDLEY STREET ENTRANCE, SPRUCE POLE FENCE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. VIEW OF THE DUDLEY STREET ENTRANCE, SPRUCE POLE FENCE, AND HISTORIC PARKING AREA WITH STORAGE SHED IN CENTER BACKGROUND. (NOTE: NEW CONCRETE SIDEWALK ALONG DUDLEY STREET IN RIGHT FOREGROUND). - Fairsted, 99 Warren Street, Brookline, Norfolk County, MA

  14. 20. GROVE OF TREES PINES, MULBERRY, JUNIPER, BLUE SPRUCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. GROVE OF TREES -- PINES, MULBERRY, JUNIPER, BLUE SPRUCE -- TRANSPLANTED FROM NEW MEXICO MANZANO MOUNTAINS, WEST OF BUILDINGS 4 AND T-59, LOOKING NORTHWEST - U. S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, 2100 Ridgecrest Southeast, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, NM

  15. 3. View from northeast corner, Canisteo and Spruce Streets. Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View from northeast corner, Canisteo and Spruce Streets. Photo shows the garage area (Building #5) with sawtooth roofline and front elevation of Buildings #6 and #1. - Merrill Silk Mill, 233 Canisteo Street, Hornell, Steuben County, NY

  16. FT Raman spectroscopy of Norway spruce needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejka, P.; Pleserova, L.; Budinova, G.; Havirova, K.; Nahlik, J.; Skacel, F.; Volka, Karel

    2001-02-01

    12 Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] needles represent a very useful bioindicator of the air pollution. They serve not only as natural samplers of the pollutants but micromorphology of the epistomatal area can be directly correlated with an environmental stress. The needles of trees growing in polluted areas exhibit different types of injury to the epicuticular wax layer. It is evident that these changes of the morphology of the wax layers are connected also with the changes of their chemical composition and so a potential of the FT Raman spectroscopy was tested to serve as a screening method of these changes. In this work variability of the spectra with the age and with the position in the tree, in the locality, and also in the different localities of the Czech Republic was studied and evaluated in comparison with results of electron scanning microscopy.

  17. Pulpability of beetle-killed spruce. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, G.M.; Bormett, D.W.; Sutherland, N.R.; Abubakr, S.; Lowell, E.

    1996-08-01

    Infestation of the Dendroctonus rufipennis beetle has resulted in large stands of dead and dying timber on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. Tests were conducted to evaluate the value of beetle-killed spruce as pulpwood. The results showed that live and dead spruce wood can be pulped effectively. The two least deteriorated classes and the most deteriorated class of logs had similar characteristics when pulped; the remaining class had somewhat poorer pulpability.

  18. The structure and evolution of seasonal wind anomalies over the near-equatorial eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutzler, David S.; Harrison, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The longitude-height-time structure and evolution of near-equatorial wind variability over the eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans are studied using data obtained from a network of eight radiosonde stations extending from southern India to the central Pacific Ocean. The seasonal zonal wind anomalies observed at the cross section beween Trivandrum and Majuro stations are analyzed using an empirical orthogonal function. The Walker Circulation fluctuations are described in terms of standing oscillations in the longitude-height plane, and it is determined that Southern Oscillation propagation anomaly best represents the wind fluctuations. A complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) analysis and an El Nino compositing methodology are applied to the seasonal zonal wind anomalies. It is determined that the composite El Nino anomalies correspond to the spatial structure and temporal evolution of anomalies implied by the CEOF analysis.

  19. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms and population structure of Enterobacter cloacae non-susceptible to Ertapenem in North-Eastern France

    PubMed Central

    Guillard, Thomas; Cholley, Pascal; Limelette, Anne; Hocquet, Didier; Matton, Lucie; Guyeux, Christophe; Lebreil, Anne-Laure; Bajolet, Odile; Brasme, Lucien; Madoux, Janick; Vernet-Garnier, Véronique; Barbe, Coralie; Bertrand, Xavier; de Champs on behalf of CarbaFrEst Group, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) agents are a potential resort to treat infection due to Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamase and susceptible to FQ. In a context of increase of non-susceptibility to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae, we characterized FQ resistance mechanisms in 75 Enterobacter cloacae isolates non-susceptible to ertapenem in North-Eastern France in 2012 and describe the population structure by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Among them, 14.7% (12/75) carried a carbapenemase-encoding gene. Except one isolate producing VIM-1, the carbapenemase-producing isolates carried the well-known IncL/M pOXA48a plasmid. Most of the isolates (59/75) harbored at least a FQ-R determinant. qnr genes were predominant (40%, 30/75). The MLST study revealed that E. cloacae isolates’ clonality was wide [24 different sequence types (STs)]. The more widespread STs were ST74, ST101, ST110, ST114, and ST133. Carbapenem MICs were higher for E. cloacae ST74 than for other E. cloacae isolates. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants were more often observed in E. cloacae ST74 isolates. These findings showed that (i) pOXA-48a is spreading in North-Eastern France, (ii) qnr is preponderant in E. cloacae, (iii) E. cloacae comprised a large amount of lineages spreading in North-Eastern France, and (iv) FQ as an alternative to β-lactams to treat ertapenem non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae are compromised. PMID:26557115

  20. Relationship between the regional tectonic activity and crustal structure in the eastern Tibetan plateau discovered by gravity anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao; Gao, Rui; Guo, Xiaoyu

    2016-04-01

    The eastern Tibetan plateau has been getting more and more attention because it combines active faults, uplifting, and large earthquakes together in a high-population region. Based on the previous researches, the most of Cenozoic tectonic activities were related to the regional structure of the local blocks within the crustal scale. Thus, a better understanding of the crustal structure of the regional tectonic blocks is an important topic for further study. In this paper, we combined the simple Bouguer gravity anomaly with the Moho depths from previous studies to investigate the crustal structure in this area. To highlight the crustal structures, the gravity anomaly caused by the Moho relief has been reduced by forward modeling calculations. A total horizontal derivative (THD) had been applied on the gravity residuals. The results indicated that the crustal gravity residual is compatible with the topography and the geological settings of the regional blocks, including the Sichuan basin, the Chuxiong basin, the Xiaojiang fault, and the Jinhe fault, as well as the Longmenshan fault zone. The THD emphasized the west margin of Yangtze block, i.e., the Longriba fault zone and the Xiaojiang fault cut through the Yangtze block. The checkboard pattern of the gravity residual in the Songpan-Garze fold belt and Chuandian fragment shows that the crust is undergoing a southward and SE-directed extrusion, which is coincident with the flowing direction indicated from the GPS measurements. By integrating the interpretations, the stepwise extensional mechanism of the eastern Tibetan plateau is supported by the southeastward crustal deformation, and the extrusion of Chuandian fragment is achieved by Xianshuihe fault.

  1. Labeling Feral Spruce Budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Populations With Rubidium.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Wayne; Eveleigh, Eldon; Silk, Peter; Forbes, Glen

    2016-04-01

    Rubidium (Rb) is a trace element that occurs naturally in low concentrations and is easily absorbed by plants, making it a useful tool for labeling insect defoliators, such as spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens). Balsam fir trees (Abies balsamea (L.) Miller) injected with either 8 or 16 g per tree of rubidium chloride (RbCl) showed quick uptake and distribution throughout the crown, with no negative effects on tree shoot growth or spruce budworm survival and development. Adult spruce budworm that fed as larvae on trees injected with RbCl were clearly labeled, with significantly higher Rb concentrations than the background levels found in adults that fed as larvae on control trees. Rb concentrations in feral spruce budworm adults for both the 8 g (9 µg/g) and 16 g (25 µg/g) per tree treatments were at least five times lower than those in laboratory-reared adults on 1,000 µg/g RbCl diet (125 µg/g); survival, development, pupal weight, sex ratio, and mating status of spruce budworm were not adversely affected by Rb treatment. Egg masses laid by feral females that fed as larvae on Rb-labeled trees were also labeled with Rb. Injecting trees with RbCl is a viable technique for labeling feral spruce budworm populations to help distinguish local populations from immigrants to better evaluate the success of early intervention strategies such as mating disruption. PMID:26920559

  2. Negative impacts of high temperatures on growth of black spruce forests intensify with the anticipated climate warming.

    PubMed

    Girardin, Martin P; Hogg, Edward H; Bernier, Pierre Y; Kurz, Werner A; Guo, Xiao Jing; Cyr, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    An increasing number of studies conclude that water limitations and heat stress may hinder the capacity of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) trees, a dominant species of Canada's boreal forests, to grow and assimilate atmospheric carbon. However, there is currently no scientific consensus on the future of these forests over the next century in the context of widespread climate warming. The large spatial extent of black spruce forests across the Canadian boreal forest and associated variability in climate, demography, and site conditions pose challenges for projecting future climate change responses. Here we provide an evaluation of the impacts of climate warming and drying, as well as increasing [CO2 ], on the aboveground productivity of black spruce forests across Canada south of 60°N for the period 1971 to 2100. We use a new extensive network of tree-ring data obtained from Canada's National Forest Inventory, spatially explicit simulations of net primary productivity (NPP) and its drivers, and multivariate statistical modeling. We found that soil water availability is a significant driver of black spruce interannual variability in productivity across broad areas of the western to eastern Canadian boreal forest. Interannual variability in productivity was also found to be driven by autotrophic respiration in the warmest regions. In most regions, the impacts of soil water availability and respiration on interannual variability in productivity occurred during the phase of carbohydrate accumulation the year preceding tree-ring formation. Results from projections suggest an increase in the importance of soil water availability and respiration as limiting factors on NPP over the next century due to warming, but this response may vary to the extent that other factors such as carbon dioxide fertilization, and respiration acclimation to high temperature, contribute to dampening these limitations. PMID:26507106

  3. Negative impacts of high temperatures on growth of black spruce forests intensify with the anticipated climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardin, M. P.; Hogg, T.; Kurz, W.; Bernier, P. Y.; Guo, X. J.; Cyr, G.

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of studies conclude that water limitations and heat stress may hinder the capacity of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) trees, a dominant species of Canada's boreal forests, to grow and assimilate atmospheric carbon. However, there is currently no scientific consensus on the future of these forests over the next century in the context of widespread climate warming. The large spatial extent of black spruce forests across the Canadian boreal forest and associated variability in climate, demography and site conditions pose challenges for projecting future climate change responses. Here we provide an evaluation of the impacts of climate warming and drying, as well as increasing [CO2], on the aboveground productivity of black spruce forests across Canada south of 60ºN for the period 1971 to 2100. We use a new extensive network of tree-ring data obtained from Canada's National Forest Inventory, spatially-explicit simulations of Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and its drivers, and multivariate statistical modelling. We found that soil water availability is a significant driver of black spruce inter-annual variability in productivity across broad areas of the western to eastern Canadian boreal forest. Inter-annual variability in productivity was also found to be driven by autotrophic respiration in the warmest regions. In most regions, the impacts of soil water availability and respiration on inter-annual variability in productivity occurred during the phase of carbohydrate accumulation the year preceding tree ring formation. Results from projections suggest an increase in the importance of soil water availability and respiration as limiting factors on NPP over the next century due to warming, but this response may vary to the extent that other factors such as carbon dioxide fertilization, and respiration acclimation to high temperature, contribute to dampening these limitations.

  4. A scaling approach of net ecosystem productivity over Alaskan black spruce forests, using the eddy covariance, BIOME-BGC, and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueyama, M.; Harazono, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We evaluated gross primary production (GPP), net ecosystem productivity (NPP), and autotrophic respiration over Alaska black spruce forests by combining a field-observed dataset and a newly developed satellite-based model. A three-year continuous dataset derived from the eddy covariance technique at a black spruce forest was used to link the MODIS products of NDVI and land surface temperature (LST) to the tower-based GPP. In order to determine NPP and autotrophic respiration (RES), BIOME-BGC was tuned and validated for Alaska black spruce forests. Using simulation results from a sensitivity analysis, ratios, NPP/GPP and RES/GPP, were determined as functions of LST, and then applied to calculate NPP and RES. The model satisfactorily reproduced not only the tower-based GPP but also simulated NPP and autotrophic respiration by BIOME-BGC. The spatial distributions of the carbon fluxes showed weak longitudinal trends with relatively lower values in the eastern interior around the Brooks Range. The estimated GPP, NPP, and autotrophic respiration over Alaska black spruce forests were 1840, 590, and 1250 g CO2 my-2 y^{- 1}, respectively, between 2003 and 2005.

  5. Structural characteristic and origin of intra-continental fold belt in the eastern Sichuan basin, South China Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanxin; He, Dengfa; Sun, Yanpeng; He, Jinyou; Jiang, Zaixing

    2015-11-01

    The fold-and-thrust belt in the eastern Sichuan basin is represented by a series of subparallel chevron anticlines. Under the orogenic tectonic setting within the South China Block in Meso-Cenozoic period and the influence of the multi-layer detachment fault, the deformation of the thrust belt exhibits remarkably layered and large-scale intracontinental thrusting structural characteristics. In this paper, we focus on the structural geometry and deformational mechanisms using the latest two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) seismic reflection data in combination with well and outcrop data. The multi-layer detachment faults, especially the upper gypsum-bearing detachment in the Middle Triassic Jialingjiang Formation and lower detachment with gypsum or shale in the Lower-Middle Cambrian system, directly control the deformational styles of the study area. Interpretation of seismic sections indicates that the fold-and-thrust belt has various deformational styles during folding, including fault-propagation fold, fault-bend fold, and detachment fold with box-fold or pop-up structural geometry. Regional location and structural boundaries play significant roles in controlling the deformational styles, and distinct differences exist among the different anticlines. The Huayingshan anticline located at the front of the thrust belt shows intense structural deformation with northwestward thrusting direction and a relatively weak opposite southeastward thrusting. In addition, the anticlines exhibit structural differences along strike and the fold-and-thrust belt in the northern segment is influenced by the North China Block.

  6. New gravity maps of the Eastern Alps and significance for the crustal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanolla, Claudio; Braitenberg, Carla; Ebbing, Jörg; Bernabini, Marcello; Bram, Kurt; Gabriel, Gerald; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Giammetti, Salvatore; Meurers, Bruno; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Palmieri, Franco

    2006-02-01

    The deep seismic profile T RANSALP crosses, from north to south, Germany, Austria and Italy. The gravity measurements for each country were made by national agencies with different reference systems and data reduction methods. Within the frame of the T RANSALP-project a comprehensive database of the Eastern Alps was compiled covering an area of 3.5° by 4° in longitude and latitude (275 by 445 km), respectively. To increase the data coverage in the south Alpine area two gravity surveys were carried out, resulting in 469 areally distributed new stations, of which 215 have been measured with the intent to improve the geoid in the area of the planned Brenner Basistunnel (BBT). The resulting gravity database is the best in terms of resolution and data quality presently available for the Eastern Alps. Here the free air, Bouguer and isostatic gravity fields are critically discussed. The spatial density of existing gravity stations in the three countries is discussed. On the Italian side of the Alps the spatial density is rather sparse compared to the Austrian side. The Bouguer-gravity field varies between - 190 * 10 - 5 m/s 2 and + 25 * 10 - 5 m/s 2, with the minimum located along the Alpine high topographic chain, but with a small offset (a few tens of km) to the greatest topographic elevation, showing that the Airy-type local isostatic equilibrium does not fully apply here. The maximum of the Bouguer anomaly has an elongated shape of 100 by 50 km located between the towns of Verona and Vicenza and covers the Venetian Tertiary Volcanic Province (VTVP), a feature not directly related to the plate collision in the Eastern Alps. The gravity high is only partly explainable by high-density magmatic rocks and requires also a deeper source, like a shallowing of the Moho. The isostatic residual anomalies (Airy model) are in the range ± 50 * 10 - 5 m/s 2, with the greatest positive anomaly corresponding to the location of the VTVP, indicating here under-compensation of masses

  7. Climate-growth relationships for bog-grown black spruce in northern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, K.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Black spruce (Picea mariana) tree-ring chronologies were derived for three bogs in northern Minnesota. Standard chronologies were highly intercorrelated (0.72 to 0.87). The ring-width variability attributable to a common signal ranged from 38.6 to 56.8 percent which is large for closed canopy eastern forests. These chronologies exhibited great serial correlation, therefore all chronologies were autoregressively modelled prior to climatic analyses. Each chronology was compared to monthly temperature and precipitation data from a nearby weather station. Strengths of linear relationships were measured by the product-moment correlation coefficient. May and August temperatures from the previous year and March precipitation of the current year were significantly correlated with ring-width indices. These data suggest that tree-ring chronologies from mid-continental peatlands may be a valuable, though presently ignored, source of paleoclimatic data.

  8. Structural models of the Eastern Alps derived from geophysical data and their relation to tectonic processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckl, E. P.; Behm, M.

    2009-12-01

    The closure of the Penninic Ocean, the collision of the Adriatic micro-plate with the European platform, the generation of the Pannonian basin in conjunction with the roll back of the Carpathian subduction, and lateral extrusion (gravitational collapse and tectonic escape) were the main tectonic processes which have been shaping the Eastern Alps since late Cretaceous. Recent large scale seismic refraction and wide angle reflection experiments (CELEBRATION 2000 and ALP 2002) completed and refined considerably the conception of the lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps and their surrounding tectonic provinces (Bohemian Massif, Carpathians, Dinarides, and the Molasse, Pannonian and Adriatic basins). We review this data and refer to related results achieved by other authors and working groups (e.g. TRANSALP). Elastic plate modelling supports the interpretation of plate boundaries and gravity data provide additional constraints to our model of the lithosphere. An analysis of lower crustal and upper mantle wide angle reflections yields further information on tectonic processes. The structure of the Moho boundary and systematic differences of crustal seismic velocities and densities indicate clearly a fragmentation of the lithosphere into three blocks, Europe (EU), Adria (AD) and the Pannonian fragment (PA). These three blocks form a triple junction near the eastern termination of the Tauern window. West of the triple junction AD collides directly with EU in N-S direction. Thickening of the crustal basement is confined mainly to the orogenic core of the Eastern Alps and the Southern Alps. Cross sectional balancing indicates that the exhumation of the Tauern window has an eastward directed horizontal component in agreement with the lateral extrusion process. East of the triple junction, EU borders PA at an NE-ENE oriented boundary. Steeply subducting lithospheric slabs revealed by teleseismic tomography are located nearly vertically below the EU-AD and EU-PA Moho

  9. Vertical and horizontal transport of energy and matter by coherent motions in a tall spruce canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Siebicke, L.; Foken, T.

    2009-04-01

    In a forested ecosystem low frequency coherent events contribute significantly to the budgets of momentum, heat and matter. In the frame of EGER (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions) project the contribution of coherent structures to the vertical and horizontal transfer of energy and matter in a tall spruce canopy was investigated. Two measuring campaigns were carried out in North-Eastern Bavaria at the Waldstein site in the Fichtelgebirge mountains. Observations of coherent structures were obtained by a vertical profile of sonic anemometers equipped with fast CO2 and H2O analyzers covering all parts of the forest up to the lower part of the roughness sub layer. In addition five small masts were set up in the trunk space of the forest and equipped with sonic anemometers, humidity and temperature sensors as well as CO2 analyzers. Combination of measurements done in vertical and horizontal directions allows us to investigate coherent structures, their temporal scales, their role in flux transport and vertical coupling between the subcanopy, canopy and air above the canopy level. To extract coherent structures from the turbulent time series, the technique based on the wavelet transform has been used. Conditional sampling analysis showed a domination of coherent structure signatures in vertical wind measurements with probable temporal scales in the order of 10 s to 30 s. The mean temporal scale of coherent structures detected in the trunk space of the forest was 30 - 40 s. The number of coherent structures detected at the slim and tall tower was found to be 40% less than the number of coherent structures detected at the heavy main tower. In contrast to the slim tower the main tower is more massive and was equipped with more instruments resulting for additional generation of turbulence. The Reynolds-averaged flux and flux contribution of coherent structures were derived using a triple decomposition for the detected and conditionally averaged time series, when

  10. Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population.

    PubMed

    Torres-Florez, J P; Hucke-Gaete, R; LeDuc, R; Lang, A; Taylor, B; Pimper, L E; Bedriñana-Romano, L; Rosenbaum, H C; Figueroa, C C

    2014-12-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas, 60 biopsy samples were collected from blue whales in SCh between 2003 and 2009. These samples were genotyped at seven microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region was sequenced, allowing us to identify 52 individuals. To investigate the genetic identity of this suspected remnant population, we compared these 52 individuals to blue whales from Antarctica (ANT, n = 96), Northern Chile (NCh, n = 19) and the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP, n = 31). No significant differentiation in haplotype frequencies (mtDNA) or among genotypes (nDNA) was found between SCh, NCh and ETP, while significant differences were found between those three areas and Antarctica for both the mitochondrial and microsatellite analyses. Our results suggest at least two breeding population units or subspecies exist, which is also supported by other lines of evidence such as morphometrics and acoustics. The lack of differences detected between SCh/NCh/ETP areas supports the hypothesis that eastern South Pacific blue whales are using the ETP area as a possible breeding area. Considering the small population sizes previously reported for the SCh area, additional conservation measures and monitoring of this population should be developed and prioritized. PMID:25492593

  11. Trophic structure and pathways of biogenic carbon flow in the eastern North Water Polynya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Hattori, Hiroshi; Michel, Christine; Ringuette, Marc; Mei, Zhi-Ping; Lovejoy, Connie; Fortier, Louis; Hobson, Keith A.; Amiel, David; Cochran, Kirk

    2006-10-01

    In the eastern North Water, most of the estimated annual new and net production of carbon (C) occurred during the main diatom bloom in 1998. During the bloom, at least 30% of total and new phytoplankton production occurred as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and was unavailable for short-term assimilation into the herbivorous food web or sinking export. Based on particle interceptor traps and 234Th deficits, 27% of the particulate primary production (PP) sank out of the upper 50 m, with only 7% and 1% of PP reaching the benthos at shallow (≈200 m) and deep (≈500 m) sites, respectively. Mass balance calculations and grazing estimates agree that ≈79% of PP was ingested by pelagic consumers between April and July. During this period, the vertical flux of biogenic silica (BioSi) at 50 m was equivalent to the total BioSi produced, indicating that all of the diatom production was removed from the euphotic zone as intact cells (direct sinking) or empty frustules (grazing or lysis). The estimated flux of empty frustules was consistent with rates of herbivory by the large, dominant copepods and appendicularians during incubations. Since the carbon demand of the dominant planktivorous bird, Alle alle, amounted to ≈2% of the biomass synthesized by its main prey, the large copepod Calanus hyperboreus, most of the secondary carbon production was available to pelagic carnivores. Stable isotopes indicated that the biomass of predatory amphipods, polar cod and marine mammals was derived from these herbivores, but corresponding carbon fluxes were not quantified. Our analysis shows that a large fraction of PP in the eastern North Water was ingested by consumers in the upper 50 m, leading to substantial carbon respiration and DOC accumulation in surface waters. An increasingly early and prolonged opening of the Artic Ocean is likely to promote the productivity of the herbivorous food web, but not the short-term efficiency of the particulate, biological CO 2 pump.

  12. Structure, Aboveground Biomass, and Soil Characterization of Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park, Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsumaiti, Tareefa Saad Sultan

    Mangrove forests are national treasures of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other arid countries with limited forested areas. Mangroves form a crucial part of the coastal ecosystem and provide numerous benefits to society, economy, and especially the environment. Mangrove trees, specifically Avicennia marina, are studied in their native habitat in order to characterize their population structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties. This study focused on Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park in Abu Dhabi, which was the first mangrove protected area to be designated in UAE. In situ measurements were collected to estimate Avicennia marina status, mortality rate (%), height (m), crown spread (m), stem number, diameter at breast height (cm), basal area (m), and aboveground biomass (t ha-1 ). Small-footprint aerial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data acquired by UAE were processed to characterize mangrove canopy height and aboveground biomass density. This included extraction of LIDAR-derived height percentile statistics, segmentation of the forest into structurally homogenous units, and development of regression relationships between in situ reference and remote sensing data using a machine learning approach. An in situ soil survey was conducted to examine the soils' physical and chemical properties, fertility status, and organic matter. The data of soil survey were used to create soil maps to evaluate key characteristics of soils, and their influence on Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park. The results of this study provide new insights into Avicennia marina canopy population, structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties in Abu Dhabi, as data in such arid environments is lacking. This valuable information can help in managing and preserving this unique ecosystem.

  13. Soil-solution chemistry in a low-elevation spruce-fir ecosystem, Howland, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Ivan J.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Son, Yowhan

    1995-01-01

    Soil solutions were collected monthly by tension and zero-tension lysimeters in a low-elevation red spruce stand in east-central Maine from May 1987 through December 1992. Soil solutions collected by Oa tension lysimeters had higher concentrations of most constituents than the Oa zero-tension lysimeters. In Oa horizon soil solutions growing season concentrations for SO4, Ca, and Mg averaged 57, 43, and 30 μmol L−1 in tension lysimeters, and 43, 28, and 19 μmol L−1 in zero-tension lysimeters, respectively. Because tension lysimeters remove water held by the soil at tensions up to 10 kPa, solutions are assumed to have more time to react with the soil compared to freely draining solutions collected by zero-tension lysimeters. Solutions collected in the Bs horizon by both types of collectors were similar which was attributed to the frequency of time periods when the water table was above the Bs lysimeters. Concentrations of SO4 and NO3 at this site were lower than concentrations reported for most other eastern U.S. spruce-fir sites, but base cation concentrations fell in the same range. Aluminum concentrations in this study were also lower than reported for other sites in the eastern U.S. and Ca/Al ratios did not suggest inhibition of Ca uptake by roots. Concentrations of SO4, Ca, K, and Cl decreased significantly in both the Oa and Bs horizons over the 56-month sampling period, which could reflect decreasing deposition rates for sulfur and base cations, climatic influences, or natural variation. A longer record of measured fluxes will be needed to adequately define temporal trends in solution chemistry and their causes.

  14. Public health research support through the European structural funds in central and eastern Europe and the Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Public health research provides evidence for practice across fields including health care, health promotion and health surveillance. Levels of public health research vary markedly across European Union (EU) countries, and are lowest in the EU's new member states (in Central and Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean). However, these countries now receive most of the EU's Structural Funds, some of which are allocated to research. Methods STEPS, an EU-funded study, sought to assess support for public health research at national and European levels. To identify support through the Structural funds, STEPS drew information from country respondents and internet searches for all twelve EU new member states. Results The EU allocates annually around €7 billion through the Structural Funds for member states' own use on research. These funds can cover infrastructure, academic employment, and direct research grants. The programmes emphasise links to business. Support for health research includes major projects in biosciences, but direct support for public health research was found in only three countries - Cyprus, Latvia and Lithuania. Conclusions Public health research is not prioritised in the EU's Structural Funds programme in comparison with biomedicine. For the research dimension of the new European programme for Structural Funds 2014-2002, ministries of health should propose public health research to strengthen the evidence-base for European public health policy and practice. PMID:22480250

  15. Cretaceous to Miocene fault zone evolution in the Eastern Alps constrained by multi-system thermochronometry and structural data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfler, Andreas; Frisch, Wolfgang; Danišík, Martin; Fritz, Harald; Wölfler, Anke

    2015-04-01

    Fault zones that display both, ductile and brittle deformation stages offer perfect sites to study the evolution of the earth's crust over a wide range of temperatures and possibly over long time spans. This study combines structural- geo- and thermochronologcial data to evaluate the tectonic evolution of a fault zone to the southeast of the Tauern Window in the Eastern Alps. This fault zone comprises a mylonitic part, the so-called "Main Mylonitic Zone" (MMZ) that has been reworked by brittle faulting, the so-called "Ragga-Teuchl fault" (RTF). Structural data of the MMZ demonstrate ductile deformation with top-to-the NW transport in the Late Cretaceous under greenschist facies conditions. Subsequent SE-directed extension occurred under semi-brittle to brittle conditions during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The Polinik Block to the north of the RTF revealed Late Cretaceous Ar/Ar ages, which reflect cooling subsequent to the thermal peak of Eo-alpine metamorphism. In contrast, the Kreuzeck Block to the south of the RTF shows early Permian Ar/Ar ages that reflect cooling related to both, late Variscan collapse in the late Carboniferous and post-Variscan extension in the Permian. Zircon and apatite fission track ages and thermal history modeling results suggest that the Polinik Block cooled rapidly to near surface temperatures in the middle Miocene. The Kreuzeck Block, in contrast, cooled and exhumed to near surface conditions already in the Oligocene and early Miocene. Thermal history modeling and apatite fission track ages of 23.3±0.8 and 11.5±1.0 suggest that brittle deformation along the RTF occurred in the middle- and late Miocene. Our results demonstrate that one single fault zone may comprise information about the evolution of the Eastern Alps from Late Cretaceous to Miocene time and that low-temperature thermochronology is a viable tool to resolve the timing of brittle faulting and accompanied fluid activity.

  16. Tectonic evolution of the eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (Mars) as inferred from detailed structural mapping and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borraccini, F.; Di Achille, G.; Ori, G. G.; Wezel, F. C.

    2007-05-01

    The eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (EMTP) is characterized by a diversity of tectonic features, which recorded its complex, and still controversial, tectonic history. A detailed structural survey and analyses have been carried out in order to assess the kinematics and relative age of the main deformational events. Combining results from statistics of lineament orientations and density of fault length for each geologic unit and taking into account crosscutting relationships among tectonic structures, three main deformational events have been recognized. The early stage of the tectonic evolution of EMTP is recorded by Noachian units at the southern edge of Melas Dorsa and is represented by N-S oriented grabens sutured by Early Hesperian formations. Starting from Late Noachian, the extensional stress field became NE-SW oriented and resulted in the formation of NW-SE striking sets of grabens. At the boundary between Noachian and Hesperian, the most important change in tectonic regime occurred. The Hesperian tectonics are characterized by an E-W shortening possibly related to an eastward motion of the Thaumasia Plateau. This tectonic phase likely produced a N-S-oriented wrinkle ridges as well as regional folds and thrust faults. E-W-oriented preexisting tectonic lineaments could have been reactivated forming regional transfer zones. In this scenario, Coprates Rise, Melas Dorsa, and Thaumasia Ridge could be interpreted as mountain belts resulting from buckling and thrust faulting of the eastern and southern margins of the Thaumasia plateau. The proto-Valles Marineris could have experienced a left-lateral component of displacement and played a role of a transfer shear zone.

  17. Mother–offspring distances reflect sex differences in fine-scale genetic structure of eastern grey kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy J; Garant, Dany; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Natal dispersal affects life history and population biology and causes gene flow. In mammals, dispersal is usually male-biased so that females tend to be philopatric and surrounded by matrilineal kin, which may lead to preferential associations among female kin. Here we combine genetic analyses and behavioral observations to investigate spatial genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal patterns in a high-density population of mammals showing fission–fusion group dynamics. We studied eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) over 2 years at Wilsons Promontory National Park, Australia, and found weak fine-scale genetic structure among adult females in both years but no structure among adult males. Immature male kangaroos moved away from their mothers at 18–25 months of age, while immature females remained near their mothers until older. A higher proportion of male (34%) than female (6%) subadults and young adults were observed to disperse, although median distances of detected dispersals were similar for both sexes. Adult females had overlapping ranges that were far wider than the maximum extent of spatial genetic structure found. Female kangaroos, although weakly philopatric, mostly encounter nonrelatives in fission–fusion groups at high density, and therefore kinship is unlikely to strongly affect sociality. PMID:26045958

  18. 75 FR 39691 - Announcement To Extend the Recommended Determination Preparation Period for the Spruce No. 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Announcement To Extend the Recommended Determination Preparation Period for the Spruce No. 1... the Spruce No. 1 Proposed Determination or prepare a Recommended Determination within 30 days...

  19. Maps Showing Geology and Shallow Structure of Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles J.; Oldale, Robert N.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents results of marine studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1975 and 1976 in eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound (fig. 1) located off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts. The study was made in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the New England Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It covered an area of the Atlantic Inner Continental Shelf between latitude 41 deg 12' and 41 deg 33'N, and between longitude 70 deg 37' and 71 deg 15'W (see index map). Major objectives included assessment of sand and gravel resources, environmental impact evaluation both of offshore mining of these resources and of offshore disposal of solid waste and dredge spoil material, identification and mapping of the offshore geology, and determination of the geologic history of this part of the Inner Shelf. A total of 670 kilometers (km) of closely spaced high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, 224 km of side-scan sonar data, and 16 cores totaling 90 meters (m) of recovered sediment, were collected during the investigation. This report is companion to geologic maps published for Cape Cod Bay (Oldale and O'Hara, 1975) and Buzzards Bay, Mass. (Robb and Oldale, 1977).

  20. Middle Eastern rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Azizzadeh, Babak; Mashkevich, Grigoriy

    2010-02-01

    The ethnic appearance of the Middle Eastern nose is defined by several unique visual features, particularly a high radix, wide overprojecting dorsum, and an amorphous hanging nasal tip. These external characteristics reflect distinct structural properties of the osseo-cartilaginous nasal framework and skin-soft tissue envelope in patients of Middle Eastern extraction. The goal, and the ultimate challenge, of rhinoplasty on Middle Eastern patients is to achieve balanced aesthetic refinement, while avoiding surgical westernization. Detailed understanding of the ethnic visual harmony in a Middle Eastern nose greatly assists in preserving native nasal-facial relationships during rhinoplasty on Middle Eastern patients. Esthetic alteration of a Middle Eastern nose follows a different set of goals and principles compared with rhinoplasties on white or other ethnic patients. This article highlights the inherent nasal features of the Middle Eastern nose and reviews pertinent concepts of rhinoplasty on Middle Eastern patients. Essential considerations in the process spanning the consultation and surgery are reviewed. Reliable operative techniques that achieve a successful aesthetic outcome are discussed in detail. PMID:20206101

  1. Pre-rift basement structure and syn-rift faulting at the eastern onshore Gulf of Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranis, Haralambos; Skourtsos, Emmanuel; Gawthorpe, Robert; Leeder, Mike; Stamatakis, Michael

    2015-04-01

    %B We present results of recent field-based research with a view to providing information about and constraints on the initiation and evolution of the Gulf of Corinth (GoC) Rift. The onshore geology and structure of the GoC rift has been studied intensively and extensively; however most research efforts have focused on the western and partly the central parts. The last few years, efforts are being made to extend the scope of research in less-studied areas, such as the eastern southern onshore part of the GoC rift, trying to address two major issues in rift initiation and evolution, namely syn-rift faulting and pre-rift basement structure. While fault spacing and length appears to be well-constrained for the western and central parts of the GoC Rift, further east -and especially in the uplifted onshore southern part- this is thought to increase dramatically, as there are practically no mapped faults. We argue, however, that this may be a false image, owing to (i) the difficulty in identifying fault structures within a thick, fairly monotonous syn-rift sequence; (ii) the lesser attention this part has drawn; and (ii) the fact that the published summary geological and tectonic maps of the GoC area are based on the dated geological maps that cover the eastern and northern onshore shoulders of the Rift. Moreover, new field data provide new information on pre-rift structure: while only the topmost thrust sheet of the Hellenide nappe stack (Pindos Unit) was thought to crop out at the eastern southern onshore part, we mapped the underlying, non-metamorphic carbonate Unit (Tripolis Unit), which crops out within the footwall of a key intra-basin block (Xylokastro block). A minor outcrop further east, may also belong to this Unit, providing basement control, in connection with recently published offshore fault data. The mapping of these outcrops, combined with a revised stratigraphical framework for the early syn-rift deposits, allows the identification and mapping of faults

  2. Decline of red spruce in the Adirondacks, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.T.; Siccama, T.G.; Johnson, A.H.; Breisch, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two stands in the spruce-fir forests of Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks, originally sampled from 1964-66, were resurveyed in 1982. From 10-25 Bitterlich points were used in each stand in 1982 to obtain an estimate of basal area per hectare. Data were summarized for low elevation (<900m) and high elevation (> or = 900m) forests. Red spruce declined by 40-60% in basal area for the low elevation forests and by 60-70% above 900m. Balsam fir decreased by 35% at high elevations, due to natural disturbance in several of the stands, but was unchanged when only undisturbed stands were considered. The decline of red spruce accounted for about three quarters of the total decrease in basal area for both the high- and low-elevation forests. Spruce seedling frequency for the high-elevation sample decreased by 80%, but was unchanged below 900m. The pattern of spruce decline in the Adirondacks is similar to findings for New England. The cause of the decline is speculative at the time.

  3. Mathematical Methods of Modelling the Morphology of Spruce Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoutová, Růžena; Novotný, Jan; Pivovarník, Marek; Zemek, František

    2014-05-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) models are simulation tools which can be used to quantify relationships between vegetation canopy properties and observed remotely sensed data. This study aims at creating a spruce tree growth model as a key input for use in RT models. The spruce tree model is built on data obtained from terrestrial laser scanning of spruce trees. Each tree model is unique. This uniqueness is achieved by using L-systems which are able to simulate natural randomness while complying with the given tree parameters. L-systems are established on a theory of grammar that enables rewriting a string of symbols according to specified rewriting rules. In practice, our tree models are generated in Blender visualization software, implementing an algorithm written in Python. The algorithm generates the basic parameters of the whole tree and then creates the parameters of the spruce trunk and initial branches. The parameters are generated randomly within a range that is calculated from measured data. Then each branch is grown on the basis of annual increments defined by field measurements. Tree needles are distributed with respect to the age of individual branches; therefore, the needles have different colors according to their age. Cones and faces are graphical representations of the spruce model. Branches are represented by cones and needles are represented by faces around the branches. The faces are transparent, thus simulating light transmittance in-between the needles. The whole model is highly computationally demanding, especially with respect to computer memory.

  4. Influence of chemosynthetic ecosystems on nematode community structure and biomass in the deep eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampadariou, N.; Kalogeropoulou, V.; Sevastou, K.; Keklikoglou, K.; Sarrazin, J.

    2012-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are a special type of cold seeps where life is based on chemoautotrophic processes. They are considered as extreme environments and are characterised by unique megafaunal and macrofaunal communities. However, very few studies on mud volcanoes taking into account the smaller meiobenthic communities have been carried out. Two mud volcanoes were explored during the MEDECO cruise (2007) with the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Victor-6000; Amsterdam, located south of Turkey between 1700 and 2000 m depth (Anaximander mud field) and Napoli, south of Crete, located along the Mediterranean Ridge at about 2000 m depth (Olimpi mud field). The major aim of this study was to describe distributional patterns of meiofaunal communities and nematode assemblages from different seep microhabitats. Meiofaunal taxa and nematode assemblages at both mud volcanoes differed significantly from other Mediterranean sites in terms of standing stocks, dominance and species diversity. Density and biomass values were significantly higher at the seep sites, particularly at Amsterdam. Nematodes, the dominant meiofaunal taxon, displayed deeper penetration vertically into the sediment at the seep areas, indicating that biological rather than physicochemical factors are responsible for their vertical distribution. Patterns of nematode diversity varied, displaying both very high or very low species richness and dominance, depending on the habitat studied. The Lamellibrachia periphery and mussel bed of Napoli exhibited the highest species richness while the reduced sediments of Amsterdam yielded a species-poor nematode community, dominated by two successful species; one belonging to the genus Aponema and the other to the genus Sabatieria. Analysis of β-diversity showed that habitat heterogeneity of mud volcanoes contributed substantially to the total nematode species richness in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. These observations indicate a strong influence of mud volcanoes and cold

  5. Influence of chemosynthetic ecosystems on nematode community structure and biomass in the deep eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampadariou, N.; Kalogeropoulou, V.; Sevastou, K.; Keklikoglou, K.; Sarrazin, J.

