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Sample records for ebd

  1. Strengths-based Assessment Differences across Students with LD and EBD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert; Epstein, Michael H.; Pastor, Dena A.; Ryser, Gail R.

    2000-01-01

    A study used the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale (BERS) with 129 students (ages 7-18) with learning disabilities (LD), 145 with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), and 144 typical students. BERS discriminated among students with LD and EBD and controls and was able to classify students with EBD and controls. (Contains references.)…

  2. Recommendations for Teaching Physical Education to Students with EBDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Shawna

    2012-01-01

    A college professor who trains preservice physical education teachers was asked to design, develop, and implement a pilot physical education program at a nonpublic school primarily serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBDs). The teacher/researcher conducted an action research study to maximize the effectiveness of teaching and…

  3. Prevalence of Students with EBD: Impact on General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, S. R.; Kim, J.; Walker, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the Council for Children with Behavior Disorders(CCBD) celebrates its 50th anniversary, it seems like a good time to take stock of our field (Peck et al.,2011). There is probably no more fundamental way to do so than an analysis of prevalence; that is, how many school-age children actually have an emotional or behavior disorder (EBD)? We do…

  4. Community Influences on E/BD Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madyun, Na'im; Lee, Moosung

    2008-01-01

    No Child Left Behind has mandated that all students reach proficiency by 2014. This mandate places special emphasis on the performance of special education students. The purpose of this study is to use social theory to understand the factors that explain the achievement of emotionally or behaviorally disordered (E/BD) students. Results suggest a…

  5. Evidence-Based Social Skills Interventions for Students at Risk for EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Children and youth with or at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBDs) present substantial challenges for schools, teachers, parents, and peers. Social skills interventions have been shown to be effective for this population. Meta-analytic reviews of this literature show that about 65% of students with EBD will improve when given social…

  6. Future Research Directions for the Field of E/BD: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Jolivette, Kristine; Conroy, Maureen; Nelson, C. Michael; Benner, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    The origins and evolution of the field of emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) provide a context for offering suggestions for advancing the field. Building from this historical past and the research of others in the field, four broad recommendations which focus on academic and social needs of students with E/BD are offered: (a) ensuring high…

  7. Hearts of Hope: Experiences of EBD Teachers and Factors Contributing to Career Longevity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Val Rae Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examined EBD teacher experiences through phenomenological research. Data was collated through interviews, a focus group, memos, and field notes. Questions focused on how EBD teachers described their work and the factors that contributed to career longevity. The study was conducted in one self-contained school for students…

  8. Effect of hypercholesterolemia on transendothelial EBD-albumin permeability and lipid accumulation in porcine iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Lamack, Jeffrey A; Himburg, Heather A; Friedman, Morton H

    2006-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and is known to promote the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions in experimental animal models. Juvenile swine were fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet, and the transendothelial macromolecular permeability of the external iliac arteries of these animals was assessed by measuring the uptake rate of circulating Evans blue dye (EBD). The extent and patterns of lipid-containing lesions were also determined using en face staining with Oil Red O (ORO). Sites of ORO staining often excluded EBD, possibly via the fragmentation of the internal elastic lamina, to which EBD binds. By spatially averaging the EBD uptake in arterial segments relatively free of ORO-positive lesions, it was found that endothelial permeability to albumin was greater in hypercholesterolemic pigs than in those on a normal diet (p=0.056). PMID:15935354

  9. The Effects of Self Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) on Reading Comprehension for Secondary Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Lisa R.

    2010-01-01

    Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EBD) in the United States are characterized by behavioral deficits that impact their academic performance and social relationships. Students with EBD have lower academic performance in reading and math, more failed courses, higher rates of grade retention, and fewer than fifty percent graduate…

  10. Integrating Technology in Program Development for Children/Youth with E/BD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Lynn K., Ed.; Black, Sharon, Ed.

    This monograph highlights how educational technology can benefit students at risk of school failure, particularly students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD). It discusses how technology can improve student motivation to learn, increase engagement in learning, improve academic outcomes, meet the needs of tactile/kinesthetic learners, link…

  11. The Message from the Pioneers in EBD: Learning from the Past and Preparing for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Susan Fread

    2009-01-01

    The Minnesota Conference for Teachers of Children with Emotional and Behavior Disorders (EBD) hosted a panel discussion in the fall of 2005 to reunite pioneers in the field of research and publication who shaped the early instructional practices of educators working with disturbed and disturbing youth in schools. The distinguished researchers and…

  12. Combating the Attrition of Teachers of Students with EBD: What Can Administrators Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancio, Edward Joseph; Albrecht, Susan Fread; Johns, Beverley Holden

    2014-01-01

    Students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) can present intensive needs, requiring the intervention and instruction of well-trained and qualified teachers who work with them in the classroom. However, schools face serious shortages in the field of special education, particularly for staff who work with this population of children (McLeskey,…

  13. Improving Mathematics Performance among Secondary Students with EBD: A Methodological Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Candace A.; Krezmien, Michael P.; Travers, Jason

    2016-01-01

    In this methodological review, the authors apply special education research quality indicators and standards for single case design to analyze mathematics intervention studies for secondary students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A systematic methodological review of literature from 1975 to December 2012 yielded 19 articles that…

  14. Meeting the Diverse Needs of Students with EBD in Inclusive Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Sarah J.; Therrien, William J.; Kaldenberg, Erica R.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports that for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), difficulties in core academic skills may play a large role in student success or failure in science. Why? Comprehending science texts can be particularly problematic with their complex and often unknown vocabulary words. Another problem identified as an…

  15. Supportive Therapies for EBD and At-Risk Students: Rich, Varied, and Underused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Robert P.; Schwabenlender, Sharon A.

    1994-01-01

    This article introduces supportive therapies for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). Strategies to help children cope with emotions are described. Bibliotherapy approaches and various expressive arts approaches to helping these children are discussed, and the role of leisure awareness and adventure recreation as therapies is…

  16. Project Baby Care: A Parental Training Program for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Catherine; Wolman, Clara; Harris-Looby, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Statistics indicate that many victims of fatalities from abuse are children of teenage parents. Profiles of typical abuse perpetrators match the characteristics of many students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and place them at higher risk of acting impulsively and using violent and abusive behaviors. Teaching students parenting…

  17. Behavioral Disorders: Identification, Assessment, and Instruction of Students with EBD. Advances in Special Education. Volume 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Jeffrey P., Ed.; Obiakor, Festus E., Ed.; Rotatori, Anthony F., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Volumes 22 and 23 of "Advances in Special Education" address the current top perspectives and issues in the field of EBD by providing chapters written by active researchers and scholarly university professors who specialize in this area. Volume 22 first delineates legal issues, themes, and dimensions related to the historical development of the…

  18. Behavioral Disorders: Practice Concerns and Students with EBD. Advances in Special Education. Volume 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Jeffrey P., Ed.; Obiakor, Festus E., Ed.; Rotatori, Anthony F., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Volumes 22 and 23 of the "Advances in Special Education" address the current top perspectives and issues in the field of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) by providing chapters written by active researchers and scholarly university professors who specialize in this area. Volume 22 first delineates legal issues, themes, and dimensions…

  19. Understanding the Experience of Girls with EBD in a Gender-Responsive Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srsic, Amy; Rice, Elisabeth Hess

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of adolescent girls with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who were participating in a support group. The focus of the study was to explore the perceptions of the girls' friendships, connectedness with others, ability to establish and maintain relationships, and self-perceptions within the group. The…

  20. Defining "Effectiveness" for Students with E/BD: Teacher, Instruction, and Management Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Terrance M.; Jolivette, Kristine; Ennis, Robin Parks; Hirn, Regina Gilkey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss how issues of effectiveness and efficiency are considered most logically in the field of education. More specifically, the focus is on the importance of these issues as they pertain to teaching, instruction, and management strategies for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). The driving…

  1. Three-Tiered Support for Students with E/BD: Highlights of the Universal Tier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Michael P.; George, Nancy L.; Kern, Lee; Fogt, Julie B.

    2013-01-01

    The scant data available suggest there is a critical need for improving service delivery within alternative education (AE) settings for children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). A promising approach for improving student outcomes in AE settings is school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (SWPBIS), an…

  2. A Review of Self-Regulated Strategy Development for Writing for Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreckovic, Melissa A.; Common, Eric A.; Knowles, Meagan M.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne

    2014-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated the evidence base of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD; Harris & Graham, 1992) for writing with students with and at risk for emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD). First, we evaluated the quality of studies identified (n 5 13) by applying the quality indicators for single case (Horner et al.,…

  3. Personality Traits of Expert Teachers of Students with EBD: Clarifying a Teacher's X-Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Svenja; Pijl, Sip Jan; Bijstra, Jan; Van den Bosch, Els

    2016-01-01

    Teaching students with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) is a challenge for many teachers in inclusive education. Much research has been done to find out what differentiates expert teachers from their less skilled colleagues. Recent evidence points to personality as an underlying core factor influencing teacher performance. In this…

  4. The Effect of Systematic Academic Instruction on Behavioural and Academic Outcomes of Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Post, Wendy J.; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of systematic academic instruction on academic progress and behavioural problems of students with emotional and/or behavioural disorders (EBD) in special education. Earlier studies have noted the importance of a systematic approach as well as the significance of focusing on academic instruction instead of on…

  5. Preliminary Psychometrics of the Participatory Evaluation and Expert Review for Classrooms Serving Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities (PEER-EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shu-Fei; Cheney, Douglas; Walker, Bridget

    2013-01-01

    The quality of classrooms serving students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) is a continuing concern because of its influence on students' educational outcomes. Program evaluation of classrooms for students with EBD has been a recommended practice for many years since Grosenick, George, and George (1987) conducted their…

  6. Support Services to Teachers to Increase Preparedness of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EBD) for Statewide Assessments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant need to address the academic outcomes of students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). Of the 13 federal disability categories under which a student can be classified to receive special education services, students with EBD have the highest dropout rate, the highest failure rate, and pose the most behavioral…

  7. An Examination of Intervention Research with Secondary Students with EBD in Light of Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Candace A.; Maccini, Paula; Wright, Kenneth; Miller, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the authors offer a critical analysis of published interventions for improving mathematics performance among middle and high school students with EBD in light of the Common Core State Standards. An exhaustive review of literature from 1975 to December 2012 yielded 20 articles that met criteria for inclusion. The authors analyzed…

  8. Early-Career EBD Teacher Knowledge, Ratings of Competency Importance, and Observed Use of Instruction and Management Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lori F.; Hendrickson, Jo M.

    2007-01-01

    The empirical, conceptual, and theoretical knowledge of early-career EBD teachers was assessed two years after student teaching and compared to their ratings of the importance of specific instruction and classroom management competencies as well as to their application of those competencies. Twelve teachers, six elementary and six secondary, with…

  9. Relationships of Aggression Subtypes and Peer Status among Aggressive Boys in General Education and Emotional/Behavioral Disorder (EBD) Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Useche, Ana Carolina; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Merk, Welmoet; Orobio de Castro, Bram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the concurrent and longitudinal relationships between reactive and proactive aggression and children's peer status. Participants were 94 Dutch elementary school-aged boys in self-contained special education classrooms for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) and 47 boys with no disabilities in general…

  10. SRSD in Practice: Creating a Professional Development Experience for Teachers to Meet the Writing Needs of Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Debra; FitzPatrick, Erin; Sandmel, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) is one of the most effective writing interventions (Graham, McKeown, Kiuhara, & Harris, 2012) and has improved the writing skills of students with emotional and behavior disorders (EBD). Practice-based professional development (PBPD) has been effective for teaching participants how to implement SRSD…

  11. Combining Self-Monitoring and an Interdependent Group Contingency to Improve the Behavior of Sixth Graders with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denune, Hilary; Hawkins, Renee; Donovan, Lauren; Mccoy, Dacia; Hall, Lyndsie; Moeder, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A withdrawal design was used to examine the influence of a self-monitoring procedure on the overall effectiveness of an interdependent group contingency intervention implemented in a sixth-grade classroom in an alternative school serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Dependent variables included student on-task, off-task,…

  12. Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Historical Perspective and Future Directions. From the Third CCBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Richard J.; Kauffman, James M.

    This monograph on teaching students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) is divided into two parts, one that offers historical perspectives and one that looks at future directions. Following an introduction, individual sections of Part 1 address the following topics: (1) a brief history of special education for E/BD students; (2) key…

  13. Cost Effectiveness of the Instrumentalism in Occupational Therapy (IOT) Conceptual Model as a Guide for Intervention with Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikiugu, Moses N.; Anderson, Lynne

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of using the Instrumentalism in Occupational Therapy (IOT) conceptual practice model as a guide for intervention to assist teenagers with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) transition successfully into adulthood. The cost effectiveness analysis was based on a project…

  14. A Probleme Complexe, Rarement Solution Simple: La Necessite d'une Intervention Integree aupres des Eleves en Difficulte de Comportement. For Every Complex Issue There Is a Simple Answer...and It Is Wrong: The Need for a Comprehensive Intervention with EBD Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, Egide

    This paper, with portions written in English and French, examines issues in the education of students with emotional or behavior disorders (EBD) from a Canadian perspective. The paper is organized to counter seven "myths" about schools and students with EBD. These are: (1) "the student is the problem" (rather, well organized schools can make a…

  15. Psychoeducation: An Idea Whose Time Has Come. From the Third CCBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Mary M.; Brendtro, Larry K.; Fecser, Frank A.; Nichols, Polly

    This monograph provides an introduction to psychoeducational theory in the education of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (E/BD). An introduction reviews the history of the psychoeducational approach and stresses the need to put this theory, as well as others, into practice. Chapter 1 compares and integrates six psychoeducational…

  16. Perspective on Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Assumptions and Their Implications for Education and Treatment. From the Third CCBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, C. Michael; Scott, Terrance M.; Polsgrove, Lewis

    This monograph provides an overview of intervention and programming strategies for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) based on the behavioral approach. It reviews the progress of the behavioral perspective in education from its earliest beginnings to the present and describes its major characteristics, chief proponents,…

  17. When Universal Approaches and Prevention Services Are Not Enough: The Importance of Understanding the Stigmatization of Special Education for Students with EBD--A Response to Kauffman and Badar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this commentary responds to an article titled "How We Might Make Special Education for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders Less Stigmatizing," by J.M. Kaufmann and J. Bader, who maintain that identifying youth as having emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and providing treatment for them is viewed to be…

  18. The "B" in EBD Is Not Just for Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Problems in defining emotional and behavioural difficulties of all types, including bullying, are discussed. Interactions among seeing, naming and communicating about these phenomena are considered. School and community characteristics of students with emotional and behavioural difficulties are touched upon. Major problems in definition and…

  19. Rethinking Teacher Preparation for EBD Students: Towards a Partnership Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher; Monahan, Elizabeth C.

    2007-01-01

    Chris Blake and Elizabeth Monahan explore the role that partnerships play in developing effective teachers working with children and young people who present emotional and behavioural difficulties. A range of innovations in the United States are highlighted and the key emphasis is placed upon a continuum of teacher development.

  20. Better Play Times Training--Theory and Practice in an EBD Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Providing child-centred play opportunities and re-creating early attachment experiences facilitates a child's social and emotional development, as well as giving time and space for self-expression and relaxation. Play therapists provide these conditions after lengthy and intensive training. Para-professionals are now being trained and supported in…

  1. Using Reliable Change to Calculate Clinically Significant Progress in Children with EBD: A BHRS Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoder, Vincent J.; Hesky, James G.; Cautilli, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    Children often have complex emotional and behavioral disorders (ADHD, ODD, Depression, PTSD, etc.). A large amount of research exists in the behavioral treatment of children with these disorders regarding specific behavioral problems. Much less research exists for the treatment of comprehensive problematic behaviors that these children experience…

  2. Introduction to The Special Issue: Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Matthew; Lochman, John; Van Acker, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in developing models of social information processing, and cognitive-behavioral processes and related interventions. While there has been limited attention to cognitive-behavioral modification (CBM) in the special education literature, the majority of the contributions have come from the fields of school,…

  3. Considerations for the Placement of Youth with EBD in Alternative Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Trent; Bartuska, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Alternative education programs (also called alternative schools) first appeared on the American landscape in the 1960s. Despite the proliferation of these programs, a generic description of what constitutes an alternative education program, historically, has been elusive. Most alternative education programs have the general criteria of serving…

  4. Reliability of Frequent Retrospective Behavior Ratings for Elementary School Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mack D.; Vannest, Kimberly; Davis, John; Davis, Cole; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This study is a preliminary examination of the reliability of frequent retrospective teacher behavior ratings. Frequent retrospective behavior ratings are an approach for creating scales that can be used to monitor individual behavioral progress. In this study, the approach is used to progress monitor behavioral individualized education plan goals…

  5. Classwide PBIS for Students with EBD: Initial Evaluation of an Integrity Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Jennifer L.; McCurdy, Barry L.; Ewing, Sam; Polis, Dustin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot project was to develop a tool and a process for providing performance feedback on evidence-based classroom management strategies to teachers of students in emotional support classrooms. The project was carried out with nine classroom teachers and descriptive results are discussed. Initial results found increases in…

  6. Reintegrating Elementary Students with EBD from Alternative Placement to Public School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery-Sterud, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Significant numbers of children with emotional and behavioral disorders receive services in settings other than general education, but it is expected they will return to a less restrictive environment. Reintegrating these students once they have completed treatment is a significant problem. Students can demonstrate improved behavior and…

  7. Depression in the Schools: A Hidden Piece in the E/BD Puzzle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Nancy L.; Toste, Jessica R.; Holly, Shareen

    2006-01-01

    Depression is an essential component in any consideration of emotional/behavioural difficulties in the schools. Depression can occur as a disorder or as a clinically significant array of depressive symptoms, both of which should be of concern to school personnel. The present paper reviews literature concerning the identification, prevalence, and…

  8. Ten Years after Special Education: EBD-Students in Transition to Adulthood in Finland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnukainen, Markku

    This study followed up on the life-courses of 23 former special education students with emotional and behavioral disabilities from a comprehensive school to further education, work, and adulthood. The students attended special classes for pupils with emotional and behavioral difficulties in a small town in southern Finland in 1985-1987. The…

  9. 75 FR 70730 - EBD Hydro; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ...: The proposed 45-Mile Hydroelectric Project would be located on the concrete drop structure of the...-Mile Hydroelectric Project would consist of: (1) A proposed intake structure; (2) a proposed 2,700-foot... public notice. p. Protests or Motions to Intervene--Anyone may submit a protest or a motion to...

  10. Four Supportive Pillars in Career Exploration and Development for Adolescents with LD and EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Audrey A.; Smith, Shane Anthony; Kim, Sunyoung

    2012-01-01

    In addition to typical career development and vocational programs in general education, providing school-based programs that are directly linked to employment and career development for youth with learning and emotional and behavioral disabilities is a legally mandated service in special education. Several broad research-based strategies are…

  11. In an EBD Population Do Looked after Children Have Specific Needs Relating to Resilience, Self-Perception and Attainment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Emily; Whitehead, Juliet; Wigford, Angie

    2010-01-01

    Poor outcomes for Looked After Children (LAC) in relation to non-LAC have been well established by research. However, a small minority of LAC do achieve positive outcomes despite having experienced a number of risk factors. It is the process of resilience which is thought to enable individuals to experience positive outcomes. This study focused on…

  12. Consumer View: What Former Students of Emotional/Behavioral Disorder (EBD) Classes Say about School in Finland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnukainen, Markku

    This paper discusses the outcomes of a Finnish study that investigated the school experiences of former special education students with emotional and behavioral disorders. Twenty-three former students, who had attended classes for students with emotional and behavioral disorders were interviewed. The students had been out of special education and…

  13. A Meta-Analysis of Video-Modeling Based Interventions for Reduction of Challenging Behaviors for Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losinski, Mickey; Wiseman, Nicole; White, Sherry A.; Balluch, Felicity

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the use of video modeling (VM)-based interventions to reduce the challenging behaviors of students with emotional or behavioral disorders. Each study was evaluated using Council for Exceptional Children's (CEC's) quality indicators for evidence-based practices. In addition, study effects were calculated along the three…

  14. "Some People Aren't Cut Out for It": The Role of Personality Factors in the Careers of Teachers of Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather-Jones, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explores reasons that experienced teachers of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders give for remaining in their field. Previous research, usually conducted among the wider population of special education teachers, has focused on the relationship of employment and demographic factors to attrition and has…

  15. Is There Any Point in Wearing Dead Men's Spectacles? How the Theoretical Insights of Adler and Colleagues Relate to Current Practice with Children Experiencing EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blamires, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the legacy of Adlerian approaches to behaviour. Mike Blamires offers an opportunity to consider the impact of Adler's premise that education is fundamentally about encouragement and the promotion of democratic principles. In so doing he challenges us to interrogate the term "behaviour management", and its current use by…

  16. Pragmatic Language and the Child with Emotional/Behavioural Difficulties (EBD): A Pilot Study Exploring the Interaction between Behaviour and Communication Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackie, Leila; Law, James

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between mental health, behaviour and language development is widely recognized in the literature. Recent advances in assessment tools allows one to consider the role of pragmatic language skills in this co-occurrence. Aims: This pilot study aimed to investigate (1) the level of association between pragmatic language…

  17. Behavioral Problems in Schools: Ways To Encourage Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) of Discipline-Evoking Behavior of Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders (EBD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Jo M.; Gable, Robert A.; Conroy, Maureen A.; Fox, James; Smith, Carl

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses some of the major challenges school districts face in implementing functional behavioral assessments (FBAs). A school improvement initiative, "Success4," is presented to illustrate an Iowa approach. Arguments are presented for fundamental changes in order to enhance school district effectiveness and accountability in…

  18. The Effects of Reading Fluency Instruction on the Academic and Behavioral Success of Middle School Students in a Self-Contained EBD Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Terrance M.; Shearer-Lingo, Amy

    2002-01-01

    This study used two reading programs with three students in a self-contained class for children with emotional and/or behavior disorders. Results indicated that when instruction sets students up to succeed on a daily basis and monitor their own progress, positive academic and social outcomes are likely. Single subject research results and…

  19. Supporting Early Adolescent Learning and Social Strengths: Promoting Productive Contexts for Students At-Risk for EBD during the Transition to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Hamm, Jill V.; Petrin, Robert A.; Robertson, Dylan; Murray, Robert A.; Meece, Judith L.; Brooks, Debbie Sprott

    2010-01-01

    This study involved a pilot examination of the impact of the Supporting Early Adolescent Learning and Social Strengths (SEALS) model on the 6th grade academic and social context following the transition to middle school. Two middle schools from a high poverty Appalachian school district were randomly assigned to the intervention and control…

  20. Effects of Sentence Instruction and Frequency Building to a Performance Criterion on Elementary-Aged Students with Behavioral Concerns and EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datchuk, Shawn M.; Kubina, Richard M.; Mason, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    Elementary-aged students with behavioral concerns and disabilities struggling to construct sentences stand a high likelihood for continued academic difficulty. Several studies have used sentence instruction with picture-word prompts to improve sentence level writing skills, including construction of simple sentences, syntax, capitalization, and…

  1. Do Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances Attending Schools for Special Education Have Lower Expectations Regarding the Transition to Adulthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margraf, Hannah; Pinquart, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with emotional and behavioral disturbances (EBD) and those attending special schools tend to have poorer adult outcomes than adolescents without EBD and peers from regular schools. Using a four-group comparison (students with or without EBD from special schools and students with or without EBD from regular schools), the present study…

  2. Medicating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders and ADHD: A State Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runnheim, Veronica A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Wisconsin teachers provided information on 1,300 students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who were receiving medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The ADHD/EBD students comprised approximately 26% of all EBD students. The most common medication was Ritalin, and teachers believed the medication effectively…

  3. Education and Services for Children and Youths with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Kaili; Soon, Tan Chee

    2006-01-01

    To describe the current status of special education and services for children and youths with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in Singapore, the authors highlight the country's overall structure of special education and mental health, identification of and intervention with children and youths with E/BD, perspectives about E/BD, and…

  4. Teacher Perceptions of Inclusionary Practices for Students with Emotional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yu-wen Grace

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined variables affecting teachers' perceptions of inclusionary practices for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in three areas: inclusion of students with E/BD, behaviors of students with E/BD, and teacher efficacy. Teachers listed in the database of one Education Service Center located in north…

  5. Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Understanding the Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mark D.; Williamson, Tricia

    2004-01-01

    It is important to realize that students who are diagnosed with E/BD often have or should have dual diagnoses. Regular classroom teachers may perceive a sense of ineffectiveness and consequently develop resistance in working with students with E/BD. Mainstreaming students with E/BD allows them to interact and learn more effective interaction…

  6. Characteristics of Successful Teachers of Students with Emotional Behavioral Disabilities: Teacher and Expert Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delport, John

    2012-01-01

    This study used a mixed methods design to examine the characteristics--including competencies (i.e., knowledge and skills), and personal attributes--of successful teachers of students with E/BD. The characteristics were examined through the perceptions of teachers of students with E/BD (teachers who are expert in E/BD, n = 14, MEd Graduates…

  7. Towards Systemic Support of Pupils with Emotional and Behavioural Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) vary in many respects. In school, specific conditions have to be fulfilled in order to deal adequately with EBD. This study addresses the question how mainstream primary schools design different instructional situations to support pupils with EBD in practice, and how this design could be…

  8. Developing Positive Behavioral Support for Students with Challenging Behaviors. From the Third CCBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugai, George, Ed.; Lewis, Timothy J., Ed.

    This monograph is a guide to positive behavioral intervention and support (PBIS) and functional behavioral assessment (FBA) in the special education of students with behavior disorders as emphasized in the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA 97). An introduction explains that positive behavioral support represents the…

  9. Safe Schools: School-Wide Discipline Practices. From the Third CCBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J., Ed.; Sugai, George, Ed.

    This monograph examines issues of school safety, focusing on the prevention/early intervention end of the continuum of services and on elementary and middle-school age children and youth. It highlights preventive measures schools can take to implement a proactive school-wide system of discipline to ensure school safety. Emphasis is on creating…

  10. Historical Chronology of the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders 1964-1999. From the Third CBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M.; Menendez, Anthony L.

    This monograph presents a history of the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders (CCBD), a division of the Council for Exceptional Children. Since its founding in 1964, the CCBD has been concerned with children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders. Following an introductory chapter, Chapter 1 highlights CCBD, including its…

  11. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  12. Access to care for children with emotional/behavioral difficulties.

