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Sample records for ecg-triggered axial ct

  1. Age-related differences in image quality of prospectively ECG-triggered axial and helical scans for coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Takase, Makoto; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Yamashita, Haruyo; Uno, Kenji; Aoki, Shigeki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the underlying reasons for the occurrence of misalignment artifacts in prospectively ECG-triggered axial coronary CT angiography scans. In this study we analyzed 56 consecutive patients scanned in axial mode and 66 consecutive patients scanned in helical mode. Predictors for the occurrence of misalignment artifacts were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis for those patients scanned in the axial mode; advanced age was identified as the sole independent predictor (odds ratio: 1.088; 95 % CI: 1.012-1.170; p = 0.0228). In a comparison with the patients scanned in the helical mode, the image quality score for patients aged 65 years or older was significantly higher in helical mode than in axial mode (2.6 ± 0.5 and 2.4 ± 0.7, respectively; p = 0.0313). Misalignment artifacts in the image are more common in the elderly than in younger. Helical mode should be preferred in this older patient population to allow for good diagnostic image quality. PMID:26984733

  2. Evaluation of high-pitch flash scan for pulmonary venous CTA on a 128-slice dual source CT: compared with prospective ECG-triggered sequence scan.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li Xiu; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Bo; Yang, Wen Jie; Zhang, Yan Yan; Pan, Zi Lai; Yan, Fu Hua; Chen, Ke Min

    2013-10-01

    To compare the image quality (IQ) and radiation dose of high-pitch scan and prospective ECG-triggered sequence scan on a 128-slice DSCT system for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Pulmonary venous (PV) CTA was performed with two protocols, including high-pitch scan and prospective ECG-triggered sequence scan. For each protocol, 20 sex, age and body-mass-index (mean 24.2 kg/m(2)) matched patients were identified. Two experienced radiologists, who were blinded to the scan protocols, independently graded the CT images of the two groups by a 5-point scale for subjective IQ assessment. Measured CT attenuation (Hounsfield units ± standard deviation), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at various anatomic locations were also recorded for objective IQ evaluation. Radiation exposure parameters [dose length product (DLP) and effective radiation dose (ERD)] were compared. Twenty-three patients (57.5 %) showed an ECG pattern of AF in total. Subjective IQ was rated excellent in 100 % for the high-pitch scan group, while minor step artifacts were observed in two patients (10 %) with arrhythmia for the prospective ECG-triggered sequence group. There was no significant difference on IQ, neither by subjective, nor by objective measures (SNR, CNR) between the two groups. The ERD of high-pitch flash scan and prospective ECG-triggered sequence scan were 0.9 (± 0.25) and 2.9 (± 0.69) mSv, respectively. Significantly lower radiation was achieved by using high-pitch flash scan (P < 0.05). High-pitch flash scan can provide similar subjective and objective IQ compared with prospective ECG-triggered sequence scan for PV CTA, while radiation exposure was significantly reduced. PMID:23645131

  3. An automatic machine learning system for coronary calcium scoring in clinical non-contrast enhanced, ECG-triggered cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Leiner, Tim; Takx, Richard A. P.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Presence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events. We present a system using a forest of extremely randomized trees to automatically identify and quantify CAC in routinely acquired cardiac non-contrast enhanced CT. Candidate lesions the system could not label with high certainty were automatically identified and presented to an expert who could relabel them to achieve high scoring accuracy with minimal effort. The study included 200 consecutive non-contrast enhanced ECG-triggered cardiac CTs (120 kV, 55 mAs, 3 mm section thickness). Expert CAC annotations made as part of the clinical routine served as the reference standard. CAC candidates were extracted by thresholding (130 HU) and 3-D connected component analysis. They were described by shape, intensity and spatial features calculated using multi-atlas segmentation of coronary artery centerlines from ten CTA scans. CAC was identified using a randomized decision tree ensemble classifier in a ten-fold stratified cross-validation experiment and quantified in Agatston and volume scores for each patient. After classification, candidates with posterior probability indicating uncertain labeling were selected for further assessment by an expert. Images with metal implants were excluded. In the remaining 164 images, Spearman's p between automatic and reference scores was 0.94 for both Agatston and volume scores. On average 1.8 candidate lesions per scan were subsequently presented to an expert. After correction, Spearman's p was 0.98. We have described a system for automatic CAC scoring in cardiac CT images which is able to effectively select difficult examinations for further refinement by an expert.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT in young infant with complex congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zhong, Yu Min; Sun, Ai Min; Wang, Qian; Ouyang, Rong Zhen; Hu, Li Wei; Qiu, Han Sheng; Wang, Shi Yu; Li, Jian Ying

    2016-06-01

    To explore the clinical value and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv low-dose prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT (CCT) in young infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). A total of 102 consecutive infant patients (53 boys and 49 girls with mean age of 2.9 ± 2.4 m and weight less than 5 kg) with complex CHD were prospectively enrolled. Scans were performed on a 64-slice high definition CT scanner with low dose prospective ECG-triggering mode and reconstructed with 80 % adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. All studies were performed during free breathing with sedation. The subjective image quality was evaluated by 5-point grading scale and interobserver variability was calculated. The objective image noise (standard deviation, SD) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. The effective radiation dose from the prospective ECG-triggering mode was recorded and compared with the virtual conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode. The detection rate for the origin of coronary artery was calculated. All patients also underwent echocardiography before CCT examination. 81 patients had surgery and their preoperative CCT and echocardiography findings were compared with the surgical results and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were calculated for separate cardiovascular anomalies. Heart rates were 70-161 beats per minute (bpm) with mean value of 129.19 ± 14.52 bpm. The effective dose of 0.53 ± 0.15 mSv in the prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT was lower than the calculated value in a conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode (2.00 ± 0.35 mSv) (p < 0.001). The mean CNR and SD were 28.19 ± 13.00 and 15.75 ± 3.61HU, respectively. The image quality scores were 4.31 ± 0.36 and 4.29 ± 0.41 from reviewer 1 and 2 respectively with an excellent agreement between them (Kappa = 0.85). The detection rate for the origins of the left and right coronary

  5. Improvement of Image Quality and Diagnostic Performance by an Innovative Motion-Correction Algorithm for Prospectively ECG Triggered Coronary CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Yan, Hong-Bing; Mu, Chao-Wei; Gao, Yang; Hou, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Kun; Parinella, Ashley H.; Leipsic, Jonathon A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of a novel motion-correction algorithm (Snap-short Freeze, SSF) on image quality and diagnostic accuracy in patients undergoing prospectively ECG-triggered CCTA without administering rate-lowering medications. Materials and Methods Forty-six consecutive patients suspected of CAD prospectively underwent CCTA using prospective ECG-triggering without rate control and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Image quality, interpretability, and diagnostic performance of SSF were compared with conventional multisegment reconstruction without SSF, using ICA as the reference standard. Results All subjects (35 men, 57.6 ± 8.9 years) successfully underwent ICA and CCTA. Mean heart rate was 68.8±8.4 (range: 50–88 beats/min) beats/min without rate controlling medications during CT scanning. Overall median image quality score (graded 1–4) was significantly increased from 3.0 to 4.0 by the new algorithm in comparison to conventional reconstruction. Overall interpretability was significantly improved, with a significant reduction in the number of non-diagnostic segments (690 of 694, 99.4% vs 659 of 694, 94.9%; P<0.001). However, only the right coronary artery (RCA) showed a statistically significant difference (45 of 46, 97.8% vs 35 of 46, 76.1%; P = 0.004) on a per-vessel basis in this regard. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting ≥50% stenosis was improved using the motion-correction algorithm on per-vessel [96.2% (177/184) vs 87.0% (160/184); P = 0.002] and per-segment [96.1% (667/694) vs 86.6% (601/694); P <0.001] levels, but there was not a statistically significant improvement on a per-patient level [97.8 (45/46) vs 89.1 (41/46); P = 0.203]. By artery analysis, diagnostic accuracy was improved only for the RCA [97.8% (45/46) vs 78.3% (36/46); P = 0.007]. Conclusion The intracycle motion correction algorithm significantly improved image quality and diagnostic interpretability in patients undergoing CCTA with prospective ECG triggering and

  6. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  7. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-01-01

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube current×rotation time)∕pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning. PMID:19544765

  8. Can nontriggered thoracic CT be used for coronary artery calcium scoring? A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xueqian; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Groen, Jaap M.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Jong, Pim A. de; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Coronary artery calcium score, traditionally based on electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered computed tomography (CT), predicts cardiovascular risk. However, nontriggered CT is extensively utilized. The study-purpose is to evaluate the in vitro agreement in coronary calcium score between nontriggered thoracic CT and ECG-triggered cardiac CT.Methods: Three artificial coronary arteries containing calcifications of different densities (high, medium, and low), and sizes (large, medium, and small), were studied in a moving cardiac phantom. Two 64-detector CT systems were used. The phantom moved at 0–90 mm/s in nontriggered low-dose CT as index test, and at 0–30 mm/s in ECG-triggered CT as reference. Differences in calcium scores between nontriggered and ECG-triggered CT were analyzed by t-test and 95% confidence interval. The sensitivity to detect calcification was calculated as the percentage of positive calcium scores.Results: Overall, calcium scores in nontriggered CT were not significantly different to those in ECG-triggered CT (p > 0.05). Calcium scores in nontriggered CT were within the 95% confidence interval of calcium scores in ECG-triggered CT, except predominantly at higher velocities (≥50 mm/s) for the high-density and large-size calcifications. The sensitivity for a nonzero calcium score was 100% for large calcifications, but 46%± 11% for small calcifications in nontriggered CT.Conclusions: When performing multiple measurements, good agreement in positive calcium scores is found between nontriggered thoracic and ECG-triggered cardiac CT. Agreement decreases with increasing coronary velocity. From this phantom study, it can be concluded that a high calcium score can be detected by nontriggered CT, and thus, that nontriggered CT likely can identify individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, a zero calcium score in nontriggered CT does not reliably exclude coronary calcification.

  9. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal: an approach for perfusion imaging on the beating calf heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Karin; Karlsson, Daniel M.; Loenn, Urban; Traff, Stefan; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik

    2001-06-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) has successfully been used to map the myocardial perfusion on patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery on the arrested heart. The need for intra-operative evaluation of graft function is obvious in routine surgery but even more imperative when adapting new surgical techniques where the procedure is performed on the beating heart. When using LDPI on the beating heart, artifacts originating from the movement of the heart are superimposed on the Doppler signal. We have investigated a method to reduce these artifacts by controlling the sampling sequence with ECG-triggering. The method has been assessed in an animal model on the beating calf heart. After sternotomy, an area covering 1 cm2 was imaged at the anterior wall of the left ventricle. In this area, six perfusion images were captured each of them recorded at fixed, but different time intervals in the cardiac cycle. In addition continuous measurements at one spot was done during 1 - 2 minutes. The signal recorded during pumping action was high compared to measurements performed in the same muscle area during infusion of blood with a syringe pump. Repeated measurements captured at a fixed delay time from the R-peak in the same areas at the same heart frequency showed reproducibility. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal is the first step in our attempts to adapt LDPI to enabling assessment of myocardial perfusion on the beating heart. Further technical achievements and in-vivo investigations are, however, needed and will be performed by our research team in future studies.

  10. Profile of CT scan output dose in axial and helical modes using convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.; Widita, R.; Arif, I.; Dougherty, G.

    2016-03-01

    The profile of the CT scan output dose is crucial for establishing the patient dose profile. The purpose of this study is to investigate the profile of the CT scan output dose in both axial and helical modes using convolution. A single scan output dose profile (SSDP) in the center of a head phantom was measured using a solid-state detector. The multiple scan output dose profile (MSDP) in the axial mode was calculated using convolution between SSDP and delta function, whereas for the helical mode MSDP was calculated using convolution between SSDP and the rectangular function. MSDPs were calculated for a number of scans (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25). The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) for differing numbers of scans was compared to the value of CT dose index (CTDI). Finally, the edge values of MSDP for every scan number were compared to the corresponding MSAD values. MSDPs were successfully generated by using convolution between a SSDP and the appropriate function. We found that CTDI only accurately estimates MSAD when the number of scans was more than 10. We also found that the edge values of the profiles were 42% to 93% lower than that the corresponding MSADs.

  11. High-definition computed tomography for coronary artery stents: image quality and radiation doses for low voltage (100 kVp) and standard voltage (120 kVp) ECG-triggered scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Han Cheol; Wu, Ming-Ting; Hwangbo, Lee; Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Ki-Nam; Kim, Jin You; Jeong, Yeon Joo

    2015-06-01

    The noninvasive assessment of coronary stents by coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is an attractive method. However, the radiation dose associated with CCTA remains a concern for patients. The purpose of this study is to compare the radiation doses and image qualities of CCTA performed using tube voltages of 100 or 120 kVp for the evaluation of coronary stents. After receiving institutional review board approval, 53 consecutive patients with previously implanted stents (101 stents) underwent 64-slice CCTA. Patients were divided into three different protocol groups, namely, prospective ECG triggering at 100 kVp, prospective ECG triggering at 120 kVp, or retrospective gating at 100 kVp. Two reviewers qualitatively scored the quality of the resulting images for coronary stents and determined levels of artificial lumen narrowing (ALN), stent lumen attenuation increase ratio (SAIR), image noise, and radiation dose parameters. No significant differences were found between the three protocol groups concerning qualitative image quality or SAIR. Coronary lumen attenuation and in-stent attenuation of 100 kVp prospective CCTA (P-CCTA) were higher than in the 120 kVp P-CCTA protocol (all Ps < 0.001). Mean ALN was significantly lower for 100 kVp P-CCTA than for 100 kVp retrospective CCTA (R-CCTA, P = 0.007). The mean effective radiation dose was significantly lower (P < 0.001) for 100 kVp P-CCTA (3.3 ± 0.4 mSv) than for the other two protocols (100 kVp R-CCTA 6.7 ± 1.0 mSv, 120 kVp P-CCTA 4.6 ± 1.2 mSv). We conclude that the use of 100 kVp P-CCTA can reduce radiation doses for patients while maintaining the imaging quality of 100 kVp R-CCTA and 120 kVp P-CCTA for the evaluation of coronary stents. PMID:26022439

  12. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (<1 years old) with CHD undergoing 128-slice CT prospective ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode. PMID:26271472

  13. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  14. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  15. SU-D-9A-04: Brain PET/CT Imaging On a Scanner with a Large Axial Field-Of-View

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Gerbaudo, V; Hamberg, L; Seaver, K; Kijewski, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large axial field-of-view (FOV) PET/CT scanners are valued for high sensitivity. Brain PET image quality may depend on the head position within the FOV. We investigated the precision of activity estimation for brain PET imaging when the brain was positioned at the end (END) and in the middle (CEN) of the FOV. The additional CT dose for the CEN position was recorded. Methods: An image quality (Jaszczak) phantom and a striatal phantom were filled with F-18 and positioned in END and CEN locations. For each phantom and each location, we acquired a ∼1-hr listmode PET, rebinned the data into 10 frames with equal number of coincidence events, and reconstructed each frame using an iterative algorithm. For the striatal phantom, END and CEN were compared by drawing on each image three regions of interest (ROI) in axially separated uniform areas. The standard deviation of the activity estimation within each ROI was averaged over the 10 images. The coefficient of variation (CV) for activity estimation was calculated at each position. Image quality was assessed by inspecting the resolution bar pattern in the Jaszczak phantom at two different head positions. Results: The CV was the lowest for ROIs near the center of the FOV. For slices near the end, not only was the CV highest, but also the resolution pattern was degraded. CTDIvol summarized in the dose report indicated that the CT dose was ∼ 10% higher for CEN as compared to END position. Conclusion: Positioning the brain in the middle of the FOV in a large FOV PET/CT scanner allows more precise measurement of tracer uptake and better image quality at the cost of increased CT dose. For the end location longer scan times may minimize image quality degradation without any additional CT dose.

  16. Pulmonary Venous Anatomy Imaging with Low-Dose, Prospectively ECG-Triggered, High-Pitch 128-Slice Dual Source Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Lin, Kaity; Cheng, Teresa; Heist, E. Kevin; Hoffmann, Udo; Singh, Jagmeet; Truong, Quynh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Efforts to reduce radiation from cardiac computed tomography (CT) are essential. Using a prospectively triggered, high-pitch dual source CT (DSCT) protocol, we aim to determine the radiation dose and image quality (IQ) in patients undergoing pulmonary vein (PV) imaging. Methods and Results In 94 patients (61±9 years, 71% male) who underwent 128-slice DSCT (pitch 3.4), radiation dose and IQ were assessed and compared between 69 patients in sinus rhythm (SR) and 25 in atrial fibrillation (AF). Radiation dose was compared in a subset of 19 patients with prior retrospective or prospectively triggered CT PV scans without high-pitch. In a subset of 18 patients with prior magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for PV assessment, PV anatomy and scan duration were compared to high-pitch CT. Using the high-pitch protocol, total effective radiation dose was 1.4 [1.3, 1.9] mSv, with no difference between SR and AF (1.4 vs 1.5 mSv, p=0.22). No high-pitch CT scans were non-diagnostic or had poor IQ. Radiation dose was reduced with high-pitch (1.6 mSv) compared to standard protocols (19.3 mSv, p<0.0001). This radiation dose reduction was seen with SR (1.5 vs 16.7 mSv, p<0.0001) but was more profound with AF (1.9 vs 27.7 mSv, p=0.039). There was excellent agreement of PV anatomy (kappa 0.84, p<0.0001), and a shorter CT scan duration (6 minutes) compared to MRI (41 minutes, p<0.0001). Conclusions Using a high-pitch DSCT protocol, PV imaging can be performed with minimal radiation dose, short scan acquisition, and excellent IQ in patients with SR or AF. This protocol highlights the success of new cardiac CT technology to minimize radiation exposure, giving clinicians a new low-dose imaging alternative to assess PV anatomy. PMID:22586259

  17. Predicting the image noise level of prospective ECG-triggered coronary computed tomography angiography: quantitative measurement of thoracic component versus body mass index.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeongmin; Park, Chul Hwan; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using quantitatively measured thoracic components, as compared to body mass index (BMI), for predicting the image noise of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). One hundred subjects (M:F = 64:36; mean age, 55 ± 8.8 years) who underwent prospective electrocardiography-gated CCTA and low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) were analyzed retrospectively. The image noise of the CCTA was determined by the standard deviation of the attenuation value in a region of interest on the aortic root level. On the low-dose chest CT, the areas of the thoracic components were measured at the aortic root level. An auto-segmentation technique with the following threshold levels was used: quantitatively measured area of total thorax [QMAtotal: -910 to 1000 Hounsfield units (HU)], lung (QMAlung: -910 to -200 HU), fat (QMAfat: -200 to 0 HU), muscle (QMAmuscle: 0-300 HU), soft tissue (fat + muscle, QMAsoft tissue: -200 to 300 HU), bone (QMAbone: 300-1000 HU) and solid tissue (fat + muscle + bone, QMAsolid tissue: -200 to 1000 HU). The relationship between image noise and variable biometric parameters including QMA was analyzed, and the linear correlation coefficients were used as indicators of the strength of association. Among the variable biometric parameters, including BMI, QMAsolid tissue showed the highest correlation coefficient with image noise in all subjects (r = 0.804), males (r = 0.716), females (r = 0.889), the overweight (r = 0.556), and the non-overweight subgroups (r = 0.783). QMAsolid tissue can be used as a potential surrogate predictor of the image noise level in low tube voltage CCTA. PMID:26507324

  18. SU-E-I-15: Quantitative Evaluation of Dose Distributions From Axial, Helical and Cone-Beam CT Imaging by Measurement Using a Two-Dimensional Diode-Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S; Sonnad, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: The dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose.