    2013-08-01

    Mud volcanoes are a~special type of cold seeps where life is based on chemoautotrophic processes. They are considered to be extreme environments and are characterized by unique megafaunal and macrofaunal communities. However, very few studies on mud volcanoes taking into account the smaller meiobenthic communities have been carried out. Two mud volcanoes were explored during the MEDECO (MEditerranean Deep-sea ECOsystems) cruise (2007) with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Victor-6000: Amsterdam, located south of Turkey between 1700 and 2000 m depth (Anaximander mud field); and Napoli, south of Crete, located along the Mediterranean Ridge at about 2000 m depth (Olimpi mud field). The major aim of this study was to describe distributional patterns of meiofaunal communities and nematode assemblages from different seep microhabitats. Meiofaunal taxa and nematode assemblages at both mud volcanoes differed significantly from other Mediterranean sites in terms of standing stocks, dominance and species diversity. Density and biomass values were significantly higher at the seep sites, particularly at Amsterdam. Patterns of nematode diversity, the dominant meiofaunal taxon, varied, displaying both very high or very low species richness and dominance, depending on the microhabitat studied. The periphery of the Lamellibrachia and bivalve shell microhabitats of Napoli exhibited the highest species richness, while the reduced sediments of Amsterdam yielded a species-poor nematode community dominated by two successful species, one belonging to the genus Aponema and the other to the genus Sabatieria. Analysis of β-diversity showed that microhabitat heterogeneity of mud volcanoes contributed substantially to the total nematode species richness in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. These observations indicate a strong influence of mud volcanoes and cold-seep ecosystems on the meiofaunal communities and nematode assemblages.

  6. Crustal structure of the eastern Qinling orogenic belt and implication for reactivation since the Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhen; Chen, Y. John

    2016-06-01

    A high resolution crustal model of the eastern Qinling belt and central North China Craton (central NCC) is obtained along a N-S trending profile (corridor) by joint inversion of surface wave and receiver function. The NCC is one of the oldest cratons on Earth and the Qinling belt is the suture zone between the NCC and South China block (SCB). The Qinling belt is characterized by low crustal velocity (< 3.6 km/s) as well as low bulk Vp/Vs ratio (1.66-1.8), suggesting that the mid- to lower crust is predominantly felsic in composition, which could be the consequence of removal of mafic root by delamination in the past. The quartz-rich hence mechanically weak crust beneath the Qinling belt could be responsible for the strain focusing and significant reactivation since the Cretaceous. Beneath the central NCC, a ~ 10 km thick high-velocity layer (3.9-4.1 km/s) is observed just above the Moho, consistent with the regional high bulk Vp/Vs ratio (> 1.8). The forward gravity modeling supports the presence of a high-density layer (3.05 g/cm3) at the base of the crust beneath the central NCC. We propose that the high velocity in the lowermost crust beneath the central NCC is most likely due to the repeated mafic underplating, which also results in high crustal Vp/Vs ratio and is responsible for the rapid crustal uplift during the late Mesozoic.

  7. Structural geometry of an exhumed UHP terrane in the eastern Sulu Orogen, China: Implications for continental collisional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Kusky, Timothy M.; Li, Sanzhong

    2010-04-01

    High-precision 1:200-1:1000 mapping of Yangkou Bay, eastern Sulu orogen, defines the structural geometry and history of one of the world's most significant UHP (ultrahigh-pressure) belts. At least four stages of folds are recognized in UHP eclogites and associated quartzo-feldspathic gneiss. UHP eclogite facies rootless F 1 and isoclinal F 2 folds are preserved locally in coesite-eclogite. Mylonitic to ultramylonitic quartzo-feldspathic and coesite-eclogite shear zones separate small-scale 5-10-m-thick nappes of ultramafic-mafic UHP rocks from banded quartzo-feldspathic gneiss. These shear zones are folded, and progressively overprinted by amphibolite-greenschist facies shear zones. The prograde to retrograde D 1-D 5 deformation sequence is explained by deep subduction of offscraped thrust slices of lower continental or oceanic crust from the down-going plate, caught between the colliding North and South China cratons in the Mesozoic. After these slices were structurally isolated along the plate interface, they were rolled in the subduction channel during exhumation and structural juxtaposition with quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, forming several generations of folds, sequentially lower-grade foliations and lineations, and intruded by in situ and exotically derived melts. Shear zones formed during different deformation generations are wider with lower grades, suggesting that deep-crustal/upper mantle deformation operates more efficiently, perhaps with more active crystallographic slip systems, than deformation at mid-upper crustal levels.

  8. Richness, origin and structure of an Eimeria community in a population of Eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) introduced into Italy.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, S; Hofmannová, L; Girardello, M; Modry, D

    2010-07-01

    The composition and structure of a community of Eimeria was investigated in a population of Eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) introduced into Italy. Eight Eimeria species were found, of which all but 1 had North American origins and were presumably introduced into Italy together with imported cottontails. The success of cottontails in spreading microparasites is probably related to their massive release for hunting purposes. Nearly all cottontails were infected with at least 1 Eimeria species, with bimonthly prevalence ranging from 0-6.3% (E. leporis) to 42.9-89.3% (E. environ). Bayesian model averaging and multivariate techniques were used to investigate the relationships between the occurrence of each parasite and the structure of the relative community. Among the host parameters, only sex was found to be associated with the prevalence of E. honessi, while the rest of the parameters were only weakly correlated with prevalence and species richness. This indicates that individual phenotypic host characteristics are probably less important than environmental factors in determining levels of parasite prevalence and diversity. The community of Eimeria species was probably structured by competition, with less species co-occurrence than expected under a null hypothesis. This was made evident by the low co-occurrence of E. environ and E. neoirresidua with E. poudrei, E. honessi, and E. maior. PMID:20233489

  9. Multi-scale variation in spatial heterogeneity for microbial community structure in an eastern Virginia agricultural field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Rima B.; Mills, Aaron L.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the distribution of soil microbial communities at multiple spatial scales, a survey was conducted to examine the spatial organization of community structure in a wheat field in eastern Virginia (USA). Nearly 200 soil samples were collected at a variety of separation distances ranging from 2.5 cm to 11 m. Whole-community DNA was extracted from each sample, and community structure was compared using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprinting. Relative similarity was calculated between each pair of samples and compared using geostatistical variogram analysis to study autocorrelation as a function of separation distance. Spatial autocorrelation was found at scales ranging from 30 cm to more than 6 m, depending on the sampling extent considered. In some locations, up to four different correlation length scales were detected. The presence of nested scales of variability suggests that the environmental factors regulating the development of the communities in this soil may operate at different scales. Kriging was used to generate maps of the spatial organization of communities across the plot, and the results demonstrated that bacterial distributions can be highly structured, even within a habitat that appears relatively homogeneous at the plot and field scale. Different subsets of the microbial community were distributed differently across the plot, and this is thought to be due to the variable response of individual populations to spatial heterogeneity associated with soil properties. c2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Subsurface structure of the eastern edge of the Zagros basin as inferred from gravity and satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Bushara, M.N.

    1995-09-01

    A data set of 10,505 points of land gravity measurements from southeast Iran obtained from the Bureau Gravimetrique International, combined with Landsat imagery, was used to investigate crustal and Cenozoic lithospheric structure. Interpretation of the Bouguer anomalies reveals three primary structural features. The Zagros Mountain belt is characterized by a progressive decrease in gravity values from -70 mGal near the Persian Gulf to -160 mGal over the structure zone between the Arabian margin and central Iran crustal blocks. The second feature is marked by a backward-L-shaped pair of anomalies that extends from the eastern peripheries of the Zagros basin and wraps around southern Iranian shores. These 15- to 20-km-deep source anomalies, with amplitudes of as much as 10 mGal, are interpreted as intrabasement intrusions demarcating an ancient rift axis. The shallow (6-8)km east-west-trending anomalies are perhaps interbasement uplifts bordered by reverse faults. The third structure, observed on both gravity and Landsat displays, a north-striking eastward-facing topographic escarpment, has a gravity gradient of 0.85 mGal/km, and is right laterally offset approximately 100 km, and is right laterally offset approximately 100 km by the Zagros main recent fault. A comparison of gravity features with surface structures on Thematic Mapper and Landsat Multi-spectral Scanner imagery indicates that a northeast-trending fault system is the result of post-Miocene pervasive transpressive stress coupled with clockwise rotation of underlying basement blocks following the collision of Arabia and Iran. Accommodation structures such as forced folds and {open_quotes}rabbit-ear{close_quotes} anticlines may develop over and on the flanks of the basement blocks, providing remigration and trapping mechanisms for new oil and gas plays.

  11. Experimental warming delays autumn senescence in a boreal spruce bog: Initial results from the SPRUCE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Furze, Morgan; Aubrecht, Donald; Milliman, Thomas; Nettles, Robert; Krassovski, Misha; Hanson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phenology is considered one of the most robust indicators of the biological impacts of global change. In temperate and boreal regions, long-term data show that rising temperatures are advancing spring onset (e.g. budburst and flowering) and delaying autumn senescence (e.g. leaf coloration and leaf fall) in a wide range of ecosystems. While warm and cold temperatures, day length and insolation, precipitation and water availability, and other factors, have all been shown to influence plant phenology, the future response of phenology to rising temperatures and elevated CO2 still remains highly uncertain because of the challenges associated with conducting realistic manipulative experiments to simulate future environmental conditions. At the SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change) experiment in the north-central United States, experimental temperature (0 to +9° C above ambient) and CO2 (ambient and elevated) treatments are being applied to mature, and intact, Picea mariana-Sphagnum spp. bog communities in their native habitat through the use of ten large (approximately 12 m wide, 10 m high) open-topped enclosures. We are tracking vegetation green-up and senescence in these chambers, at both the individual and whole-community level, using repeat digital photography. Within each chamber, digital camera images are recorded every 30 minutes and uploaded to the PhenoCam (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu) project web page, where they are displayed in near-real-time. Image processing is conducted nightly to extract quantitative measures of canopy color, which we characterize using Gcc, the green chromatic coordinate. Data from a camera mounted outside the chambers (since November 2014) indicate strong seasonal variation in Gcc for both evergreen shrubs and trees. Shrub Gcc rises steeply in May and June, and declines steeply in September and October. By comparison, tree Gcc rises gradually from March through June, and declines gradually from

  12. Impact of Forest Harvesting on Trophic Structure of Eastern Canadian Boreal Shield Lakes: Insights from Stable Isotope Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Glaz, Patricia; Sirois, Pascal; Archambault, Philippe; Nozais, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations on ecosystems can have profound immediate effects and can, accordingly, greatly alter the natural community. Land-use such as forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure in eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. We measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes values for aquatic primary producers, terrestrial detritus, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) over a three-year period in eight eastern Boreal Shield lakes. Four lakes were studied before, one and two years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes) and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes) sampled at the same time. Stable isotope mixing models showed leaf-litter to be the main food source for benthic primary consumers in both perturbed and unperturbed lakes, suggesting no logging impact on allochthonous subsidies to the littoral food web. Brook trout derived their food mainly from benthic predatory macroinvertebrates in unperturbed lakes. However, in perturbed lakes one year after harvesting, zooplankton appeared to be the main contributor to brook trout diet. This change in brook trout diet was mitigated two years after harvesting. Size-related diet shift were also observed for brook trout, indicating a diet shift related to size. Our study suggests that carbon from terrestrial habitat may be a significant contribution to the food web of oligotrophic Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. Forest harvesting did not have an impact on the diet of benthic primary consumers. On the other hand, brook trout diet composition was affected by logging with greater zooplankton contribution in perturbed lakes, possibly induced by darker-colored environment in these lakes one year after logging. PMID:24763366

  13. Impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure of eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes: insights from stable isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Glaz, Patricia; Sirois, Pascal; Archambault, Philippe; Nozais, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations on ecosystems can have profound immediate effects and can, accordingly, greatly alter the natural community. Land-use such as forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure in eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. We measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes values for aquatic primary producers, terrestrial detritus, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) over a three-year period in eight eastern Boreal Shield lakes. Four lakes were studied before, one and two years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes) and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes) sampled at the same time. Stable isotope mixing models showed leaf-litter to be the main food source for benthic primary consumers in both perturbed and unperturbed lakes, suggesting no logging impact on allochthonous subsidies to the littoral food web. Brook trout derived their food mainly from benthic predatory macroinvertebrates in unperturbed lakes. However, in perturbed lakes one year after harvesting, zooplankton appeared to be the main contributor to brook trout diet. This change in brook trout diet was mitigated two years after harvesting. Size-related diet shift were also observed for brook trout, indicating a diet shift related to size. Our study suggests that carbon from terrestrial habitat may be a significant contribution to the food web of oligotrophic Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. Forest harvesting did not have an impact on the diet of benthic primary consumers. On the other hand, brook trout diet composition was affected by logging with greater zooplankton contribution in perturbed lakes, possibly induced by darker-colored environment in these lakes one year after logging. PMID:24763366

  14. Population structure and phylogeography reveal pathways of colonization by a migratory marine reptile (Chelonia mydas) in the central and eastern Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Peter H; Jensen, Michael P; Frey, Amy; LaCasella, Erin; Balazs, George H; Zárate, Patricia; Chassin-Noria, Omar; Sarti-Martinez, Adriana Laura; Velez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Climate, behavior, ecology, and oceanography shape patterns of biodiversity in marine faunas in the absence of obvious geographic barriers. Marine turtles are an example of highly migratory creatures with deep evolutionary lineages and complex life histories that span both terrestrial and marine environments. Previous studies have focused on the deep isolation of evolutionary lineages (>3 mya) through vicariance; however, little attention has been given to the pathways of colonization of the eastern Pacific and the processes that have shaped diversity within the most recent evolutionary time. We sequenced 770 bp of the mtDNA control region to examine the stock structure and phylogeography of 545 green turtles from eight different rookeries in the central and eastern Pacific. We found significant differentiation between the geographically separated nesting populations and identified five distinct stocks (FST = 0.08–0.44, P < 0.005). Central and eastern Pacific Chelonia mydas form a monophyletic group containing 3 subclades, with Hawaii more closely related to the eastern Pacific than western Pacific populations. The split between sampled central/eastern and western Pacific haplotypes was estimated at around 0.34 mya, suggesting that the Pacific region west of Hawaii has been a more formidable barrier to gene flow in C. mydas than the East Pacific Barrier. Our results suggest that the eastern Pacific was colonized from the western Pacific via the Central North Pacific and that the Revillagigedos Islands provided a stepping-stone for radiation of green turtles from the Hawaiian Archipelago to the eastern Pacific. Our results fit with a broader paradigm that has been described for marine biodiversity, where oceanic islands, such as Hawaii and Revillagigedo, rather than being peripheral evolutionary “graveyards”, serve as sources and recipients of diversity and provide a mechanism for further radiation. PMID:25540693

  15. Population structure and phylogeography reveal pathways of colonization by a migratory marine reptile (Chelonia mydas) in the central and eastern Pacific.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Peter H; Jensen, Michael P; Frey, Amy; LaCasella, Erin; Balazs, George H; Zárate, Patricia; Chassin-Noria, Omar; Sarti-Martinez, Adriana Laura; Velez, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Climate, behavior, ecology, and oceanography shape patterns of biodiversity in marine faunas in the absence of obvious geographic barriers. Marine turtles are an example of highly migratory creatures with deep evolutionary lineages and complex life histories that span both terrestrial and marine environments. Previous studies have focused on the deep isolation of evolutionary lineages (>3 mya) through vicariance; however, little attention has been given to the pathways of colonization of the eastern Pacific and the processes that have shaped diversity within the most recent evolutionary time. We sequenced 770 bp of the mtDNA control region to examine the stock structure and phylogeography of 545 green turtles from eight different rookeries in the central and eastern Pacific. We found significant differentiation between the geographically separated nesting populations and identified five distinct stocks (F ST = 0.08-0.44, P < 0.005). Central and eastern Pacific Chelonia mydas form a monophyletic group containing 3 subclades, with Hawaii more closely related to the eastern Pacific than western Pacific populations. The split between sampled central/eastern and western Pacific haplotypes was estimated at around 0.34 mya, suggesting that the Pacific region west of Hawaii has been a more formidable barrier to gene flow in C. mydas than the East Pacific Barrier. Our results suggest that the eastern Pacific was colonized from the western Pacific via the Central North Pacific and that the Revillagigedos Islands provided a stepping-stone for radiation of green turtles from the Hawaiian Archipelago to the eastern Pacific. Our results fit with a broader paradigm that has been described for marine biodiversity, where oceanic islands, such as Hawaii and Revillagigedo, rather than being peripheral evolutionary "graveyards", serve as sources and recipients of diversity and provide a mechanism for further radiation. PMID:25540693

  16. Genetic host-tree effects on the ectomycorrhizal community and root characteristics of Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Velmala, S M; Rajala, T; Haapanen, M; Taylor, A F S; Pennanen, T

    2013-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was used to study the effects of host genotype on short root formation and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal community structure in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Rooted cuttings representing 55 clones were inoculated with a mix of vegetative hyphae of five ECM fungal species (Laccaria sp., Amphinema byssoides, Piloderma sp., Cadophora finlandia, Paxillus involutus). After one growing season, the ECM fungal community structure was determined by amplifying the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of ribosomal DNA directly from ECM root tips. Restriction profiles of obtained amplicons were then compared to those of the inoculated strains. Spruce clones differed in their ECM fungal community composition; we found a statistically significant clone-specific effect on ECM fungal diversity and dominating fungal species. Nevertheless, the broad sense heritabilities of the levels of Laccaria sp., Piloderma sp. and A. byssoides colonisations as well as the ECM fungal community structure were low (H(2) = 0.04-0.11), owing to the high within-clone variation. As nitrogen concentration of needles correlated negatively with ECM fungal richness, our results imply that in the experimental conditions nutrient acquisition of young trees may benefit from colonisation with only one or two ECM fungal species. The heritability of short root density was moderate (H(2) = 0.41) and highest among all the measured shoot and root growth characteristics of Norway spruce cuttings. We suggest that the genetic component determining root growth and short root formation is significant for the performance of young trees in natural environments as these traits drive the formation of the below-ground symbiotic interactions. PMID:22644394

  17. Mantle structure beneath eastern Africa: Evidence for a through going-mantle anomaly and its implications for the origin of Cenozoic tectonism in eastern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulibo, G.; Tugume, F.; Julia, J.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, teleseismic earthquakes recorded on over 60 temporary AfricaArray seismic stations deployed in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia between 2007 and 2011 are used to invert P and S travel time residuals, together with travel time residuals from previous deployments, for a 3D image of mantle wave speeds and for examining relief on transition zone discontinuities using receiver function stacks. Tomographic images reveal a low wave speed anomaly (LWA) that dips to the SW beneath northern Zambia, extending to a depth of at least 900 km. The anomaly appears to be continuous across the transition zone, extending into the lower mantle. Receiver function stacks reveal an average transition zone thickness (TZT) across a wide region extending from central Zambia to the NE through Tanzania and into Kenya, which is ~30-40 km thinner than the global average. These results are not easily explained by models for the origin of the Cenozoic tectonism in eastern Africa that invoke a plume head or small scale convection either by edge flow or passive stretching of the lithosphere. However, the depth extent of the LWA coincident with a thin transition zone is consistent with a model invoking a through-going mantle anomaly beneath eastern Africa that links anomalous upper mantle to the African Superplume anomaly in the lower mantle beneath southern Africa. This finding indicates that geodynamic processes deep in the lower mantle are influencing surface dynamics across the Afro-Arabian rift system.

  18. Possible red spruce decline: Contributions of tree-ring analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Deusen, P.C. ); Reams, G.A. ); Cook, E.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Debate continues about the cause of apparent unprecedented decreases in ring width at all elevations, and increasing levels of mortality at high elevations, in red spruce (Picea rubens) stands in the northeastern United States. These growth and mortality trends are often used as evidence of red spruce decline, but the possibility remains that they may be occurring naturally. Two hypotheses are being used to explain the causes of red spruce growth reduction across its range and increased levels of standing dead at some high-elevation sites. This article summarizes the basic evidence used by advocates of these hypotheses and discusses the strengths of their arguments. The information presented is based primarily on tree-ring studies sponsored by the Forest Response Program, which is part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program.

  19. Excess growing-season water limits lowland black spruce productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, S.; Kolka, R. K.; Bolstad, P. V.; Gill, K.; Curzon, M.; D'Amato, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The annual growth of many tree species is limited by water availability, with growth increasing as water becomes less scarce. In lowland bogs of northern Minnesota, however, black spruce (Picea mariana) is often exposed to excess water via high water table elevations. These trees grow in thick deposits of organic mucky peat and often have shallow rooting systems to avoid the complete submersion of roots in water. While it is generally believed that black spruce decrease growth rates with rising water table elevations, this hypothesis has not been tested in situ. We used a unique, 50-year record of daily bog water table elevations at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) in northern Minnesota to investigate the relationship between climate and black spruce productivity. Nine 1/20th ha circular plots were established in five different bogs and tree height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), and crown class were recorded. Additionally, two perpendicular cores were collected on all trees greater than 10 cm diameter-at-breast-height. Tree cores were sanded, mounted, cross-dated, and de-trended according to standard dendrochronological procedures. Ring width measurements were correlated with precipitation, temperature, and water table elevation using package BootRes in R to determine the climatic variables most associated with stand level productivity. Across the different plots, we found that early growing season water table elevation (May and June) was negatively correlated with both individual and stand-level black spruce growth (p < 0.01), while growth was positively correlated with March temperatures (p < 0.01). No significant relationships existed between black spruce growth and monthly precipitation. If summer water table elevations in these peatland ecosystems rise as is anticipated with more extreme precipitation events due to climate change, we could see an overall decrease in the stand level productivity of black spruce.

  20. STRUCTURAL GEOMETRY OF AN EXHUMED UHP TERRANE IN THE EASTERN SULU OROGEN, CHINA: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTINENTAL COLLISIONAL PROCESSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Kusky, T.

    2009-12-01

    High-precision 1:1,000 mapping of Yangkou Bay, eastern Sulu orogen, defines the structural geometry and history of the world’s most significant UHP (Ultrahigh Pressure) rock exposures. Four stages of folds are recognized in the UHP rocks and associated quartzo-feldspathic gneiss. Eclogite facies rootless F1 and isoclinal F2 folds are preserved locally in coesite-eclogite. Mylonitic to ultramylonitic cosesit-eclogite shear zones separate 5-10-meter-thick nappes of ultramafic-mafic UHP rocks from banded quartzo-feldspathic gneiss. These shear zones are folded, and progressively overprinted by amphibolite and greenschist facies shear zones that become wider with lower grade. The deformation sequences is explained by deep subduction of offscraped thrust slices of oceanic or lower continental crust, caught between the colliding North and South China cratons in the Mesozoic. After these slices were structurally isolated along the plate interface, they were rolled like ball-bearings, in the subduction channel during their exhumation, forming several generations of folds, sequentially lower-grade foliations and lineations, and intruded by several generations of in situ and exotically derived melts. The shear zones formed during different generations of deformation are wider with lower grades, suggesting that deep-crustal/upper mantle deformation operates efficiently (perhaps with more active crystallographic slip systems) than deformation at mid to upper crustal levels.

  1. Changes in soil microbial community structure following the abandonment of agricultural terraces in mountainous areas of Eastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Zornoza, R.; Guerrero, C.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Scow, K.M.; Arcenegui, V.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2012-01-01

    In Eastern Spain, almond trees have been cultivated in terraced orchards for centuries, forming an integral part of the Mediterranean forest scene. In the last decades, orchards have been abandoned due to changes in society. This study investigates effects of changes in land use from forest to agricultural land and the posterior land abandonment on soil microbial community, and the influence of soil physico-chemical properties on the microbial community composition (assessed as abundances of phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA). For this purpose, three land uses (forest, agricultural and abandoned agricultural) at four locations in SE Spain were selected. Multivariate analysis showed a substantial level of differentiation in microbial community structure according to land use. The microbial communities of forest soils were highly associated with soil organic matter content. However, we have not found any physical or chemical soil property capable of explaining the differences between agricultural and abandoned agricultural soils. Thus, it was suggested that the cessation of the perturbation caused by agriculture and shifts in vegetation may have led to changes in the microbial community structure. PLFAs indicative of fungi and ratio of fungal to bacterial PLFAs were higher in abandoned agricultural soils, whereas the relative abundance of bacteria was higher in agricultural soils. Actinomycetes were generally lower in abandoned agricultural soils, while the proportions of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhyzal fungi were, as a general trend, higher in agricultural and abandoned agricultural soils than in forests. Total microbial biomass and richness increased as agricultural < abandoned agricultural < forest soils. PMID:22291451

  2. Cloud deposition to a spruce forest edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathers, K. C.; Lovett, G. M.; Likens, G. E.

    Deposition from clouds to a spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) forest edge on Hunter Mt. in the Catskill Mts of New York State was measured during 1987 and 1988 to determine whether the windward edge of forest floor receives greater deposition of water and ions via cloud water than the interior of a forest. Throughfall was used as a measure of deposition and was collected during cloud-only and mixed cloud-and-rain events along five windward-to-leeward transects in a 30 x 30 m forested area. Ambient cloud water was also collected in a passive collector and chemically analyzed. Trees at the edge of the forest received on average three times, and up to 15 times, greater deposition of ions than those in the interior of the forest. Lead content in samples from Hunter Mt. forest floor at the windward edge, relative to the interior, was enhanced as well. Using a regression of distance vs deposition, the deposition "half-distance", (i.e. the point at which the rate of cloud water deposition is 50% of the rate at the windward edge of the forest) was found to be 28 m. The cloud deposition data from this study are compared to other studies of Na particle deposition to low-elevation forest edges, which show similar deposition "half distances", ranging from ˜ 2 to 36 m into the forest. Most models of cloud deposition currently in use assume landscape homogeneity. Montane forest landscapes, however, are often highly heterogeneous, consisting of many "edges", and thus current models may seriously underestimate cloud deposition.

  3. Genetic uniformity and the decline of red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This brief note examines current research that suggests genetic uniformity as a cause of red spruce decline. Although acid rain and ozone have been implicated in the decline of the species, dieback has been observed evening areas where pollution is low. In addition, the dieback is not observed in other species. Researchers have analyzed the seeds of approximately 500 red spruce trees representing 13 boreal and Montane populations from southern Appalachia to Canada. Of 42 gene loci examined, on the average only 8% of the genes were heterozygousand only 31% were polymorphic.

  4. Structural evolution of the early Permian Nambucca Block (New England Orogen, eastern Australia) and implications for oroclinal bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaanan, Uri; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Li, Pengfei; Vasconcelos, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    The Paleozoic to early Mesozoic southern New England Orogen of eastern Australia exhibits a remarkable ear-shaped curvature (orocline), but the geodynamic processes responsible for its formation are unclear. Oroclinal bending took place during the early Permian, simultaneously with the deposition of the rift-related Sydney, Gunnedah, and Bowen basins, which bound the oroclines to the west. The Nambucca Block is another early Permian rift basin, but it is situated in the core of the oroclinal structure. Here we present new stratigraphic, structural, and geochronological data from the Nambucca Block in an attempt to better understand its tectonic history and relationships to the formation of the oroclines. We recognized four phases of folding and associated structural fabrics (S1-4), with the second phase (S2) dated at 275-265 Ma by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of muscovite. This age overlaps with independent constraints on the timing of oroclinal bending, suggesting that the earlier two phases of deformation in the Nambucca Block (F1 and F2) were associated with orocline formation. We propose that oroclinal bending involved three major stages. The first stage (<300 Ma) was associated with variations in rates of trench rollback and formation of rift basins in a hot extensional back-arc setting. This was followed by a second stage of oroclinal bending, possibly linked to dextral wrench faulting, which involved ~ N-S contraction (F1). Subsequent deformation at 275-265 Ma involved formation of nappe-style structures (F2). This phase of contractional deformation may have resulted from an increased plate coupling that was possibly linked to flat-slab subduction.

  5. Biological structure and dynamics of littoral fish assemblages in the eastern Finger Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Fish assemblages from three of the New York Finger Lakes were examined for structure within and between lakes and over time. Species-area relationships indicated that local fish assemblages are the result of recent, lake-specific events that altered the regional species pool. Fish assemblages varied among seasons and those occupying eutrophic waters had different characteristics from those in oligotrophic waters. Bluntnose minnows (Pimephales notatus) were a persistent and important component of most assemblages, but abundance of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was the most distinguishing feature. Species associations indicated that interactions among the fishes had little influence on assemblage structure. Correlations between community structure and abiotic factors were identified. Ten abiotic variables were strongly associated with the species assemblages, but could not fully explain differences between assemblages. Results indicate that the abundance and diversity of water column feeders was related to productivity of lake habitat. In general, fish populations were smaller in oligotrophic waters and water column feeders were poorly represented in those assemblages. Productivity at various trophic levels was implicated as a major factor determining lake fish assemblage structure.

  6. Structural implications on the deposition of the Upper Freeport coal bed in eastern Greene County, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, B.N. )

    1993-08-01

    The orientation, geometry, thickness, and quality of the Upper Freeport coal bed suggests that syndepositional tectonic activity influenced the accumulation of peat and its laterally equivalent sediments. Both strike-parallel and strike-normal structures appear to influence the deposition of the Upper Freeport coal bed. Strike-parallel structures are faults that were active during the Carboniferous, but do not penetrate into the Carboniferous section. The Carboniferous rocks at the surface within the study area reflect deeper structures as a series of gentle synclines and anticlines. The Upper Freeport coal bed was deposited as a domed peat across the Belle Vernon anticline, which represents the upthrown side of a syndepositionally active deep fault. Laterally equivalent fluvial channel sediments were deposited on the downthrown side of the structure, represented at the surface by the Waynesburg syncline. The influence of syndepositionally active faults on the distribution, thickness, and quality of the Upper Freeport coal bed is similar to the previously reported influence of contemporaneous growth faults on the distribution and thickness of Carboniferous coal beds in Kentucky and Alabama. Strike-normal features also influence the position, geometry, and thickness of the Upper Freeport coal bed. The strike-normal features appear to be produced by deep strike-slip faulting. A major no-coal zone within the Upper Freeport coal bed lies within and parallel to the trend of a cross-strike discontinuity within the study area.

  7. Transverse zones controlling the structural evolution of the Zipaquira Anticline (Eastern Cordillera, Colombia): Regional implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Helbert; Jiménez, Giovanny

    2016-08-01

    We report paleomagnetic, magnetic fabric and structural results from 21 sites collected in Cretaceous marine mudstones and Paleogene continental sandstones from the limbs, hinge and transverse zones of the Zipaquira Anticline (ZA). The ZA is an asymmetrical fold with one limb completely overturned by processes like gravity and salt tectonics, and marked by several axis curvatures. The ZA is controlled by at least two (2) transverse zones known as the Neusa and Zipaquira Transverse Zones (NTZ and ZTZ, respectively). Magnetic mineralogy methods were applied at different sites and the main carriers of the magnetic properties are paramagnetic components with some sites being controlled by hematite and magnetite. Magnetic fabric analysis shows rigid-body rotation for the back-limb in the ZA, while the forelimb is subjected to internal deformation. Structural and paleomagnetic data shows the influence of the NTZ and ZTZ in the evolution of the different structures like the ZA and the Zipaquira, Carupa, Rio Guandoque, Las Margaritas and Neusa faults, controlling several factors as vergence, extension, fold axis curvature and stratigraphic detatchment. Clockwise rotations unraveled a block segmentation following a discontinuos model caused by transverse zones and one site reported a counter clockwise rotation associated with a left-lateral strike slip component for transverse faults (e.g. the Neusa Fault). We propose that diverse transverse zones have been active since Paleogene times, playing an important role in the tectonic evolution of the Cundinamarca sub-basin and controlling the structural evolution of folds and faults with block segmentation and rotations.

  8. Effectiveness of polyethylene sheeting in controlling spruce beetles ( coleoptera: scolytidae') in infested stacks of spruce firewood in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Holsten, E.H.; Werner, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The covering stacks of spruce firewood with either clear or black polyethylene sheeting does not raise log temperatures high enough to kill spruce beetle brood in the logs. Based on the results of the study, the authors do not recommend the use of polyethylene sheeting as a remedial measure for the reduction of spruce beetle brood in infested firewood or log decks in south-central Alaska.

  9. Structure and dynamics in the north Jizhong Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Q.; Qi, J.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Study of structural geology in the north Jizhong Depression, Bohai Bay has achieved great breakthroughs in recent years. However the studies of structure and dynamics still remain much controversy. Based on the 3D and partial 2D seismic data, combined with regional geology and well data, the characteristics of structures in the north Jizhong Deprssion are analyzed, the dynamics is discussed. Our analyses show that the Cenozoic structures in the north Jizhong Depression can be subdivided into extensional system and strike-slip system. Extensional system concludes series of normal faults and transfer faults. Normal faults are mainly trend NNE and NE. They control the Paleogene sediments in sub-depressions of hanging-wall, and bottom out into a sub-horizontal detachment zone in deep level shaped like listric. Transfer faults mainly adjust displacement of normal faults, yet some like Tongbozhen and Niutuozhen are transfer faults in Paleocene and Eocene but change to normal faults in Oligocene. Strike-slip system is predominantly consisted by sub-vertical right-lateral strike-slip faults such as Xin`anzhen and Maxi. From seismic profiles, Xin`anzhen and Maxi cut into basement but only influence the sediments of Ed of Paleogene and Lower Neogene. Based on the relation of sedimentary sequence and faults, the extensional system mainly develops from Paleocene to Late Oligocene, but strike-slip system predominantly develops from Late Oligocene to Miocene. From the superposed section of crustal structure and basin structure in Jizhong Depression, the Cenozoic sub-basin is just located on the thinner zones of crustal, corresponding with the location of mantle uplift. It indicates that the Paleogene development of Jizhong Depression is related to the horizontal tension caused by uplift of magma in mantle. The results illustrate that extensional deformation in Jizhong depression is caused by the uplift of magma. The right-lateral strike-slip deformation, same with Tancheng

  10. Deformation of allochthonous salt and evolution of related salt-structural systems, eastern Louisiana Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Salt tectonics in the northern Gulf of Mexico involves both vertical diapirism and lateral silling or flow of salt into wings and tablets (sheets). Combinations of these two modes of salt deformation, concurrent with sediment loading and salt evacuation, have produced complex structures in the coastal and offshore region of southeastern Louisiana, a prolific oil and gas province. Many large growth faults and salt domes in the study area root into intra-Tertiary salt welds that were formerly occupied by allochthonous salt tablets. Two end-member structural systems involving evacuation of former tabular salt are recognized: roho systems and stepped counter-regional systems. Both end-member systems share a similar multi-staged evolution, including (1) initial formation of a south-leaning salt dome or wall sourced from the Jurassic salt level; (2) progressive development into a semi-tabular allochthonous salt body; and (3) subsequent loading, evacuation, and displacement of the tabular salt into secondary domes. In both systems, it is not uncommon to find salt displaced as much as 16-24 km south of its autochthonous source, connected by a horizontal salt weld to an updip, deflated counter-regional feeder. Although both end-member structural systems may originate before loading of allochthonous salt having grossly similar geometry, their final structural configurations after loading and salt withdrawal are distinctly different. Roho systems are characterized by large-displacement, listric, south-dipping growth faults that sole into intra-Tertiary salt welds marked by high-amplitude reflections continuous with residual salt masses. Salt from the former salt tablets has been loaded and squeezed laterally and downdip. Stepped counter-regional systems, in contrast, comprise large salt domes and adjacent large-displacement, north-dipping growth faults that sole into intra-Tertiary salt welds before stepping down again farther north.

  11. Effects of structural complexity enhancement on eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus) populations in northern hardwood forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenny, H.C.; Keeton, W.S.; Donovan, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Managing for stand structural complexity in northern hardwood forests has been proposed as a method for promoting microhabitat characteristics important to eastern red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus). We evaluated the effects of alternate, structure-based silvicultural systems on red-backed salamander populations at two research sites in northwestern Vermont. Treatments included two uneven-aged approaches (single-tree selection and group-selection) and one unconventional approach, termed "structural complexity enhancement" (SCE), that promotes development of late-successional structure, including elevated levels of coarse woody debris (CWD). Treatments were applied to 2 ha units and were replicated two to four times depending on treatment. We surveyed red-backed salamanders with a natural cover search method of transects nested within vegetation plots 1 year after logging. Abundance estimates corrected for detection probability were calculated from survey data with a binomial mixture model. Abundance estimates differed between study areas and were influenced by forest structural characteristics. Model selection was conducted using Akaike Information Criteria, corrected for over-dispersed data and small sample size (QAICc). We found no difference in abundance as a response to treatment as a whole, suggesting that all of the uneven-aged silvicultural systems evaluated can maintain salamander populations after harvest. However, abundance was tied to specific structural habitat attributes associated with study plots within treatments. The most parsimonious model of habitat covariates included site, relative density of overstory trees, and density of more-decayed and less-decayed downed CWD. Abundance responded positively to the density of downed, well-decayed CWD and negatively to the density of poorly decayed CWD and to overstory relative density. CWD volume was not a strong predictor of salamander abundance. We conclude that structural complexity enhancement

  12. Plasticity in variation of xylem and phloem cell characteristics of Norway spruce under different local conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gričar, Jožica; Prislan, Peter; de Luis, Martin; Gryc, Vladimír; Hacurová, Jana; Vavrčík, Hanuš; Čufar, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on intra-annual plasticity of secondary tissues of tree species growing under different environmental conditions. To increase the knowledge about the plasticity of secondary growth, which allows trees to adapt to specific local climatic regimes, we examined climate–radial growth relationships of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.] from three contrasting locations in the temperate climatic zone by analyzing tree-ring widths for the period 1932–2010, and cell characteristics in xylem and phloem increments formed in the years 2009–2011. Variation in the structure of xylem and phloem increments clearly shows that plasticity in seasonal dynamics of cambial cell production and cell differentiation exists on xylem and phloem sides. Anatomical characteristics of xylem and phloem cells are predominantly site-specific characteristics, because they varied among sites but were fairly uniform among years in trees from the same site. Xylem and phloem tissues formed in the first part of the growing season seemed to be more stable in structure, indicating their priority over latewood and late phloem for tree performance. Long-term climate and radial growth analyses revealed that growth was in general less dependent on precipitation than on temperature; however, growth sensitivity to local conditions differed among the sites. Only partial dependence of radial growth of spruce on climatic factors on the selected sites confirms its strategy to adapt the structure of wood and phloem increments to function optimally in local conditions. PMID:26442044

  13. Subsurface structure along the eastern marginal fault zone of Yokote Basin by Seismic reflection profiling studies, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagohara, K.; Imaizumi, T.; Echigo, T.; Miyauchi, T.; Sato, H.