    PubMed

    Henning-Smith, Carrie; Alang, Sirry

    2016-06-01

    Emotional/behavioral difficulties (EBDs) are increasingly diagnosed in children, constituting some of the most common chronic childhood conditions. Left untreated, EBDs pose long-term individual and population-level consequences. There is a growing evidence of disparities in EBD prevalence by various demographic characteristics. This article builds on this research by examining disparities in access to medical care for children with EBD. From 2008 to 2011, using data from the US National Health Interview Survey (N = 31,631) on sample children aged 4-17, we investigate (1) whether having EBD affects access to care (modeled as delayed care due to cost and difficulty making an appointment) and (2) the role demographic characteristics, health insurance coverage, and frequency of service use play in access to care for children with EBD. Results indicate that children with EBD experience issues in accessing care at more than twice the rate of children without EBD, even though they are less likely to be uninsured than their counterparts without EBD. In multivariable models, children with EBD are still more likely to experience delayed care due to cost and difficulty making a timely appointment, even after adjusting for frequency of health service use, insurance coverage, and demographic characteristics. PMID:25583944

  13. Randomized phase 2 study: elotuzumab plus bortezomib/dexamethasone vs bortezomib/dexamethasone for relapsed/refractory MM

    PubMed Central

    Offidani, Massimo; Pégourie, Brigitte; De La Rubia, Javier; Garderet, Laurent; Laribi, Kamel; Bosi, Alberto; Marasca, Roberto; Laubach, Jacob; Mohrbacher, Ann; Carella, Angelo Michele; Singhal, Anil K.; Tsao, L. Claire; Lynch, Mark; Bleickardt, Eric; Jou, Ying-Ming; Robbins, Michael; Palumbo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept, open-label, phase 2 study, patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) received elotuzumab with bortezomib and dexamethasone (EBd) or bortezomib and dexamethasone (Bd) until disease progression/unacceptable toxicity. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary/exploratory endpoints included overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). Two-sided 0.30 significance level was specified (80% power, 103 events) to detect hazard ratio (HR) of 0.69. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed on all randomized patients and all treated patients, respectively. Of 152 randomized patients (77 EBd, 75 Bd), 150 were treated (75 EBd, 75 Bd). PFS was greater with EBd vs Bd (HR, 0.72; 70% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-0.88; stratified log-rank P = .09); median PFS was longer with EBd (9.7 months) vs Bd (6.9 months). In an updated analysis, EBd-treated patients homozygous for the high-affinity FcγRIIIa allele had median PFS of 22.3 months vs 9.8 months in EBd-treated patients homozygous for the low-affinity allele. ORR was 66% (EBd) vs 63% (Bd). Very good partial response or better occurred in 36% of patients (EBd) vs 27% (Bd). Early OS results, based on 40 deaths, revealed an HR of 0.61 (70% CI, 0.43-0.85). To date, 60 deaths have occurred (28 EBd, 32 Bd). No additional clinically significant adverse events occurred with EBd vs Bd. Grade 1/2 infusion reaction rate was low (5% EBd) and mitigated with premedication. In patients with RRMM, elotuzumab, an immunostimulatory antibody, appears to provide clinical benefit without added clinically significant toxicity when combined with Bd vs Bd alone. Registered to ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01478048. PMID:27091875

  14. Randomized phase 2 study: elotuzumab plus bortezomib/dexamethasone vs bortezomib/dexamethasone for relapsed/refractory MM.

    PubMed

    Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Offidani, Massimo; Pégourie, Brigitte; De La Rubia, Javier; Garderet, Laurent; Laribi, Kamel; Bosi, Alberto; Marasca, Roberto; Laubach, Jacob; Mohrbacher, Ann; Carella, Angelo Michele; Singhal, Anil K; Tsao, L Claire; Lynch, Mark; Bleickardt, Eric; Jou, Ying-Ming; Robbins, Michael; Palumbo, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    In this proof-of-concept, open-label, phase 2 study, patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) received elotuzumab with bortezomib and dexamethasone (EBd) or bortezomib and dexamethasone (Bd) until disease progression/unacceptable toxicity. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary/exploratory endpoints included overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). Two-sided 0.30 significance level was specified (80% power, 103 events) to detect hazard ratio (HR) of 0.69. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed on all randomized patients and all treated patients, respectively. Of 152 randomized patients (77 EBd, 75 Bd), 150 were treated (75 EBd, 75 Bd). PFS was greater with EBd vs Bd (HR, 0.72; 70% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-0.88; stratified log-rank P = .09); median PFS was longer with EBd (9.7 months) vs Bd (6.9 months). In an updated analysis, EBd-treated patients homozygous for the high-affinity FcγRIIIa allele had median PFS of 22.3 months vs 9.8 months in EBd-treated patients homozygous for the low-affinity allele. ORR was 66% (EBd) vs 63% (Bd). Very good partial response or better occurred in 36% of patients (EBd) vs 27% (Bd). Early OS results, based on 40 deaths, revealed an HR of 0.61 (70% CI, 0.43-0.85). To date, 60 deaths have occurred (28 EBd, 32 Bd). No additional clinically significant adverse events occurred with EBd vs Bd. Grade 1/2 infusion reaction rate was low (5% EBd) and mitigated with premedication. In patients with RRMM, elotuzumab, an immunostimulatory antibody, appears to provide clinical benefit without added clinically significant toxicity when combined with Bd vs Bd alone. Registered to ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01478048. PMID:27091875

  15. The winds of change revisited: progress towards building a culture of evidence-based dentistry.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; McCann, Ann L; Schneiderman, Emet D; Dechow, Paul C

    2015-05-01

    In 2008, Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry launched a comprehensive four-year curriculum in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) along with a series of faculty development initiatives to create an EBD culture. The aim of this study was to determine the institution's success in achieving this goal. The assessment tool used was the PEAK instrument, which measures respondents' EBD Practices, Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge. Two EBD-trained classes of students and one class untrained in EBD (approximately 100 students in each class) were assessed annually. The faculty were assessed before and after completion of the initiative. Nearly all students responded, with samples ranging from 87 to 102; the faculty response rates were 53% (62/117) in 2009 and 66% in 2013 (81/123). In the results, the trained students scored significantly higher in knowledge than the untrained students at each of the first three PEAK administrations (p≤0.001). Regarding confidence in appraising a research report, the first trained group significantly gained in appropriate use of statistical tests (p<0.001), while the second trained group significantly gained in this aspect and five others (p≤0.032). At the final PEAK administration, the second trained group agreed more than the untrained group that EBD was important for the practice of dentistry (p<0.001). Faculty comfort level with reading peer-reviewed articles increased significantly from 2009 to 2013 (p=0.039). Faculty members who participated in the summer EBD Fundamentals course (n=28) had significantly higher EBD knowledge scores than those who did not participate (p=0.013), and their EBD attitudes and practices were more positive (p<0.05). Students and faculty trained in EBD were more knowledgeable and exhibited more positive attitudes, supporting a conclusion that the college has made substantial progress towards achieving an EBD culture. PMID:25941143

  16. The Winds of Change Revisited: Progress Towards Building a Culture of Evidence-Based Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert J.; McCann, Ann L.; Schneiderman, Emet D.; Dechow, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry launched a comprehensive four-year curriculum in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) along with a series of faculty development initiatives to create an EBD culture. The aim of this study was to determine the institution's success in achieving this goal. The assessment tool used was the PEAK instrument, which measures respondents’ EBD Practices, Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge. Two EBD-trained classes of students and one class untrained in EBD (approximately 100 students in each class) were assessed annually. The faculty were assessed before and after completion of the initiative. Nearly all students responded, with samples ranging from 87 to 102; the faculty response rates were 53% (62/117) in 2009 and 66% in 2013 (81/123). In the results, the trained students scored significantly higher in knowledge than the untrained students at each of the first three PEAK administrations (p≤0.001). Regarding confidence in appraising a research report, the first trained group significantly gained in appropriate use of statistical tests (p<0.001), while the second trained group significantly gained in this aspect and five others (p≤0.032). At the final PEAK administration, the second trained group agreed more than the untrained group that EBD was important for the practice of dentistry (p<0.001). Faculty comfort level with reading peer-reviewed articles increased significantly from 2009 to 2013 (p=0.039). Faculty members who participated in the summer EBD Fundamentals course (n=28) had significantly higher EBD knowledge scores than those who did not participate (p=0.013), and their EBD attitudes and practices were more positive (p<0.05). Students and faculty trained in EBD were more knowledgeable and exhibited more positive attitudes, supporting a conclusion that the college has made substantial progress towards achieving an EBD culture. PMID:25941143

  17. An Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the CBCL 6-18 in a Sample of Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolfi, Vincent; Magyar, Caroline I.; Dill, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with co-occurring emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The Child Behavior Checklist 6-18 (CBCL; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) is an EBD measure that contains several norm-referenced scales derived through factor analysis of data from the general pediatric population. The…

  18. Investigation of a Multi-Component Intervention Addressing Mathematical Reasoning and Self-Regulation of Behavior for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Marie B.

    2013-01-01

    For students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities (EBD), negative student outcomes are the poorest across disability categories, including high rates of school dropouts, unemployment and incarcerations. Mathematically, students with EBD receiving instruction in special education settings experience practices not consistent with recommendations…

  19. State and Local Interagency Collaboration--Creating Services for Challenging Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, William W.; And Others

    This collection of papers describes the interagency collaboration of Georgia agencies that serve students with emotional and behavior disorders (EBD). The first paper, "Overview and State Perspective" (P. Paulette Bragg and Phillip H. Pickens), describes the problems facing Georgia by placing students with EBD in state hospitals, private…

  20. Improving the Mathematics Instruction for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Two Evidenced-Based Instructional Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccomini, Paul J.; Witzel, Bradley; Robbins, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Teaching mathematics to students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) is one of the most challenging tasks educators face today. Students with EBD are reported to have the most dismal outcomes of any other group of students with disabilities including the lowest grades, the most failing grades, higher retention rates, the highest dropout…

  1. Critical Educational Program Components for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Science, Policy, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Richard L.; Peterson, Reece L.; Smith, Carl R.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of recent education reform and reorganization efforts requiring the use of research-based methods, the fundamental elements of an effective program for children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) have not been succinctly identified. This article presents the essential features of programs for students with EBD.…

  2. Behavioral Disorders in the School: Participant Roles and Sub-Roles in Three Types of School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumpel, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an attempt to widen the study of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) to include children not formally identified by the school as having EBD through examining the case of extreme school aggressors and their victims. The research describes the validation of the School Violence Inventory (SVI) and its use to map participant…

  3. An Investigation of the Academic Processing Speed of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Served in Public School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Gregory J.; Allor, Jill H.; Mooney, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the academic processing speed (i.e., rapid automatic naming and academic fluency) of children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) served in public school settings. A cross-sectional design was used to investigate the (a) percentage of K-12 students with EBD served in public school settings with…

  4. Toward Improved Accuracy: A Response to Kauffman and Badar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphaus, Randy; DiStefano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The number of children estimated to suffer mental health disorders, and therefore, creating the need for special education services for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), is between 5% and 25% of children under the age of 18 (Brauner & Stephens, 2006). Admittedly, not all children with EBD have been identified and served,…

  5. Strategies and Procedures for Designing Proactive Interventions with a Culturally Diverse Population of Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders and Their Families/Caregivers. Fourth CCBD Mini-Library Series: Addressing the Diverse Needs of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders--Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Gardner, Ralph, III

    This monograph examines the special problems of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) who are from culturally diverse backgrounds and offers strategies for designing appropriate interventions. In the introductory chapter, the student demographics in the E/BD category of special education are reviewed and efforts of one state,…

  6. Comorbid Diagnosis and Concomitant Medical Treatment for Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kristina M.; Bowman, Krista A.; Ley, Katie; Frankenberger, William

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the types of psychiatric disorders and the corresponding medications prescribed to children enrolled in elementary Emotional Behavioral Disability (EBD) programs. The project employed a questionnaire that was distributed to elementary level teachers (EBD) to: (a) determine the proportion of …

  7. Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention on the School Performance of Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Mathur, Sarup R.

    2009-01-01

    Despite widespread treatment success in clinical settings, anxiety disorders are rarely targeted for intervention in students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) who exhibit them. This study examined the effects of a school-based anxiety intervention on the performance of 3 students attending school in a self-contained EBD setting. Using…

  8. The Central Role of Teaching Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Beverley H.; Crowley, E. Paula; Guetzloe, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    According to Shores and Jack (1996), children and youth are identified as having behavioral disorders based on their excesses and their deficits of social behavior. They respond to available social stimuli in unpredictable ways. The teaching of social skills should be an integral part of any program for E/BD students. E/BD teachers work on…

  9. Including Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties Pupils in a Mainstream Comprehensive: A Study of the Behaviour of Pupils and Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinson, Jeremy; Woof, Catherine; Melling, Richard

    2003-01-01

    A group of twelve pupils from an emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) school were transferred to a mainstream comprehensive school. They were supported by a specialist teacher and two Educational Support Assistants. The behaviour of the pupils was monitored. The behaviour of the EBD pupils was found to be very similar to that of the other…

  10. Caveat Emptor: Considerations before Buying In to the "New" Medical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.

    2002-01-01

    In response to Forness and Kavale's (2001) argument that the field of emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) should adopt a "new" medical model, this commentary argues that the benefit of psychiatric diagnoses and pharmacologic treatments have not been established. It advocates a resistance-to-intervention approach to E/BD eligibility…

  11. Difficulties Associated with the Coding and Categorization of Students with Emotional and Behavioural Disabilities in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, Diane; Jahnukainen, Markku

    2010-01-01

    In Canada, there is a recent trend toward non-categorization of services of students with emotional and behavioural disabilities (EBD). Yet in Alberta, the coding of students with EBD provides opportunities to diagnose students' learning difficulties but is hindered in this process, in large part, by being tied into special needs funding. Current…

  12. Teaching and Working with Children Who Have Emotional and Behavioral Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Mary Magee; Osher, David; Warger, Cynthia L.; Hanley, Tom V.; Bader, Beth DeHaven; Hoffman, Catherine C.

    This guidebook is designed to help educators and others in their efforts to work with students with emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the needs and problems presented by such students. Chapter 2 contains basic information to help provide an enhanced understanding of students with EBD. Causes of…

  13. Co-Teaching and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Kimberly A.; Landrum, Timothy J.; Gelman, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    In the past decade, increased emphasis on academic instruction for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) has replaced the misguided notion that teachers must focus exclusively or primarily on behavior problems before they can effectively teach students with EBD. Numerous scholars have noted that academic instruction should be the…

  14. Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Post-School Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolivette, Kristine; Stichter, Janine Peck; Nelson, C. Michael; Scott, Terrance M.; Liaupsin, Carl J.

    This report reviews existing data related to post-school outcomes for individuals with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), discusses why these data may be misleading, and describes what the special education field is doing to improve the post-school outcomes for individuals with EBD. In the first part of the paper, outcomes related to three…

  15. Increasing the Knowledge and Competencies Needed for Active Participation in Transition Planning: Use of the CD-ROM Version of the Self-Advocacy Strategy with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, Angela Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Given their dismal postschool outcomes, students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are in dire need of effective methods to increase their involvement in the transition process. It is believed that through this increased involvement, students with EBD may have greater opportunity to realize success in their postschool endeavors. This…

  16. Treatment Integrity of Literacy Interventions for Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Annette K.; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Hagaman, Jessica L.

    2009-01-01

    This review examines the treatment integrity data of literacy interventions for students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD). Forty-four studies published between 1977 and 2005 were examined. Findings indicate that studies focusing on literacy interventions for students with EBD included clear operational definitions and data on…

  17. You Tell Us: How Well Are We Preparing Teachers for a Career in Classrooms Serving Children with Emotional Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindzierski, Corinne M.; O'Dell, Robin; Marable, Michele A.; Raimondi, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to reveal the knowledge and skill sets that practicing day treatment and residential treatment EBD teachers view as important, and/or lacking, in novice EBD teachers, and to situate those findings within the larger contexts of teacher attrition and teacher preparation in special education. Primary results suggest that EBD…

  18. Using the Good Behavior Game in an Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lastrapes, Renée E.

    2014-01-01

    Students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) are being included to a greater degree in the general education classroom. Due to the least restrictive environment mandate in the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, more students with EBD are being taught in inclusive settings. As a result, general education…

  19. Integrating Research, Policy, and Practice to Bring Science to the Classroom: New Leaders' Perspectives on the Field of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Robertson, Rachel; Oliver, Regina M.; Hollo, Alex; Partin, Tara C. Moore

    2010-01-01

    In 1991, the Peacock Hill Working Group provided the field of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) a roadmap for improving the quality of services provided to students with EBD. The working group considered issues at every level of the educational system, from the classroom to federal policy. Although many strides have been made in the past 20…

  20. Mathematics Instruction for Middle School Students with and At-Risk for Behavioral Disorders: A Survey Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Stacey Eagan Lefort

    2012-01-01

    This survey study was designed to investigate mathematics instruction for middle school students with and at-risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). It sought to identify who is teaching mathematics to students with and at-risk for EBD, investigate if mathematics and special education teachers are implementing recommended curricula and…

  1. Strategies for Success: Evidence-Based Instructional Practices for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niesyn, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    The number of students with special needs, including those with emotional and behavioral disorder (EBD) who are being served in the early elementary classroom, is increasing rapidly. The actual number of students with EBD in Grades K-3 is frequently underreported, as the formal process of identifying students for special education services has…

  2. Concurrent and Predictive Criterion-Related Validity of Curriculum-Based Measurement for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fore, Cecil, III; Boon, Richard T.; Martin, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    There has been a recent emphasis on improving the academic performance of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Improving the academic performance of students with EBD is especially important in the current accountability era in which there is much emphasis placed on performance of standardized tests. The purpose of this study…

  3. Supporting Transition-Age Youth with and at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders at the Secondary Level: A Need for Further Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen L.; Carter, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    Although the task of intervening with transition-age youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) may be daunting, this area of inquiry is sorely needed. In this introductory article, the authors discuss the scarcity of available research involving students with EBD at the secondary level and the importance of meeting these students'…

  4. Exploring the Perceptions of Students Classified as Emotional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Students classified as Emotional/Behavioral Disability (EBD) face tremendous challenges in their lives on a daily basis. Is an alternative school with self-contained classes the best option for educating EBD students? How do the students feel about this educational environment? Do they perceive it as the solution to their problems, or do they see…

  5. Special Needs Characteristics of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders that Affect Inclusion in Regular Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoutjesdijk, Regina; Scholte, Evert M.; Swaab, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the discriminating special needs characteristics of children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) that predict restrictiveness of placement in special education. The focus is on dynamic factors instead of static factors. To this end, 235 children with EBD in special schools and 111 children with EBD…

  6. Factors Associated with Participation of Children with Mental Health Problems in Structured Youth Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Thomas E.; Bost, Noel S.; Lock, Eric D.; Marcenko, Maureen O.

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive community care principles emphasize the importance of positive community-based activities for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), and caregivers frequently indicate the need for recreation and after-school programs. This study examined the involvement of children with EBD in positive youth development programs and…

  7. Teacher Implementation of Trial-Based Functional Analysis and Function-Based Interventions for Students with Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Susan Dagenhart

    2012-01-01

    Children and youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or emotional and behavioral disabilities (E/BD) often exhibit challenging behavior including aggression, self-injury, non-compliance, or property destruction (Kamps, Kravits, Rauch, Kamps, & Chung, 2000; National Autism Center, 2009). As a result, students with ASD or E/BD often miss out…

  8. Teacher Perceptions of Emotional Behavior Disorder Students in a Rural High School Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Brian Craig

    2013-01-01

    Little research has examined the perceptions of special education teachers who teach students with Emotional Behavior Disorders (EBD). This study aimed to provide insight into how educators are preparing EBD students for post-high school living. The conceptual framework for the study was based on Braun's theory, which examines teachers'…

  9. Understanding Students' Interactions: Why Varied Social Tasks Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaldi, Christina M.; Kates, Allison D.; Welton, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Many social interactions between school-age children contain both competitive and cooperative elements. In order to gain a better understanding of how students at risk for emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) negotiate social exchanges in cooperative and competitive-related tasks in comparison with non-EBD students: (a) prosocial; (b)…

  10. The Lived Experiences of Teachers of Students with Emotional Behavior Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sheneka L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain an understanding of teacher attrition among the emotional and behavior disorder (EBD) student population within a self-contained environment through the lived experiences of former EBD teachers. Attrition among special education teachers has been a perennial issue. Special education teacher…

  11. Lessons Learned from Implementing Self-Regulated Strategy Development with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Alternative Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Harris, Karen R.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Mason, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) is an evidence-based intervention for use with students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). To date, there are nine studies investigating SRSD in alternative education settings, including self-contained day and residential schools, with 113 students with EBD in grades 3 through 12. A brief…

  12. Effects of the WhyTry Social Skills Program on Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Problems in an Alternative School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhite, Shannon; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2012-01-01

    Social skills training (SST) is an evidence-based intervention to help increase social competence for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), but there is limited research that addresses SST for students identified as experiencing EBD at alternative campuses. A mixed methods design was utilized to examine SST at an alternative…

  13. Examining the Effectiveness of Numbered Heads Together for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, William; Haydon, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Challenging behaviors displayed in both general education classrooms and self-contained classrooms by students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) can be a difficult challenge for novice and experienced teachers (Kennedy & Jolivette, 2008; Turnbull, Turnbull, & Wehmeyer, 2010). Furthermore, students with EBD demonstrate broad…

  14. The Effects of Disability Labels on Special Education and General Education Teachers' Referrals for Gifted Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianco, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the disability labels learning disabilities (LD) and emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) on public school general education and special education teachers' willingness to refer students to gifted programs. Results indicated that teachers were significantly influenced by the LD and EBD labels when making…

  15. Special Education Implications of Point and Cumulative Prevalence for Children with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, Steven R.; Freeman, Stephanny F. N.; Paparella, Tanya; Kauffman, James M.; Walker, Hill M.

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence of children with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) is a critical component in the discussion of underidentification of children served in special education. This discussion has previously focused almost exclusively on point prevalence or the number of children with EBD presumably needing services at any single point in time.…

  16. Themes and Dimensions of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustian, April L.; Cuenca-Sanchez, Yojanna

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are one of the most underserved populations in today's schools (Kauffman, Mock, & Simpson, 2011). Many of these students also have additional disabilities in conjunction with an EBD identification, such as Learning Disabilities (LD), Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Attention Deficit…

  17. How We Might Make Special Education for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders Less Stigmatizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.; Badar, Jeanmarie

    2013-01-01

    The authors note that identification as having emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) is generally acknowledged to be stigmatizing. The stigma associated with identification as needing special education for EBD (or any other disability) could be reduced by talking in readily understood language about differences, accepting the reality of…

  18. Corrective Reading as a Supplementary Curriculum for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Houchins, David E.; Terry, Nicole P.

    2013-01-01

    Reading deficits among students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) are well documented. One approach to addressing these deficits has been providing students with intensive and explicit reading instruction. In this study, 31 students with E/BD and reading deficits in self-contained settings were provided with 8 weeks of…

  19. Self-Regulated Strategy Development for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders in a Residential School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have academic deficits that affect their success in school; however, few researchers have investigated what strategies work best for this population, especially in the area of writing. One promising intervention to support the writing skills of students with and at-risk for E/BD is…

  20. Existing Research and Future Directions for Self-Regulated Strategy Development with Students with and at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Jolivette, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have academic deficits that affect their success in school. However, there are few research studies investigating what strategies work best for this population, especially in the area of writing. One promising intervention to support the writing skills of students with and at risk for E/BD is…

  1. Effective Teachers for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Active Ingredients Leading to Positive Teacher and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) have varied skills and abilities. Within the field there are some teachers, who teach students with E/BD by actively engaging them in learning tasks and who have few behavior problems in comparison to other teachers, who struggle with classroom management. Many researchers have found…

  2. Learned Helplessness and Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders: Deprivation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kevin S.; Singh, Nirbhay N.

    2004-01-01

    Students with emotional or behavioral disorders (E/BD) are characterized by academic deficits and classroom behavioral problems. The relationship between problem behavior and academic difficulties is complex, and some researchers have hypothesized that the classroom behavior problems of students with E/BD are responses to aversive stimuli, namely…

  3. Improving Family Involvement for Juvenile Offenders with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders and Related Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Lili

    2010-01-01

    Youth with emotional and behavioral (E/BD) and other disorders, who in many cases have not received needed interventions and supports in school, are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system. This article considers how parents of youth with E/BDs can become more involved in the process when their child is referred to juvenile court, thereby…

  4. A Literature Review of Research Quality and Effective Practices in Alternative Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flower, Andrea; McDaniel, Sara C.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Effective behavioral practices for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) are critical. Students with E/BD are often served in alternative education (AE) settings due to behavior that cannot be supported in a typical school setting or due to court adjudication based on delinquent activity. Like other settings for students with E/BD,…

  5. Struggling Readers with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders and Their Teachers: Perceptions of Corrective Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Duchaine, Ellen L.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) experience deficits in social, behavioral, and academic areas. Of great importance in the academic area is reading achievement. Students with E/BD who struggle with reading tend to have negative in-school and post-school outcomes. Due to the severity of potential outcomes, it is essential to…

  6. Promise and Possibility in Special Education Services for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders: Peacock Hill Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Adamson, Reesha; Mitchell, Barbara S.; Lierheimer, Kristin; O'Connor, Karen V.; Bailey, Natasha; Schultz, Tia; Schmidt, Carla; Jones, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an historical look at how programs and practices for students with emotional or behavior disorders (E/BD) have been evaluated since 1964, leading to a codified, although not universally recognized, set of recommendations for evaluating best practices for students with E/BD set out by The Peacock Hill Working Group (1991). The…

  7. Put Me in, Coach! A Powerful and Efficient Tier 2 Behavioral Intervention for Alternative Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Flower, Andrea; Cheney, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Students with high-incidence disabilities, including emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD), learning disabilities (LD), and mild intellectual disabilities (MID), demonstrate academic, social, and behavioral deficits to varying degrees, which places them at risk for school failure. Because students with E/BD face dire consequences, it is…

  8. Using Precorrection as a Secondary-Tier Intervention for Reducing Problem Behaviors in Instructional and Noninstructional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Schwab, James Raymond; Jolivette, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have academic, behavioral, and social characteristics that present unique needs within schools. Educators across the country are responding to the academic, behavioral, and social needs of all students, including students with E/BD, by implementing a continuum of supports across a…

  9. The Social Lives of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Self-Contained Classrooms: A Descriptive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panacek, Luanne J.; Dunlap, Glen

    2003-01-01

    Social lives of 14 children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in segregated elementary school classrooms were compared with 14 typical students in general classrooms. Children with E/BD had little opportunity to engage in integrated school activities and their school social networks were dominated by individuals affiliated with…

  10. Effective Practices/Interventions for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, Stacey Jones; Borders, Christy

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) present unique challenges to the families and educators supporting them. Even though families and educators report that behavioral issues can be identified by age 3 (Walker, Ramsey, & Gresham, 2004), the commonly used wait-and-see approach to intervening results in children with E/BD not…

  11. A Meta-Analysis of the Academic Status of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Nordness, Philip D.; Trout, Alexandra; Epstein, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Emotional/behavioral disturbance (EBD) is characterized by a range of behaviors that adversely affect a child's academic performance and cannot be explained by other sensory or health impairments. Although research has clearly demonstrated that children and youth with EBD tend to exhibit high rates of problem behavior, research on the…

  12. The Influence of Professional Development for Special Education Teachers: Self-Regulated Strategy Development in Writing for Students with Emotional Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberty, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) are well known for their challenging, demanding, unpredictable, and difficult behaviors. Many students with EBD exhibit significant academic deficits, especially in writing. Writing instruction is challenging for teachers because they lack knowledge of the writing process, strategies, and…

  13. Problems Related to Underservice of Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.; Mock, Devery R.; Simpson, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Data suggest that students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are underidentified and underserved for a variety of reasons. In response to this problem, the authors identify misinformation and provide evidence-based information regarding prevalence; discuss the role of stigma and exclusion from the EBD category and appropriate responses…

  14. Defining Administrative Support and Its Relationship to the Attrition of Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancio, Edward J.; Albrecht, Susan Fread; Johns, Beverley H.

    2013-01-01

    Special education faces serious shortages of teachers, and the area of special education teaching with the greatest shortage is in the field emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). This study was conducted to identify the perceptions of current teachers of students with EBD on the definition of and the extent and importance of administrative…

  15. Electrical characterization of defects introduced in n-Ge during electron beam deposition or exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, S. M. M.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Nel, J. M.