  19. Assessment of image quality and radiation dose of prospectively ECG-triggered adaptive dual-source coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) with arrhythmia rejection algorithm in systole versus diastole: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ashley M; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Sidhu, Manavjot S; Abbara, Suhny; Brady, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Udo; Ghoshhajra, Brian B

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we sought to evaluate the image quality and effective radiation dose of prospectively ECG-triggered adaptive systolic (PTA-systolic) dual-source CTA versus prospectively triggered adaptive diastolic (PTA-diastolic) dual-source CTA in patients of unselected heart rate and rhythm. This retrospective cohort study consisted of 41 PTA-systolic and 41 matched PTA-diastolic CTA patients whom underwent clinically indicated 128-slice dual source CTA between December 2010 to June 2012. Image quality and motion artifact score (both on a Likert scale 1-4 with 4 being the best), effective dose, and CTDIvol were compared. The effect of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability [HRV] on image motion artifact score and CTDIvol was analyzed with Pearson's correlation coefficient. All 82 exams were considered diagnostic with 0 non-diagnostic segments. PTA-systolic CTA patients had a higher maximum HR, wider HRV, were less likely to be in sinus rhythm, and received less beta-blocker vs. PTA-diastolic CTA patients. No difference in effective dose was observed (PTA-systolic vs. PTA-diastolic CTA: 2.9 vs. 2.2 mSv, p = 0.26). Image quality score (3.3 vs. 3.5, p < 0.05) and motion artifact score (3.5 vs. 3.8, p < 0.05) were lower in PTA-systolic CTAs than in PTA-diastolic CTAs. For PTA-systolic CTAs, an increase in HR was not associated with a negative impact on motion artifact score nor CTDIvol. For PTA-diastolic CTA, an increase in HR was associated with increased motion artifacts and CTDIvol. HRV demonstrated no correlation with motion artifact and CTDIvol for both PTA-systolic and PTA-diastolic CTAs. In conclusion, both PTA-diastolic CTA and PTA-systolic CTA yielded diagnostic examinations at unselected heart rates and rhythms with similar effective radiation, but PTA-systolic CTA resulted in more consistent radiation exposure and image quality across a wide range of rates and rhythms. PMID:23526082

  20. Accuracy of finite element analyses of CT scans in predictions of vertebral failure patterns under axial compression and anterior flexion.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Timothy M; DelMonaco, Alex M; Morgan, Elise F

    2016-01-25

    Finite element (FE) models built from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans can provide patient-specific estimates of bone strength and fracture risk in the spine. While prior studies demonstrate accurate QCT-based FE predictions of vertebral stiffness and strength, the accuracy of the predicted failure patterns, i.e., the locations where failure occurs within the vertebra and the way in which the vertebra deforms as failure progresses, is less clear. This study used digital volume correlation (DVC) analyses of time-lapse micro-computed tomography (μCT) images acquired during mechanical testing (compression and anterior flexion) of thoracic spine segments (T7-T9, n=28) to measure displacements occurring throughout the T8 vertebral body at the ultimate point. These displacements were compared to those simulated by QCT-based FE analyses of T8. We hypothesized that the FE predictions would be more accurate when the boundary conditions are based on measurements of pressure distributions within intervertebral discs of similar level of disc degeneration vs. boundary conditions representing rigid platens. The FE simulations captured some of the general, qualitative features of the failure patterns; however, displacement errors ranged 12-279%. Contrary to our hypothesis, no differences in displacement errors were found when using boundary conditions representing measurements of disc pressure vs. rigid platens. The smallest displacement errors were obtained using boundary conditions that were measured directly by DVC at the T8 endplates. These findings indicate that further work is needed to develop methods of identifying physiological loading conditions for the vertebral body, for the purpose of achieving robust, patient-specific FE analyses of failure mechanisms. PMID:26792288

  1. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  2. In vivo three-dimensional intervertebral kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine during seated axial rotation and lateral bending via a fluoroscopy-to-CT registration approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Wang, Ting-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Jung; Shih, Ting-Fang

    2014-10-17

    Accurate measurement of the coupled intervertebral motions is helpful for understanding the etiology and diagnosis of relevant diseases, and for assessing the subsequent treatment. No study has reported the in vivo, dynamic and three-dimensional (3D) intervertebral motion of the cervical spine during active axial rotation (AR) and lateral bending (LB) in the sitting position. The current study fills the gap by measuring the coupled intervertebral motions of the subaxial cervical spine in ten asymptomatic young adults in an upright sitting position during active head LB and AR using a volumetric model-based 2D-to-3D registration method via biplane fluoroscopy. Subject-specific models of the individual vertebrae were derived from each subject's CT data and were registered to the fluoroscopic images for determining the 3D poses of the subaxial vertebrae that were used to obtain the intervertebral kinematics. The averaged ranges of motion to one side (ROM) during AR at C3/C4, C4/C5, C5/C6, and C6/C7 were 4.2°, 4.6°, 3.0° and 1.3°, respectively. The corresponding values were 6.4°, 5.2°, 6.1° and 6.1° during LB. Intervertebral LB (ILB) played an important role in both AR and LB tasks of the cervical spine, experiencing greater ROM than intervertebral AR (IAR) (ratio of coupled motion (IAR/ILB): 0.23-0.75 in LB, 0.34-0.95 in AR). Compared to the AR task, the ranges of ILB during the LB task were significantly greater at C5/6 (p=0.008) and C6/7 (p=0.001) but the range of IAR was significantly smaller at C4/5 (p=0.02), leading to significantly smaller ratios of coupled motions at C4/5 (p=0.0013), C5/6 (p<0.001) and C6/7 (p=0.0037). The observed coupling characteristics of the intervertebral kinematics were different from those in previous studies under discrete static conditions in a supine position without weight-bearing, suggesting that the testing conditions likely affect the kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine. While C1 and C2 were not included owing to

  3. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6{<=}pitch{<=}3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  4. Flash imaging in dual source CT (DSCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, H.; Petersilka, M.; Mehldau, H.; Heidinger, W.; Allmendinger, T.; Schmidt, B.,; Raupach, R.; Thierfelder, C.,; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2009-02-01

    We present new acquisition modes of a recently introduced dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) system equipped with two X-ray tubes and two corresponding detectors, mounted onto the rotating gantry with an angular offset of typically 90°. Due to the simultaneous acquisition of complementary data, the minimum exposure time is reduced by a factor of two compared to a single-source CT system (SSCT). The correspondingly improved temporal resolution is beneficial for cardiac CT. Also, maximum table feed per rotation in a spiral mode can be increased by a factor of 2 compared to SSCT, which provides benefits both for cardiac CT and non-cardiac CT. In an ECG-triggered mode the entire cardiac volume can be scanned within a fraction of one cardiac RR-cycle. At a rotation time of 0.28s using a detector with 64×0.6 mm beam collimation, the scan time of the entire heart is less than 0.3s at a temporal resolution of 75 ms. It will be shown, that the extremely fast cardiac scan reduces the patient dose to a theoretical lowest limit: for a 120 kV scan the dose level for a typical cardiac CT scan is well below 2 mSv. Using further protocol optimization (scan range adaptation, 100kV), the radiation dose can be reduced below 1mSv.

  5. Rare and challenging extra-axial brain lesions: CT and MRI findings with clinico-radiological differential diagnosis and pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapıcıer, Özlem; Onat, Elif; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Urgun, Kamran; Kılıç, Türker

    2014-01-01

    There are many kinds of extra-axial brain tumors and tumor-like lesions, and definitive diagnosis is complicated in some cases. In this pictorial essay, we present rare and challenging extra-axial brain lesions including neuroenteric cyst, primary leptomeningeal melanomatosis, isolated dural neurosarcoidosis, intradiploic epidermoid cyst, ruptured dermoid cyst, intraventricular cavernoma, and cavernous hemangioma of the skull with imaging findings and clinico-radiological differential diagnosis, including the pathologic correlation. Familiarity with these entities may improve diagnostic accuracy and patient management. PMID:25010368

  6. Axial Skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site-specific Modules Resources Archived Modules Updates Axial Skeleton (80 bones) Skull (28) Cranial Bones Parietal (2) ... Sternum (1) Ribs (24) « Previous (Divisions of the Skeleton) Next (Appendicular Skeleton (126 bones)) » Contact Us | Privacy ...

  7. Coronary Artery Stent Evaluation Using a Vascular Model at 64-Detector Row CT: Comparison between Prospective and Retrospective ECG-Gated Axial Scans

    PubMed Central

    Furui, Shigeru; Kuwahara, Sadatoshi; Mehta, Dhruv; Kaminaga, Tatsuro; Miyazawa, Akiyoshi; Ueno, Yasunari; Konno, Kumiko

    2009-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the performance of prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated axial scans for assessing coronary stents as compared with retrospective ECG-gated helical scans. Materials and Methods As for a vascular model of the coronary artery, a tube of approximately 2.5-mm inner diameter was adopted and as for stents, three (Bx-Velocity, Express2, and Micro Driver) different kinds of stents were inserted into the tube. Both patent and stenotic models of coronary artery were made by instillating different attenuation (396 vs. 79 Hounsfield unit [HU]) of contrast medium within the tube in tube model. The models were scanned with two types of scan methods with a simulated ECG of 60 beats per minute and using display field of views (FOVs) of 9 and 18 cm. We evaluated the in-stent stenosis visually, and we measured the attenuation values and the diameter of the patent stent lumen. Results The visualization of the stent lumen of the vascular models was improved with using the prospective ECG-gated axial scans and a 9-cm FOV. The inner diameters of the vascular models were underestimated with mean measurement errors of -1.10 to -1.36 mm. The measurement errors were smaller with using the prospective ECG-gated axial scans (Bx-Velocity and Express2, p < 0.0001; Micro Driver, p = 0.0004) and a 9-cm FOV (all stents: p < 0.0001), as compared with the other conditions, respectively. The luminal attenuation value was overestimated in each condition. For the luminal attenuation measurement, the use of prospective ECG-gated axial scans provided less measurement error compared with the retrospective ECG-gated helical scans (all stents: p < 0.0001), and the use of a 9-cm FOV tended to decrease the measurement error. Conclusion The visualization of coronary stents is improved by the use of prospective ECG-gated axial scans and using a small FOV with reduced blooming artifacts and increased spatial resolution. PMID:19412509

  8. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  9. Axial superchargers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1944-01-01

    Improvements, however, have been attained which permit a shortening of the structure without any impairment of the efficiency. The axial supercharger has a better efficiency and a simpler design than the radial supercharger. The relatively narrow range in which it operates satisfactorily should not be a very disturbing factor for practical flight problems. The length of this type of supercharger may be reduced considerably if some impairment in the efficiency is permitted.

  10. Low-Dose Prospectively Electrocardiogram-Gated Axial Dual-Source CT Angiography in Patients with Pulsatile Bilateral Bidirectional Glenn Shunt: An Alternative Noninvasive Method for Postoperative Morphological Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Bin; Cheng, Zhaoping; Si, Biao; Wang, Zhiheng; Duan, Yanhua; Nie, Pei; Li, Haiou; Yang, Shifeng; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Ximing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of low-dose prospectively electrocardiogram-gated axial dual-source CT angiography (low-dose PGA scanning, CTA) in patients with pulsatile bilateral bidirectional Glenn shunt (bBDG) as an alternative noninvasive method for postoperative morphological estimation. Methods Twenty patients with pulsatile bBDG (mean age 4.2±1.6 years) underwent both low-dose PGA scanning and conventional cardiac angiography (CCA) for the morphological changes. The morphological evaluation included the anatomy of superior vena cava (SVC) and pulmonary artery (PA), the anastomotic location, thrombosis, aorto-pulmonary collateral circulation, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, etc. Objective and subjective image quality was assessed. Bland–Altman analysis and linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the correlation on measurements between CTA and CCA. Effective radiation dose of both modalities was calculated. Results The CT attenuation value of bilateral SVC and PA was higher than 300 HU. The average subjective image quality score was 4.05±0.69. The morphology of bilateral SVC and PA was displayed completely and intuitively by CTA images. There were 24 SVC above PA and 15 SVC beside PA. Thrombosis was found in 1 patient. Collateral vessels were detected in 13 patients. No pulmonary arteriovenous malformation was found in our study. A strong correlation (R2>0.8, P<0.001) was observed between the measurements on CTA images and on CCA images. Bland–Altman analysis demonstrated a systematic overestimation of the measurements by CTA (the mean value of bias>0).The mean effective dose of CTA and CCA was 0.50±0.17 mSv and 4.85±1.34 mSv respectively. Conclusion CT angiography with a low-dose PGA scanning is an accurate and reliable noninvasive examination in the assessment of morphological changes in patients with pulsatile bBDG. PMID:24736546

  11. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  12. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  13. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  14. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  15. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... gov/pubmed/18381118 . Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, ...

  16. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Mosby; 2012:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  17. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  18. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  19. Coronary artery calcium quantification from contrast enhanced CT using gemstone spectral imaging and material decomposition.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Tobias A; Stehli, Julia; Dougoud, Svetlana; Sah, Bert-Ram; Bull, Sacha; Clerc, Olivier F; Possner, Mathias; Buechel, Ronny R; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2014-10-01

    To explore the feasibility of coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement from low-dose contrast enhanced coronary CT angiography (CCTA) as this may obviate the need for an unenhanced CT scan. 52 patients underwent unenhanced cardiac CT and prospectively ECG triggered contrast enhanced CCTA (Discovery HD 750, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA). The latter was acquired in single-source dual-energy mode [gemstone spectral imaging (GSI)]. Virtual unenhanced images were generated from GSI CCTA by monochromatic image reconstruction of 70 keV allowing selective iodine material suppression. CAC scores from virtual unenhanced CT were compared to standard unenhanced CT including a linear regression model. After iodine subtraction from the contrast enhanced CCTA the attenuation in the ascending aorta decreased significantly from 359 ± 61 to 54 ± 8 HU (P < 0.001), the latter comparing well to the value of 64 ± 55 HU found in the standard unenhanced CT (P = ns) confirming successful iodine subtraction. After introducing linear regression formula the mean values for Agatston, Volume and Mass scores of virtual unenhanced CT were 187 ± 321, 72 ± 114 mm(3), and 27 ± 46 mg/cm(3), comparing well to the values from standard unenhanced CT (187 ± 309, 72 ± 110 mm(3), and 27 ± 45 mg/cm(3)) yielding an excellent correlation (r = 0.96, r = 0.96, r = 0.92; P < 0.001). Mean estimated radiation dose revealed 0.83 ± 0.02 mSv from the unenhanced CT and 1.70 ± 0.53 mSv from the contrast enhanced CCTA. Single-source dual-energy scanning with GSI allows CAC quantification from low dose contrast enhanced CCTA by virtual iodine contrast subtraction. PMID:24993390

  20. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  1. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  2. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  3. High-Pitch Coronary CT Angiography at 70 kVp With Low Contrast Medium Volume

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Spearman, James V.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to evaluate image quality and radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp and 30 mL contrast medium. One hundred fifty patients with a heart rate ≤70 beats per minute (bpm) underwent CCTA using a second-generation dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner and were randomized into 3 groups according to tube voltage and contrast medium volume (370 mg/mL iodine concentration) (100 kVp group, 100 kVp/60 mL, n = 55; 80 kVp group, 80 kVp/60 mL, n = 44; 70 kVp group, 70 kVp/30 mL, n = 51). Objective and subjective image quality along with the effect of heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI) was evaluated and compared between the groups. Radiation dose was estimated for each patient. CT attenuation and image noise were higher in the 80 and 70 kVp groups than in the 100 kVp group (all P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were lower in the 70 kVp group than in the 80 and 100 kVp groups (all P < 0.05). There was no difference for subjective image quality between the groups (P > 0.05). HR did not affect subjective image quality (all P > 0.05), while patients with BMI <23 kg/m2 had higher image quality than patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m2 (P < 0.05). Compared with the 100 kVp group, the radiation dose of the 70 kVp group was reduced by 75%. In conclusion, prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch 70 kVp/30 mL CCTA can obtain diagnostic image quality with lower radiation dose in selected patients with BMI <23 kg/m2 compared with 80/100 kVp/60 mL CCTA. PMID:25396334

  4. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  5. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  6. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  7. Evaluation of a Chest Circumference-Adapted Protocol for Low-Dose 128-Slice Coronary CT Angiography with Prospective Electrocardiogram Triggering

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenying; Wang, Zufei; Wang, Hailin; Hu, Xianghua; Chen, Chunmiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol on radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Materials and Methods One hundred-eighty-five consecutive patients, who had undergone prospective ECG triggering CCTA with a 128-slice CT, were included in the present study. Nipple-level chest circumference, body weight and height were measured before CT examinations. Patients were divided into four groups based on kV/ref·mAs = 100/200, 100/250, 120/200, and 120/250, when patient's chest circumference was ≤ 85.0 (n = 56), 85.0-90.0 (n = 53), 90.0-95.0 (n = 44), and > 95.0 (n = 32), respectively. Image quality per-segment was independently assessed by two experienced observers. Image noise and attenuation were also measured. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The effective radiation dose was calculated using CT dose volume index and the dose-length product. Results A significant correlation was observed between patients' chest circumference and body mass index (r = 0.762, p < 0.001). Chest circumference ranged from 74 to 105 cm, and the mean effective radiation dose was 1.9-3.8 mSv. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 98.5% (2440/2478) of all evaluated coronary segments without any significant differences among the four groups (p = 0.650). No significant difference in image noise was observed among the four groups (p = 0.439), thus supporting the validity of the chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol. However, vessel attenuation, SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the 100 kV groups than in the 120 kV groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion A measure of chest circumference can be used to adapt tube voltage and current for individualized radiation dose control, with resultant similar image noise and sustained diagnostic image quality. PMID:25598671

  8. Axially chiral BODIPYs.

    PubMed

    Lerrick, Reinner I; Winstanley, Thomas P L; Haggerty, Karen; Wills, Corinne; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Bultinck, Patrick; Herrebout, Wouter; Benniston, Andrew C; Hall, Michael J

    2014-05-11

    The synthesis and resolution of a class of chiral organic fluorophores, axially chiral 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacenes (Ax*-BODIPY), is described. Ax*-BODIPYs were prepared through a modular synthesis combined with a late stage Heck functionalisation. Resolution was achieved by preparative chiral HPLC. Absolute stereochemical assignment was performed by comparison of experimental ECD spectra with TD-DFT calculations. PMID:24676233

  9. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  10. Analysis and calibration of stage axial vibration for synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography (SR nano-CT) is a powerful analysis tool and can be used to perform chemical identification, mapping, or speciation of carbon and other elements together with X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. In practical applications, there are often challenges for SR nano-CT due to the misaligned geometry caused by the sample stage axial vibration. It occurs quite frequently because of experimental constraints from the mechanical error of manufacturing and assembly and the thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. The axial vibration will lead to the structure overlap among neighboring layers and degrade imaging results by imposing artifacts into the nano-CT images. It becomes worse for samples with complicated axial structure. In this work, we analyze the influence of axial vibration on nano-CT image by partial derivative. Then, an axial vibration calibration method for SR nano-CT is developed and investigated. It is based on the cross correlation of plane integral curves of the sample at different view angles. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission X-ray microscope nano-CT setup at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results demonstrate that the presented method can handle the stage axial vibration. It can work for random axial vibration and needs neither calibration phantom nor additional calibration scanning. It will be helpful for the development and application of synchrotron radiation nano-CT systems. PMID:26265032

  11. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  12. High-pitch coronary CT angiography at 70 kVp with low contrast medium volume: comparison of 80 and 100 kVp high-pitch protocols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; De Cecco, Carlo N; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Spearman, James V; Schoepf, U Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate image quality and radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp and 30 mL contrast medium.One hundred fifty patients with a heart rate ≤70 beats per minute (bpm) underwent CCTA using a second-generation dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner and were randomized into 3 groups according to tube voltage and contrast medium volume (370 mg/mL iodine concentration) (100 kVp group, 100 kVp/60 mL, n = 55; 80 kVp group, 80 kVp/60 mL, n = 44; 70 kVp group, 70 kVp/30 mL, n = 51). Objective and subjective image quality along with the effect of heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI) was evaluated and compared between the groups. Radiation dose was estimated for each patient.CT attenuation and image noise were higher in the 80 and 70 kVp groups than in the 100 kVp group (all P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were lower in the 70 kVp group than in the 80 and 100 kVp groups (all P < 0.05). There was no difference for subjective image quality between the groups (P > 0.05). HR did not affect subjective image quality (all P > 0.05), while patients with BMI <23 kg/m had higher image quality than patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m (P < 0.05). Compared with the 100 kVp group, the radiation dose of the 70 kVp group was reduced by 75%.In conclusion, prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch 70 kVp/30 mL CCTA can obtain diagnostic image quality with lower radiation dose in selected patients with BMI <23 kg/m compared with 80/100 kVp/60 mL CCTA. PMID:25396334

  13. GEOS axial booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A booms and mechanisms subsystem was designed, developed, and qualified for the geostationary scientific satellite GEOS. Part of this subsystem consist of four axial booms consisting of one pair of 1 m booms and one pair of 2.5 m booms. Each of these booms is carrying one bird cage electric field sensor. Alignment accuracy requirements led to a telescopic type solution. Deployment is performed by pressurized nitrogen. At deployment in orbit two of these booms showed some anomalies and one of these two deployed only about 80%. Following this malfunction a detailed failure investigation was performed resulting in a design modification of some critical components as release mechanism, guide sleeves of the telescopic elements, and pressure system.

  14. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  15. Identification of a unique cause of ring artifact seen in computed tomography trans-axial images.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu C; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Puranik, Ameya D; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2013-10-01

    Artifacts present in computed tomography (CT) image often degrade the image quality and ultimately, the diagnostic outcome. Ring artifact in trans-axial image is caused by either miscalibrated or defective detector element of detector row, which is often categorized as scanner based artifact. A ring artifact detected on trans-axial CT image of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), was caused by contamination of CT tube aperture by droplet of injectable contrast medium. This artifact was corrected by removal of contrast droplet from CT tube aperture. The ring artifact is a very common artifact, commonly cited in the literature. Our case puts forward an uncommon cause of this artifact and its method of correction, which also, has no mention in the existing literature. PMID:24379535

  16. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  17. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  18. Axial Patterning in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Hans R.

    2009-01-01

    Morphogen gradients play an important role in pattern formation during early stages of embryonic development in many bilaterians. In an adult hydra, axial patterning processes are constantly active because of the tissue dynamics in the adult. These processes include an organizer region in the head, which continuously produces and transmits two signals that are distributed in gradients down the body column. One signal sets up and maintains the head activation gradient, which is a morphogenetic gradient. This gradient confers the capacity of head formation on tissue of the body column, which takes place during bud formation, hydra's mode of asexual reproduction, as well as during head regeneration following bisection of the animal anywhere along the body column. The other signal sets up the head inhibition gradient, which prevents head formation, thereby restricting bud formation to the lower part of the body column in an adult hydra. Little is known about the molecular basis of the two gradients. In contrast, the canonical Wnt pathway plays a central role in setting up and maintaining the head organizer. PMID:20066073

  19. Intracranial vascular malformations: MR and CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharczyk, W.; Lemme-Pleghos, L.; Uske, A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Dooms, G.; Norman, D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with 29 cerebrovascular malformations were evaluated with a combination of computed tomography (CT), angiography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristics of the malformations on MR images were reviewed retrospectively, and a comparative evaluation of MR and CT images was made. Of 14 angiographically evident malformations, 13 intra-axial lesions were detected on both CT and MR images, and one dural malformation gave false-negative results on both modalities. The appearance of parenchymal lesions on MR images closely mirrored characteristic CT findings. Angiographically evident malformations have a highly characteristic appearance on MR images. MR may be more sensitive than CT in the detection of small hemorrhagic foci associated with cryptic arteriovenous malformations and may add specificity in the diagnosis of occult malformations in some cases, but MR is less sensitive than CT for the detection of small calcified malformations.