    2005-12-01

    Typical reverse faults, which are known as Senya earthquake faults appeared along the western foot of the Mahiru Mountains, associated with The Rikuu Earthquake (Mj7.2) of 1896 in Northeast Japan. Eastern marginal fault zone of the Yokote Basin consist of four main surface ruptures, about 35 km long, Obonai fault, Shiraiwa fault, Ota fault and Senya fault, depending on their continuity and strike (Matsuda et al., 1980). We carried out the seismic reflection profiling across these faults (Kawaguchi03 Seismic line, Unjono04 Seismic line and Kotaki05 Seismic line) to clarify the subsurface structure of these reverse fault system based on the data of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology and furthermore, to discuss the timing of migration of the thrusting from the range front to the basin margin. The seismic source was mini-vibrator trucks, with 20seconds of 10-100Hz signals at 10m or 5m intervals. The sweep signals were recorded by a digital telemetry system (GDAPS-4a) with 10 Hz geophones. The obtained seismic reflection data were processed by conventional Common mid-point (CMP) methods, including post-stack migration and depth conversion. The resulting seismic reflection profile reveals a thrust structure beneath these areas. At the Center of Senya hills there are two thrusts and one high angle reverse fault (1997 Seismic Line). Senya fault is an active frontal emergent thrust with flat and ramp structure. Although, the high angle reverse fault, located along the foot of the range is a short-cut branching fault from the Senya fault in the central part of the Senya hill (Sato et al., 1998), in the Unjono04 seismic line, the depth of the flat and ramp structure gradually shallow in the north part of the Senya hill, where the flexure scarp accompanied with antithetic faults formed on the fluvial terraces. In the Kawaguchi03 seismic line, the concealed fault, 0.5km below the surface, branched from the master Ota fault, form a flexure scarplet on the alluvial fan

  14. Cenozoic structural history of selected areas in the eastern Great Basin, Nevada-Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Ernest

    1983-01-01

    The Confusion Range structural trough (CRST) of west-central Utah predates the Oligocene rocks that are exposed along it. The northern part of the axial region of the CRST is complicated by structures that include reverse faults and associated folds, a large-amplitude mushroom fold, and belts of sharply flexed to overturned strata some of which are fault bounded. These structures, which also predate the Oligocene rocks, formed in a compressional regime that has been interpreted as resulting from thin-skinned gravitational gliding toward the axis of the CRST. Study of the sparse Tertiary rocks that are scattered along the axial region of the CRST reveals abundant evidence of Oligocene and younger deformation. The chief evidence includes (1) widespread Oligocene and Miocene coarse clastic rocks, many of which are conglomerates, that attest to local and distant tectonism, (2) faults that range from high-angle structures generally with less than 100 m of normal displacement to low-angle attenuation faults some of which may have large displacements, and (3) open asymmetric folds. Together with the distribution of sheet-form bodies of ash-flow tuffs, the Oligocene stratigraphic record allows for paleogeographic reconstruction of a lacustrine basin across what is now the northern Confusion Range and one or more basins in the southern part of the CRST. The basins are inferred to have been fault controlled by reactivation of previously formed faults or steep fold flanks. They may have been localized by differential vertical movements similar to those that produced the older systems of folds and faults. Parts of early formed basins were cannibalized as local syndepositional deformation took place in the axial region of the CRST. Both limbs of the CRST have been modified by folds that involve Oligocene rocks. Some of these folds appear to be genetically related to displacements on faults that bound them. They may record thin-skinned Neogene tectonic displacements toward the

  15. Distribution and structure of active strike-slip faults in the Enshu forearc basin of the eastern Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, T.; Ashi, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Accretionary prisms and forearc basins are developed in the Nankai Trough, SW Japan. Many active faults are recognized and classified into five fault systems in the eastern Nankai Trough. The Enshu Faults System, the most landward one, runs over 200 km along the northern edge of the Tokai, Enshu and Kumano forearc basins. Swath bathymetry and side-scan sonar surveys indicate a general fault trend of ENE-WSW and dextral displacement of submarine canyons across the landward-most fault. Seismic reflection profiles partly exhibit landward dipping fault planes and flower structures suggesting that the Enshu fault system is affected by oblique subduction of the Philippines Sea Plate. Structural investigation of this area is important for earthquake disaster mitigation as well as understanding of oblique subduction tectonics. However, activity of faults has not been clarified. Japan Oil, Gas and Metal National Corporation (JOGMEC) conducted dense seismic reflection survey at the Tokai-Kumano area in 2001. Seismic reflection profiles clearly show depositional sequences and deformation structures such as faults and folds. This study examined deformation styles and fault activities based on detailed interpretation of seismic reflection profiles. Sediment thickness mapped from seismic profiles clearly changes with age. Sediment thickness is almost homogeneous from the acoustic basement (probably Paleogene Shimanto Complex) to a Pliocene horizon in the survey area. In contrast, thickness between a Pliocene horizon and present seafloor shows large variations from east to west. It is suggested that sedimentary environments change drastically at this period. There are also small-scale variations in sediment thickness for all horizons. Some distinct changes are distributed along linear boundaries. It seems that they correspond to the faults recognized as lineaments on the sidescan sonar images. We estimated activities of faulting based on such sediment thickness changes and their

  16. Wood Anatomy and Insect Defoliator Systems: Is there an anatomical response to sustained feeding by the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on Douglas-fir (Pseudotusga menziesii)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelson, Jodi; Gärtner, Holger; Alfaro, René; Smith, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) is the most widespread and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in western North America, and has a long-term coexistence with its primary host tree, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Franco). Western spruce budworm (WSB) outbreaks usually last for several years, and cause reductions in annual growth, stem defects, and regeneration delays. In British Columbia, the WSB is the second most damaging insect after the mountain pine beetle, and sustained and/or severe defoliation can result in the mortality of host trees. Numerous studies have used tree rings to reconstruct WSB outbreaks across long temporal scales, to evaluate losses in stand productivity, and examine isotope ratios. Although some studies have looked at the impacts of artificial defoliation on balsam fir in eastern North America, there has been no prior research on how WSB outbreaks affect the anatomical structure of the stem as described by intra-annual wood density and potential cell size variations. The objective of this study was to anatomically examine the response of Douglas-fir to sustained WSB outbreaks in two regions of southern British Columbia. We hypothesize that the anatomical intra-annual characteristics of the tree rings, such as cell wall thickness, latewood cell size, and/or lumen area changes during sustained WSB outbreaks. To test this hypothesis we sampled four permanent sample plots in coastal and dry interior sites, which had annually resolved defoliation data collected over a 7-12 year period. At each site diameter-at-breast height (cm), height (m), and crown position were recorded and three increment cores were extracted from 25 trees. Increment cores were prepared to permit anatomical and x-ray density analyses. For each tree, a 15µm thick micro section was cut from the radial plane. Digital images of the micro sections were captured and processed. In each annual ring, features such as cell lumen area (µm2

  17. Subsurface structural geology of the eastern part of the Buyuk Menderes Graben, western Turkey: Implications for structural evolution of the Buyuk Menderes and Alasehir Grabens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Seren

    The Central Menderes Metamorphic Core complex of Western Anatolia, Turkey is bordered by two major approximately E-W trending seismically active grabens: the Alasehir and Buyuk Menderes Grabens (BMG). Seven depth-converted 2-D seismic reflection profiles and well log data from one well are used to delineate the geometry of the subsurface structural features and the Cenozoic stratigraphy of the eastern part of the BMG. Depth converted seismic profiles indicate ~2100 meters (m) thickness of Early Miocene to recent sedimentary rock units in the BMG. The south-dipping Graben Bounding Fault (GBF) along the northern margin of the BMG has been active probably since Miocene sedimentation in the basin. Miocene to Pliocene (Neogene) sedimentary units show thickness variations along the three N-S cross-sections constructed based on the structural interpretation of the seismic data. The Neogene units are thickest in the center of the graben, and illustrate a wedge-shaped geometry towards the north and south-dipping graben bounding faults flanking the graben. Due to this geometry, syn-sedimentary extension in the graben has not formed a rollover structure and associate extensional folds and faults. The subsurface structural geometry of the BMG contrasts with the structural geometry of the Neogene sedimentary units in the Alasehir Graben (AG). The AG contains a thicker (3000 m) Neogene sedimentary succession (Ciftci and Bozkurt, 2009, 2010), a rollover structure and a supradetachment basin were interpreted by (Cemen et al., 2006; Ciftci and Bozkurt, 2009, 2010). Although the AG and BMG may have started to form simultaneously in Early Miocene time during the Cenozoic extensional phase in the region, they do not contain symmetrical structural features.

  18. Structural survey and faults kinematics analysis of the eastern Thaumasia Region, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borraccini, F.; di Achille, G.

    Thaumasia Region, Mars F. Borraccini (1), G. Di Achille (2) (1) Institute of Environmental Dynamics, University of Urbino, Italy, (2) Int'l Research School of Planetary Sciences, Pescara, Italy (borraccini@uniurb.it / Fax: +39 0722 304295 / Phone: +39 0722 304295) Thaumasia plateau is a tectonically uplifted area buonded by outward-verging ridges (Thaumasia Highlands and Coprates Rise) and by extensional features (Valles Marineris and Claritas Fossae). Since the geodynamic and tectonic evolution of Thaumasia is still debated, we have undertaken a detailed tectonic mapping of a key-sector (of about 2.400.000 km2 ) in order to provide new constraints for the reconstruction of the geodynamic evolution of the whole Thaumasia Region. The study area encompasses the Coprates Chasma and Thaumasia Planum and is bordered by Melas Dorsae and by Nectaris Fossae to the West and East, respectively. In addition to previous Martian data sets (MOC, Themis, and Viking), we also used the HRSC images which made possible a detailed structural analysis. The area shows tectonic features characterized by different kinematics, origins and ages. In particular, horst and graben structures are arranged in two main WNW-ESE and NW-SE trending sets. A further set of normal faults is E-W oriented and dissects the Coprates Rise. This is affected by intense scarp retreat processes probably associated to wind and/or fluvial activities. E-W oriented right-lateral strike-slip faults postdates the extensional features and locally shows associated pull-apart basins. A compressive tectonic phase is recorded by NNE-SSW trending wrinkle ridges and by N-S oriented, east-verging regional buckling folds. We also investigated the relationship between the kinematics of those sets of structures and of major features like Valles Marineris and Coprates Rise. The analysis of crosscutting relationships between observed tectonic trends allowed the identification of the main deformational events occurred in the

  19. The Tschigot granodiorite (Eastern Alps, Southern Tyrol): a structural and AMS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Neven; Pomella, Hannah; Cifelli, Francesca; Mattei, Massimo; Fügenschuh, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    The Ordovician Tschigot granodiorite, hosted by the Texel complex, underwent polyphase tectonometamorphic overprint during the Variscan and Alpine orogenies. The main magmatic body forms a large sigma-like clast. While the contact with the host rock is characterized by a strong and coherent mylonitic foliation the internal part of the body is almost isotropic. The mylonitic foliation (S1.2 ) dips 40-60° toward N to NW. The related stretching lineation (L1.2) plunges 5-35° toward W or E, but also with some 10-15° deviations to NW or SW. Shear sense criteria related to L1.2 indicate top-to-the W sense of shear. Towards the inner parts of the body the intensity of deformation decreases rapidly within first 200-300 meters. From the mylonites at the contact (i.e. LS tectonites) the fabric first changes to form L>S and L-tectonites with their lineation (30-40° to NW) in perfect agreement with the orientation of the crenulation lineation (L2) from the surrounding host rocks. Unfortunately the continuous transition from LS to L-tectonites is hardly outcropping. Rarely two foliations (S1.1 and S1.2) can be observed in the granodiorite with the intersection lineation shallowly dipping towards NW (i.e. parallel to the lineation from the L-tectonite). While dynamic recrystallization of quartz in the L-tectonite is dominated by grain boundary migration with subordinate subgrain rotation (SGR), SGR characterizesthe mylonite from the contact area. With respect to their orientation the analysed magnetic lineations (Lmag) and foliations (Smag) are perfectly in agreement with the structural field data. The parallelism between magnetic (Smag, Lmag) and field structures (S1.2, L1.2) in the mylonite domain shows that in the temperature range between 400-500°C and under conditions of intensive shearing preexisting structural and magnetic features are fully overprinted and reoriented. In conclusion our data demonstrate perfect overlap between magnetic and structural fabrics in

  20. A terminal Pleistocene child cremation and residential structure from eastern Beringia.

    PubMed

    Potter, Ben A; Irish, Joel D; Reuther, Joshua D; Gelvin-Reymiller, Carol; Holliday, Vance T

    2011-02-25

    The dearth of human remains and residential sites has constrained inquiry into Beringian lifeways at the transition of the late Pleistocene-early Holocene. We report on human skeletal remains and a residential structure from central Alaska dated to ~11,500 calendar years ago. The remains are from a ~3-year-old child who was cremated in a pit within a semisubterranean house. The burial-cremation and house have exceptional integrity and preservation and exhibit similarities and differences to both Siberian Upper Paleolithic and North American Paleoindian features. PMID:21350175

  1. Higher fine-scale genetic structure in peripheral than in core populations of a long-lived and mixed-mating conifer - eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fine-scale or spatial genetic structure (SGS) is one of the key genetic characteristics of plant populations. Several evolutionary and ecological processes and population characteristics influence the level of SGS within plant populations. Higher fine-scale genetic structure may be expected in peripheral than core populations of long-lived forest trees, owing to the differences in the magnitude of operating evolutionary and ecological forces such as gene flow, genetic drift, effective population size and founder effects. We addressed this question using eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) as a model species for declining to endangered long-lived tree species with mixed-mating system. Results We determined the SGS in two core and two peripheral populations of eastern white cedar from its Maritime Canadian eastern range using six nuclear microsatellite DNA markers. Significant SGS ranging from 15 m to 75 m distance classes was observed in the four studied populations. An analysis of combined four populations revealed significant positive SGS up to the 45 m distance class. The mean positive significant SGS observed in the peripheral populations was up to six times (up to 90 m) of that observed in the core populations (15 m). Spatial autocorrelation coefficients and correlograms of single and sub-sets of populations were statistically significant. The extent of within-population SGS was significantly negatively correlated with all genetic diversity parameters. Significant heterogeneity of within-population SGS was observed for 0-15 m and 61-90 m between core and peripheral populations. Average Sp, and gene flow distances were higher in peripheral (Sp = 0.023, σg = 135 m) than in core (Sp = 0.014, σg = 109 m) populations. However, the mean neighborhood size was higher in the core (Nb = 82) than in the peripheral (Nb = 48) populations. Conclusion Eastern white cedar populations have significant fine-scale genetic structure at short distances. Peripheral

  2. South Florida Ecosystem Program: quantifying freshwater discharge for coastal hydraulic control structures in eastern Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kapadia, Amit; Swain, Eric D.

    1996-01-01

    The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort, involving a number of agencies, to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), one of the agencies, provides scientific information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began their ow program, called the South Florida Ecosystem Program, in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. As part of the South Florida Ecosystem Program, the USGS, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), has conducted a study to determine discharge ratings for 16 coastal hydraulic control structures in eastern Dade County, Fla. (fig. 1 ). Discharge data are needed to quantify water that can be made available for water supply and ecosystem restoration and to calibrate regional hydrologic models.

  3. Triangle zone and displacement transfer structures in the eastern Front Ranges, southern Canadian Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, D.A. ); Spratt, D.A. )

    1992-06-01

    The geometry of a relict triangle zone at the boundary of the Foothills and Front Ranges in the southern Canadian Rocky Mountains is constrained by detailed surface mapping over 700 m of relief and by seismic reflection data. The geometry and progressive development of the triangle zone along a strike length of 15-20 km, in the displacement transfer zone between the Coleman and Misty thrusts, is illustrated using closely spaced balanced cross sections, palinspastic restorations, and s sequentially restored cross section. Structural geometries show that a northeast- (foreland-) verging, mainly carbonate wedge of Mississippian to Triassic rock was inserted along a major upper detachment zone in shale, near the base of the Jurassic-Cretaceous clastic package. This was accompanied by southwest- (hinterland-) verging displacements along the upper detachment zone, tectonic thickening of the clastic package exceeding 200%, and backthrusting. Later northeast-verging deformation slightly modified the triangle zone by steepening structures, tightening folds, and minor thrusting. Recognition of relict triangle zones within the fold and thrust belt may document important changes in the rate of thrust front advancement, and aid in the delineation of potential hydrocarbon traps, similar to those discovered along the present-day thrust-belt margin in the southern Canadian Rocky Mountains.

  4. ERTS-1 imagery of eastern Africa: A first look at the geological structure of selected areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, P. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Imagery of the African rift system resolves the major Cainozoic faults, zones of warping, and associated volcanism. It also clearly depicts the crystal grain of the Precambrian rocks where these are exposed. New structural features, or new properties of known features such as greater extent, continuity, and linearity are revealed by ERTS-1 imagery. This applies, for example, to the NE-SW fracture zones in Yemen, the Aswa mylonite zone at the northern end of the Western Rift, the Nandi fault of western Kenya, the linear faults of the Elgeyo escarpment in the Gregory Rift, and the hemibasins of warped Tertiary lavas on the Red Sea margin of Yemen, matching those of Ethiopian plateau-Afar margin. A tentative scheme is proposed, relating the effect on the pattern of Cainozoic faulting of the degree of obliquity to Precambrian structural trend. It is particularly noteworthy that, even where the Precambrian grain determines the rift faulting to be markedly oblique to the overall trend of the rift trough, for example, in central Lake Tanganyika, the width of the trough is not significantly increased. Some ground mapped lithological boundaries are obscure on ERTS-1 imagery.

  5. Magnetic Anomaly Modeling of Volcanic Structure and Stratigraphy - Socorro Island, Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Escorza-Reyes, Marisol; Pavon-Moreno, Julio; Perez-Cruz, Ligia; Sanchez-Zamora, Osvaldo

    2013-04-01

    Results of a magnetic survey of the volcanic structure of Socorro Island in the Revillagigedo Archipielago are presented. Socorro is part of a group of seamounts and oceanic islands built by volcanic activity at the northern end of the Mathematician ridge and intersection with the Clarion and Rivera fracture zones. Subaerial volcanic activity is characterized by alkaline and peralkaline compositions, marked by pre-, syn- and post-caldera phases of the Evermann volcano, and the Holocene mafic activity of the Lomas Coloradas. The magnetic survey conducted in the central-southern sector of the island permits to investigate the volcanic structure and subsurface stratigraphy. Regional fields for second- and third-degree polynomials show a magnetic low over the caldera, positive anomalies above the pre-caldera deposits and intermediate amplitude anomalies over Lomas Coloradas. Residual fields delineate the structural rim of the caldera, anomaly trends for the pre- and post-caldera deposits and a broad anomaly over Lomas Coloradas. Regional-residual anomalies, first vertical derivative, analytical upward and downward continuations, and forward four-layer modeling are used to construct the geophysical models. Rock magnetic properties were analyzed on samples collected at 24 different sites. Magnetic susceptibility showed wide range of variation from ~10 to ~500 10-3 SI, corresponding to the different lithologies from trachytes and glass-rich tuffs to alkali basalts. Data have been divided into groups with low, intermediate and high values. Rock magnetic analyses indicate that magnetite and titanomagnetites are the main magnetization carriers. Magnetic hysteresis loops indicate low coercivity minerals, with high saturation and remanent magnetizations and PSD domain states. Magnetic susceptibility versus temperature curves show irreversible behavior with Curie temperatures around 560-575 C, suggesting magnetite and Ti-poor titanomagnetites. Paleomagnetic directions

  6. Crustal Structure of the Central Anatolia - Eastern Mediterrenean, Turkey and Cyprus from Wide-Angle Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denli, Alper; Gürbüz, Cemil; Mechie, James; Weber, Michael

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the CyprusArc project, a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction profiles were carried out in March 2010. The 300 km and 45 km long north-south trending profiles extended from Cihanbeyli in Central Anatolia to Anamur in eastern Mediterranean, Turkey and in southern Cyprus, respectively. The purpose of the project is to observe the impact of the transition from subduction to continent-continent collision of the African plate with the Anatolian plate. The field experiment comprised two land shots (1125 kg explosives) in Turkey and airguns (98 cubic liters) on the Mediterranean sea, beneath Cyprus. 244 stations were installed on land for data acquisition. 77 three-component sensors and 167 vertical-component sensors were installed along ~300 km distances between Cihanbeyli and Anamur with an average spacing of 1.25 km, on Turkey. 24 three-component sensors and 21 vertical component sensors were deployed along 45 km distances on land at southern Cyprus with an average spacing of 1.25 km. To reveal a good data quality, a visual quality check, frequency analysis and filtering were applied to the seismic data. Two land shots on Turkey (also recorded on Cyprus) and airgun shots on the Mediterranean sea beneath Cyprus, geological and previous seismic investigations provide information to derive a layered velocity models beneath from the Anatolian plateau to eastern Mediterranean, Turkey and for the ophiolite complex on Cyprus. After picking observed seismic phases, finite-differences ray tracing of the wide-angle data leads a 2-D crustal P-wave velocity models. The results show moho depth increases from 38 km to 45 km depth along north-south trending profile on Turkey and crustal thinning between south Turkey and Cyprus from 40 km to 36 km. Obtained models were further refined using forward modeling to generate synthetic seismograms for individual shot gathers. Thus, by varying the velocity structure, the theoretical times and amplitudes of the various

  7. Neogene Structural History of Biak and the Biak Basin, Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, D.; Hall, R.; Burgess, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Biak Basin is within a frontier region, located between the islands of Biak to the north and Yapen to the south in the Indonesian province of West Papua. The Biak Basin is underlain by a Paleogene basement sequence that originated in an intra-oceanic island arc, formed on the leading edge of the oceanic Pacific-Caroline Plate. The basin has a structural history that can be divided into three stages: 1) a compressional stage, 2) a rifting stage and 3) a strike-slip stage. The compressional stage occurred during the Early Miocene. Collision of the arc with the northern edge of the Australian continental margin caused folding and thrusting of the basement sequence which was uplifted and subaerially exposed resulting in a widespread unconformity that can be traced west through the western Bird's Head as far as Halmahera. Following this collision the Biak Basin was filled largely by carbonates from the Early Miocene. During the Middle-Late Miocene the Biak Basin underwent a period of rapid subsidence resulting from a period of rifting. Extension occurred as convergence of the Pacific Plate with the Australian margin produced a regional stress field in which the maximum compressive stress was orientated NE-SW and maximum tensional stress NW-SE. This tensional stress produced NE-SW striking horsts and grabens with a Paleogene basement overlain by Lower Miocene carbonates. A final stage involving strike-slip faulting occurred during the Pliocene-Pleistocene with the initiation of major regional faults such as those of the Yapen Fault Zone and Biak Array which bound the southern and northeastern margins of the basin respectively. The strike-slip faulting accommodated continued convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates and uplifted Miocene carbonates as pop-up structures now observed on Biak.There are parallels to the Biak Basin in basins within the Basin and Range Province of the western United States, in particular the Walker Lake Basin, Nevada and other

  8. First images of the crustal structure across the eastern Algerian margin, from deep penetrating seismic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyahiaoui, Boualem; Abtout, Abdeslam; Sage, Françoise; Klingelhoeffer, Frauke; Collot, Jean-yves; Yelles-chaouche, Abdelkarim; Marok, Abbas; Djellit, Hamou; Galves, Audrey; Bracène, Rabah; Schnurle, Philippe; Graindorge, David; party, Scientific

    2013-04-01

    The Algerian continental margin North Africa presents one of only a few examples of a passive continental margin formed in a back-arc environment, which undergoes current compression and is proposed to be reactivated today. In the framework of the Algerian - French SPIRAL research program (Sismique Profonde et Investigation Regionale du nord de l'ALgérie), a seismic cruise was conducted on the R/V Atalante from September to November 2009. During the cruise, deep penetrating low frequency multichannel and wide-angle seismic data were acquired in order to study the deep structure of the Algerian margin. In this work, we present the preliminary results from wide-angle modeling of the North-east Algerian margin in the region of Annaba along a N-S transect using a data set of 42 OBS (ocean bottom seismometers) along a profile extending 117km, and 13 broadband seismological stations along a profile of 80 km length. Travel-time tomography and forward modeling were undertaken to model the velocity structure in this region. The resulting velocity models image the thickness of the sedimentary layers, which varies between a few hundred meters on the continental margin of more than 4 km in the basin. The crust is about 6 km thick in the basin, and thickens to 7-8 km between 40 and 60km distance from the margin toe. Crustal thickness increases to about 22 km at the continental slope over a distance of ~ 90 km. The nature of the crust was determined to be thin oceanic with abnormal velocity gradient in the basin, and thinned continental from around 30 km distance from the coast landward. Integration of the wide-angle seismic data with multichannel seismic, gravity and magnetic data will help to better understand the structure of the Algerian margin and the adjacent oceanic basin in the Annaba region, and to discuss the numerous cinematic models proposed in literature regarding the formation of the north-Algerian basin.

  9. A new name for the western spruce budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There currently is considerable confusion as to the correct application of the name Choristoneura occidentalis. This name has historically been applied to the western spruce budworm, a serious forest pest in western North America. However, Razowski (2008) transferred Archips occidentalis into Choris...

  10. POSSIBLE RED SPRUCE DECLINE: CONTRIBUTIONS OF TREE-RING ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies of the northeastern red spruce ecosystem, several points evoke some agreement: 1) many high elevation sites exhibit substantial post-1960 mortality that could be due to winter injury; 2) there is widespread pre-1950 growth increase with a subsequent post-l960 growth de...

  11. The Structures of Summer Convective Clouds in Eastern Montana. II: Effects of Artificial Seeding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.; Politovich, Marcia K.

    1980-06-01

    The seeding of clouds in Miles City, Montana with AgI pyrotechnics at cloud tops generally produced large increases in ice particle concentrations, decreases in liquid water contents, and increases in precipitation particles lower down in the clouds. Similar, but even more pronounced, changes were observed when clouds were seeded with dry ice. Seeding with AgI-NH4I-acetone solution at cloud base generally did not produce observable changes in cloud microstructures at higher levels but in one case changes attributable to this type of seeding were observed.Comparisons of the structure of seeded clouds at Miles City with unseeded clouds suggests that the seeding of small and embedded cumulus clouds with dry ice to produce ice panicle concentrations of 1-10 1 may offer the best potential for enhancing precipitation.

  12. Crustal structure of the Hecataeus Rise (eastern Mediterranean) deduced by marine gravity and marine magnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In the year 2010 extensive geophysical researches were carried out in the area of Hecataeus Rise using the German research vessel Maria S. Merian. Beside the bathymetry, refraction and reflection seismic data, marine gravity and marine magnetic data were acquired during this cruise. The result of the research along one Wide-Angle reflection/refraction seismic line of this cruise is published 2015 by K. Welford et al.. Based on interpretation of reflection seismic and bathymetry data across the Hecataeus Rise, S. Reiche published 2015 the crustal structure and bathymetric features along some seismic profiles of this cruise. The focus of this work is to use the available sediments and crustal structures inferred by seismic information together with real marine gravity and marine magnetic data in order to produce gravity and magnetic 2-D models along all seismic profiles. While Welford et al. used the altimetry gravity data and magnetic data from EMAG3 database for their modelling, the real gravity and magnetic data measured exactly along the seismic profiles will be used in this work. The advantage of the real marine gravity and real marine magnetic data used for the modelling is that they have higher accuracy in the values as well as in the positions. Furthermore, Welford et al. calculated the gravity and Magnetic models along some seismic profiles, while in this work the result of gravity and magnetic modelling along all seismic profiles of this cruise will be presented. The marine gravity and marine magnetic data along all seismic profiles were recorded continuously. The accuracy of marine gravity data is about ± 1 mGal, while the accuracy of Marine magnetic data is in the range of ± 3 nT. The results of 2-D gravity and magnetic modelling will be presented and discussed in this work.

  13. Structural pattern in the Precambrian rocks of Sonua-Lotapahar region, North Singhbhum, eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Dhruba; Bhattacharya, Tapas; Chakraborty, Tapan; Dey, Arun Kanti

    1990-06-01

    In the western part of the North Singhbhum fold belt near Lotapahar and Sonua the remobilized basement block of Chakradharpur Gneiss is overlain by a metasedimentary assemblage consisting of quartz arenite, conglomerate, slate-phyllite, greywacke with volcanogenic material, volcaniclastic rocks and chert. The rock assemblage suggests an association of volcanism, turbidite deposition and debris flow in the basin. The grade of metamorphism is very low, the common metamorphic minerals being muscovite, chlorite, biotite and stilpnomelane. Three phases of deformation have affected the rocks. The principal D1 structure is a penetrative planar fabric, parallel to or at low angle to bedding. No D1 major fold is observed and the regional importance of this deformation is uncertain. The D2 deformation has given rise to a number of northerly plunging major folds on E-W axial planes. These have nearly reclined geometry and the L 2lineation is mostly downdip on the S 2surface, though some variation in pitch is observed. The morphology of D2 planar fabric varies from slaty cleavage/schistosity to crenulation cleavage and solution cleavage. D3 deformation is weak and has given rise to puckers and broad warps on schistosity and bedding. The D2 major folds south of Lotapahar are second order folds in the core of the Ongarbira syncline whose easterly closure is exposed east of the mapped area. Photogeological study suggests that the easterly and westerly closing folds together form a large synclinal sheath fold. There is a continuity of structures from north to south and no mylonite belt is present, though there is attenuation and disruption along the fold limbs. Therefore, the Singhbhum shear zone cannot be extended westwards in the present area. There is no evidence that in this area a discontinuity surface separates two orogenic belts of Archaean and Proterozoic age.

  14. Deep crustal structure off Akita, eastern margin of the Japan Sea, deduced from ocean bottom seismographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Azusa; Asada, Akira

    1999-06-01

    A seismic exploration was carried out to detect the heterogeneity of the seismic wavespeed structure associated with the plate convergence at the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. Two airgun-OBS (ocean bottom seismograph) profiles were shot off Akita, Japan, where a seismic gap seems to exist but the location of the plate boundary has not been confirmed. One of the profiles was 60 km long, trending NNE-SSW, named Line OBS-9, at the northeastern end of the Yamato Basin and the other was 170 km long, trending WNW-ESE, Line NT95-1, parallel to the direction of the supposed plate convergence. The crustal structure beneath Line OBS-9 consists of six layers. The uppermost layer is sediment. Three layers are identified beneath the top sedimentary layer and their P wavespeeds are estimated to be 3.3-3.4 km/s, 5.1-5.4 km/s and 5.8-6.3 km/s, which corresponds to the upper crust. Underneath these layers, a layer with P wavespeed ranges of 6.3-7.2 km/s comprises the middle and lower crust. The depth of Moho is inferred to be 19 km. These wavespeed values are comparable with those of the present Japanese island arc, while the thickness of the crust is one-half of that of the Japanese arc. The crustal model supports the scenario that the Yamato Basin is formed by extension of the island arc. The crustal model for Line NT95-1 shows a transition from the extended island arc structure beneath the Yamato Basin to a thicker crust similar to the Japanese arc. P wavespeed heterogeneity related to the plate boundary is not detected. However, a significant change in the structural model along the profile is found around the region where the largest change in the seafloor topography exists. In that region, the wavespeeds in the middle crust have lower values than those of the neighboring area and the Moho begins to deepen towards the Japanese island arc. From comparison with the relationship between P wavespeed structure and aftershock distribution of the 1993 Hokkaido

  15. Prompt arrival of solar energetic particles from far eastern events: The role of large-scale interplanetary magnetic field structure

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, I.G.; Cane, H.V.; von Rosenvinge, T.T. )

    1991-05-01

    Intensity-time profiles of solar energetic particle enhancements generally show an asymmetry with respect to the heliolongitude of the associated solar event. Particles arrive promptly form events to the west of an observer because of good magnetic connection whereas particle enhancements from poorly connected eastern source regions usually show much slower onsets. However, some 15% of eastern events do show prompt onsets. Two prompt particle enhancements associated with eastern solar events are studied using data from the Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. In both events the prompt particle onset was observed when the spacecraft were in a postshock plasma region, apparently within a magnetic bottle. They suggest that the magnetic bottle extended back to the Sun and served as a channel for fast particle propagation to the spacecraft. Particles accelerated at an expanding coronal shock initiated by the eastern event could be injected onto field lines in the foot of the bottle.

  16. Prompt arrival of solar energetic particles from far eastern events - The role of large-scale interplanetary magnetic field structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    Intensity-time profiles of solar energetic particle enhancements generally show an asymmetry with respect to the heliolongitude of the associated solar event. Particles arrive promptly from events to the west of an observer because of good magnetic connection, whereas particle enhancements from poorly connected eastern source regions usually show much slower onsets. However, some 15 percent of eastern events do show prompt onsets. Two prompt particle enhancements associated with eastern solar events are studied using data from the Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. In both events the prompt particle onset was observed when the spacecraft were in a postshock plasma region, apparently within a magnetic bottle. It is suggested that the magnetic bottle extended back to the sun and served as a channel for fast particle propagation to the spacecraft. Particles accelerated at an expanding coronal shock initiated by the eastern event could be injected onto field lines in the foot of the bottle.

  17. Cloudwater and ozone effects upon high elevation red spruce: A summary of study results from Whitetop Mountain, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, F.C.; Joslin, J.D.; Pier, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This paper integrates the results of a number of studies on the effects of cloudwater and ozone (O{sub 3}) on red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings, saplings, and mature trees at Whitetop Mountain, VA, over a 3-yr period. These investigations consisted of (1) seedling chamber exclusion studies, (2) mature tree branch chamber exclusion studies, and (3) field experiments comparing responses of seedlings, saplings, and mature trees. The studies included treatments that : (1) excluded clouds and O{sub 3} (COE), (2) excluded clouds and had ambient O{sub 3} (CE), and (3) exposed plants to both clouds and O{sub 3} either with (CC) or without (AA) chambers. Seedlings and mature branches in the various treatments were compared with respect to growth rates, gas exchange rates, foliar nutrition, and chlorophyll and wax content. Soil solution, throughfall, and foliar responses of mature trees near the summit, receiving differing amounts of cloud exposure (low cloud and high cloud sites) were also monitored. Ozone was found to have minimal effects on the parameters measured, whereas cloudwater exposure was found to have adverse effects on several response parameters. Chambered seedlings that were exposed to cloudwater (AA and CC), and mature trees at the high cloud site had significantly lower foliar Ca and Mg concentrations than their counterparts, which were protected from exposure (seedlings) or received low cloud exposure (mature). A 3 to 5{degrees}C increase in cold tolerance was also measured in seedlings form which cloudwater was excluded. These findings suggest that cloudwater-mediated effects are currently having a negative impact on the health of red spruce, and may be involved in red spruce decline in the eastern USA. 62 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. The crustal structure of the north-eastern Gulf of Aden continental margin: insights from wide-angle seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watremez, L.; Leroy, S.; Rouzo, S.; D'Acremont, E.; Unternehr, P.; Ebinger, C.; Lucazeau, F.; Al-Lazki, A.

    2011-02-01

    The wide-angle seismic (WAS) and gravity data of the Encens survey allow us to determine the deep crustal structure of the north-eastern Gulf of Aden non-volcanic passive margin. The Gulf of Aden is a young oceanic basin that began to open at least 17.6 Ma ago. Its current geometry shows first- and second-order segmentation: our study focusses on the Ashawq-Salalah second-order segment, between Alula-Fartak and Socotra-Hadbeen fracture zones. Modelling of the WAS and gravity data (three profiles across and three along the margin) gives insights into the first- and second-order structures. (1) Continental thinning is abrupt (15-20 km thinning across 50-100 km distance). It is accommodated by several tilted blocks. (2) The ocean-continent transition (OCT) is narrow (15 km wide). The velocity modelling provides indications on its geometry: oceanic-type upper-crust (4.5 km s-1) and continental-type lower crust (>6.5 km s-1). (3) The thickness of the oceanic crust decreases from West (10 km) to the East (5.5 km). This pattern is probably linked to a variation of magma supply along the nascent slow-spreading ridge axis. (4) A 5 km thick intermediate velocity body (7.6 to 7.8 km s-1) exists at the crust-mantle interface below the thinned margin, the OCT and the oceanic crust. We interpret it as an underplated mafic body, or partly intruded mafic material emplaced during a `post-rift' event, according to the presence of a young volcano evidenced by heat-flow measurement (Encens-Flux survey) and multichannel seismic reflection (Encens survey). We propose that the non-volcanic passive margin is affected by post-rift volcanism suggesting that post-rift melting anomalies may influence the late evolution of non-volcanic passive margins.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Aromatic and Quality Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Landraces from North-Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Mawkhlieng, Bandapkuper; Misra, A. K.; Pattanayak, A.; Harish, G. D.; Singh, S. K.; Ngachan, S. V.; Bansal, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    The North-eastern (NE) India, comprising of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura, possess diverse array of locally adapted non-Basmati aromatic germplasm. The germplasm collections from this region could serve as valuable resources in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance, grain yield and cooking/eating quality. To utilize such collections, however, breeders need information about the extent and distribution of genetic diversity present within collections. In this study, we report the result of population genetic analysis of 107 aromatic and quality rice accessions collected from different parts of NE India, as well as classified these accessions in the context of a set of structured global rice cultivars. A total of 322 alleles were amplified by 40 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with an average of 8.03 alleles per locus. Average gene diversity was 0.67. Population structure analysis revealed that NE Indian aromatic rice can be subdivided into three genetically distinct population clusters: P1, joha rice accessions from Assam, tai rices from Mizoram and those from Sikkim; P2, chakhao rice germplasm from Manipur; and P3, aromatic rice accessions from Nagaland. Pair-wise FST between three groups varied from 0.223 (P1 vs P2) to 0.453 (P2 vs P3). With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, two major groups (Indica and Japonica) were identified in NE Indian germplasm. The aromatic accessions from Assam, Manipur and Sikkim were assigned to the Indica group, while the accessions from Nagaland exhibited close association with Japonica. The tai accessions of Mizoram along with few chakhao accessions collected from the hill districts of Manipur were identified as admixed. The results highlight the importance of regional genetic studies for understanding diversification of aromatic rice in India. The data also suggest that there is scope for exploiting the genetic diversity of aromatic and quality rice

  20. Fine fault structure of the 2012-2013 earthquake swarm in the eastern Guadalquivir basin (South Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, José; Cantavella, Juan V.; Perez-Peña, José V.; Martín, Rosa; Stich, Daniel; Azañon, José M.; Gonzalez-Ramón, Antonio; Roldán, Francisco J.; Martín, José B.