    2013-11-07

    Schottky barrier diodes prepared by electron beam deposition (EBD) on Sb-doped n-type Ge were characterized using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Pt EBD diodes manufactured with forming gas in the chamber had two defects, E{sub 0.28} and E{sub 0.31}, which were not previously observed after EBD. By shielding the samples mechanically during EBD, superior diodes were produced with no measureable deep levels, establishing that energetic ions created in the electron beam path were responsible for the majority of defects observed in the unshielded sample. Ge samples that were first exposed to the conditions of EBD, without metal deposition (called electron beam exposure herein), introduced a number of new defects not seen after EBD with only the E-center being common to both processes. Substantial differences were noted when these DLTS spectra were compared to those obtained using diodes irradiated by MeV electrons or alpha particles indicating that very different defect creation mechanisms are at play when too little energy is available to form Frenkel pairs. These observations suggest that when EBD ions and energetic particles collide with the sample surface, inducing intrinsic non-localised lattice excitations, they modify defects deeper in the semiconductor thus rendering them observable.

  16. Analysis of Zebrafish Larvae Skeletal Muscle Integrity with Evans Blue Dye

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Ann E.; Dowling, James

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an emerging system for the study of neuromuscular disorders. In the study of neuromuscular diseases, the integrity of the muscle membrane is a critical disease determinant. To date, numerous neuromuscular conditions display degenerating muscle fibers with abnormal membrane integrity; this is most commonly observed in muscular dystrophies. Evans Blue Dye (EBD) is a vital, cell permeable dye that is rapidly taken into degenerating, damaged, or apoptotic cells; in contrast, it is not taken up by cells with an intact membrane. EBD injection is commonly employed to ascertain muscle integrity in mouse models of neuromuscular diseases. However, such EBD experiments require muscle dissection and/or sectioning prior to analysis. In contrast, EBD uptake in zebrafish is visualized in live, intact preparations. Here, we demonstrate a simple and straightforward methodology for performing EBD injections and analysis in live zebrafish. In addition, we demonstrate a co-injection strategy to increase efficacy of EBD analysis. Overall, this video article provides an outline to perform EBD injection and characterization in zebrafish models of neuromuscular disease. PMID:26649573

  17. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education. PMID:20007494

  18. Evidence Based Design and healthcare: an unconventional approach to hospital design.

    PubMed

    Alfonsi, E; Capolongo, S; Buffoli, M

    2014-01-01

    Evidence Based Design (EBD) is a scientific analysis methodology that emphasises the use of data acquired in order to influence the design process in hospitals. It measures the physical and psychological effects of the built environment on its users. EBD uses formularization of hypothesis, testing/analyzing and outcome gathering as a framework. The design practice, in general, has always been based on a combination of legal, technical/ functional/ and aesthetical knowledge. This generalization has been shifted to another level after the implementation of EBD. In the last 30 years many case studies were collected which demonstrate the built environment's impact on users. EBD methodology can be applied to any type of building, but it is particularly used to analyze the efficiency of healthcare facilities. The Goal of this paper is to demonstrate various applications of EBD principles in healthcare buildings through case studies concerning: - reduction of infections - reduction of stress on medical staff - improved patient healing In addition to the analysis of case studies, we will also focus on official EBD researches developed by healthcare designers and professionals as "alternative solutions". These alternative "ad hoc" solutions are developed in order to answer EBD research results. The solutions that are developed from the results can answer the real needs of each hospital and improve best technological practice to reduce infection, stress and improve patient comfort. Abroad the EBD research results are studied and used by many contemporary hospital architects to develop new solutions to meet the specific requirements of any hospital project they are currently designing. This procedure demonstrates that for each outcome and key finding, there is always at least one alternative solution and, therefore, the achievement of a new hypothesis, case studies to test/measure and outcome to gather occurs. This repetitive attitude leads to a "virtuous circle" where the

  19. The deviation of light path in Einstein-Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. G.; Lu, H. Q.; Pan, P. P.

    2005-02-01

    Both Jordan-Brans-Dicke (shortened JBD) theory and Brans-Dicke theory in the Einstein’s frame (shortened EBD) are treated as Brans-Dicke theory. However, we learn that only Pauli metric represents the massless spin-two graviton and thus, should be identified as physical. If one just considers the weak field approximation and Newtonian limit, EBD theory gives the same results with Einstein’s general relativity. So, it is necessary to consider strong field effects and cosmological model. The purpose of this paper is to find the exact spherically symmetric metric in the strong field situation, and deduce the deviation of light path in EBD theory.

  20. Abgrenzung Lebensmittel - Arzneimittel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Helmut

    Angereicherte Lebensmittel (ALM), Arzneimittel (AM), Diätetische Lebensmittel (DLM), Ergänzende bilanzierte Diäten (EbD), Funktionelle Lebensmittel (FF), Lebensmittel (LM), Medizinprodukte (MP), Nahrungsergänzungsmittel (NEM), Neuartige Lebensmittel (NF).

  1. Human primordial germ cell-derived progenitors give rise to neurons and glia in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yincheng; Chen, Bin; Tao, Minfang

    2009-12-18

    We derived a cell population from cultured human primordial germ cells from early human embryos. The derivates, termed embryoid body-derived (EBD) cells, displayed an extensive capacity for proliferation and expressed a panel of markers in all three germ layers. Interestingly, EBD cells were also positive for markers of neural stem/progenitor cells, such as nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. When these cells were transplanted into the brain cavities of fetal sheep and postnatal NOD-SCID mice or nerve-degenerated tibialis anterior muscles, they readily gave rise to neurons or glial cells. To our knowledge, our data are the first to demonstrate that EBD cells can undergo further neurogenesis under suitable environments in vivo. Hence, with the abilities of extensive expansion, self-renewal, and differentiation, EBD cells may provide a useful donor source for neural stem/progenitor cells to be used in cell-replacement therapies for diseases of the nervous system.

  2. Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This article provides an Australian perspective on students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). Consideration is given to the cultural issues, structure of special services, identification procedures, delivery system, and types of services provided.

  3. Full-Length Structures of BenM and Two Variants Reveal Different Oligomerization Schemes for LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruangprasert, Ajchareeya; Craven, Sarah H.; Neidle, Ellen L.; Momany, Cory

    2010-11-30

    BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) from the bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi, responds synergistically to benzoate and cis,cis-muconate. With these effectors, BenM activates gene expression during benzoate consumption. Without effectors, BenM represses transcription. Here, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the full-length structures of BenM and two variants that activate transcription without benzoate or cis,cis-muconate: BenM(R156H) and BenM(E226K). Previous studies indicate that these regulators function as tetramers. Here, interconnections between subunits in the crystals prevented the formation of a closed oligomer and highlighted the inherent flexibility of this multidomain regulator. Nevertheless, analysis of subunit interfaces suggested the functional significance of key interactions. The structures of BenM and its variants were nearly identical, implying that transcriptional differences rely on factors beyond major conformational changes defined solely by sequence. Comparisons of BenM with other LTTRs, including unpublished structures in the Protein Data Bank, revealed extensive variation in the relative orientations of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector-binding domains (EBDs). To form dimers, different LTTRs used similar interfaces between two EBDs, each containing two subdomains: EBD-I and EBD-II. Surprisingly, the dimers used three substantially different schemes to form higher-order oligomers. In one scheme used by BenM, oligomer assembly involved contacts between the EBD-II regions and the DBD regions of adjacent subunits. In another scheme, there were no contacts between the EBDs; only the DBDs were involved in tetramer formation. In the third scheme, the oligomer interface involved DBD and EBD-I/EBD-II contacts. These diverse schemes demonstrate novel variation in the oligomeric structures of individual LTTRs within this large and important family.

  4. Identification of Important Regions for Ethylene Binding and Signaling in the Transmembrane Domain of the ETR1 Ethylene Receptor of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyi; Esch, Jeff J.; Shiu, Shin-Han; Agula, Hasi; Binder, Brad M.; Chang, Caren; Patterson, Sara E.; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2006-01-01

    The ethylene binding domain (EBD) of the Arabidopsis thaliana ETR1 receptor is modeled as three membrane-spanning helices. We surveyed ethylene binding activity in different kingdoms and performed a bioinformatic analysis of the EBD. Ethylene binding is confined to land plants, Chara, and a group of cyanobacteria but is largely absent in other organisms, consistent with our finding that EBD-like sequences are overrepresented among plant and cyanobacterial species. We made amino acid substitutions in 37 partially or completely conserved residues of the EBD and assayed their effects on ethylene binding and signaling. Mutations primarily in residues in Helices I and II midregions eliminated ethylene binding and conferred constitutive signaling, consistent with the inverse-agonist model of ethylene receptor signaling and indicating that these residues define the ethylene binding pocket. The largest class of mutations, clustered near the cytoplasmic ends of Helices I and III, gave normal ethylene binding activity yet still conferred constitutive signaling. Therefore, these residues may play a role in turning off the signal transmitter domain of the receptor. By contrast, only two mutations were loss of function with respect to signaling. These findings yield insight into the structure and function of the EBD and suggest a conserved role of the EBD as a negative regulator of the signal transmitter domain. PMID:17189345

  5. A Comparison of Preoperative Biliary Drainage Methods for Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma: Endoscopic versus Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Min; Park, Ji Won; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Lee, Kyu Taek; Shim, Sang Goon

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Controversy remains over the optimal approach to preoperative biliary drainage in patients with resectable perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. We compared the clinical outcomes of endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) with those of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) in patients undergoing preoperative biliary drainage for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods A total of 106 consecutive patients who underwent biliary drainage before surgical treatment were divided into two groups: the PTBD group (n=62) and the EBD group (n=44). Results Successful drainage on the first attempt was achieved in 36 of 62 patients (58.1%) with PTBD, and in 25 of 44 patients (56.8%) with EBD. There were no significant differences in predrainage patient demographics and decompression periods between the two groups. Procedure-related complications, especially cholangitis and pancreatitis, were significantly more frequent in the EBD group than the PTBD group (PTBD vs EBD: 22.6% vs 54.5%, p<0.001). Two patients (3.8%) in the PTBD group experienced catheter tract implantation metastasis after curative resection during the follow-up period. Conclusions EBD was associated with a higher risk of procedure-related complications than PTBD. These complications were managed properly without severe morbidity; however, in the PTBD group, there were two cases of cancer dissemination along the catheter tract. PMID:26087784

  6. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practice with regard to evidence-based dentistry among dental students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Eslamipour, Faezeh; Ghaiour, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is an approach to oral health that requires the application and examination of relevant scientific data related to the patient's oral health and his priorities. The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice of dental students of Isfahan about EBD. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 168 dental students in 3 final years of their education who engaged in clinical practice by consensus sampling were recruited. For data collection, a validated questionnaire was used. The questionnaire was consisted of demographic questions and some questions about four issues: Knowledge of self-assess (KSA), evidence-based practice, actual knowledge and attitude about EBD. Data were analyzed with t-test, one-way ANOVA, Chi-square, and linear regression with SPSS 16. Results: One hundred and thirty-six students from 168 students were filled the questionnaire. The mean of KSA was 13 ± 4.3, mean of usage of useful references in EBD was 16.9 ± 7.6. One-third of students were studied their last article in last 6 months before. The mean of actual knowledge and attitude was 7.4 ± 2.3 and 24 ± 3.8, respectively. The relation between 4 main issues was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: By considering overall interest and positive attitude toward learning EBD in dental students, it is highly recommended that practical educational courses about EBD be planned by dental faculties. PMID:27500165

  7. Repair of extrahepatic bile duct defect using a collagen patch in a Swine model.

    PubMed

    Tao, Liang; Li, Qiang; Ren, Haozhen; Chen, Bing; Hou, Xianglin; Mou, Lingjun; Zhou, Siqiao; Zhou, Jianxin; Sun, Xitai; Dai, Jianwu; Ding, Yitao

    2015-04-01

    Extrahepatic bile duct (EBD) injury can happen during surgery. To repair a defect of the EBD and prevent postoperative biliary complications, a collagen membrane was designed. The collagen material was porous, biocompatible, and degradable and could maintain its shape in bile soaking for about 4 weeks. The goal was to induce rapid bile duct tissue regeneration. Twenty Chinese experimental hybrid pigs were used in this study and divided into a patch group and a control group. A spindle-shaped defect (20 mm × 6 mm) was made in the anterior wall of the lower EBD in the swine model, and then the defect was reconstructed using a collagen patch with a drainage tube and wrapped with greater omentum. Ultrasound was performed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Liver function tests and white blood cell count (WBC) were measured. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, cytokeratin 7 immunohistochemical staining, and Van Gieson's staining of EBD were used. The diameter and thickness of the EBD at the graft site were measured. There was no significant difference in liver function tests or WBC in the patch group compared with the control group. No evidence of leakage or stricture was observed, but some pigs developed biliary sludge or stone at 4 and 8 weeks. The drainage tube was lost within 12 weeks. The neo-EBD could withstand normal biliary pressure 2 weeks after surgery. Histological study showed the accessory glands and epithelial cells gradually regenerated at graft sites from 4 weeks, with increasing vessel infiltration and decreasing inflammation. The collagen fibers became regular with full coverage of epithelial cells. The statistical analysis of diameter and thickness showed no stricture formation at the graft site, but the EBD wall was slightly thicker than in the normal bile duct due to collagen fiber deposition. The structure of the neo-EBD was similar to that of the normal EBD. The collagen membrane patch associated with a drainage tube and wrapped with greater

  8. External birth defects in southern Vietnam: a population-based study at the grassroots level of health care in Binh Thuan province

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There currently exists no data on birth defects from population-based studies in Vietnam. Our study's aim was to assess external birth defect (EBD) prevalence among live newborns in Binh Thuan Province in Vietnam with the help of health workers at all levels of the health system. Methods A 2-month training session for 452 health professionals (HP) practicing delivery care in 127 Commune Health Stations (CHS) and in 12 provincial or district hospitals (DH) was setup in 2006. After a successful 6-month pilot study, a one-year registry of EBDs was established in 2008. All live newborns were screened for EBDs within 24 hours after birth in all DH obstetric departments and in all CHSs. Trained local HPs collected information by filling out a predesigned form and by photographing the affected newborn. EBDs were coded using the International Classification of Diseases system-10, Clinical Modification. The study was repeated in 2010. Results Throughout 2010, out of a total of 13,954 newborns, 84 cases with one or more EBDs were reported, representing an overall prevalence rate of 60.2 per 10,000 live births. The most common groups of EBDs were limbs (27.2/10,000), orofacial clefts (20.1/10,000) and the central nervous system (7.9/10,000). Conclusions This first population-based study in Vietnam, which required coordination efforts at the local level, provides baseline prevalences of external birth defects. Data on EBDs from this study in southern Vietnam may be useful for setting up a regional population-based registry of birth defects in Vietnam. PMID:23631673

  9. Biochemical, molecular and behavioral phenotypes of Rab3A mutations in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yang, S.; Farias, M.; Kapfhamer, D.; Tobias, J.; Grant, G.; Abel, T.; Bućan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ras-associated binding (Rab) protein 3A is a neuronal guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein that binds synaptic vesicles and regulates synaptic transmission. A mouse mutant, earlybird (Ebd), with a point mutation in the GTP-binding domain of Rab3A (D77G), exhibits anomalies in circadian behavior and homeostatic response to sleep loss. Here, we show that the D77G substitution in the Ebd allele causes reduced GTP and GDP binding, whereas GTPase activity remains intact, leading to reduced protein levels of both Rab3A and rabphilin3A. Expression profiling of the cortex and hippocampus of Ebd and Rab3a-deficient mice revealed subtle differences between wild-type and mutant mice. Although mice were backcrossed for three generations to a C57BL/6J background, the most robust changes at the transcriptional level between Rab3a−/− and Rab3a+/+ mice were represented by genes from the 129/Sv-derived chromosomal region surrounding the Rab3a gene. These results showed that differences in genetic background have a stronger effect on gene expression than the mutations in the Rab3a gene. In behavioral tests, the Ebd/Ebd mice showed a more pronounced mutant phenotype than the null mice; Ebd/Ebd have reduced anxiety-like behavior in the elevated zero-maze test, reduced response to stress in the forced swim test and a deficit in cued fear conditioning (FC), whereas Rab3a−/− showed only a deficit in cued FC. Our data implicate Rab3A in learning and memory as well as in the regulation of emotion. A combination of forward and reverse genetics has provided multiple alleles of the Rab3a gene; our studies illustrate the power and complexities of the parallel analysis of these alleles at the biochemical, molecular and behavioral levels. PMID:16734774

  10. Thinking Developmentally: The Next Evolution in Models of Health.

    PubMed

    Garner, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    As the basic sciences that inform conceptions of human health advance, so must the models that are used to frame additional research, to teach the next generation of providers, and to inform health policy. This article briefly reviews the evolution from a biomedical model to a biopsychosocial (BPS) model and to an ecobiodevelopmental (EBD) model. Like the BPS model, the EBD model reaffirms the biological significance of psychosocial features within the patient's ecology, but it does so at the molecular and cellular levels. More importantly, the EBD model adds the dimension of time, forcing providers to "think developmentally" and to acknowledge the considerable biological and psychological consequences of previous experiences. For the health care system to move from a reactive "sick care" system to a proactive "well care" system, all providers must begin thinking developmentally by acknowledging the dynamic but cumulative dance between nature and nurture that drives development, behavior, and health, not only in childhood, but across the lifespan. PMID:27429356

  11. Increasing the on-task homework behavior of youth with behavior disorders using functional behavioral assessment.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Renee O; Axelrod, Michael I

    2008-11-01

    Research has shown a positive correlation between time spent on homework and learning. However, students often engage in off-task behaviors to escape the demands of homework. Youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) are especially likely to engage in off-task behaviors. Effective interventions to increase on-task behavior during homework are needed to increase students' academic success. Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures may be helpful for intervention planning; however, there has been limited research on use of FBA with youth with EBD experiencing poor academic performance or task completion problems. In the current study, FBA methods were used to identify the contingencies maintaining the off-task behavior of four youth with behavior problems. Effects of interventions based on functional hypotheses were compared to the effects of interventions not linked to such hypotheses. Discussion focuses on utility of FBA procedures for developing and implementing effective interventions for youth with EBD. PMID:18490267

  12. Therapeutic Ultrasound Enhancement of Drug Delivery to Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, George; Wang, Peng; Lewis, George; Olbricht, William

    2009-04-01

    Effects of exposure to 1.58 MHz focused ultrasound on transport of Evans Blue Dye (EBD) in soft tissues are investigated when an external pressure gradient is applied to induce convective flow through the tissue. The magnitude of the external pressure gradient is chosen to simulate conditions in brain parenchyma during convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) to the brain. EBD uptake and transport are measured in equine brain, avian muscle and agarose brain-mimicking phantoms. Results show that ultrasound enhances EBD uptake and transport, and the greatest enhancement occurs when the external pressure gradient is applied. The results suggest that exposure of the brain parenchyma to ultrasound could enhance penetration of material infused into the brain during CED therapy.

  13. Evidence-based design for healthcare in post-katrina new orleans: current dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Verderber, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    New Orleans continues to struggle to rebuild from the devastation inflicted by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. More than 1,800 perished in its aftermath. Katrina stands as the costliest catastrophe in U.S. history, and the city's healthcare infrastructure is similarly striving to resuscitate itself. The incorporation of evidence-based design and research (EBD&R) in the reconstitution of the city's healthcare infrastructure offers a promising direction to improve healthcare outcomes. Recent efforts to incorporate EBD&R in New Orleans' recovery are summarized. EBD&R interventions are needed that take certain key dilemmas into consideration-embracing the adaptive reuse possibilities of historic healthcare facilities, private-public sector collaborations in acute care and in neighborhood-based outpatient care environments, and interventions to serve the city's growing population of medically underserved residents. PMID:21161902

  14. Sparkling extreme-ultraviolet bright dots observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Régnier, S.; Alexander, C. E.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; Korreck, K. E.; Weber, M.; Mitchell, N.; Platt, S.; De Pontieu, B.; Title, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Kuzin, S.; DeForest, C. E.

    2014-04-01

    Observing the Sun at high time and spatial scales is a step toward understanding the finest and fundamental scales of heating events in the solar corona. The high-resolution coronal (Hi-C) instrument has provided the highest spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in the EUV wavelength range to date. Hi-C observed an active region on 2012 July 11 that exhibits several interesting features in the EUV line at 193 Å. One of them is the existence of short, small brightenings 'sparkling' at the edge of the active region; we call these EUV bright dots (EBDs). Individual EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength; however, they can be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA, which suggests a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on their frequency in the Hi-C time series, we define four different categories of EBDs: single peak, double peak, long duration, and bursty. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale, trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV heating events at the base of these coronal loops, which have a free magnetic energy of the order of 10{sup 26} erg.

  15. Steroid Administration is Effective to Prevent Strictures After Endoscopic Esophageal Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjin; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal stricture is a severe adverse event after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Steroid administration is a new method to prevent stricture formation. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of steroid administration to prevent esophageal stricture after circumferential ESD. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Database, and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Studies on steroid administration + endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) versus EBD alone for esophageal stricture were included and pooled analyzed in random-effects models. Besides, subgroup analysis and network analysis were performed to define the influence of ESD type and steroid administration method. Twelve studies involving 513 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that steroid administration significantly achieved a lower stricture rate (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20–0.81) and less required EBD sessions (mean difference [MD], −4.33; 95% CI, −6.10 to −2.57) than control. Subgroup analysis indicated that steroid was effective after both semi- and complete circumferential ESD. Network meta-analysis showed that compared with oral steroid, local injected steroid had a similar effect to prevent stricture (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.48–2.85), whereas a better effect to reduce required EBD sessions (MD, 7.77; 95%CI, 0.26–15.3). Additional steroid administration is effective to reduce the stricture rate and required EBD sessions. And local injected steroid was superior to oral steroid in EBD reduction, whereas due to the varied method and dose of steroid administration, the finding needs to be clarified in the future. PMID:26426665

  16. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. PMID:25697199

  17. The role of stents in the treatment of Crohn’s disease strictures

    PubMed Central

    Loras Alastruey, Carme; Andújar Murcia, Xavier; Esteve Comas, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Stenosis is one of the most frequent local complications in Crohn’s disease (CD). Surgery is not the ideal treatment because of the high rate of postoperative recurrence. Endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) currently is the current treatment of choice for short strictures amenable to the procedure. However, it is not applicable or effective in all the cases, and it is not without related complications. Our goal was to summarize the published information regarding the use and the role of the stents in the treatment of CD stricture. A Medline search was performed on the terms “stricture,” “stenosis,” “stent” and “Crohn’s disease.” Results: a total of 19 publications met our search criteria for an overall number of 65 patients. Placing a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) may be a safe and effective alternative to EBD and/or surgical intervention in the treatment of short stenosis in patients with CD. Indications are the same as those for EBD. In addition, SEMS may be useful in stenosis refractory to EBD and may be suitable in the treatment of longer or more complex strictures that cannot be treated by EBD. With the current information, it seems that the best treatment option is the placement of a fully covered stent for a mean time of 4 weeks. Regarding the use of biodegradable stents, the information is limited and showing poor results. Conclusions: the use of stents in the treatment of strictures in CD should be taken into account either as a first endoscopic therapy or in case of EBD failure. PMID:27014743

  18. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian Cang; Li, Rui; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng

    2015-04-01

    The critical pulse width (τc) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (Ef) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (EBD) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854-857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τc is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (td) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τc: (1) EBD is lower than Ef; (2) td of bulk breakdown is shorter than td of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τc are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τc is expected to increase: (1) factors causing EBD to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower EBD; (2) factors causing Ef to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing EBD and Ef to increase together, but Ef increases faster than EBD, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τc for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τc on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  19. EGFR, COX2, p-AKT expression and PIK3CA mutation in distal extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ahrim; Chin, Susie; Kim, Hee Kyung; Kwak, Jeong Ja; Koh, Eun Suk; Kim, Youn Wha; Jang, Kee-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Distal extrahepatic bile duct (EBD) carcinoma is a rare but highly aggressive malignant neoplasm. Some in vitro studies have shown that EGFR and PI3K-Akt pathway play an important role in the carcinogenesis of bile duct carcinoma. The aim of the present study is to investigate the expression of EGFR, p-AKT, and COX-2 and the mutation of PIK3CA in distal EBD carcinoma and evaluate the association with clinicopathological factors. Ninety cases of distal extrahepatic bile duct (EBD) carcinoma specimens were studied. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) using antibodies against EGFR, p-AKT, and COX-2 was performed on TMA blocks. The PIK3CA mutation was evaluated using the PNAClamp Detection Kit from DNA samples extracted from formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue. EGFR expression of distal EBD carcinomas was 61.9%, 26.2%, 6.0% and 6.0% in the negative, weakly positive, moderately positive, and strongly positive groups, respectively. Positive EGFR expression showed significant relationships with high T stage (p = 0.024). In Kaplan-Meier analysis, EGFR expression was associated with shorter cancer-specific overall survival (p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis also showed that moderate or strong (2+ or 3+) EGFR expression was a significant prognostic factor in distal EBD carcinoma: HR 5.286; p = 0.001. Ninety cases of EBD carcinoma tissue were analysed for hotspot mutations (exon 9 and 20) in the PIK3CA gene. Only one mutation was detected: a missense mutation of H1047 at exon 20. The expression levels of p-AKT and COX-2 showed no association with any clinicopathological parameters, including survival rate. Moderate and strong EGFR expressions demonstrate a direct link to poor prognosis. Although further study is warranted to understand the clinicopathological significance, our finding suggests EGFR is a useful prognostic marker of patients with distal EBD carcinoma. A low prevalence of PIK3CA mutation exists in the distal EBD carcinoma of Korean patients, indicating that

  20. Stakeholders' Voices: Defining Needs of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Transitioning between School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Rohanna; Nese, Rhonda N. T.; Clark, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) too often do not receive adequate services or care in their school settings, particularly during transitions in educational placements. In addition, school support teams often struggle with creating transition plans that honor the needs of students with input from key stakeholders responsible…

  1. Measuring Technology and Engineering Literacy in the Engineering by Design™ Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Tanner; Burke, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Engineering byDesign™ (EbD) provides teachers and students with reflective, formative, and comprehensive summative assessment tools throughout the curriculum. Each lesson, unit, and course is created with a list of essential questions that are meant to guide students to a deeper understanding of national standards across the STEM domains (STL,…

  2. Educating Juveniles with Disabilities in Correctional Settings. Fifth CCBD Mini-Library Series: Meeting the Diverse Needs of Children and Youth with E/BD--Evidence-Based Programs and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Mayer, Matthew J.

    This monograph addresses issues in the appropriate education of children and youth with disabilities, especially emotional and/or behavioral disorders, who are in juvenile correctional facilities. An introductory chapter considers the characteristics of students with E/BD in the public schools; educational services in juvenile corrections; and…

  3. Teacher Involvement in the Development of Function-Based Behaviour Intervention Plans for Students with Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Sue; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This article examines literature published since 1997 on functional behaviour assessment (FBA) and behaviour intervention plans (BIPs), involving school-based personnel, for children identified as having or being at risk of emotional/behavioural disorder (E/BD) in school settings. Of interest was the level of involvement of school-based personnel…

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Child Behavior Checklist 1.5-5 in a Sample of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolfi, Vincent; Magyar, Caroline I.; Dill, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Validity studies of measures for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) for use with preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are lacking. The Child Behavior Checklist 1.5-5 (CBCL; Achenbach and Rescorla, Manual for the ASEBA Preschool Forms & Profiles. VT: University of Vermont, Research Center for Children, Youth, and Families,…

  5. Curriculum and Assessment Policies and Practices in a Day Treatment Center in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Kimberly Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative single case study was to describe current instructional policies and practices in a one-day treatment center in North Carolina for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The following research questions guided the study: (1) What are the curriculum policies, practices, and philosophies of day…

  6. The Effects of Praise Notes on the Disruptive Behaviors of Elementary Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Residential Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Christina

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of two secondary tier positive behavioral support strategies, teacher praise notes (TPNs) and peer praise notes (PPNs), were investigated using an alternating treatments single-subject design in residential classroom settings with eight elementary students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in grades one…

  7. Preparing Teachers for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disabilities in Professional Development Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belknap, Nancy; Mosca, Frank J.