  20. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  1. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  2. Intra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Batchelor, Tracy; González, R Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide variety of intra-axial primary and secondary brain neoplasms. Many of them have characteristic imaging features while other tumors can present in a similar fashion. There are peculiar posttreatment imaging phenomena that can present as intra-axial mass-like lesions (such as pseudoprogression or radiation necrosis), further complicating the diagnosis and clinical follow-up of patients with intracerebral tumors. The purpose of this chapter is to present a general overview of the most common intra-axial brain tumors and peculiar posttreatment changes that are very important in the diagnosis and clinical follow-up of patients with brain tumors. PMID:27432670

  3. Achromatic axially symmetric wave plate.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Komaki, Kazuki; Otani, Yukitoshi; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2012-12-31

    An achromatic axially symmetric wave plate (AAS-WP) is proposed that is based on Fresnel reflections. The wave plate does not introduce spatial dispersion. It provides retardation in the wavelength domain with an axially symmetric azimuthal angle. The optical configuration, a numerical simulation, and the optical properties of the AAS-WP are described. It is composed of PMMA. A pair of them is manufactured on a lathe. In the numerical simulation, the achromatic angle is estimated and is used to design the devices. They generate an axially symmetric polarized beam. The birefringence distribution is measured in order to evaluate the AAS-WPs. PMID:23388751

  4. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan; Computed axial tomography scan; Computed tomography scan ... Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, et al. eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ...

  5. Identification of an intra-cranial intra-axial porcupine quill foreign body with computed tomography in a canine patient.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Christopher P; Sereda, Nikki C; Sereda, Colin W

    2012-02-01

    An intra-cranial intra-axial foreign body was diagnosed in a golden retriever dog through the use of computed tomography (CT). Confirmed by necropsy, a porcupine quill had migrated to the patient's left cerebral hemisphere, likely through the oval foramen. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of CT in visualizing a quill in the canine brain. PMID:22851782

  6. Identification of an intra-cranial intra-axial porcupine quill foreign body with computed tomography in a canine patient

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, Christopher P.; Sereda, Nikki C.; Sereda, Colin W.

    2012-01-01

    An intra-cranial intra-axial foreign body was diagnosed in a golden retriever dog through the use of computed tomography (CT). Confirmed by necropsy, a porcupine quill had migrated to the patient’s left cerebral hemisphere, likely through the oval foramen. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of CT in visualizing a quill in the canine brain. PMID:22851782

  7. [Rational CT diagnosis before operations on the paranasal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, A; Baumann, I; Remy, C T; Dammann, F

    2002-03-01

    Movement or metal artefacts as well as the relatively high radiation exposure of both the axial and the coronal scan are disadvantages of computed tomography. A single spiral CT scan with a secondary reformation replacing the second CT scan might solve these problems. The goal of this project was to compare the diagnostic value of primary spiral CT scans of paranasal sinuses with secondary reformations. These were evaluated by ENT surgeons as well as radiologists. We performed axial and coronal spiral-CT's of paranasal sinuses in 80 patients. The secondary coronal and axial reformations were calculated with 2 mm image sections. Although a reduced resolution was observed in the secondary reformations, this did not compromise the detection of important anatomical features. Image deterioration due to artifacts was significantly reduced. PMID:11975076

  8. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern spiral scanners can perform the exam without stopping. A computer ...

  9. Axial structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner

    2002-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the axial nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.

  10. Axial pumps for propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppert, M. C.; Rothe, K.

    1974-01-01

    The development of axial flow hydrogen pumps is examined. The design features and the performance data obtained during the course of the development programs are discussed. The problems created by the pump characteristics are analyzed. Graphs of four stage pump performance for various turbine blade configurations are developed. The characteristics and performance of a variety of pumps are included.

  11. Forced axial segregation in axially inhomogeneous rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, S.; Windows-Yule, C. R. K.; Luding, S.; Parker, D. J.; Thornton, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. Using a novel drum design comprising concave and convex geometry, we explore, through the application of both discrete particle simulations and positron emission particle tracking, a means by which radial size segregation may be used to drive axial segregation, resulting in an order of magnitude increase in the rate of separation. The inhomogeneous drum geometry explored also allows the direction of axial segregation within a binary granular bed to be controlled, with a stable, two-band segregation pattern being reliably and reproducibly imposed on the bed for a variety of differing system parameters. This strong banding is observed to persist even in systems that are highly constrained in the axial direction, where such segregation would not normally occur. These findings, and the explanations provided of their underlying mechanisms, could lead to radical new designs for a broad range of particle processing applications but also may potentially prove useful for medical and microflow applications.

  12. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy. PMID:23944089

  13. Principles of CT and CT technology.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-09-01

    This article provides a review of the basic principles of CT within the context of the evolution of CT. Modern CT technology can be understood as a natural progression of improvements and innovations in response to both engineering problems and clinical requirements. Detailed discussions of multislice CT, CT image quality evaluation, and radiation doses in CT will be presented in upcoming articles in this series. PMID:17823453

  14. Quasi-axially symmetric stellarators

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Confinement of a plasma for controlled thermonuclear fusion is studied numerically. Toroidal equilibria are considered, with an emphasis on the Modular Helias-like Heliac 2 (MHH2), which is a stellarator of low aspect ratio with just two field periods surrounded by 16 modular coils. The geometry is fully three-dimensional, but there is an axial symmetry of the magnetic structure that is calculated to give confinement competitive with that in circular tokamaks. Additional vertical and toroidal field coils, together with a current drive, provide the flexibility and the control of rotational transform necessary for a successful experiment. An MHH3 device with three field periods and comparable quasi-axial symmetry is presented, too, and because of reversed shear, its physical properties may be better. Variational analysis of equilibrium and stability is shown to give a more reliable prediction of performance for these stellarators than linearized or local theories that suffer from a failure of differentiability and convergence. PMID:9707544

  15. Quasi-axially symmetric stellarators.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, P R

    1998-08-18

    Confinement of a plasma for controlled thermonuclear fusion is studied numerically. Toroidal equilibria are considered, with an emphasis on the Modular Helias-like Heliac 2 (MHH2), which is a stellarator of low aspect ratio with just two field periods surrounded by 16 modular coils. The geometry is fully three-dimensional, but there is an axial symmetry of the magnetic structure that is calculated to give confinement competitive with that in circular tokamaks. Additional vertical and toroidal field coils, together with a current drive, provide the flexibility and the control of rotational transform necessary for a successful experiment. An MHH3 device with three field periods and comparable quasi-axial symmetry is presented, too, and because of reversed shear, its physical properties may be better. Variational analysis of equilibrium and stability is shown to give a more reliable prediction of performance for these stellarators than linearized or local theories that suffer from a failure of differentiability and convergence. PMID:9707544

  16. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal CT; CT - lumbosacral spine ... In other cases, a CT of the lumbosacral spine may be done after injecting contrast dye into ... of the body. A CT of the lumbosacral spine can evaluate fractures and changes of the spine, ...

  17. Thoracic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... table that slides into the center of the scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... than 300 pounds, have your doctor contact the scanner operator before the exam. CT scanners have a ...

  18. [CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Rogalla, P; Juran, R

    2004-07-01

    Percutaneous biopsy of pulmonary nodules requires precise needle placement, with the goal of attaining a secure position of the needle for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes as quickly as possible and with minimal tissue damage along the access route. The requirements from the image guidance system during the intervention are, in addition to universal applicability, a quick reaction time and a user-friendly interface. CT fluoroscopy fulfils these requirements, although radiation protection for the patient and radiologist becomes an important issue. PMID:15232690

  19. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  20. Lingual mandibular bony defects: CT in the buccolingual plane

    SciTech Connect

    Slasky, B.S.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1996-05-01

    Our goal was to record the appearance of lingular mandibular bony defects (LMBD) on CT imaging of the mandible in the buccolingual plane. During the CT evaluation of patients planning to undergo dental implant surgery, five cases of LMBD were found. Axial 1.2 x 1.00 mm overlapping CT sections of the mandible and the maxilla were obtained. Then with use of specific software (DentaCT; Elscint), panoramic and cross-sectional (buccolingual) images of the mandible and maxilla were reformatted. Five cases of posterior LMBD were identified; one patient had both a posterior as well as the much rarer anterior LMBD. All cases were incidental findings and all were asymptomatic. CT features of LMBD were displayed it axial, panoramic, and buccolingual planes. The characteristic opening of the bony defect in the lingual aspect of the mandible was clearly displayed on the axial as well as the buccolingual images; however, this key feature was not manifest on the panoramic images; however, this key feature was not manifest on the panoramic images of the mandible. CT features of LMBD in the buccolingual plane are added to the known radiologic description of this entity. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Quark mass effect on axial charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of the axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in the axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of the axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and an external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a nonmonotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of the axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and a magnetic field.

  2. Sensorless Control of Axial Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumo, Daichi; Yoshida, Toshiya; Ohniwa, Katsumi

    This paper describes a sensorless control method of axial active magnetic bearings (AMBs). At high frequencies, inductance of the axial electromagnets is hardly dependent on the airgap because of the eddy current effects of the non-laminated core. Therefore the carrier frequency should be 3 kHz below to improve the sensitivity to the airgap. In the experiment, Sensorless controll of the axial AMBs have been achieved.

  3. Axial velocity in decaying swirl flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algifri, A. H.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Rao, Y. V. N.

    1988-09-01

    Experiments were carried out on turbulent swirling flow with variable initial swirl at different flow rates to study the effect of swirl on axial velocity. A correlation was made between the defect in the swirling flow axial velocity and the swirl number which locally defines the swirl intensity. An expression which can be used to predict the axial velocity distribution of turbulent swirling flow in a pipe is presented.

  4. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  5. Axially grooved heat pipe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A technology evaluation study on axially grooved heat pipes is presented. The state-of-the-art is reviewed and present and future requirements are identified. Analytical models, the Groove Analysis Program (GAP) and a closed form solution, were developed to facilitate parametric performance evaluations. GAP provides a numerical solution of the differential equations which govern the hydrodynamic flow. The model accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction, puddle flow as well as laminar and turbulent vapor flow conditions. The closed form solution was developed to reduce computation time and complexity in parametric evaluations. It is applicable to laminar and ideal charge conditions, liquid/vapor shear interaction, and an empirical liquid flow factor which accounts for groove geometry and liquid recession effects. The validity of the closed form solution is verified by comparison with GAP predictions and measured data.

  6. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  7. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  8. Classification of CT-brain slices based on local histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Tymkovych, Maksym Y.; Pavlov, Sergii V.; Timchik, Sergii V.; Kisała, Piotr; Orakbaev, Yerbol

    2015-12-01

    Neurosurgical intervention is a very complicated process. Modern operating procedures based on data such as CT, MRI, etc. Automated analysis of these data is an important task for researchers. Some modern methods of brain-slice segmentation use additional data to process these images. Classification can be used to obtain this information. To classify the CT images of the brain, we suggest using local histogram and features extracted from them. The paper shows the process of feature extraction and classification CT-slices of the brain. The process of feature extraction is specialized for axial cross-section of the brain. The work can be applied to medical neurosurgical systems.

  9. Cytokine profiles in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Madej, Marta; Nowak, Beata; Sokolik, Renata; Chlebicki, Arkadiusz; Korman, Lucyna; Woytala, Patryk; Lubiński, Łukasz; Wiland, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Current studies concentrate on the cytokine network and its role in the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA). In this study, we analyzed whether the serum cytokine profile (interleukins: IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33) correlates with demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity and treatment outcome in a group of patients with axial spondyloarthritis. Material and methods Forty-nine patients with an established diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (aSpA) and 19 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation included patient's medical history, 44 joint count, back pain intensity and global disease activity in the preceding week (VAS), the duration of morning stiffness and blood tests. Disease activity was assessed using BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP. Serum concentration of IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33 was determined. Results In patients with aSpA, elevated serum concentration of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 was detected. In the aSpA group we detected higher values of serum concentration of IL-23 and IL-33 in the subgroup with anterior uveitis (83.1 ±184.0 pg/ml vs. 14.0 ±17.1 pg/ml, p < 0.0001 and 45.5 ±71.9 pg/ml vs. 18.4 ±14.3 pg/ml, p < 0.0001, respectively). Additionally, in the subgroup with peripheral arthritis, elevation of serum concentration of IL-12 (249.3 ±246.9 pg/ml vs. 99.9 ±105.9 pg/ml, p = 0.0001) was detected. Patients with preradiological SpA had higher serum concentration of IL-17 than patients with established diagnosis of AS (6.37 ±8.50 pg/ml vs. 2.04 ±2.98 pg/ml, p = 0.0295). No differences in serum concentration of analyzed cytokines were found between the subgroup with low to moderate disease activity and the subgroup with high to very high disease activity. Conclusions We report that in aSpA patients, compared to controls, elevated serum concentrations of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 were observed. Some cytokines may predispose to a more

  10. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  11. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  12. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  13. Psychogenic axial myoclonus: report on two cases.

    PubMed

    Sławek, Jarosław; Wichowicz, Hubert M; Cubała, Wiesław Jerzy; Sołtan, Witold; Palasik, Witold; Wilczewska, Lucyna; Fiszer, Urszula

    2010-04-01

    Axial myoclonus (AM) is characterized by sudden muscle jerks involving axial and proximal muscles. It includes propriospinal myoclonus (PSM) which consists of trunk flexion or extension jerking with activity arising in axial muscles and spreading to caudal and rostral muscles at low velocity along propriospinal pathways. We report on two patients displaying flexion AM jerks in the absence of structural lesion of the central nervous system or electrophysiological evidence of organic origin. A conversion disorder was diagnosed. The jerks disappeared after psychoeducation with the patients remaining symptom free in 6-year long follow-up. The diagnoses of psychogenic axial (propriospinal-like) myoclonus were established. The literature on psychogenic axial (propriospinal-like myoclonus) is limited to a case report. Our cases demonstrate a good response to psychotropic medication and psychoeducation and fulfill the psychogenic movement disorder criteria. The phenomenology of psychogenic abnormal movements is diverse and PSM-like clinical picture may be a novel presentation. PMID:20135184

  14. Non-Radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Eshed, Iris

    2015-12-01

    The term non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nrAxSpA) was coined for patients who have a clinical picture of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but do not exhibit radiographic sacroiliitis. The ASAS classification criteria for nrAxSpA, ensuring the recruitment of homogenous study cohorts, were accepted in 2009, although the respective diagnostic criteria for daily clinical practice have not yet been developed. The clinical diagnosis should be based on the composite of clinical symptoms and signs of the disease, HLA B27 status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac joints. Notably, a negative MRI or HLA B27 does not exclude the diagnosis in patients with a high clinical suspicion for nrAxSpA. The prevalence of nrAxSpA is similar to that of AS, but the former has a higher female preponderance. The rate of progression of nrAxSpA to the radiographic stage of disease (AS) ranges from 10% to 20% over 2 years. Current treatment strategies for nrAxSpA are the same as for AS and include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. While this review summarizes the current achievements in the field of nrAxSpA, further understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and, particularly, mechanisms of inflammation and subsequent new bone formation is essential for the development of new treatment strategies for nrAxSpA patients. PMID:26897981

  15. Combustion enhancement by axial vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Schadow, K. C.; Parr, T. P.; Parr, D. M.; Wilson, K. J.

    1987-06-01

    A tapered slot jet was studied experimentally in nonreacting and reacting tests using hot-wire anemometry, water-tunnel flow visualization, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The tapered slot jet is a modified elliptic jet which has a conical contraction leading to its outlet. The added contraction changes the entire flow field. The jet spread in the major axis plane is larger than in the minor axis plane, which is the opposite behavior of an elliptic jet. Consequently, no axes switching, typical to an elliptic jet, is observed. The turbulence amplification in the jet core is higher than in circular and elliptic jets. The different behavior is attributed to the change in flow direction, inside the nozzle, from the conical section to the slot outlet. During this transition, the flow acquires angular momentum thereby generating axial vorticity. The influence of the contraction angle and the outlet aspect ratio were investigated. The effect of the augmented turbulence on reactive flow was tested in a premixed flame. The combustion rate was augmented in both the core and edges of the flame relative to a circular burner.

  16. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  17. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  18. Non-axial muscle stress and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zahalak, G I

    1996-09-01

    A generalization is developed of the classic two-state Huxley cross-bridge model to account for non-axial active stress and stiffness. The main ingredients of the model are: (i) a relation between the general three-dimensional deformation of an element of muscle and the deformations of the cross-bridges, that assumes macroscopic deformation is transmitted to the myofibrils, (ii) radial as well as axial cross-bridge stiffness, and (iii) variations of the attachment and detachment rates with lateral filament spacing. The theory leads to a generalized Huxley rate equation on the bond-distribution function, n(zeta, theta, t), of the form [equation: see text] where the Dij are the components of the relative velocity gradient and rho and ñ are functions of the polar angle, theta, and time that describe, respectively, the deformation of the myofilament lattice and the distribution of accessible actin sites (both of these functions can be calculated from the macroscopic deformation). Explicit expressions, in terms of n, are derived for the nine components of the active stress tensor, and the 21 non-vanishing components of the active stiffness tensor; the active stress tensor is found to be unsymmetric. The theory predicts that in general non-axial deformations will modify active axial stress and stiffness, and also give rise to non-axial (e.g., shearing) components. Under most circumstances the magnitudes of the non-axial stress and stiffness components will be small compared with the axial and, further, the effects of non-axial deformation rates will be small compared with those of the axial rate. Large transverse deformations may, however, greatly reduce the axial force and stiffness. The theory suggests a significant mechanical role for the non-contractile proteins in muscle, namely that of equilibrating the unsymmetric active stresses. Some simple applications of the theory are provided to illustrate its physical content. PMID:8917737

  19. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  1. Bone formation in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lories, Rik J; Haroon, Nigil

    2014-10-01

    The success of targeted therapies directed against tumor necrosis factor for patients with spondyloarthritis has shifted the focus of physicians and scientists towards the prevention of structural damage to the involved structures, in particular the sacroiliac joints and the spine, to avoid loss of function and disability. Structural damage to the skeleton as witnessed by radiography mainly consists of new bone formation potentially progressively leading to spine or joint ankylosis. This important long-term outcome parameter has been difficult to study, not alone because the time window for change may be long but also because human tissues with direct translational relevance are rarely available. Data from rodent models have identified growth factor signaling pathways as relevant targets. Both human and animal studies have tried to understand the link between inflammation and new bone formation. At the current moment, most evidence points towards a strong link between both but with the question still lingering about the sequence of events, disease triggers, and the interdependence of both features of disease. New discoveries such as a masterswitch T cell population that carries the IL23 receptor and the analysis of auto-antibodies directed again noggin and sclerostin are contributing to innovative insights into the pathophysiology of disease. Long-term data with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors also suggest that some window of opportunity may exist to inhibit structural disease progression. All these data provide support for a further critical analysis of the available datasets and boost research in the field. The introduction of novel disease definitions, in particular the characterization of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis patients, will likely be instrumental in our further understanding of structural damage. PMID:25488783

  2. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    PubMed

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  3. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.; LaBelle, James

    2000-02-22

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  4. Imaging of childhood torticollis due to atlanto-axial rotatory fixation.

    PubMed

    Maheshwaran, S; Sgouros, S; Jeyapalan, K; Chapman, S; Chandy, J; Flint, G

    1995-12-01

    Atlanto-axial rotatory fixation is a rare cause of childhood torticollis. It may occur spontaneously or may be associated with trauma, upper respiratory tract infection or congenital abnormality of the cervical spine. Presentation is usually with persistent torticollis and "cock robin" deformity of the neck. In this paper the radiological experience in three patients is presented. Investigations included plain radiographs, plain anteroposterior tomography, CT and MRI. Displacement of the lateral mass of the atlas and the eccentric position of the odontoid peg can be seen in the plain films. CT scan can exclude fractures and confirm atlanto-axial rotation. The superimposition of CT images is demonstrated as a way of diagnosing subluxation. MRI offers better soft tissue differentiation and allows assessment of the integrity of the transverse ligament. This has an important bearing on the prognosis and may influence surgical treatment. It is important to recognise the plain film features of this uncommon condition and confirm the diagnosis with CT or MRI. The treatment options are discussed with particular reference to long term outcome. PMID:8750947

  5. Two pad axially grooved hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Andres, Luis A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing having two axial grooves on opposite sides of the bearing for breaking the rotational symmetry in the dynamic force coefficients thus reducing the whirl frequency ratio and increasing the damping and stiffness of the hydrostatic bearing.

  6. Axial Thermal Rotation of Slender Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dichuan; Fakhri, Nikta; Pasquali, Matteo; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2011-05-01

    Axial rotational diffusion of rodlike polymers is important in processes such as microtubule filament sliding and flagella beating. By imaging the motion of small kinks along the backbone of chains of DNA-linked colloids, we produce a direct and systematic measurement of axial rotational diffusivity of rods both in bulk solution and near a wall. The measured diffusivities decrease linearly with the chain length, irrespective of the distance from a wall, in agreement with slender-body hydrodynamics theory. Moreover, the presence of small kinks does not affect the chain’s axial diffusivity. Our system and measurements provide insights into fundamental axial diffusion processes of slender objects, which encompass a wide range of entities including biological filaments and linear polymer chains.

  7. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  8. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  9. Planned Axial Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study axial reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned axial reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are modelled using computational fluid dynamics. These models show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.

  10. Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.

    2000-08-29

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane.

  11. Head CT (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  12. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  13. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  14. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  15. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  16. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  17. Detection of the mandibular canal via shaded surface display and multiplanar reconstruction of CT data.