    2014-05-01

    Seismic swarms in areas with low seismic activity offer valuable information on the stress regimen from often-unidentified tectonic structures. From October 20th 2012 to end of October 2013, a seismic swarm with more than 6500 located earthquakes took place near the village of Torreperogil in the Eastern Guadalquivir basin. We relocate 523 events (md >1.5) using the double difference algorithm, in order to image the active structures associated with this swarm. Relocation places most events at 4-6.5 km depth along to two separate, steep dipping, ~N-S trending lineaments at ~1 km distance, with the western lineament becoming active more than 2 months after the start of the swarm. The Hough algorithm indicates a direction of N173E for the main alignment, similar to the result from full waveform moment tensor inversion for the large earthquake, yielding a strike slip mechanism with NS striking left-lateral plane. The results draw a scenario of ~N-S left-lateral blind faults in a highly fractured volume of the Variscan basement underlying the basin, consistent with a ~NNW direction of the principal compressive stress in the central Betics. The strike slip faulting style is compatible with an inactive mountain front in this sector, but the simultaneous activity of these side-by-side faults is not straightforward to understand in terms of stress transfer. We found no evidence for triggering of this sequence, investigating as possible mechanisms the pore pressure variations by hydraulic diffusion from rainwater, variations in elastic loading following the fluctuations in the water table of aquifers, as well as triggering by large remote earthquakes.

  1. New constraints on the crustal structure in the eastern part of northern Baffin Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, C. J.; Damm, V.; Altenbernd, T.; Berglar, K.; Block, M.; Ehrhardt, A.; Schnabel, M.

    2010-12-01

    The northern Baffin Bay is a key area for testing plate kinematic models for the Paleocene-Eocene motion of Greenland relative to North America and to decipher the evolution of the thick sedimentary basins in this area. In summer 2010, a multidisciplinary marine geoscientific expedition focusing on the Greenland part of northern Baffin Bay was performed under the direction of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources Hannover, Germany in cooperation with the Alfred-Wegener Institute Bremerhaven. Using 70 days ship time onboard the German R/V Polarstern a comprehensive data set was acquired along profiles extending from the deep oceanic basin in the central part of North Baffin Bay onto the Greenland continental margin in an area which was bordered by the Kane Basin in the North and Disco Island in the South. By means of multi-channel seismic, wide angle seismic, gravimetric and magnetic methods the structural inventory of the crust in the NW Baffin Bay was investigated. Additionally, heat flow data and sediment cores were collected at selected positions along lines across the Greenland continental margin. The cores were extracted for geochemical and geomicrobiological analysis to be used for basin modeling and studying the hydrocarbon potential. Aeromagnetic data was acquired covering part of the marine survey area to investigate magnetic signatures of the oceanic crust and the continental margin. In our presentation we will give an overview of the first results of the expedition with special focus on multi-channel seismic data. With a total length of 3500 km, the initial interpretation of multi-channel seismic data shows that the West Greenland margin is a typical passive continental margin with large rotated basement blocks, listric faults facing mainly seaward, and deep syn-rift-basins in between. The most prominent reflector under the shelf and the slope probably indicates the transition from rifting to drifting and therefore the beginning of

  2. Fatty acids as biomarkers for food web structure in the eastern North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, J.; Aluwihare, L.; Stephens, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Resulting from a NSF funded REU program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 2015, this research utilized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to analyze the fatty acid composition of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) and zooplankton (ZP; primarily copepods). Samples analyzed for this study were collected simultaneously from surface waters approximately 9 miles off the coast of San Diego in June 2015. I was testing the hypothesis that essential fatty acids in ZP should reflect their diet, in particular, distinguishing contributions from a microbial versus traditional food web. Food web structure in this region of the ocean has been shown to be sensitive to climate change on inter-annual and longer timescales. Thus, a proxy that identifies restructuring of food webs would be useful for examining the response of ocean ecosystems to future climate change. Lipids were extracted from ZP and POM using a modified Bligh and Dyer method with sonication. Following saponification free fatty acids and other lipids were further purified using column chromatography. Polar functional groups in lipids were then methylated prior to GC-MS analysis. In addition, 2-dimensional GCxGC with time of flight MS was used to distinguish polyunsaturated fatty acid isomers. My poster will present initial findings of shared fatty acids of zooplankton and POM suspended material from the Northern Pacific collection site. Further research will be focused on analyzing the hydrogen isotope composition of fatty acids in zooplankton and suspended DOM obtained at the collection site to further characterize and increase certainty on the role of microbes and phytoplankton in the region's food-web to distinguish prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources.

  3. Group Velocity Tomography for Eastern Mexico and Crustal Structure for Tehuantepec Isthmus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba Montiel, F.; Iglesias, A.; Melgar, D.; Singh, S.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2013-05-01

    We use seismic noise records from the broadband network of the Mexican National Seismological Service (Servicio Sismológico Nacional) and from MASE and VEOX stations (two temporal seismic experiments) to compute the vertical-vertical component of noise cross correlations for station pairs. MASE (Mesoamerican Seismic Experiment) consisted of one hundred stations deployed along a profile perpendicular to the trench and starting in Acapulco,Gro. Mex. This experiment ran from December 2004 until May, 2007. Fifty of these stations were relocated in a N-S profile crossing the Tehuantepec Isthmus from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific coast. These stations were operated from July 2007 until February 2009 and this stage of the experiment was called VEOX (Veracruz-Oaxaca). From the cross correlation for each pair of stations, Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were computed which represents the average group velocity between stations pairs. Furthermore, regional earthquakes recorded by the stations, were used to compute Rayleigh wave dispersion curves, which represent the average group velocity between epicenter and station. This mixed set of group velocity measurements was inverted to obtain tomographic images in discrete periods (5-50 s). Resolution tests show that the better-covered regions are surrounding both temporal experiments. Good coverage is also achieved in the large area between both experiments. In order to find details of crustal structure in the Tehuantepec Isthmus we use a set of previously computed receiver functions (Melgar and Pérez-Campos, 2011), to perform a joint inversion together with local dispersion curves reconstructed from the tomographic images. Results show good agreement with previous results by Melgar and Pérez-Campos (2011).

  4. Ocean-continent-transition and oceanic ridge structural evolution (eastern Gulf of Aden): Implications for rift to seafloor spreading processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S. D.; Beslier, M.; Autin, J.; Watremez, L.; Maia, M. A.; Gente, P.

    2009-12-01

    The rifting between Arabia and Somalia, which started around 35 Ma ago, is followed by oceanic accretion from at least 17.6 Ma leading to the present Gulf of Aden. The transition between the thinned continental and the oceanic crusts is characterized, in space and time, by an ocean-continent transition (OCT). Here, we use bathymetry, gravity, seismic reflection and magnetism from the Encens-Sheba and Encens cruises in order to constrain the structure and segmentation of the conjugate OCT as well as the oceanic ridge between two main fracture zones (Alula-Fartak and Socotra-Hadbeen). The segmentation of the initial oceanic spreading centers seem directly related to the margin structure. Then, magmatic processes and kinematics change strongly influenced the evolution of the segmentation. The OCT and the oceanic domain can be divided into two distinct areas in the study area. The Eastern area is characterized by an extremely thin OCT and oceanic crusts (< 4km), a ~30 km wide and tectonized OCT with isolated continental blocks and short axial segments. In the western area, thicker OCT and oceanic crusts (>5km), a ~15 km wide OCT with a volcanic ridge, and a 6 km thick underplated mafic body in the northern margin suggest a high melt supply. The magmatic supply observed in the western domain is probably due to an off-axis thermal anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge, at 75 km east of the major Alula-Fartak transform fault. This suggests that the OCT and the axial ridge morphology of this domain are perturbed by post-rift volcanism, which is due to a combination of the spreading rate, a thermal anomaly, and the cold edge effect of the Alula-Fartak transform fault. The presence of the inherited Mesozoic basins (Jezar-Qamar-Gardafui basin) located on this western domain can also explain, the difference in both the structure and the nature of the OCT between the two domains. The nature of the OCT could be either (or both) exhumed lower crust or

  5. Crustal seismic velocity structure from Eratosthenes Seamount to Hecataeus Rise across the Cyprus Arc, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welford, J. Kim; Hall, Jeremy; Hübscher, Christian; Reiche, Sönke; Louden, Keith

    2015-02-01

    Wide-angle reflection/refraction seismic profiles were recorded across the Cyprus Arc, the plate boundary between the African Plate and the Aegean-Anatolian microplate, from the Eratosthenes Seamount to the Hecataeus Rise immediately south of Cyprus. The resultant models were able to resolve detail of significant lateral velocity variations, though the deepest crust and Moho are not well resolved from the seismic data alone. Conclusions from the modelling suggest that (i) Eratosthenes Seamount consists of continental crust but exhibits a laterally variable velocity structure with a thicker middle crust and thinner lower crust to the northeast; (ii) the Hecataeus Rise has a thick sedimentary rock cover on an indeterminate crust (likely continental) and the crust is significantly thinner than Eratosthenes Seamount based on gravity modelling; (iii) high velocity basement blocks, coincident with highs in the magnetic field, occur in the deep water between Eratosthenes and Hecataeus, and are separated and bounded by deep low-velocity troughs and (iv) one of the high velocity blocks runs parallel to the Cyprus Arc, while the other two appear linked based on the magnetic data and run NW-SE, parallel to the margin of the Hecataeus Rise. The high velocity block beneath the edge of Eratosthenes Seamount is interpreted as an older magmatic intrusion while the linked high velocity blocks along Hecataeus Rise are interpreted as deformed remnant Tethyan oceanic crust or mafic intrusives from the NNW-SSE oriented transform margin marking the northern boundary of Eratosthenes Seamount. Eratosthenes Seamount, the northwestern limit of rifted continental crust from the Levant Margin, is part of a jagged rifted margin transected by transform faults on the northern edge of the lower African Plate that is being obliquely subducted under the Aegean-Anatolian upper plate. The thicker crust of Eratosthenes Seamount may be acting as an asperity on the subducting slab, locally locking up

  6. Active tectonics of the Devils Mountain Fault and related structures, northern Puget Lowland and eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca region, Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Mosher, David C.; Blakely, Richard J.; Childs, Jonathan R.

    2001-01-01

    Information from marine high-resolution and conventional seismic-reflection surveys, aeromagnetic mapping, coastal exposures of Pleistocene strata, and lithologic logs of water wells is used to assess the active tectonics of the northern Puget Lowland and eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca region of the Pacific Northwest. These data indicate that the Devils Mountain Fault and the newly recognized Strawberry Point and Utsalady Point faults are active structures and represent potential earthquake sources.

  7. Hydraulic properties and inner structure of a relict rock glacier in the Eastern Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauritsch, Marcus; Winkler, Gerfried; Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Birk, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    Water economic studies in 1990s documented the importance of the springs draining relict rock glaciers for water supply and human consumption as well as for the ecosystem in alpine catchments in the Niederen Tauern Range, Austria. Recent studies confirm the hydrologic importance and show that in the easternmost subunit, the Seckauer Tauern Range, more than 40% of the area above 2000 m a.s.l. and up to 20% of the area above 1500 m a.s.l. drain through relict rock glaciers. Thus, the hydraulic properties of these alpine aquifers are considered to be important controls on the hydrology of these areas. Nevertheless their hydraulic properties and their inner structure are still poorly understood. Our hydrogeological research is carried out at the Schöneben Rock Glacier, located in Seckauer Tauern Range, Austria. This rock glacier is presumably relict although patches of permafrost might exist particularly in the upper part of the landform. The rock glacier covers an area of 0.11 km² and drains a total catchment of 0.76 km² with a maximum elevation of 2282 m a.s.l.. The rock glacier consists predominantly of gneissic sediments (mainly coarse-grained, blocky at the surface) and extends from 1720 to 1905 m a.s.l.. Discharge of the rock glacier spring is recorded since 2002. Electrical conductivity and water temperature used as natural tracers are continuously monitored since 2008. Furthermore, a tracer test with simultaneous injection of the fluorescent dyes naphthionate and fluoresceine at two injection points (one close to the front and one close to the rooting zone of the rock glacier) was performed. Recession analysis of the spring hydrograph reveals similarities to the flow dynamics of karst springs. The results exhibit on the one hand a slow base flow recession indicating a high storage capacity and on the other hand sharp discharge peaks immediately after rainfall events referring to a high hydraulic conductivity. Applying different analytic runoff models, the

  8. Transpression and juxtaposition of middle crust over upper crust forming a crustal scale flower structure: Insight from structural, fabric, and kinematic studies from the Rengali Province, eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Gautam; Bose, Sankar; Das, Kaushik; Dasgupta, Arnab; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Hayasaka, Yasutaka; Chakrabarti, Kalyan; Mukhopadhyay, Joydip

    2016-02-01

    Deformational, metamorphic, monazite age and fabric data from Rengali Province, eastern India converge towards a multi-scale transpressional deformational episode at ca. 498-521 Ma which is linked with the latest phase of tectonic processes operative at proto-India-Antarctica join. Detailed sector wise study on mutual overprinting relationships of macro-to microstructural elements suggest that deformation was regionally partitioned into fold-thrust dominated shortening zones alternating with zones of dominant transcurrent deformation bounded between the thrust sense Barkot Shear Zone in the north and the dextral Kerajang Fault Zone in the south. The strain partitioned zones are further restricted between two regional transverse shear zones, the sinistral Riamol Shear Zone in the west and the dextral Akul Fault Zone in the east which are interpreted as synthetic R and antithetic R' Riedel shear plane, respectively. The overall structural disposition has been interpreted as a positive flower structure bounded between the longitudinal and transverse faults with vertical extrusion and symmetric juxtaposition of mid-crustal amphibolite grade basement gneisses over low-grade upper crustal rocks emanating from the central axis of the transpressional belt.

  9. Geophysical investigation and reconstruction of lithospheric structure and its control on geology, structure, and mineralization in the Cordillera of northern Canada and eastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, N.

    2015-10-01

    A reconstruction of the Tintina fault is applied to regional geophysical and topographic data, facilitating the definition of west trending lineaments within the lower crust and/or mantle lithosphere, oblique to the NW trending structure of the Cordilleran terranes. The lineaments, which exhibit a range of geophysical and geological signatures, are interpreted to be related to the Liard transfer zone, continuous to the Denali fault, that divided lower and upper plates during late Proterozoic-Cambrian rifting of the Laurentian margin. Three-dimensional gravity models show a density increase in the lower crust and mantle lithosphere to the north. The transfer zone also divides bimodal mantle xenolith suites to the south from unimodal suites to the north. These conclusions suggest that extended North American basement, related to Laurentian margin rifting that would have brought mantle lithosphere rocks to a shallow depth, continuously underlies a thin carapace of accreted terranes in western Yukon and eastern Alaska. The interpreted continuity of North American basement reaffirms that if oroclinal bending of the Intermontane terranes occurred, then it was prior to its emplacement upon the rifted basement. Examination of the spatial relationships between mineral occurrences and postaccretionary, Cretaceous lithospheric lineaments, from their manifestation in geophysical, geological, and topographic data, suggest that the late Proterozoic lineaments influenced Mesozoic mineralization through influence on the development of the shallow crustal structure, intrusion, and exhumation and erosion.

  10. Early to Late Cenozoic structural inheritance of Paleozoic basement structures in the northern Alpine foreland: examples from eastern France and northern Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madritsch, Herfried

    2014-05-01

    During his time at the Geological Institute of the University of Basel, Peter Ziegler was the main initiator of the EUCOR-URGENT project, a joint multi-disciplinary research and training programme aiming at a better understanding of seismic hazard, neotectonics and evolution of the Upper Rhine Graben and surrounding areas. Throughout the duration of the programme from 1999 to 2007 the EUCOR-URGENT network embraced more than 40 Ph.D. students, 20 Post-Docs and 18 senior researchers, who were based at one of the 25 involved universities or national organizations. Peter's natural drive, networking capabilities and scientific enthusiasm were without doubt the main reasons for this success story. The Rhine-Bresse Transfer Zone (RBTZ) in eastern France, one of the natural laboratories investigated within the EUCOR-URGENT framework, is a major segment of the European Cenozoic Rift system (Ziegler, 1992) and formed by structural inheritance of the pre-existing Late Paleozoic Burgundy Trough. The Mid-Eocene to Oligocene evolution of the sinistral transtensional RBTZ was kinematically linked to crustal extension across the Upper Rhine and Bresse Grabens (Lacombe et al., 1993). From the Early Miocene onward the RBTZ further evolved under the influence of the far field effects of the Alpine collision involving Late Miocene to Pliocene NW-ward propagation of the thin-skinned Jura Thrust Belt but also thick-skinned reactivation of the Late Paleozoic and Paleogene fault systems in the RBTZ. In fact, shortening throughout the RBTZ appears to be still mildly active, as is indicated by one of the very few clearly oblique-compressive focal mechanisms in the northern Alpine foreland and evidenced by geomorphologic investigations that yielded Late Quaternary folding of fluvial meanders in the area of Besançon (Madritsch et al. 2010). The Late Paleozoic Burgundy Trough as well as the Jura Thrust Belt continue eastward into northern Switzerland. In this area, reprocessed and newly

  11. Crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the eastern margin of the Yilgarn Craton (Australia) from passive seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian; Spaggiari, Catherine; Gessner, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia is one of the largest units of Archean lithosphere on earth. Along its southern and southeastern margin, it is bounded by the Albany-Fraser Orogen (AFO), a Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic extensioal-accretionary orogen. In this contribution, we investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of the AFO and adjacent regions using passive seismic data collected during the recent ALFREX experiment. Since the entire region has not been significantly reactivated since the Mesoproterozoic, the old signature of craton edge modification should have been well preserved until today. From November 2013 until January 2016, we operated a temporary passive seismic network consisting of 70 stations in the eastern Albany-Fraser Orogen. The array had an average station spacing of about 40 km and was designed to fill the gap between recently acquired active seismic profiles. We present results from the analysis of P receiver functions and ambient noise tomography using the ALFREX data. Receiver functions were used to derive a Moho depth map via H-K stacking, for direct imaging (common conversion point stacking) as well as joint inversion with surface wave dispersion data to derive 1D S-velocity profiles beneath the stations. The obtained receiver functions show a marked change of character from west to east across the array. Whereas they feature clear and sharp Moho phases for stations on the Yilgarn Craton, significantly more crustal complexity and fainter Moho phases are seen throughout the AFO. Crustal thickness increases from 36-39 km for the Yilgarn Craton to values between 42 and 48 km across the AFO, decreasing to around 40 km in the east. Ambient noise cross-correlations were used to derive maps of phase and group velocities of Rayleigh waves at periods between 1 and 30 seconds. A three-dimensional model of S wavespeeds throughout the area was then computed by pixelwise inversion of dispersion curves. Obtained S wavespeeds are generally

  12. Crustal structure from the Hecataeus Rise to the Levantine Basin, eastern Mediterranean, from seismic refraction and gravity modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welford, J. Kim; Hall, J.; Rahimi, A.; Reiche, S.; Hübscher, C.; Louden, K.

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, a wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profile was acquired along the Hecataeus Rise, an area of shallow seabed immediately south of Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean. The profile crossed from the Hecataeus Rise, through the Cyprus Arc to the Levantine Basin beyond. Due to the short length of the profile and the corresponding lack of deep ray coverage, velocity modelling was complemented by gravity modelling to gain constraints on deep crustal structure. The resultant model reveals velocities for the Hecataeus Rise that show no evidence of shallow ophiolites like those seen on mainland Cyprus, and the velocities are not diagnostic of a unique crustal affinity. Low-velocity sediments make up at least 7 km of the upper structure of Hecataeus Rise and these sediments overlie a two-layered crust. From the gravity modelling, the combined sediments and crust of Hecataeus Rise appear to be thinner than the Eratosthenes Seamount block to the southwest. A high-velocity lower crustal block is modelled under the seaward edge of Hecataeus Rise and, based on the gravity modelling, is inferred to extend landwards beneath the Rise. Similar high-velocity blocks were identified on the southwestern edge of Hecataeus Rise along nearby refraction lines and were interpreted as remnant Tethyan oceanic crust, foundered in the Cyprus Arc, along which subduction has ceased in this area. Given the thin two-layered crust beneath a thick accumulation of sediments modelled for Hecataeus Rise, we interpret that Hecataeus Rise represents a collage of oceanic fragments, accreted together within the failed subduction zone. Outboard of the crust of Hecataeus Rise, a 5-km deep low-velocity basin, possibly an accretionary wedge, is imaged that appears to correspond with the Cyprus Arc deformation zone imaged on both coincident and along-strike seismic reflection lines. A similar and wider feature is observed on seismic refraction lines to the west and combined, these may be revealing

  13. Cumulative potential hydrologic impacts of surface coal mining in the eastern Powder River structural basin, northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, L.J.; Naftz, D.L.; Lowham, H.W.; Rankl, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    There are 16 existing and six proposed surface coal mines in the eastern Powder River structural basin of northeastern Wyoming. Coal mining companies predict water level declines of 5 ft or more in the Wasatch aquifer to extend form about 1,000 to about 2,000 ft beyond the mine pits. The predicted 5 ft water level decline in the Wyodak coal aquifer generally extends 4-8 mi beyond the lease areas. About 3,000 wells are in the area of potential cumulative water level declines resulting from all anticipated mining. Of these 3,000 wells, about 1,200 are outside the areas of anticipated mining: about 1,000 wells supply water for domestic or livestock uses, and about 200 wells supply water for municipal, industrial, irrigation, and miscellaneous uses. The 1,800 remaining wells are used by coal mining companies. Future surface coal mining probably will result in postmining groundwater of similar quality to that currently present in the study area. By use of geochemical modeling techniques, the results of a hypothetical reaction path exercise indicate the potential for marked improvements in postmining water quality because of chemical reactions as postmining groundwater with a large dissolved solids concentration (3,540 mg/L) moves into a coal aquifer with relatively small dissolved solids concentrations (910 mg/L). Results of the modeling exercise also indicate geochemical conditions that are most ideal for large decreases in dissolved solids concentrations in coal aquifers receiving recharge from a spoil aquifer. (Lantz-PTT)

  14. An integrated structural and geochemical study of fracture aperture growth in the Campito Formation of eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doungkaew, N.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Processes of fracture formation control flow of fluid in the subsurface and the mechanical properties of the brittle crust. Understanding of fundamental fracture growth mechanisms is essential for understanding fracture formation and cementation in chemically reactive systems with implications for seismic and aseismic fault and fracture processes, migration of hydrocarbons, long-term CO2 storage, and geothermal energy production. A recent study on crack-seal veins in deeply buried sandstone of east Texas provided evidence for non-linear fracture growth, which is indicated by non-elliptical kinematic fracture aperture profiles. We hypothesize that similar non-linear fracture growth also occurs in other geologic settings, including under higher temperature where solution-precipitation reactions are kinetically favored. To test this hypothesis, we investigate processes of fracture growth in quartzitic sandstone of the Campito Formation, eastern California, by combining field structural observations, thin section petrography, and fluid inclusion microthermometry. Fracture aperture profile measurements of cemented opening-mode fractures show both elliptical and non-elliptical kinematic aperture profiles. In general, fractures that contain fibrous crack-seal cement have elliptical aperture profiles. Fractures filled with blocky cement have linear aperture profiles. Elliptical fracture aperture profiles are consistent with linear-elastic or plastic fracture mechanics. Linear aperture profiles may reflect aperture growth controlled by solution-precipitation creep, with the aperture distribution controlled by solution-precipitation kinetics. We hypothesize that synkinematic crack-seal cement preserves the elliptical aperture profiles of elastic fracture opening increments. Blocky cement, on the other hand, may form postkinematically relative to fracture opening, with fracture opening accommodated by continuous solution-precipitation creep.

  15. Population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in a malaria-endemic region of eastern Amazonian Brazil.

    PubMed

    Conn, Jan E; Vineis, Joseph H; Bollback, Jonathan P; Onyabe, David Y; Wilkerson, Richard C; Póvoa, Marinete M

    2006-05-01

    Anopheles darlingi is the primary malaria vector in Latin America, and is especially important in Amazonian Brazil. Historically, control efforts have been focused on indoor house spraying using a variety of insecticides, but since the mid-1990s there has been a shift to patient treatment and focal insecticide fogging. Anopheles darlingi was believed to have been significantly reduced in a gold-mining community, Peixoto de Azevedo (in Mato Grosso State), in the early 1990s by insecticide use during a severe malaria epidemic. In contrast, although An. darlingi was eradicated from some districts of the city of Belem (the capital of Para State) in 1968 to reduce malaria, populations around the water protection area in the eastern district were treated only briefly. To investigate the population structure of An. darlingi including evidence for a population bottleneck in Peixoto, we analyzed eight microsatellite loci of 256 individuals from seven locations in Brazil: three in Amapa State, three in Para State, and one in Mato Grosso State. Allelic diversity and mean expected heterozygosity were high for all populations (mean number alleles/locus and H(E) were 13.5 and 0.834, respectively) and did not differ significantly between locations. Significant heterozygote deficits were associated with linkage disequilibrium, most likely due to either the Wahlund effect or selection. We found no evidence for a population bottleneck in Peixoto, possibly because the reduction was not extreme enough to be detected. Overall estimates of long-term N(e) varied from 92.4 individuals under the linkage disequilibrium model to infinity under the heterozygote excess model. Fixation indices and analysis of molecular variance demonstrated significant differentiation between locations north and south of the Amazon River, suggesting a degree of genetic isolation between them, attributed to isolation by distance. PMID:16687683

  16. Impacts of logging and wildfire on an upland black spruce community in northwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M H; Elliott, J A

    1996-01-01

    Plant species composition and community structure were compared among four sites in an upland black spruce community in northwestern Ontario. One site had remained undisturbed since the 1930s and three had been disturbed by either logging, fire, or both logging and fire. Canonical correspondence ordination analyses indicated that herbaceous species composition and abundance differed among the disturbance types while differences in the shrub and tree strata were less pronounced. In the herb stratum Pleurozium schreberi, Ptilium crista-castrensis and Dicranum polysetum were in greatest abundance on the undisturbed forest site, while the wildfire and burned cutover sites were dominated by Epilobium angustifolium and Polytrichum juniperinum. The unburned harvested site was dominated by Epilobium angustifolium, Cornus canadensis and Pleurozium schreberi. Species richness was lower on the undisturbed site than on any of the disturbed sites while species diversity (H') and evenness (Hill's E5) were higher on the unburned harvested site than on the other sites. Results suggest that herb re-establishment is different among harvested and burned sites in upland black spruce communities and we hypothesize that differences in the characteristics of the disturbance were responsible, in particular, the impact of burning on nutrient availability. These differences need to be taken into account in determining the effects of these disturbances on biodiversity and long-term ecosystem management. PMID:24198011

  17. Patterns of colonization and spread in the fungal spruce pathogen Onnia tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Germain, H; Bergeron, M-J; Bernier, L; Laflamme, G; Hamelin, R C

    2009-11-01

    The basidiomycetous fungus Onnia tomentosa is one of the most widespread root rot pathogens in North America. Although the disease is more severe on spruce and pine trees, this pathogen can infect several coniferous species. To study the population structure of O. tomentosa, we harvested 180 basidiocarps in a 45-year-old white spruce plantation in western Quebec in autumn 1997 and extracted DNA directly from individual basidiocarps. Using a combination of spatial coordinates and molecular data based on the analysis of two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci, we measured the average genet size and molecular diversity and assessed the relative contribution of basidiospores and vegetative growth to the stand colonization. Most of the sampled basidiocarps that clustered spatially belonged to the same genet. A total of 37 discrete multilocus genets of an average size of 3.42 m were obtained. The genet size distribution was skewed towards smaller genets (<3 m) that displayed higher diversity than the larger genets (>3 m). The nuclear loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the larger genets, but not in the smaller genets, which displayed a deficiency of heterozygotes. This suggests a Wahlund effect, whereby different colonization events resulted in expected heterozygosity higher than observed heterozygosity. Using an estimate of the growth rate of the fungus, only a few of the largest genets were approximately the age of the plantation. These observations are consistent with the colonization by basidiospores subsequent to site preparation and tree planting followed by secondary colonization events and vegetative spread. PMID:19804376

  18. Microarray gene expression profiling of developmental transitions in Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) apical shoots.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Michael; Ralph, Steven G; Aeschliman, Dana; Zhuang, Jun; Ritland, Kermit; Ellis, Brian E; Bohlmann, Joerg; Douglas, Carl J

    2007-01-01

    The apical shoot drives the yearly new stem growth of conifer trees, is the primary site for the establishment of chemical and physical defences, and is important in establishing subsequent perennial growth. This organ presents an interesting developmental system, with growth and development progressing from a meristematic tip through development of a primary vascular system, to a base with fully differentiated and lignified secondary xylem on the inside and bark tissue with constitutive defence structures such as resin, polyphenolic phloem parenchyma cells, and sclereids on the outside. A spruce (Picea spp.) microarray containing approximately 16.7K unique cDNAs was used to study transcript profiles that characterize the developmental transition in apical shoots of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) from their vegetative tips to their woody bases. Along with genes involved in cell-wall modification and lignin biosynthesis, a number of differentially regulated genes encoding protein kinases and transcription factors with base-preferred expression patterns were identified, which could play roles in the formation of woody tissues inside the apical shoot, as well as in regulating other developmental transitions associated with organ maturation. Preferential expression of known conifer defence genes, genes encoding defence-related proteins, and genes encoding regulatory proteins was observed at the apical shoot tip and in the green bark tissues at the apical shoot base, suggesting a commitment to constitutive defence in the apical shoot that is co-ordinated with rapid development of secondary xylem. PMID:17220514

  19. The impact of disturbance and ensuing forestry practices on Collembola in spruce forest stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čuchta, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Soil Collembola communities were investigated in spruce forest stands of the High Tatra Mts that had been heavily damaged by a windstorm in November 2004 and subsequently by a wildfire in July 2005. The study focused on the impact of these disturbances and forestry practices on collembolan community distribution and structure four years after the disturbance. Four different treatments were selected for this study: intact forest stands (REF), non-extracted windthrown stands (NEX), clear-cut windthrown stands (EXT) and burnt windthrown stands (FIR). From a total of 7,820 individuals, 72 species were identified. The highest total abundance mean was recorded in FIR stands followed by NEX and EXT stands and, surprisingly, the lowest in REF stands. The highest total species richness was observed in REF stands, followed by NEX stands and FIR stands and the lowest in EXT stands. In REF and NEX stands the most abundant species were Folsomia penicula and Tetracanthella fjellbergi, while in heavily damaged stands the most abundant was Anurophorus laricis. The present study shows the negative impact of windthrow on Collembola communities as reflected in decreased species richness and abundance. However, disturbance by fire caused a considerable increase in collembolan abundance three years after the event. Moreover, we found out that clearing of windthrown spruce forests after a windstorm is less favourable for communities of soil collembolans and slows down the recovery process.

  20. Nesting ecology of boreal forest birds following a massive outbreak of spruce beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuoka, S.M.; Handel, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    We studied breeding dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata), and spruce-nesting birds from 1997 to 1998 among forests with different levels of spruce (Picea spp.) mortality following an outbreak of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis) in Alaska, USA. We identified species using live and beetle-killed spruce for nest sites and monitored nests to determine how the outbreak influenced avian habitat selection and reproduction. We tested predictions that 1) nesting success of ground-nesting juncos would increase with spruce mortality due to proliferation of understory vegetation available to conceal nests from predators, 2) nesting success of canopy-nesting warblers would decrease with spruce mortality due to fewer live spruce in which to conceal nests, and 3) both species would alter nest-site selection in response to disturbance. Juncos did not benefit from changes in understory vegetation; nesting success in highly disturbed stands (46%) was comparable to that in undisturbed habitats throughout their range. In stands with low spruce mortality, nesting success of juncos was low (5%) and corresponded with high densities of red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Yellow-rumped warblers nested exclusively in spruce, but success did not vary with spruce mortality. As disturbance increased, nesting warblers switched from selecting forest patches with high densities of live white spruce (Picea glauca) to patches with beetle-killed spruce. Warblers also placed nests in large-diameter live or beetle-killed spruce, depending on which was more abundant in the stand, with no differences in nesting success. Five of the 12 other species of spruce-nesting birds also used beetle-killed spruce as nest sites. Because beetle-killed spruce can remain standing for >50 years, even highly disturbed stands provide an important breeding resource for boreal forest birds. We recommend that boreal forest managers preserve uncut blocks of infested

  1. Hyperspectral data for assessment of temporal changes in Norway spruce forest conditions in the mountainous region of the Czech Republic affected by long-term acidic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrechtova, J.; Lhotakova, Z.; Misurec, J.; Kopackova, V.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Edwards-Jonasova, M.; Kupkova, L.; Cervena, L.; Potuckova, M.; Cudlin, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Ore Mts. located in the western part of the Czech Republic suffered during 1950's-1990´s heavy atmospheric pollution due to the mining activities and brown coal combustion. Acidic deposition in combination with harsh climatic conditions led there to large-scale forest decline. Although the load of SO2 has significantly decreased since 1991, tree damage was still visible in 1998 in terms of high defoliation or dead trees. Nowadays Norway spruce trees do not exhibit visible symptoms of damage but the full recovery of Norway spruce forests is not complete yet due to persisting adverse soil conditions. The temporal changes in the physiological status of Norway spruce forests in the Krušné Hory Mts. were evaluated using two sets of spectral images acquired in 1998 (ASAS) and in 2013 (APEX) and ground truth data (LAI, tree crown status, photosynthetic pigment contents, leaf spectral properties measured by spectroradiometer, soil properties - pH, contents of basic cations, heavy metals, etc.). Ground truth data were evaluated by unconstrained and constrained multivariate analyses using Canoco 5. The high resolution spectral images (ASAS and APEX) enabled the identification of a gradient of forest conditions and their comparison. In 1998 the stands exhibited different physiological status corresponding to the pollution gradient with healthier trees at the western part of the mountains. Analysis of the foliar chemistry in 2013 show a slight improvement of the Norway spruce physiological status in the eastern part of the mountains while the status of the western-located stands slightly worsened. In 2013 we also studied the differences in soil geochemical conditions, which appeared to be less favorable in the western part of the mountains characterized by a low base cation contents in the top organic horizon and a very low pH (pH<3).

  2. [Community stability for spruce-fir forest at different succession stages in Changbai Mountains, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng-tao; Zhang, Qing; Kang, Xin-gang; Yang, Ying-jun; Xu, Guang; Zhang, Li-xin

    2015-06-01

    Based on the analysis of three forest communities (polar-birch secondary forest, spruce-fir mixed forest, spruce-fir near pristine forest) in Changbai Mountains, a total of 22 factors of 5 indices, including the population regeneration, soil fertility (soil moisture and soli nutrient), woodland productivity and species diversity that reflected community characteristics were used to evaluate the stability of forest community succession at different stages by calculating subordinate function values of a model based on fuzzy mathematics. The results that the indices of population regeneration, soli nutrient, woodland productivity and species diversity were the highest in the spruce-fir mixed forest, and the indices of soil moisture were the highest in the spruce-fir near-pristine forest. The stability of three forest communities was in order of natural spruce-fir mixed forest > spruce-fir near pristine forest > polar-birch secondary forest. PMID:26572010

  3. Productivity of the spruce grouse in fragmented habitat at the edge of its range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitcomb, S.D.; O'Connell, A.F., Jr.; Servello, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    We measured productivity of the Spruce Grouse (Dendragapusc anadensicsa nadensis) in patchy black spruce (Picea mariana) habitat along the southeastern limit of its range in mid-coastal Maine. We captured grouse and attached necklace-mounted radio transmitters to hens prior to nesting. Of 19 females monitored, only 26% raised chicks to the late brood-rearing period. Predation was high on hens (37%) and five were killed before hatching eggs. Six (55%) entire broods were lost and only 30% of chicks survived to late summer. Production ( No. of chicks/female), an index of productivity, was < 1 and lower in Maine and Minnesota study areas in black spruce than areas dominated by jack pine (Pinus banksiana) or a mixture of jack pine and spruce with dense undergrowth. Where Spruce Grouse breed in patchy black spruce communities, immigration from neighboring populations or inter-patch movement by local individuals may be required to maintain viable populations.

  4. Structure and Evolution of The Conjugate Passive Margins of The Eastern Gulf of Aden: The Oceanisation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.; Bellahsen, N.; Beslier, M. O.; Fournier, M.; Gente, P.; Patriat, P.; Fleury, J. M.

    The geophysical data set of the Encens-Sheba cruise recorded in the eastern Gulf of Aden and previous experiment, allow us to define the structure of the two conjugate margins, to localise the position of the ocean-continent transition zone (OCT), and fi- nally to study the oceanisation process from the continental break-up to the emplace- ment of an active spreading ridge, the Sheba ridge. Through the two margins, the base- ment, observed by seismic reflection, can be individualised into three domains from continental area to oceanic area, with distinct morphology and sedimentary charac- ters: (1) an area of rifted continental crust composed by a series of titled blocks, horsts and grabens bounded by faults N110E trending which can be related with onshore structures (2) a 20-30km wide ocean-continent transition and (3) an oceanic crust with a smoother relief than the rifted crust. The two conjugate margins are characterised by three major segments bounded from west to east respectively by the Alula-Fartak and the Socotra fracture zones, divided by two transfer faults N027E trending. The ocean- continent transition is marked by a negative gradient of the free-air gravity anomalies; by a seismic reflection pattern of the top acoustic basement that becomes rough in the oceanic domain; by the last presence of syn-rift sediment before the oceanic crust; and finally by the lack of well-constrained oceanic magnetic anomalies. The first identi- fiable magnetic anomaly is the An5d that gives 17Ma as opening age for the oriental Gulf of Aden. The crustal section of the margins constrained by gravity model and seismic profiles, shows that the steep and starved northern margin and the broad and thickly sedimented southern margin are asymmetric. On the northern side, the crust is slightly less thick than on the southern side. The width of the rifted continental crust varies between the two margins and from west to east, testifying an asymme- try during the continental break

  5. Seismically imaging the structural legacy of rifting and collision events in the central and eastern U.S. crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, B.; Lin, F. C.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    EarthScope's USArray now provides broadband seismic data across the contiguous U.S. and southeastern Canada. We used teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave tomography to map crustal structure beneath the entire array. Crust thickness was estimated with multi-mode Ps receiver function images using <0.5 Hz Ps and <0.25 Hz 2p1s and 2s1p reverberations between the free-surface and Moho. In areas of sedimentary basins or large impedance contrasts in the middle crust the reverberations alone often provide clearer images of the Moho than the Ps mode, because of interference from conversions at shallow interfaces is reduced at greater lag times. The new results enable large-scale comparison of the structural legacy of multiple rifting and collision events in eastern North America. Some Proterozoic rift segments defined by Bouguer gravity and surface geology maintain locally thin crust while others lack correlated Moho topography or are areas of locally thicker crust. Locally thin crust is found at southern end of the mid-continent rift (MCR) in northern Kansas and southern Nebraska, along the Reelfoot rift, and beneath inferred rifts in Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio. The Oklahoma aulacogen is not associated with a coherent change in crust thickness along its length, at least at a scale resolvable by USArray data and our imaging approach. The MCR extending northeast from Nebraska to Lake Superior has locally thicker crust, consistent with other recent results. We suggest that magmatic additions to the lower crust overwhelmed extension in the northern mid-continent rift, but not the rift segments further south and east. Collision events of the Grenville orogeny and Paleozoic orogens that created the Appalachian Mountains are still associated with ~45-55 km thick crust extending from the Grenville front eastward across the Appalachian Mountains to the fall line that marks the abrupt geomorphic transition to the coastal plains. Despite the ~45-55 km crust thickness long

  6. Environmental monitoring based on NMR analysis of the composition of essential oil from Canadian spruce needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Gaidukevich, O. A.; Matveichuk, S. V.; Kiselev, V. P.; Lamotkin, S. A.; Vladykina, D. S.