    This paper describes George Washington University's Teacher Preparation Programs for Children with Emotional Disturbance, which uses a Professional Development School (PDS) model to deepen understanding about the specific needs of students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) and prepare outstanding classroom teachers. Goals are to improve…

  8. Measuring Implementation of Evidence-Based Programs Targeting Young Children at Risk for Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Conceptual Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kevin S.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Conroy, Maureen A.; Cox, Julia R.

    2013-01-01

    Young children with and at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) present challenges for early childhood teachers. Evidence-based programs designed to address these young children's behavior problems exist, but there are a number of barriers to implementing these programs in early childhood settings. Advancing the science of treatment…

  9. Effects of Aligning Self-Management Interventions with Functional Behavioral Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard P.; Kamps, Debra M.

    2009-01-01

    The differential effects of interventions aligned with indicated and non-indicated behavioral function were studied. Disruptive behavior of a fourth grade child at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) was assessed through functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures. Following the FBA, three interventions were designed, only one…

  10. Capacity and Opportunity: Predicting Engagement for Middle School Students with Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, Marsha Dempsey; Martin, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the capacity and opportunity scores of 36 middle school students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) on the student version of the "American Institutes for Research (AIR) Self-Determination Scale" across three school engagement factors: grade point averages (GPA), school absences, and frequency of school…

  11. Review of Video Modeling with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sonia D.; Lang, Russell; O'Reilly, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often engage in behavior that is disruptive in the classroom, impedes educational progress, and inhibits peer relationships. Video modeling has been demonstrated to be an effective intervention for other challenging populations (e.g., autism) and has been identified as a feasible intervention…

  12. Teaching Academic Skills as an Answer to Behavioural Problems of Students with Emotional or Behavioural Disorders: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2014-01-01

    Academic learning has always been a serious issue for students with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) and their teachers. However, teaching academic skills could be an important protective and curative factor for the problem behaviour of these students. The current review was conducted to study the effect of interventions developed to…

  13. Assessment of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotts, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment and identification of children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) is complex and involves multiple techniques, levels, and participants. While federal law sets the general parameters for identification in school settings, these criteria are vague and may lead to inconsistencies in selection and interpretation of assessment…

  14. Functional Behavioral Assessment-Based Interventions for Students with or at Risk for Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders in School: A Hierarchical Linear Modeling Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Lewis, Timothy J.; Stichter, Janine P.

    2012-01-01

    Of the myriad practices currently utilized for students with disabilities, particularly students with or at risk for emotional and/or behavioral disorder (EBD), functional behavior assessment (FBA) is a practice with an emerging solid research base. However, the FBA research base relies on single-subject design (SSD) and synthesis has relied on…

  15. Accessing the General Education Math Curriculum for Secondary Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccini, Paula; Strickland, Tricia; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Malmgren, Kimber

    2008-01-01

    In all educational settings, youth with disabilities, particularly those with learning disability (LD) and emotional behavioral disability (EBD), frequently have difficulties in mathematics. For teachers to provide students with access to the grade-level curriculum, a reliance on empirically validated instruction is essential. In this paper, the…

  16. Considering Systematic Direct Observation after a Century of Research--Commentary on the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine P.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Systematic Direct Observation (SDO) has played a pivotal role in the field of Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders (EBD) since its inception as a key part of understanding more about the behaviors, contexts that impact them, and the effective supports necessary for this population. This methodology is an ongoing charge for everyone. The authors…

  17. "Teacher, It's Just like What Happens at My House"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verden, Claire E.; Hickman, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a sixteen-week, read-aloud intervention conducted using culturally and experientially-relevant literature with six urban middle school youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), to facilitate prosocial skill development through opportunities for personal reflection and sharing through journaling and group…

  18. Are Social Competence Difficulties Caused by Performance or Acquisition Deficits? The Importance of Self-Regulatory Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumpel, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted three studies which examined the performance vs. skill acquisition model of social skills deficits. In Study 1, baseline social behaviors for a random sample of 12 boys with comorbid emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), learning disabilities (LD), language delays, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) revealed that…

  19. Teaching Paragraph Composition to Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders Using the Simultaneous Prompting Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Tina Marlene; Hinkson-Lee, Kim; Collins, Belva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the simultaneous prompting procedure in teaching paragraph composition to 4, 5th grade students identified with emotional behavioral disorder (EBD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The instructor taught students how to construct and proofread a 5-sentence paragraph…

  20. Training Paraeducators to Implement a Group Contingency Protocol: Direct and Collateral Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Fallon, Lindsay M.; Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; Ruberto, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of an intensive training protocol on levels of paraeducator fidelity to a group contingency intervention used to manage the classroom behavior of students with EBD. A multiple baseline design across classrooms was used to determine whether the training was associated with initial and sustained increases…

  1. Science Instruction for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrien, William J.; Taylor, Jonte C.; Watt, Sarah; Kaldenberg, Erica R.

    2014-01-01

    This review examined classroom science instruction for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A total of 11 group and single-subject studies were analyzed. Across all group studies, a conservatively calculated mean effect size of 0.471 was obtained indicating the interventions as a whole had at least a small to moderate impact on…

  2. Peer Relations and Emotion Regulation of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties with and without a Developmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Sasha; Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen; Cobham, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) and those who also have developmental disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), can experience the same adverse consequences in their peer interactions and relationships. This present study compared the emotion regulation and peer…

  3. Transition Tips for Educators Working with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) have had difficulties in achieving educational, vocational, and community outcomes that would lead to personal success and satisfaction. Some of these outcomes relate to how special education transition programs integrate effective approaches to support success with these students. In this…

  4. Function-Based Planning for Young Children at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahgahgwon, Kari N.; Umbreit, John; Liaupsin, Carl J.; Turton, Amina M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of function-based intervention for young children at-risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in inclusive environments. Participants were two kindergarten students and one first-grade student, all of whom exhibited chronic disruptive behavior in the classroom despite previous interventions implemented…

  5. Teachers Working Together: How to Communicate, Collaborate, and Facilitate Positive Behavior in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chan; Weiss, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of a school wide positive behavior intervention and support (PBIS) framework is well established as a beneficial model for the majority of students taught in general education classrooms (e.g., Bradshaw, Mitchell, & Leaf, 2010). Some students, whether at-risk for or school-identified with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) or other…

  6. The Effects of a Dog Reading Visitation Program on Academic Engagement Behavior in Three Elementary Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities: A Single Case Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassette, Laura A.; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) struggle with behavioral problems during reading activities in school. One way to address these concerns may be through dog reading programs which are increasing in popularity in schools and libraries. Preliminary anecdotal research suggests dog reading programs may improve…

  7. What Are They Thinking? The Moral Judgment of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe the moral judgment of 12 third- through fifth-grade children with and without emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and to explore how feelings affected their thought processes. Data were gathered via three individually conducted moral dilemma interviews with each child participant. These procedures produced…

  8. The Impact of Teaching Self-Determination Skills on the On-Task and Off-Task Behaviors of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, John R.; Shogren, Karrie A.

    2014-01-01

    A multiple baseline across participants design was used to examine the functional relation between the "Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction" (SDLMI) intervention and the on- and off-task behaviors of high school students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The results showed that all four students significantly…

  9. Early Intervention for Young Children at Risk for Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Implications for Policy and Practice. From the Mini-Library Series on Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Wesley; And Others

    This monograph is intended to encourage policy formation and appropriate interventions for young children with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD). After an introductory chapter, the second chapter analyzes policy within the areas of both behavioral disorders and early intervention, including existing labels and eligibility criteria, reluctance…

  10. Validation of the Ford Score as a Measure for Predicting the Level of Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Mainstream Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Anna; Ford, Tamsin

    2008-01-01

    Emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) are common in children, and forecasting their prevalence in schools is of interest to both academic researchers and local authorities. Percentage of pupils eligible for free school meals is one measure often used for this purpose. The article presents the first independent validation of a simple…

  11. A Comparison of the Instructional Context for Students with Behavioral Issues Enrolled in Self-Contained and General Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Moore Partin, Tara C.; Robertson, Rachel; Oliver, Reginal M.

    2011-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are often placed into self-contained settings to provide more focused academic and behavioral supports. Little is known, however, about differences in the instructional contexts of self-contained and general education classrooms. Using direct observation and self-report measures, the present…

  12. Direct Observation of Teacher and Student Behavior in School Settings: Trends, Issues and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J.; Scott, Terrance M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Wills, Howard P.

    2014-01-01

    Across the modern history of the field of special education and emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD), direct observation of student and educator behavior has been an essential component of the diagnostic process, student progress monitoring, and establishing functional and statistical relationships within research. This article provides an…

  13. Intellectual, Academic, and Behavioral Functioning of Students with High-Incidence Disabilities: A Cross-Categorical Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabornie, Edward J.; Cullinan, Douglas; Osborne, Susan S.; Brock, Lynne B.

    2005-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 58 studies was performed in which IQ, academic achievement, and behavior characteristics were examined across students with learning disabilities (LD), mild intellectual disabilities (MID), and emotional/behavioral disabilities (E/BD). The effect sizes between students with LD and MID were the largest in the domains of IQ and…

  14. What Affects Academic Functioning in Secondary Special Education Students with Serious Emotional and/or Behavioral Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.; Blader, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Concern is growing over the limited academic progress in special education students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD). We know little about how academic and behavioral factors interact in these students to affect their academic functioning. Therefore, potential associations were investigated over the course of one school year for…

  15. Role Models, Approaches to Studying, and Self-Efficacy in Forensic and Mainstream High School Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, Michael; Dede, Yemi U.; Moneta, Giovanni B.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between role models, approaches to studying, and self-efficacy in students attending a high school specialising in educating those with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD, n = 30) and students attending a mainstream high school (n = 41) in the UK. Types and quantity of role models held by students…

  16. Social Acceptability of Five Screening Instruments for Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Judith R.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Reynolds, Cecil R.

    2013-01-01

    Social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) screening occurs in only two percent of our schools. This is unfortunate because universal screening is linked to prevention and early intervention with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in children and youth, a population who continues to experience a plethora of poor outcomes. The social…

  17. Mindfulness for Students Classified with Emotional/Behavioral Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malow, Micheline S.; Austin, Vance L.

    2016-01-01

    A six-week investigation utilizing a standard mindfulness for adolescents curriculum and norm-based standardized resiliency scale was implemented in a self-contained school for students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (E/BD). Informal integration of mindfulness activities into a classroom setting was examined for ecological appropriateness and…

  18. Mathematics Instructional Practices and Assessment Accommodations by Secondary Special and General Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccini, Paula; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin

    2006-01-01

    A nationwide random sample of 179 secondary general education math and special education teachers completed a survey asking them about their use of specific instructional practices to help teach math to students with learning disabilities (LD) and emotional/behavioral disorders (EB/D) and their use of specific assessment accommodations with these…

  19. Perspectives on Select Field-Based Experiences for Pre-Service Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioural Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Maureen N.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2013-01-01

    The proficiency with which teachers of students with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) plan for, provide instructional activities, and address the challenging behaviour of their students is influenced by the nature of their preservice teacher preparation. The purpose of this study was to examine educators' perceptions of the…

  20. Teaching Disturbed and Disturbing Students: An Integrative Approach. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zionts, Paul

    This book examines intervention with children having emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD), through the use of many case studies, activities, and examples. The text is organized in a developmental manner, with behavioral interventions recommended for lower grades and cognitive-behavioral approaches recommended for older students. The first unit…

  1. Social Skills Training in Natural Play Settings: Educating through the Physical Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljadeff-Abergel, Elian; Ayvazo, Shiri; Eldar, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    Social skills are prerequisite to academic performance and success in school. Training of these skills is particularly important for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who have social deficits and struggle maintaining appropriate and accepted behavior in and outside of the classroom. Educating through the "physical" model is a…

  2. Filling in the Gaps: Funding Services To Support Youth and Young Adults as They Transition into Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimac, Douglas J.; Davis, Cliff; Fick, Kristy; Clark, Hewitt B.; Deschenes, Nicole

    This study investigated the various funding sources used by programs which serve and support youth and young adults with emotional and/or behavioral disabilities (EBD) as they transition into adulthood. Initial data from a survey of 18 program sites in Florida that are serving this target population resulted in the identification of more than 40…

  3. The innervation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver: protein gene product 9.5 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivities

    PubMed Central

    ESTEBAN, F. J.; JIMÉNEZ, A.; BARROSO, J. B.; PEDROSA, J. A.; DEL MORAL, M. L.; RODRIGO, J.; PEINADO, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We have explored the innervation of the rainbow trout (O. mykiss) liver using immunohistochemical procedures and light microscopy to detect in situ protein gene product 9.5 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivities (PGP-IR and NOS-IR). The results showed PGP-IR nerve fibres running with the extralobular biliary duct (EBD), hepatic artery (EHA) and portal vein (EPV) that form the hepatic hilum, as well as following the spatial distribution of the intrahepatic blood vessel and biliary channels. These nerve fibres appear as single varicose processes, thin bundles, or thick bundles depending on their diameter and location in the wall of the blood vessel or biliary duct. No PGP-IR fibres were detected in the liver parenchyma. NOS-IR nerve fibres were located only in the vessels and ducts that form the hepatic hilum (EBD, EHA, EPV); in addition, NOS-IR nerve cell bodies were found isolated or forming ganglionated plexuses in the peribiliary fibromuscular tissue of the EBD. No PGP-IR ganglionated plexuses were detected in the EBD. The location of the general (PGP-IR) and nitrergic (nNOS-IR) intrinsic nerves of the trout liver suggest a conserved evolutionary role of the nervous control of hepatic blood flow and hepatobiliary activity. PMID:9827640

  4. Best Practices in Programs for Children with Emotional Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bak, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) are educated in restrictive placements at higher rates than students in other disability categories due to their challenging behavior and inability to function in the general educational environment (Bullock & Gable, 2006). The increasing utilization of alternative programming to educate…

  5. Improving the Way We Think about Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Kelley S.

    2009-01-01

    Teacher preparation programs provide preservice teachers with evidence-based teaching strategies, skills of behavior management, and various field experiences. The greatest learning however, is acquired the very first year of instruction in the teacher's own classroom. Teaching students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) may prove to…

  6. From High School to Juvenile Corrections: The Downward Spiral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueter, Jessica A.; Trice, John Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) require pervasive supports that are typically addressed through behavior intervention plans. This article illustrates one student's ("Mark") journey from the general education high school campus, to an alternative discipline campus, and subsequent placement at a juvenile corrections setting. Also,…

  7. A Qualitative Study of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities under NCLB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Lisa H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to find out if No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has affected the academic achievement rates of students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). This qualitative phenomenological study explored perceptions of both regular education and special education teachers on the achievement rate…

  8. Twenty-Four Months after High School: Paths Taken by Youth Diagnosed with Severe Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigmond, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    The author located students with severe emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who had been assigned to separate day schools with partial hospitalization treatment facilities because their public school programs did not sufficiently meet their needs, then conducted interviews at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postsecondary school as part of a large…

  9. Engaged Time in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns E., Beverly H.; Crowley, Paula; Guetzloe, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    Foremost in an effective curriculum for students with emotional and behavioral disorder (E/BD) is a high level of engaged time--time spent doing meaningful learning activities. Engaged time (time-on-task) is the portion of instructional time that students spend directly involved in learning activities. Walker and Severson (1992) defined the…

  10. Comparison of Repeated and Two Non-Repeated Readings Conditions on Reading Abilities of Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escarpio, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) present considerable academic challenges along with emotional and/or behavioral problems. In terms of reading, these students typically perform one-to-two years below grade level (Kauffman, 2001). Given the strong correlation between reading failure and school failure and overall success…

  11. Increasing the on-Task Homework Behavior of Youth with Behavior Disorders Using Functional Behavioral Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Renee O.; Axelrod, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    Research has shown a positive correlation between time spent on homework and learning. However, students often engage in off-task behaviors to escape the demands of homework. Youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) are especially likely to engage in off-task behaviors. Effective interventions to increase on-task behavior during homework…

  12. Behaviour Recovery. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This second edition of Behaviour Recovery puts emphasis on teaching behaviour concerning children with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD). These children have many factors in their lives that affect their behaviour over which schools have limited control. This book acknowledges the challenge and explores the practical realities, options and…

  13. Creating Opportunities for Success in College Settings for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Justin T.; Pruitt, Beth Anne

    2005-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are completing high school with standard diplomas, and it is imperative that educators explore all of the available postsecondary settings in which these students may be successful. Although college settings may not be the focus of transition efforts for many students…

  14. Positive Behavior Support in the Classroom: Facilitating Behaviorally Inclusive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Terrance M.; Park, Kristy Lee; Swain-Bradway, Jessica; Landers, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Teaching in a public school is a demanding job as the multiple dynamics of a classroom can be a challenge. In addition to addressing the challenging behaviors that many students without disabilities exhibit, more and more students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are being included in the general education classroom. Effective…

  15. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of postsurgical intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, Neven; Bisćanin, Alen; Nikić, Ines; Budimir, Ivan; Nikolić, Marko; Pavić, Tajana

    2013-09-01

    Strictures are one of the most common complications of Crohn's disease. If symptomatic and resistant to medical anti-inflammatory therapy, and especially in cases of acute obstruction, surgical correction may be unavoidable. Although surgical treatment is dramatically effective in curing Crohn's disease strictures, a high rate of postsurgical restenosis has been recognized, ultimately requiring additional surgery. To avoid the risks and costs entailed by repeated surgical resection, endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) has been proposed as a conservative treatment option for intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease, in which the stricture is pneumatically dilated with through-the-scope balloons of different diameters. The main clinical indication for EBD is the appearance of obstructive symptoms associated with the stricture, especially if they are postoperative and shorter than 4 centimeters. Usually more than one dilatation session is required for every stricture. EBD is applied infrequently, possibly due to the perceived risk of perforation and early stricture recurrence, but studies have demonstrated that EBD has a high success rate, a low chance of complications, excellent symptomatic response, as well as good short-term and long-term outcomes, proving that it is a relatively simple and successful technique that provides long-term effective palliation of the symptoms with minimal risk in patients with simple strictures, and offers a reasonable alternative to surgery. PMID:24558771

  16. The Effects of Function-Based Self-Management Interventions on Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard P.; Kamps, Debra M.; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) struggle to achieve social and academic outcomes. Many studies have demonstrated self-management interventions to be effective at reducing problem behavior and increasing positive social and academic behaviors. Functional behavior assessment (FBA) information may be used in designing…

  17. Self-Determination Prospects of Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities: Divergent Perspectives and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey; Owens, Laura; Sweden, Beth; Sun, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Promoting student self-determination has emerged as a key component of recommended practices in the field of secondary transition. This article examined the self-determination prospects of 196 youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), learning disabilities (LD), and mild/moderate cognitive disabilities (CD) using the "AIR…

  18. Special Education Teachers' Perceptions of Students with Emotional Impairments and Their Same-Sex Behaviors: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrieta, Stefanie A.; Palladino, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent trends in educational research have addressed the educational plight of LGBT [lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, and queer/questioning] students, a dearth of literature exists about the subpopulation of LGBT youth with disabilities, namely those with verified emotional-behavior disorders (EBDs). Discussions throughout what…

  19. BEST in CLASS: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  20. Preservice Teachers' Self Efficacy and Knowledge of Emotional and Behavioural Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillingford, Shani; Karlin, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    This research examined preservice teachers' knowledge of emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) and their sense of efficacy. The participants included a convenience sample of 230 undergraduate general education and special education preservice teachers enrolled in teacher education classes. The age of the participants ranged from 19 to 51…

  1. Best Practices to Support Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Kelley S.; Michaud, Kim M.

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act" mandates that teachers employ evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the classroom in order to improve student performance. For students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) to be successful, particularly in inclusive settings, the most salient practices would probably be those promoting classroom organization…

  2. Special Education Teacher Preparation in Classroom Management: Implications for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Regina M.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Special education teachers' skills with classroom organization and behavior management affect the emergence and persistence of behavior problems as well as the success of inclusive practice for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Adequate special education teacher preparation and strong classroom organization and behavior…

  3. Self-Determination Interventions for Students with and at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Mapping the Knowledge Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Crnobori, Mary; Bruhn, Allison L.; Oakes, Wendy P.

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the association between self-determination and improved educational and postschool outcomes for children and youth with or at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), increased attention has focused on efforts to promote the skills and attitudes that enhance self-determination. We conducted a comprehensive, systematic review…

  4. Rediscovering the Art of Developmental Therapy: An Interview with Mary M. Wood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teagarden, James M.; Kaff, Marilyn S.; Zabel, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Mary Margaret Wood is best known for developing psychoeducational programs that integrate mental health and special education interventions for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Developmental Therapy (DT) includes comprehensive assessment of student behavior, communication, social, and cognitive development,…

  5. Early Identification of Middle School At-Risk Students with Learning and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Lisa J.

    2004-01-01

    Culturally and linguistically diverse students with learning disorders (LD) and emotional or behavioral disorders (E/BD) have higher school dropout rates than their peers with and without disabilities. The primary purpose of this study was to determine how early potential dropouts could be identified. Research questions included the following: (a)…

  6. Prediction of Dropout among Students with Mild Disabilities: A Case for the Inclusion of Student Engagement Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reschly, Amy L.; Christenson, Sandra L.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the engagement of students with learning disabilities and emotional disturbance and the relation of this engagement to school completion. Participants were parent-identified students with learning disabilities (LD) and emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) and comparison groups of average-achieving peers and students without…

  7. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: Effects of Group Contingency Programs in Urban Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard P.; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Laylin, Jeff; Szoke, Carolyn; Petrillo, Tai; Culey, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention for whole classes, and for students with disruptive behaviors who are at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). The CW-FIT program includes four elements designed from…

  8. The Interface between Mental Health Providers, Families, and Schools: Parent and Child Attitudes about Information-Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Vuppala, Aparna; Lamps, Christopher; Miller, Terri L.; Thrush, Carol R.

    2006-01-01

    Youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are at an increased risk for school problems and negative consequences into adulthood, increasing the need for collaboration between families, school personnel and mental health providers. Current treatment guidelines emphasize the importance of information-sharing between providers and schools,…

  9. Validating Curriculum-Based Measurement for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fore, Cecil, III; Boon, Richard T.; Burke, Mack D.; Martin, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concurrent validity of curriculum-based measurement (CBM) for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in middle school using the Maze (MAZE); Oral Reading Fluency (ORF); and the "Woodcock-Johnson, Third Edition" (WJ-III), Passage Comprehension (WJ-PC) and Reading Fluency (WJ-RF)…

  10. Teachers' Perceptions of the Concomitance of Emotional Behavioural Difficulties and Learning Disabilities in Children Referred for Learning Disabilities in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Kazem, Ali Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented overlapping and coexisting characteristics of learning disabilities (LD) and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD). Such concomitance may impact teacher referrals of children at risk for LD which in turn may influence service delivery. Using the Learning Disabilities Diagnostic Inventory (LDDI) and the Strengths and…

  11. Associations between Social Potential and Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Egyptian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    A number of Egyptian children experience psychiatric or mental health problems owing to a variety of internal and external qualities in their social context. These problems may mask strengths, particularly their social potential represented in their prosocial behaviour (PB). Research on emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBDs) should thus…

  12. Current Educational Practices in Classifying and Serving Students with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gail B.; Smith, Thomas J.; Bolt, Sara E.; Nolten, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Current educational practices for classifying and serving students with mental health disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been associated with specific problems. These include the stigma of labeling, misalignment of school-based categories (e.g., E/BD, OHI) with clinical diagnoses, and concerns regarding the provision of…

  13. The Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Primary School Children with Poor Attendance Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Two complementary studies of poor and better attenders are presented. To measure emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) different teacher-completed rating scales were employed, and to determine social difficulties, the studies used sociometry and some items from the scales. One study had a longitudinal design. It revealed that, after…

  14. Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Different Learning Environments: Academic and Self-Concept Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisolm, Terrence Ranier

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) perform poorly both academically and behaviorally, and this performance tends not to improve over time. There is a need to understand the effect of learning environments on the academic achievement and self-concept of this population. In this quantitative, archival study, academic achievement…

  15. Influence of Peer Buddy Program Interventions for Adolescents with Disabilities in a High School Setting: Impact on Social and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqahtani, Ragea Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    A mixed methods research design was chosen for this study in order to examine the effectiveness of the Peer Buddy Program across one year on the social and academic skill acquisition of high school students with learning disabilities (LD) and/or emotional/behavioral disabilities (EBD). Specifically, this research focused on identifying the…

  16. Best in Class: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail K.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  17. Canadian Children's Mental Health: Building Capacity in School-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Climie, Emma A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing identification of children with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD), it is imperative that innovative ways of addressing these concerns are explored. Fewer than half of students identified with mental illness receive treatment, leaving a significant proportion of students to cope with mental illness without support. One…

  18. Teaching Students with Emotional and Behavior Disorder How to Write Persuasive Essays Fluently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerar, Nancy Irby

    2012-01-01

    A multiprobe, multiple baseline design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of persuasive writing strategy instruction. Six middle school students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) received two instructional phases of Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) instruction for writing persuasive essays over 33 days of intervention.…

  19. Job Stressors and Teacher Job Satisfaction in Programs Serving Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adera, Beatrice A.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher turnover is problem that continues to plague the field of special education, given the associated costs when a teacher leaves his or her job. The challenges associated with recruitment and retention of quality teachers, especially in programs serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have been attributed to a variety…

  20. Unidentified Language Deficits in Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollo, Alexandra; Wehby, Joseph H.; Oliver, Regina M.