    PubMed

    Solar, P; Gahleitner, A; Bednar, A; Rodinger, S; Watzek, G

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of conventional two-dimensional (2D) multisection images (multiplanar rendering, MPR) and registered three-dimensional (3D) shaded surface images (shaded surface display, SSD) of standard axial computed tomography (CT) data for detecting the mandibular canal (MC) in the lower jaw of 136 patients. The patients, who had different indications for mandibular CT, were examined using standard axial CT scanning. Two post-processing programs were used for 3D visualization of the data sets. The cross-sectional rendered images and the shaded surface 3D images were graded for detection of the MC, the presence of artefacts, overall quality and clinical relevance. A 3D display of the MC was achieved using the MPR technique in 100% with high image quality. The surface rendered display depicted the MC in 80%. Artefacts markedly degraded the 3D displays obtained using the surface rendering technique; thus, SSD is an inappropriate technique for imaging the entire MC without manual segmentation. MPR-CT improves the sensitivity of CT imaging in the detection of the MC with very little time needed for post-processing compared with the SSD method. This post-processing modality should, therefore, be considered for serial studies of patients undergoing dental CT. The sensitivity of the MPR method is even superior to the standard axial CT slices. PMID:11394371

  18. Axial-conductances angular filter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, P. W.; Pedersen, J. F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes the concept, analysis, design, construction, and tests of an angular filter using an axial-conductance medium. The filter provides rejection that increases with incidence angle in the E plane. It is essentially invisible at broadside incidence, does not have critical tolerances on dimensions or materials, and operates over a wide frequency band. Analysis of an ideal homogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that the optimum value for the axial loss tangent is unity. With this value, the homogeneous medium provides approximately 8 dB of absorptive rejection per wavelength of filter thickness at a 45 E-plane incidence angle. Analysis of a practical inhomogeneous axial-conductance medium shows that some loss is introduced at broadside incidence, and that two types of waves can exist in the medium when only one wave is incident at an oblique angle. When the practical medium has dimensions that are properly chosen, its broadside loss can be negligible, and its rejection versus incidence angle can approximate that of the ideal medium. Tests of inhomogeneous samples in simulator wave guide confirm these analytical results. A screen printing method for depositing thick-film resistive ink on thin dielectric sheets has been investigated. With this method a 5x5 foot angular filter, designed for operation at 10 GHz, has been constructed containing over 70,000 axial-conductance elements.

  19. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  20. Polarization converters based on axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Ko, Shih-Wei; Ting, Chi-Lun; Fuh, Andy Y-G; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2010-02-15

    An axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal (ASTNLC) device, based on axially symmetric photoalignment, was demonstrated. Such an ASTNLC device can convert axial (azimuthal) to azimuthal (axial) polarization. The optical properties of the ASTNLC device are analyzed and found to agree with simulation results. The ASTNLC device with a specific device can be adopted as an arbitrary axial symmetric polarization converter or waveplate for axially, azimuthally or vertically polarized light. A design for converting linear polarized light to axially symmetric circular polarized light is also demonstrated. PMID:20389369

  1. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  2. Radial/axial power divider/combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaddiparty, Yerriah P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic power divider/combiner comprises N radial outputs (31) having equal powers and preferably equal phases, and a single axial output (20). A divider structure (1) and a preferably identical combiner structure (2) are broadside coupled across a dielectric substrate (30) containing on one side the network of N radial outputs (31) and on its other side a set of N equispaced stubs (42) which are capacitively coupled through the dielectric substrate (30) to the N radial outputs (31). The divider structure (1) and the combiner structure (2) each comprise a dielectric disk (12, 22, respectively) on which is mounted a set of N radial impedance transformers (14, 24, respectively). Gross axial coupling is determined by the thickness of the dielectric layer (30). Rotating the disks (12, 22) with respect to each other effectuates fine adjustment in the degree of axial coupling.

  3. Normal glow discharge in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S.; Shang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Theory and results of mathematical modeling of a glow discharge in a parallel-plate configuration with axial magnetic field is presented. The model consists of continuity equations for electron and ion fluids, the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field. Numerical simulation results are presented for two-dimensional glow discharge at various initial conditions. The results are obtained for molecular nitrogen at pressure 1-5 Torr, emf of power supply 1-2 kV, and magnetic field induction B = 0-0.5 T. It is shown that in the presence of the axial magnetic field the glow discharge is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Nevertheless it is shown that in the investigated range of discharge parameters in an axial magnetic field the law of the normal current density is retained.

  4. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  5. Seronegative spondyloarthropathy-related sacroiliitis: CT, MRI features and differentials

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Daya; Prabhu, Shailesh M; Irodi, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Seronegative spondyloarthropathy is a group of chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases that predominantly affect the axial skeleton. Involvement of sacroiliac joint is considered a hallmark for diagnosis of seronegative spondyloarthropathy and is usually the first manifestation of this condition. It is essential for the radiologist to know the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of spondyloarthropathy-related sacroiliitis as imaging plays an important role in diagnosis and evaluation of response to treatment. We present a pictorial essay of CT and MRI imaging findings in seronegative spondyloarthropathy-related sacroiliitis in various stages and highlight common differentials that need to be considered. PMID:25114391

  6. Cystic lesions accompanying extra-axial tumours.

    PubMed

    Lohle, P N; Wurzer, H A; Seelen, P J; Kingma, L M; Go, K G

    1999-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of cyst formation in extra-axial tumours in the central nervous system (CNS). Cyst fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma were analysed in eight patients with nine peritumoral cysts: four with meningiomas, two with intracranial and two spinal intradural schwannomas. Measuring concentrations of various proteins [albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, alpha 2-macroglobulin and IgM] in cyst fluid, CSF and blood plasma provides insight into the state of the semipermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Peritumoral cysts accompanying intra-axial brain tumours are the end result of disruption of the BBB and oedema formation. Unlike intra-axial tumours which lie embedded within nervous tissue, extra-axial tumours tend to be separated from nervous tissue by arachnoid and pia mater. High concentrations of proteins were measured in the cyst fluid, approaching blood plasma levels, suggesting a local barrier disruption, and passage across the arachnoid, pia mater and cortical/medullary layer into the CNS parenchyma, leaving the protein concentrations of CSF practically unchanged. We confirmed that very high concentrations of protein are to be found in tumour cysts, plasma proteins forming almost 90% of the total protein in the cyst. We review current hypotheses on the pathogenesis of cysts accompanying neoplasms, particularly meningiomas and schwannomas, and conclude that the majority of proteins in cyst fluid in extra-axial, intradural meningiomas and schwannomas are plasma proteins. This provides a strong argument for pathogenesis of extra-axial intradural tumour cysts in favour of leakage of plasma proteins out of the tumour vessels into the nervous tissue. PMID:9987761

  7. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  8. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  9. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of lubricating plugs are disposed in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are disposed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  10. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of lubricating plugs is located in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are placed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  11. Theoretical Determination of Axial Fan Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struve, E.

    1943-01-01

    The report presents a method for the computation of axial fan characteristics. The method is based on the assumption that the law of constancy of the circulation along the blade holds, approximately, for all fan conditions for which the blade elements operate at normal angles of attack (up to the stalling angles). Pressure head coefficient K(sub a) and power coefficient K(sub u) for the force components in the axial and tangential directions, respectively, and analogous to the lift and drag coefficients C(sub y) and C(sub x) are conveniently introduced.

  12. High axial load termination for TLP tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a hollow high axial load termination for a composite tubular tendon. It comprises: a curved hollow termination body open at one end wit a circular opening and connected at the opposite curved end with an elongated hollow member of lesser diameter than the diameter of the circular opening of the termination body, a composite tubular tendon containing axial fibers and helical fibers laid on an inner hollow liner; fibers of the composite tubular tendon extending over and covering the termination body from the abutment with the composite tubular tendon to the elongated member of lesser diameter than the termination body.

  13. Imaging of posterior element axial pain generators: facet joints, pedicles, spinous processes, sacroiliac joints, and transitional segments.

    PubMed

    Kotsenas, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    The role of the posterior elements in generating axial back and neck pain is well established; the imaging detection of posterior element pain generators remains problematic. Morphologic imaging findings have proved to be nonspecific and are frequently present in asymptomatic patients. Edema, inflammation, and hypervascularity are more specific for sites of pain generation, but are often overlooked by imagers if physiologic imaging techniques such as fat-suppressed T2 or contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide bone scanning with single-photon emission computed tomography (CT), or (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with CT are not used. PMID:22643392

  14. Comparison of Computed Tomography Scout Based Reference Point Localization to Conventional Film and Axial Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  15. Comparison of computed tomography scout based reference point localization to conventional film and axial computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C H

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  16. [Correlation between diagnostic hypothesis and result of cranial computed axial tomography].

    PubMed

    Nóvak, E M; Terabe, F; Nasimoto, A L; Carvalho, P H; Loper, A D; Büchele, F S; Nogara, J C

    2001-09-01

    The use of computed axial tomography (CT) in the investigation of neurologic disorders is attractive for its disponibility in the health services. However, the indications of the exam and the correlation with the clinical features has not been frequently studied. We study correlation between the requests of CT and the findings reported by the radiologist, in 367 exams performed from 07/1995 to 07/ 1996. The mean age was 31.7 +/- 22.9 years. The CT were requested in decrescent order of frequency by the Services of Neurology (36.2%), Emergency room (17.4%), Pediatric Neurology (16.9%) and Internal Medicine (5.9%). The CT was more indicated in cases of seizures (30%), headache (26.2%), motor impairment (20.2%) and reduction of conscience level (16.9%). The main hypothetic diagnosis were "to discard anatomic lesions" (9.0%), not specified stroke (8.2%) and neurocisticercosis (8.2%). The result of the CT was normal in 50.4% of the exams specially those requested in cases of headache (94.4%), seizures (71.4%) and "to discard anatomic lesions"(66.7%). The more frequently CT abnormalities were hydrocephalus (5.4%), ischemic stroke (5.4%) and neoplasm (3.5%) The greatest rates of correlation were among those to discard anatomic lesions (66,7%), hydrocephalus (50%), ischemic stroke (50%) and hematoma (50%). We concluded that CT is more helpful if more clinical data is provided in the request form, so aiding the radiologist in the final report. PMID:11593279

  17. Missed rib fractures on evaluation of initial chest CT for trauma patients: pattern analysis and diagnostic value of coronal multiplanar reconstruction images with multidetector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, S H; Sung, Y M; Kim, M S

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to review the prevalence and radiological features of rib fractures missed on initial chest CT evaluation, and to examine the diagnostic value of additional coronal images in a large series of trauma patients. Methods 130 patients who presented to an emergency room for blunt chest trauma underwent multidetector row CT of the thorax within the first hour during their stay, and had follow-up CT or bone scans as diagnostic gold standards. Images were evaluated on two separate occasions: once with axial images and once with both axial and coronal images. The detection rates of missed rib fractures were compared between readings using a non-parametric method of clustered data. In the cases of missed rib fractures, the shapes, locations and associated fractures were evaluated. Results 58 rib fractures were missed with axial images only and 52 were missed with both axial and coronal images (p=0.088). The most common shape of missed rib fractures was buckled (56.9%), and the anterior arc (55.2%) was most commonly involved. 21 (36.2%) missed rib fractures had combined fractures on the same ribs, and 38 (65.5%) were accompanied by fracture on neighbouring ribs. Conclusion Missed rib fractures are not uncommon, and radiologists should be familiar with buckle fractures, which are frequently missed. Additional coronal imagescan be helpful in the diagnosis of rib fractures that are not seen on axial images. PMID:22514102

  18. Investigations on Experimental Impellers for Axial Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Encke, W.

    1947-01-01

    A selection of measurements obtained on experimental impellers for axial blowers will be reported. In addition to characteristic curves plotted for low and for high peripheral velocities, proportions and blade sections for six different blower models and remarks on the design of blowers will be presented.

  19. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  20. Stability of structural members under axial load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1937-01-01

    The principles of the cross method of moment distribution are used to check the stability of structural members under axial load. A brief theoretical treatment of the subject, together with an illustrative problem, is included as well as a discussion of the reduced modulus at high stresses and a set of tables to aid in the solution of practical problems.

  1. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  2. Practical CT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizumi, T.T.; Suneja, S.K.; Teal, J.S. )

    1989-07-01

    The dose from computed tomography (CT) examinations is not negligible from a radiation safety standpoint. Occasionally, one encounters a case in which an unsuspected pregnant woman undergoes a CT pelvic scan, and the radiologist is required to estimate the dose to the fetus. This article addresses practical methods of CT dosimetry with a specific discussion on fetal dose estimate. Three methods are described: (1) the use of a dose chart, (2) the pencil ionization chamber method, and (3) the thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method.

  3. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  4. PET/CT Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M.; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2014-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT. PMID:21237418

  5. Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly R; Galloway, Jack D

    2012-04-20

    For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the

  6. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  7. Evaluation of manual and computerized methods for the determination of axial vertebral rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2010-03-01

    Axial vertebral rotation is among the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal deformities, and several manual and computerized methods have been proposed for its measurement. Routine manual measurement of axial vertebral rotation from three-dimensional (3D) images is error-prone due to the limitations of the observers, different properties of imaging techniques, variable characteristics of the observed anatomy, and difficulties in image navigation and representation. Computerized methods do not suffer from these limitations and may yield accurate results, however, they also require manual identification of multiple anatomical landmarks or neglect the sagittal and coronal inclinations of vertebrae. The variability of manual and computerized methods for measuring axial vertebral rotation in 3D images has not been thoroughly investigated yet. In this study we evaluated, compared and analyzed four different manual and a computerized method for measuring axial vertebral rotation. Using each method, three observers independently performed two series of manual measurements on 56 normal and scoliotic vertebrae in images, acquired by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), which allowed the estimation of intra-observer, inter-observer and inter-method variability. The relatively low intra-observer standard deviation (0.8, 0.7 and 1.3 degrees for each observer), inter-observer standard deviation (1.3, 2.0 and 1.9 degrees for each observer pair), and inter-method standard deviation (best: 1.9 degrees) of the computerized method indicate that it is feasible for the determination of axial vertebral rotation and may represent an efficient alternative to manual methods in terms of repeatability, reliability and user effort.

  8. SPECT/CT Fusion in the Diagnosis of Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Yoshio; Tamura, Akihisa; Okazaki, Hajime; Kurose, Taichi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kuraoka, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed to analyze the relationship between the diagnostic ability of fused single photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images in localization of parathyroid lesions and the size of adenomas or hyperplastic glands. Methods: Five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 4 patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) were imaged 15 and 120 minutes after the intravenous injection of technetium99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI). All patients underwent surgery and 5 parathyroid adenomas and 10 hyperplastic glands were detected. Pathologic findings were correlated with imaging results. Results: The SPECT/CT fusion images were able to detect all parathyroid adenomas even with the greatest axial diameter of 0.6 cm. Planar scintigraphy and SPECT imaging could not detect parathyroid adenomas with an axial diameter of 1.0 to 1.2 cm. Four out of 10 (40%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were diagnosed, using planar and SPECT imaging and 5 out of 10 (50%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were localized, using SPECT/CT fusion images. Conclusion: SPECT/CT fusion imaging is a more useful tool for localization of parathyroid lesions, particularly parathyroid adenomas, in comparison with planar and or SPECT imaging.

  9. Axial X Pinch Backlighting on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesener, Isaac; Greenly, John; Pikuz, Sergey; Shelkovenko, Tatiania; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    X pinch backlighting is a useful imaging technique whereby two or more wires are crossed at a single point and driven with a high current (300-500 kA). At the crossing point, a micron-scale sub-nanosecond x-ray source is produced that acts as a point source and can be used for point-projection imaging. Axial x pinch backlighting is a new technique that allows an end-on image of Z pinches. New load geometry was developed at Cornell University to allow all standard diagnostics to be used on the same shot as the axial x pinch backlighting diagnostic. High density plasma features have been observed that correlate well with XUV self-emission images previously recorded on COBRA and simulation results from GORGON. Data and images will be presented illustrating the latest results from COBRA. Future applications include the possibility of shockwave imaging in the center of thing foil cylinders.

  10. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Treanor, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  11. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1994-12-06

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of axially moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics for forced motions of an axially moving plate is numerically investigated using Von Kármán plate theory and retaining in-plane displacements and inertia. The equations of motion are obtained via an energy method based on Lagrange equations. This yields a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations with coupled terms. The equations are transformed into a set of first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations and are solved via the pseudo-arclength continuation technique. The near-resonance nonlinear dynamics is examined via plotting the frequency-response curves of the system. Results are shown through frequency-response curves, time histories, and phase-plane diagrams. The effect of system parameters, such as the axial speed and the pretension, on the resonant responses is also highlighted.

  13. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  14. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  15. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  16. Tri-axial tactile sensing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Ramos, Julián.; Navas-González, Rafael; Vidal-Verdú, F.

    2013-05-01

    A 13 x 13 square millimetre tri-axial taxel is presented which is suitable for some medical applications, for instance in assistive robotics that involves contact with humans or in prosthetics. Finite Element Analysis is carried out to determine what structure is the best to obtain a uniform distribution of pressure on the sensing areas underneath the structure. This structure has been fabricated in plastic with a 3D printer and a commercial tactile sensor has been used to implement the sensing areas. A three axis linear motorized translation stage with a tri-axial precision force sensor is used to find the parameters of the linear regression model and characterize the proposed taxel. The results are analysed to see to what extent the goal has been reached in this specific implementation.

  17. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-10-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity.

  18. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  19. Atlanto-axial subluxation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Thurlow, Robert D

    1988-01-01

    One of the causes of death in rheumatoid patients is cord compression following atlanto-axial subluxation. Dislocations in the cervical spine are common with patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. Anterior subluxation occurs in up to 35%, followed by vertical subluxation in 22.2%, lateral subluxation in 20.6% and rarely posterior subluxation. A case report is presented to illustrate such a complication. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  20. Nucleon Axial Charge in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.G.; Richards, D.G.; Fleming, G.T.; Haegler, Ph.; Negele, J.W.; Pochinsky, A.V.; Orginos, K.; Renner, D.B.; Schroers, W.

    2006-02-10

    The nucleon axial charge is calculated as a function of the pion mass in full QCD. Using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks, we present the first calculation with pion masses as light as 354 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm){sup 3}. We show that finite volume effects are small for our volumes and that a constrained fit based on finite volume chiral perturbation theory agrees with experiment within 7% statistical errors.

  1. Axial pattern skin flaps in cats.

    PubMed

    Remedios, A M; Bauer, M S; Bowen, C V; Fowler, J D

    1991-01-01

    The major direct cutaneous vessels identified in the cat include the omocervical, thoracodorsal, deep circumflex iliac, and caudal superficial epigastric arteries. Axial pattern skin flaps based on the thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric arteries have been developed in cats. Rotation of these flaps as islands allows skin coverage to the carpus and metatarsus, respectively. The thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric flaps provide a practical, one-step option in the reconstruction of large skin defects involving the distal extremities of cats. PMID:2011063

  2. Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1982-02-11

    Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

  3. Numerical simulation of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Su, Boyang; Lim, Tau Meng; Zhou, Tongming

    2007-07-01

    The axial blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller is superior to other artificial blood pumps because of its small size. In this article, the distributions of velocity, path line, pressure, and shear stress in the straightener, the rotor, and the diffuser of the axial blood pump, as well as the gap zone were obtained using the commercial software, Fluent (version 6.2). The main focus was on the flow field of the blood pump. The numerical results showed that the axial blood pump could produce 5.14 L/min of blood at 100 mm Hg through the outlet when rotating at 11,000 rpm. However, there was a leakage flow of 1.06 L/min in the gap between the rotor cylinder and the pump housing, and thus the overall flow rate the impeller could generate was 6.2 L/min. The numerical results showed that 75% of the scalar shear stresses (SSs) were less than 250 Pa, and 10% were higher than 500 Pa within the whole pump. The high SS region appeared around the blade tip where a large variation of velocity direction and magnitude was found, which might be due to the steep angle variation at the blade tip. Because the exposure time of the blood cell at the high SS region within the pump was relatively short, it might not cause serious damage to the blood cells, but the improvement of blade profile should be considered in the future design of the axial pump. PMID:17584481

  4. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    PubMed Central

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern. PMID:26046671

  5. Wetting on axially-patterned heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ruiz-Cabello, F J Montes; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, M A

    2008-05-19

    Contact angle variability, leading to errors in interpretation, arises from various sources. Contact angle hysteresis (history-dependent wetting) and contact angle multiplicity (corrugation of three-phase contact line) are irrespectively the most frequent causes of this uncertainty. Secondary effects also derived from the distribution of chemical defects on solid surfaces, and so due to the existence of boundaries, are the known "stick/jump-slip" phenomena. Currently, the underlying mechanisms in contact angle hysteresis and their connection to "stick/jump-slip" effects and the prediction of thermodynamic contact angle are not fully understood. In this study, axial models of smooth heterogeneous surface were chosen in order to mitigate contact angle multiplicity. For each axial pattern, advancing, receding and equilibrium contact angles were predicted from the local minima location of the system free energy. A heuristic model, based on the local Young equation for spherical drops on patch-wise axial patterns, was fruitfully tested from the results of free-energy minimization. Despite the very simplistic surface model chosen in this study, it allowed clarifying concepts usually misleading in wetting phenomena. PMID:18279819

  6. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.

  7. Computational analysis of a multistage axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamidoju, Chaithanya

    Turbomachines are used extensively in Aerospace, Power Generation, and Oil & Gas Industries. Efficiency of these machines is often an important factor and has led to the continuous effort to improve the design to achieve better efficiency. The axial flow compressor is a major component in a gas turbine with the turbine's overall performance depending strongly on compressor performance. Traditional analysis of axial compressors involves throughflow calculations, isolated blade passage analysis, Quasi-3D blade-to-blade analysis, single-stage (rotor-stator) analysis, and multi-stage analysis involving larger design cycles. In the current study, the detailed flow through a 15 stage axial compressor is analyzed using a 3-D Navier Stokes CFD solver in a parallel computing environment. Methodology is described for steady state (frozen rotor stator) analysis of one blade passage per component. Various effects such as mesh type and density, boundary conditions, tip clearance and numerical issues such as turbulence model choice, advection model choice, and parallel processing performance are analyzed. A high sensitivity of the predictions to the above was found. Physical explanation to the flow features observed in the computational study are given. The total pressure rise verses mass flow rate was computed.