    2012-07-01

    We have used 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy to analyze the chemical composition of essential oil from needles of Canadian spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) grown in different regions of the Republic of Belarus. We consider the change in the composition of the oil depending on the area where the spruce was grown. We suggest using spruce needle essential oil as a biological indicator for environmental conditions in the area.

  7. Kinematic evolution of Andean fold-thrust structures along the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and Middle Magdalena Valley basin, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SáNchez, Javier; Horton, Brian K.; Tesón, Eliseo; Mora, AndréS.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2012-06-01

    Surface and subsurface data support a kinematic reconstruction of Cenozoic fold-thrust deformation along the Eastern Cordillera-Magdalena Valley transition in Colombia. The La Salina fault (LSF) marks the boundary between west-vergent Eastern Cordillera structures and hinterland deposits of the Middle Magdalena Valley basin. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He thermochronological results for the west-directed LSF reveal initial hanging wall exhumation during middle Eocene-early Oligocene (45-30 Ma) shortening, renewed exhumation in the early middle Miocene (18-12 Ma), and accelerated late Miocene-Pliocene (12-3 Ma) exhumation. Vitrinite reflectance data suggest maximum burial of 4-6 km, helping constrain Cenozoic basin architecture. Mapping of the LSF reveals hanging wall Cretaceous-Eocene rocks in a broad anticline-syncline pair with limited faulting and footwall Eocene-Quaternary basin fill in a complex series of tight thrust-related folds. Limited displacement along the westernmost (frontal) thrust suggests that shortening is largely accommodated by east-directed thrusting within a broader triangle zone of a passive-roof duplex (and probable minor strike-slip deformation). In the preferred kinematic restoration, the most recent phase of shortening to transpressional deformation represents out-of-sequence reactivation of the LSF consistent with irregular crosscutting relationships among footwall structures. Earliest exhumation by 45-30 Ma in the Eastern Cordillera fold-thrust belt is correlated with increased sedimentary lithic fragments and high compositional maturity in sandstones of the adjacent Magdalena Valley basin. Exhumation since ˜15 Ma coincided with decreased compositional maturity and elevated accumulation rates for the Real Group. The compositional provenance shifts are attributed to westward advance of fold-thrust deformation into the proximal (eastern) segments of the Magdalena Valley basin.

  8. 5. View from northwest corner, Spruce Street. Photo shows the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View from northwest corner, Spruce Street. Photo shows the elevation of Buildings #6 and #1. Doors in the center of the buildings provide a passageway to the interior courtyard of the complex between Buildings #6, #5, #3, and #1. The photo illustrates the pilaster and corbeling of the walls. The photo also shows the coal hopper. - Merrill Silk Mill, 233 Canisteo Street, Hornell, Steuben County, NY

  9. Exome capture from the spruce and pine giga-genomes.

    PubMed

    Suren, H; Hodgins, K A; Yeaman, S; Nurkowski, K A; Smets, P; Rieseberg, L H; Aitken, S N; Holliday, J A

    2016-09-01

    Sequence capture is a flexible tool for generating reduced representation libraries, particularly in species with massive genomes. We used an exome capture approach to sequence the gene space of two of the dominant species in Canadian boreal and montane forests - interior spruce (Picea glauca x engelmanii) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Transcriptome data generated with RNA-seq were coupled with draft genome sequences to design baits corresponding to 26 824 genes from pine and 28 649 genes from spruce. A total of 579 samples for spruce and 631 samples for pine were included, as well as two pine congeners and six spruce congeners. More than 50% of targeted regions were sequenced at >10× depth in each species, while ~12% captured near-target regions within 500 bp of a bait position were sequenced to a depth >10×. Much of our read data arose from off-target regions, which was likely due to the fragmented and incomplete nature of the draft genome assemblies. Capture in general was successful for the related species, suggesting that baits designed for a single species are likely to successfully capture sequences from congeners. From these data, we called approximately 10 million SNPs and INDELs in each species from coding regions, introns, untranslated and flanking regions, as well as from the intergenic space. Our study demonstrates the utility of sequence capture for resequencing in complex conifer genomes, suggests guidelines for improving capture efficiency and provides a rich resource of genetic variants for studies of selection and local adaptation in these species. PMID:27428061

  10. CONTRASTING PATTERNS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF ARMILLARIA MELLEA SENSU STRICTO IN THE EASTERN AND WESTERN UNITED STATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Armillaria mellea infects over 300 hosts in natural and managed ecosystems throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Previously reported nuclear genetic divergenece between eastern and western US isolates is consistent with the disjunct range of A. mellea in N. America, which is restricted mainly to the ...

  11. Can repeated fertilizer applications to young Norway spruce enhance avian diversity in intensively managed forests?

    PubMed

    Edenius, Lars; Mikusiński, Grzegorz; Bergh, Johan

    2011-07-01

    Repeated fertilization of forests to increase biomass production is an environmentally controversial proposal, the effects of which we assessed on breeding birds in stands of young Norway spruce (Picea abies), in an intensively managed forest area in southern Sweden. Our results show that fertilized stands had 38% more species and 21% more individuals than unfertilized stands. Compared with stands under traditional management, the further intensification of forestry by repeated applications of fertilizers thus seemed to enhance species richness and abundance of forest birds. We cannot conclude at this stage whether the response in the bird community was caused by changes in food resources or increased structural complexity in the forest canopy due to the skid roads used for the application of the fertilizers. Future studies should focus on structural and compositional effects of fertilization processes during the entire rotation period and at assessing its effects in a landscape PMID:21848140

  12. Doctoring in Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Henry

    1983-01-01

    Health care in Eastern Europe has not achieved world standards nor the goals of planners of socialist societies. With luck, perseverance, bribes or good connections, it is possible to obtain good medical and surgical care in Eastern Europe for a major illness. Primary and even secondary care usually are substandard, however, and often completely unacceptable to most Western foreigners. The reasons for this are complex but mainly rooted in different attitudes of health workers towards their patients, poor physical plants, poor salary structures, inadequate advancement opportunities for health care workers, poor social status and professional recognition for nurses and almost complete isolation of the average primary care doctor from hospital medicine. PMID:6659504

  13. Numerical simulation of structural evolution from regional to local scale in the Outokumpu ore district, eastern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Sorjonen-Ward, Peter; Ord, Alison; Kontinen, Asko

    2015-04-01

    Numerical simulations of geological processes may be used in several ways. On the one hand there is an analytical, or forensic approach, analogous to geophysical inversion, to constrain boundary conditions and to demonstrate how a particular geological process or sequence of events is feasible, or even probable. Alternatively, or additionally, modeling of earth processes can be used in a predictive sense, where forward modeling of various scenarios representing different initial states and applied boundary conditions and processes can provide generic or specific insights - depending on model complexity - which may be applied to problems as diverse as geohazard risk assessment and mineral exploration. These two approaches are complementary, and either may be emphasized, depending on the degree of understanding or density of data in a given study area. Here we review how the results of modeling can be used to develop and test structural scenarios and hypotheses and how they can be integrated with new data sets, in this case, deep crustal and upper crustal high resolution reflection seismic data acquired in recent years in the Paleoproterozoic Outokumpu ore district in eastern Finland. A range of process models have been devised and run for the Outokumpu mineral system, including coupled convective reactive transport models, coupled thermomechanical models assessing thermal regimes in rifting, and coupled mechanical and fluid flow models, but here we focus on the results of mechanical modeling using the finite element code FLAC. Models designed at different scales have provided simple and plausible solutions that affirm the geometric and kinematic scenarios based on regional and mine-scale structural data. At regional scale, FLAC models effectively simulated the partitioning of deformation into NW-SE trending ductile shear zones and domains where coeval folding and thrusting have NE-trending axial trends. At a more detailed district scale, development of local

  14. Fertility of soils under spruce forests of the Khibiny Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, M. A.; Lukina, N. V.; Smirnov, V. E.; Krasnov, D. A.; Kamaev, I. O.

    2012-06-01

    The development of fertility of soils on different parent rocks is considered for different types of spruce forests in the Khibiny Mountains. The spruce forests of Mts. Kuel'por, Vud'yavrchorr, Chil'mana, and Saami were the objects for the study. The results showed that the fertility level of the soils of the Khibiny Mountains was determined by the combined influence of the parent rock's composition and the vegetation. The differences in the soil properties are mainly explained by the composition of the parent rocks. The pod-burs differ from the podzols by the higher contents of organic matter, nitrogen, and available nutrients. The podzols are the most acid soils there. The podburs of Mt Kuel'por developing on base-rich parent rocks are the most fertile. The differences in the fertility of the soils on the intrabiogeocenotic (tessera) level are related to the vegetation. The soils of the spruce and tall-grass tesseras are richer in nitrogen, calcium, and manganese as compared to the soils of the dwarf shrub-green moss, low-grass-dwarf shrub-green moss, and tussock grass-dwarf shrub tesseras.

  15. Possible red spruce decline: Contributions of tree-ring analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Deusen, P.C.; Reams, G.A.; Cook, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    In studies of the northeastern red spruce ecosystem, several points evoke some agreement: (1) many high-elevation sites exhibit substantial post-1960 mortality that could be due to winter injury; (2) there is widespread pre-1950 growth increase with a subsequent post-1960 growth decrease; (3) many locations show none of these effects; and (4) dendro-climate models suggest that late summer and early winter temperatures of the previous year are significant determinants of red spruce year-to-year growth. It is a mistake to advocate a single cause at this time, because there is compelling evidence that both climate and stand dynamics are involved to some degree. The study of long-term forest trends based on tree-ring data is difficult and subject to interpretation, but it is unlikely that other data is available for most natural forest areas. In fact, progress made in the study of northeastern red spruce owes much to tree-ring analysis, and other ecological studies could benefit as well.

  16. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nickolas K.; Mina, Marco

    2012-03-01

    A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ˜10% and ˜20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0-5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

  17. Forceful emplacement of the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek composite pluton into a structural basin in eastern California; internal structure and wall rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Sven; Law, Richard; de Saint Blanquat, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility parameters have been analyzed at 311 locations in the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek (EJB) pluton of eastern California. The large amount of data has allowed for the AMS parameters to be contoured using techniques that both reveal map-scale trends and emphasize small-scale differences. The contour maps suggest that magnetic susceptibility is dominantly controlled by composition of the magma but may also be affected by emplacement-related strain as the magma chamber inflated and forced the wall rocks outward. Pluton construction involved two major pulses of different composition magmas that were emplaced sequentially but with overlapping periods of crystallization. The magmas initially intruded as sill-like bodies into a structural basin. The magnetic foliation of the pluton cuts across internal magmatic contacts on the map scale and is parallel to local contacts between the pluton and surrounding metasedimentary wall rocks. The magnetic fabric is similar in orientation and symmetry to intense flattening strains recorded in the aureole rocks. The metasedimentary wall rocks have been shortened between 60 and 70% and this strain magnitude is approximately equal on the west, south, and east margins of the pluton. Strain in the wall rocks is dominantly flattening and concentrated into a narrow (1 km wide) inner aureole. Mapping of bedding/cleavage intersection lineations south of the pluton indicates that the magma made room for itself by translating the wall rocks outward and rotating the already inward dipping wall rocks of the structural basin to sub-vertical. Stretching of the inner aureole around an expanding magma chamber was responsible for the intense shortening. Limited data on the Marble Canyon pluton to the south of the EJB pluton indicates a very similar emplacement process.

  18. Observations of oceanic crust and mantle structures at a deep ocean seismic array in the Eastern Mid Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, twelve ocean bottom stations (OBS) were installed approximately 100 km North of the Gloria Fault during the DOCTAR project (Deep OCean Test ARray). This fault marks the plate boundary between the Eurasian and African plate in the North Eastern Mid Atlantic. The experiment took place in water depth of 4-6 km, 800 km West of the Portuguese coast. The stations were equipped with broad band seismometers which recorded for ten months. We employ P and S receiver functions (RF) to have a closer look at the structure of crust and mantle. The ocean is a quite noisy environment, therefore the number of usable events is low (around 20) compared to RF studies on land. We use several quality criteria (e.g. signal to noise ratio, relative spike position) to select proper processing parameters for the calculation of the RF and carefully reviewed all later on used RF. Despite the low number of events, the usage of an array of OBS with an aperture of 75 km allows us to investigate deeper discontinuities (e.g. in 410 and 660 km depth) compared to single station approaches which are usually employed for OBS. Furthermore, we increase the number of usable events by applying array methods. We use move out corrected and stacked RF to have a closer look at the mantle transition zone, and estimate average depth values for the Moho, the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary (LAB) and the base of the asthenosphere. The Moho lies at depth of 7 km, the LAB at approximately 50 km and the asthenosphere has an approximated thickness of 110 km. We observe a slight increase in the time difference of the mantle discontinuity conversion times compared to PREM. RF give just information regarding the impedance contrast at a discontinuity instead of velocities. We additionally use P wave polarization of teleseismic events to estimate absolute S velocities beneath the single stations. All in all, we use the information gained by the RF analysis, and the analysis of the P wave polarization to

  19. Fire Severity Controlled Susceptibility to a 1940s Spruce Beetle Outbreak in Colorado, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kulakowski, Dominik; Veblen, Thomas T.; Bebi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The frequency, magnitude, and size of forest disturbances are increasing globally. Much recent research has focused on how the occurrence of one disturbance may affect susceptibility to subsequent disturbances. While much has been learned about such linked disturbances, the strength of the interactions is likely to be contingent on the severity of disturbances as well as climatic conditions, both of which can affect disturbance intensity and tree resistance to disturbances. Subalpine forests in western Colorado were affected by extensive and severe wildfires in the late 19th century and an extensive and severe outbreak of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) in the 1940s. Previous research found that most, but not all, of the stands that burned and established following the late 19th century fires were not susceptible to the 1940s outbreak as beetles preferentially attack larger trees and stands in advanced stages of development. However, previous research also left open the possibility that some stands that burned and established following the 19th century fires may have been attacked during the 1940s outbreak. Understanding how strongly stand structure, as shaped by disturbances of varying severity, affected susceptibility to past outbreaks is important to provide a baseline for assessing the degree to which recent climate change may be relaxing the preferences of beetles for larger trees and for stands in latter stages of structural development and thereby changing the nature of linked disturbances. Here, dendroecological methods were used to study disturbance history and tree age of stands in the White River National Forest in Western Colorado that were identified in historical documents or remotely-sensed images as having burned in the 19th century and having been attacked by spruce beetle in the 1940s. Dendroecological reconstructions indicate that in young post-fire stands only old remnant trees that survived the otherwise stand-replacing fires were

  20. Fire Severity Controlled Susceptibility to a 1940s Spruce Beetle Outbreak in Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Kulakowski, Dominik; Veblen, Thomas T; Bebi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The frequency, magnitude, and size of forest disturbances are increasing globally. Much recent research has focused on how the occurrence of one disturbance may affect susceptibility to subsequent disturbances. While much has been learned about such linked disturbances, the strength of the interactions is likely to be contingent on the severity of disturbances as well as climatic conditions, both of which can affect disturbance intensity and tree resistance to disturbances. Subalpine forests in western Colorado were affected by extensive and severe wildfires in the late 19th century and an extensive and severe outbreak of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) in the 1940s. Previous research found that most, but not all, of the stands that burned and established following the late 19th century fires were not susceptible to the 1940s outbreak as beetles preferentially attack larger trees and stands in advanced stages of development. However, previous research also left open the possibility that some stands that burned and established following the 19th century fires may have been attacked during the 1940s outbreak. Understanding how strongly stand structure, as shaped by disturbances of varying severity, affected susceptibility to past outbreaks is important to provide a baseline for assessing the degree to which recent climate change may be relaxing the preferences of beetles for larger trees and for stands in latter stages of structural development and thereby changing the nature of linked disturbances. Here, dendroecological methods were used to study disturbance history and tree age of stands in the White River National Forest in Western Colorado that were identified in historical documents or remotely-sensed images as having burned in the 19th century and having been attacked by spruce beetle in the 1940s. Dendroecological reconstructions indicate that in young post-fire stands only old remnant trees that survived the otherwise stand-replacing fires were

  1. Integrated well log and 2-D seismic data interpretation to image the subsurface stratigraphy and structure in north-eastern Bornu (Chad) basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyaku, Aminu A.; Rust, Derek; Teeuw, Richard; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-09-01

    Structural and stratigraphic mapping within the Bornu Basin in north east Nigeria was commonly carried out using traditional field geological methods. However, such traditional approaches remain inadequate in the semi-arid region characterised by topographically flat areas and lack of continuous bedrock outcrops that are mostly concealed beneath sand cover. Previous studies in the north-eastern part of the basin carried out using ditch cuttings from few wells and disconnected seismic data were largely inadequate and the resulting stratigraphic analyses were more often generalised. This paper presents an integrated structural and stratigraphic study of the basin using combined subsurface geophysical datasets. A Combined Log Pattern (CLP) method is a well log analysis, which utilises various well log data including gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and sonic logs to identify lithology and stratigraphic boundaries of subsurface formations. This method is applied to constrain the subsurface stratigraphy of the north-eastern part of the Bornu Basin bordering the Lake Chad. In addition to qualitative combined well log analysis, the time-depth relationship of the sonic log and seismic data was quantitatively determined by tying a well with an intersecting seismic section to validate the stratigraphic facies horizons identified. Four well log facies and their environments of deposition were characterised from the combined well log analysis of the different log types. It is discovered that the Cretaceous basement structural features controlled the deposition of overlying formations in the basin. Without intact core data, the shallower wells were discovered to have bottomed over subsurface horst features while deeper wells penetrated into the basal facies contained mainly within the grabens. Main subsurface structural lineaments in the area include NW-SE, NE-SW and NNW-SSE trending faults, which mainly formed the horst and graben features. Some stratigraphic formations

  2. Effects of tsaoko (Fructus tsaoko) cultivating on tree diversity and canopy structure in the habitats of eastern hoolock gibbon (Hoolock leuconedys).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sheng-Dong; Fei, Han-Lan; Zhu, Shao-Han; Cui, Liang-Wei; Ai, Huai-Sen; Fan, Peng-Fei

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the quadrat method was used to study the effects of tsaoko (Fructus tsaoko) plantation on tree diversity and canopy structure of two natural habitats of eastern hoolock gibbon (Hoolock leuconedys): Nankang (characterized by extensive tsaoko plantation) and Banchang (relatively well reserved and without tsaoko plantation). Totally, 102 tree species from 25 families and 16 woody liana species from 10 families were recorded in Nankang, whereas 108 tree species from 30 families and 17 woody liana species from 12 families were recorded in Banchang. Although the tree species between two habitats is different, both habitats are characterized by enriched food resources for eastern hoolock gibbons, sharing similar dominant plant families. Due to tsaoko plantation, tree density proportion and diversity of forest layerⅠ (>20 m) in Nankang were both significantly decreased, but the tree density of layerⅡ (10-20 m) increased. Likewise, in conjunction with these behavioral observations, we also address potential impacts of tsaoko plantation on the behavior of eastern hoolock gibbon. PMID:24866494

  3. Population structure and gene flow of the Atlantic walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) in the eastern Atlantic Arctic based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite variation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, L W; Born, E W; Gjertz, I; Wiig, O; Holm, L E; Bendixen, C

    1998-10-01

    The population structure of the Atlantic walrus, Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus, was studied using 11 polymorphic microsatellites and restriction fragment length polymorphism detected in the NADH-dehydrogenase ND1, ND2 and ND3/4 segments in mtDNA. A total of 105 walrus samples were analysed from northwest (NW) Greenland, east (E) Greenland, Svalbard and Franz Joseph Land. Two of the 10 haplotypes detected in the four samples were diagnostic for the NW Greenland sample, which implied that the group of walruses in this area is evolutionary distinct from walruses in the other three areas. One individual sampled in E Greenland exhibited a Pacific haplotype, which proved a connection between the Pacific walrus and walruses in eastern Greenland. The Franz Joseph Land, Svalbard and E Greenland samples shared the most common haplotype, indicating very little differentiation at the mtDNA level. Gene flow (Nm) estimates among the four areas indicated a very restricted exchange of female genes between NW Greenland and the more eastern Atlantic Arctic samples, and a closer relationship between the three samples composing the eastern Atlantic Arctic. The genetic variation at 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci grouped individuals into three populations, NW Greenland, E Greenland and a common Franz Joseph Land-Svalbard population, which were connected by moderate gene flow. PMID:9787444

  4. Magnetic fabrics and Pan-African structural evolution in the Najd Fault corridor in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh M.; Greiling, Reinhard O.; Sadek, Mohamed F.; Hamad, Sayed S.

    2014-11-01

    In order to assess the Pan-African structural evolution from early orogenic fabrics through Najd wrenching to the latest orogenic collapse/extension, the authors used field work, aided by aerial photographs and satellite images. This work is complemented by the study of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS, or magnetic fabric). The Pan-African rock associations of the Um Gheig-Kadabora area can be divided into a lower tier composed mainly of amphibolite-migmatite and granitoid gneisses, and an upper tier of ophiolitic rocks, metavolcanics and their related volcaniclastics, and molasse-type Hammamat sediments. Both these units are intruded by late orogenic granitoid plutons and dykes. The lower tier is exposed in a domal structure in the El Sibai area, the upper tier forms a series of weakly to highly deformed thrust units, called Pan-African Nappes here, which are dissected by high strain shear zones. According to their age, these rock units are divided here into early and late-orogenic. The early orogenic rock association is characterized by medium-high metamorphic grades. The late orogenic rock association is characterized by low metamorphic grade. The rocks in the upper tier form a series of low angle thrust sheets, which are bounded by NW-striking high angle shear zones related to the Najd Fault System. The early orogenic rocks show a polyphase structural evolution with early folds, thrusts, and strike-slip shear zones. The late orogenic rocks show a relatively weaker deformation. The latest intrusives studied here are the dykes dissecting the late orogenic Kadabora granite. In the present work magnetic fabric data document the deformational features in detail and assess the role of the Najd Fault System in the deformational evolution. A strong variation in volume susceptibility of various rocks, due to their variations in mineral composition, is observed. Lower values are in the range of 10-6 SI units for late-orogenic alkaline granite and the

  5. Structural evolution and Cenozoic tectonostratigraphy of the Cairo-Suez district, north Eastern Desert of Egypt: Field-structural data from Gebel Qattamiya-Gebel Um Reheiat area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagag, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Detailed field mapping reveals that continental rifting is strongly deforming the Gebel Qattamiya-Gebel Um Reheiat area and the entire Cairo-Suez district, in north Eastern Desert of Egypt. Rift-related structures are predominantly represented by E to WNW, NNW and NW oriented faults. The E to WNW oriented faults are small and build up the Gebel Qattamiya en echelon fault belt, whereas the faults trending NNW and NW establish a pervasive horst and graben structural style involving some rhomb-shape horsts as Gebel Qattamiya (GQRH), Gebel Um Reheiat (GURRH) and south Gebel Um Reheiat (SGURRH). Rock units of the Eocene succession and Oligocene sediments are well exposed and highly controlled by rift-related structures. Rifting was developed through two rift-phases; initial and major ones. The initial phase (a newly recognized phase in this contribution) has been occurred in Late Eocene (Priabonian), while the main phase was prevailing during Late Oligocene-Early Miocene time and is characterized by hydrothermal veins and basaltic eruptions. Continental transtension in the Cairo-Suez district, including the study area, was probably synchronous with a major tectonic stage (Pyrenean-Atlasic movement) of continental collision between African-Arabian and Eurasian plates in Late Eocene-Oligocene time. Field investigation suggests that the transfer of displacement (slip) from the Gulf of Suez proto-rift into the E-W oriented faults ''relays'' is an important mechanism, which helps to explain the current structural framework and tectonic evolution of the Cairo-Suez district. Reactivation of such faults with right-lateral divergent wrenching with NE-SW oriented extension deformed the Cairo-Suez district with several E-W oriented en echelon fault belts (e.g. Gebel Qattamiya fault belt in the study area). Thus the Cairo-Suez district represents an accommodation or transfer zone in northeastern Egypt, intercepting the ''far-field stresses'' from the Arabian-Nubian Shield, the Red

  6. Evaluation of genetic variability in a small, insular population of spruce grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, A.F., Jr.; Rhymer, J.; Keppie, D.M.; Svenson, K.L.; Paigan, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    Using microsatellite markers we determined genetic variability for two populations of spruce grouse in eastern North America, one on a coastal Maine island where breeding habitat is limited and highly fragmented, the other in central New Brunswick (NB), where suitable breeding habitat is generally contiguous across the region. We examined six markers for both populations and all were polymorphic. Although the number of alleles per locus and the proportion of unique alleles were lower in the island population, and probably a result of small sample.size, heterozygosity and a breeding coefficient (Fis) indicated slightly more variability in the island population. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium also was more evident in loci for the mainland population. Several traits previously documented in the island population: relatively long natal dispersal distances, reproductive success, territoriality, adult survival, and longevity support the maintenance of hetrerzygosity, at least in the short-term. Sample collection from two small (500 ha), separate areas in NB, and the predicted importance of immigration density to supplement this population demonstrate the need for behavioral and ecological information when interpreting genetic variation. We discuss the relevance of these issues with respect to genetic variability and viability.

  7. Extensive Families of miRNAs and PHAS Loci in Norway Spruce Demonstrate the Origins of Complex phasiRNA Networks in Seed Plants

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Rui; Xu, Jing; Arikit, Siwaret; Meyers, Blake C.

    2015-01-01

    In eudicot plants, the miR482/miR2118 superfamily regulates and instigates the production of phased secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from NB-LRR (nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat) genes that encode disease resistance proteins. In grasses, this miRNA family triggers siRNA production specifically in reproductive tissues from long noncoding RNAs. To understand this functional divergence, we examined the small RNA population in the ancient gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies). As many as 41 miRNA families in spruce were found to trigger phasiRNA (phased, secondary siRNAs) production from diverse PHAS loci, with a remarkable 19 miRNA families capable of targeting over 750 NB-LRR genes to generate phasiRNAs. miR482/miR2118, encoded in spruce by at least 24 precursor loci, targets not only NB-LRR genes to trigger phasiRNA production (as in eudicots) but also noncoding PHAS loci, generating phasiRNAs preferentially in male or female cones, reminiscent of its role in the grasses. These data suggest a dual function of miR482/miR2118 present in gymnosperms that was selectively yet divergently retained in flowering plants. A few MIR482/MIR2118 precursors possess an extremely long stem-loop structure, one arm of which shows significant sequence similarity to spruce NB-LRR genes, suggestive of an evolutionary origin from NB-LRR genes through gene duplication. We also characterized an expanded miR390-TAS3 (TRANS-ACTING SIRNA GENE 3)-ARF (AUXIN RESPONSIVE FACTOR) pathway, comprising 18 TAS3 genes of diverse features. Finally, we annotated spruce miRNAs and their targets. Taken together, these data expand our understanding of phasiRNA network in plants and the evolution of plant miRNAs, particularly miR482/miR2118 and its functional diversification. PMID:26318183

  8. Extensive Families of miRNAs and PHAS Loci in Norway Spruce Demonstrate the Origins of Complex phasiRNA Networks in Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Xia, Rui; Xu, Jing; Arikit, Siwaret; Meyers, Blake C

    2015-11-01

    In eudicot plants, the miR482/miR2118 superfamily regulates and instigates the production of phased secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from NB-LRR (nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat) genes that encode disease resistance proteins. In grasses, this miRNA family triggers siRNA production specifically in reproductive tissues from long noncoding RNAs. To understand this functional divergence, we examined the small RNA population in the ancient gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies). As many as 41 miRNA families in spruce were found to trigger phasiRNA (phased, secondary siRNAs) production from diverse PHAS loci, with a remarkable 19 miRNA families capable of targeting over 750 NB-LRR genes to generate phasiRNAs. miR482/miR2118, encoded in spruce by at least 24 precursor loci, targets not only NB-LRR genes to trigger phasiRNA production (as in eudicots) but also noncoding PHAS loci, generating phasiRNAs preferentially in male or female cones, reminiscent of its role in the grasses. These data suggest a dual function of miR482/miR2118 present in gymnosperms that was selectively yet divergently retained in flowering plants. A few MIR482/MIR2118 precursors possess an extremely long stem-loop structure, one arm of which shows significant sequence similarity to spruce NB-LRR genes, suggestive of an evolutionary origin from NB-LRR genes through gene duplication. We also characterized an expanded miR390-TAS3 (TRANS-ACTING SIRNA GENE 3)-ARF (AUXIN RESPONSIVE FACTOR) pathway, comprising 18 TAS3 genes of diverse features. Finally, we annotated spruce miRNAs and their targets. Taken together, these data expand our understanding of phasiRNA network in plants and the evolution of plant miRNAs, particularly miR482/miR2118 and its functional diversification. PMID:26318183

  9. Disturbance and climatic effects on red spruce community dynamics at its southern continuous range margin.

    PubMed

    Ribbons, Relena Rose

    2014-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens) populations experienced a synchronous rangewide decline in growth and vigor starting in the 1960s, likely caused by climate change and a combination of environmental disturbances. However, it is not yet known if populations continue to decline or have recovered. Red spruce growing near its southern range margin in Massachusetts is a species of concern, in light of the vulnerability to climate change. This study uses population data from 17 permanent plots coupled with tree-ring data to examine radial growth rates, determine the growth-climate relationship, and document disturbance events. Red spruce at these plots ranged from 90 to 184 years old, and comprised 15 to 29 m(2)/ha basal area. Red spruce seedlings and saplings were common at plots with previously high overstory spruce abundance, indicating it could return to a more dominant position under favorable growing conditions. However, permanent plot measures over a 50 year time span did not indicate any consistent trends for changes in basal area or density for red spruce or other woody species. Climate data show that mean annual minimum, maximum, and summer temperatures have increased over the last 100 years. Dendroclimatological analyses indicated that red spruce growth was sensitive to both temperature and precipitation. Prior to the 1960s, spruce at these sites showed a positive response to precipitation; however after a multi-year drought in the 1960s showed an increasingly negative correlation with precipitation. There has been a negative growth response to regional warming, as spruce radial growth was mostly constrained by increasing temperatures, potentially coupled with the associated increasing drought-dress. I suggest the change in climate response is potentially due to a physiological threshold response to increasing temperatures, which may cause spruce to continue to decline or be lost from the lower elevation sites, while the high elevation sites has a persistent spruce

  10. Disturbance and climatic effects on red spruce community dynamics at its southern continuous range margin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens) populations experienced a synchronous rangewide decline in growth and vigor starting in the 1960s, likely caused by climate change and a combination of environmental disturbances. However, it is not yet known if populations continue to decline or have recovered. Red spruce growing near its southern range margin in Massachusetts is a species of concern, in light of the vulnerability to climate change. This study uses population data from 17 permanent plots coupled with tree-ring data to examine radial growth rates, determine the growth-climate relationship, and document disturbance events. Red spruce at these plots ranged from 90 to 184 years old, and comprised 15 to 29 m2/ha basal area. Red spruce seedlings and saplings were common at plots with previously high overstory spruce abundance, indicating it could return to a more dominant position under favorable growing conditions. However, permanent plot measures over a 50 year time span did not indicate any consistent trends for changes in basal area or density for red spruce or other woody species. Climate data show that mean annual minimum, maximum, and summer temperatures have increased over the last 100 years. Dendroclimatological analyses indicated that red spruce growth was sensitive to both temperature and precipitation. Prior to the 1960s, spruce at these sites showed a positive response to precipitation; however after a multi-year drought in the 1960s showed an increasingly negative correlation with precipitation. There has been a negative growth response to regional warming, as spruce radial growth was mostly constrained by increasing temperatures, potentially coupled with the associated increasing drought-dress. I suggest the change in climate response is potentially due to a physiological threshold response to increasing temperatures, which may cause spruce to continue to decline or be lost from the lower elevation sites, while the high elevation sites has a persistent spruce

  11. Drought-induced stomatal closure probably cannot explain divergent white spruce growth in the Brooks Range, Alaska, USA.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, Annalis H; Sullivan, Patrick F; Csank, Adam Z; Sveinbjörnsson, Bjartmar; Ellison, Sarah B Z

    2016-01-01

    Increment cores from the boreal forest have long been used to reconstruct past climates. However, in recent years, numerous studies have revealed a deterioration of the correlation between temperature and tree growth that is commonly referred to as divergence. In the Brooks Range of northern Alaska, USA, studies of white spruce (Picea glauca) revealed that trees in the west generally showed positive growth trends, while trees in the central and eastern Brooks Range showed mixed and negative trends during late 20th century warming. The growing season climate of the eastern Brooks Range is thought to be drier than the west. On this basis, divergent tree growth in the eastern Brooks Range has been attributed to drought stress. To investigate the hypothesis that drought-induced stomatal closure can explain divergence in the Brooks Range, we synthesized all of the Brooks Range white spruce data available in the International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) and collected increment cores from our primary sites in each of four watersheds along a west-to-east gradient near the Arctic treeline. For cores from our sites, we measured ring widths and calculated carbon isotope discrimination (δ13C), intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE), and needle intercellular CO2 concentration (C(i)) from δ13C in tree-ring alpha-cellulose. We hypothesized that trees exhibiting divergence would show a corresponding decline in δ13C, a decline in C(i), and a strong increase in iWUE. Consistent with the ITRDB data, trees at our western and central sites generally showed an increase in the strength of the temperature-growth correlation during late 20th century warming, while trees at our eastern site showed strong divergence. Divergent tree growth was not, however, associated with declining δ13C. Meanwhile, estimates of C(i) showed a strong increase at all of our study sites, indicating that more substrate was available for photosynthesis in the early 21st than in the early 20th century. Our

  12. Micro- and Macro-Geographic Scale Effect on the Molecular Imprint of Selection and Adaptation in Norway Spruce

    PubMed Central

    Scalfi, Marta; Mosca, Elena; Di Pierro, Erica Adele; Troggio, Michela; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Sperisen, Christoph; La Porta, Nicola; Neale, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Forest tree species of temperate and boreal regions have undergone a long history of demographic changes and evolutionary adaptations. The main objective of this study was to detect signals of selection in Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst), at different sampling-scales and to investigate, accounting for population structure, the effect of environment on species genetic diversity. A total of 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing 290 genes were genotyped at two geographic scales: across 12 populations distributed along two altitudinal-transects in the Alps (micro-geographic scale), and across 27 populations belonging to the range of Norway spruce in central and south-east Europe (macro-geographic scale). At the macrogeographic scale, principal component analysis combined with Bayesian clustering revealed three major clusters, corresponding to the main areas of southern spruce occurrence, i.e. the Alps, Carpathians, and Hercynia. The populations along the altitudinal transects were not differentiated. To assess the role of selection in structuring genetic variation, we applied a Bayesian and coalescent-based FST-outlier method and tested for correlations between allele frequencies and climatic variables using regression analyses. At the macro-geographic scale, the FST-outlier methods detected together 11 FST-outliers. Six outliers were detected when the same analyses were carried out taking into account the genetic structure. Regression analyses with population structure correction resulted in the identification of two (micro-geographic scale) and 38 SNPs (macro-geographic scale) significantly correlated with temperature and/or precipitation. Six of these loci overlapped with FST-outliers, among them two loci encoding an enzyme involved in riboflavin biosynthesis and a sucrose synthase. The results of this study indicate a strong relationship between genetic and environmental variation at both geographic scales. It also suggests that an

  13. Hartig' net formation of Tricholoma vaccinum-spruce ectomycorrhiza in hydroponic cultures.

    PubMed

    Henke, Catarina; Jung, Elke-Martina; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    For re-forestation of metal-contaminated land, ectomycorrhizal trees may provide a solution. Hence, the study of the interaction is necessary to allow for comprehensive understanding of the mutually symbiotic features. On a structural level, hyphal mantle and the Hartig' net formed in the root apoplast are essential for plant protection and mycorrhizal functioning. As a model, we used the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum and its host spruce (Picea abies). Using an optimized hydroponic cultivation system, both features could be visualized and lower stress response of the tree was obtained in non-challenged cultivation. Larger spaces in the apoplasts could be shown with high statistical significance. The easy accessibility will allow to address metal stress or molecular responses in both partners. Additionally, the proposed cultivation system will enable for other experimental applications like addressing flooding, biological interactions with helper bacteria, chemical signaling, or other biotic or abiotic challenges relevant in the natural habitat. PMID:25791268

  14. Genetic species identification and population structure of Halophila (Hydrocharitaceae) from the Western Pacific to the Eastern Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Indo-Pacific region has the largest number of seagrass species worldwide and this region is considered as the origin of the Hydrocharitaceae. Halophila ovalis and its closely-related species belonging to the Hydrocharitaceae are well-known as a complex taxonomic challenge mainly due to their high morphological plasticity. The relationship of genetic differentiation and geographic barriers of H. ovalis radiation was not much studied in this region. Are there misidentifications between H. ovalis and its closely related species? Does any taxonomic uncertainty among different populations of H. ovalis persist? Is there any genetic differentiation among populations in the Western Pacific and the Eastern Indian Ocean, which are separated by the Thai-Malay peninsula? Genetic markers can be used to characterize and identify individuals or species and will be used to answer these questions. Results Phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region based on materials collected from 17 populations in the Western Pacific and the Eastern Indian Ocean showed that some specimens identified as H. ovalis belonged to the H. major clade, also supported by morphological data. Evolutionary divergence between the two clades is between 0.033 and 0.038, much higher than the evolutionary divergence among H. ovalis populations. Eight haplotypes were found; none of the haplotypes from the Western Pacific is found in India and vice versa. Analysis of genetic diversity based on microsatellite analysis revealed that the genetic diversity in the Western Pacific is higher than in the Eastern Indian Ocean. The unrooted neighbor-joining tree among 14 populations from the Western Pacific and the Eastern Indian Ocean showed six groups. The Mantel test results revealed a significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances among populations. Results from band-based and allele frequency-based approaches from Amplified Fragment Length

  15. Water masses, ocean fronts, and the structure of Antarctic seabird communities: putting the eastern Bellingshausen Sea in perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, Christine A.; Ainley, David G.; Ford, R. Glenn; Fraser, William R.; Tynan, Cynthia T.; Woehler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula (i.e., the eastern Bellingshausen Sea) are unusually complex owing to the convergence of several major fronts. Determining the relative influence of fronts on occurrence patterns of top-trophic species in that area, therefore, has been challenging. In one of the few ocean-wide seabird data syntheses, in this case for the Southern Ocean, we analyzed ample, previously collected cruise data, Antarctic-wide, to determine seabird species assemblages and quantitative relationships to fronts as a way to provide context to the long-term Palmer LTER and the winter Southern Ocean GLOBEC studies in the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. Fronts investigated during both winter (April–September) and summer (October–March) were the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which separates the High Antarctic from the Low Antarctic water mass, and within which are embedded the marginal ice zone and Antarctic Shelf Break Front; and the Antarctic Polar Front, which separates the Low Antarctic and the Subantarctic water masses. We used clustering to determine species' groupings with water masses, and generalized additive models to relate species' densities, biomass and diversity to distance to respective fronts. Antarctic-wide, in both periods, highest seabird densities and lowest species diversity were found in the High Antarctic water mass. In the eastern Bellingshausen, seabird density in the High Antarctic water mass was lower (as low as half that of winter) than found in other Antarctic regions. During winter, Antarctic-wide, two significant species groups were evident: one dominated by Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) (High Antarctic water mass) and the other by petrels and prions (no differentiation among water masses); in eastern Bellingshausen waters during winter, the one significant species group was composed of species from both Antarctic-wide groups. In summer, Antarctic-wide, a High Antarctic group

  16. Water masses, ocean fronts, and the structure of Antarctic seabird communities: putting the eastern Bellingshausen Sea in perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, Christine A.; Ainley, David G.; Ford, R. Glenn; Fraser, William R.; Tynan, Cynthia T.; Woehler, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula (i.e., the eastern Bellingshausen Sea) are unusually complex owing to the convergence of several major fronts. Determining the relative influence of fronts on occurrence patterns of top-trophic species in that area, therefore, has been challenging. In one of the few ocean-wide seabird data syntheses, in this case for the Southern Ocean, we analyzed ample, previously collected cruise data, Antarctic-wide, to determine seabird species assemblages and quantitative relationships to fronts as a way to provide context to the long-term Palmer LTER and the winter Southern Ocean GLOBEC studies in the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. Fronts investigated during both winter (April–September) and summer (October–March) were the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which separates the High Antarctic from the Low Antarctic water mass, and within which are embedded the marginal ice zone and Antarctic Shelf Break Front; and the Antarctic Polar Front, which separates the Low Antarctic and the Subantarctic water masses. We used clustering to determine species' groupings with water masses, and generalized additive models to relate species' densities, biomass and diversity to distance to respective fronts. Antarctic-wide, in both periods, highest seabird densities and lowest species diversity were found in the High Antarctic water mass. In the eastern Bellingshausen, seabird density in the High Antarctic water mass was lower (as low as half that of winter) than found in other Antarctic regions. During winter, Antarctic-wide, two significant species groups were evident: one dominated by Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) (High Antarctic water mass) and the other by petrels and prions (no differentiation among water masses); in eastern Bellingshausen waters during winter, the one significant species group was composed of species from both Antarctic-wide groups. In summer, Antarctic-wide, a High Antarctic group

  17. Water masses, ocean fronts, and the structure of Antarctic seabird communities: Putting the eastern Bellingshausen Sea in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, Christine A.; Ainley, David G.; Glenn Ford, R.; Fraser, William R.; Tynan, Cynthia T.; Woehler, Eric J.