    2014-01-01

    Low language proficiency and problem behavior often co-occur, yet language deficits are likely to be overlooked in children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to determine prevalence and severity of the problem. Across 22 studies, participants included 1,171 children ages 5-13 with formally…

  1. Reflections on the Future of Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders: A Response to Colvin, Forness, and Nelson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Alec F.; Albrecht, Susan Fread; George, Cheryl L.; Mathur, Sarup R.; Paget, Mike; Ryan, Joseph B.; White, Richard B.; Baker, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In issue 37(1) of this journal, the authors published the findings of three studies addressing the status of Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders (CCBD) as an organization and of the field of special education for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). In order to continue discussion of the status of CCBD, the editors…

  2. Teacher-Reported Use of Empirically Validated and Standards-Based Instructional Approaches in Secondary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Maccini, Paula

    2007-01-01

    A random sample of 167 secondary special and general educators who taught math to students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and learning disabilities (LD) responded to a mail survey. The survey examined teacher perceptions of (a) definition of math; (b) familiarity with course topics; (c) effectiveness of methods courses; (d)…

  3. The NHERF2 sequence adjacent and upstream of the ERM-binding domain affects NHERF2-ezrin binding and dexamethasone stimulated NHE3 activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianbo; Sarker, Rafiquel; Singh, Varsha; Sarker, Prateeti; Yin, Jianyi; Chen, Tian-E; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Li, Xuhang; Tse, C Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-08-15

    In the brush border of intestinal and kidney epithelial cells, scaffolding proteins ezrin, Na(+)-H(+) exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF)1 and NHERF2 play important roles in linking transmembrane proteins to the cytoskeleton and assembling signalling regulatory complexes. The last 30 carboxyl residues of NHERF1 and NHERF2 form the EBDs [ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM)-binding domain]. The current study found that NHERF1/2 contain an ERM-binding regulatory sequence (EBRS), which facilitates the interaction between the EBD and ezrin. The EBRSs are located within 24 and 19 residues immediately upstream of EBDs for NHERF1 and NHERF2 respectively. In OK (opossum kidney) epithelial cells, EBRSs are necessary along with the EBD to distribute NHERF1 and NHERF2 exclusively to the apical domain. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Ser(303) located in the EBRS of NHERF2, decreases the binding affinity for ezrin, dislocates apical NHERF2 into the cytosol and increases the NHERF2 microvillar mobility rate. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Ser(303) was functionally significant preventing acute stimulation of NHE3 (Na(+)-H(+) exchanger 3) activity by dexamethasone. PMID:26251448

  4. Communication and Behavioral Considerations in Planning Programs for Female Juvenile Delinquents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Dixie; Maag, John W.; Spilker, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Recent information on the incidence and types of language and communication problems experienced by female delinquents and the relation they have to emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) indicate a contribution to the problems these girls have encountered in social and academic situations. Pragmatics (i.e., use of language in interpersonal…

  5. Medicine in the Classroom: A Review of Psychiatric Medications for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Konopasek, Dean

    2007-01-01

    There are many ways to help children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) succeed in school. Behavior intervention plans provide support to help students adjust their actions to fit school norms. Inclusive philosophy and practices continue to break the cycle of restricted and segregated placements, whereas schoolwide intervention models…

  6. Romanian Preschool Teachers' Understanding of Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties: Implications for Designing Teacher Trainings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefan, Catrinel A.; Rebega, Oana L.; Cosma, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have emphasized the role of the teacher-child relationship on children's adjustment. Children lacking such positive relationships are placed at increased risk for emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD). We propose a qualitative approach to exploring Romanian teachers' knowledge and strategies related to preschoolers who…

  7. An Analysis of Job Satisfaction for Special Educators Who Instruct Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: How Working Conditions Impact Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) find that myriad concerns for effective teaching (e.g., salaries, increased paperwork, classroom management) challenge their ability to meet personal and professional needs. The push for certified teachers and limited training to work with students with special needs create stressors…

  8. The Effect of the Child's Disability on United Arab Emirates In-Service Teachers' Educational Decisions regarding Gifted and Talented Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhoweris, Hala

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the disability labels: learning disabilities (LD), physical disabilities (PHD) and emotional and behavioural disorder (EBD), on United Arab Emirates public school general education and special education teachers' willingness to refer and place students in gifted and talented programmes. A total of 269…

  9. Understanding Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Are We Paying the Cost of Borderline Ethics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathur, Sarup R.

    2007-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often exhibit moderate to severe broad academic deficits in multiple areas as compared to their normative peers (Lane, 2004); they engage in aggressive acts and receive less positive attention by peers and adults. As a result, they are more likely to drop out of school, stay unemployed, engage…

  10. Technology and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtad, Carrie Anna; Bouck, Emily C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently there is a lack of evidence existing on technology specifically to support students with emotional-behavior disorder (EBD) in schools (Fitzpatrick & Knowlton, 2009). However, assistive technology (AT) considerations for all students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) must still occur. Evidence exists that technology can…

  11. Cross-Setting Correspondence in Sociometric Nominations among Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Hoza, Betsy; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Hechtman, Lily; Pelham, William E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Peer problems are common among children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). However, the extent to which children's peer functioning varies across settings is unknown, as is the incremental power of peer functioning in different settings in predicting subsequent psychopathology. Participants were 57 children with…

  12. Bridging the Research-to-Practice Gap: Empowering Staff to Implement Meaningful Program Evaluation and Improvement to Better Serve Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bridget; Clancy, Michaela; Tsai, Shu-Fei; Cheney, Doug

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years researchers have published lists of evidence-based practices that research indicates "should" be in place in programs and supports for students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) (e.g., Farley, Torres, Wailehua, & Cook, 2012; Ryan, Pierce, & Mooney, 2008; Simpson, Peterson, & Smith, 2011). Some…

  13. Behavioral Momentum during a Continuous Reading Task: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vostal, Brooks R.; Lee, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often fail to master literacy skills, in part because disruptive behaviors interfere with task engagement and persistence. The theory of behavioral momentum explains the persistence of behavior in the face of changing environmental conditions. The current exploratory study examined…

  14. Effects of Oral Reading Fluency on Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders' Latency to Continue Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vostal, Brooks R.; Lee, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD) present deficits in literacy skills, in part because their disruptive behaviors interfere with task engagement. Antecedent manipulations, such as those based on behavioral momentum theory, can increase students' contact with reinforcement, leading to greater task engagement. This study…

  15. An Examination of the Evidence Base for Function-Based Interventions for Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders Attending Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Kalberg, Jemma Robertson; Shepcaro, Jenna Courtney

    2009-01-01

    The authors field-tested the core quality indicators and standards for evidence-based practices for single-case design studies developed by Horner and colleagues (2005) by applying them to the literature exploring functional assessment-based interventions conducted with secondary-age students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD).…

  16. The Past Is Prologue: Suggestions for Moving Forward in Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, C. Michael; Kauffman, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors' association goes back more than 40 years, when they were both starting doctoral studies in special education for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) at the University of Kansas. In this article, the authors provide a balanced (albeit biased) account of the good and the bad, including some of the many achievements…

  17. The Impact of Targeted Classroom Interventions and Function-Based Behavior Interventions on Problem Behaviors of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Robert P.; Lewis, Timothy J.; Stichter, Janine P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of both functional behavior assessment-based interventions and targeted classroom interventions for reducing problem behaviors of children with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) in special education classrooms. Specifically, this study was interested in how interventions based on changes in…

  18. Families and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Fredrick J.; Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Rotatori, Anthony F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present chapter is to provide an overview of issues facing families of children and youths with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). We argue that although much is written about families of individuals with disabilities, comparatively little is known about families with children in this category. We suggest that the…

  19. Class Placement and Academic and Behavioral Variables as Predictors of Graduation for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Linda; Cramer, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a range of variables as predictors of graduation potential for students with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) or Emotional Behavioral Disorders (EBD) within a large urban school district. These factors included the following characteristics and elements: (a) primary exceptionality, (b) gender, (c)…

  20. Behavior Modification/Traditional Techniques for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Paul; Ryan, Joseph B.; Gunter, Philip L.; Denny, R. Kenton

    2012-01-01

    In addressing positive general education teaching practices for use with students with or at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), the chapter emphasizes teacher behavior change research that has been informed by applied behavior analytic (ABA) principles. Its central theme is that general education teachers can access research…

  1. Impact of Remedial Reading Interventions on a Secondary Student with Emotional Behavior Disorder: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, LuCinda Nance

    2013-01-01

    Students who struggle with emotional behavior disorders (EBD) often enter high school with reading levels far below those of their peers. At the secondary level, these at-risk students must regularly read and write proficiently in order to demonstrate their literacy achievement and potential for success either in college or on the job. As a…

  2. Emotional Behavior Disorders: The Lost Population of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bounds, Quintella

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in postsecondary completion rates between students with Emotional Behavior Disorder (EBD) who were involved with their own postsecondary transition planning processes, whose parents were involved in the transition planning, and who received services or…

  3. Nitric oxide donors improve prednisone effects on muscular dystrophy in the mdx mouse diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Upadhaya, Ritika; Burczynski, Frank J; Wang, Guqi; Anderson, Judy E

    2011-05-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), palliative glucocorticoid therapy can produce myopathy or calcification. Since increased nitric oxide synthase activity in dystrophic mice promotes regeneration, the outcome of two nitric oxide (NO) donor drugs, MyoNovin (M) and isosorbide dinitrate (I), on the effectiveness of the anti-inflammatory drug prednisone (P) in alleviating progression of dystrophy was tested. Dystrophic mdx mice were treated (18 days) as controls or with an NO donor ± P. Fiber permeability and DNA synthesis were labeled by Evans blue dye (EBD) and bromodeoxyuridine uptake, respectively. P decreased body weight gain, M increased quadriceps mass, and I increased heart mass. P increased fiber permeability (%EBD+ fibers) and calcification in diaphragm. Treatment with NO donors + P (M+P, I+P) reduced %EBD+ fibers and calcification vs. P alone. %EBD+ fibers in M+P diaphragm did not differ from control. NO donor treatment reduced proliferation and the population of c-met+ cells and accelerated fiber regeneration. Concurrent with P, NO donor treatment suppressed two important detrimental effects of P in mice, possibly by accelerating regeneration, rebalancing satellite cell quiescence and activation in dystrophy, and/or increasing perfusion. Results suggest that NO donors could improve current therapy for DMD. PMID:21270295

  4. Language Competence and Social Behavior of Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaldi, Claudia

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to explore a model of communicative competence (Abbeduto & Nuccio, 1989) and identify whether its components could (a) predict pragmatic language difficulties for children with emotional or behavioral disorders (E/BD) and (b) describe the semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic language ability as well as the social skills of…

  5. Structural architecture and interplay of the nucleotide- and erythrocyte binding domain of the reticulocyte binding protein Py235 from Plasmodium yoelii.

    PubMed

    Grüber, Ardina; Manimekalai, Malathy S S; Preiser, Peter R; Grüber, Gerhard

    2012-11-01

    Human malaria is caused by the cyclical invasion of the host's red blood cells (RBCs) by the invasive form of the parasite, the merozoite. The invasion of the RBC involves a range of parasite ligand receptor interactions, a process which is under intensive investigation. Two protein families are known to be important in the recognition and invasion of the human erythrocyte, the erythrocyte-binding like (EBL) proteins and the reticulocyte binding like proteins, of which the Py235 family in Plasmodium yoelii is a member. Recently the nucleotide binding domain (NBD94), that plays a role in ATP sensing, and the erythrocyte binding domain (EBD) of Py235, called EBD(1-194), have been identified. Binding of ATP leads to conformational changes within Py235 from P. yoelli and results in enhanced binding of the protein to the RBC. Structural features of these domains have been obtained, providing the platform to discuss how the structural architecture creates the basis for an interplay of the sensing NBD and the EBD domain in Py235. In analogy to the receptor-mediated ligand-dimerization model of the EBL proteins PvDBP and PfEBA-175 from Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, respectively, we hypothesise that Py235 of P. yoelii binds via its EBD(1-194) domain to the RBC receptor, thereby inducing dimerization of the Py235-receptor complex. PMID:22878128

  6. Neuropsychological Characteristics of Special Education Students with Serious Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.; Hooper, Stephen R.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.

    2006-01-01

    Special education, elementary school students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) were investigated for neuropsychological deficits with the NEPSY battery. Over half (54%) scored two or more standard deviations below the test mean on at least one of the four functional domains, especially Language and Attention/Executive Functions. The NEPSY…

  7. Classroom-Based Functional Analysis and Intervention for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright-Gallo, Glenna L.; Higbee, Thomas S.; Reagon, Kara A.; Davey, Bryan J.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted functional analyses of disruptive behavior in a classroom setting for two students of typical intelligence with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) using the classroom teacher to implement functional analysis conditions. The functional analyses suggested that both participants' disruptive behavior was maintained by escape from task…

  8. Early Classification of Reading Performance in Children Identified or At Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Discriminant Analysis Using the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Reid, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the kindergarten and first grade Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS), measures of early literacy development, to discriminate among low average, average, and above average students considered at risk emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) on the Total Reading cluster of the Woodcock…

  9. Collecting Behavioral Data in General Education Settings: A Primer for Behavioral Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David L.; Vostal, Brooks; Lylo, Brooke; Hua, Youjia

    2011-01-01

    Recent trends toward the inclusion of students with disabilities mean that a majority of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) now spend at least 40% of their day in general education settings. With this change in location, teachers in general education settings are now asked to perform tasks that were not given much emphasis…

  10. The Effects of Instruction in Peer-Revision on the Persuasive Writing of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the use of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) to improve the writing skills of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). This single subject multiple baseline, multiple probe design study extends this research base by investigating the effects of peer-revision instruction on the persuasive…

  11. Conservatism and the Underidentification of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Andrew L.; Kauffman, James M.; Plageman, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Underidentification of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD; emotional disturbance or ED in federal language) is a critical issue, perhaps explainable in part by causal attributions of problem behavior associated with conservatism. Conservatism in 58 counties in the state of California was measured by finding the percentage of…

  12. Professionalism and Whole Primary School Factors Aiding and Impeding the Work of the Learning Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Heather Roper

    2006-01-01

    This article is based on a survey of 25 learning mentors in order to identify their background and training, barriers and opportunities they experience in their work with individual primary aged pupils with EBD. Heather Roper Marshall undertook this study as part of her work towards her BA (Hons) Education. She adopts a personalised, narrative…

  13. Prove Them Wrong: Be There for Secondary Students with an Emotional or Behavioral Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Students with an emotional or behavioral disability (EBD) are sometimes judged and feared based on their label before teachers even meet them. These students are different than other students that walk into a classroom, but they should never be feared. They have had more "loops" in their roller coaster ride of adolescent life than the average…

  14. Preparation of Teachers of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. Retrospective Series on Critical Issues in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M., Ed.; Gable, Robert A., Ed.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr., Ed.

    The third in a series, this collection of previously published monographs examines the challenges of preparing teachers to work with students who have emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Monographs include: (1) "Issues in Training Teachers for the Seriously Emotionally Disturbed" (Frank H. Wood), which discusses preparing regular and special…

  15. Relations between Secondary Art Teachers' Personal Education Theories and Attitudes about Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manjack, Sharon Kay

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was multifold: to define secondary art teachers. personal practical theories about the purposes of art education; to examine teachers. attitudes toward the inclusion of students with learning disabilities (LD) and those with emotional/behavioral disabilities (EBD) into their classrooms; and to determine the relation between…

  16. Perspectives of Pre-Service Teachers on Students with Emotional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beam, Andrea P.; Yocum, Russell G.; Pinkie, Elyse C.

    2016-01-01

    Perceptions of working with students of emotional disabilities or who are considered Emotionally/Behaviorally Disturbed (E/BD) is varied across the spectrum. However, one constant that does hold true is that all pre-service teachers have some hesitation in working with such students, especially if they lack any previous exposure to students with…

  17. Disability as Metaphor: Examining the Conceptual Framing of Emotional Behavioral Disorder in American Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danforth, Scot

    2007-01-01

    A growing, interdisciplinary field of cognitive linguistics has developed in recent decades, bringing together research from many fields to explore the ways that metaphors provide structure and semantic content to thought and language. In this article, the American public school disability emotional/behavioral disorder (E/BD) is examined in regard…

  18. Teacher-Mediated Instructional Strategies for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirn, Regina Gilkey; Park, Kristy L.

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) may exhibit both learning and behavioral needs that affect the teacher's ability to provide effective instruction. Extending beyond simple academic content knowledge, effective teacher-based interventions include preventive and predictive actions that manage the disruptive behaviors often…

  19. Canadian School Programs for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: An Updated Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworet, Don; Maich, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Canada is a country composed of 10 provinces and three territories with very limited federal control over the public K-12 education system. This lack of consistent direction has led to a range of diverse educational policies for educating students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD). This article investigates the current state of policies…

  20. The Effects of Using Direct Instruction and the Equal Additions Algorithm to Promote Subtraction with Regrouping Skills of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders with Mathematics Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Angela Christine

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) display severe social and academic deficits that can adversely affect their academic performance in mathematics and result in higher rates of failure throughout their schooling compared to other students with disabilities (U.S. Department of Education, 2005; Webber & Plotts, 2008).…

  1. Promising Practices for Effective Transition for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Zhang, Dalun; Mackiewicz, Sara Moore

    2012-01-01

    Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (E/BD) have been consistently experiencing dismal outcomes. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of outcomes for this population, examine school-based instructional and behavioral strategies, and discuss transition related practices intended to improve present and future…

  2. Perceived Social Support and Domain-Specific Adjustment of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popliger, Mina; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    The perceived availability of social support has been documented as a protective mechanism among adults and adolescents. However, little research has explored the role of social support among children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (E/BD). The current study sought to investigate the effects of perceived social support from family,…

  3. Writing Performance of Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Wilson, Joshua; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.

    2014-01-01

    Students with emotional and/or behavioral disabilities (E/BD), including students with emotional disturbance and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, receiving special education services perform significantly worse on academic performance measures than same age peers. Researchers have focused on reading and math performance while less is…

  4. Challenges of Serving Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Legal and Policy Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl R.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    Significant issues still confront the field of emotional or behavioral disorders (E/BD) in providing a free, appropriate, public educational (FAPE) program for these students. This paper reviews recent case law for several critical areas of concern to the field today, including: (a) response to intervention (RTI) and child find procedures, (b)…

  5. Using Comparison Peers as an Objective Measure of Social Validity: Recommendations for Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Jolivette, Kristine; Fredrick, Laura D.; Alberto, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, students with challenging behaviors (SWCB) in a classroom may include those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD), intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, and those at risk of these disabilities. These students may present…

  6. Placement of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Programs for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Contemporary Trends and Research Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J.; Bal, Aydin; Trent, Stanley C.; Thorius, Kathleen King

    2012-01-01

    Little research has been conducted regarding the disproportionate representation of minority learners in programs for students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (E/BD). To date, the majority of the disproportionality literature examines multiple eligibility categories, most frequently the high incidence disabilities of Mild Intellectual…

  7. Functional Behavioral Assessment and Intervention with Emotional/Behaviorally Disordered Students: In Pursuit of State of the Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waguespack, Angela; Vaccaro, Terrence; Continere, Lauren

    2006-01-01

    The application of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures for the purposes of developing interventions for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) has received considerable attention since the 1997 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The purpose of this paper is to review the…

  8. Placement of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathur, Sarup R.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) receive educational and related services within a continuum of placement options per the Individual with Disabilities Education Act. The continuum of placement options ranges from fully included general education type classrooms to more restrictive environments such as alternative education…

  9. C-CARD: A Strategy to Improve Revising Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saddler, Bruce; Asaro-Saddler, Kristie; Thomas, Job

    2015-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often perform well below their peers across academic areas, with lower math and reading scores and higher school failure and grade retention rates (Reid, Gonzalez, Nordness, Trout, & Epstein, 2004). However, writing is the most significant academic deficit for these students (Austinner,…

  10. Engaging Students with Behavior Disorders in Mathematics Practice Using the High-"p" Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vostal, Brooks R.

    2011-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) demonstrate significant academic deficits across content areas (Coutinho, 1986; Lane, Barton-Arwood, Nelson, & Wehby, 2008; Nelson, Benner, Lane, & Smith, 2004; Reid, Gonzalez, Nordness, Trout, & Epstein, 2004; Ruhl & Berlinghoff, 1992). Mathematics, however, appears to be especially…

  11. Changing Attitudes: Supporting Teachers in Effectively Including Students with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Mainstream Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Geraldine; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) are often considered the most challenging group to manage within mainstream education. The challenges perceived by teachers may be due, in part, to negative attitudes towards this cohort of pupils, which may exacerbate feelings of inadequacy and impact negatively upon direct interactions…

  12. The Effects of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Time Spent outside the Classroom for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Residential Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Christina; Jolivette, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    To more effectively instruct the entire class, teachers of students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) often choose to send students who display inappropriate behavior out of the room. A multiple baseline across settings was used to evaluate the effects of increasing teacher positive verbal reinforcement on the amount of time 2 students…

  13. Individual and Systemic Approaches to Collaboration and Consultation on Behalf of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. From the Second CCBD Mini Library Series: Successful Interventions for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gable, Robert A.; Sugai, George; Lewis, Tim; Nelson, J. Ron; Cheney, Douglas; Safran, Stephen P.; Safran, Joan S.

    This monograph discusses using collaboration and consultation to teach children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in the general education classroom. After an introductory chapter, Chapter 2, "Collaboration and Consultation: Promises and Limitations," compares collaboration and consultation as they relate to serving students…

  14. Differences in Drinking Expectancies and Motives for Regular Education and Special Education High School Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Jeff; Harbke, Colin R.; Blake, Dawn; Catanzaro, Salvatore J.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol expectancies and drinking motives were compared for regular education students (n = 159) and students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) receiving special education services (n = 51). Differences existed between groups with respect to expected negative social consequences and emotional and physical outcomes associated with drinking.…

  15. The Twice Exceptional Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, William F.; Omdal, Stuart N.

    2000-01-01

    Research and programs in gifted education and programs for students who exhibit emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) do not often consider students who display violent or other negative behaviors and also exhibit gifted and talented behaviors. A qualitative analysis of responses to an interview with one such individual reveals information…

  16. Burnout Experience of Teachers Serving Students with Emotional Behavioral Disorders in Grades PreK-8 within Non-Public Special Education Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kendra A.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationships between five predictor variables identified by the literature (age, years of special education teaching experience, level of emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) preparation, principal support, and principal feedback) and two higher order terms (age and years of special education teaching…

  17. Who Is Writing? Author Affiliation across Peer-Reviewed Journals of Emotional or Behavioral Disorders, 2000-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Janney, Donna M.; Rekart, Jerome L.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of practitioner participation in identifying and maintaining use of best educational practice is well established; however, little is known about the ways in which practitioners contribute to the development and dissemination of those practices within the field of emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD). This review examines…

  18. Scaffolding Dynamics and the Emergence of Problematic Learning Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenbeek, Henderien; Jansen, Louise; van Geert, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at examining problematic learning trajectories of students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) by means of a longitudinal and time serial (micro genetic) study of individual instruction sessions during arithmetic lessons. Micro genetic analysis techniques were applied on the variable "responsiveness" in the scaffolding…

  19. Three Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Tell Why People Do Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a small preliminary investigation of the moral judgment of three children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) using case study research methodology to describe their moral orientations and explore how their reasoning patterns might affect the development of a cooperative moral orientation. Data were…

  20. Self-Monitoring Strategies for Use in the Classroom: A Promising Practice to Support Productive Behavior for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menzies, Holly M.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Lee, Johanna Marie

    2009-01-01

    The authors begin this article by introducing a student, Andy, who has emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Andy is the kind of student who needs to be given more responsibility for his own behavior. In this article, the authors illustrate why and how that can be done. The authors focus predominantly on the strategy of self-monitoring and how…

  1. The Education of Students with Emotional and Behavior Disabilities in Australia: Current Trends and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Therese M.

    2012-01-01

    A discussion about the current state of special education, more specifically the field of emotional and behavior disabilities (EBD), in Australia cannot take place without first providing an overview of the Australian education system. Education comes under the jurisdiction of state and territory responsibility. The federal government coordinates…

  2. Disproportionality of English Learners with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders: A Comparative Meta-Analysis with English Learners with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas; Gersten, Russell; Sugai, George; Newman-Gonchar, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Disproportionate representation of English learners in special education has been a longstanding and ongoing concern. However, research examining disproportionate representation of English learners receiving special education services for emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) has been limited. To address this gap, a meta-analysis of…

  3. Reading Instruction in Secondary Day Treatment and Residential Schools for Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Kimber L.; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Melekoglu, Macid Ayhan; Cakiroglu, Orhan

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to obtain the first national picture of the characteristics of special educators who provide reading or English instruction in secondary day treatment and residential schools for youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) as well as their approach to reading instruction. Also, information was collected concerning…

  4. Expert-Recommended Strategies for Teaching the Twice-Exceptional Student in the General Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Cherylynn Jody

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the best practice strategies, those that bring the most value for the twice-exceptional (2e) student (giftedness with autism spectrum disorder [ASD], attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], specific learning disabilities [SLD], and/or emotional and behavioral disorder [EBD]) in the…

  5. Pioneers--The "Engineering byDesign[TM]" Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Barry N.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the standards-based instruction model, Engineering byDesign[TM] (EbD), and a network of teachers called the Engineering byDesign[TM] Network. Engineering byDesign[TM] is the only standards-based national model for Grades K-12 that delivers technological literacy which was developed by the International Technology Education…

  6. The NHERF2 sequence adjacent and upstream of the ERM-binding domain affects NHERF2–ezrin binding and dexamethasone stimulated NHE3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Sarker, Rafiquel; Singh, Varsha; Sarker, Prateeti; Yin, Jianyi; Chen, Tian-E; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Li, Xuhang; Tse, C. Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In the brush border of intestinal and kidney epithelial cells, scaffolding proteins ezrin, Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF)1 and NHERF2 play important roles in linking transmembrane proteins to the cytoskeleton and assembling signalling regulatory complexes. The last 30 carboxyl residues of NHERF1 and NHERF2 form the EBDs [ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM)-binding domain]. The current study found that NHERF1/2 contain an ERM-binding regulatory sequence (EBRS), which facilitates the interaction between the EBD and ezrin. The EBRSs are located within 24 and 19 residues immediately upstream of EBDs for NHERF1 and NHERF2 respectively. In OK (opossum kidney) epithelial cells, EBRSs are necessary along with the EBD to distribute NHERF1 and NHERF2 exclusively to the apical domain. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Ser303 located in the EBRS of NHERF2, decreases the binding affinity for ezrin, dislocates apical NHERF2 into the cytosol and increases the NHERF2 microvillar mobility rate. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Ser303 was functionally significant preventing acute stimulation of NHE3 (Na+-H+ exchanger 3) activity by dexamethasone. PMID:26251448

  7. Percutaneous vs. endoscopic pre-operative biliary drainage in hilar cholangiocarcinoma – a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Ahmer; Pang, Tony; Chiou, Judy; Pleass, Henry; Lam, Vincent; Hollands, Michael; Johnston, Emma; Richardson, Arthur; Yuen, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background The strategy for preoperative management of biliary obstruction in hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA) patients with regards to drainage by endoscopic (EBD) or percutaneous (PTBD) methods is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility, complications and therapeutic efficacy of these methods in HCCA patients, with a secondary aim to assess the use of portal vein embolization (PVE) in patients undergoing drainage. Methods Studies incorporating HCCA patients undergoing biliary drainage prior to curative resection were included (EMBASE and Medline databases). Analyses included baseline drainage data, procedure-related complications and efficacy, post-operative parameters, and meta-analyses where applicable. Results Fifteen studies were included, with EBD performed in 536 patients (52%). Unilateral drainage of the future liver remnant was undertaken in 94% of patients. There was a trend towards higher procedure conversion (RR 7.36, p = 0.07) and cholangitis (RR 3.36, p = 0.15) rates in the EBD group. Where specified, 134 (30%) drained patients had PVE, in association with a major hepatectomy in 131 patients (98%). Post-operative hepatic failure occurred in 22 (11%) of EBD patients compared to 56 (13%) of PTBD patients, whilst median 1-year survival in these groups was 91% and 73%, respectively. Discussion The accepted practice is for most jaundiced HCCA patients to have preoperative drainage of the future liver remnant. EBD may be associated with more immediate procedure-related complications, although it is certainly not inferior compared to PTBD in the long term. PMID:27154803

  8. Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers for High Breakdown Strength Polymer Film Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Samant, Saumil P; Grabowski, Christopher A; Kisslinger, Kim; Yager, Kevin G; Yuan, Guangcui; Satija, Sushil K; Durstock, Michael F; Raghavan, Dharmaraj; Karim, Alamgir