  8. High-resolution CT of temporal bone trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, B.A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-08-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) finding in 18 patients with temporal bone trauma were reviewed. Eight patients suffered longitudinal fractures of the petrous bone, which were associated with ossicular dislocation in two patients. Transverse fractures were detected in six patients, with a contralateral mastoid fracture in one patient. In four patients, the fractures were restricted to the mastoid region. Of the 14 patients in whom adequate neurologic evaluation was available, seven had a permanent facial nerve or hearing deficit while five suffered at least a transient neurologic deficit related to the temporal bone trauma. Routine head CT (10 mm sections) demonstrated only eight of 19 petrous bone injuries. Evidence of brain trauma or extra-axial hemotoma was seen in 12 patients. In 13 cases, high-resolution CT was also performed, demonstrating temporal bone injuries in all. This latter technique allows rapid and detailed evaluation of temporal bone trauma.

  9. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls. PMID:26562229

  10. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  11. Influence of model based iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality of multiplanar reformations in reduced dose chest CT

    PubMed Central

    Dunet, Vincent; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Grimm, Jochen; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reduces image noise and improves image quality (IQ) but its influence on post-processing tools including maximal intensity projection (MIP) and minimal intensity projection (mIP) remains unknown. Purpose To evaluate the influence on IQ of MBIR on native, mIP, MIP axial and coronal reformats of reduced dose computed tomography (RD-CT) chest acquisition. Material and Methods Raw data of 50 patients, who underwent a standard dose CT (SD-CT) and a follow-up RD-CT with a CT dose index (CTDI) of 2–3 mGy, were reconstructed by MBIR and FBP. Native slices, 4-mm-thick MIP, and 3-mm-thick mIP axial and coronal reformats were generated. The relative IQ, subjective IQ, image noise, and number of artifacts were determined in order to compare different reconstructions of RD-CT with reference SD-CT. Results The lowest noise was observed with MBIR. RD-CT reconstructed by MBIR exhibited the best relative and subjective IQ on coronal view regardless of the post-processing tool. MBIR generated the lowest rate of artefacts on coronal mIP/MIP reformats and the highest one on axial reformats, mainly represented by distortions and stairsteps artifacts. Conclusion The MBIR algorithm reduces image noise but generates more artifacts than FBP on axial mIP and MIP reformats of RD-CT. Conversely, it significantly improves IQ on coronal views, without increasing artifacts, regardless of the post-processing technique.

  12. Electrostatic mirror objective with eliminated spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Bimurzaev, Seitkerim B; Serikbaeva, Gulnur S; Yakushev, Evgeniy M

    2003-01-01

    Computational formulae for the coefficients of the third-order spherical aberration and the second-order axial chromatic aberration are presented for an axially symmetric electrostatic electron mirror. A technique for eliminating the high-order derivatives of the potential axial distribution in mirror systems from the integrands is described. Conditions for elimination of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations, either separately or simultaneously, are found for a three-electrode axially symmetric mirror composed of coaxial cylinders of the same diameter. A principal scheme of the transmission electron microscope, where an electrostatic electron mirror serves as its objective, is presented. PMID:14599097

  13. Dual-energy computed tomography of the head: a phantom study assessing axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Kawashima, Hiroki; Hamaguchi, Takashi; Takata, Tadanori; Kobayashi, Masanao; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Koshida, Kichiro

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a calibration method for small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses during dual- source dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and to compare the axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level between DE and standard, single-energy (SE) head CT angiography. Three DE (100/Sn140 kVp 80/Sn140 kVp, and 140/80 kVp) and one SE (120 kVp) acquisitions were performed using a second-generation dual-source CT device and a female head phantom, with an equivalent volumetric CT dose index. The axial absorbed dose distribution at the orbital level and the absorbed doses for the eye lens were measured using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. CT attenuation numbers were obtained in the DE composite images and the SE images of the phantom at the orbital level. The doses absorbed at the orbital level and in the eye lens were lower and standard deviations for the CT attenuation numbers were slightly higher in the DE acquisitions than those in the SE acquisition. The anterior surface dose was especially higher in the SE acquisition than that in the DE acquisitions. Thus, DE head CT angiography can be performed with a radiation dose lower than that required for a standard SE head CT angiography, with a slight increase in the image noise level. The 100/Sn140 kVp acquisition revealed the most balanced axial dose distribution. In addition, our proposed method was effective for calibrating small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses in DECT.

  14. Development of the Tensor CT Algorithm for Strain Tomography Using Bragg-edge Neutron Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hirotaka; Shiota, Yoshinori; Shinohara, Takenao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Ohnuma, Masato; Furusaka, Michihiro; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    The tensor CT algorithm for strain tomography using the Bragg-edge neutron transmission spectroscopy is presented. Crystal lattice strain is not scalar but is a tensorwhich changesdepending on the observation angle. Therefore, since traditional"scalar" CT algorithms cannot be applied to tomography of strain, the development of a "tensor" CT algorithm is needed. Aiming at further developments in the future, we first developed a ML-EM based versatile tensor tomography using ofa simple algorithm withsmall restriction. The basic concept is to simultaneously reconstruct multiple strain-tensor components (scalar quantities of normal strain and shear strain) existing at a certain position. In the actual CT image reconstruction, it is important to consider the angular dependence of each tensor component. Through the simulation studies on axially-symmetric and axially-asymmetric distributionscomposed of two strain components and experimental demonstration using the axially-symmetric VAMAS standard sample, we found some important points for strain-tensor tomography. The angle-dependent back-projection procedure of ML-EM is indispensable fortomography of each tensor component,butsuch function also causes animage distortion which can average each strain value along each strain direction. Also, we found that the optimization of the angle-dependent back-projection procedure is important for further improvements of the tensor CT algorithm.

  15. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  16. CFD Simulation of Casing Treatment of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the improvement in stall margin of an axial flow rotor due to the circumferential casing grooves. It is shown that the computational tool used predicts an increase in operating range of the rotor when casing grooves are present. A budget of the axial momentum equation is carried out at the rotor casing in the tip gap in order to uncover the physical process behind this stall margin improvement. It is shown that for the smooth casing the net axial pressure force . However in the presence of casing grooves the net axial shear stress force acting at the casing is augmented by the axial force due to the radial transport of axial momentum, which occurs across the grooves and power stream interface. This additional force adds to the net axial viscous sheer force and thus leads to an increase in the stall margin of the rotor.

  17. Drop size selection in axially heated co-axial fiber capillary instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlavi, Saviz; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Gallaire, Francois

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the sphere size selection mechanism in silicon-in-silica sphere formation through the application of an external axial thermal gradient to a co-axial silicon-in-silica fiber (Gumennik et al., Nature Com., 2013). We first apply a convective/absolute stability analysis to the in-fibre capillary instability governing the sphere formation and demonstrate that the resulting wavelength selection predicts a finite but still too large wavelength. A global stability analysis is then pursued, which accounts for the spatial inhomogeneity of the base flow. F.G. acknowledges funding from ERC SimCoMiCs 280117.

  18. Designing and updating the flow part of axial and radial-axial turbines through mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, Andrey; Rusanov, Roman; Lampart, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes an algorithm for the design of axial and radial-axial type turbines. The algorithm is based on using mathematical models of various levels of complexity - from 1D to 3D. Flow path geometry is described by means of analytical methods of profiling using a limited number of parameters. 3D turbulent flow model is realised in the program complex IPMFlow, developed based on the earlier codes FlowER and FlowER-U. Examples of developed or modernized turbines for differentpurpose power machines are presented. They are: an expansion turbine, ORC turbine and cogeneration mediumpressure turbine.

  19. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  20. Ultrasound velocities for axial eye length measurement.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, K J

    1994-09-01

    Since 1974, I have used individual sound velocities for each eye condition encountered for axial length measurement. The calculation results in 1,555 M/sec for the average phakic eye. A slower speed of 1,549 M/sec was found for an extremely long (30 mm) eye and a higher speed of 1,561 M/sec was noted for an extremely short (20 mm) eye. This inversely proportional velocity change can best be adjusted for by measuring the phakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and correcting the result by dividing the square of the measured axial length (AL1,532)2 by the difference of the measured axial length (AL1,532) minus 0.35 mm. A velocity of 1,534 M/sec was found for all aphakic eyes regardless of their length, and correction is clinically significant. The velocity of an eye containing a poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens is not different from an average phakic eye but it does magnify the effect of axial length change. I recommend measuring the pseudophakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and adding to the result (AL1,532), + 0.04 + 44% of the IOL thickness. The speed for an eye with a silicone IOL was found to be 1,476 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 - 56% of IOL thickness) and for glass, 1,549 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 + 75% of IOL thickness). A speed of 1,139 M/sec was found for a phakic eye with silicone oil filling most of the vitreous cavity and 1,052 M/sec for an aphakic eye filled with oil. For varying volumes of oil, each eye should be calculated individually. The speed was 534 M/sec for phakic eyes filled with gas. Eyes containing a silicone IOL or oil or gas will create clinically significant errors (3 to 10 diopters) if the sound velocity is not corrected. PMID:7996413

  1. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  2. G-A and Octet Axial Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress on lattice calculations of nucleon axial coupling constants, as well as couplings of other octet members. With a combined SU(3) fit to all octet baryons, we find a better determination of g_A = 1.18(4)_stat(6)_syst. Our predictions for g_SS = 0.450(21)_stat(27)_syst and g_XX = -0.277(15)_stat(19)_syst are better determined than previous theoretical estimations. Finally, we describe a preliminary first full-QCD calculation of semileptonic decay quantity (g1(0)= f1(0))S->n = -0.348(37).

  3. Digital enhancement of computerized axial tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic evaluation was conducted of certain digital image enhancement techniques performed in image space. Three types of images were used, computer generated phantoms, tomograms of a synthetic phantom, and axial tomograms of human anatomy containing images of lesions, artificially introduced into the tomograms. Several types of smoothing, sharpening, and histogram modification were explored. It was concluded that the most useful enhancement techniques are a selective smoothing of singular picture elements, combined with contrast manipulation. The most useful tool in applying these techniques is the gray-scale histogram.

  4. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  5. Stall in axial flow aero engine compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Christopher J.

    The inception of stall in an aeroengine compressor over a range of speeds and the post stall behavior are described. Reference is made to the varying matching and system response as the speed is increased and the effects demonstrated on a single shaft gas turbine. In particular, the following are detailed: surge and stall in axial compressors, compressor matching, low speed stalls, mid speed stalls, stalls ending in rotating stalls, high speed surges, contour plots of stage 1, 4, and 7 pressures, and compressor behavior during surge.

  6. Changes in choroidal thickness, axial length, and ocular perfusion pressure accompanying successful glaucoma filtration surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kara, N; Baz, O; Altan, C; Satana, B; Kurt, T; Demirok, A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the changes in choroidal thickness (CT), axial length (AL), and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) accompanying intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after trabeculectomy. Methods Thirty-nine eyes of 39 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma uncontrolled by medical therapy were included in this prospective and interventional study. All patients underwent a fornix-based trabeculectomy. The CT was measured by enhanced depth imaging-optical coherence tomography. IOP, AL, and systolic/diastolic blood pressure were also measured, and OPP was calculated. All measurements were performed at baseline and 1 month after surgery. Results The mean IOP was 25.0±5.8 mm Hg at baseline and 11.7±2.6 mm Hg after trabeculectomy (P<0.001), and the mean subfoveal CT was 295±84 mm Hg at baseline and 331±82 mm Hg after trabeculectomy (P<0.001). The mean AL was 23.64±0.98 mm at baseline and 23.54±0.96 mm after trabeculectomy (P<0.001), whereas the mean OPP was 38.8±6.2 mm Hg preoperatively, and 51.1±7.3 mm Hg postoperatively (P<0.001). The change in CT negatively correlated with the change in IOP (r=−0.785, P<0.001) and AL (r=−0.693, P<0.001), whereas it positively correlated with the change in OPP (r=0.418, P=0.008). Conclusion These results suggest that the large IOP decrease following trabeculectomy causes choroidal thickening. In addition, CT changes are associated with IOP and AL reduction as well as OPP increase. PMID:23743533

  7. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  8. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern "spiral" scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer ...

  9. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. While inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... breathing during the test, you should notify the scanner operator immediately. Scanners come with an intercom and ...

  10. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  11. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  12. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  13. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  14. Accuracy assessment of the axial images obtained from cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Panzarella, FK; Junqueira, JLC; Oliveira, LB; de Araújo, NS; Costa, C

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate accuracy of linear measurements assessed from axial tomograms and the influence of the use of different protocols in two cone beam CT (CBCT) units. Methods A cylinder object consisting of Nylon® (Day Brazil, Sao Paulo, Brazil) with radiopaque markers was radiographically examined applying different protocols from NewTom 3GTM (Quantitative Radiology s.r.l, Verona, Veneto, Italy) and i-CATTM (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA) units. Horizontal (A–B) and vertical (C–D) distances were assessed from axial tomograms and measured using a digital calliper that provided the gold standard for actual values. Results There were differences when considering acquisition protocols to each CBCT unit. Concerning all analysed protocols from i-CATTM and Newtom 3GTM, both A–B and C–D distances presented underestimated values. Measurements of the axial images obtained from NewTom 3GTM (6 inch 0.16 mm and 9 inch 0.25 mm) were similar to the ones obtained from i-CATTM (13 cm 20 s 0.3 mm, 13 cm 20 s 0.4 mm and 13 cm 40 s 0.25 mm). Conclusion The use of different protocols from CBCT machines influences linear measurements assessed from axial images. Linear distances were underestimated in both equipments. Our findings suggest that the best protocol for the i-CATTM is 13 cm 20 s 0.3 mm and for the NewTom 3GTM, the use of 6 inch or 9 inch is recommended. PMID:21831977

  15. Atroposelective Synthesis of Axially Chiral Thiohydantoin Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sarigul, Sevgi; Dogan, Ilknur

    2016-07-15

    Nonracemic axially chiral thiohydantoins were synthesized atroposelectively by the reaction of o-aryl isothiocyanates with amino acid ester salts in the presence of triethylamine (TEA). The synthesis of the nonaxially chiral derivatives, however, gave thiohydantoins racemized at C-5 of the heterocyclic ring. The micropreparatively resolved enantiomers of the nonaxially chiral derivatives from the racemic products were found to be optically stable under neutral conditions. On formation of the 5-methyl-3-arylthiohydantoin ring, bulky o-aryl substituents at N3 were found to suppress the C-5 racemization and in this way enabled the transfer of chirality from the α-amino acid to the products. The corresponding 5-isopropylthiohydantoins turned out to be more prone to racemization at C-5 during the ring formation. The isomer compositions of the synthesized axially chiral thiohydantoins have been determined through HPLC analyses with chiral stationary phases. In most cases a high prevalence of the P isomers over the M isomers has been obtained. The barriers to rotation determined around the Nsp(2)-Caryl chiral axis were found to be dependent upon the size of the o-halo aryl substituents. PMID:27322739

  16. Single Rod Vibration in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Noah; Wang, Shengfu; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Fluid structure interaction of a single rod in axial flow is a coupled dynamical system present in many application including nuclear reactors, steam generators, and towed antenna arrays. Fluid-structure response can be quantified thanks to detailed experimental data where both structure and fluid responses are recorded. Such datum deepen understanding of the physics inherent to the system and provide high-dimensionality quantitative measurements to validate coupled structural and CFD codes with various level of complexity. In this work, single rods fixed on both ends in a concentric pipe, are subjected to an axial flow with Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter of Re =4000. Rods of varying material stiffness and diameter are utilized in the experiment resulting in a range of dimensionless U between 0.5 and 1, where U = (ρA/EI)1/2uL. Experimental measurements of the velocity field around the rod are taken with PIV from time-resolved Nd:YLF laser and a high speed CMOS camera. Three-dimensional and temporal vibration and deflection of the rod is recorded with shadowgraphy utilizing two sets of pulsed high power LED and dedicated CMOS camera. Through integration of these two diagnostics, it is possible to reconstruct the full FSI domain providing unique validation data.

  17. Axial vessel widening in arborescent monocots.

    PubMed

    Petit, Giai; DeClerck, Fabrice A J; Carrer, Marco; Anfodillo, Tommaso

    2014-02-01

    Dicotyledons have evolved a strategy to compensate for the increase in hydraulic resistance to water transport with height growth by widening xylem conduits downwards. In monocots, the accumulation of hydraulic resistance with height should be similar, but the absence of secondary growth represents a strong limitation for the maintenance of xylem hydraulic efficiency during ontogeny. The hydraulic architecture of monocots has been studied but it is unclear how monocots arrange their axial vascular structure during ontogeny to compensate for increases in height. We measured the vessel lumina and estimated the hydraulic diameter (Dh) at different heights along the stem of two arborescent monocots, Bactris gasipaes (Kunth) and Guadua angustifolia (Kunth). For the former, we also estimated the variation in Dh along the leaf rachis. Hydraulic diameter increased basally from the stem apex to the base with a scaling exponent (b) in the range of those reported for dicot trees (b = 0.22 in B. gasipaes; b = 0.31 and 0.23 in G. angustifolia). In B. gasipaes, vessels decrease in Dh from the stem's centre towards the periphery, an opposite pattern compared with dicot trees. Along the leaf rachis, a pattern of increasing Dh basally was also found (b = 0.13). The hydraulic design of the monocots studied revealed an axial pattern of xylem conduits similar to those evolved by dicots to compensate and minimize the negative effect of root-to-leaf length on hydrodynamic resistance to water flow. PMID:24488857

  18. Paleoradiology: advanced CT in the evaluation of nine Egyptian mummies.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Heidi; Torres, William E; Ernst, Randy D

    2002-01-01

    Axial thin-collimation state-of-the-art spiral computed tomography (CT) was combined with sagittal and coronal reformatting, three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, and virtual "fly-through" techniques to nondestructively study nine Egyptian mummies. These techniques provided important paleopathologic and historical information about mummification techniques, depicted anatomy in the most informative imaging plane, illustrated the soft-tissue preservation and physical appearance of mummies in superb detail, and generated an intriguing virtual tour through hollow mummified remains without harming the specimens themselves. Images generated with these methods can help archaeologists and Egyptologists understand these fascinating members of mankind and can serve as adjunct visual aids for laypersons who are interested in mummies. CT has emerged as the imaging modality of choice for the examination of Egyptian mummies due to its noninvasive cross-sectional nature and inherently superior contrast and spatial resolution. As multi-detector row CT and postprocessing tools evolve, the capabilities and applications of CT will continue to proliferate, attesting to the expanded versatility and utility of CT as a noninvasive research tool in the multidisciplinary study of Egyptian mummies. PMID:11896227

  19. Elastic Buckling of Orthotropic Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf; Hu, Hurang; Diallo, Abdouramane

    1997-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular orthotropic plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  20. Dynamics of Flapping Flag in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Fayed, Mohamed; Gunter, Amy-Lee; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the phenomenon of the flapping of a flag, placed within a low turbulent axial flow inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. Flags of different sizes and flexural rigidities were used. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the edge of the flag was analyzed. The stability condition of the flag was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models and numerical simulations. Afterwards, the nonlinear dynamics of the flapping was investigated using nonlinear time series method. The nonlinear dynamics is depicted in phase space and the correlation dimension of the attractors is determined. On the basis of observations made in this study, some conclusions on the existing models were drawn.

  1. Axial flux machine, stator and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Ralph James

    2004-03-16

    An axial flux machine comprises: a soft magnetic composite stator extension positioned in parallel with a rotor disk and having slots; soft magnetic composite pole pieces attached to the stator extension and facing a permanent magnet on the rotor disk, each comprising a protrusion situated within a respective one of the slots, each protrusion shaped so as to facilitate orientation of the respective pole piece with respect to the stator extension; electrical coils, each wrapped around a respective one of the pole pieces. In another embodiment the soft magnetic composite pole pieces each comprise a base portion around with the electrical coils are wound and a trapezoidal shield portion a plurality of heights with a first height in a first region being longer than a second height in a second region, the second region being closer to a pole-to-pole gap than the first region.

  2. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  3. Numerical prediction of axial turbine stage aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; Griffin, L. W.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of two NASA-developed unsteady turbine stage computer codes. The methodology and previous partial validation of the codes are briefly outlined. Application of these codes to a Space Shuttle main engine turbine for two sets of operating conditions is then described. Steady and unsteady, two and three-dimensional results are presented, compared, and discussed. These results include time-mean and instantaneous airfoil pressure distributions and pressure fluctuations, streamlines on the airfoil surfaces and endwalls, and relative total pressure contours at different axial locations in the rotor passage. Although not available at the time of this writing, experimental data for one of the operating conditions simulated is forthcoming and will be used to assess the accuracy of the unsteady, as well as, the steady predictions presented. Issues related to code usage and resource requirements of the two codes are also discussed.

  4. Fragmentation of an axially impacted slender rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, W.; Waas, A. M.

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by experimental results on the dynamic buckling and fragmentation of a vertical column impacted by a falling mass, results from an analytical model for dynamic buckling which considers the dynamic interaction between the axial column deformation and the out-of-plane buckling displacements are used to interpret the fragmentation process and the resulting fragment lengths. It is shown that a critical time exists for the rod to undergo fragmentation. At this critical time, the rod deforms in a modulated pattern of waves, setting up the stage for the ensuing fragmentation as a result of induced large curvatures that exceed the critical bending strain of the rod material. The resulting fragment length distributions, which show two characteristics peaks at \\frac{\\lambda}{2} and \\frac{\\lambda}{4} , where λ is a characteristic half-wavelength, are found to compare favorably with the experimental results.

  5. Axially symmetric shapes with minimum wave drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Fuller, Franklyn B

    1956-01-01

    The external wave drag of bodies of revolution moving at supersonic speeds can be expressed either in terms of the geometry of the body, or in terms of the body-simulating axial source distribution. For purposes of deriving optimum bodies under various given conditions, it is found that the second of the methods mentioned is the more tractable. By use of a quasi-cylindrical theory, that is, the boundary conditions are applied on the surface of a cylinder rather than on the body itself, the variational problems of the optimum bodies having prescribed volume or caliber are solved. The streamline variations of cross-sectional area and drags of the bodies are exhibited, and some numerical results are given.