    2011-07-01

    Waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula (i.e., the eastern Bellingshausen Sea) are unusually complex owing to the convergence of several major fronts. Determining the relative influence of fronts on occurrence patterns of top-trophic species in that area, therefore, has been challenging. In one of the few ocean-wide seabird data syntheses, in this case for the Southern Ocean, we analyzed ample, previously collected cruise data, Antarctic-wide, to determine seabird species assemblages and quantitative relationships to fronts as a way to provide context to the long-term Palmer LTER and the winter Southern Ocean GLOBEC studies in the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. Fronts investigated during both winter (April-September) and summer (October-March) were the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which separates the High Antarctic from the Low Antarctic water mass, and within which are embedded the marginal ice zone and Antarctic Shelf Break Front; and the Antarctic Polar Front, which separates the Low Antarctic and the Subantarctic water masses. We used clustering to determine species' groupings with water masses, and generalized additive models to relate species' densities, biomass and diversity to distance to respective fronts. Antarctic-wide, in both periods, highest seabird densities and lowest species diversity were found in the High Antarctic water mass. In the eastern Bellingshausen, seabird density in the High Antarctic water mass was lower (as low as half that of winter) than found in other Antarctic regions. During winter, Antarctic-wide, two significant species groups were evident: one dominated by Adélie penguins ( Pygoscelis adeliae) (High Antarctic water mass) and the other by petrels and prions (no differentiation among water masses); in eastern Bellingshausen waters during winter, the one significant species group was composed of species from both Antarctic-wide groups. In summer, Antarctic-wide, a High Antarctic group dominated

  18. Accumulation of organic air constituents by plant surfaces. Spruce needles for monitoring airborne chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Reischl, A.; Thoma, H.; Reissinger, M.; Hutzinger, O. )

    1988-10-01

    The needles of the spruce (Picea abies) were used to monitor ambient air for organic trace substances. Analyses of spruce needles in an industrialized area demonstrated that the concentrations of these substances were much higher than those in a nonindustrialized area.

  19. GROWTH-TREND DECLINES OF SPRUCE AND FIR IN MID-APPALACHIAN SUBALPINE FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dendroecological analysis of 258 increment growth cores collected from red spruce, balsam fir, and Fraser fir in central West Virginia and western Virginia indicates marked declines in growth-trend during the past 20 years similar to that reported for spruce and fir in high-eleva...

  20. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ˜200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  1. Post-folding magmatism (1.85-1.7 Ga) in the eastern part of the Baltic Shield: Correlation of its structural position and evolution of surrounding complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, E. N.; Baluev, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    This work discusses the structural and compositional correlation of an unusual group of rocks that comprise post-folding massifs and dikes in the eastern Baltic Shield, which formed between 1.85 and 1.7 Ga. Occurring from the Barents Sea in the north to the Gulf of Finland in the south, these structures are associated with areas of granulite facies rocks that formed under conditions corresponding to the deep continental crust. Large-scale extension of continental crust, which led to the exhumation of the granulite complex, simultaneous with the formation of metasomatic formations and manifestations of post-folding magmatism, was confined to the periphery of a large circular structure, which is interpreted by us as the Baltic nucleus, or a tectonic portion of the continental crust at the end of early Precambrian. The formation of enriched mantle, a source of the Paleozoic alkaline melts, can also be associated with these processes of extension.

  2. New structural and seismological evidence and interpretation of a lithospheric-scale shear zone at the southern edge of the Ionian subduction system (central-eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreca, G.; Scarfı, L.; Cannavò, F.; Koulakov, I.; Monaco, C.

    2016-06-01

    Geological, gravimetric, and seismological data from the central-eastern Sicily (Italy) provide evidences of a NW-SE oriented shear zone at the southern edge of the Ionian subduction system. This structure consists of a near 100 km long lithospheric-scale structural and seismic boundary. In the near-surface, it shows Plio-Pleistocene vertical-axis structural rotations, kilometer-scale topographic imprint, progressive wrenching, and large down-faulting. All these features, together with its location south-west of the subduction system, allow us to interpret the shear zone as the upper plate expression of an abandoned Subduction Transform Edge Propagator fault, working before slab detachment, currently reactivated by elastic rebound or mantle upwelling mechanism triggered by slab detachment, to form an incipient transform belt separating compartments characterized by different motion in the modern context of Africa-Europe convergence.

  3. Foliage responses of spruce trees to long-term low-grade sulfur dioxide deposition.

    PubMed

    Meng, F R; Bourque, C P; Belczewski, R F; Whitney, N J; Arp, P A

    1995-01-01

    Foliage on spruce trees (Picea rubens Sarg.) growing on dry SO(2) deposition zones (dry SO(2) deposition ranging from 0.5 and 8.5 S kg ha(-1) year(-1)) downwind from a SO(2) emission source was analyzed to assess chronic effects of long-term low-grade SO(2) deposition on net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, dark respiration, stomatal antechamber wax structures, elemental concentrations in and on foliage (bulk and surficial concentrations), and types of epiphytic fungi that reside in the phylloplane. Elemental distributions on stomatal antechambers, on fungal colonies, and on smooth surfaces between stomates and fungus colonies were determined with a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) by way of X-ray scanning. It was found that net photosynthesis of newly developed spruce foliage (current-year, and 1-year-old) was not significantly affected by the local SO(2) deposition rates. Sulfur dioxide deposition, however, may have contributed to the gradual decrease in net photosynthesis with increasing needle age. Dark respiration rates were significantly higher on foliage taken from high SO(2) deposition zones. Stomatal rod-web structures deteriorated to flakes with increasing needle age and increasing SO(2) deposition. Further inspection of the needle surfaces revealed an increasing abundance of fungal colonies with increasing needle age. Many fungal taxa were isolated and identified. It was found that black yeasts responded positively, and Xylohypha pinicola responded negatively to high rates of SO(2) deposition. Surficial concentrations of elements such as P, S, K, Cl, Ca were about 10 times higher on fungal colonies than on smooth needle surfaces. Surficial Ca contents on 4 or 5-year-old needles decreased with increasing SO(2) deposition, but surficial S concentrations remained the same. In contrast, bulk foliar Ca and S concentrations increased with increasing SO(2) deposition. PMID:15091479

  4. Relationship of the crustal structure and its deformation from arc to back-arc basin in the eastern Japan Sea deduced from the seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; No, Tetsuo; Miura, Seiichi; Kodaira, Shuichi; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The Japan Sea is a back-arc basin in the northwestern Pacific. Based on geophysical, geological, and petrological results, it is suggested that the opening of the Japan Sea was initiated by crustal rifting and the separation of Japan Island arcs from the Asian continent in the Early Oligocene, followed by the ocean floor spreading in the Late Oligocene (e.g., Tamaki et al., 1992). After 3.5 Ma, the crustal shortening by a strong compression occurred in the eastern margin (e.g., Sato, 1994). In the eastern margin, because of the extension associated with the opening of the Japan Sea and this shortening, the deformation such as active faults and folds formed have developed and large earthquakes with magnitudes-7 class repeatedly occurred (e.g., Okamura et al., 2007). The Japan Sea has a unique setting in terms of the connection between the back-arc basin opening and the crustal deformation. However, we have little information concerning with a crustal structure formed by the back-arc opening in the margin and the deformation. To obtain the information, we have been carrying out active-source seismic surveys using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) and multi-channel streamer system (MCS) to cover the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. The obtained results show a difference in crustal structures between the northern and the southern parts of the eastern Japan Sea. In the northern part from the arc to the back-arc basin, the crust is divided into three types; the rifted island arc crust, the thicker oceanic crust and the oceanic crust, based on the comparison of the P-wave velocity distribution and the crustal thickness of a typical oceanic crust (White et al., 1992) and of the northeastern Japan Island arc crust (Iwasaki et al., 2001). On the other hand, the southern part from the arc to the back-arc basin has two crustal types, which are the rifted island arc crust and the thicker oceanic crust. In the northern part, the deformation is distributed in a structural boundary

  5. Crust Uppermost Mantle Structure beneath Eastern Asia: Progress towards a Uniform, Tightly Constrained, High Resolution 3-D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Zheng, Y.; Lin, F. C.; Kim, Y.; Ning, J.; Kang, D.; Feng, L.; Wiens, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, large and dense seismic arrays have been deployed across much of eastern Asia (e.g., the "CEArray" and the "China Array" deployed by the China Earthquake Administration (CEA), the NECESS Array deployed collaboratively by China, Japan and the US, Korean Seismic Network, KNET and other networks in Japan, and historical PASSCAL installations), which have been used to produce increasingly well resolved models of the crust and uppermost mantle at different length scales. These models, however, do not cover eastern Asia uniformly. In this presentation, we report on an effort to generate a uniform high resolution 3-D model of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath eastern Asia using state-of-art surface wave and body wave inversion techniques. Highlights of this effort include: 1) We collect ambient noise cross-correlations using more than 1,800 seismic stations from multiple seismic arrays in this area and perform uniform surface wave tomography for the study area. 2) We collect P-wave receiver functions for over 1,000 stations and Rayleigh wave H/V ratio measurements for over 200 stations in this area. 3) We adopt a Bayesian Monte Carlo inversion to the Rayleigh wave dispersion maps and produce a uniform 3-D model with uncertainties of the crust and uppermost mantle. 4) In the areas where receiver functions and/or Rayleigh wave H/V ratios are collected, we replace the surface wave inversion by a joint inversion of surface waves and these seismic observables. The resulting model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle which we summarize and discuss with focus on the relationship between the observed crustal variations and tectonic/geological boundaries and lithospheric modifications associated with volcanism in Northeast China.

  6. Midwinter needle temperature and winter injury of montane red spruce.

    PubMed

    Strimbeck, G R; Johnson, A H; Vann, D R

    1993-09-01

    To assess the role of solar warming and associated temperature fluctuations in the winter injury of sun-exposed red spruce foliage, we used fine wire thermocouples to monitor midwinter needle temperature in the upper canopy of mature red spruce trees over two winters. In 1989-1990, 15-min mean temperatures were recorded for six needles in a single tree. In 1990-1991, 10-min mean temperatures of six needles in one tree, and 1-min mean temperatures of seven needles in a second tree were recorded during rapid temperature changes. Warming was more frequent and greatest on terminal shoots of branches with a south to southwest aspect. The maximum rise above ambient air temperature exceeded 20 degrees C, and the maximum one minute decrease in temperature was 9 degrees C, with maximum rates of 0.8 and 0.6 degrees C min(-1) sustained over 10- and 15-min intervals, respectively. These data demonstrate that red spruce is subject to rapid temperature fluctuations similar to those known to produce visible injury in American aborvitae, a much hardier species. We concluded that solar warming to temperatures above the freezing point was unlikely to result in dehardening and subsequent freezing injury, because warming was infrequent, of short duration, and did not always raise needle temperature above the freezing point. Parts of branches and some individual shoots were frequently covered by snow or rime that may have prevented injury by reducing the frequency or intensity of needle temperature fluctuations. Radiation load on exposed shoots may have been increased by reflection of short wave radiation from snow and rime deposits on surrounding surfaces, which would exacerbate temperature fluctuations. PMID:14969891

  7. Combined structural interventions for gender equality and livelihood security: a critical review of the evidence from southern and eastern Africa and the implications for young people

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Andrew; Willan, Samantha; Misselhorn, Alison; Mangoma, Jaqualine

    2012-01-01

    Background Young people in southern and eastern Africa remain disproportionately vulnerable to HIV with gender inequalities and livelihood insecurities being key drivers of this. Behavioural HIV prevention interventions have had weak outcomes and a new generation of structural interventions have emerged seeking to challenge the wider drivers of the HIV epidemic, including gender inequalities and livelihood insecurities. Methods We searched key academic data bases to identify interventions that simultaneously sought to strengthen people's livelihoods and transform gender relationships that had been evaluated in southern and eastern Africa. Our initial search identified 468 articles. We manually reviewed these and identified nine interventions that met our criteria for inclusion. Results We clustered the nine interventions into three groups: microfinance and gender empowerment interventions; supporting greater participation of women and girls in primary and secondary education; and gender empowerment and financial literacy interventions. We summarise the strengths and limitations of these interventions, with a particular focus on what lessons may be learnt for young people (18–24). Conclusions Our review identified three major lessons for structural interventions that sought to transform gender relationships and strengthen livelihoods: 1) interventions have a narrow conceptualisation of livelihoods, 2) there is limited involvement of men and boys in such interventions, 3) studies have typically been done in stable populations. We discuss what this means for future interventions that target young people through these methods. PMID:22713350

  8. Genetic structure of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) in the Old World reveals a strong differentiation between eastern and western populations

    PubMed Central

    Zehdi-Azouzi, Salwa; Cherif, Emira; Moussouni, Souhila; Gros-Balthazard, Muriel; Abbas Naqvi, Summar; Ludeña, Bertha; Castillo, Karina; Chabrillange, Nathalie; Bouguedoura, Nadia; Bennaceur, Malika; Si-Dehbi, Farida; Abdoulkader, Sabira; Daher, Abdourahman; Terral, Jean-Frederic; Santoni, Sylvain; Ballardini, Marco; Mercuri, Antonio; Ben Salah, Mohamed; Kadri, Karim; Othmani, Ahmed; Littardi, Claudio; Salhi-Hannachi, Amel; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe; Aberlenc-Bertossi, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Date palms (Phoenix dactylifera, Arecaceae) are of great economic and ecological value to the oasis agriculture of arid and semi-arid areas. However, despite the availability of a large date palm germplasm spreading from the Atlantic shores to Southern Asia, improvement of the species is being hampered by a lack of information on global genetic diversity and population structure. In order to contribute to the varietal improvement of date palms and to provide new insights on the influence of geographic origins and human activity on the genetic structure of the date palm, this study analysed the diversity of the species. Methods Genetic diversity levels and population genetic structure were investigated through the genotyping of a collection of 295 date palm accessions ranging from Mauritania to Pakistan using a set of 18 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and a plastid minisatellite. Key Results Using a Bayesian clustering approach, the date palm genotypes can be structured into two different gene pools: the first, termed the Eastern pool, consists of accessions from Asia and Djibouti, whilst the second, termed the Western pool, consists of accessions from Africa. These results confirm the existence of two ancient gene pools that have contributed to the current date palm diversity. The presence of admixed genotypes is also noted, which points at gene flows between eastern and western origins, mostly from east to west, following a human-mediated diffusion of the species. Conclusions This study assesses the distribution and level of genetic diversity of accessible date palm resources, provides new insights on the geographic origins and genetic history of the cultivated component of this species, and confirms the existence of at least two domestication origins. Furthermore, the strong genetic structure clearly established here is a prerequisite for any breeding programme exploiting the effective polymorphism related to each gene pool. PMID

  9. Can we trace the eastern Gondwanan margin in Australia? New perspectives from transdimensional inversion of ambient noise for 3D shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    Although the notion of Rodinia is quite well accepted in the geoscience community, the location and nature of the eastern continental margin of the Gondwana fragment in Australia is still vague and remains one of the most hotly debated topics in Australian geology. Moreover, most post-Rodinian reconstructions models choose not to tackle the ';Tasmanian challenge', and focus only on the tectonic evolution of mainland southeast Australia, thereby conveniently ignoring the wider tectonic implications of Tasmania's complex geological history. One of the chief limitations of the tectonic reconstructions in this region is a lack of information on Paleozoic (possibly Proterozoic) basement structures. Vast Mesozoic-Cainozoic sedimentary and volcanic cover sequences obscure older outcrops and limit the power of direct observational techniques. In response to these challenges, our effort is focused on ambient seismic noise for imaging 3D crustal shear velocity structure using surface waves, which is capable of illuminating basement structure beneath younger cover. The data used in this study is sourced from the WOMBAT transportable seismic array, which is compounded by around 650 stations spanning the majority of southeastern Australia, including Tasmania and several islands in Bass Strait. To produce the highest quality Green's functions, careful processing of the data has been performed, after which group velocity dispersion measurements have been carried out using a frequency-time analysis method on the symmetric component of the empirical Green's functions (EGFs). Group dispersion measurements from the EGFs have been inverted using a novel hierarchical, transdimensional, Bayesian algorithm to obtain Rayleigh-wave group velocity maps at different periods from 2 to 30 s. The new approach has several advantages in that the number and distribution of model parameters are implicitly controlled by the data, in which the noise is treated as unknown in the inversion. This

  10. Crustal structure and rift tectonics across the Cauvery-Palar basin, Eastern Continental Margin of India based on seismic and potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twinkle, D.; Rao, G. Srinivasa; Radhakrishna, M.; Murthy, K. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    The Cauvery-Palar basin is a major peri-cratonic rift basin located along the Eastern Continental Margin of India (ECMI) that had formed during the rift-drift events associated with the breakup of eastern Gondwanaland (mainly India-Sri Lanka-East Antarctica). In the present study, we carry out an integrated analysis of the potential field data across the basin to understand the crustal structure and the associated rift tectonics. The composite-magnetic anomaly map of the basin clearly shows the onshore-to-offshore structural continuity, and presence of several high-low trends related to either intrusive rocks or the faults. The Curie depth estimated from the spectral analysis of offshore magnetic anomaly data gave rise to 23 km in the offshore Cauvery-Palar basin. The 2D gravity and magnetic crustal models indicate several crustal blocks separated by major structures or faults, and the rift-related volcanic intrusive rocks that characterize the basin. The crustal models further reveal that the crust below southeast Indian shield margin is ˜36 km thick and thins down to as much as 13-16 km in the Ocean Continent Transition (OCT) region and increases to around 19-21 km towards deep oceanic areas of the basin. The faulted Moho geometry with maximum stretching in the Cauvery basin indicates shearing or low angle rifting at the time of breakup between India-Sri Lanka and the East Antarctica. However, the additional stretching observed in the Cauvery basin region could be ascribed to the subsequent rifting of Sri Lanka from India. The abnormal thinning of crust at the OCT is interpreted as the probable zone of emplaced Proto-Oceanic Crust (POC) rocks during the breakup. The derived crustal structure along with other geophysical data further reiterates sheared nature of the southern part of the ECMI.

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Growth melt asymmetry in ice crystals under the influence of spruce budworm antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaya, Natalya; Celik, Yeliz; Di Prinzio, Carlos L.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-10-01

    Here we describe studies of the crystallization behavior of ice in an aqueous solution of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbwAFP) at atmospheric pressure. SbwAFP is an ice binding protein with high thermal hysteresis activity, which helps protect Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm) larvae from freezing as they overwinter in the spruce and fir forests of the north eastern United States and Canada. Different types of ice binding proteins have been found in many other species. They have a wide range of applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation, as well as the potential to protect plants and vegetables from frost damage through genetic engineering. However, there is much to learn regarding the mechanism of action of ice binding proteins. In our experiments, a solution containing sbwAFP was rapidly frozen and then melted back, thereby allowing us to produce small single crystals. These maintained their hexagonal shapes during cooling within the thermal hysteresis gap. Melt-growth-melt sequences in low concentrations of sbwAFP reveal the same shape transitions as are found in pure ice crystals at low temperature (-22 °C) and high pressure (2000 bar) (Cahoon et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 255502) while both growth and melt shapes display faceted hexagonal morphology, they are rotated 30° relative to one another. Moreover, the initial melt shape and orientation is recovered in the sequence. To visualize the binding of sbwAFP to ice, we labeled the antifreeze protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and observed the sbwAFP-GFP molecules directly on ice crystals using confocal microscopy. When cooling the ice crystals, facets form on the six primary prism planes (slowest growing planes) that are evenly decorated with sbwAFP-GFP. During melting, apparent facets form on secondary prism planes (fastest melting planes), leaving residual sbwAFP at the six corners of the hexagon. Thus, the same general growth-melt behavior of an apparently rotated

  12. Functional profile of black spruce wetlands in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The profile describes the ecologic context and wetland functions of black spruce (Picea mariana) wetlands (BSWs) covering about 14 million ha of Alaska taiga. Ecologic descriptions include climate, permafrost, landforms, post-Pleistocene vegetation, fire, successional processes, black spruce community types and adaptations, and characteristics of BSWs. The profile describes human activities potentially affecting BSWs and identifies research literature and data gaps generally applicable to BSWs. Hydrologic, water quality, global biogeochemical, and ecologic functions of BSWs, as well as their socioeconomic uses, appear in the profile, along with potential functional indicators, expected sensitivities of functions to fill placement or weltand drainage, and potential mitigation strategies for impacts. Functional analysis separately considers ombrotrophic and minerotrophic BSWs where appropriate. Depending on trophic status, Alaska`s BSWs perform several low-magnitude hydrologic (groundwater discharge and recharge, flow regulation, and erosion control) and ecologic (nutrient export, nutrient cycling, and food-chain support) functions and several substantial water quality (sediment retention, nutrient transformation, nutrient uptake, and contaminant removal), global biogeochemical (carbon cycling and storage), and ecologic (avian and mammalian habitat) functions. BSWs also provide important socioeconomic uses: harvested of wetland-dependent fish, wildlife, and plant resources and active winter recreation.

  13. Application of a six-layer SVAT model for simulation of evapotranspiration and water uptake in a spruce forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltchev, A.; Constantin, J.; Gravenhorst, G.; Ibrom, A.; Heimann, J.; Schmidt, J.; Falk, M.; Morgenstern, K.; Richter, I.; Vygodskaya, N.

    1996-05-01

    The One-Dimensional non-steady-state Six-Layer SVAT model (SLODSVAT) was applied to a quasihomogeneous stand of spruce trees ( Picea abies [L.] Karst) in the Solling hills (Germany) in order to describe the water transport from the soil into the atmosphere through the roots-stem-shoots-needles system of the trees and to predict the possible response to changes of soil water conditions on transpiration rate of the forest. The modelled water uptake and evapotranspiration rates were compared with long-term sap flow, eddy correlation and gradient flux measurements for a one-week test period (01-08.07.1995) which provided a variety of weather conditions including clear as well as partly cloudy and rainy days. Moreover, for this period the sensitivity of response of the transpiration rate and water uptake to changes of environmental conditions is estimated. The results show, that the SLODSVAT can describe and simulate the short-term variability of water uptake by the roots and evapotranspiration in the spruce forest adequately under different environmental conditions. For the selected period the SLODSVAT explained about 94% of the variation of water uptake (r 2=0.940), and 88% and 78% of variation of evapotranspiration measured by Bowen ratio - energy balance (r 2=0.881) and eddy correlation (r 2=0.785) methods, respectively. Thus, these results give evidence that it is possible to estimate and predict evapotranspiration and transpiration rates for spruce forest ecosystems in the stand-scale during one vegetation period if appropriate input parameters for the soil and canopy structure and the atmospheric conditions are available.

  14. Reproductive potential of balsam fir (Abies balsamea), white spruce (Picea glauca), and black spruce (P. mariana) at the ecotone between mixedwood and coniferous forests in the boreal zone of western Quebec.

    PubMed

    Messaoud, Yassine; Bergeron, Yves; Asselin, Hugo

    2007-05-01

    The reproductive potentials of balsam fir and white spruce (co-dominants in mixedwood forests) and black spruce (dominant in coniferous forests) were studied to explain the location of the ecotone between the two forest types in the boreal zone of Quebec. Four sites were selected along a latitudinal gradient crossing the ecotone. Cone crop, number of seeds per cone, percentage filled seeds, and percentage germination were measured for each species. Balsam fir and white spruce cone crops were significantly lower in the coniferous than in the mixedwood forest, while black spruce had greater crop constancy and regularity between both forest types. Mast years were more frequent for black spruce than for balsam fir in both forest types (mast year data not available for white spruce). The number of seeds per cone was more related to cone size than to forest type for all species. Black spruce produced more filled seeds in the coniferous forest than balsam fir or white spruce. The sum of growing degree-days and the maximum temperature of the warmest month (both for the year prior to cone production) significantly affected balsam fir cone production. The climate-related northward decrease in reproductive potential of balsam fir and white spruce could partly explain the position of the northern limit of the mixedwood forest. This could change drastically, however, as the ongoing climate warming might cancel this competitive advantage of black spruce. PMID:21636443

  15. Combined fluorescence, reflectance, and ground measurements of a stressed Norway spruce forest for forest damage assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banninger, C.

    1991-01-01

    The detection and monitoring of stress and damage in forested areas is of utmost importance to forest managers for planning purposes. Remote sensing are the most suitable means to obtain this information. This requires that remote sensing data employed in a forest survey be properly chosen and utilized for their ability to measure canopy spectral features directly related to key tree and canopy properties that are indicators of forest health and vitality. Plant reflectance in the visible to short wave IR regions (400 to 2500 nm) provides information on its biochemical, biophysical, and morphological make up, whereas plant fluorescence in the 400 to 750 nm region is more indicative of the capacity and functioning of its photosynthetic apparatus. A measure of both these spectral properties can be used to provide an accurate assessment of stress and damage within the forest canopy. Foliar chlorophyll and nitrogen are essential biochemical constituents required for the proper functioning and maintenance of a plant's biological processes. Chlorophyll-a is the prime reactive center for photosynthesis, by which a plant converts CO2 and H2O into necessary plant products. Nitrogen forms an important component of the amino-acids, enzymes, proteins, alkaloids, and cyanogenic compounds that make up a plant, including its pigments. Both chlorophyll and nitrogen have characteristic absorption features in the visible to short wave IR region. By measuring the wavelength position and depth of these features and the fluorescence response of the foliage, the health and vitality of a canopy can be ascertained. Examples for a stressed Norway spruce forest in south-eastern Austria are presented.

  16. Structure and segmentation of the eastern Gulf of Aden basin and the Sheba ridge from gravity, bathymetric and magnetic anomalies: implications for accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.; Maia, M.; Gente, P.; Autin, J.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern Gulf of Aden is a key place for investigating seafloor spreading processes and the evolution in space and time of the margin and ridge segmentation. The rifting of the Gulf that separated Arabia from Somalia started around 35 Ma ago followed by oceanic accretion from at least17.6 Ma. Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic data from the Encens-Sheba cruise are used to study the structure and segmentation of the eastern part of the basin and ridge, which have strong implications for accretion processes. The segmentation of the first oceanic spreading centre, which is dated at least 17.6 Ma by the magnetic anomaly (A5d) identification, seems to be directly related to the structural geometry of the margins. Then, magmatic processes governed the evolution of the segmentation. The segmentation of the oceanic crust evolved, by eastward propagation of the western segment, from three segments (from an5d to an5) to two segments (from an5). At 6 Ma (an3a) a third segment appeared by duplication of the Socotra transform fault, maybe due to a regional kinematics change. The Encens-Sheba oceanic domain is divided in two distinct areas trending NE-SW perpendicular to the Sheba ridge. (1) The Eastern area is characterized by a shorter wavelength variation of the axial segmentation with two spreading segments 30 to 40 km long, and by a thin crust particularly on the northern and southern ends of its flanks. (2) The Western zone, whose axial segment is more than 120 km long, is characterized by a thick crust and/or a hot mantle and no axial rift valley. This abnormal volcanic activity for a slow spreading ridge is emphasized by bathymetric highs with 5-10 km wide volcanic edifices, and by a negative anomaly of the MBA. These different results support the presence of an off-axis thermal anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge. The magnetic anomalies and spreading asymmetry reveal that the location of this thermal anomaly might be relatively recent (~ 10 Ma

  17. Evidence of Variscan and Alpine tectonics in the structural and thermochronological record of the central Serbo-Macedonian Massif (south-eastern Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antić, Milorad D.; Kounov, Alexandre; Trivić, Branislav; Spikings, Richard; Wetzel, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian Massif (SMM) represents a composite crystalline belt within the Eastern European Alpine orogen, outcropping from the Pannonian basin in the north to the Aegean Sea in the south. The central parts of this massif (south-eastern Serbia) consist of the medium- to high-grade Lower Complex and the low-grade Vlasina Unit. Outcrop- and micro-scale ductile structures in this area document three major stages of ductile deformation. The earliest stage D1 is related to isoclinal folding, commonly preserved as up to decimetre-scale quartz-feldspar rootless fold hinges. D2 is associated with general south-eastward tectonic transport and refolding of earlier structures into recumbent metre- to kilometre-scale tight to isoclinal folds. Stages D1 and D2 could not be temporally separated and probably took place in close sequence. The age of these two ductile deformation stages was constrained to the Variscan orogeny based on indirect geological evidence (i.e. ca. 408-ca. 328). During this period, the SMM was involved in a transpressional amalgamation of the western and eastern parts of the Galatian super-terrane and subsequent collision with Laurussia. Outcrop-scale evidence of the final stage D3 is limited to spaced and crenulation cleavage, which are probably related to formation of large-scale open upright folds as reported previously. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology was applied on hornblende, muscovite, and biotite samples in order to constrain the age of tectonothermal events and activity along major shear zones. These 40Ar/39Ar data reveal three major cooling episodes affecting the central SMM. Cooling below greenschist facies conditions in the western part of the Vlasina Unit took place in a post-orogenic setting (extensional or transtensional) in the early Permian (284 ± 1 Ma). The age of activity along the top-to-the-west shear zone formed within the orthogneiss in the Božica area of the Vlasina Unit was constrained to Middle Triassic (246 ± 1 Ma). This

  18. A new Triassic shortening-extrusion tectonic model for Central-Eastern Asia: Structural, geochronological and paleomagnetic investigations in the Xilamulun Fault (North China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pan; Faure, Michel; Chen, Yan; Shi, Guanzhong; Xu, Bei

    2015-09-01

    At the northern margin of the North China Block (NCB), the Xilamulun Fault (XMF) is a key belt to decipher the tectonic evolution of Central-Eastern Asia, as it records the Paleozoic final closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean, and localizes a Late Triassic intracontinental deformation. In this study, structural analysis, 40Ar-39Ar dating, and paleomagnetic studies were performed to investigate the kinematics of the XMF and to further discuss its Triassic geodynamic significance in the Central-Eastern Asia framework after the Paleozoic Central Asian Orogenic evolution. The structural analyses reveal two phases of ductile deformation. The first one (D1), which displays N-verging and E-W trending folds, is related to the Early Paleozoic collisional event between the NCB and the Songliao-Hunshandake Block (SHB). The second phase (D2) displays a high-angle foliation and a pervasive sub-horizontal E-W stretching lineation with kinematic criteria indicative of dextral strike-slip shearing. The 40Ar-39Ar dating on mylonitic granite places the main shearing event around 227-209 Ma. This D2 shearing is coeval with that of the dextral strike-slip Bayan Obo-Chifeng Fault (BCF) and the Chicheng-Fengning-Longhua Fault to the south, which together constitute a dextral shearing fault system on the northern margin of the NCB during the Late Triassic. The paleomagnetic study performed on the Middle Permian Guangxingyuan pluton, located between the XMF and BCF, documents a local clockwise rotation of this pluton with respect to the NCB and SHB. Our multidisciplinary study suggests an NNW-SSE shortening and strike-slip shearing dominated tectonic setting on the northern margin of the NCB during the Late Triassic. Combining the contemporaneous dextral strike-slip movements of the XMF and BCF in northern China and the sinistral strike-slip movement of East Gobi Fault (EGF) in southeastern Mongolia with the large-scale tectonic framework, a Late Triassic NNW-SSE shortening-eastward extrusion

  19. Long-term study of coherent exchange over spruce forest using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Foken, T.

    2003-04-01

    Turbulent time series obtained over tall vegetated surfaces consist of high frequent turbulent signal and additional low frequent ramp-like patterns. These ramp patterns are called coherent structures and show well-organized and regular presence during solar insolation. In the last decade coherent structures have been analyzed in turbulent signals mainly focussing on temperature and horizontal wind speed data of single events or short-term periods under varying stability regimes. These studies concluded that the exchange of energy and matter between tall vegetation and the surfacer layer through coherent structures significantly contribute to the overall budget of the stand. Wavelet analysis has recently been found a powerful and objective tool for detecting and characterizing the coherent exchange. The underlying new concept of this study aims to get information on the long-term behaviour of coherent structures through application of wavelet analysis and their contribution to the energy, carbon and water budget of a mid-european spruce forest. Particular attention is paid to possible origins of coherent motion due to wind shear and roughness changes, their typical length scales in space and time and the behaviour of stationarity and intermittency parameters during the presence of coherent exchange.

  20. A multi-locus molecular phylogeny for Australia's iconic Jacky Dragon (Agamidae: Amphibolurus muricatus): phylogeographic structure along the Great Dividing Range of south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Mitzy; Barquero, Marco D; Whiting, Martin J; Keogh, J Scott

    2014-02-01

    Jacky dragons (Amphibolurus muricatus) are ubiquitous in south-eastern Australia and were one of the first Australian reptiles to be formally described. Because they are so common, Jacky dragons are widely used as a model system for research in evolutionary biology and ecology. In addition, their distribution along the Great Dividing Range of eastern Australia provides an opportunity to examine the influence of past biogeographical processes, particularly the expansion and contraction of forest habitats, on the diversification of this iconic agamid lizard. We generated sequence data for two mitochondrial and three nuclear DNA loci (4251base pairs) for 62 Jacky dragons sampled from throughout their distribution. Phylogenetic analyses based on maximum likelihood and Bayesian species-tree methods revealed five geographically structured clades separated by up to 6% mitochondrial and 0.7% nuclear sequence divergence. We also quantified body proportion variation within and between these genetic clades for more than 500 specimens and found no evidence of any significant differentiation in body proportions across their range. Based on body proportion homogeneity and lack of resolution in the nuclear loci, we do not support taxonomic recognition of any of the mitochondrial clades. Instead, A. muricatus is best thought of as a single species with phylogeographic structure. The genetic patterns observed in the Jacky dragon are consistent with fragmented populations reduced to multiple refugia during cold, arid phases when forested habitats were greatly restricted. Consequently, the inferred biogeographic barriers for this taxon appear to be in line with lowland breaks in the mountain ranges. Our results are congruent with studies of other reptiles, frogs, mammals, birds and invertebrates, and together highlight the overarching effects of widespread climatic and habitat fluctuations along the Great Dividing Range since the Pliocene. PMID:24315864

  1. Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine and Norwegian spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, R.W. )

    1993-02-20

    Rates of monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norwegian spruce (Picea abies) have been measured at four sites in Sweden with a dynamic flow chamber technique. Forest floor emissions have been made in the pine forest with the static chamber technique. The compounds [Delta][sup 3]-carene and [alpha]-pinene were the predominant terpenes emitted from the crown and floor of the Scots pine forest. Alpha-pinene was the main terpene emitted from Norwegian spruce at the sites in southern and central Sweden, while [Delta][sup 3]-carene was predominant at the northern site. Emission rates, normalized to temperature, were seen to vary diurnally with a maximum at midday, and seasonally with maxima in early May and October, and a summer maximum in June-July. The possible dependence of the emission rate on needle growth rate and other plant-physiological processes is discussed. A higher emission rate and different relative composition of the emission was seen to occur when the vegetation was wet, as compared to dry vegetation. The emission from the pine forest floor was seen to have a composition different from that of the crown and a seasonality of the rate similar to that of the crown. The ground emission could not be explained by sources in the litter or ground vegetation alone, and it is suggested that the root system of the trees is also an emission source. The emission rate from the pine forest floor was of the order of 30% of the crown emission. The July rate of emission from the crown of Scots pine, normalized to 20[degrees]C and averaged over four sites in Sweden, was 0.8 [plus minus] 0.4 [mu]g (gdw (grams dry weight) h)[sup [minus]1], and for Norwegian spruce, 0.5 [plus minus] 0.7 [mu]g(gdw h)[sup [minus]1]. It would seem that previous regional and global estimates of hydrocarbon fluxes to the atmosphere have used emission factors which are too high for boreal coniferous forests. 52 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Seasonal variation of BVOC emissions from Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Schurgers, Guy; Ekberg, Anna; Arneth, Almut; Holst, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are known as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) due to their high reactivity in the atmosphere [1, 2]. Dominant boreal forest species (pine, spruce and birch) have been considered to be high monoterpene (MT) emitters [3, 4], and BVOC emissions and compound composition vary considerably under different temperature and light conditions through growing season [5, 6]. We characterize the canopy BVOC emissions variation from a Norway spruce dominated boreal forest in Central Sweden (Norunda, 60°05'N, 17°29'E). Air samples were taken during growing season (June to September 2013) from transparent dynamic branch chambers set up on Norway spruce at 20m agl. using a scaffolding tower. Air samples were collected every hour from the chamber with Tenax-TA adsorbent tubes and a pocket pump, and analyzed later by gas chromatography and a mass selective detector (GC-MS) to quantify trapped terpenoid compounds. Total terpenoids emission rates in August were found to be highest even though the highest average air temperature was observed in July. Isoprene could not be detected in any sample in June and in most samples from September, but during peak season. Emissions of Isoprene, MT and sesquiterpenes (SQT) showed a clear diurnal pattern in July and August with highest emissions at noon time, however, the composition of terpenoids was slightly changing among different months. The most complex chemical composition with 13 different MT species occurred in late July, while 9 SQT species occurred in the middle of August. However, the fraction of dominant MT species (Limonene, α-Pinene, β-Pinene and Camphene) of the total terpenoids emission was almost constant throughout the whole season from June to September except for β-Pinene which showed a higher fraction in August. References [1]M.Ehn et al., 2014, Nature, 506(7489), 476-479. [2]M.Kulmala et al., 2004, Atmos. Environ., 4, 557-562. [3]J.Rinne et al., 2005, Boreal Environ

  3. Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine and Norwegian spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Robert W.