    2016-03-01

    Emerging needs for fast charge/discharge yet high-power, lightweight, and flexible electronics requires the use of polymer-film-based solid-state capacitors with high energy densities. Fast charge/discharge rates of film capacitors on the order of microseconds are not achievable with slower charging conventional batteries, supercapacitors and related hybrid technologies. However, the current energy densities of polymer film capacitors fall short of rising demand, and could be significantly enhanced by increasing the breakdown strength (EBD) and dielectric permittivity (εr) of the polymer films. Co-extruded two-homopolymer component multilayered films have demonstrated much promise in this regard showing higher EBD over that of component polymers. Multilayered films can also help incorporate functional features besides energy storage, such as enhanced optical, mechanical, thermal and barrier properties. In this work, we report accomplishing multilayer, multicomponent block copolymer dielectric films (BCDF) with soft-shear driven highly oriented self-assembled lamellar diblock copolymers (BCP) as a novel application of this important class of self-assembling materials. Results of a model PS-b-PMMA system show ∼50% enhancement in EBD of self-assembled multilayer lamellar BCP films compared to unordered as-cast films, indicating that the breakdown is highly sensitive to the nanostructure of the BCP. The enhancement in EBD is attributed to the "barrier effect", where the multiple interfaces between the lamellae block components act as barriers to the dielectric breakdown through the film. The increase in EBD corresponds to more than doubling the energy storage capacity using a straightforward directed self-assembly strategy. This approach opens a new nanomaterial paradigm for designing high energy density dielectric materials. PMID:26942835

  9. Refractory strictures despite steroid injection after esophageal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Noboru; Ishihara, Ryu; Uedo, Noriya; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Kanesaka, Takashi; Matsuura, Noriko; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Hamada, Kenta; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although steroid injection prevents stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), some patients require repeated sessions of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD). We investigated the risk for refractory stricture despite the administration of steroid injections to prevent stricture in patients undergoing esophageal ESD. Refractory stricture was defined as the requirement for more than three sessions of EBD to resolve the stricture. In addition, the safety of steroid injections was assessed based on the rate of complications. Patients and methods: We analyzed data from 127 consecutive patients who underwent esophageal ESD and had mucosal defects with a circumferential extent greater than three-quarters of the esophagus. To prevent stricture, steroid injection was performed. EBD was performed whenever a patient had symptoms of dysphagia. Results: The percentage of patients with a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was significantly higher in those with refractory stricture than in those without stricture (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, history of radiation therapy, tumor location, and tumor diameter showed that a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was an independent risk factor for refractory stricture (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.49 [95 %CI 1.91 – 15.84], P = 0.002). Major adverse events occurred in 3 patients (2.4 %): perforation during EBD in 2 patients and delayed perforation after EBD in 1 patient. The patient with delayed perforation underwent esophagectomy because of mediastinitis. Conclusions: A tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % is an independent risk factor for refractory stricture despite steroid injections. The development of more extensive interventions is warranted to prevent refractory stricture. PMID:27004256

  10. Bioimpedence to Assess Breast Density as a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer in Adult Women and Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Morimoto, Yukiko; Laguana, Michelle B; Novotny, Rachel; Leon Guerrero, Rachael T

    2016-01-01

    Although high mammographic density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk, X-ray based mammography cannot be performed before the recommended screening age, especially not in adolescents and young women. Therefore, new techniques for breast density measurement are of interest. In this pilot study in Guam and Hawaii, we evaluated a radiation-free, bioimpedance device called Electrical Breast DensitometerTM (EBD; senoSENSE Medical Systems, Inc., Ontario, Canada) for measuring breast density in 95 women aged 31-82 years and 41 girls aged 8-18 years. Percent density (PD) was estimated in the women's most recent mammogram using a computer-assisted method. Correlation coefficients and linear regression were applied for statistical analysis. In adult women, mean EBD and PD values of the left and right breasts were 230±52 and 226±50 Ω and 23.7±15.1 and 24.2±15.2%, respectively. The EBD measurements were inversely correlated with PD (rSpearman=-0.52, p<0.0001); the correlation was stronger in Caucasians (rSpearman=-0.70, p<0.0001) than Asians (rSpearman=-0.54, p<0.01) and Native Hawaiian/Chamorro/Pacific Islanders (rSpearman=-0.34, p=0.06). Using 4 categories of PD (<10, 10-25, 26-50, 51-75%), the respective mean EBD values were 256±32, 249±41, 202±46, and 178±43 Ω (p<0.0001). In girls, the mean EBD values in the left and right breast were 148±40 and 155±54 Ω; EBD values decreased from Tanner stages 1 to 4 (204±14, 154±79, 136±43, and 119±16 Ω for stages 1-4, respectively) but were higher at Tanner stage 5 (165±30 Ω). With further development, this bioimpedance method may allow for investigations of breast development among adolescent, as well as assessment of breast cancer risk early in life and in populations without access to mammography. PMID:26838256

  11. Bioimpedence to Assess Breast Density as a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer in Adult Women and Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Morimoto, Yukiko; Laguaña, Michelle B; Novotny, Rachel; Guerrero, Rachael T Leon

    2016-01-01

    Although high mammographic density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk, X-ray based mammography cannot be performed before the recommended screening age, especially not in adolescents and young women. Therefore, new techniques for breast density measurement are of interest. In this pilot study in Guam and Hawaii, we evaluated a radiation-free, bioimpedance device called Electrical Breast Densitometer™ (EBD; senoSENSE Medical Systems, Inc., Ontario, Canada) for measuring breast density in 95 women aged 31–82 years and 41 girls aged 8–18 years. Percent density (PD) was estimated in the women’s most recent mammogram using a computer-assisted method. Correlation coefficients and linear regression were applied for statistical analysis. In adult women, mean EBD and PD values of the left and right breasts were 230±52 and 226±50 Ω and 23.7±15.1 and 24.2±15.2%, respectively. The EBD measurements were inversely correlated with PD (rSpearman=−0.52, p<0.0001); the correlation was stronger in Caucasians (rSpearman=−0.70, p<0.0001) than Asians (rSpearman=−0.54, p<0.01) and Native Hawaiian/Chamorro/Pacific Islanders (rSpearman=−0.34, p=0.06). Using 4 categories of PD (<10, 10–25, 26–50, 51–75%), the respective mean EBD values were 256±32, 249±41, 202±46, and 178±43 Ω (p<0.0001). In girls, the mean EBD values in the left and right breast were 148±40 and 155±54 Ω; EBD values decreased from Tanner stages 1 to 4 (204±14, 154±79, 136±43, and 119±16 Ω for stages 1–4, respectively) but were higher at Tanner stage 5 (165±30 Ω). With further development, this bioimpedance method may allow for investigations of breast development among adolescent, as well as assessment of breast cancer risk early in life and in populations without access to mammography. PMID:26838256

  12. Effect of periodic alterations in shear on vascular macromolecular uptake.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H; Henderson, J M; Aukerman, J A; Clingan, P A

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in swine to test the hypothesis that changes in the fluid dynamic environment of the arterial wall, with time constants of several minutes to perhaps a few hours, prompt adaptive responses that transiently increase endothelial permeability. After parenteral Evans Blue Dye (EBD) administration, the hemodynamics of the external iliac arteries of the experimental animals were altered using a reversible arteriovenous femoral shunt. For 3 h, the shunt was opened and closed with a period (tau) between 1-180 min. Subsequently, the animal was euthanized and the iliac vessels were photographed en face to obtain the distribution of EBD-bound albumin uptake by the tissue during its exposure to the dye. Albumin uptake increases with tau in a fashion that can be explained by an a priori model of the adaptive permeability response, with a time constant of about an hour. PMID:11145073

  13. Cyclotron autoresonant accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    LaPointe, M.A.; Hirshfield, J.L.; Hirshfield, J.L.; Wang, Changbiao

    1999-06-01

    Design and construction is underway for a novel rf electron accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) of flue gases emanating from fossil-fuel burners. This machine, a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA), has already shown itself capable of converting rf power to electron beam power with efficiency values as high as 96{percent}. This proof-of-principle experiment will utilize a 300 kV, 33 A Pierce type electron gun and up to 24 MW of available rf power at 2.856 GHz to produce 1.0 MeV, 33 MW electron beam pulses. The self-scanning conical beam from the high power CARA will be evaluated for EBDS and other possible environmental applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Cyclotron autoresonant accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang Changbiao

    1999-06-10

    Design and construction is underway for a novel rf electron accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) of flue gases emanating from fossil-fuel burners. This machine, a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA), has already shown itself capable of converting rf power to electron beam power with efficiency values as high as 96%. This proof-of-principle experiment will utilize a 300 kV, 33 A Pierce type electron gun and up to 24 MW of available rf power at 2.856 GHz to produce 1.0 MeV, 33 MW electron beam pulses. The self-scanning conical beam from the high power CARA will be evaluated for EBDS and other possible environmental applications.

  15. Properties of optical thin films and coatings prepared by reactive electron-beam deposition with and without ion bombardments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Rung Y.; Shiau, Sen C.; Lee, Chii H.; Ho, Fang C.; Hua, Mu-Yi

    1997-12-01

    The structural, microstructural, optical, and mechanical properties of MgF2, SiO2, and TiO2 films prepared by reactive electron-beam deposition (EBD) and reactive ion- assisted deposition (IAD) were systematically investigated using an x-ray diffractometer (XRD), a transmission electron microscope, a spectrophotometer, and a microhardness tester, respectively. A mixture gas of pure argon and pure oxygen was used as the reactant. The mean ion energy was about 90 eV for the IAD process. Results show that the preferred orientation, refractive index, and hardness of the films were strongly influenced by ion bombardments, although the variations of the phases and grain sizes were insignificant. With the fixed x- ray incident angle of 2 deg, the measured preferred orientation of polycrystalline MgF2 films deposited on unheated glass substrate by IAD was [110], which was consistent with the powder XRD pattern of MgF2, whereas that of the film deposited by EBD at a substrate temperature of 280 degrees Celsius was [111]. The refractive index and hardness of the films deposited by IAD were always higher than those of the respective films deposited by EBD at a substrate temperature of 280 degrees Celsius, which were due to the higher packing density caused by energetic ion bombardments. A 24-layer near-IR cutoff filter of alternating SiO2 and TiO2 layers prepared by IAD was more efficient on near-IR isolation and more thermally stable than that prepared by EBD. The optical thickness variation for the filter prepared by IAD over a substrate holder radius of 30 cm was less than 1%.

  16. Crystal structure of the AmpR effector binding domain provides insight into the molecular regulation of inducible ampc beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Balcewich, Misty D; Reeve, Thomas M; Orlikow, Evan A; Donald, Lynda J; Vocadlo, David J; Mark, Brian L

    2010-07-30

    Hyperproduction of AmpC beta-lactamase (AmpC) is a formidable mechanism of resistance to penicillins and cephalosporins in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is regulated by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator AmpR. ampR and ampC genes form a divergent operon with overlapping promoters to which AmpR binds and regulates the transcription of both genes. AmpR induces ampC by binding to one member of the family of 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl peptides, which are cytosolic catabolites of peptidoglycan that accumulate during beta-lactam challenge. To gain structural insights into AmpR regulation, we determined the crystal structure of the effector binding domain (EBD) of AmpR from Citrobacter freundii up to 1.83 A resolution. The AmpR EBD is dimeric and each monomer comprises two subdomains that adopt alpha/beta Rossmann-like folds. Located between the monomer subdomains is a pocket that was found to bind the crystallization buffer molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid. The pocket, together with a groove along the surface of subdomain I, forms a putative effector binding site into which a molecule of 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl pentapeptide could be modeled. Amino acid substitutions at the base of the interdomain pocket either were found to render AmpR incapable of inducing ampC (Thr103Val, Ser221Ala and Tyr264Phe) or resulted in constitutive ampC expression (Gly102Glu). While the substitutions that prevented ampC induction did not alter the overall AmpR EBD structure, circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the nonconservative Gly102Glu mutation affected EBD secondary structure, confirming previous work suggesting that Gly102Glu induces a conformational change to result in constitutive AmpC production. PMID:20594961

  17. Crystal Structures of the Global Regulator DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor: Implications for the Allosteric Regulation of GntR/HutC Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Fillenberg, Simon B.; Friess, Mario D.; Körner, Samuel; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Muller, Yves A.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule effectors regulate gene transcription in bacteria by altering the DNA-binding affinities of specific repressor proteins. Although the GntR proteins represent a large family of bacterial repressors, only little is known about the allosteric mechanism that enables their function. DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor belongs to the GntR/HutC subfamily and specifically recognises operators termed DasR-responsive elements (dre-sites). Its DNA-binding properties are modulated by phosphorylated sugars. Here, we present several crystal structures of DasR, namely of dimeric full-length DasR in the absence of any effector and of only the effector-binding domain (EBD) of DasR without effector or in complex with glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P) and N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6-P). Together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a comparison with other GntR/HutC family members these data allowed for a structural characterisation of the different functional states of DasR. Allostery in DasR and possibly in many other GntR/HutC family members is best described by a conformational selection model. In ligand-free DasR, an increased flexibility in the EBDs enables the attached DNA-binding domains (DBD) to sample a variety of different orientations and among these also a DNA-binding competent conformation. Effector binding to the EBDs of DasR significantly reorganises the atomic structure of the latter. However, rather than locking the orientation of the DBDs, the effector-induced formation of β-strand β* in the DBD-EBD-linker segment merely appears to take the DBDs ‘on a shorter leash’ thereby impeding the ‘downwards’ positioning of the DBDs that is necessary for a concerted binding of two DBDs of DasR to operator DNA. PMID:27337024

  18. Creating an Evidence-Based Dentistry Culture at Baylor College of Dentistry: The Winds of Change

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert J.; Dechow, Paul C.; Abdellatif, Hoda; Jones, Daniel L.; McCann, Ann L.; Schneiderman, Emet D.; D’Souza, Rena

    2011-01-01

    In the early years of the new millennium, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health began funding Oral Health Research Education Grants using the R25 mechanism to promote the application of basic and clinical research findings to clinical training and to encourage students to pursue careers in oral health research. This report describes the impact of an R25 grant awarded to the Texas A&M Health Science Center’s Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) on its curriculum and faculty development efforts. At BCD, the R25 grant supports a multipronged initiative that employs clinical research as a vehicle for acquainting both students and faculty with the tools of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). New coursework and experiences in all four years of the curriculum plus a variety of faculty development offerings are being used to achieve this goal. Progress on these fronts is reflected in a nascent EBD culture characterized by increasing participation and buy-in by students and faculty. The production of a new generation of dental graduates equipped with the EBD skill set as well as a growing nucleus of faculty members who can model the importance of evidence-based practice is of paramount importance for the future of dentistry. PMID:21368252

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  20. Evidence based dental care: integrating clinical expertise with systematic research.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Mallika; Panat, Sunil R; Aggarwal, Ashish; Agarwal, Nupur; Upadhyay, Nitin; Alok, Abhijeet

    2014-02-01

    Clinical dentistry is becoming increasingly complex and our patients more knowledgeable. Evidence-based care is now regarded as the "gold standard" in health care delivery worldwide. The basis of evidence based dentistry is the published reports of research projects. They are, brought together and analyzed systematically in meta analysis, the source for evidence based decisions. Activities in the field of evidence-based dentistry has increased tremendously in the 21(st) century, more and more practitioners are joining the train, more education on the subject is being provided to elucidate the knotty areas and there is increasing advocacy for the emergence of the field into a specialty discipline. Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD), if endorsed by the dental profession, including the research community, may well- influence the extent to which society values dental research. Hence, dental researchers should understand the precepts of EBD, and should also recognize the challenges it presents to the research community to strengthen the available evidence and improve the processes of summarizing the evidence and translating it into practice This paper examines the concept of evidence-based dentistry (EBD), including some of the barriers and will discuss about clinical practice guidelines. PMID:24701551

  1. Evidence-based dentistry as it relates to dental materials.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Stephen C; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is reviewed in depth to underscore the limitations for evidence-based dental materials information that exist at this time. Anecdotal estimates of evidence for dental practice are in the range of 8 percent to 10 percent. While the process of evaluating the literature base for dental evidence began 20 years ago, it was not practical to implement it until high-speed wireless connections, open access to journals, and omnipresent connections via smart phones became a reality. EBD includes five stages of information collection and analysis, starting with a careful definition of a clinical question using the PICO(T) approach. Clinical evidence in randomized control trials is considered the best. Clinical trial perspectives (prospective, cross-sectional, retrospective) and outcome designs (RCTs, SCTs, CCTs, cohort studies, case-control studies) are quite varied. Aggregation techniques (including meta-analyses) allow meaningful combinations of clinical data from trials with similar designs but with fewer rigors. Appraisals attempt to assess the entire evidence base without bias and answer clinical questions. Varying intensities to these approaches, Cochrane Collaboration, ADA-EBD Library, UTHSCSA CATs Library, are used to answer questions. Dental materials evidence from clinical trials is infrequent, short-term, and often not compliant with current guidelines (registration, CONSORT, PRISMA). Reports in current evidence libraries indicate less than 5 percent of evidence is related to restorative dental materials. PMID:24571523

  2. The evidence-based dentistry initiative at Baylor College of Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel L; Hinton, Robert J; Dechow, Paul C; Abdellatif, Hoda; McCann, Ann L; Schneiderman, Emet D; D'Souza, Rena

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the impact of an R25 Oral Health Research Education Grant awarded to the Texas A&M Health Science Center-Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) to promote the application of basic and clinical research findings to clinical training and encourage students to pursue careers in oral health research. At Baylor, the R25 grant supports a multi-pronged initiative that employs clinical research as a vehicle for acquainting both students and faculty with the tools of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). New coursework and experiences in all 4 years of the curriculum plus a variety of faculty development offerings are being used to achieve this goal. Progress on these fronts is reflected in a nascent "EBD culture" characterized by increasing participation and buy-in by students and faculty. The production of a new generation of dental graduates equipped with the EBD skill set as well as a growing nucleus of faculty who can model the importance of evidence-based practice is of paramount importance for the future of dentistry. PMID:21473244

  3. Youth, Caregiver, and Staff Perspectives on an Initiative to Promote Success of Emerging Adults with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Stein, Kathleen F; Connors, Elizabeth H; Chambers, Kerri L; Thomas, Charmaine L; Stephan, Sharon H

    2014-07-01

    Transitioning to adulthood is more challenging for youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) as compared to youth with other disability types and typically-developing peers. Outcomes for emerging adults with EBD as a group are particularly concerning in the domains of unemployment, educational dropout rates, and interactions with the judicial system including incarceration, early parenting, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health problems, and suicide. The current study presents qualitative program evaluation data for one of seven grantee states awarded 5-year cooperative agreements by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to build developmentally-appropriate and effective youth-guided local systems of care for transition age youth, ages 16-25 years, to promote positive transition outcomes. Findings, obtained from focus groups of 25 participating transition age youth, caregivers, staff, and supervisors, include strategies for maintaining and expanding on the strengths of program, as well as for improving specific program areas. Also, consistent with the goals of the program, this process provided an opportunity for the youth and caregivers to voice their opinions and perspectives regarding their services. Implications for research and practice on effectively serving the unique needs of young adults experiencing EBD and their families in areas such as navigating special education, providing emotional and behavioral supports, and leveraging interagency collaboration are discussed. PMID:25005428

  4. An approach to define semantics for BPM systems interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, Mariela; Caliusco, María Laura; Chiotti, Omar; Rosa Galli, María

    2015-04-01

    This article proposes defining semantics for Business Process Management systems interoperability through the ontology of Electronic Business Documents (EBD) used to interchange the information required to perform cross-organizational processes. The semantic model generated allows aligning enterprise's business processes to support cross-organizational processes by matching the business ontology of each business partner with the EBD ontology. The result is a flexible software architecture that allows dynamically defining cross-organizational business processes by reusing the EBD ontology. For developing the semantic model, a method is presented, which is based on a strategy for discovering entity features whose interpretation depends on the context, and representing them for enriching the ontology. The proposed method complements ontology learning techniques that can not infer semantic features not represented in data sources. In order to improve the representation of these entity features, the method proposes using widely accepted ontologies, for representing time entities and relations, physical quantities, measurement units, official country names, and currencies and funds, among others. When the ontologies reuse is not possible, the method proposes identifying whether that feature is simple or complex, and defines a strategy to be followed. An empirical validation of the approach has been performed through a case study.

  5. Anti-parallel filament flows and bright dots observed in the EUV with Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Regnier, S.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Hi-C instrument imaged the million degree corona at the highest spatial and temporal resolution to date. The instrument imaged a complicated active region which contained several interesting features. Scientists at UCLan in the UK, in collaboration with other members of the Hi-C science team, studied two of these festures: anti-parallel filament flows and bright EUV dots. Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Evidence of ';counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). We present observations of an active region filament observed with Hi-C that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70 - 80 km/s) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.8' × 0.1'). The temperature distribution of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T(K) = 5.45 × 0.10 using EM loci analysis. Short-lived, small brightenings sparkling at the edge of the active region, calle EUV Bright Dots (EBDs) were also investigated. EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength, but can however be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA suggesting a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV

  6. Evidence-based dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  7. Factors promoting or potentially impeding school success: disparities and state variations for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Bethell, Christina; Forrest, Christopher B; Stumbo, Scott; Gombojav, Narangerel; Carle, Adam; Irwin, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    School success predicts many pathways for health and well-being across the life span. Factors promoting or potentially impeding school success are critical to understand for all children and for children with special health care needs (CSHCN), whose life course trajectories are already impacted by their chronic health problems. The 2007 National Survey of Children's Health was used (1) to estimate national and state prevalence and within and across states disparities in factors promoting school success (engagement, participation, safety) or potentially impeding success (missing school, grade repetition, school identified problems) for all children and CSHCN and (2) to evaluate associations with CSHCN service need complexity and presence of emotional, behavioral or developmental problems (EBD) as well as with school case management policies in states. Among school age children, 60 % experienced all three factors promoting school success (49.3-73.8 % across states), dropping to 51.3 % for CSHCN (39.4-64.7 % across states) and to 36.2 % for the 40 % of all CSHCN who have both more complex service needs and EBD. CSHCN were more likely to experience factors potentially impeding school success. After accounting for child factors, CSHCN living in states requiring case management in schools for children with disabilities were less likely to experience grade repetition (OR 0.65). Within-state disparities between non-CSHCN and CSHCN varied across states. Threats to school success for US children are pervasive and are especially pronounced for CSHCN with more complex needs and EBD. Findings support broad, non-condition specific efforts to promote school success for CSHCN and consideration of state school policies, such as case management. PMID:22488159

  8. Metalliferous sediment and a silica-hematite deposit within the Blanco fracture zone, Northeast Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Clague, D.A.; Koski, R.A.; Embley, R.W.; Dunham, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    A Tiburon ROV dive within the East Blanco Depression (EBD) increased the mapped extent of a known hydrothermal field by an order of magnitude. In addition, a unique opal-CT (cristobalite-tridymite)-hematite mound was discovered, and mineralized sediments and rock were collected and analyzed. Silica-hematite mounds have not previously been found on the deep ocean floor. The light-weight rock of the porous mound consists predominantly of opal-CT and hematite filaments, rods, and strands, and averages 77.8% SiO2 and 11.8% Fe2O3. The hematite and opal-CT precipitated from a low-temperature (???115?? C), strongly oxidized, silica- and iron-rich, sulfur-poor hydrothermal fluid; a bacterial mat provided the framework for precipitation. Samples collected from a volcaniclastic rock outcrop consist primarily of quartz with lesser plagioclase, smectite, pyroxene, and sulfides; SiO2 content averages 72.5%. Formation of these quartz-rich samples is best explained by cooling in an up-flow zone of silica-rich hydrothermal fluids within a low permeability system. Opal-A, opal-CT, and quartz mineralization found in different places within the EBD hydrothermal field likely reflects decreasing silica saturation and increasing temperature of the mineralizing fluid with increasing silica crystallinity. Six push cores recovered gravel, coarse sand, and mud mineralized variously by Fe or Mn oxides, silica, and sulfides. Total rare-earth element concentrations are low for both the rock and push core samples. Ce and Eu anomalies reflect high and low temperature hydrothermal components and detrital phases. A remarkable variety of types of mineralization occur within the EBD field, yet a consistent suite of elements is enriched (relative to basalt and unmineralized cores) in all samples analyzed: Ag, Au, S, Mo, Hg, As, Sb, Sr, and U; most samples are also enriched in Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn. On the basis of these element enrichments, the EBD hydrothermal field might best be described as a base

  9. Effects of buffer layer and thermal annealing on the performance of hybrid Cu2S/PVK electrically bistable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu; Lu, Yue; Guan, Li; Li, Jiantao; Wang, Yichao; Dong, Guoyi; Tang, Aiwei; Teng, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid organic/inorganic electrically bistable devices (EBDs) based on Cu2S/PVK nanocomposites have been fabricated by using a simple spin-coating method. An obvious electrical bistability is observed in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the devices, and the presence of the buffer layer and the annealing process have an important effect on the enhancement of the ON/OFF current ratios. Different electrical conduction mechanisms are responsible for the charge switching of the devices in the presence and absence of the buffer layer.

  10. Comparison of biophysical factors influencing on emphysema quantification with low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Chang Yong; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-03-01

    Emphysema Index(EI) measurements in MDCT is known to be influenced by various biophysical factors such as total lung volume, and body size. We investigated the association of the four biophysical factors with emphysema index in low-dose MDCT. In particular, we attempted to identify a potentially stronger biophysical factor than total lung volume. A total of 400 low-dose MDCT volumes taken at 120kVp, 40mAs, 1mm thickness, and B30f reconstruction kernel were used. The lungs, airways, and pulmonary vessels were automatically segmented, and two Emphysema Indices, relative area below -950HU(RA950) and 15th percentile(Perc15), were extracted from the segmented lungs. The biophysical factors such as total lung volume(TLV), mode of lung attenuation(ModLA), effective body diameter(EBD), and the water equivalent body diameter(WBD) were estimated from the segmented lung and body area. The association of biophysical factors with emphysema indices were evaluated by correlation coefficients. The mean emphysema indices were 8.3±5.5(%) in RA950, and -930±18(HU) in Perc15. The estimates of biophysical factors were 4.7±1.0(L) in TLV, -901±21(HU) in ModLA, 26.9±2.2(cm) in EBD, and 25.9±2.6(cm) in WBD. The correlation coefficients of biophysical factors with RA950 were 0.73 in TLV, 0.94 in ModLA, 0.31 in EBD, and 0.18 WBD, the ones with Perc15 were 0.74 in TLV, 0.98 in ModLA, 0.29 in EBD, and 0.15 WBD. Study results revealed that two biophysical factors, TLV and ModLA, mostly affects the emphysema indices. In particular, the ModLA exhibited strongest correlation of 0.98 with Perc15, which indicating the ModLA is the most significant confounding biophysical factor in emphysema indices measurement.

  11. Obtaining an Acicular Microstructure by Thermomechanical Sequences in X-80 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Renato Soares; Pedrosa, Igor Rafael Vilarouco; Yadava, Yogendra Prasad; Ferreira, Ricardo Artur Sanguinetti

    2014-09-01

    Microstructural modification is one of the routes to increase strength and toughness in high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels. Considering the good mechanical properties of acicular ferrite, thermomechanical sequences, with continuous cooling or isothermal treatment, were applied in an X-80 HSLA steel to obtain dominant acicular microstructure. Electron microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBDS) analyses were performed to identify and quantify microstructural changes. It was possible to correlate the misorientation boundaries profile with the occurrence of acicular microstructure, which was characterized by a high quantity of substructured and deformed units. Thermomechanical sequences with continuous cooling were more effective for obtaining acicular microstructure than sequences of isothermal treatments.