  6. Temperature gradient formation while axial gas compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A spinning gas in equilibrium has a rotation-dependent heat capacity. However, as equilibrium is approached, such as after sudden heating, significant variations in temperature appear. Surprisingly, when fast axial compression or instantaneous gas heating occurs, the temperature does not grow homogeneously in radial direction, but instead has a gradient towards to the maximum of potential energy of external or self potential. The gradient monotonically grows with compression rate and the amplitude of the potential. The gradient builds up due to change of equilibrium density distribution, yet, not due to acoustic waves created by the compression. This result was checked in numerical simulations for particles in an external constant gravitational potential and also for rotating gas in the cylinder with perfect slip boundary conditions on the walls. This work was supported by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG52-08NA28553.

  7. Hierarchical tapered bar elements undergoing axial deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.; Thampi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described to model the dynamics of tapered axial bars of various cross sections based on the well-known Craig/Bampton component mode synthesis technique. This element is formed in terms of the static constraint modes and interface restrained normal modes. This is in contrast with the finite elements as implemented in NASTRAN where the interface restrained normal modes are neglected. These normal modes are in terms of Bessel functions. Restoration of a few of these modes leads to higher accuracy with fewer generalized coordinates. The proposed models are hierarchical so that all lower order element matrices are embedded in higher order element matrices. The advantages of this formulation compared to standard NASTRAN truss element formulation are demonstrated through simple numerical examples.

  8. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, Michele

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power countingmore » is constructed.« less

  9. Gated CT imaging using a free-breathing respiration signal from flow-volume spirometry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Kwok, Young; Deyoung, Chad; Zacharapoulos, Nicholas; Pepelea, Mark; Klahr, Paul; Yu, Cedric X.

    2005-12-15

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is known to cause artifacts on free-breathing spiral CT images used in treatment planning. This leads to inaccurate delineation of target volumes on planning CT images. Flow-volume spirometry has been used previously for breath-holds during CT scans and radiation treatments using the active breathing control (ABC) system. We have developed a prototype by extending the flow-volume spirometer device to obtain gated CT scans using a PQ 5000 single-slice CT scanner. To test our prototype, we designed motion phantoms to compare image quality obtained with and without gated CT scan acquisition. Spiral and axial (nongated and gated) CT scans were obtained of phantoms with motion periods of 3-5 s and amplitudes of 0.5-2 cm. Errors observed in the volume estimate of these structures were as much as 30% with moving phantoms during CT simulation. Application of motion-gated CT with active breathing control reduced these errors to within 5%. Motion-gated CT was then implemented in patients and the results are presented for two clinical cases: lung and abdomen. In each case, gated scans were acquired at end-inhalation, end-exhalation in addition to a conventional free-breathing (nongated) scan. The gated CT scans revealed reduced artifacts compared with the conventional free-breathing scan. Differences of up to 20% in the volume of the structures were observed between gated and free-breathing scans. A comparison of the overlap of structures between the gated and free-breathing scans revealed misalignment of the structures. These results demonstrate the ability of flow-volume spirometry to reduce errors in target volumes via gating during CT imaging.

  10. Thin-Section CT Characteristics and Longitudinal CT Follow-up of Chemotherapy Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Na; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol; Song, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of chemotherapy-induced interstitial pneumonitis (CIIP) with longitudinal follow-up.The study was approved by the local ethics committee. One hundred consecutive patients with CIIP between May 2005 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. The initial CT was reviewed by 2 independent chest radiologists and categorized into 1 of 4 CT patterns in accordance with the 2013 guidelines for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) mimicking desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). We assessed semiquantitative analysis on a 5% scale to assess the extent of parenchymal abnormalities (emphysema, reticulation, ground-glass opacity, consolidation, honeycombing cyst) and their distribution on initial (n = 100), subsequent (n = 87), and second follow-up CT (n = 48). Interval changes in extent on follow-up CT were compared using paired t test. The clinic-radiologic factors were compared between Group 1 (NSIP and OP patterns) and Group 2 (HP and DAD patterns) using χ and independent t tests.The most common pattern of CIIP on the initial CT was HP (51%), followed by NSIP (23%), OP (20%), and DAD (6%). Diffuse ground-glass opacity was the most common pulmonary abnormality. The predominant distribution was bilateral (99%) and symmetric (82%), with no craniocaudal (60%) or axial (79%) dominance. Subsequent and second follow-up CTs showed decreased extent of total pulmonary abnormalities (P < 0.001, respectively). In comparison with Group 1 CIIP, Group 2 CIIP was more likely to be caused by molecularly targeted drugs (P = 0.030), appeared earlier (P = 0.034), and underwent more complete resolution (P < 0.001). Use of a CT pattern-recognition approach to CIIP is appropriate and practical in interpreting radiological findings. PMID:26765442

  11. Nonunion of acetabular fractures: evaluation with interactive multiplanar CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Ney, D.R.; Brooker, A.F. Jr.; Magid, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nonunions involving fractures of the acetabulum are reportedly rare, with few citings and little discussion in the literature. It is possible that acetabular nonunions go undetected because imaging of the acetabulum is difficult by conventional radiography. We report two cases of fracture nonunion involving the weight-bearing surface of the acetabulum diagnosed with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and a newly developed interactive 2D/3D orthotool that uniquely processes and reformats routine CT data. The interactive 2D/3D orthotool is a sophisticated computer program that allows dynamic viewing of standard multiplanar reconstructions in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes as well as multiple oblique projections. The 2D/3D orthotool provides on screen correlation of two-dimensional multiplanar images with three-dimensional reconstructions of the pelvis. The authors found this capability ideally suited for studying fractures with off-axis orientation such as those through the acetabular dome, greatly facilitating the diagnosis of nonunion.

  12. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual ... to allow for inflation with air while CT images are being taken. If you’re scheduled for ...

  13. Dose management in CT facility

    PubMed Central

    Tsapaki, V; Rehani, M

    2007-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) examinations have rapidly increased in number over the last few years due to recent advances such as the spiral, multidetector-row, CT fluoroscopy and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-CT technology. This has resulted in a large increase in collective radiation dose as reported by many international organisations. It is also stated that frequently, image quality in CT exceeds the level required for confident diagnosis. This inevitably results in patient radiation doses that are higher than actually required, as also stressed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the CT exposure of paediatric and small adult patients. However, the wide range in exposure parameters reported, as well as the different CT applications reveal the difficulty in standardising CT procedures. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic CT principles, outline the recent technological advances and their impact in patient radiation dose and finally suggest methods of radiation dose optimisation. PMID:21614279

  14. Elliptic instability in a Rankine vortex with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, Laurent; Birbaud, Anne-Laure; Le Dizès, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    The elliptic instability of a Rankine vortex with axial flow subject to a weak strain field perpendicular to its axis is analyzed by asymptotic methods in the limit of small strain rate. General unstable modes associated with resonant Kelvin modes of arbitrary azimuthal wavenumbers are considered. Both the effects of axial flow and viscosity are analyzed in details.

  15. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  16. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  17. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-04-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  18. An Axial-Torsional, Thermomechanical Fatigue Testing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for conducting strain-controlled, thermomechanical, axial-torsional fatigue tests on thin-walled tubular specimens was developed. Three waveforms of loading, namely, the axial strain waveform, the engineering shear strain waveform, and the temperature waveform were required in these tests. The phasing relationships between the mechanical strain waveforms and the temperature and axial strain waveforms were used to define a set of four axial-torsional, thermomechanical fatigue (AT-TMF) tests. Real-time test control (3 channels) and data acquisition (a minimum of 7 channels) were performed with a software program written in C language and executed on a personal computer. The AT-TMF testing technique was used to investigate the axial-torsional thermomechanical fatigue behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188. The maximum and minimum temperatures selected for the AT-TMF tests were 760 and 316 C, respectively. Details of the testing system, calibration of the dynamic temperature profile of the thin-walled tubular specimen, thermal strain compensation technique, and test control and data acquisition schemes, are reported. The isothermal, axial, torsional, and in- and out-of-phase axial-torsional fatigue behaviors of Haynes 188 at 316 and 760 C were characterized in previous investigations. The cyclic deformation and fatigue behaviors of Haynes 188 in AT-TMF tests are compared to the previously reported isothermal axial-torsional behavior of this superalloy at the maximum and minimum temperatures.

  19. Axial viewing of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, R.L.; Winge, R.K.; Praphairaksit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector constricts the analyte emission zone and prevents the production of off-axis emission from the upstream reaches of the axial channel. These properties should both improve signal, reduce background and alleviate matrix effects during axial viewing of the ICP through a metal sampling orifice thrust into the plasma. Recent results along these lines will be presented.

  20. Surgical stabilization of the atlanto-occipital overlap with atlanto-axial instability in a dog.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2016-05-01

    The atlanto-occipital (AO) overlap in combination with atlanto-axial (AA) instability was found in a dog. We hypothesized that ventral fixation of the AA junction can stabilize the atlas and prevent AO overlap by reviewing our past cases with AA instability. A standard ventral fixation of the AA junction using stainless k-wires and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was performed. The dog fully recovered, and no complication was noted. The results of the postoperative CT imaging supported our hypothesis. The ventral fixation of the AA junction is a feasible treatment option for similar cases, although craniocervical junction abnormalities (CJA) including AA instability are varied, and careful consideration is required for each case. PMID:27506088

  1. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... weight limit. Too much weight can damage the scanner's working parts. You will be asked to remove ...

  2. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  3. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  4. Relation between retinal vein occlusions and axial length.

    PubMed Central

    Aritürk, N.; Oge, Y.; Erkan, D.; Süllü, Y.; Mohajerý, F.

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the ocular axial length as a risk factor for development of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS: Ocular axial lengths were measured, by A-scan ultrasonography, in 17 patients with CRVO and 41 patients with BRVO and compared with those of contralateral unaffected eyes and 66 age matched controls. RESULTS: In 17 patients with CRVO the mean axial length of affected eyes was 22.25 (SD 0.19) mm and of unaffected eyes was 22.61 (0.13) mm. In 41 patients with BRVO the mean axial length of affected eyes was 22.89 (0.11) mm and of unaffected eyes was 22.99 (0.12) mm. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm that the axial lengths in CRVO and BRVO were significantly shorter than in the controls. This significant difference may be a risk factor in the development of CRVO and BRVO. PMID:8795376

  5. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  6. Hypothetical silicon nanotubes under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2003-03-01

    This study shows the response of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) under axial compression using an atomistic simulation based on the Tersoff potential. The application of pressure, proportional to the deformation within Hook's law, eventually led to a collapse of the SiNT and an abrupt change in structure. Using the sum of the cross sections of the atoms on the SiNT cross section and the SiNT pressure, we determined Young's modulus for the SiNTs that was constant irrespective of the SiNTs' diameter. As the SiNTs' diameter increased, the collapse pressure, that is the critical stress, linearly decreased. However, the net forces on the SiNTs at their collapse were almost constant irrespective of the SiNTs' diameter. We calculated the variations in the unit cell volume as a function of pressure, which were not dealt with in previous works considering carbon nanotubes under compression. Using properly chosen parameters for the SiNTs (Young's modulus, effective spring constant, diameter, lattice constant and cylindrical volume modulus), the critical strain, the collapse pressure, the elastic energy and the critical volume at which the SiNT buckling occurs can be estimated by equations given in this work.

  7. Small axial turbine stator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, W.; Kozak, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effects of surface finish, fillet radius, inlet boundary layer thickness, and free-stream inlet turbulence level on the aerodynamic performance of a small axial flow turbine stator. The principal objective of this program was to help understand why large turbine efficiency is not maintained when a large turbine is scaled to a smaller size. The stator used in this program as a one-sixth scale of a 762 mm (30 in.) diameter stator design with 50 vanes having a vane height of 17 mm (0.666 in.) and an aspect ratio of 1.77. A comprehensive overall test matrix was used to provide a complete engineering understanding of the effects of each variable over the full range of all the other variables. The range of each variable investigated was as follows: surface finish 0.1 micro (4 micro in.) to 2.4 micro (95 micro in.); boundary layer thickness 2 to 25 percent of channel height at each wall; fillet radius 0 mm (0 in.) to 1.0 mm (.040 in.) and turbulence 2 to 12 percent.

  8. High Power Co-Axial SRF Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, R.A. Rimmer

    2009-05-01

    There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Two-thirds of these designs are coaxial couplers using disk or cylindrical ceramics in various combinations and configurations. While it is well known that dielectric losses go down by several orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, it not well known that the thermal conductivity also goes down, and it is the ratio of thermal conductivity to loss tangent (SRF ceramic Quality Factor) and ceramic volume which will determine the heat load of any given design. We describe a novel robust co-axial SRF coupler design which uses compressed window technology. This technology will allow the use of highly thermally conductive materials for cryogenic windows. The mechanical designs will fit into standard-sized ConFlat® flanges for ease of assembly. Two windows will be used in a coaxial line. The distance between the windows is adjusted to cancel their reflections so that the same window can be used in many different applications at various frequencies.

  9. Small axial compressor technology, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.; Ware, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    A scaled single-stage, highly-loaded, axial-flow transonic compressor was tested at speeds from 70 to 110% design equivalent speed to evaluate the effects of scaling compromises and the individual and combined effects of rotor tip running clearance and rotor shroud casing treatment on the overall and blade element performance. At design speed and 1% tip clearance the stage demonstrated an efficiency of 83.2% at 96.4% design flow and a pressure ratio of 1.865. Casing treatment increased design speed surge margin 2.0 points to 12.8%. Overall performance was essentially unchanged. An increase in rotor running clearance to 2.2%, with smooth casing, reduced design speed peak efficiency 5.7 points, flow by 7.4%, pressure ratio to 1.740, and surge margin to 5.4%. Reinstalling casing treatment regained 3.5 points in design speed peak efficiency, 4.7% flow, increased pressure ratio to 1.800 and surge margin to 8.7%.

  10. Axial compressor middle stage secondary flow study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation of the secondary flow within and aft of an axial compressor model with thick endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to obtain detailed aerodynamic and trace gas concentration traverse data aft of a well documented isolated rotor for the ultimate purpose of improving the design phases of compressor development based on an improved physical understanding of secondary flow. It was determined from the flow visualization, aerodynamic, and trace gas concentration results that the relative unloading of the midspan region of the airfoil inhibitied a fullspan separation at high loading preventing the massive radial displacement of the hub corner stall to the tip. Radial distribution of high and low total pressure fluid influenced the magnitude of the spanwise distribution of loss, such that, there was a general decreases in loss near the hub to the extent that for the least loaded case a negative loss (increase in total pressure) was observed. The ability to determine the spanwise distribution of blockage was demonstrated. Large blockage was present in the endwall regions due to the corner stall and tip leakage with little blockage in the core flow region. Hub blockage was found to increase rapidly with loading.

  11. Axially Loaded Behavior of Driven PC Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shih-Tsung

    2010-05-01

    To obtain a fair load-settlement curve of a driven pile, and to evaluate the ultimate pile capacity more accurately, a numerical model was created to simulate the ground movements during a pile being driven. After the procedure, the axially loaded behaviors of the piles in silty sand were analyzed. The numerical results are compared with those results by full scale pile load tests. It was found, although the loads added on the tested piles are different from those by the numerical analyses which applied displacement increments on piles, the load-settlement behaviors of piles calculated from the numerical model were close to those measured from field tests before the piles stressed to peak. Total load, shaft friction, and point bearing do not reach peak values at the same pile settlement; furthermore, the point bearing slowly increases all the while, with no peak. However, the point bearing only contributes 10˜20% of ultimate pile capacity. No matter which relative density of silty sand, pile diameter, and pile length increased, ultimate pile capacity increased as well.

  12. Axial channeling of boron ions into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Ferla, A.; Galvagno, G.; Raineri, V.; Setola, R.; Rimini, E.; Carbera, A.; Gasparotto, A.

    1992-04-01

    Channeling boron implants were performed into (100) and (110) silicon substrates in the energy range 80-700 keV. The dose ranged between 3.5 × 10 11 and 1 × 10 15 atoms/cm 2. The axial channeling concentration profiles of implanted B + were compared with that obtained for incidence along the random direction of the crystal and with that obtained by implantation in amorphous silicon. The electrical and chemical boron distributions were obtained by spreading resistance and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, respectively. The inelastic stopping power, Sc, was extracted from the experimental maximum ranges for the [100] and [110] axis. The energ dependence of the electronic stopping power is given by Sc = KEp with p[100] = 0.469±0.010 and p[110] = 0.554±0.004. Simulations obtained by the MARLOWE code, using the Oen-Robinson impact parameter dependent formula, for the electronic energy loss reproduce quite well the experimental depth profiles.

  13. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P.; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors. PMID:22448122

  14. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  15. Axially localized states in Taylor Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose M.; Marques, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow in a Taylor Couette system with the inner cylinder rotating and aspect ratio Γ restricted to 0 . 86 <Γ/N < 0 . 95 , being N the number of Taylor vortices. For these values a complex experimental bifurcation scenario has been reported. The transition from wavy vortex flow (WVF) to a very low frequency mode VLF happens via an axisymmetric eigenfunction. The VLF plays an essential role in the dynamics, leading to chaos through a two-tori period-doubling route. This chaotic regime vanishes with further increase in Re and gives rise to a new flow regime ALS characterized by the existence of large jet oscillations localized in some pairs of vortices. The aim of this numerical study is to extend the available information on ALS by means of a detailed exploration of the parameter space in which it occurs. Frequency analysis from time series simultaneously recorded at several points of the domain has been applied to identify the different transitions taking place. The VLF occurs in a wide range of control parameters and its interaction with the axially localized states is crucial is most transitions, either between different ALS or to the chaotic regime. Spanish Ministry of Education and Science Grants (with FEDER funds) FIS2013-40880 and BES-2010-041542.

  16. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  17. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Paula; Faria-Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana-Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study. The total sample of 504 patients and their CT was included in this study. The patients were from a private dental clinic, specializing in oral surgery, where the first complaint was not directly related to sinus disease, but with dental pathology. For each patient, the etiological factors of maxillary sinusitis and the imaging CT findings were analyzed. All the axial, coronal and sagittal CT slices were evaluated and general data were registered. The latter was selected based on the maxillary sinus CT published literature. Results 32.40% of patients presented normal sinus (without any etiological factor associated), 29.00% showed presence of etiological and imaging findings in the maxillary sinus, 20.60% had only imaging changes in the maxillary sinus and 18.00% of patients presented only etiological factors and no change in the maxillary sinus. Conclusions Radiological imaging is an important tool for establishing the diagnosis of maxillary sinus pathology. These results indicate that the CT scan should be an excellent tool for complement the odontogenic sinusitis diagnosis. Key words: Maxillary sinusitis/etiology, odontogenic, computed tomography, maxillary sinus. PMID:25858084

  18. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2013-08-14

    A superconducting RF (SRF) power coupler capable of handling 500 kW CW RF power at 750 MHz is required for present and future storage rings and linacs. There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Coupler windows vary from cylinders to cones to disks and RF power couplers will always be limited by the ability of ceramic windows and their matching systems to withstand the stresses due to non-uniform heating from dielectric and wall losses, multipactor, and mechanical flexure. In the Phase II project, we built a double window coaxial system with materials that would not otherwise be useable due to individual VSWRs. Double window systems can be operated such that one is cold (LN2) and one is warm. They can have different materials and still have a good match without using matching elements that create problematic multipactor bands. The match of the two windows will always result from the cancellation of the two window’s reflections when they are located approximately a quarter wavelength apart or multiples of a quarter wavelength. The window assemblies were carefully constructed to put the window material and its braze joint in compression at all times. This was done using explosion bonding techniques which allow for inexpensive fabrication of the vacuum / compression ring out of stainless steel with copper plating applied to the inner surface. The EIA 3-1/8” double window assembly was then successfully baked out and tested to 12 kW in a 3-1/8” co-axial system. The thermal gradient across the window was measured to be 90 C which represents about 15 ksi tensile stress in an uncompressed window. In our design the compression was calculated to be about 25 ksi, so the net compressive force was 5 ksi at full power.

  19. An update on biomarkers in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Prajzlerová, Klára; Grobelná, Kristýna; Pavelka, Karel; Šenolt, Ladislav; Filková, Mária

    2016-06-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with the onset at a young age, and, if undiagnosed and untreated, it may result in permanent damage and lifelong disability. Rates of early diagnosis have improved, due in particular to the addition of magnetic resonance imaging into the diagnostic armamentaria; however, it is costly, not widely available, and requires experienced readers to interpret the findings. In addition to clinical measures and imaging techniques, biomarkers that will be described in this review may represent useful tools for diagnosis, monitoring disease activity and outcomes as well as therapeutic responses. Currently, HLA-B27 remains the best genetic biomarker for making a diagnosis, while CRP currently appears to be the best circulating measure for assessing disease activity, predicting structural progression and therapeutic response. Interestingly, key molecules in the pathogenesis of the disease and essential therapeutic targets, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23, show only limited association with disease characteristics or disease progression. Some genetic biomarkers and particularly anti-CD74 antibodies, may become a promising tool for the early diagnosis of axSpA. Further biomarkers, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-3, calprotectin (S100A8/9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) or dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), are not sufficient to reflect disease activity, but may predict spinal structural progression. In addition, recent data have shown that monitoring calprotectin might represent a valuable biomarker of therapeutic response. However, all of these results need to be confirmed in large cohort studies prior to use in daily clinical practice. PMID:26851549

  20. Axial field spectrometer at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.; Hogue, R.; Killian, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer (AFS) was recently brought into operation at the CERN ISR. It is being exploited in a wide-ranging program to study different aspects of those proton-proton or proton-antiproton collisions which are characterized by a large transverse momentum (p/sub T/). Examples include the measurement of inclusive distributions of identified high p/sub T/ hadrons, and the study of event structures characterized by a large transverse energy (E/sub T/) or the production of one or several high-p/sub T/ electrons or photons. The experimental approach to this program emphasizes integration of advanced magnetic spectroscopy with state-of-the-art calorimetry. These techniques are fully exploited to provide maximal information on all particles produced. In addition, information from these detectors is used in new ways for on-line event triggering and filtering; this allows even very rare events to be selected with high efficiency, an essential prerequisite for studies at a high-luminosity hadron collider, such as the ISR. Considerable modularity of the detectors was sought. Apart from clear advantages of construction, debugging, running, and servicing of such components, modularity provides ease for addition or reconfiguration of the system to emphasize the study of specific final states. At present, for example, a 1 sr Cerenkov detector system allows hadron identification up to p approx. = 12 GeV/c; liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeters and a uranium-scintillator calorimeter (Hexagon) are used for a study of events containing direct photons.