    1993-02-01

    Rates of monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norwegian spruce (Picea abies) have been measured at four sites in Sweden with a dynamic flow chamber technique. Forest floor emissions have been made in the pine forest with the static chamber technique. Sampling was done with Tenax TA and analysis and detection by GC and ion trap detection. The compounds Δ3-carene and α-pinene were the predominant terpenes emitted from the crown and floor of the Scots pine forest. Alpha-pinene was the main terpene emitted from Norwegian spruce at the sites in southern and central Sweden, while Δ3-carene was predominant at the northern site. The relative composition of the emission of both species underwent changes in early spring and fall. Emission rates, normalized to temperature, were seen to vary diurnally with a maximum at midday, and seasonally with maxima in early May and October, and a summer maximum in June-July. The possible dependence of the emission rate on needle growth rate and other plant-physiological processes is discussed. A higher emission rate and different relative composition of the emission was seen to occur when the vegetation was wet, as compared to dry vegetation. The emission from the pine forest floor was seen to have a composition different from that of the crown and a seasonality of the rate similar to that of the crown. The ground emission could not be explained by sources in the litter or ground vegetation alone, and it is suggested that the root system of the trees is also an emission source. The emission rate from the pine forest floor was of the order of 30% of the crown emission. The July rate of emission from the crown of Scots pine, normalized to 20°C and averaged over four sites in Sweden, was 0.8 ± 0.4 μg (gdw (grams dry weight) h)-1, and for Norwegian spruce, 0.5 ± 0.7 μg(gdw h)-1. It would seem that previous regional and global estimates of hydrocarbon fluxes to the atmosphere have used emission factors which are

  4. Black Carbon characterization in Quebec black spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, L. N.; Wasylishen, R. E.; MacKenzie, M. D.; Quideau, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), the solid carbonaceous residue of incomplete combustion, is a major by-product of wildfires in Quebec black spruce forests. Because of its estimated recalcitrance, it is considered a valuable pool in the global carbon cycle. However, BC characteristics, and more specifically its resistance to degradation depend on its conditions of formation. The objective of this study was to characterize BC chemical and physical properties under varying fire severities in order to assess its potential for recalcitrance as a passive carbon pool. Fresh BC samples from the forest floor were collected in 2010 from Quebec black spruce forests stands that had burnt 3-5 years prior. Fire severity was assessed at each sampling location and a total of 33 samples were selected to cover the range of severity encountered in these burnt forests. Samples were further analyzed for aromaticity and porosity using elemental and proximate analyses, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface area (SA) analysis. They were then compared to BC samples produced under controlled conditions in the laboratory (lab-BC). The 13C NMR spectra of the BC collected on low fire severity sites showed a distribution of total intensity between the different spectral regions very similar to those of unburnt fuels. They were generally dominated by a peak at 74 ppm indicative of cellulose. On the other hand, 13C NMR spectra obtained for BC from high fire severity sites were dominated by peaks from aromatic carbons. When compared to the lab-BC NMR spectra, we concluded that the temperature of formation for the 33 analyzed samples ranged between 75°C and 250°C and that pyrolysis conditions prevailed, which points towards BC formation by a smouldering fire. Atomic ratio values (H/C = [1.36-0.77]; O/C = [0.75-0.30]) decreased with increasing fire severity and were in agreement with the results from 13C NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the

  5. Intramontane basin development related to contractional and extensional structure interaction at the termination of a major sinistral fault: The Huércal-Overa Basin (Eastern Betic Cordillera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, Antonio; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Tello, Alejandro; Marín-Lechado, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Among the classical minor structural associations on the termination of transcurrent faults are horsetail splays formed by reverse, normal or strike-slip faults developing duplexes. However, temporal and spatial coexistence of contractional and extensional structures is very rarely documented. We discuss the relationships of contractional and extensional structures and associated sedimentary depocenters at the termination of a major strike-slip fault in the Eastern Betic Cordillera. Field mapping, kinematic fault analysis, paleostress determination and gravity prospecting in the Huércal-Overa Basin, at the southern termination of the NE-SW Alhama de Murcia transcurrent fault (AMF), are used to establish the relationships of tectonic structures and associated sedimentary depocenters. Here, ENE-WSW and WNW-ESE folds interact with two sets of normal faults having the same orientation as well as ENE-WSW reverse faults. Progressive unconformities associated with folds reveal that the beginning of the AMF activity occurred in the Tortonian. The folds progressively grew and rotated from ENE-WSW up to WNW-ESE close to the transcurrent fault. We propose that the development of the normal faults developed during short-term episodes characterized by vertical major stress axis and are, in turn, related to gravitational instability linked to the thickening of a crust relatively hot at depth. This setting may have become predominant in between the main activity, compressive pulses along transcurrent faults.

  6. Spatial variability in phytoplankton community structure along the eastern Arabian Sea during the onset of south-west monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Kurian, Siby; Gauns, Mangesh; Chndrasekhararao, A. V.; Mulla, Amara; Naik, Bhagyashri; Naik, Hema; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Arabian Sea experiences moderate to weak upwelling along the south-west coast of India, which subsequently propagates towards the north. This causes variation in plankton community composition, which is addressed in the present study. Here we report the spatial variations in distribution of phytoplankton groups along the north-south transect in the eastern Arabian Sea based on marker pigments supported with flow-cytometric and microscopic analyses. 15 phytoplankton pigments were identified using High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the chemotaxonomic software (CHEMTAX) analysis associated these to seven major group of phytoplankton. The phytoplankton biomass, chlorophyll a (Chl a) was higher in southern stations with dominance of fucoxanthin whereas, divinyl chlorophyll a (divinyl Chl a), marker pigment of Prochlorococcus was present only in the northern region. Microscopic observation revealed the dominance of larger forms; diatoms (Chaetoceros coarctatum and Nitzschia sp.) and dinoflagellates (Scrippsiella sp., Oxytoxum nanum and Oxytoxum sp.) in the southern region. Furthermore, a study of plankton size distribution showed dominance of picoplankton (fpico) followed by nanoplankton (fnano) along the northern stations with comparatively higher microplankton (fmicro) in the south. This study clearly showed the influence of different environmental conditions on the phytoplankton community as reflected in dominance of diatoms in the southern (south of 12 °N) and that of picoplankton in the northern (north of 12 °N) region.

  7. Yellowheaded spruce sawfly: Its ecology and management. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Katovich, S.A.; McCullough, D.G.; Haack, R.A.

    1995-12-14

    The yellowheaded spruce sawfly (YHSS), Pikonema alaskensis (Rohwer), (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae), defoliates spruce, Picea sp., throughout the Northern United States and Canada. YHSS defoliation can result in substantial growth reduction and tree mortality. Young, open-grown trees, 3 to 18 feet in height and 5 to 9 years old, are more vulnerable to YHSS damage than are understory trees, older trees, or trees in dense stands. Young plantations and naturally regenerated stands of spruce YHSS defoliation, particularly in the Great Lakes region. Many Christmans trees, nursery stock, roadside and windbreak trees, and ornamental spruce are also damaged. Susceptibility to YHSS drops sharply once trees reach 10 to 12 years of age and stands reach the stage of crown closure.

  8. Red spruce decline in the northeastern US: hypotheses regarding the role of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.H.

    1983-11-01

    Red spruce have died in abnormal numbers in the high elevation forests of New York and New England during the past two decades while spruce in the southern Appalachians remain healthy. Investigations of insect damage, fungai pathogens, successional dynamics, competitive status, climate and weather patterns, and possible pollutant effects indicate that the decline was triggered by abiotic stress during the dry years of the 1960s. Tree response, as recorded in the pattern of annual rings, and the wide range of soil conditions in which spruce are declining, suggest drought or dry summers as key factors. Hypotheses regarding the role of acid deposition induced stress have been offered, but at present there is not evidence which clearly links acid deposition to spruce decline. Indirect effects of acid deposition on soils, direct effects of acid deposition on foliage, and interactions of acid deposition and drought stress are possible but unproven pathways by which acid deposition could be involved. 23 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  9. Physiological diagnosis of the health of spruce and fir at high elevations in the Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Wullschleger, S.D.; Stone, A. )

    1994-06-01

    A sequence of field studies to evaluate causes of decreasing radial growth rates of red spruce at high elevations in the Great Smokey Mountains during the past 30 years has examined climatic signals, competition, xylem wood chemistry, soil chemistry, foliar nutrition and carbon allocation patterns. The resultant hypothesis that acid deposition alters red spruce growth through limiting calcium availability, and consequently net carbon assimilation, has now been tested in controlled greenhouse and field studies. Recent measurements of reduce respiration and increased photosynthesis of red spruce samplings in response to adding calcium in the field, provides additional evidence linking acid deposition to altered nutrition, physiology, and growth of red spruce. Initial data from physiological gradient analysis also support the occurrence of parallel elevational gradients in physiology of fraser fir.

  10. Climate and red spruce growth and decline in the northern Appalachians

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. H.; Cook, E. R.; Siccama, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    Between the mid-1960s and mid-1980s, red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) died at unusual rates on the mountains of New York and western New England. We determined the relationship between standardized tree ring widths and monthly climate data for calibration and verification periods from 1856 to 1981 and found that after about 1960, there was a distinct shift in the temperature variables related to standardized ring widths in vigorous spruce. The beginning of widespread spruce mortality, regionwide growth decreases, and the shift in response to climate in the early 1960s corresponds to the onset of a decade of unusually cold winters and several consecutive years when severe winter damage was noted across the Northeast in this species. We suggest that the episodes of winter damage are an important initiating and synchronizing factor in the red spruce decline. PMID:16593962

  11. Plasticity and Evolution of (+)-3-Carene Synthase and (−)-Sabinene Synthase Functions of a Sitka Spruce Monoterpene Synthase Gene Family Associated with Weevil Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Christopher R.; Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The monoterpene (+)-3-carene is associated with resistance of Sitka spruce against white pine weevil, a major North American forest insect pest of pine and spruce. High and low levels of (+)-3-carene in, respectively, resistant and susceptible Sitka spruce genotypes are due to variation of (+)-3-carene synthase gene copy number, transcript and protein expression levels, enzyme product profiles, and enzyme catalytic efficiency. A family of multiproduct (+)-3-carene synthase-like genes of Sitka spruce include the three (+)-3-carene synthases, PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and the (−)-sabinene synthase PsTPS-sab. Of these, PsTPS-3car2 is responsible for the relatively higher levels of (+)-3-carene in weevil-resistant trees. Here, we identified features of the PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and PsTPS-sab proteins that determine different product profiles. A series of domain swap and site-directed mutations, supported by structural comparisons, identified the amino acid in position 596 as critical for product profiles dominated by (+)-3-carene in PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, and PsTPS-3car3, or (−)-sabinene in PsTPS-sab. A leucine in this position promotes formation of (+)-3-carene, whereas phenylalanine promotes (−)-sabinene. Homology modeling predicts that position 596 directs product profiles through differential stabilization of the reaction intermediate. Kinetic analysis revealed position 596 also plays a role in catalytic efficiency. Mutations of position 596 with different side chain properties resulted in a series of enzymes with different product profiles, further highlighting the inherent plasticity and potential for evolution of alternative product profiles of these monoterpene synthases of conifer defense against insects. PMID:25016016

  12. A spruce gene map infers ancient plant genome reshuffling and subsequent slow evolution in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extant conifers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Seed plants are composed of angiosperms and gymnosperms, which diverged from each other around 300 million years ago. While much light has been shed on the mechanisms and rate of genome evolution in flowering plants, such knowledge remains conspicuously meagre for the gymnosperms. Conifers are key representatives of gymnosperms and the sheer size of their genomes represents a significant challenge for characterization, sequencing and assembling. Results To gain insight into the macro-organisation and long-term evolution of the conifer genome, we developed a genetic map involving 1,801 spruce genes. We designed a statistical approach based on kernel density estimation to analyse gene density and identified seven gene-rich isochors. Groups of co-localizing genes were also found that were transcriptionally co-regulated, indicative of functional clusters. Phylogenetic analyses of 157 gene families for which at least two duplicates were mapped on the spruce genome indicated that ancient gene duplicates shared by angiosperms and gymnosperms outnumbered conifer-specific duplicates by a ratio of eight to one. Ancient duplicates were much more translocated within and among spruce chromosomes than conifer-specific duplicates, which were mostly organised in tandem arrays. Both high synteny and collinearity were also observed between the genomes of spruce and pine, two conifers that diverged more than 100 million years ago. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that much genomic evolution has occurred in the seed plant lineage before the split between gymnosperms and angiosperms, and that the pace of evolution of the genome macro-structure has been much slower in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extent conifers than that seen for the same period of time in flowering plants. This trend is largely congruent with the contrasted rates of diversification and morphological evolution observed between these two groups of seed plants. PMID:23102090

  13. Effects of prolonged drought on the anatomy of sun and shade needles in young Norway spruce trees.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Roman; Volařík, Daniel; Urban, Josef; Børja, Isabella; Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Eldhuset, Toril Drabløs; Krokene, Paal

    2015-11-01

    Predicted increases in the frequency and duration of drought are expected to negatively affect tree vitality, but we know little about how water shortage will influence needle anatomy and thereby the trees' photosynthetic and hydraulic capacity. In this study, we evaluated anatomical changes in sun and shade needles of 20-year-old Norway spruce trees exposed to artificial drought stress. Canopy position was found to be important for needle structure, as sun needles had significantly higher values than shade needles for all anatomical traits (i.e., cross-sectional needle area, number of tracheids in needle, needle hydraulic conductivity, and tracheid lumen area), except proportion of xylem area per cross-sectional needle area. In sun needles, drought reduced all trait values by 10-40%, whereas in shade needles, only tracheid maximum diameter was reduced by drought. Due to the relatively weaker response of shade needles than sun needles in drought-stressed trees, the difference between the two needle types was reduced by 25% in the drought-stressed trees compared to the control trees. The observed changes in needle anatomy provide new understanding of how Norway spruce adapts to drought stress and may improve predictions of how forests will respond to global climate change. PMID:26640676

  14. AmeriFlux CA-Man Manitoba - Northern Old Black Spruce (former BOREAS Northern Study Area)

    SciTech Connect

    Amiro, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Man Manitoba - Northern Old Black Spruce (former BOREAS Northern Study Area). Site Description - 55.880° N, 98.481° W, elevation of 259 m, Boreal coniferous: Black spruce; occasional larch present in poorly-drained areas. Groundcover is moss (feathermosses and Sphagnum), Labrador Tea, Vaccinium, and willows are a main component of the understory. It was established in 1993 as a BOREAS site.

  15. Inclination distributions and size measurements of hemlock and red spruce needles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel S.; Smith, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Needle inclination angle distributions were plotted for 5 and 10 deg intervals for two hemlock trees and one red spruce. The distributions for the hemlock and spruce were similar, with the peak normal angle occurring between 10 and 20 deg. These distributions are between two theoretical (planophile and spherical) leaf angle distributions. The results can be used as an input to radiative transfer models that require a distribution of the orientation of the scattering elements of the canopy.

  16. Food-web structure and elemental (C, N and P) fluxes in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agusti, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.; Vaqué, Dolors; Hein, Mette; Gasol, Josep M.; Vidal, Montserrat

    The flow of biogenic elements (C, N and P) in the upper tropical Atlantic (29-5°N, 17-22°W) was studied are the Latitude II cruise 1995 with the aim of examining planktonic food web controls on these fluxes. The transect crossed three distinct water masses, a productive area in the NW African upwelling between 18° and 23°N, a warm water mass between 6° and 13°N, and unproductive waters at the northern range of the transect. The contrasting phytoplankton biomass and production across the eastern tropical N Atlantic appear to be driven by major changes in the supply of nutrients across the thermocline, which averaged 0.99±0.6 mmol N m -2 d -1 and 0.13±0.07 mmol P m -2 d -1, and was particularly high at the upwelling area off NW Africa. This supply was relatively low in nitrogen relative to that in phosphorus, driving the system towards nitrogen limitation. This was further enhanced by an important sinking flux of nitrogen in dissolved organic matter, which averaged 14.8±6.8 mmol N m -2 d -1 and exceeded the average internal input of nitrate by seven fold. There was, therefore, a severe nitrogen deficit that must have been offset by lateral and/or atmospheric inputs. Evaluation of the likely size of these sources indicates that lateral inputs must be important in the southern range of the area investigated, while atmospheric inputs seem to deliver the required N to balance losses in the northern area of the eastern subtropical Atlantic. Planktonic biomass was dominated by heterotrophs, and community respiration rates and bacterial carbon requirements exceeded the net primary production in the most unproductive areas. There must be significant allocthonous inputs of organic carbon and nitrogen in this region of the ocean. The distribution of primary production was uncoupled to that of the calculated CO 2 flux across the ocean surface. The productive area off the NW African upwelling acted as a source of CO 2 to the atmosphere (0.5 mmol C m -2 d -1), driven by

  17. Structure of a Young Oceanic Basin: Results of the Encens-Sheba Cruise in the Eastern Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S.; Fournier, M.; Gente, P.; Al-Kathiri, A.; Bellahsen, N.; Beslier, M.; Blais, A.; d'Acremont, E.; Mercouriev, S.; Patriat, P.; Perrot, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Encens-Sheba cruise was carried out in July 2000 aboard R/V Marion Dufresne in the eastern part of the Gulf of Aden. It produced a complete swath bathymetry, gravity and magnetic data set between southern Oman (Dhofar) and Yemen in the north and Socotra island in the south, and between Alula-Fartak fracture zone in the west and the Socotra fracture zone in the east. The new data set shows a complete section of a young oceanic basin from conjugate passive continental margins up to the oceanic spreading center. On the conjugate passive margins, single channel seismic data have been also collected. The two conjugate margins are steep, narrow and asymmetric. Titled blocks, horsts and grabens bounded by faults dipping towards the ocean or the continent compose the northern margin, whereas a deep basin near the continental slope in the vicinity of the continent-ocean transition characterizes the southern margin. The two margins are divided by transfer faults in 3 major segments. The continent-ocean transition is marked by a negative gradient of the free-air gravity anomalies. The present Sheba ridge is divided by discontinuities in 3 segments from 20 to 100 km long. The central part of the 100-km-long western segment is characterized by an axial uplift reflecting a large magmatic activity. The two other shorter segments display axial valley more classical for a slow spreading ridge (1.1cm/a). Although the magnetic anomalies show a complex history of oceanic accretion, the evolution of the segmentation can be followed. Indeed, the segmentation of the conjugate passive margins seems to be correlated with the location of early traces of identifiable Sheba ridge offset. The oldest anomalies are identified as an5C-an5D. The Gulf of Aden in this area thus opened 16-17Ma ago, which is significantly older than the 12-13 Ma suggested by previous studies.

  18. Structure, formation and geochronology of the late Pleistocene and Holocene cover deposits in South-Eastern Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltrūnas, Valentinas; Karmaza, Bronislavas; Molodkov, Anatoly; Šinkūnas, Petras; Švedas, Kęstutis; Zinkutė, Rimantė

    2010-11-01

    The available data of earlier investigations ( Basalykas, 1965; Basalykas et al., 1976a,b; Kudaba, 1983) show that deposits of various origin and age are widespread in Ašmena Upland and Lyda Plateau (South-Eastern Lithuania). They overlie a polygenetic dislodged marginal formations of the penultimate Medininkai (Warthe) glaciation. Pleistocene deposits in this area are often deformed by solifluction and fluvial erosion and penetrated by cryogenic ice-wedge pseudomorphs. Granulometric, geochemical and petrographic investigations of the deposits have demonstrated that they are characterized by different sources of sedimentary material supply as well as different degrees of physical and chemical weathering. The alternate deposits preserved in the study area imply palaeoenvironmental changes associated with the different palaeoclimatic events. The Ca/Zr ratios in cover deposits testify that the upper beds usually experienced stronger chemical weathering that is associated with warmer climate. The cases of weaker weathering can be explained by different sources of material, i.e. deposit origin, which can be indicated by Zr/Ti ratio. According to the scarce geochronological data available at least 4 clusters of IR-OSL dates can be distinguished in the late Pleistocene environmental history of Ašmena Upland and Lyda Plateau: about 100 ka (marine isotope stage (MIS) 5c, Merkinė interglacial), 89-71 ka (MIS 5a, Merkinė interglacial), about 40 ka (MIS 3, Rokai interstadial) and 21-12 ka (late Nemunas). One cluster of IR-OSL dates (9.7-5.3 ka) is obtained in the first half of Holocene.

  19. Fault Population Analyses in the Eastern California Shear Zone: Insights into the Development of Young, Actively Evolving Plate Boundary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Dawers, N. H.; Amer, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Relationships between cumulative fault displacement, slip rate and length, along with fault population statistics are analyzed for faults located within the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ), focusing on areas north of the Garlock fault. Here many faults are geologically young and in an early stage of evolution, while many older and larger faults are also still active. We analyze scaling relationships for both strike-slip and normal faults in order to determine whether the two fault populations share the same properties or not. Cumulative displacement, slip rate and length data are collected from published maps and literature sources. The dataset spans fault lengths from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. Results of fault scaling analyses indicate that displacement has a linear relationship with fault length for normal faults in this area over the entire length span, whereas strike-slip faults do not have a clear displacement-length scaling relation. For a given length, the subset of strike-slip faults typically exhibits a much larger displacement than that for the normal faults. The slip rate versus length trends are similar but are considerably more scattered. In addition, we define a subpopulation of normal faults that are kinematically related to the right-lateral strike-slip faults; these have a maximum length set by the spacing between the right-lateral faults. Fault size-frequency distributions also indicate differences between the normal and strike-slip fault populations. Overall, the normal faults have higher ratios of cumulative number to fault length than the strike-slip population does, which we relate to different patterns of localization of faulting. We interpret these trends as reflecting different tectonic histories, with the majority of normal faults being intraplate faults associated with Basin and Range extension and the strike-slip faults being kinematically connected with plate boundary.

  20. Quaternary structural partitioning within the rigid Tarim plate inferred from magnetostratigraphy and sedimentation rate in the eastern Tarim Basin in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hong; An, Zhisheng; Liu, Weiguo; Ao, Hong; Qiang, Xiaoke; Song, Yougui; Lai, Zhongping

    2014-05-01

    It has been proposed that within the Tarim Basin tectonic activity has been limited since Triassic time. However, on the basis of magnetostratigraphy from the eastern Tarim Basin, which defines the chronology of sedimentation and structural evolution of the basin, we show that the basin interior has been uplifted and partitioned during Quaternary. The magnetostratigraphy was constructed from 2228 samples that yielded acceptable inclination values. Characteristic remnant magnetization (ChRM) with both normal (N1-N11) and reversed (R1-R11) polarity was isolated by thermal demagnetization. The data correlate best with polarity chrons C3r to C1n, which range from 5.39 Ma to recent on the geological time scale 2004 (GTS2004). An abrupt decrease in the sedimentation rate is observed at 1.77 Ma in the Ls1 core. This change does not overlap with known Pleistocene climate-change events. We attribute this sedimentation rate decrease to a structurally controlled local decrease in accommodation space where basin basement uplifts occur. This period of sedimentary environmental change reveals that structural partitioning in the basement of the Tarim Basin occurred since ~ 1.77 Ma, and we speculate that tilting of the Southeast Uplift (a sub-basin unit) within the Tarim Basin began in early Pleistocene time.

  1. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ∼200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  2. Spatial Genetic Analyses Reveal Cryptic Population Structure and Migration Patterns in a Continuously Harvested Grey Wolf (Canis lupus) Population in North-Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Hindrikson, Maris; Remm, Jaanus; Männil, Peep; Ozolins, Janis; Tammeleht, Egle; Saarma, Urmas

    2013-01-01

    Spatial genetics is a relatively new field in wildlife and conservation biology that is becoming an essential tool for unravelling the complexities of animal population processes, and for designing effective strategies for conservation and management. Conceptual and methodological developments in this field are therefore critical. Here we present two novel methodological approaches that further the analytical possibilities of STRUCTURE and DResD. Using these approaches we analyse structure and migrations in a grey wolf (Canislupus) population in north-eastern Europe. We genotyped 16 microsatellite loci in 166 individuals sampled from the wolf population in Estonia and Latvia that has been under strong and continuous hunting pressure for decades. Our analysis demonstrated that this relatively small wolf population is represented by four genetic groups. We also used a novel methodological approach that uses linear interpolation to statistically test the spatial separation of genetic groups. The new method, which is capable of using program STRUCTURE output, can be applied widely in population genetics to reveal both core areas and areas of low significance for genetic groups. We also used a recently developed spatially explicit individual-based method DResD, and applied it for the first time to microsatellite data, revealing a migration corridor and barriers, and several contact zones. PMID:24069446

  3. 2D magnetotelluric imaging of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, Yangtze metallogenic belt, eastern China: An insight into the crustal structure and tectonic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangbin; Yan, Jiayong

    2016-08-01

    Two parallel NW-trending magnetotelluric (MT) profiles were placed perpendicularly to the main structures of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, one of the seven ore districts in the middle-lower Yangtze River metallogenic belt of eastern China. In October-December 2013, the MT data acquisition was carried out at 117 sites with 0.5-1 km site spacing. The MT data has a good quality in the frequency range between 320 and 0.01 Hz. The dimensionality analysis and 2D resistivity inversion results indicate that: (1) the deep of the ore district with three-dimensional structural characteristics, but two-dimensional structural characteristics for shallow; (2) there is a clear correlation between resistivity and the main geological units of the ore district, as well as correlation with mapped surface faults; (3) the Gandan deep fault (GDF) and Jiangnan deep fault (JNF) extend from the surface to 10 km deep, with dip of NW45°, and dip angles larger than 60°. A series of NE-trending acidic intrusive rocks were controlled by the GDF.

  4. Crustal and upper mantle velocity structure in the vicinity of the eastern Tennessee seismic zone based upon radial P wave transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graw, Jordan H.; Powell, Christine A.; Langston, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Teleseismic transfer function analysis is used to investigate crust and upper mantle velocity structure in the vicinity of the active eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The ETSZ is associated with the New York-Alabama (NY-AL) magnetic lineament, a prominent aeromagnetic anomaly indicative of Grenville-age, basement structure. Radial component, P wave transfer functions for 10 short-period stations operated by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information are inverted for velocity structure. Velocity profiles are also determined for three broadband stations by converting the instrument response to that of an S-13 short-period seismometer. Distinct differences in the velocity profiles are found for stations located on either side of the NY-AL magnetic lineament; velocities west of the lineament are lower than velocities to the east of the lineament in the upper 10 km and in the depth range 30 to 50 km. A gradational Moho boundary is found beneath several stations located in the Valley and Ridge province. A Moho boundary is absent at four Valley and Ridge stations located east of the magnetic lineament and south of 35.5°N.

  5. Vertical and Horizontal Transport of Energy and Matter by Coherent Motions in a Tall Spruce Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, Andrei; Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    In the framework of the EGER (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions) project, the contribution of coherent structures to vertical and horizontal transports in a tall spruce canopy is investigated. The combination of measurements done in both the vertical and horizontal directions allows us to investigate coherent structures, their temporal scales, their role in flux transport, vertical coupling between the sub-canopy, canopy and air above the canopy, and horizontal coupling in the sub-canopy layer. The temporal scales of coherent structures detected with the horizontally distributed systems in the sub-canopy layer are larger than the temporal scales of coherent structures detected with the vertically distributed systems. The flux contribution of coherent structures to the momentum and sensible heat transport is found to be dominant in the canopy layer. Carbon dioxide and latent heat transport by coherent structures increase with height and reach a maximum at the canopy height. The flux contribution of the ejection decreases with increasing height and becomes dominant above the canopy level. The flux fraction transported during the sweep increases with height and becomes the dominant exchange process at the upper canopy level. The determined exchange regimes indicate consistent decoupling between the sub-canopy, canopy and air above the canopy during evening, nighttime and morning hours, whereas the coupled states and coupled by sweep states between layers are observed mostly during the daytime. Furthermore, the horizontal transport of sensible heat by coherent structures is investigated, and the heterogeneity of the contribution of coherent events to the flux transport is demonstrated. A scheme to determine the horizontal coupling by coherent structures in the sub-canopy layer is proposed, and it is shown that the sub-canopy layer is horizontally coupled mainly in the wind direction. The vertical coupling in most cases is observed together with streamwise

  6. Structural development of the central Kyrenia Range (north Cyprus) in its regional setting in the eastern Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. H. F.; Kinnaird, T. C.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed structural analysis of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic geological development of the central segment of the Kyrenia Range in its regional tectonic context is given here. The structural evidence comes from five structural traverses, outcrop observations, small-scale structures and related regional evidence. The majority of the structures are fault planes, of which a subordinate number exhibit slickenlines (fault plane data, n = 2688; with kinematics, n = 537). Additional kinematic data were obtained from C-S fabrics and folds. Small-scale structures in each stratigraphic unit were `backstripped' to reveal relative chronology. Synthesis of the structural information indicates three phases of convergence-related deformation: (1) Late Cretaceous, associated with greenschist facies metamorphism, followed by exhumation that was probably associated with WNW-ESE to ENE-WSW-trending high-angle faulting; (2) Mid-Eocene, associated with southward thrusting, coupled with ~N-S strike-slip (transfer faulting) and oblique faulting in an overall sinistral transpressive stress regime; (3) Late Miocene-earliest Pliocene, involving southward thrusting and folding, localised back-thrusting, extensive fault reactivation and large-scale segmentation of the range. Intense uplift of the Kyrenia Range took place during the Plio-Pleistocene, possibly related to the collision of the Eratosthenes Seamount with the Cyprus trench to the south of the island. The three main convergent phases relate to stages of northward subduction and diachronous continental collision affecting the northerly, active continental margin of the Southern Neotethys.

  7. Finders keepers, losers weepers - drought as a modifier of competition between European beech and Norway spruce -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goisser, Michael; Blanck, Christian; Geppert, Uwe; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E. E.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) frequently reflect over-yielding, when compared to respective monospecific stands. Over-yielding is attributed to enhanced resource uptake efficiency through niche complementarity alleviating species competition. Under climate change, however, with severe and frequent summer drought, water limitation may become crucial in modifying the competitive interaction between neighboring beech and spruce trees. In view of the demands by silvicultural practice, basic knowledge from experimental field work about competitive versus facilitative interaction in maturing mixed beech-spruce forests is scarce. To this end, we investigate species-specific drought response including underlying mechanisms of species interaction in a maturing group-wise mixed beech-spruce forest, amongst 60 and 53 adult trees of beech and spruce, respectively (spruce 65 ± 2, beech 85 ± 4 years old). Severe and repeated experimental drought is being induced over several years through a stand-scale approach of rain throughfall exclusion (Kranzberg Forest Roof Experiment, KROOF). The experimental design comprises 6 roofed (E, automated, closing only during rain) and 6 control (C) plots with a total area of almost 1800 square meters. In 2015 minimum predawn potentials of -2.16 MPa and -2.26 MPa were reached in E for beech and spruce respectively. At the leaf level, spruce displayed high drought susceptibility reflected by a distinct decrease in both stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 80% each, suggesting isohydric response. Beech rather displayed anisohydry indicated by less pronounced yet significant reduction of stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 55% and 45%, respectively. Under the C regime, a negative species interaction effect on stomatal conductance was found in beech, contrasting with a positive effect in spruce. However, drought reversed the effect of

  8. Contrasting definitive hosts as determinants of the genetic structure in a parasite with complex life cycle along the south-eastern Pacific.

    PubMed

    López, Z; Cárdenas, L; Runil, F; González, M T

    2015-03-01

    The spatial genetic structure (and gene flow) of parasites with complex life cycles, such as digeneans, has been attributed mainly to the dispersion ability of the most mobile host, which most often corresponds to the definitive host (DH). In this study, we compared the genetic structure and diversity of adult Neolebouria georgenascimentoi in two fish species (DHs) that are extensively distributed along the south-eastern Pacific (SEP). The analysis was based on the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene sequences of parasites collected between 23°S and 45°S. In total, 202 sequences of N. georgenascimentoi in Pinguipes chilensis isolated from nine sites and 136 sequences of Prolatilus jugularis from five sites were analysed. Our results showed that N. georgenascimentoi is a species complex that includes three different parasite species; however, in this study, only lineage 1 and 2 found in P. chilensis and P. jugularis, respectively, were studied because they are widely distributed along the coastline. Lineage 1 parasites had two common haplotypes with wide distribution and unique haplotypes in northern sites. Lineage 2 had only one common haplotype with wide distribution and a large number of unique haplotypes with greater genetic diversity. Both lineages have experienced recent population expansion. Only lineage 1 exhibited a genetic structure that was mainly associated with a biogeographical break at approximately 30°S along the SEP. Our finding suggests that host access to different prey (=intermediate hosts) could affect the genetic structure of the parasite complex discovered here. Consequently, difference between these patterns suggests that factors other than DH dispersal are involved in the genetic structure of autogenic parasites. PMID:25602037

  9. Genetic variation and population structure of American mink Neovison vison from PCB-contaminated and non-contaminated locales in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Wirgin, Isaac; Maceda, Lorraine; Waldman, John; Mayack, David T

    2015-11-01

    American mink Neovison vison may be particularly vulnerable to toxicities of persistent contaminants such as PCBs because of their aquatic-based diet, position near the top of the food web, and small deme sizes. Furthermore, ranched mink are sensitive to reproductive toxicities of fish diets from PCB-polluted sites. The upper Hudson River is highly contaminated with PCBs and previous studies have shown elevated hepatic burdens of total and coplanar PCBs in mink collected near the river compared with those from more distant locales in New York and elsewhere. We hypothesized that bioaccumulation of PCBs in Hudson River mink has reduced their levels of genetic diversity or altered their genetic population structure. To address this, we conducted microsatellite DNA analysis on collections made in proximity to and from more distant locales in the Hudson River watershed, elsewhere in New York State, and at other sites in eastern North America including New Brunswick, four locales in Ontario, multiple drainages in Maine, and two ecoregions in Rhode Island. We did not find reduced genetic diversity at the individual or population levels in mink collected near (<6 km) to PCB hotspots in the Hudson River nor evidence of altered population structure. Consistent with their distribution in small localized and isolated demes, we did find significant genetic population structure among many mink collections in New York State and elsewhere. Depending on the analytical approach used, genetically distinct populations numbered between 16 when using STRUCTURE to 19-20 when using Exact G tests, F ST, or AMOVA analyses. Genetically distinct population units were found among major ecoregions and minor ecoregions in New York State, among different hydrologic subunits within the Hudson River watershed, among spatially separate locales in Ontario, and among most watersheds in Maine. However, despite this localization and potential heightened impact of stressors, genetic diversity and genetic

  10. Foraging habitats of lactating northern fur seals are structured by thermocline depths and submesoscale fronts in the eastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, Chad A.; Battaile, Brian C.; Cotté, Cédric; Trites, Andrew W.

    2013-04-01

    The relationships between fine-scale oceanographic features, prey aggregations, and the foraging behavior of top predators are poorly understood. We investigated whether foraging patterns of lactating northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) from two breeding colonies located in different oceanographic domains of the eastern Bering Sea (St. Paul Island—shelf; Bogoslof Island—oceanic) were a function of submesoscale oceanographic features. We tested this by tracking 87 lactating fur seals instrumented with bio-logging tags (44 St. Paul Island, 43 Bogoslof Island) during July-September, 2009. We identified probable foraging hotspots using first-passage time analysis and statistically linked individual areas of high-use to fine-scale oceanographic features using mixed-effects Cox-proportional hazard models. We found no overlap in foraging areas used by fur seals from the two islands, but a difference in the duration of their foraging trips—trips from St. Paul Island were twice as long (7.9 d average) and covered 3-times the distance (600 km average) compared to trips from Bogoslof Island. St. Paul fur seals also foraged at twice the scale (mean radius=12 km) of Bogoslof fur seals (6 km), which suggests that prey were more diffuse near St. Paul Island than prey near Bogoslof Island. Comparing first passage times with oceanographic covariates revealed that foraging hotspots were linked to thermocline depth and occurred near submesoscale surface fronts (eddies and filaments). St. Paul fur seals that mixed epipelagic (night) and benthic (day) dives primarily foraged on-shelf in areas with deeper thermoclines that may have concentrated prey closer to the ocean floor, while strictly epipelagic (night) foragers tended to use waters with shallower thermoclines that may have aggregated prey closer to the surface. Fur seals from Bogoslof Island foraged almost exclusively over the Bering Sea basin and appeared to hunt intensively along submesoscale fronts that may have

  11. Diversity and three-dimensional structures of the alpha Mcr of the methanogenic Archaea from the anoxic region of Tucuruí Lake, in Eastern Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila Bessa; Junior, Rubens Ghilardi; Alves, Claudio Nahum; Silva, Jeronimo Lameira; McCulloch, John Anthony; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; da Costa da Silva, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Methanogenic archaeans are organisms of considerable ecological and biotechnological interest that produce methane through a restricted metabolic pathway, which culminates in the reaction catalyzed by the Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr) enzyme, and results in the release of methane. Using a metagenomic approach, the gene of the α subunit of mcr (mcrα) was isolated from sediment sample from an anoxic zone, rich in decomposing organic material, obtained from the Tucuruí hydroelectric dam reservoir in eastern Brazilian Amazonia. The partial nucleotide sequences obtained were 83 to 95% similar to those available in databases, indicating a low diversity of archaeans in the reservoir. Two orders were identified - the Methanomicrobiales, and a unique Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) forming a clade with the Methanosarcinales according to low bootstrap values. Homology modeling was used to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structures, for this the partial nucleotide sequence of the mcrα were isolated and translated on their partial amino acid sequences. The 3D structures of the archaean Mcrα observed in the present study varied little, and presented approximately 70% identity in comparison with the Mcrα of Methanopyrus klanderi. The results demonstrated that the community of methanogenic archaeans of the anoxic C1 region of the Tucurui reservoir is relatively homogeneous. PMID:22481885

  12. The structural controls of gold mineralisation within the Bardoc Tectonic Zone, Eastern Goldfields Province, Western Australia: implications for gold endowment in shear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, Anthony A.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Bierlein, Frank P.