  12. Strengths and limitations of evidence-based dermatology.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hywel C

    2014-03-01

    The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also

  13. Detection of and response to a probable volcanogenic T-wave event swarm on the western Blanco Transform Fault Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dziak, R.P.; Fox, C.G.; Embley, R.W.; Lupton, J.E.; Johnson, G.C.; Chadwick, W.W.; Koski, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The East Blanco Depression (EBD), a pull-apart basin within the western Blanco Transform Fault Zone (BTFZ), was the site of an intense earthquake T-wave swarm that began at 1317Z on January 9, 1994. Although tectonically generated earthquakes occur frequently along the BTFZ, this swarm was unusual in that it was preceded and accompanied by periodic, low-frequency, long-duration acoustic signals, that originated from near the swarm epicenters. These tremor-like signals were very similar in character to acoustic energy produced by a shallow-submarine eruption near Socorro Island, a seamount several hundred km west of Baja, California. The ???69 earthquakes and ???400 tremor-like events at the EBD occurred sporadically, with two periods of peak activity occurring between January 5-16 and 27-31. The swarm-like character of the earthquakes and the similarity of the tremor activity to the Socorro eruption indicated that the EBD was undergoing an intrusion or eruption episode. On January 27, six CTD/rosette casts were conducted at the site. Water samples from two of the stations yielded anomalous 3He concentrations, with maxima at ???2800 m depth over the main basin. In June 1994 two camera tows within the basin yielded evidence of pillow-lava volcanism and hydrothermal deposits, but no conclusive evidence of a recent seafloor eruption. In September 1994, deployments of the U.S. Navy's Advanced Tethered Vehicle resulted in the discovery of an active hydrothermal mound on the flanks of a pillow-lava volcano. The hydrothermal mound consists of Fe-rich hydrothermal precipitate and bacterial mats. Temperatures to 60??C were measured 30 cm below the surface. This is the first discovery of active hydrothermal vents along an oceanic fracture zone. Although no conclusive evidence of volcanic activity associated with the T-wave event swarm was found during these response efforts, the EBD has been the site of recent seafloor eruptions. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical

  14. Atomic-resolution imaging in liquid by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy using small cantilevers with megahertz-order resonance frequencies.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, T; Onishi, K; Kobayashi, N; Matsuki, A; Asakawa, H

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we have investigated the performance of liquid-environment FM-AFM with various cantilevers having different dimensions from theoretical and experimental aspects. The results show that reduction of the cantilever dimensions provides improvement in the minimum detectable force as long as the tip height is sufficiently long compared with the width of the cantilever. However, we also found two important issues to be overcome to achieve this theoretically expected performance. The stable photothermal excitation of a small cantilever requires much higher pointing stability of the exciting laser beam than that for a long cantilever. We present a way to satisfy this stringent requirement using a temperature controlled laser diode module and a polarization-maintaining optical fiber. Another issue is associated with the tip. While a small carbon tip formed by electron beam deposition (EBD) is desirable for small cantilevers, we found that an EBD tip is not suitable for atomic-scale applications due to the weak tip-sample interaction. Here we show that the tip-sample interaction can be greatly enhanced by coating the tip with Si. With these improvements, we demonstrate atomic-resolution imaging of mica in liquid using a small cantilever with a megahertz-order resonance frequency. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the improvement in the minimum detectable force obtained by the small cantilever in measurements of oscillatory hydration forces. PMID:22421199

  15. Extended Burnup Demonstration Reactor Fuels Program. Annual progress report, April 1983-March 1984. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, C.A.

    1985-06-20

    The US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation have participated since 1979 in a cooperative Extended Burnup Demonstration Program. Under the program, standard ENC-fabricated reload fuel in the Big Rock Point and Oyster Creek reactor cores has been irradiated to discharge burnups at or beyond 35,000 MWD/MTU, one to two cycles beyond its originally projected exposure life. The program provides for examination of the fuel at poolside before and after each extended burnup cycle as well as for limited destructive hot cell examination. The 1984 progress report covers work performed under the EBD program between April 1983 and March 1984. Major milestones reached during the period include completion of a hot cell examination on four high burnup rods from Big Rock Point and of a poolside on the Oyster Creek EBD fuel at discharge. The hot cell examination of four rods at burnups to 37.2 GWD/MTU confirmed poolside measurements on the same fuel, showing the urania and gadolinia-bearing fuel rods to be in excellent condition. No major cladding degradation, pellet restructuring, or pellet-clad interaction was found in any of the samples examined. The Oyster Creek fuel, examined at an assembly average exposure of 34.5 GWD/MTU, showed good performance with regard to both diametral creepdown and clad oxide accumulation.

  16. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Nieradka, K.; MaloziePc, G.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2011-10-15

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  17. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nieradka, K; Małozięć, G; Kopiec, D; Grabiec, P; Janus, P; Sierakowski, A; Gotszalk, T

    2011-10-01

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement. PMID:22047334

  18. Selective determination of thiram residues in fruit and vegetables by hydrophilic interaction LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ringli, Daniela; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Thiram belongs to the most important class of dithiocarbamate (DTC) fungicides including dimethyldithiocarbamates (DMDs), ethylenebis(dithiocarbamtes) (EBDs) and propylenebis(dithiocarbamates) (PBDs). During the surface extraction of fruit and vegetables for the LC-MS determination of residues of DMDs, EBDs and PBDs, thiram is reduced by the penicillamine buffer to the DMD anion, thus resulting in false-positive findings of DMD fungicides like ziram. Therefore, an alkaline sulfite buffer was applied for surface extraction, quantitatively transforming thiram into the DMD anion and a stable DMD-sulfite adduct that was used as a selective marker for thiram. Separation was performed isocratically on a ZIC-pHILIC column with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium hydroxide solution (85/15). Mass selective detection was carried out on a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to an electrospray ionisation interface operating in negative mode. Using d12-thiram as the internal standard, recoveries of 80-108% were obtained from apples, tomatoes, grapes and sweet peppers, spiked in the range of 0.02-1 mg kg(-1). Limits of detection and quantification were 0.6 and 2 µg kg(-1), respectively. PMID:24070320

  19. Recovery of graft steatosis and protein-losing enteropathy after biliary diversion in a PFIC 1 liver transplanted child.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Stephenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Fusaro, Fabio; de Magnée, Catherine; Reding, Raymond; Sokal, Etienne M

    2012-08-01

    PFIC 1 is a genetic disorder characterized by hepatic and gastrointestinal disease, often requiring LT during childhood. Extrahepatic symptoms, such as diarrhea and malabsorption, do not improve or may be aggravated after LT, as graft steatosis or steatohepatitis as consequences of the interaction between transplanted liver and native bowel. We describe a patient with PFIC 1 who presented with cholestasis in infancy, who developed intractable pruritus and liver fibrosis. The child underwent living donor LT at 3.6 yr of age, and he early developed severe refractory diarrhea, secondary malabsorption with protein-losing enteropathy, and an early fatty liver disease trough graft steatohepatitis. As the response to cholestyramine was unsatisfactory, we decided to perform an EBD by using the jejunal loop used for the cholangiojejunostomy. Diarrhea resolved rapidly after surgery. He remained well after six months following biliary diversion, with normal stool output and no protein loss. We documented a dramatic improvement of graft steatosis at histology as well as normalization of liver function test. EBD can be considered a valuable treatment option to avoid organ disfunction and loss in PFIC 1 transplanted patients who develop graft steatohepatitis. PMID:21672103

  20. Growth and electrical properties of AlOx grown by mist chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Uchida, Takayuki; Sanada, Masaru; Furuta, Mamoru

    2013-03-01

    Aluminum oxide (AlOx) thin films were grown using aluminum acetylacetonate (Al(acac)3) as a source solute by mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD). The AlOx thin films grown at temperatures above 400°C exhibited a breakdown field (EBD) over 6 MV/cm and a dielectric constant (κ) over 6. It is suggested that residual OH bonding in the AlOx thin films grown at temperatures below 375°C caused degradation of the breakdown field (EBD). With FC type mist CVD, the reaction proceeded efficiently (Ea = 22-24 kJ/mol) because the solvent, especially H2O, worked as a stronger oxygen source. The AlOx film could be grown at 450°C with a high deposition rate (23 nm/min) and smooth surface (RMS = 1.5 nm). Moreover, the AlOx thin films grown by mist CVD had excellent practicality as insulators because the gate leakage current (IG) of the oxide thin film transistor (TFT) with an IGZO/AlOx stack was suppressed below 1 pA at a gate voltage (VG) of 20 V.

  1. Theoretical studies on the stability, detonation performance and possibility of synthesis of the nitro derivatives of epoxyethane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueli; Gong, Xuedong

    2014-08-01

    Compounds with heterocyclic rings and NO2 groups have drawn much attention as high energy density compounds in recent years. In this study, the nitro derivatives 1-4 of epoxyethane (ETO) were investigated, and their synthetic possibilities in thermodynamics and thermal stability were predicted. The trigger bond for 1, 2 and 3 is the C-C bond, but for 4 it is the C-NO2 bond. The bond dissociation energies (EBDs) were estimated to be 205.40-164.86 kJ mol(-1) and h 50s were 53-126 cm. EBD, h 50 and energy gap all decrease from 1 to 4. A linear relationship exists between the strain energy and the number of the NO2 group. Derivative 2 has a zero oxygen balance and possesses the best detonation properties (D=8.77 km s(-1) and P=33.88 GPa) as a single explosive. Derivatives 3 and 4 used as oxidizers in the composite explosives of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) produce very good detonation performance (D=9.36 km s(-1), P=40.15 GPa and I s = 281.56 s for 3/RDX, and D=9.45 km s(-1), P=41.04 GPa and I s=280.34 s for 4/RDX). The intermolecular hydrogen bonding and dispersion interactions of 3/RDX and 4/RDX show that the compatibilities of these composites are acceptable. PMID:25092241

  2. Disability-adjusted life years in the assessment of health effects of traffic-related air pollution.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Ł; Badyda, A J; Gayer, A; Mucha, D

    2015-01-01

    Traffic-related air pollutants have an impact on human health and have been recognized as one of the main stressors that cause mortality and morbidity in urban areas. Research confirms that citizens living in the vicinity of main roads are strongly exposed to high concentrations of numerous air pollutants. In the present study the measurements of traffic-related parameters such as density, velocity, and structure were performed for cross-sections of selected street canyons in Warsaw, the capital city of Poland. In addition, the results of the general traffic measurements were used to describe the number of cars crossing the border of the city. Vehicle emissions of PM10 were calculated for the whole city area and changes of the PM10 concentration were modeled to present the exposure to this pollutant that could be attributable to traffic. The principles of the environmental burden of disease (EBD) were used. The assessment of the impact of traffic-related air pollutants on human health was made. The results, presented in disability-adjusted life years (DALY), were based on the outcomes of the study conducted in 2008-2012 in Warsaw, one the most congested agglomerations in Europe, and included the health damage effect of the exposure to high concentrations of air pollutants. DALY calculations were performed in accordance to the methodologies used in renowned international scientific research on EBD. PMID:25310938

  3. Executive functioning: developmental consequences on adolescents with histories of maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Kirke-Smith, Mimi; Henry, Lucy; Messer, David

    2014-09-01

    Research suggests that children exposed to maltreatment have deficits in executive functioning (EF) but few studies have focused on the adolescent age group. We investigated whether maltreated adolescents had lower EF abilities compared to a group of non-maltreated adolescents. Forty adolescents with histories of child maltreatment, together with a comparison group of 40 non-maltreated adolescents matched for age, completed a comprehensive battery of EF tasks. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses, controlling for IQ, were carried out using each of the EF measures as dependent variables to examine group differences. Maltreated adolescents had significantly lower performance than non-maltreated adolescents on tasks assessing executive loaded working memory, fluency, and inhibition, although switching was not impaired. Emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) were included in additional regression analyses to examine whether these variables would explain the group differences. The inclusion of EBD variables had some effect on group differences, as expected, but did not eliminate them. These findings support the theory that impairments in EF may be one underlying reason why adolescents with histories of maltreatment struggle to cope both inside and outside the classroom. PMID:24684281

  4. Intraparenchymal ultrasound application and improved distribution of infusate with convection-enhanced delivery in rodent and nonhuman primate brain.

    PubMed

    Mano, Yui; Saito, Ryuta; Haga, Yoichi; Matsunaga, Tadao; Zhang, Rong; Chonan, Masashi; Haryu, Shinya; Shoji, Takuhiro; Sato, Aya; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Tsuruoka, Noriko; Nishiyachi, Keisuke; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an effective drug delivery method that delivers high concentrations of drugs directly into the targeted lesion beyond the blood-brain barrier. However, the drug distribution attained using CED has not satisfactorily covered the entire targeted lesion in tumors such as glioma. Recently, the efficacy of ultrasound assistance was reported for various drug delivery applications. The authors developed a new ultrasound-facilitated drug delivery (UFD) system that enables the application of ultrasound at the infusion site. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the UFD system and to examine effective ultrasound profiles. METHODS The authors fabricated a steel bar-based device that generates ultrasound and enables infusion of the aqueous drug from one end of the bar. The volume of distribution (Vd) after infusion of 10 ml of 2% Evans blue dye (EBD) into rodent brain was tested with different frequencies and applied voltages: 252 kHz/30 V; 252 kHz/60 V; 524 kHz/13 V; 524 kHz/30 V; and 524 kHz/60 V. In addition, infusion of 5 mM gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) was tested with 260 kHz/60 V, the distribution of which was evaluated using a 7-T MRI unit. In a nonhuman primate (Macaca fascicularis) study, 300 μl of 1 mM Gd-DTPA/EBD was infused. The final distribution was evaluated using MRI. Two-sample comparisons were made by Student t-test, and 1-way ANOVA was used for multiple comparisons. Significance was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS After infusion of 10 μl of EBD into the rat brain using the UFD system, the Vds of EBD in the UFD groups were significantly larger than those of the control group. When a frequency of 252 kHz was applied, the Vd of the group in which 60 V was applied was significantly larger than that of the group in which 30 V was used. When a frequency of 524 kHz was applied, the Vd tended to increase with application of a higher voltage; however, the differences were not significant (1-way

  5. Sequential analysis applied to clinical trials in dentistry: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bogowicz, P; Flores-Mir, C; Major, P W; Heo, G

    2008-01-01

    Clinical trials employ sequential analysis for the ethical and economic benefits it brings. In dentistry, as in other fields, resources are scarce and efforts are made to ensure that patients are treated ethically. The objective of this systematic review was to characterise the use of sequential analysis for clinical trials in dentistry. We searched various databases from 1900 through to January 2008. Articles were selected for review if they were clinical trials in the field of dentistry that had applied some form of sequential analysis. Selection was carried out independently by two of the authors. We included 18 trials from various specialties, which involved many different interventions. We conclude that sequential analysis seems to be underused in this field but that there are sufficient methodological resources in place for future applications.Evidence-Based Dentistry (2008) 9, 55-62. doi:10.1038/sj.ebd.6400587. PMID:18584009

  6. Enhanced Breakdown Reliability and Spatial Uniformity of Atomic Layer Deposited High-k Gate Dielectrics on Graphene via Organic Seeding Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Vinod; Jariwala, Deep; Filippone, Stephen; Karmel, Hunter; Johns, James; Alaboson, Justice; Marks, Tobin; Lauhon, Lincoln; Hersam, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-thin high- κ top-gate dielectrics are essential for high-speed graphene-based nanoelectronic circuits. Motivated by the need for high reliability and spatial uniformity, we report here the first statistical analysis of the breakdown characteristics of dielectrics grown on graphene. Based on these measurements, a rational approach is devised that simultaneously optimizes the gate capacitance and the key parameters of large-area uniformity and dielectric strength. In particular, vertically heterogeneous oxide stacks grown via atomic-layer deposition (ALD) seeded by a molecularly thin perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) organic monolayer result in improved reliability (Weibull shape parameter β > 25) compared to the control dielectric directly grown on graphene without PTCDA (β < 1). The optimized sample also showed a large breakdown strength (Weibull scale parameter, EBD > 7 MV/cm) that is comparable to that of the control dielectric grown on Si substrates.

  7. Bis-butanediol-mercapturic acid (bis-BDMA) as a urinary biomarker of metabolic activation of butadiene to its ultimate carcinogenic species

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Natalia Y.

    2014-01-01

    Human carcinogen 1,3-butadiene (BD) undergoes metabolic activation to 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethylvinyl ketone (HMVK), 3,4-epoxy-1,2-butanediol (EBD) and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB). Among these, DEB is by far the most genotoxic metabolite and is considered the ultimate carcinogenic species of BD. We have shown previously that BD-exposed laboratory mice form 8- to 10-fold more DEB–DNA adducts than rats exposed at the same conditions, which may be responsible for the enhanced sensitivity of mice to BD-mediated cancer. In the present study, we have identified 1,4-bis-(N-acetyl-l-cystein-S-yl)butane-2,3-diol (bis-BDMA) as a novel DEB-specific urinary biomarker. Isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry was employed to quantify bis-BDMA and three other BD-mercapturic acids, 2-(N-acetyl-l-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-l-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxy-but-3-ene (MHBMA, from EB), 4-(N-acetyl-l-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA, from HMVK) and 4-(N-acetyl-l-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutane (THBMA, from EBD), in urine of confirmed smokers, occupationally exposed workers and BD-exposed laboratory rats. Bis-BDMA was formed in a dose-dependent manner in urine of rats exposed to 0–200 p.p.m. BD by inhalation, although it was a minor metabolite (1%) as compared with DHBMA (47%) and THBMA (37%). In humans, DHBMA was the most abundant BD-mercapturic acid excreted (93%), followed by THBMA (5%) and MHBMA (2%), whereas no bis-BDMA was detected. These results reveal significant differences in metabolism of BD between rats and humans. PMID:24531806

  8. Isoflurane post-treatment improves pulmonary vascular permeability via upregulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiang; Hu, Rong; Sun, Yu; Li, Qifang; Jiang, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Isoflurane (ISO) has been shown to attenuate acute lung injury (ALI). Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression provide cytoprotection in lung and vascular injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of post-treatment with isoflurane on lung vascular permeability and the role of HO-1 in an ALI rat model induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: sham group, sham rats post-treated with vehicle (Sham); CLP group, CLP rats post-treated with vehicle (CLP); ISO group, CLP rats post-treated with isoflurane (ISO); and ZnPP group, CLP rats injected with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, 1 hour before the operation, and post-treated with isoflurane (ZnPP). Isoflurane (1.4%) was administered 2 hour after CLP. At 24 hour after CLP, the extent of ALI was evaluated by lung wet/dry ratio, Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation, lung permeability index (LPI), as well as histological and immunohistochemical examinations. We also determined pulmonary iNOS and HO-1 expression. Compared with the CLP group, the isoflurane post-treatment group showed improved pulmonary microvascular permeability as detected by EBD extravasation, LPI, as well as histological and immunohistochemical examinations. Furthermore, isoflurane decreased iNOS and increased HO-1 expression in lung tissue. Pretreatment with ZnPP prevented the protective effects of isoflurane in rats. These findings indicate that the protective role of isoflurane post-conditioning against CLP-induced lung injury may be associated with its role in upregulating HO-1 in ALI. PMID:23919323

  9. Assessing changes in vascular permeability in a hamster model of viral hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of RNA viruses cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), in which proinflammatory mediators released from infected cells induce increased permeability of the endothelial lining of blood vessels, leading to loss of plasma volume, hypotension, multi-organ failure, shock and death. The optimal treatment of VHF should therefore include both the use of antiviral drugs to inhibit viral replication and measures to prevent or correct changes in vascular function. Although rodent models have been used to evaluate treatments for increased vascular permeability (VP) in bacterial sepsis, such studies have not been performed for VHF. Results Here, we use an established model of Pichinde virus infection of hamsters to demonstrate how changes in VP can be detected by intravenous infusion of Evans blue dye (EBD), and compare those measurements to changes in hematocrit, serum albumin concentration and serum levels of proinflammatory mediators. We show that EBD injected into sick animals in the late stage of infection is rapidly sequestered in the viscera, while in healthy animals it remains within the plasma, causing the skin to turn a marked blue color. This test could be used in live animals to detect increased VP and to assess the ability of antiviral drugs and vasoactive compounds to prevent its onset. Finally, we describe a multiplexed assay to measure levels of serum factors during the course of Pichinde arenavirus infection and demonstrate that viremia and subsequent increase in white blood cell counts precede the elaboration of inflammatory mediators, which is followed by increased VP and death. Conclusions This level of model characterization is essential to the evaluation of novel interventions designed to control the effects of virus-induced hypercytokinemia on host vascular function in VHF, which could lead to improved survival. PMID:20846417

  10. Substrate-Dependent Regulation of Anaerobic Degradation Pathways for Toluene and Ethylbenzene in a Denitrifying Bacterium, Strain EbN1

    PubMed Central

    Kühner, Simon; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Fritz, Ingo; Wruck, Wasco; Hultschig, Claus; Hufnagel, Peter; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Rabus, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and ethylbenzene is of environmental concern and biochemical interest due to toxicity and novel reactions, respectively. The denitrifying strain EbN1 is unique in anaerobically degrading both alkylbenzenes via different pathways which converge at benzoyl coenzyme A. The organization of genes involved in both pathways was only recently determined for strain EbN1. In the present study, global expression analysis (DNA microarray and proteomics) indicated involvement of several thus-far-unknown proteins in the degradation of both alkylbenzenes. For example, orf68 and orf57, framing the ebd operon, are implicated in ethylbenzene degradation, and the ebA1932 and ebA1936 genes, located 7.2 kb upstream of the bbs operon, are implicated in toluene degradation. In addition, expression studies were now possible on the level of the complete pathways. Growth experiments demonstrated that degradative capacities for toluene and ethylbenzene could be simultaneously induced, regardless of the substrate used for adaptation. Regulation was studied at the RNA (real-time reverse transcription-PCR and DNA microarray) and protein (two-dimensional-difference gel electrophoresis) level by using cells adapted to anaerobic growth with benzoate, toluene, ethylbenzene, or a mixture of toluene and ethylbenzene. Expression of the two toluene-related operons (bss and bbs) was specifically induced in toluene-adapted cells. In contrast, genes involved in anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation were induced in ethylbenzene- and toluene-adapted cells, suggesting that toluene may act as a gratuitous inducer. In agreement with the predicted sequential regulation of the ethylbenzene pathway, Ebd proteins (encoding subunits of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase) were formed in ethylbenzene- but not in acetophenone-adapted cells, while Apc proteins (subunits of predicted acetophenone carboxylase) were formed under both conditions. PMID:15687214

  11. Fabrication of p-{beta}-Fe{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}Si{sub 2}/nSi heterostructure diode and their electrical and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, T.; Katsumata, H.; Makita, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Uekusa, S.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of p-type {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} layers on n-type Si(100) substrates and the investigation of their p-n diode characteristics. Since the undoped {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} layers have typically shown n-type conductivity, the p-type layers were formed by the introduction of Mn impurity into {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} layers using two types of doping methods; one is an Electron-Beam-Deposition (EBD) procedure of Fe{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x < {approximately}0.1) at room temperature and subsequent annealing at 900 C for 1--120 min, where FeSi{sub 2} ingots added with Mn({approximately}10%) were used as starting materials. The other is a {sup 55}Mn{sup +}-implantation into {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} layers formed by EBD and subsequent annealing at 850 C for 1--120 min. From van der Pauw measurements, p-type {beta}-Fe{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}Si{sub 2} layers with the resistivity of 0.0036--0.031 {Omega}{center{underscore}dot}cm and hole mobility of 11.9--89.0 cm{sup 2}/V{center{underscore}dot}sec were found to be successfully formed on n-Si substrates by both doping methods. The p-n diode characteristics of these heterostructure diodes were investigated by I-V and C-V measurements. The results indicate that the carrier distribution does not agree with either ideal one-side step or one-side slop junctions, although optical transmittance and reflectance measurements indicate that the silicide/Si interface is of good quality.

  12. Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes After Early Exposure to Anesthesia and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katusic, Slavica K.; Colligan, Robert C.; Wilder, Robert T.; Voigt, Robert G.; Olson, Michael D.; Sprung, Juraj; Weaver, Amy L.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Warner, David O.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Annually, millions of children are exposed to anesthetic agents that cause apoptotic neurodegeneration in immature animals. To explore the possible significance of these findings in children, we investigated the association between exposure to anesthesia and subsequent (1) learning disabilities (LDs), (2) receipt of an individualized education program for an emotional/behavior disorder (IEP-EBD), and (3) scores of group-administered achievement tests. METHODS: This was a matched cohort study in which children (N = 8548) born between January 1, 1976, and December 31, 1982, in Rochester, Minnesota, were the source of cases and controls. Those exposed to anesthesia (n = 350) before the age of 2 were matched to unexposed controls (n = 700) on the basis of known risk factors for LDs. Multivariable analysis adjusted for the burden of illness, and outcomes including LDs, receipt of an IEP-EBD, and the results of group-administered tests of cognition and achievement were outcomes. RESULTS: Exposure to multiple, but not single, anesthetic/surgery significantly increased the risk of developing LDs (hazard ratio: 2.12 [95% confidence interval: 1.26–3.54]), even when accounting for health status. A similar pattern was observed for decrements in group-administered tests of achievement and cognition. However, exposure did not affect the rate of children receiving an individualized education program. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated exposure to anesthesia and surgery before the age of 2 was a significant independent risk factor for the later development of LDs but not the need for educational interventions related to emotion/behavior. We cannot exclude the possibility that multiple exposures to anesthesia/surgery at an early age may adversely affect human neurodevelopment with lasting consequence. PMID:21969289

  13. Environmental Burden of Disease in Europe: Assessing Nine Risk Factors in Six Countries

    PubMed Central

    Knol, Anne B.; Jantunen, Matti; Lim, Tek-Ang; Conrad, André; Rappolder, Marianne; Carrer, Paolo; Fanetti, Anna-Clara; Kim, Rokho; Buekers, Jurgen; Torfs, Rudi; Iavarone, Ivano; Classen, Thomas; Hornberg, Claudia; Mekel, Odile C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental health effects vary considerably with regard to their severity, type of disease, and duration. Integrated measures of population health, such as environmental burden of disease (EBD), are useful for setting priorities in environmental health policies and research. This review is a summary of the full Environmental Burden of Disease in European countries (EBoDE) project report. Objectives: The EBoDE project was set up to provide assessments for nine environmental risk factors relevant in selected European countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands). Methods: Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were estimated for benzene, dioxins, secondhand smoke, formaldehyde, lead, traffic noise, ozone, particulate matter (PM2.5), and radon, using primarily World Health Organization data on burden of disease, (inter)national exposure data, and epidemiological or toxicological risk estimates. Results are presented here without discounting or age-weighting. Results: About 3–7% of the annual burden of disease in the participating countries is associated with the included environmental risk factors. Airborne particulate matter (diameter ≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) is the leading risk factor associated with 6,000–10,000 DALYs/year and 1 million people. Secondhand smoke, traffic noise (including road, rail, and air traffic noise), and radon had overlapping estimate ranges (600–1,200 DALYs/million people). Some of the EBD estimates, especially for dioxins and formaldehyde, contain substantial uncertainties that could be only partly quantified. However, overall ranking of the estimates seems relatively robust. Conclusions: With current methods and data, environmental burden of disease estimates support meaningful policy evaluation and resource allocation, including identification of susceptible groups and targets for efficient exposure reduction. International exposure monitoring standards would enhance data quality and improve