  1. Lack of Axial Rotation in Mobile-bearing Knee Designs

    PubMed Central

    Komistek, Richard D.; Zingde, Sumesh M.; Sheridan, Kate C.; Mahfouz, Mohamed R.

    2008-01-01

    It has often been assumed rotational kinematics are improved with mobile-bearing TKA designs as the terms mobile-bearing and rotating platform imply. We tested this assumption by assessing the in vivo axial rotation magnitudes and patterns of 527 knees implanted with 12 different mobile-bearing TKA designs. Implants were grouped and compared by type—posterior stabilized (PS), posterior cruciate retaining (PCR), and posterior cruciate sacrificing (PCS)—and by specific design. We hypothesized all three mobile-bearing types (PS, PCR, and PCS) would achieve greater than 10° average axial rotation and we would find no differences in axial rotation between types. Only 14% of PS knees, 3% of PCS knees, and 17% of PCR knees attained greater than 10° axial rotation when measured from 0° to 90°. The percentage of PCS knees with greater than 10° axial rotation was less compared with the other two groups. Axial rotation averaged 4.3°, 2.5°, and 3.8° for the PS, PCS, and PCR knees, respectively. Incidences of reverse rotation were observed in 17% of PS knees, 32% of PCS knees, and 28% of PCR knees. Compared with the PCS group, the PS group achieved greater average axial rotation and had a lower percentage of knees displaying incidences of reverse rotation. The data refuted the hypotheses. PMID:18581194

  2. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator.

    PubMed

    Goharian, M; Khan, R F H

    2010-04-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) 'X-Ray ON' status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL 'X-Ray ON' indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 +/- 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment delivery

  3. Concha bullosa: CT evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zinreich, S J; Mattox, D E; Kennedy, D W; Chisholm, H L; Diffley, D M; Rosenbaum, A E

    1988-01-01

    Aeration of the middle turbinate, termed "concha bullosa," is a common anatomical variant of intranasal anatomy. Of 320 patients evaluated for sinus disease with coronal CT, 34% had concha bullosa on at least one side. The overall incidence of inflammatory disease in the ostiomeatal complex in these symptomatic patients was not different between those with and without concha bullosa. However, there were many cases in which an abnormally large middle turbinate appeared to obstruct the ostiomeatal complex causing secondary infection of the ethmoid, frontal, and maxillary sinuses. Obstruction of drainage of the concha bullosa itself can lead to mucocele formation. Furthermore, the presence of a concha bullosa has important implications for the technique of endoscopic surgery used in the management of the sinus disease. The anatomy, pathophysiology, and CT findings in patients with concha bullosa are reviewed. PMID:3170840

  4. Quantitative micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven

    2005-09-01

    Micro-CT for bone structural analysis has progressed from an in-vitro laboratory technique to devices for in-vivo assessment of small animals and the peripheral human skeleton. Currently, topological parameters of bone architecture are the primary goals of analysis. Additional measurement of the density or degree of mineralization (DMB) of trabecular and cortical bone at the microscopic level is desirable to study effects of disease and treatment progress. This information is not commonly extracted because of the challenges of accurate measurement and calibration at the tissue level. To assess the accuracy of micro-CT DMB measurements in a realistic but controlled situation, we prepared bone-mimicking watery solutions at concentrations of 100 to 600 mg/cm3 K2PO4H and scanned them with micro-CT, both in glass vials and microcapillary tubes with inner diameters of 50, 100 and 150 μm to simulate trabecular thickness. Values of the linear attenuation coefficients μ in the reconstructed image are commonly affected by beam hardening effects for larger samples and by partial volume effects for small volumes. We implemented an iterative reconstruction technique to reduce beam hardening. Partial voluming was sought to be reduced by excluding voxels near the tube wall. With these two measures, improvement on the constancy of the reconstructed voxel values and linearity with solution concentration could be observed to over 90% accuracy. However, since the expected change in real bone is small more measurements are needed to confirm that micro-CT can indeed be adapted to assess bone mineralization at the tissue level.

  5. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  6. Buckling of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes under Axial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Seiji; Nishio, Mitsumasa; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated the axial buckling of multiwall nanotubes under the axial compression using nanomanipulation experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Experimentally, Young’s moduli of nanotubes with different inner hollow diameters for the same outer diameters are consistent with the Eulers buckling model based on the continuum analysis. The MD simulations for the buckling behavior of triple- and double-walled nanotubes are also consistent with the continuum analysis. This good agreement indicates that Euler’s buckling model is applicable to the analysis of the axial buckling behavior of the multiwall nanotubes.

  7. Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-06-15

    We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

  8. A non-integral, axial-force measuring element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringel, M.; Levin, D.; Seginer, A.

    1989-10-01

    A new approach to the measurement of the axial force is presented. A nonintegral axial-force measuring element, housed within the wind-tunnel model, avoids the interactions that are caused by nonlinear elastic phenomena characteristic of integral balances. The new design overcomes other problems, such as friction, misalignment and relative motion between metric elements, that plagued previous attempts at separate measurement of the axial force. Calibration and test results prove the ability of the new approach to duplicate and even surpass the results of much more complicated and expensive integral balances. The advantages of the new design make it the best known solution for particular measurement problems.

  9. Axial 3D region of interest reconstruction using weighted cone beam BPF/DBPF algorithm cascaded with adequately oriented orthogonal butterfly filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaojie; Tang, Xiangyang

    2016-03-01

    Axial cone beam (CB) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction is still the most desirable in clinical applications. As the potential candidates with analytic form for the task, the back projection-filtration (BPF) and the derivative backprojection filtered (DBPF) algorithms, in which Hilbert filtering is the common algorithmic feature, are originally derived for exact helical and axial reconstruction from CB and fan beam projection data, respectively. These two algorithms have been heuristically extended for axial CB reconstruction via adoption of virtual PI-line segments. Unfortunately, however, streak artifacts are induced along the Hilbert filtering direction, since these algorithms are no longer accurate on the virtual PI-line segments. We have proposed to cascade the extended BPF/DBPF algorithm with orthogonal butterfly filtering for image reconstruction (namely axial CB-BPP/DBPF cascaded with orthogonal butterfly filtering), in which the orientation-specific artifacts caused by post-BP Hilbert transform can be eliminated, at a possible expense of losing the BPF/DBPF's capability of dealing with projection data truncation. Our preliminary results have shown that this is not the case in practice. Hence, in this work, we carry out an algorithmic analysis and experimental study to investigate the performance of the axial CB-BPP/DBPF cascaded with adequately oriented orthogonal butterfly filtering for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction in region of interest (ROI).

  10. Solving outside-axial-field-of-view scatter correction problem in PET via digital experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Zhu, Yang-Ming; Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Unaccounted scatter impact from unknown outside-axial-field-of-view (outside-AFOV) activity in PET is an important degrading factor for image quality and quantitation. Resource consuming and unpopular way to account for the outside- AFOV activity is to perform an additional PET/CT scan of adjacent regions. In this work we investigate a solution to the outside-AFOV scatter problem without performing a PET/CT scan of the adjacent regions. The main motivation for the proposed method is that the measured random corrected prompt (RCP) sinogram in the background region surrounding the measured object contains only scattered events, originating from both inside- and outside-AFOV activity. In this method, the scatter correction simulation searches through many randomly-chosen outside-AFOV activity estimates along with known inside-AFOV activity, generating a plethora of scatter distribution sinograms. This digital experimentation iterates until a decent match is found between a simulated scatter sinogram (that include supposed outside-AFOV activity) and the measured RCP sinogram in the background region. The combined scatter impact from inside- and outside-AFOV activity can then be used for scatter correction during final image reconstruction phase. Preliminary results using measured phantom data indicate successful phantom length estimate with the method, and, therefore, accurate outside-AFOV scatter estimate.

  11. CT radiation profile width measurement using CR imaging plate raw data.

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, Thorarin Albert; Yang, Chang-Ying Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This technical note demonstrates computed tomography (CT) radiation profile measurement using computed radiography (CR) imaging plate raw data showing it is possible to perform the CT collimation width measurement using a single scan without saturating the imaging plate. Previously described methods require careful adjustments to the CR reader settings in order to avoid signal clipping in the CR processed image. CT radiation profile measurements were taken as part of routine quality control on 14 CT scanners from four vendors. CR cassettes were placed on the CT scanner bed, raised to isocenter, and leveled. Axial scans were taken at all available collimations, advancing the cassette for each scan. The CR plates were processed and raw CR data were analyzed using MATLAB scripts to measure collimation widths. The raw data approach was compared with previously established methodology. The quality control analysis scripts are released as open source using creative commons licensing. A log-linear relationship was found between raw pixel value and air kerma, and raw data collimation width measurements were in agreement with CR-processed, bit-reduced data, using previously described methodology. The raw data approach, with intrinsically wider dynamic range, allows improved measurement flexibility and precision. As a result, we demonstrate a methodology for CT collimation width measurements using a single CT scan and without the need for CR scanning parameter adjustments which is more convenient for routine quality control work. PMID:26699559

  12. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  13. Analytical equations for CT dose profiles derived using a scatter kernel of Monte Carlo parentage with broad applicability to CT dosimetry problems

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of the complete axial dose profile f(z), including its long scatter tails, provides the most complete (and flexible) description of the accumulated dose in CT scanning. The CTDI paradigm (including CTDI{sub vol}) requires shift-invariance along z (identical dose profiles spaced at equal intervals), and is therefore inapplicable to many of the new and complex shift-variant scan protocols, e.g., high dose perfusion studies using variable (or zero) pitch. In this work, a convolution-based beam model developed by Dixon et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 3712-3728, (2005)] updated with a scatter LSF kernel (or DSF) derived from a Monte Carlo simulation by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547-4554 (2009)] is used to create an analytical equation for the axial dose profile f(z) in a cylindrical phantom. Using f(z), equations are derived which provide the analytical description of conventional (axial and helical) dose, demonstrating its physical underpinnings; and likewise for the peak axial dose f(0) appropriate to stationary phantom cone beam CT, (SCBCT). The methodology can also be applied to dose calculations in shift-variant scan protocols. This paper is an extension of our recent work Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 37, 2703-2718 (2010)], which dealt only with the properties of the peak dose f(0), its relationship to CTDI, and its appropriateness to SCBCT. Methods: The experimental beam profile data f(z) of Mori et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 1061-1069 (2005)] from a 256 channel prototype cone beam scanner for beam widths (apertures) ranging from a = 28 to 138 mm are used to corroborate the theoretical axial profiles in a 32 cm PMMA body phantom. Results: The theoretical functions f(z) closely-matched the central axis experimental profile data{sup 11} for all apertures (a = 28 -138 mm). Integration of f(z) likewise yields analytical equations for all the (CTDI-based) dosimetric quantities of conventional CT (including CTDI{sub L} itself) in addition to the peak dose f(0) relevant to

  14. Spatial information transmission using axial temporal coherence coding.

    PubMed

    Micó, Vicente; García, Javier; Ferreira, Carlos; Sylman, David; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2007-04-01

    We present an approach that can be used for transmission of information through space-limited systems or for superresolution. The spatial information is coded with different axial temporal coherence by interfering every spatial region in the input with the same region, but with a certain known delay in the longitudinal axis. Every spatial region has different delay. After mixing all of the spatial information, it is transmitted through the space-limited system. At the detection the information is passed through a similar interference setup containing certain axial delay. By temporally scanning along the longitudinal axis, each time a different spatial region that was coded with the corresponding axial delay is reconstructed. To allow coding of different spatial regions with different and small axial delays, we use a thermal light source that has very short coherence length. We include experimental validation of the presented approach. PMID:17339919

  15. Axial field shaping under high-numerical-aperture focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Toufic G.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2007-03-01

    Kant reported [J. Mod. Optics47, 905 (2000)] a formulation for solving the inverse problem of vector diffraction, which accurately models high-NA focusing. Here, Kant's formulation is adapted to the method of generalized projections to obtain an algorithm for designing diffractive optical elements (DOEs) that reshape the axial point-spread function (PSF). The algorithm is applied to design a binary phase-only DOE that superresolves the axial PSF with controlled increase in axial sidelobes. An 11-zone DOE is identified that axially narrows the PSF central lobe by 29% while maintaining the sidelobe intensity at or below 52% of the peak intensity. This DOE could improve the resolution achievable in several applications without significantly complicating the optical system.

  16. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.

  17. Historic Image: view of Axial Cemetery Road and Sections 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Image: view of Axial Cemetery Road and Sections 1 and 2, from Receiving Vault looking to the entrance. Photograph 8 November 1937. NCA History Collection - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Jamaica Avenue Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  18. The stresses in columns under combined axial and side loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnstein, Karl

    1922-01-01

    The problem before us is to determine the total stresses in an axially loaded column of any degree of restraint which is also subject to transverse bending both from a uniformly distributed load and from concentrated loads.

  19. 22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; view to southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  20. CT number variations in micro CT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2008-03-01

    CT numbers can be directly computed from the linear attenuation coefficients in the reconstructed CT images and are correlated to the electron densities of the chemical elements with specific atomic numbers. However, the computed CT numbers can be varied when different imaging parameters are used. Phantoms composed of clinically relevant and tissue-equivalent materials (lung, bone, muscle, and adipose) were scanned with a commercial circular-scanning micro CT imager. This imaging system is composed with a micro-focused x-ray tube and charged-coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The mean CT numbers and the corresponding standard deviations in terms of Hounsfield units were then computed from a pre-defined region of interest located within the reconstructed volumetric images. The variations of CT number were then identified from a series of imaging parameters. Those parameters include imaging acquisition modes (e.g., the metal filter used in the x-ray tube), reconstruction methods (e.g., Feldkamp and iterative algorithm), and post-image processing techniques (e.g., ring artifact, beam-hardening artifact, and smoothing processing). These variations of CT numbers are useful and important in tissue characterization, quantitative bone structure analysis, bone marrow density evaluation, and Monte Carlo dose calculations for the pilot small animal study when micro CT imaging systems are employed. Also these variations can be used as the quantification for the performance of the micro CT imaging systems.

  1. Mapping AUV Survey of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H.; Caress, D.; Conlin, D.; Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Butterfield, D.; Chadwick, W.; Tucker, P.

    2006-12-01

    In late August and early September 2006, the MBARI Mapping Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed for 5 missions on Axial Seamount during a NOAA NeMO cruise on the R/V Thompson. The objective of the survey was to determine the geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount using high resolution multibeam, sidescan, and sub-bottom profiler data. The Mapping AUV is a torpedo-shaped, 6000 m rated vehicle designed and constructed by MBARI. The vehicle is equipped with a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz and 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, and a 2-16 kHz sweep chirp sub-bottom profiler. The multibeam provides a 120-degree swath with 0.94 degree by 0.94 degree beam resolution. The endurance of the AUV is eight hours at 3 knots. Navigation derives from an inertial navigation system (INS) incorporating a ring laser gyro aided by GPS at the surface and by velocity-over- ground observations from a Doppler velocity log (DVL) when within 130 m of the seafloor. A navigational precision of 0.05 percent of distance traveled is achieved with continuous DVL bottom lock. An acoustic modem allows surface aiding of navigation during deep descents. The AUV ran two types of missions: those on the rim of the caldera were run at 90 m altitude with a line spacing of 250 m and those on the caldera floor were run at 50 m altitude with a line spacing of 150 or 175 m. The surveys covered most of 1998 lava flow on the south rim of the caldera and northern part of the south rift zone, the southern region of the caldera floor where hydrothermal vents are common, the northeast rim of the caldera where volcaniclastic deposits related to caldera collapse drape the surface, the north rift zone, and the northern portion of the caldera floor. The low-altitude maps have a resolution of 1 m, so large individual lava pillars and hydrothermal chimneys can be seen, fissures stand out clearly, and the regions of collapsed lobate flows and lava channels are prominent. Many of the flows, including the

  2. Watson's theorem and the N Δ (1232 ) axial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Hernández, E.; Nieves, J.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2016-01-01

    We present a new determination of the N Δ axial form factors from neutrino induced pion production data. For this purpose, the model of Hernandez et al. [Phys. Rev. D 76, 033005 (2007)] is improved by partially restoring unitarity. This is accomplished by imposing Watson's theorem on the dominant vector and axial multipoles. As a consequence, a larger C5A(0 ), in good agreement with the prediction from the off-diagonal Goldberger-Treiman relation, is now obtained.

  3. Limit loads for pipelines with axial surface flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Tyson, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    The limit loads for pipelines with axial surface flaws have been evaluated by using a strip yield model at levels of ligament yield and ligament collapse. The former was defined as that at which the plastic zone first reaches the back surface, and the later is that at which the plastic zone spreads over the entire ligament. The evaluated collapse load has been used to estimate the failure stress of pipelines containing axial surface flaws. Predictions have been compared with existing experimental data.

  4. Light-front view of the axial anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chueng-Ryong |; Rey, Soo-Jong

    1995-07-01

    Motivated by an apparent puzzle of the light-front vacua incompatible with the axial anomaly, we have considered the two-dimensional massless Schwinger model for an arbitrary interpolating angle of the quantization surface. By examining spectral deformation of the Dirac sea under an external electric field semiclassically, we have found that the axial anomaly is quantization angle independent. This indicates an intricate nontrivial vacuum structure present even in the light-front limit.

  5. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical. PMID:25324066

  6. Active axial spondyloarthritis: potential role of certolizumab pegol

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, Sriya; Miller, Anne V

    2014-01-01

    The axial spondyloarthropathies are a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that predominantly affect the axial joints. This group includes ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthropathy. While the pathogenesis of axial spondyloarthropathies is not clear, immunologically active tissues primarily include the entheses, ie, the areas where ligaments, tendons, and joint capsules attach to bone and to the annulus fibrosis at the vertebrae. One of the major mediators of the immune response in this group of diseases is tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). Blockade of TNFα results in reduced vascularity and inflammatory cell infiltration in the synovial tissues of affected joints. Certolizumab pegol (CZP) is an Fc-free, PEGylated anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody. CZP has unique properties that differ from other available TNFα inhibitors by virtue of its lack of an Fc region, which minimizes potential Fc-mediated effects, and its PEGylation, which improves drug pharmacokinetics and bioavailability. It has been shown in clinical trials that CZP improves patient outcomes and reduces inflammation in the sacroiliac joints and spine in both ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthropathies. These data support CZP as a treatment option for axial spondyloarthropathies. PMID:24611014

  7. Assessment of phase based dose modulation for improved dose efficiency in cardiac CT on an anthropomorphic motion phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde, Adam; Nilsen, Roy; Nett, Brian

    2014-03-01

    State of the art automatic exposure control modulates the tube current across view angle and Z based on patient anatomy for use in axial full scan reconstructions. Cardiac CT, however, uses a fundamentally different image reconstruction that applies a temporal weighting to reduce motion artifacts. This paper describes a phase based mA modulation that goes beyond axial and ECG modulation; it uses knowledge of the temporal view weighting applied within the reconstruction algorithm to improve dose efficiency in cardiac CT scanning. Using physical phantoms and synthetic noise emulation, we measure how knowledge of sinogram temporal weighting and the prescribed cardiac phase can be used to improve dose efficiency. First, we validated that a synthetic CT noise emulation method produced realistic image noise. Next, we used the CT noise emulation method to simulate mA modulation on scans of a physical anthropomorphic phantom where a motion profile corresponding to a heart rate of 60 beats per minute was used. The CT noise emulation method matched noise to lower dose scans across the image within 1.5% relative error. Using this noise emulation method to simulate modulating the mA while keeping the total dose constant, the image variance was reduced by an average of 11.9% on a scan with 50 msec padding, demonstrating improved dose efficiency. Radiation dose reduction in cardiac CT can be achieved while maintaining the same level of image noise through phase based dose modulation that incorporates knowledge of the cardiac reconstruction algorithm.

  8. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  9. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  10. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  11. Nano-CT Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masschaele, B.

    Tomography is a non-destructive research technique which allows investigating the internal structure of objects in 3D . The "centre for X-ray tomography (UGCT)" of the Ghent University has developed a modular X-ray micro/nanoCT scanner which is used for multi-disciplinary research. In this paper we give an overview of the different components of the UGCT scanner with special attention to the X-ray imaging detectors. Also the software tools for data reconstruction and analysis and some obtained results are discussed.

  12. Combined correlation estimation of axial displacement in optical coherence elastography: assessment of axial displacement sensitivity performance relative to existing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimwood, A.; Messa, A.; Bamber, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    A combined correlation method is introduced to optical coherence elastography for axial displacement estimation. Its performance is compared with that of amplitude correlation tracking and phase shift estimation. Relative sensitivities to small (sub-micron), and large (pixel-scale) axial displacements are analysed for a Perspex test object and gelatine phantom. The combined correlation method exhibited good overall performance, with a larger dynamic range than phase shift estimation and higher sensitivity than amplitude correlation tracking.

  13. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  14. Investigation on viewing direction dependent detectability in a reconstructed 3D volume for a cone beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junhan; Lee, Changwoo; Baek, Jongduk

    2015-03-01

    In medical imaging systems, several factors (e.g., reconstruction algorithm, noise structures, target size, contrast, etc) affect the detection performance and need to be considered for object detection. In a cone beam CT system, FDK reconstruction produces different noise structures in axial and coronal slices, and thus we analyzed directional dependent detectability of objects using detection SNR of Channelized Hotelling observer. To calculate the detection SNR, difference-of-Gaussian channel model with 10 channels was implemented, and 20 sphere objects with different radius (i.e., 0.25 (mm) to 5 (mm) equally spaced by 0.25 (mm)), reconstructed by FDK algorithm, were used as object templates. Covariance matrix in axial and coronal direction was estimated from 3000 reconstructed noise volumes, and then the SNR ratio between axial and coronal direction was calculated. Corresponding 2D noise power spectrum was also calculated. The results show that as the object size increases, the SNR ratio decreases, especially lower than 1 when the object size is larger than 2.5 mm radius. The reason is because the axial (coronal) noise power is higher in high (low) frequency band, and therefore the detectability of a small (large) object is higher in coronal (axial) images. Our results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slices in order to improve the detectability of a small object in a cone beam CT system.