    2007-08-01

    The Bardoc Tectonic Zone (BTZ) of the late Archaean Eastern Goldfields Province, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, is physically linked along strike to the Boulder-Lefroy Shear Zone (BLSZ), one of the richest orogenic gold shear systems in the world. However, gold production in the BTZ has only been one order of magnitude smaller than that of the BLSZ (˜100 t Au vs >1,500 t Au). The reasons for this difference can be found in the relative timing, distribution and style(s) of deformation that controlled gold deposition in the two shear systems. Deformation within the BTZ was relatively simple and is associated with tight to iso-clinal folding and reverse to transpressive shear zones over a <12-km-wide area of high straining, where lithological contacts have been rotated towards the plane of maximum shortening. These structures control gold mineralisation and also correspond to the second major shortening phase of the province (D2). In contrast, shearing within the BLSZ is concentrated to narrow shear zones (<2 km wide) cutting through rocks at a range of orientations that underwent more complex dip- and strike-slip deformation, possibly developed throughout the different deformation phases recorded in the region (D1-D4). Independent of other physico-chemical factors, these differences provided for effective fluid localisation to host units with greater competency contrasts during a prolonged mineralisation process in the BLSZ as compared to the more simple structural history of the BTZ.

  13. Genetic structure and diversity of natural and domesticated populations of Citrus medica L. in the Eastern Himalayan region of Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Barbhuiya, Atiqur R; Khan, Mohammed L; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2016-06-01

    Citron (Citrus medica L.) is a medicinally important species of citrus native to India and occurs in natural forests and home gardens in the foothills of the eastern Himalayan region of northeast India. The wild populations of citron in the region have undergone rapid decline due to natural and anthropogenic disturbances and most of the remaining individuals of citron are found in fragmented natural forests and home gardens in the region. In order to assess the genetic structure and diversity of citron in wild and domesticated populations, we analyzed 219 individuals of C. medica collected from four wild and eight domesticated populations using microsatellite markers. The genetic analysis based on five polymorphic microsatellite loci revealed an average of 13.40 allele per locus. The mean observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged between 0.220-0.540 and 0.438-0.733 respectively among the wild and domesticated populations. Domesticated populations showed close genetic relationships as compared to wild populations and pairwise Nei's genetic distance ranged from 0.062 to 2.091 among wild and domesticated populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed higher genetic diversity among- than within populations. The analysis of population structure revealed five groups. Mixed ancestry of few individuals of different populations revealed exchange of genetic materials among farmers in the region. Citron populations in the region show high genetic variation. The knowledge gained through this study is invaluable for devising genetically sound strategies for conservation of citron genetic resources in the region. PMID:27516853

  14. Research aircraft observations of the mesoscale and microscale structure of a cold front over the eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Shapiro, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of an oceanic cold front is described on the basis of research aircraft observations taken during the Ocean Storms field experiment. Synoptic and mesoscale analyses compare the structure of an upper-level jet-front system observed slightly downstream from the wind speed maximum to its structure in the upstream entrance region. Stratospheric potential vorticity and ozone were found within the frontal zone down to about 800 mb. Microscale analyses of the front near the sea surface were carried out for a portion of the front having the signature of a 'rope' cloud in satellite imagery. A narrow (less than 1 km) zone of upward motion (about 4 m/s) and of horizontal shear (about 0.01/s) characterized the front near the surface. Significant alongfront variability was found, including lateral displacements in the frontal zone where there were weaker updrafts.

  15. Stratigraphy, petrology, and structure of the Pingston terrane, Mount Hayes C-5 and C-6 quadrangles, eastern Alaska Range, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokleberg, W. J.; Schwab, C. E.; Miyaoka, R. T.; Buhrmaster, C. L.

    Recent field, petrologic, and structural studies of the Pingston terrane in the Mount Hayes C-5 and C-6 quandrangles reveal that in this area the terrane: (1) has a highly distinctive stratigraphy, age, petrology (relict textures, relict minerals, and metamorphic facies), and structure; and (2) differs markedly from that described in previous studies. These more recent studies indicate that the major rock types, in order of decreasing abundance, are meta-andesite, metadacite and metarhyodacite flows and (or) tuff, metabasalt, metagabbro, metavolcanic graywacke, metagray-wacke, metasiltstone, metaquartzite or metachert, and very sparse marble. The general petrography of the major rock units in the Pingston terrane is given.

  16. Delineating ecological regions in marine systems: Integrating physical structure and community composition to inform spatial management in the eastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Matthew R.; Hollowed, Anne B.

    2014-11-01

    Characterizing spatial structure and delineating meaningful spatial boundaries have useful applications to understanding regional dynamics in marine systems, and are integral to ecosystem approaches to fisheries management. Physical structure and drivers combine with biological responses and interactions to organize marine systems in unique ways at multiple scales. We apply multivariate statistical methods to define spatially coherent ecological units or ecoregions in the eastern Bering Sea. We also illustrate a practical approach to integrate data on species distribution, habitat structure and physical forcing mechanisms to distinguish areas with distinct biogeography as one means to define management units in large marine ecosystems. We use random forests to quantify the relative importance of habitat and environmental variables to the distribution of individual species, and to quantify shifts in multispecies assemblages or community composition along environmental gradients. Threshold shifts in community composition are used to identify regions with distinct physical and biological attributes, and to evaluate the relative importance of predictor variables to determining regional boundaries. Depth, bottom temperature and frontal boundaries were dominant factors delineating distinct biological communities in this system, with a latitudinal divide at approximately 60°N. Our results indicate that distinct climatic periods will shift habitat gradients and that dynamic physical variables such as temperature and stratification are important to understanding temporal stability of ecoregion boundaries. We note distinct distribution patterns among functional guilds and also evidence for resource partitioning among individual species within each guild. By integrating physical and biological data to determine spatial patterns in community composition, we partition ecosystems along ecologically significant gradients. This may provide a basis for defining spatial management

  17. Structural controls on the spatial distribution and geochemical composition of volcanism in a continental rift zone; an example from Owens Valley, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haproff, P. J.; Yin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Bimodal volcanism is common in continental rift zones. Structural controls to the emplacement and compositions of magmas, however, are not well understood. To address this issue, we examine the location, age, and geochemistry of active volcanic centers, and geometry and kinematics of rift-related faults across the active transtensional Owens Valley rift zone. Building on existing studies, we postulate that the spatial distribution and geochemical composition of volcanism are controlled by motion along rift-bounding fault systems. Along-strike variation in fault geometry and characteristics of active volcanism allow us to divide Owens Valley into three segments: southern, northern, and central. The southern segment of Owens Valley is a simple shear, asymmetric rift bounded to the west by the east-dipping Sierra Nevada frontal fault (SNFF). Active vents of Coso volcanic field are distributed along the eastern rift shoulder and characterized by the eruption of bimodal lavas. The SNFF within this segment is low-angle and penetrates through the lithosphere and into the ductile asthenosphere, allowing for mantle-derived magma to migrate across the weakest part of the fault zone beneath the eastern rift shoulder. Magma thermally weakens wall rocks and eventually stalls in the crust where the melt develops a greater felsic component prior to eruption. The northern segment of Owens Valley displays similar structural geometry, as the west-dipping White Mountains fault (WMF) is listric at depth and offsets the crust and mantle lithosphere, allowing for vertical transport of magma and reservoir emplacement within the crust. Bimodal lavas periodically erupted in the Long Valley Caldera region along the western rift shoulder. The central segment of Owens Valley is a pure shear, symmetric graben generated by motion along the SNFF and WMF. The subvertical, right-slip Owens Valley fault (OVF) strikes along the axis of the valley and penetrates through the lithosphere into the

  18. Simultaneous Inversion of Receiver Functions, Surface-wave Dispersion, and Gravity Observations for Lithospheric Structure Beneath the Central and Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, C.; Ammon, C. J.; Herrmann, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    In contrast with the western United States (US), the eastern US has been less a focus for detailed passive seismological imaging of the crust and upper mantle. However, in the last few years, the EarthScope-USArray Transportable Array has substantially increased the available high-quality observations that sample the "stable" regions of North America with a roughly uniform ~70km spacing. The result is an unprecedented opportunity to illuminate the subsurface and to explore how upper crustal phenomena relate to deeper crustal and upper mantle structure and processes, which likely exert some control on the regional tectonics. But even with such a fine network, tightly constraining the subsurface 3D geologic variations is a challenge. We combine the complementary sensitivities P-wave receiver functions, surface-wave dispersion, and wavenumber-filtered gravity variations to constrain lateral variations in shear-wave speed beneath the eastern US and southeastern Canada. The receiver-function wavefield is interpolated and smoothed to equalize the lateral sensitivity of the receiver functions and the surface-wave dispersion and to simplify the receiver functions. Combining information from adjacent stations through interpolation suppresses poorly sampled and difficult to interpret back-azimuthal variations and allows the stable extraction of the key features in the receiver-function wavefield. We use a hybrid 3D, multi-objective inversion that provides more constraints than individual inversions, and generally produces a more robust estimate of the subsurface structure. The subsurface model is parameterized with shear-wave speed (the primary sensitivity of the surface-wave dispersion and P-wave receiver functions) within one-degree cells that are modeled using 1D seismic calculations. We relate P-wave speed and density variations to shear-speed using velocity ratios and density-velocity relations and we constrain the 3D variations to be laterally and vertically smooth

  19. Structural interpretation of the Erzurum Basin, eastern Turkey, using curvature gravity gradient tensor and gravity inversion of basement relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruç, B.; Sertçelik, İ.; Kafadar, Ö.; Selim, H. H.

    2013-01-01

    The Erzurum Basin has received more attention in petroleum potential research because of its particularity in geographic and tectonic position. There remains debate on the basement structure of the basin since igneous rocks and faults make the structure and stratigraphy more complicated. We utilize gravity data to understand the structure of the Erzurum Basin. This study describes an edge enhancement technique based on the eigenvalues and determinant obtained from the curvature gravity gradient tensor (CGGT). The main goal of this technique is to delineate structural boundaries in complex geology and tectonic environment using CGGT. The results obtained from theoretical data, with and without Gaussian random noise, have been analyzed in determining the locations of the edges of the vertical-sided prism models. The zero contours of the smallest eigenvalue delineate the spatial location of the edges of the anomalous sources. In addition, 3-D gravity inversion of Bouguer anomalies has been used with purpose to estimate the structure of the substrata to allow modeling of the basement undulation in the Erzurum basin. For this reason, the Parker-Oldenburg algorithm helped to investigate this undulation and to evidence the main linear features. This algorithm reveals presence of basement depths between 3.45 and 9.06 km in the region bounded by NE-SW and E-W trending lineaments. We have also compared the smallest eigenvalue zero contours with the HGM images and Tilt derivative (TDR) of Bouguer anomaly map of the study area. All techniques have agreed closely in detecting the horizontal locations of geological features in the subsurface with good precision.

  20. Comparing modern and presettlement forest dynamics of a subboreal wilderness: Does spruce budworm enhance fire risk?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturtevant, Brian R.; Miranda, Brian R.; Shinneman, Douglas J.; Gustafson, Eric J.; Wolter, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Insect disturbance is often thought to increase fire risk through enhanced fuel loadings, particularly in coniferous forest ecosystems. Yet insect disturbances also affect successional pathways and landscape structure that interact with fire disturbances (and vice-versa) over longer time scales. We applied a landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS-II) to evaluate the relative strength of interactions between spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks and fire disturbances in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota (USA). Disturbance interactions were evaluated for two different scenarios: presettlement forests and fire regimes vs. contemporary forests and fire regimes. Forest composition under the contemporary scenario trended toward mixtures of deciduous species (primarily Betula papyrifera and Populus spp.) and shade-tolerant conifers (Picea mariana, Abies balsamea, Thuja occidentalis), with disturbances dominated by a combination of budworm defoliation and high-severity fires. The presettlement scenario retained comparatively more “big pines” (i.e., Pinus strobus, P. resinosa) and tamarack (L. laricina), and experienced less budworm disturbance and a comparatively less-severe fire regime. Spruce budworm disturbance decreased area burned and fire severity under both scenarios when averaged across the entire 300-year simulations. Contrary to past research, area burned and fire severity during outbreak decades were each similar to that observed in non-outbreak decades. Our analyses suggest budworm disturbances within forests of the BWCA have a comparatively weak effect on long-term forest composition due to a combination of characteristics. These include strict host specificity, fine-scaled patchiness created by defoliation damage, and advance regeneration of its primary host, balsam fir (A. balsamea) that allows its host to persist despite repeated disturbances. Understanding the nature of the three-way interaction

  1. Comparing modern and presettlement forest dynamics of a subboreal wilderness: does spruce budworm enhance fire risk?

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Brian R; Miranda, Brian R; Shinneman, Douglas J; Gustafson, Eric J; Wolter, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Insect disturbance is often thought to increase fire risk through enhanced fuel loadings, particularly in coniferous forest ecosystems. Yet insect disturbances also affect successional pathways and landscape structure that interact with fire disturbances (and vice-versa) over longer time scales. We applied a landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS-II) to evaluate the relative strength of interactions between spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks and fire disturbances in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota (USA). Disturbance interactions were evaluated for two different scenarios: presettlement forests and fire regimes vs. contemporary forests and fire regimes. Forest composition under the contemporary scenario trended toward mixtures of deciduous species (primarily Betula papyrifera and Populus spp.) and shade-tolerant conifers (Picea mariana, Abies balsamea, Thuja occidentalis), with disturbances dominated by a combination of budworm defoliation and high-severity fires. The presettlement scenario retained comparatively more "big pines" (i.e., Pinus strobus, P. resinosa) and tamarack (L. laricina), and experienced less budworm disturbance and a comparatively less-severe fire regime. Spruce budworm disturbance decreased area burned and fire severity under both scenarios when averaged across the entire 300-year simulations. Contrary to past research, area burned and fire severity during outbreak decades were each similar to that observed in non-outbreak decades. Our analyses suggest budworm disturbances within forests of the BWCA have a comparatively weak effect on long-term forest composition due to a combination of characteristics. These include strict host specificity, fine-scaled patchiness created by defoliation damage, and advance regeneration of its primary host, balsam fir (A. balsamea) that allows its host to persist despite repeated disturbances. Understanding the nature of the three-way interaction between

  2. Deep Crustal Magma Conduits, Diabase Internal Structure, and Coupled Hydrothermal Processes in Mesozoic Basins of Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. P.; Ingerov, A.; Daniels, D. L.; Carr, P. M.; Elliott, G.; Fox, L.; Pierce, H. A.; Sutphin, D. M.

    2004-05-01

    Integrated geophysical, geological, and hydrological studies of the Culpeper (VA) and Gettysburg (PA) basins have shown fundamental new relationships among the internal structure of their plutonic rocks and have constrained the structural controls on paleo- and contemporary subsurface fluid flow within their ancient rift zone intrusive centers. Deep sub-basin igneous structure and the cross-sectional structure of the Culpeper basin. Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements along two basin-crossing transects have been inverted to reveal the basin cross-sectional structure and the structure of the primary conduit that transported tholeiitic magma through the crust during the Lower Jurassic. In cross-section, the basin deepens abruptly east of the Bull Run and Catoctin mountains, reaching a maximum depth of 2.5 to 2.75 km. The basin then shallows gradually towards the east. Basin rocks span the range 25 to 8,000 Ohm-m and range from fluid-saturated siltstones to unsaturated diabase, respectively. The crustal conduit for the Belmont diabase sheet has been resolved to 20 km depth. At that depth, it is characterized by a vertical region of relatively low resistivity (150 to 4,000 Ohm-m) embedded in relatively resistive (~10,000+ Ohm-m) crystalline Proterozoic rocks. At 4--5 km depth, the conduit width is ~2 km, flaring outward to a mean width of 6 km at 20 km depth. The conduit is inferred to be a laminate-like resistivity ``composite,'' with a central core resistivity of ~150 Ohm-m grading outwards through zones of 103, 2×103, and finally 4×103 Ohm-m near the outer margins. Based on the phase equilibria of ultramafic rocks and the petrology of diabase, the conduit is inferred to be olivine gabbro +/- dunite, and to be compositionally-zoned from core to margin. In general, the resistivity structure of the conduit is bilaterally-symmetric. Intra-basin igneous structure of the Gettysburg basin. The structure and geometry of the diabase sheets, lopoliths, and dikes of the

  3. Changing sources of respiration between a black spruce forest and thermokarst bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; McFarland, J.; Czimczik, C. I.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Amendolara, T.; Scott, G. J.; Turetsky, M. R.; Harden, J. W.; McGuire, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Permafrost thaw in lowland black spruce forests (Picea mariana) which develop into thermokarst bogs can alter ecosystem carbon balance through positive or negative feedbacks to climate warming. In this context, the responses of plant and soil microbial communities to permafrost thaw, and their roles in altered carbon balance, need to be understood. In addition, gross changes in microbial community composition, such as fungal:bacterial ratios and their temperature response functions, are poorly characterized in permafrost thaw experiments. In this study, we compared carbon fluxes between a lowland black spruce forest with intact permafrost and an adjacent thermokarst bog that developed 20-30 years ago located near the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest in Alaska. We quantified net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER), and gross primary productivity (GPP) using flux autochambers, and partitioned sources of ecosystem respiration into autotrophic vs. heterotrophic sources using radiocarbon analysis of ecosystem and microbial respiration, and atmospheric CO2. We further partitioned microbial respiration into fungal vs. bacterial sources using substrate inhibition techniques. Preliminary results indicate that in mid summer of 2011 the thermokarst bog was a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. NEE data indicated that the black spruce understory was a source of CO2. However, because flux tower data showed that the black spruce ecosystem was actually a net sink, GPP by the black spruce trees must have been large. In the black spruce forest ER was dominated by plant respiration in the spring and by microbial respiration in the fall whereas in the thermokarst bog CO2 was derived from deeper soil C sources. Although microbial respiration was roughly balanced between fungi and bacteria in the black spruce forest, respiration was dominantly bacterial in the thermokarst bog. Our initial results show that thermokarst bogs are source of C to the atmosphere during summer

  4. Interspecific variation in resistance of two host tree species to spruce budworm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentealba, Alvaro; Bauce, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Woody plants regularly sustain biomass losses to herbivorous insects. Consequently, they have developed various resistance mechanisms to cope with insect attack. However, these mechanisms of defense and how they are affected by resource availability are not well understood. The present study aimed at evaluating and comparing the natural resistance (antibiosis and tolerance) of balsam fir (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill.) and white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench) Voss] to spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.), and how drainage site quality as a component of resource availability affects the expression of resistance over time (6 years). Our results showed that there are differences in natural resistance between the two tree species to spruce budworm, but it was not significantly affected by drainage quality. Balsam fir exhibited higher foliar toxic secondary compounds concentrations than white spruce in all drainage classes, resulting in lower male pupal mass, survival and longer male developmental time. This, however, did not prevent spruce budworm from consuming more foliage in balsam fir than in white spruce. This response suggests that either natural levels of measured secondary compounds do not provide sufficient toxicity to reduce defoliation, or spruce budworm has developed compensatory mechanisms, which allow it to utilize food resources more efficiently or minimize the toxic effects that are produced by its host's defensive compounds. Larvae exhibited lower pupal mass and higher mortality in rapidly drained and subhygric sites. Drainage class also affected the amount of foliage destroyed but its impact varied over the years and was probably influenced by climatic variables. These results demonstrate the complexity of predicting the effect of resource availability on tree defenses, especially when other confounding environmental factors can affect tree resource allocation and utilization.

  5. Three-dimensional crustal structure of a craton rim: Preliminary results from passive seismic imaging of the eastern Albany-Fraser Orogen, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian L. N.; Spaggiari, Catherine V.; Gessner, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Western Australia consists of two Archaean cratons (Yilgarn and Pilbara) and a number of Proterozoic orogens surrounding them that attest to past continental collisions. While the former feature seismically fast crust of average thickness (around 35 km) and a usually well defined Moho overlying a thick mantle lithospheric keel, the latter have been significantly less well studied and appear to be less uniform in terms of their crustal architecture. Thicker crust and a more fuzzy Moho are two common characteristics of these belts. The Albany-Fraser orogen, situated at the south-eastern margin of the Yilgarn craton, has been interpreted as an old suture zone from the collision of the West Australian craton (Yilgarn and Pilbara already welded together) with the Mawson craton (southern Australia and part of Antarctica today). Newer evidence, however, might point at an original rift or backarc setting of the units. It is a complex amalgam of different structures that vary significantly along its strike, featuring heavily reworked parts of the outermost Yilgarn craton as well as younger units accreted or intruded significantly later. Two major deformation stages at 1345-1260 Ma and 1214-1140 Ma have been deduced for these, the first of which has been associated with the aforementioned collision/backarc rifting itself, while the second phase is commonly interpreted as intracratonic reworking due to a major thermal event. No large-scale tectonic overprint has occurred in the region since the second deformation phase, which means that the originally emplaced units have been unusually well preserved until the present day. However, surface outcrops of rocks are very rare, so that most knowledge about extent and geometric configuration of different rock suites comes from the interpretation of magnetic and gravity data. The eastern end of the Albany-Fraser orogen, in all likelihood corresponding to the Mawson craton's westernmost edge, is hidden beneath the limestones of the

  6. The spruce shoot gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae): Piceacecis, a new genus for a non-native pest of Norway spruce from Europe and its native American relative

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dasineura abietiperda (Henschel), a European pest of Norway spruce, Picea abies (Pinaceae), is reported as new to North America. Damage symptoms are illustrated and an outline of its biology is given. A new genus, Piceacecis Gagné is described to include it and its North American relative, Phytophag...

  7. Micro-chemical and micro-structural investigation of archaeological bronze weapons from the Ayanis fortress (lake Van, Eastern Anatolia, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraldi, F.; Çilingirǒglu, A.; Angelini, E.; Riccucci, C.; De Caro, T.; Batmaz, A.; Mezzi, A.; Caschera, D.; Cortese, B.

    2013-12-01

    Bronze weapons (VII cen BC) found during the archaeological excavation of the Ayanis fortress (lake Van, eastern Anatolia, Turkey) are investigated in order to determine their chemical composition and metallurgical features as well as to identify the micro-chemical and micro-structural nature of the corrosion products grown during long-term burial. Small fragments were sampled from the artefacts and analysed by means of the combined use of optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results show that the bronze artefacts have been manufactured by using alloys with a controlled and refined chemical composition demonstrating the high level metallurgical competence and skill of the Urartian craftsmen and artists. Furthermore, the micro-structural and metallurgical investigations evidence the presence of equiaxed grains in the matrix, indicating that the artefact were produced by repeated cycles of mechanical shaping and thermal annealing treatments to restore the alloy ductility. From the degradation point of view, the results show the structures and the chemical composition of the stratified corrosion layers (i.e. the patina) where the copper or tin depletion phenomenon is commonly observed with the surface enrichment of some elements coming from the burial soil, mainly Cl, which is related to the high concentration of chlorides in the Ayanis soil. The results reveal also that another source of degradation is the inter-granular corrosion phenomenon likely increased by the metallurgical features of the alloys caused by the high temperature manufacturing process that induces crystallisation and segregation phenomena along the grain boundaries.

  8. Mega-scale Moho relief and the structure of the lithosphere on the eastern flank of the Viking Graben, offshore southwestern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielsen, Roy H.; Fossen, Haakon; Faleide, Jan Inge; Hurich, Charles A.

    2015-05-01

    The International Lithosphere Project deep reflection seismic survey in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea has been reprocessed, particularly focusing on the deep crust, the reflection Moho, and the upper mantle. The data display shifting reflection patterns of the crust and the upper mantle parallel to the eastern margin of the Viking Graben. In the upper crust, which is mainly seismically transparent by the processing techniques utilized here, large-scale structural features like detachment shear zones and master faults can be identified. Several of the major onshore faults and shear zones match seismic features in the seismic lines. Many of these structures acted as extensional shear zones in the Devonian. The middle crust is of variable reflectivity, whereas the lower crust is generally strongly reflective and is particularly so in the southern domain. The reflection Moho is identified throughout the study area but is of variable character. The presence of a S(E) dipping structure (Hardanger Moho Offset) that displaces the Moho by approximately 10 km, extends deep into the mantle (below the 50 km line depth), is positioned where the shallower Hardangerfjord Shear Zone, which flattens on the level of the middle crust, is situated. The Hardangerfjord Shear Zone/Hardanger Moho Offset-system coincides with change of the crustal thickness (depth to Moho), a change that also coincides with the transition from thin- to thick-skinned Caledonian deformation. Intramantle reflections are common in the study area, some of which are interpreted as shear zones, whereas others most likely represent magmatic intrusions.

  9. Evolution of Meso-Cenozoic lithospheric thermal-rheological structure in the Jiyang sub-basin, Bohai Bay Basin, eastern North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Qiu, Nansheng; Wang, Ye; Chang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The Meso-Cenozoic lithospheric thermal-rheological structure and lithospheric strength evolution of the Jiyang sub-basin were modeled using thermal history, crustal structure, and rheological parameter data. Results indicate that the thermal-rheological structure of the Jiyang sub-basin has exhibited obvious rheological stratification and changes over time. During the Early Mesozoic, the uppermost portion of the upper crust, middle crust, and the top part of the upper mantle had a thick brittle layer. During the early Early Cretaceous, the top of the middle crust's brittle layer thinned because of lithosphere thinning and temperature increase, and the uppermost portion of the upper mantle was almost occupied by a ductile layer. During the late Early Cretaceous, the brittle layer of the middle crust and the upper mantle changed to a ductile one. Then, the uppermost portion of the middle crust changed to a thin brittle layer in the late Cretaceous. During the early Paleogene, the thin brittle layer of the middle crust became even thinner and shallower under the condition of crustal extension. Currently, with the decrease in lithospheric temperature, the top of the upper crust, middle crust, and the uppermost portion of the upper mantle are of a brittle layer. The total lithospheric strength and the effective elastic thickness (T e) in Meso-Cenozoic indicate that the Jiyang sub-basin experienced two weakened stages: during the late Early Cretaceous and the early Paleogene. The total lithospheric strength (approximately 4-5 × 1013 N m-1) and T e (approximately 50-60 km) during the Early Mesozoic was larger than that after the Late Jurassic (2-7 × 1012 N m-1 and 19-39 km, respectively). The results also reflect the subduction, and rollback of Pacific plate is the geodynamic mechanism of the destruction of the eastern North China Craton.

  10. Universal fractionation of lignin–carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) from lignocellulosic biomass: an example using spruce wood

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xueyu; Gellerstedt, Goran; Li, Jiebing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY It is of both theoretical and practical importance to develop a universally applicable approach for the fractionation and sensitive lignin characterization of lignin–carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) from all types of lignocellulosic biomass, both natively and after various types of processing. In the present study, a previously reported fractionation approach that is applicable for eucalyptus (hardwood) and flax (non-wood) was further improved by introducing an additional step of barium hydroxide precipitation to isolate the mannan-enriched LCC (glucomannan-lignin, GML), in order to suit softwood species as well. Spruce wood was used as the softwood sample. As indicated by the recovery yield and composition analysis, all of the lignin was recovered in three LCC fractions: a glucan-enriched fraction (glucan-lignin, GL), a mannan-enriched fraction (GML) and a xylan-enriched fraction (xylan-lignin, XL). All of the LCCs had high molecular masses and were insoluble or barely soluble in a dioxane/water solution. Carbohydrate and lignin signals were observed in 1H NMR, 13C CP-MAS NMR and normal- or high-sensitivity 2D HSQC NMR analyses. The carbohydrate and lignin constituents in each LCC fraction are therefore believed to be chemically bonded rather than physically mixed with one another. The three LCC fractions were found to be distinctly different from each other in terms of their lignin structures, as revealed by highly sensitive analyses by thioacidolysis-GC, thioacidolysis-SEC and pyrolysis-GC. PMID:23332001

  11. Geology of the Spruce Pine District, Avery, Mitchell, and Yancy Counties, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brobst, Donald Albert

    1962-01-01

    The Spruce Pine pegmatite district, a northeastward-trending belt 25 miles long and 10 miles wide, lies in parts of Avery, Mitchell, and Yancey Counties in the Blue Ridge Province of western North Carolina. The most abundant rocks in the district are interlayered mica and amphibole gneisses and schists, all of which are believed to be of Precambrian age. These rocks are cut by small bodies of dunite and associated rocks of Precambrian (?) age, large bodies of alaskite and associated pegmatite of early Paleozoic age, and basaltic and diabasic dikes and sills of Triassic (?) age. The rocks of the district have been weathered to saprolite that is locally 50 feet thick. The major structure in the area is a southwestward-plunging asymmetrical synclinorium that has its steeper limb on the northwest side. Feldspar, muscovite as sheet and scrap (ground) mica, and kaolin from the alaskite and associated pegmatite account for over 90 percent of the total mineral production of the district. Amounts of other pegmatite minerals, including quartz, beryl, columbite-tantalite, rare-earth and uranium minerals are an extremely small part of the mineral resources. Actual or potential products from other rocks are olivine, vermiculite, asbestos, talc, chromium and nickel, soapstone, mica schist, garnet, kyanite, dolomite marble, and construction materials.

  12. Routing of canopy drip in the snowpack below a spruce crown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bründl, Michael; Schneebeli, Martin; Flühler, Hannes

    1999-01-01

    Snow that is retained by a forest canopy may either sublimate or evaporate directly from the crown or drop as snow clumps or meltwater to the ground. Redistributed snow and meltwater affect the snow structure and prevent the formation of mechanically weak layers, which is the prerequisite for avalanche formation in forests. In this paper we describe the results of dye tracer experiments conducted in a subalpine forest near Davos, Switzerland. Before a snowfall event we stained snow-free branches of a spruce with a dye tracer solution. After snowfall the coloured meltwater dripping from the branches down on to the snowpack stained the percolation pathways of the meltwater in the snowpack. Photographs of the snow profiles indicate that the meltwater seeped almost vertically through the isothermal snowpack to the soil surface not exceeding the projected crown edge. Meltwater of different events moves along different preferential flow channels in the snow suggesting that old channels are not non-conducting and additional meltwater fronts create new channels.

  13. Structure of metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks in the Matterhorn-Twin Peaks area, Saddlebag Lake pendant, eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lahren, M.M.; Schweickert, R.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Recent structural mapping shows that the rocks in the Matterhorn-Twin Peaks area comprise parts of seven east-dipping and east-facing thrust sheets. These sheets and their bounding thrusts all appear to dip beneath the structurally higher, Glenberry Lake thrust sheet, and are intruded discordantly in Spiller, Cattle, Horse canyons by the 86-Ma Cathedral Peak Granodiorite of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS). The lowest exposed sheet contains rocks that probably correlate with the Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic Koip sequence. The overlying six sheets contain a distinctive assemblage of metamorphosed calcareous sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, limestone, and interbedded silicic tuffs of the Horse Canyon sequence, possibly of Middle Jurassic age. Thrust faults expose mylonitic and schistose metavolcanic rocks, and the two lowest are marked by slices of periodotite up to several tens of meters in length. Locally, conglomerates with clasts of peridotite, quartzite, and metavolcanic rocks are associated with the peridotite slices. A sill-like body of granitic orthogneiss occurs along one of the thrusts. Stretching lineations in the most intensely deformed rocks plunge steeply to the east, suggesting dominantly dip slip displacement. The origin(s) of the peridotite slices are enigmatic, but the authors provisionally interpret the peridotite to have been intermittently exposed at the surface during thrusting, and the conglomerates to have been thrust-derived. Age of thrusting is unknown, but probably was between Middle Jurassic and Middle Cretaceous. The structure of this area argues against major deformation due to intrusion or return flow along the margins of the TIS.

  14. Broadband Magnetotelluric Investigations of Crustal Resistivity Structure in North-Eastern Alberta: Implications for Engineered Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell, M. V.; Unsworth, M. J.; Nieuwenhuis, G.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from hydrocarbon consumption produce profound changes in the global climate, and the implementation of alternative energy sources is needed. The oilsands industry in Alberta (Canada) is a major producer of greenhouse gases as natural gas is burnt to produce the heat required to extract and process bitumen. Geothermal energy could be utilized to provide this necessary heat and has the potential to reduce both financial costs and environmental impacts of the oilsands industry. In order to determine the geothermal potential the details of the reservoir must be understood. Conventional hydrothermal reservoirs have been detected using geophysical techniques such as magnetotellurics (MT) which measures the electrical conductivity of the Earth. However, in Northern Alberta the geothermal gradient is relatively low, and heat must be extracted from deep inside the basement rocks using Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) and therefore an alternative exploration technique is required. MT can be useful in this context as it can detect fracture zones and regions of elevated porosity. MT data were recorded near Fort McMurray with the goal of determining the geothermal potential by understanding the crustal resistivity structure beneath the Athabasca Oilsands. The MT data are being used to locate targets of significance for geothermal exploration such as regions of low resistivity in the basement rocks which can relate to in situ fluids or fracture zones which can facilitate efficient heat extraction or het transport. A total of 93 stations were collected ~500m apart on two profiles stretching 30 and 20km respectively. Signals were recorded using Phoenix Geophysics V5-2000 systems over frequency bands from 1000 to 0.001 Hz, corresponding to depths of penetration approximately 50m to 50km. Groom-Bailey tensor decomposition and phase tensor analysis shows a well defined geoelectric strike direction that varied along the profile from N60°E to N45

  15. A reconnaissance space sensing investigation of crustal structure for a strip from the eastern Sierra Nevada to the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, I. C. (Principal Investigator); Liggett, M. L.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Research progress in applications of ERTS-1 MSS imagery in study of Basin-Range tectonics is summarized. Field reconnaissance of ERTS-1 image anomalies has resulted in recognition of previously unreported fault zones and regional structural control of volcanic and plutonic activity. NIMBUS, Apollo 9, X-15, U-2, and SLAR imagery are discussed with specific applications, and methods of image enhancement and analysis employed in the research are summarized. Areas studied and methods employed in geologic field work are outlined.

  16. A reconnaissance space sensing investigation of crustal structure for a strip from the eastern Sierra Nevada to the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Research progress in applications of ERTS-1 MSS imagery to study of Basin-Range tectonics is summarized. Field reconnaissance of ERTS-1 image anomalies has resulted in recognition of previously unreported fault zones and regional structural control of volcanic and plutonic activity. Nimbus, Apollo 9, X-15, U-2, and SIAR imagery are discussed with specific applications, and methods of image enhancement and analysis employed in the research are summarized. Field areas studied and methods employed in geologic field work are outlined.

  17. Crustal structure of the eastern Algerian continental margin and adjacent deep basin: implications for late Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyahiaoui, B.; Sage, F.; Abtout, A.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Yelles-Chaouche, K.; Schnürle, P.; Marok, A.; Déverchère, J.; Arab, M.; Galve, A.; Collot, J. Y.

    2015-06-01

    We determine the deep structure of the eastern Algerian basin and its southern margin in the Annaba region (easternmost Algeria), to better constrain the plate kinematic reconstruction in this region. This study is based on new geophysical data collected during the SPIRAL cruise in 2009, which included a wide-angle, 240-km-long, onshore-offshore seismic profile, multichannel seismic reflection lines and gravity and magnetic data, complemented by the available geophysical data for the study area. The analysis and modelling of the wide-angle seismic data including refracted and reflected arrival travel times, and integrated with the multichannel seismic reflection lines, reveal the detailed structure of an ocean-to-continent transition. In the deep basin, there is an ˜5.5-km-thick oceanic crust that is composed of two layers. The upper layer of the crust is defined by a high velocity gradient and P-wave velocities between 4.8 and 6.0 km s-1, from the top to the bottom. The lower crust is defined by a lower velocity gradient and P-wave velocity between 6.0 and 7.1 km s-1. The Poisson ratio in the lower crust deduced from S-wave modelling is 0.28, which indicates that the lower crust is composed mainly of gabbros. Below the continental edge, a typical continental crust with P-wave velocities between 5.2 and 7.0 km s-1, from the top to the bottom, shows a gradual seaward thinning of ˜15 km over an ˜35-km distance. This thinning is regularly distributed between the upper and lower crusts, and it characterizes a rifted margin, which has resulted from backarc extension at the rear of the Kabylian block, here represented by the Edough Massif at the shoreline. Above the continental basement, an ˜2-km-thick, pre-Messinian sediment layer with a complex internal structure is interpreted as allochthonous nappes of flysch backthrusted on the margin during the collision of Kabylia with the African margin. The crustal structure, moreover, provides evidence for Miocene

  18. Crustal electrical structures and deep processes of the eastern Lhasa terrane in the south Tibetan plateau as revealed by magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chengliang; Jin, Sheng; Wei, Wenbo; Ye, Gaofeng; Jing, Jianen; Zhang, Letian; Dong, Hao; Yin, Yaotian; Wang, Gang; Xia, Ruixue

    2016-04-01

    A 3D Magnetotelluric (MT) inversion for a 2D broadband MT profile along 92°E in the eastern Lhasa terrane was applied to understand the crustal electrical structures and deep processes in the India-Tibet continental collision zone. The middle and lower (- 20 to - 50 km) crust is distributed with conductors that are primarily concentrated north of the Yarlung-Zangbo sutures (YZS). The results imply that the hypothesis of middle (and/or lower) crustal flow between the Tethyan Himalaya and Lhasa terrane are not supported by the MT data within the profile area. We suggest that given the possibility of the existence of channel flow in the middle (and/or lower) crust extruding southward from Tibet, the southernmost portion should be limited in the northern YZS. The electric model also indicates that the primarily conductive region in the middle to lower crust can be imaged from the YZS to ~ 30.8°N, while the crust of the northern Lhasa terrane north of ~ 30.8°N has a higher resistivity. From this result, it can be inferred that the northern Lhasa terrane might have a cold and strong middle to lower crust and that the fron