  14. Sorafenib Decreases Tumor Exposure to an Anti-carcinoembryonic Antigen Monoclonal Antibody in a Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Veena A; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    In this investigation, we test the hypothesis that treatment with sorafenib, an anti-angiogenic agent, decreases tumor vascularization and, consequently, hinders the delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to xenograft tumors. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expressing tumor xenografts were divided into control and sorafenib-treated groups. Sorafenib was administered to the latter group at 50 mg/kg IP every 48 h, starting 4 days post-tumor implantation. When tumors attained a size of 200-300 mm(3), mice were evaluated for (a) tumor microvessel density (using immunohistochemical analysis), (b) tumor macromolecular extravasation (using Evans Blue Dye (EBD)), (c) pharmacokinetics of an anti-CEA mAb, T84.66, following an intravenous dose of 10 mg/kg, and (d) intra-tumoral spatial distribution of T84.66 (using autoradiography). Sorafenib treatment resulted in a substantial reduction in tumor growth rate, a visible reduction in tumor microvessel density, and in a 46.4% decrease in EBD extravasation in tumor tissue (p < 0.0455). For control and treated mice, no significant difference was found for the area under the mAb plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-7d): 1.67 × 10(3) ± 1.28 × 10(2) vs. 1.76 × 10(3) ± 1.75 × 10(2) nM × day, p = 0.51). However, tumor AUC(0-7d) was reduced by 40.8% in sorafenib-treated mice relative to that observed in control mice (5.61 × 10(2) ± 4.27 × 10(1) vs. 9.48 × 10(2) ± 5.61 × 10(1) nM × day, p < 0.001). Sorafenib therapy was also found to markedly alter mAb tumor spatial distribution. The results collectively suggest that sorafenib treatment causes a significant reduction in mAb delivery to, and distribution within, solid tumors. PMID:27029796

  15. Cardiopulmonary bypass increases pulmonary microvascular permeability through the Src kinase pathway: Involvement of caveolin-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUNWEN; JIANG, ZHAOLEI; BAO, CHUNRONG; MEI, JU; ZHU, JIAQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Changes in pulmonary microvascular permeability following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the underlying mechanisms have not yet been established. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the alterations in pulmonary microvascular permeability following CPB and the underlying mechanism. The pulmonary microvascular permeability was measured using Evans Blue dye (EBD) exclusion, and the neutrophil infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine secretion was investigated. In addition, the activation of Src kinase and the phosphorylation of caveolin-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) was examined. The results revealed that CPB increased pulmonary microvascular leakage, neutrophil count and proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and activated Src kinase. The administration of PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase, decreased the activation of Src kinase and attenuated the increase in pulmonary microvascular permeability observed following CPB. Two important proteins associated with vascular permeability, caveolin-1 and VE-cadherin, were significantly activated at 24 h in the lung tissues following CPB, which correlated with the alterations in pulmonary microvascular permeability and Src kinase. PP2 administration inhibited their activation, suggesting that they are downstream factors of Src kinase activation. The data indicated that the Src kinase pathway increased pulmonary microvascular permeability following CPB, and the activation of caveolin-1 and VE-cadherin may be involved. Inhibition of this pathway may provide a potential therapy for acute lung injury following cardiac surgery. PMID:26847917

  16. Adenosine receptor agonist NECA increases cerebral extravasation of fluorescein and low molecular weight dextran independent of blood-brain barrier modulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Chung; Yang, Ya Lan; Liao, Kate Hsiurong; Lai, Ted Weita

    2016-01-01

    Conventional methods for therapeutic blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption facilitate drug delivery but are cumbersome to perform. A previous study demonstrated that adenosine receptor (AR) stimulation by 5′-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) increased the extravasation of intravascular tracers into the brain and proposed that AR agonism may be an effective method for therapeutic BBB disruption. We attempted to confirm the extravasation of tracers into the brain and also investigated tracer extravasation into peripheral organs and tracer retention in the blood. We found that NECA not only increased the extravasation of intravascular fluorescein and low molecular weight dextran into the brain of mice but also increased the concentrations of these tracers in the blood. In fact, the brain:blood ratio-normalized BBB permeability for either tracer is actually decreased by NECA administration. Elevated blood urea nitrogen levels in mice following NECA treatment suggested that renal function impairment was a probable cause of tracer retention. Therefore, NECA has almost no effect on the extravasation of intravascular Evans blue dye (EBD), an albumin-binding tracer with little renal clearance. Rather than inducing BBB disruption, our study demonstrated that NECA increased tracer extravasation into the brain by increasing the concentration gradient of the tracer across the BBB. PMID:27025761

  17. A Model for an Object Created

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeok-Je

    2006-04-01

    Before going into the model treated here, it is need to know the nature of energy. Energy itself is active and constantly move. This fact results in the phenomenon of energy spread. The phenomenon of energy spread is under the law of energy conservation. For confining energy, additional energy is required. Suppose there were gathered energies for some reason. Creation of some objects is the result of the gathered energy and energy spread. In the case where a new object is more stable, after some fluctuation, energy from the object goes away so that a new object remains behind. For this, the enegy, E, larger than the sum of energy barrier, Eb, and the difference between the energy state of the object and initial energy state, dE, is required. E > Eb+dE Thus, a new object is created. It is an irreversible process. Adaptation is a sort of creation with no energy barrier. In the case where there is no energy source near the object, the created object is relatively inactive one. This is matter. To reduce the increased energy state due to gravitation, matters gather. In the case where there is an energy source near matters, a new object can be created around or within the matters. The created object will be active. This is life.

  18. “Evidence-Based Dentistry in Oral Surgery: Could We Do Better?”

    PubMed Central

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; Verlato, Giuseppe; Frustaci, Andrea; de Gemmis, Antonio; Rigoni, Giovanni; De Santis, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD), like Evidence-based Medicine (EBM), was born in order to seek the “best available research evidence” in the field of dentistry both in research and clinical routine. But evidence is not clearly measurable in all fields of healthcare: in particular, while drug effect is rather independent from clinician’s characteristics, the effectiveness of surgical procedures is strictly related to surgeon’s expertise, which is difficult to quantify. The research problems of dentistry have a lot in common with other surgical fields, where at the moment the best therapeutic recommendations and guidelines originates from an integration of evidence-based medicine and data from consensus conferences. To cope with these problems, new instruments have been developed, aimed at standardizing clinical procedures (CAD-CAM technology) and at integrating EBM achievements with the opinions of expert clinicians (GRADE System). One thing we have to remember however: it is necessary to use the instruments developed by evidence-based medicine but is impossible to produce sound knowledge without considering clinical expertise and quality of surgical procedures simultaneously. Only in this way we will obtain an evidence-based dentistry both in dental research and clinical practice, which is up to third millennium standards. PMID:20871758

  19. Arterial intimal-medial permeability and coevolving structural responses to defined shear-stress exposures.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald L

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the evolution of arterial shear stress-induced intimal albumin permeability and coevolving structural responses in swine arteries. Uniform laminar shear-stress responses were compared with those of a simulated "flow separation" stress field. These fields were created using specially designed flow-configuring devices in an experimentally controlled, metabolically supported, ex vivo thoracoabdominal aorta preparation. The Evans blue dye-albumin complex (EBD-alb) permeability patterns that evolved were measured by a reflectometric method. The corresponding tissue structural responses were evaluated by histological, immunostaining, and ultrastructural microscopic techniques. It was shown that when a previously in vivo-adapted artery is challenged by a new mechanochemical environment, it undergoes a sequence of adaptive processes over the ensuing 95 h. Intimal regions of laminar shear-stress exposure ( approximately 16 dyn/cm(2)) responded initially (23 h) with an increase in permeability. With continued stress exposure, intimal-medial structural changes ensued that restored the artery to a physiologically normal permeability. Over this same period, adjacent endothelial regions exposed to simulated flow separation stress fields ( approximately 0.03-0.27 dyn/cm(2)) developed early and progressively increasing permeability. This was associated with formation of local intimal edema, loss of intimal matrix material, and development of distinctively raised, gelatinous-appearing intimal lesions having a potentially preatheromatous architecture. PMID:12388284

  20. [Towards bacterial detection in labile blood products].

    PubMed

    Morel, P

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood components represents today the highest infectious risk in blood transfusion, the risk is particularly high when it affects platelet concentrates. The prevention methods developed over the past ten years (donor selection, phlebotomy site preparation, first 30 ml diversion, systematic leuko-reduction...) which aimed at limiting the introduction of bacteria in donations and bacterial proliferation, has reduced the risk of transfusion reaction due to the bacterial contamination. Improving strategies for reducing the risks of bacterial contamination is one of the priorities of the French National Blood Transfusion Service (l'Etablissement français du sang - EFS). It is essential to improve existent prevention methods and develop the implication of all the actors (from donation to transfusion) involved in the prevention of this risk. Bacterial detection or pathogens inactivation are now available and are able to reduce (for detection) or prevent (for inactivation) the occurrence of reaction due to bacterial contamination of PC. Up to now, the choice is in favour of bacterial detection. Three methods (BacT/Alert, BioMerieux; eBDS, Pall; ScanSystem, Hemosystem) of detection of bacterial contamination in PC can be generalised now. Adaptations, need for their implementation are acceptable, especially concerning PC availability. PMID:15894499

  1. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  2. Cyclotron Autoresonance Accelerator for Electron Beam Dry Scrubbing of Flue Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao

    1997-05-01

    A novel, self-scanning, highly-efficient electron beam source is proposed for electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) of flue gases. The beam is prepared using cyclotron autoresonance acceleration (CARA),(C. Wang and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. E 51), 2456 (1995); B. Hafizi, P. Sprangle , and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. E 50, 3077 (1994). which has already demonstrated an rf efficiency of above 90% experimentally.(M. A. LaPointe, R. B. Yoder, C. Wang, A. K. Ganguly, and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 2718 (1996). Simulations were done for a 250 kV, 25 A warm beam which is accelerated in a 130 cm CARA using an rf power of 21 MW at 2.856 GHz. The accelerated beam has an energy of up to 1.0 MV, corresponding to 98% acceleration efficiency. The beam can scan across the escaping flue gas with a conical angle of about 11 degrees after a 60-cm down-tapered-to-zero magnetic field. The conical scan angle is adjustable by changing the slope of the tapered magnetic field.

  3. Dielectric/metal sidewall diffusion barrier for Cu/porous ultralow-k interconnect technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Prasad, K.; Li, C. Y.; Lu, P. W.; Su, S. S.; Tang, L. J.; Gui, D.; Balakumar, S.; Shu, R.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2004-03-01

    With the acknowledged insufficiency of traditional Ta or TaN barriers, deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD), in the Cu/porous ultralow-k intermetal dielectric integration, an amorphous hydrogenated SiC (a-SiC:H)/Ta bilayer sidewall diffusion barrier has been fabricated using 0.13 μm Cu/porous ultralow-k [Porous-SiLK (Proprietary product from Dow Chemical Corporation, USA), k˜2.2] single damascene process. The electrical tests show that the line-to-line leakage current and the electrical breakdown field (EBD) of samples with this a-SiC:H/Ta dielectric/metal bilayer structure are significantly improved compared to the conventional PVD multi-stacked Ta(N) sidewall barrier. This improvement is mostly due to surface roughness modification after the deposition of a-SiC:H film, which, in addition to being a good barrier to Cu diffusion, can effectively "seal" the weak points on the surface of porous low-k material that are responsible for the sidewall barrier failure.

  4. Public health experts urge U.S. hospitals to be prepared as Ebola outbreak accelerates.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    With the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EBD) accelerating in West Africa, public health authorities are urging frontline providers in the United States to be vigilant in questioning patients who present with a suspected infectious disease, and in adhering to infection control practices. Recent travel to West Africa and contact with others who may have been exposed to EVD are key points that need to be covered at triage, say experts. The World Health Organization (WHO) indicates that mortality from the latest outbreak is 55%, although it is as high as 75% in Guinea. Health care workers are particularly vulnerable to EVD, with WHO noting that more than 250 workers in West Africa have contracted EVD and at least 120 have died from the disease. Experts say that one of the greatest times of risk for health care workers is while a patient is at triage because he or she has not yet been placed in isolation precautions. The CDC is recommending that hospitals rigorously apply standard infection control policies at a minimum, and that extra protective equipment may be required when there are body fluids in the patient environment. Hospitals in 27 states have reported dozens of suspected cases of EVD to the CDC, but at press time, none had yet tested positive. PMID:25291835

  5. An integrative variant analysis pipeline for accurate genotype/haplotype inference in population NGS data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Lu, James; Yu, Jin; Gibbs, Richard A; Yu, Fuli

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful approach for discovering genetic variation. Sensitive variant calling and haplotype inference from population sequencing data remain challenging. We describe methods for high-quality discovery, genotyping, and phasing of SNPs for low-coverage (approximately 5×) sequencing of populations, implemented in a pipeline called SNPTools. Our pipeline contains several innovations that specifically address challenges caused by low-coverage population sequencing: (1) effective base depth (EBD), a nonparametric statistic that enables more accurate statistical modeling of sequencing data; (2) variance ratio scoring, a variance-based statistic that discovers polymorphic loci with high sensitivity and specificity; and (3) BAM-specific binomial mixture modeling (BBMM), a clustering algorithm that generates robust genotype likelihoods from heterogeneous sequencing data. Last, we develop an imputation engine that refines raw genotype likelihoods to produce high-quality phased genotypes/haplotypes. Designed for large population studies, SNPTools' input/output (I/O) and storage aware design leads to improved computing performance on large sequencing data sets. We apply SNPTools to the International 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) Phase 1 low-coverage data set and obtain genotyping accuracy comparable to that of SNP microarray. PMID:23296920

  6. The e-SCRUB Machine: an 800-kV, 500-kW average power pulsed electron beam generator for flue-gas scrubbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, James R.; Briggs, Ray; Crewson, Walter F.; Johnson, R. D.; Ratafia-Brown, J. A.; Richardson, W. K.; Rienstra, W. W.; Ballard, Perry G.; Cukr, Jeffrey; Cassel, R. L.; Schlitt, Leland; Genuario, R. D.; Morgan, R. D.; Tripoli, G. A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper gives an overview of electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) to remove SOx and NOx from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. It also describes the e-SCRUB program, a program currently underway to commercialize this process with an integrated pulsed electron beam. The electron beam, together with injected water and ammonia, causes chemical reactions which convert the SOx and NOx into commercial grade agricultural fertilizer, a usable byproduct. The e-SCRUB facility is a test bed to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of a repetitive, reliable pulsed electron beam generator operating at average power levels of up to 1 MW. This facility contains the electron beam generator and all the auxiliary and support systems required by the machine, including a computer driven central experiment control system, a 100,000 SCFM flowing dry nitrogen load which simulates the characteristics of a power plant flue, and a 2 MVA dedicated electrical service to power the machine. The e-SCRUB electron beam machine is designed to produce an 800 kV pulsed electron beam with a repetition rate of 667 pps. The energy per pulse deposited into the flue gas is approximately 750 J. The pulsed power system converts the utility power input to a 667 pps, 800 kV pulse train which powers the electron gun. The functional units of the pulsed power system will be discussed in the paper, along with some preliminary experimental results.

  7. Rapid CO breath test screening of drugs for protective effects on ribavirin-induced hemolysis in a rabbit model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Wu, Chuang-Hong; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Ji, Kun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is a major side effect of ribavirin antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C. Ribavirin dose reduction may compromise the antiviral response and erythropoietin can take several weeks to alleviate anemia. The purpose of the present study was to screen potentially protective drugs against ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia in a rabbit model, using our modified CO breath test for measuring erythrocyte (RBC) lifespan, the gold standard diagnostic index of hemolysis. Fifteen rabbits were divided randomly into five groups (N  =  3/group): one vehicle control group, one ribavirin (only)-treated (RBV) group, and three groups initially treated with ribavirin only, followed by a combination of ribavirin with prednisone (RBV  +  Pred), polyene phosphatidyl choline (RBV  +  PPC), or reduced glutathione (RBV  +  GSH). RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO measured in a closed rebreath apparatus, blood volume measured by the Evan's blue dye (EBD) dilution test, and hemoglobin concentration data. The RBC lifespan was normal in the vehicle control group (44-60 d), but reduced significantly in all of the ribavirin-treated groups before the addition of screened drugs (17-35 d). RBC lifespan rebounded significantly with the addition of glutathione, but not with the addition of prednisone or polyene phosphatidyl choline. A similar overall drug effect pattern was seen in the hemoglobin concentration and reticulocyte count data. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study indicate that reduced glutathione can attenuate ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia, and that the RBC lifespan measured with our modified rapid CO breath test is feasible and reliable for use in animal studies. PMID:27506143

  8. Alleviation of Kainic Acid-Induced Brain Barrier Dysfunction by 4-O-Methylhonokiol in In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Yi; Ahn, Sun-Young; Yoo, Jae Hyeon; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate whether 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), a principal ingredient of Magnolia (M.) officinalis bark, alleviated acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) kainic acid- (KA-) induced brain blood barrier dysfunction (BBBD) via pathological examination and cytological analyses of the brain tissues of mice. KA (10–30 mg/kg) time- and dose-dependently increased the water content of brain tissues and induced edema and encephalopathy. However, pretreatment with MH (5 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the water content of the brain compared to that observed in the KA control group. Furthermore, MH significantly and dose-dependently reversed the remarkable variations in evan's blue dye (EBD) staining and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.). MH also decreased the elevated seizure scores that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice in a manner similar to scavengers such as DMTU and trolox. Additionally, MH significantly scavenged intracellular ROS and Ca2+ within hippocampal cells. The tight junction seals mediated by claudin (Cld-5) were also found to be modulated by MH. MH efficiently reduced 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC50, 52.4 mM) and •OH with an electron spin resonance (ESR) signal rate constant of 4 × 109 M−1 · S−1, which is close to the reactivity of the vitamin E analog trolox. Taken together, these results suggest that MH may enhance radical scavenging in lipid and hydrophobic environments, which may be important for the physiological activity of the barrier. PMID:25688368

  9. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers. PMID:25727266

  10. Expression and protective role of two novel NACHT-containing proteins in pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi Wei; Yu, Zhang Long; Xue, Na Na; Nie, Pin; Chang, Ming Xian

    2014-10-01

    Lower vertebrates have been found to possess over 200 NACHT-domain encoding genes; but, to date, very little is known about their functional activity. This article describes the sequences and expression analysis of two zebrafish NACHT-containing proteins, namely NALPL1 and NALPL2. In addition, the functions of zebrafish NALPL1 and NALPL2, which are absent for both amino-terminal effector-binding domain (EBD) and carboxy-terminal ligand-recognition domain (LRD), were investigated for the first time in fish species. The predicted NALPL1 and NALPL2 proteins consist of 651 and 847 amino acids (aa), respectively, with both molecules only containing NACHT domain, which were different from other NACHT-family members. Phylogenetic analysis showed that zebrafish NALPL1 and NALPL2 have a closer relationship with mammalian NALP subfamily than NOD subfamily. The differential expression patterns of NALPL1 and NALPL2 in development stages and organs were observed, suggesting the difference of action phase and effector organ of NALPL1 and NALPL2. When the modulation of NALPL1 and NALPL2 in pathogen infection was analyzed, it was found that the two molecules were upregulated by both bacterial and viral infection. Overexpression of NALPL1 and NALPL2 resulted in significant inhibition for intracellular Edwardsiella tarda growth. Further studies demonstrated that NALPL1 and NALPL2 also contributed to protection against viral infection. These results demonstrate that both NALPL1 and NALPL2 are important intracellular proteins in host surveillance against both bacterial and viral infection. Interestingly, the expression of downstream signaling genes was not affected by the overexpression of NALPL1 or NALPL2, but NOD1 and MDA5 were upregulated by NALPL1 or NALPL2 overexpression, suggesting that they likely act in pathogen infection through the interaction with other PRRs. PMID:24858030

  11. Evaluation of radiation exposure dose at double-balloon endoscopy for the patients with small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagura, Asuka; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Koyama, Shuji; Hinami, Tomoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diseases. Although fluoroscopy is used to confirm the position of endoscope at DBE, the endoscopist does not have the knowledge with regard to the radiation exposure dose. In this study, we evaluated the absorbed dose during DBE in patients with suspected or established small bowel diseases. This was a retrospective study in which the estimated fluoroscopic radiation absorbed doses loaded on the small bowel and skin were determined according to the data of the referential X-ray experiment with a human body phantom. The subjects were 415 DBEs preformed in total. The mean small bowel absorbed doses on antegrade and retrograde DBEs were 42.2 and 53.8 mGy, respectively, showing that the organ dose applied in retrograde DBE was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The mean skin absorbed doses of them were 79.2 and 101.0 mGy, respectively, showing that the dose was also significantly higher on retrograde DBE (P<0.0001). Of 27 cases who were applied endoscopic balloon dilation, the mean fluoroscopy time was 16.0 minutes, and mean small bowel and skin absorbed doses were 121.9 and 228.9 mGy, respectively. In conclusion, endoscopist should be careful for reducing the organ exposure dose at DBE, particularly for the lower abdominal region. Abbreviations: Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE), endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (DBERCP), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) PMID:27578908

  12. Burden of disease attributable to air pollutants from municipal solid waste incinerators in Seoul, Korea: a source-specific approach for environmental burden of disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Jung-Wk; Lee, Hyun-Jung

    2011-05-01

    Few studies have attempted to quantify the integrated health burden, incorporating both mortality and morbidity as these factors pertain to air pollutants, on the population in the vicinity of the incinerators. The aims of this study are to estimate the attributable burden of disease caused by incinerators in Seoul, Korea and to present an approach based on source-specific exposure for the estimation of the environmental burden of disease (EBD). With particular attention on the development of a measurement means of the source-specific, exposure-based population attributable fraction (PAF), we integrated air dispersion modeling, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the population distribution of exposure, and the exposure-response relationship. We then estimated the PAFs caused by additional concentrations of four air pollutants (PM(10), NO(2,) SO(2), and CO) emitted from four municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in Seoul in 2007. We, finally, estimated the attributable burden of disease, using the estimated PAF and the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) method developed by the Global Burden of Disease Group of the World Health Organization (WHO). The PAF for NO(2) to all-cause mortality was assessed at approximately 0.02% (95% CI: 0.003-0.036%), which was the highest among all air pollutants. The PAFs for respiratory and cardiovascular disease were 0.12% (95% CI: 0.01-0.16%) and 0.10% (95% CI: 0.04-0.16%), respectively. The sum of the attributable burden of disease for four pollutants was about 297 person-years (PYs) (95% CI: 121-472 PYs) when the incinerators observed to the emission standards. The attributable burdens of respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease were about 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively, of the total burden of respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease of Seoul citizens for the year 2007. Although the air emissions from one risk factor, an incinerator, are small, the burden of disease can be significant to the public health when

  13. In vitro corrosion testing of PVD coatings applied to a surgical grade Co-Cr-Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Bolton, J; Hu, X

    2002-06-01

    Toxic effects and biological reaction of metallic corrosion and wear products are an important concern for metal on metal artificial joints. Corrosion tests were conducted to study the susceptibility to pitting and localized corrosion, with three coatings, CrN, TiN and DLC, applied to a wrought high carbon Co-Cr-Mo alloy substrate material. Corrosion testing involved the measurement of potential time transients during immersion in a physiological solution and cyclic polarization of specimen potentials into the transpassive range followed by reversal of the potential to scan in the cathodic direction to regain the rest potential E(rest). Resistance to pitting and localized corrosion was assessed by determining the transpassive breakdown potential E(bd) and if any hysteresis generated during the reverse cyclic scan may have caused crossover with the original anodic scan. Three different surface coating conditions were tested namely: (1) as-coated, (2) polished, and (3) indented to penetrate the coating by diamond pyramid hardness indentor. Results showed that all three coatings produced significant improvements in corrosion resistance compared to performance of the wrought cobalt alloy but that some corrosive attack to both the CrN and TiN coatings occurred and some risk of attack to the cobalt alloy substrate existed due to coating defects or when damage to the coating occurred. TiN coatings were highly effective in preventing corrosion provided they were thick enough to produce complete coverage. Thin TiN coatings displayed some tendency to encourage localized attack of the cobalt alloy at coating defects or where the coating suffered mechanical damage. CrN coatings underwent transpassive breakdown more easily and some degree of pitting at defects within the coating was observed, especially when the CrN coating was polished before the test. No corrosive attack of the cobalt alloy substrate was observed when the CrN coating was mechanically damaged by indentation

  14. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  15. Processing-property relationships in epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    obtained from conventional, ex situ synthesis that requires high shear mixing of the organic and inorganic phases. Using the ex situ technique, we synthesized TiO{sub 2} particles (also {le}5nm in diameter) in a polyethylene glycol solution - see Figure 1(c) - and subsequently mixed them with the resin. The mixing process, even at low concentrations (1% by weight), resulted in the formation of aggregates of several hundred nanometers in size. We performed optical, thermomechanical, and electrical measurements of systems with similar weight fractions of TiO{sub 2} to evaluate the impact of particle size and dispersion on the macroscopic properties of the nanocomposite. In agreement with the TEM images, UV-visible transmittance spectra show the same optical properties for the unfilled resin and in situ nanocomposite owing to the small particle-cluster size. Because of the formation of clusters of comparable size to the wavelength of light in the visible range, the ex situ specimen showed decreased transmittance, producing an opaque composite. Moreover, we found that creating large and weak interfaces between the phases degrades the macroscopic thermomechanical and electrical properties of the specimen. The in situ nanocomposite exhibited superior mechanical performance compared to both the unfilled resin and ex situ nanocomposite over the entire temperature range. Notably, at the lowest measured temperature (-145 C), the increase in the storage modulus (G') relative to that of the unfilled resin is approximately 30%. Furthermore, the in situ technique did not degrade the thermodynamic properties of the polymer network. The glass-transition temperature (T{sub g}) remains unchanged. In contrast, the ex situ nanocomposite displayed a 55% relative decrease in Tg because of the formation of weak and large interfaces. This morphology is also associated with significant degradation of dielectric properties under high electric fields. The dielectric-breakdown strength (EBD) of the

  16. Seeding Experiment of Liquid Carbon Dioxide for Enhancing Winter-time Precipitation in Saga Prefecture,Northern Kyushu,Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakimizu, K.; Nishiyama, K.; Tomine, K.; Maki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Morita, O.

    2012-12-01

    Many droughts (shortage of water) have broken out by extreme small amount rainfall in recent Japan. So far,in order to prevent these droughts,artificial rainfall methods with 'AgI' or 'dry ice' have been widely used in Japan. However,these methods have many problems,which a large amount of overcooling liquid in the cumulus cloud was not able to be converted into precipitation efficiently. So as to solve these problems,new artificial rainfall method using liquid carbon dioxide (LC) was proposed by Fukuta (1996). This new method consists of the generation of ice particles by homogeneous nucleation using LC and the subsequent more effective growth for ice particles without competition process. And, this method is called 'Low-Level Penetration Seeding of Homogeneous Ice Nucleant (LOLEPSHIN)' ; this induces a 'Roll-up Expansion of Twin Horizontal Ice-crystal Thermals (RETHIT)' and a subsequent 'Falling growth-Induced Lateral Air Spreading (FILAS)'. This LC method was applied to thin super-cooled cumulus clouds in Saga prefecture, Northern Kyushu, Japan on February 4,2006. The seeding airplane took off the Atugi Airport in Kanagawa Prefecture toward the Iki Island around 0830JST. Many cloud bands were cofirmed in the flight going to the experimental area and the cloud base temperature was approximately -9C (1200m). Scince some young developing thin cumuli were found over the Iki Island, LC seeding to these clouds was carried out two times from 0841JST until 0919JST penetrating the -9C (1200m) altitude. The first precipitation seeding ebded in failure. The second penetration seeding was done for 115 seconds around 0917JST. This penetration led to success of developing one artificial echo (Echo I) in the leeward side of the Iki Island. Eco I moved from NNW to SSW. The maximum area of Echo I were 48km2 (at 1033JST) and first comfirmed by the Kyushu University radar (KU radar) at 1006JST (46 min. after LC seeding) around Mt.Sefuri in Saga Prefecture. It can be inferred that