  15. Low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses with eye lens protection: effect on image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hein, Eike; Rogalla, Patrik; Klingebiel, Randolph; Hamm, Bernd

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of lens protection on image quality and radiation dose to the eye lenses in CT of the paranasal sinuses. In 127 patients referred to rule out sinusitis, an axial spiral CT with a lens protection placed on the patients eyes was obtained (1.5/2/1, 50 mAs, 120 kV). Coronal views were reconstructed at 5-mm interval. To quantify a subjective impression of image quality, three regions of interest within the eyeball were plotted along a line perpendicular to the protection at 2, 5, and 9 mm beneath skin level on the axial images. Additionally, dose reduction of a bismuth-containing latex shield was measured using a film-dosimetry technique. The average eyeball density was 17.97 HU (SD 3.7 HU). The relative increase in CT density was 180.6 (17.7), 103.3 (11.7), and 53.6 HU (9.2), respectively. There was no diagnostic information loss on axial and coronal views observed. Artifacts were practically invisible on images viewed in a bone window/level setting. The use of the shield reduced skin radiation from 7.5 to 4.5 mGy. The utilization of a radioprotection to the eye lenses in paranasal CT is a suitable and effective means of reducing skin radiation by 40%. PMID:12111059

  16. CT-Guided Transfacet Pedicle Screw Fixation in Facet Joint Syndrome: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Manfré, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Axial microinstability secondary to disc degeneration and consequent chronic facet joint syndrome (CFJS) is a well-known pathological entity, usually responsible for low back pain (LBP). Although posterior lumbar fixation (PIF) has been widely used for lumbar spine instability and LBP, complications related to wrong screw introduction, perineural scars and extensive muscle dissection leading to muscle dysfunction have been described. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of facet joints zygapophyseal nerves conventionally used for pain treatment fails in approximately 21% of patients. We investigated a “covert-surgery” minimal invasive technique to treat local spinal instability and LBP, using a novel fully CT-guided approach in patients with axial instability complicated by CFJS resistant to radioablation, by introducing direct fully or partially threaded transfacet screws (transfacet fixation - TFF), to acquire solid arthrodesis, reducing instability and LBP. The CT-guided procedure was well tolerated by all patients in simple analogue sedation, and mean operative time was approximately 45 minutes. All eight patients treated underwent clinical and CT study follow-up at two months, revealing LBP disappearance in six patients, and a significant reduction of lumbar pain in two. In conclusion, CT-guided TFF is a fast and safe technique when facet posterior fixation is needed. PMID:25363265

  17. Atlanto-odontoid osteoarthritis in rheumatoid arthritis: dynamic CT findings.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ozlem; Baysal, Tamer; Sigirci, Ahmet; Ersoy, Yuksel; Altay, Zuhal

    2004-10-01

    We analyzed the CT appearances of degenerative change in the atlanto-odontoid joint (AOJ) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and evaluated the effect of these changes on atlanto-axial joint (AAJ) rotation by dynamic CT. This revealed that 9 patients (24%) treated with methotrexate had degenerative features in the AOJ. The ratio of AAJ rotation to the total rotation of the cervical spine was significantly higher in normal subjects (54 +/- 3%) than in patients (38 +/- 12%). The degree of AAJ rotation was significantly lower in the patient group with degenerative features in the AOJ (20.9 +/- 8.4 degrees ) than in patients without degenerative features (28.5 +/- 7.4 degrees ). RA patients with a history of longstanding disease and treatment with antirheumatic drugs may develop AO OA. Although secondary OA was described as healing phenomena in the joints of RA patients, it can limit rotation in the AAJ and cause suboccipital neck pain. A regular check-up of the AAJ and AOJ by means of dynamic CT in all RA patients is proposed to avoid possible antirheumatic drug complications. PMID:15459811

  18. Automated segmentation of mesothelioma volume on CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Binsheng; Schwartz, Lawrence; Flores, Raja; Liu, Fan; Kijewski, Peter; Krug, Lee; Rusch, Valerie

    2005-04-01

    In mesothelioma, response is usually assessed by computed tomography (CT). In current clinical practice the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) or WHO, i.e., the uni-dimensional or the bi-dimensional measurements, is applied to the assessment of therapy response. However, the shape of the mesothelioma volume is very irregular and its longest dimension is almost never in the axial plane. Furthermore, the sections and the sites where radiologists measure the tumor are rather subjective, resulting in poor reproducibility of tumor size measurements. We are developing an objective three-dimensional (3D) computer algorithm to automatically identify and quantify tumor volumes that are associated with malignant pleural mesothelioma to assess therapy response. The algorithm first extracts the lung pleural surface from the volumetric CT images by interpolating the chest ribs over a number of adjacent slices and then forming a volume that includes the thorax. This volume allows a separation of mesothelioma from the chest wall. Subsequently, the structures inside the extracted pleural lung surface, including the mediastinal area, lung parenchyma, and pleural mesothelioma, can be identified using a multiple thresholding technique and morphological operations. Preliminary results have shown the potential of utilizing this algorithm to automatically detect and quantify tumor volumes on CT scans and thus to assess therapy response for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

  19. CEnPiT: Helical cardiac CT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bontus, Claas; Koken, Peter; Koehler, Thomas; Grass, Michael

    2006-08-15

    Computer tomography (CT) scanners with an increasing number of detector rows offer the potential of shorter scanning times. Nevertheless, the reconstruction problem becomes more challenging, since cone beam artifacts are likely to enter. Here, we consider helical cardiac CT. We analyze how a relationship can be established between exact reconstruction algorithms and the demand to perform a cardiac gating. Utilizing the redundancies requires the consideration of all kinds of Radon planes. For the reconstruction algorithm proposed here, we separate the data into two parts. The first part contains contributions of Radon planes, which are measured with a large number of redundancies. The second part contains the remaining contributions. As it turns out, the second part contributes rather to the low-frequency contents of trans-axial slices. Therefore, we propose to perform a gated back-projection only for the first part, while the second part is back-projected in an ungated way. Data from the complete source trajectory are employed in the reconstruction process in contrary to conventional helical cardiac reconstruction methods. Moreover, all different types of Radon planes are taken into account in the reconstruction, though an ECG-dependent cardiac gating is applied. The reconstruction results, which we present for clinical and simulated data, demonstrate the high potential of CEnPiT for helical cardiac CT with large cone angle systems.

  20. Head CT scan in Iranian minor head injury patients: evaluating current decision rules.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, Robab; Karimialavijeh, Ehsan; Shirani, Farzaneh; Payandemehr, Pooya; Bahramimotlagh, Hooman; Ramezani, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to select one of the seven available clinical decision rules for minor head injury, for managing Iranian patients. This was a prospective cohort study evaluating medium- or high-risk minor head injury patients presenting to the Emergency Department. Patients with minor head trauma who were eligible for brain imaging based on seven available clinical decision rules (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS)-II, Neurotraumatology Committee of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (NCWFNS), New Orleans, American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Guideline, Scandinavian, and Canadian computed tomography (CT) head rule) were selected. Subjects were underwent a non-contrast axial spiral head CT scan. The outcome was defined as abnormal and normal head CT scan. Univariate analysis and stepwise linear regression were applied to show the best combination of risk factors for detecting CT scan abnormalities. Five hundred patients with minor head trauma were underwent brain CT scan. The following criteria were derived by stepwise linear regression: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) less than 15, confusion, signs of basal skull fracture, drug history of warfarin, vomiting more than once, loss of consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, and age over 65 years. This model has 86.15 % (75.33-93.45 %) sensitivity and 46.44 % (46.67-51.25 %) specificity in detecting minor head injury patients with CT scan abnormalities (95 % confidence interval). Of seven decision rules, only the Canadian CT Head Rule possesses seven of the eight high-risk factors associated with abnormal head CT results which were identified by this study. This study underlines the Canadian CT Head Rule's utility in Iranian minor head injury patients. Our study encourages researchers to evaluate available guidelines in different communities. PMID:26407978

  1. Segmental Comparison of Peripheral Arteries by Doppler Ultrasound and CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Ram Kumar; Ganesan, Prakash; Mayavan, Manibharathi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diseases of peripheral arterial system are one of the common causes of limb pain, especially in elderly patients. Here we analyse non invasive imaging of peripheral arterial segments. Aim Aim of the study was to compare arterial diseases of extremities using Doppler ultrasound and CT angiography, and to find the better non-invasive modality of choice. Materials and Methods Fifty patients {14 patients with upper limb complaints (15 upper limbs) and 36 patients with lower limb complaints (72 lower limbs)} of peripheral arterial disease underwent Doppler ultrasound (USG) and CT Angiogram (CTA). Arterial systems divided into anatomic segments and luminal narrowing were compared using gray scale Doppler ultrasound and axial images of arterial phase of CT angiogram. Using statistical methods, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of Doppler ultrasound and CT angiography were determined. Results Six hundred and nineteen arterial segments were studied with CT angiography and Doppler ultrasound. Of which 226 diseased segments were identified in CT angiography. Doppler overestimated narrowing by one grade in 47 segments, by two grade in 11 segments, by three grades in 30 segments and by four grades in 22 segments; underestimated by one grade in 28 segments, by two grades in 9 segments, by three grades in 5 segments and by four grades in 3 segments. Significant statistical difference exists between Doppler USG and CT angiography. Doppler showed good correlation with CT angiography in 74%, but, Doppler overestimated stenosis grade in a significant percentage. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of Doppler USG compared with CT angiography was 93.36%, 82.44%, and 86.42%. Conclusion Duplex Doppler can be the first investigation in excluding peripheral arterial disease, especially for evaluation of infra inguinal region of lower limbs and from second part of the subclavian artery in upper limbs. PMID:27042556

  2. Multivariate Analysis of Factors Associated With Axial Symptoms in Unilateral Expansive Open-Door Cervical Laminoplasty With Miniplate Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yuxiao; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective case-control study.Unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation is an efficient and increasing popular surgery for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Axial symptoms are the most frequent complaints after cervical laminoplasty. But the mechanisms have not been fully clarified yet.The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiologic data between patients with or without axial symptoms and to investigate the factors associated with axial symptoms by multivariate analysis in cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation.A total of 129 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation were comprised from August 2009 to March 2014. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative axial symptoms (PA) or not (NA). The clinical data including gender, age, duration of symptoms, diagnosis type, medical comorbidity, operative level, blood loss, operative time, pre- and post-Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, JOA recovery rates, and other complications were recorded. The radiologic data including cervical canal diameter, C2-7 Cobb angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), cross-sectional area, open angle, hinge union, and facet joint destroyed would be measured according to X-ray plain and CT scan images. The univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed.There were 39 patients in PA group and 90 patients in NA group. Both groups gained significant JOA improvement postoperatively (P < 0.05). The preoperative neck pain (P = 0.048), negative change of cervical ROM (P = 0.018), and facet joints destroyed (P = 0.022) were significant different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences for other clinical and radiography parameters between the groups (P > 0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that the negative change of cervical ROM (OR = 1.062, P = 0.047) and facet joints

  3. Multivariate Analysis of Factors Associated With Axial Symptoms in Unilateral Expansive Open-Door Cervical Laminoplasty With Miniplate Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yuxiao; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Retrospective case–control study. Unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation is an efficient and increasing popular surgery for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Axial symptoms are the most frequent complaints after cervical laminoplasty. But the mechanisms have not been fully clarified yet. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiologic data between patients with or without axial symptoms and to investigate the factors associated with axial symptoms by multivariate analysis in cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation. A total of 129 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation were comprised from August 2009 to March 2014. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative axial symptoms (PA) or not (NA). The clinical data including gender, age, duration of symptoms, diagnosis type, medical comorbidity, operative level, blood loss, operative time, pre- and post-Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, JOA recovery rates, and other complications were recorded. The radiologic data including cervical canal diameter, C2–7 Cobb angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), cross-sectional area, open angle, hinge union, and facet joint destroyed would be measured according to X-ray plain and CT scan images. The univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed. There were 39 patients in PA group and 90 patients in NA group. Both groups gained significant JOA improvement postoperatively (P < 0.05). The preoperative neck pain (P = 0.048), negative change of cervical ROM (P = 0.018), and facet joints destroyed (P = 0.022) were significant different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences for other clinical and radiography parameters between the groups (P > 0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that the negative change of cervical ROM (OR = 1.062, P = 0.047) and

  4. PET/CT: fundamental principles.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Marcus D

    2004-05-28

    Positron emission tomography (PET) facilitates the evaluation of metabolic and molecular characteristics of a wide variety of cancers, but is limited in its ability to visualize anatomical structures. Computed tomography (CT) facilitates the evaluation of anatomical structures of cancers, but can not visualize their metabolic and molecular aspects. Therefore, the combination of PET and CT provides the ability to accurately register metabolic and molecular aspects of disease with anatomical findings, adding further information to the diagnosis and staging of tumors. The recent generation of high performance PET/CT scanners combines a state of the art full-ring 3D PET scanner and a high-end 16-slice CT scanner. In PET/CT scanners, a CT examination is used for attenuation correction of PET images rather than standard transmission scanning using superset 68 Ge sources. This reduces the examination time, but metallic objects and contrast agents that alter the CT image quality and quantitative measurements of standardized uptake values (SUV) may lead to artifacts in the PET images. Hybrid PET/CT imaging will be very important in oncological applications in the decades to come, and possibly for use in cancer screening and cardiac imaging. PMID:15257877

  5. Development and Testing of an Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic thrust bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help to reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical systems, computer memory systems, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  6. The window of opportunity: a relevant concept for axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The window of opportunity is a concept critical to rheumatoid arthritis treatment. Early treatment changes the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis treatment, in that response rates are higher with earlier disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment and damage is substantially reduced. Axial spondyloarthritis is an inflammatory axial disease encompassing both nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis and established ankylosing spondylitis. In axial spondyloarthritis, studies of magnetic resonance imaging as well as tumor necrosis factor inhibitor treatment and withdrawal studies all suggest that early effective suppression of inflammation has the potential to reduce radiographic damage. This potential would suggest that the concept of a window of opportunity is relevant not only to rheumatoid arthritis but also to axial spondyloarthritis. The challenge now remains to identify high-risk patients early and to commence treatment without delay. Developments in risk stratification include new classification criteria, identification of clinical risk factors, biomarkers, genetic associations, potential antibody associations and an ankylosing spondylitis-specific microbiome signature. Further research needs to focus on the evidence for early intervention and the early identification of high-risk individuals. PMID:25167369

  7. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, Gary K.; DiGuiseppe, Carl P.

    1985-01-01

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

  8. Method to measure tone of axial and proximal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel, Victor S; Cacciatore, Timothy W; Cordo, Paul J; Horak, Fay B

    2011-01-01

    The control of tonic muscular activity remains poorly understood. While abnormal tone is commonly assessed clinically by measuring the passive resistance of relaxed limbs, no systems are available to study tonic muscle control in a natural, active state of antigravity support. We have developed a device (Twister) to study tonic regulation of axial and proximal muscles during active postural maintenance (i.e. postural tone). Twister rotates axial body regions relative to each other about the vertical axis during stance, so as to twist the neck, trunk or hip regions. This twisting imposes length changes on axial muscles without changing the body's relationship to gravity. Because Twister does not provide postural support, tone must be regulated to counteract gravitational torques. We quantify this tonic regulation by the restive torque to twisting, which reflects the state of all muscles undergoing length changes, as well as by electromyography of relevant muscles. Because tone is characterized by long-lasting low-level muscle activity, tonic control is studied with slow movements that produce "tonic" changes in muscle length, without evoking fast "phasic" responses. Twister can be reconfigured to study various aspects of muscle tone, such as co-contraction, tonic modulation to postural changes, tonic interactions across body segments, as well as perceptual thresholds to slow axial rotation. Twister can also be used to provide a quantitative measurement of the effects of disease on axial and proximal postural tone and assess the efficacy of intervention. PMID:22214974

  9. An Axial-Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter field. Thereby, findings suggest at the level of the mass-charge structure of gauge invariance a new equation for the C-noninvariant Lagrangian.

  10. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  11. Stationary axially symmetric solutions in Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirezli, Pınar; Delice, Özgür

    2015-11-01

    Stationary, axially symmetric Brans-Dicke-Maxwell solutions are reexamined in the framework of the Brans-Dicke (BD) theory. We see that, employing a particular parametrization of the standard axially symmetric metric simplifies the procedure of obtaining the Ernst equations for axially symmetric electrovacuum spacetimes for this theory. This analysis also permits us to construct a two parameter extension in both Jordan and Einstein frames of an old solution generating technique frequently used to construct axially symmetric solutions for BD theory from a seed solution of general relativity. As applications of this technique, several known and new solutions are constructed including a general axially symmetric BD-Maxwell solution of Plebanski-Demianski with vanishing cosmological constant, i.e., the Kinnersley solution and general magnetized Kerr-Newman-type solutions. Some physical properties and the circular motion of test particles for a particular subclass of Kinnersley solution, i.e., a Kerr-Newman-NUT-type solution for BD theory, are also investigated in some detail.

  12. On-the-fly generation of multiplanar reformation images independent of CT scanner type.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong Kyun; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Bo Hyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Young Hoon; Bajpai, Vasundhara; Shin, Yeong Gil

    2008-09-01

    We propose a system that automatically generates multiplanar reformation (MPR) images on-the-fly, which is independent of computed tomography (CT) scanner type. Triggered by digital imaging communication in medicine (DICOM) Storage Commitment or in a time threshold manner, this system generates MPR images from received thin-section CT data sets with predefined reformation parameters and then sends MPR images to DICOM stations. Users can specify the reformation parameters and the destination of the resulting MPR images for each CT study description. A pilot system was tested for 3 months. From thin-section data sets received from two 16- and one 64-detector-row CT scanners, this system generated MPR images and sent them to the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) without failure or any additional human operation. For 143 test thin-section CT studies (172-4,761 images in each study), the time to store reformatted images (axial and coronal with 5-mm thicknesses and 4-mm intervals) in PACS after the completion of the CT scan ranged from 92 to 1,772 s (mean +/- SD, 555.1 +/- 509.4). PMID:17384976

  13. Multirigid registration of MR and CT images of the cervical spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.

    2004-05-01

    We present our work on fusion of MR and CT images of the cervical spine. To achieve the required registration accuracy of approximately 1mm, the spine is treated as a collection of rigid vertebrae, and a separate rigid body transformation applied to each (Hawkes). This in turn requires segmentation of the CT datasets into separate vertebral images, which is difficult because the narrow planes separating adjacent vertebrae are parallel to the axial plane of the CT scans. We solve this problem by evolving all the vertebral contours simultaneously using a level set method, and use contour competition to estimate the position of the vertebral edges when a clean separation between adjacent vertebrae is not seen. Contour competition is based in turn on the vertical scan principle: no part of a given vertebra is vertically below any part of an inferior vertebra. Once segmentation is complete, the individual rigid body transforms are then estimated using mutual information maximization, and the CT images of the vertebrae superimposed on the MR scans. The resultant fused images contain the bony detail of CT and the soft tissue discrimination of MR and appear to be diagnostically equivalent, or superior, to CT myelograms. A formal test of these conclusions is planned for the next phase of our work.

  14. Three-dimensional spiral CT for craniofacial surgical planning and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo G.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate measurement accuracy of 3D volumetric medical imaging from Spiral CT for craniofacial surgical planing. Material and methods: The study population consisted of 5 cadaver heads that were imaged on a spiral CT scanner with volumetric technique high-resolution contiguous axial slices 3mm thickness and 2mm/sec table feed, with 120Kvp and 200 mA. The archived CT data were stored on optical disks to allow full retrospective review of any image. The data sets were transferred to a networked computer workstation, to generated 3D volumetric images for subsequent manipulation and analyses. The computer graphics workstation allowed to do measurements, based on conventional craniometric anatomic landmarks, by 2 observers with 2 sessions each. The specimens were then submitted to a dynamic blunt force, in an effort to simulate craniofacial fractures, scanned and measured again. The soft tissues were then partially subsequently removed and the measurements were repeated by electromagnetic digitizer. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance. Results: Measurements from 3D spiral CT scans can be precise with high repeatability and sufficient accuracy for surgical planing. Conclusion: 3D computer graphics by spiral CT allowed, in vitro, sufficient precision for assessment of surgical management. Digital volumetric spiral CT imaging is valid quantitatively and qualitatively for craniofacial surgical planning and evaluation.

  15. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  16. Coronary vasospasm during CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Toyama, Takuji; Tsushima, Yoshito; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old man, a heavy smoker, was admitted for evaluation of "chest oppression" after every dinner. Cardiac CT with a beta-blocker showed coronary stenosis in the left circumflex. Although adenosine triphosphate-stress perfusion single-photon emission CT revealed no ischemia, Holter electrocardiography belatedly indicated an ST elevation associated with his symptoms while smoking. He was diagnosed to have vasospastic angina. Cardiac CT without a beta-blocker showed thin diffuse plaque and negative remolding without any significant stenosis at the same site. Asian patients have a tendency to develop vasospastic angina. Although beta-blockers are recommended for cardiac CT, the routine administration of beta-blockers in cardiac CT may have some risk for such cases. PMID:25065860

  17. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  18. STED microscopy based on axially symmetric polarized vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhehai, Zhou; Lianqing, Zhu

    2016-03-01

    A stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy scheme using axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is proposed based on unique focusing properties of such kinds of beams. The concept of axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is first introduced, and the basic principle about the scheme is described. Simulation results for several typical beams are then shown, including radially polarized vortex beams, azimuthally polarized vortex beams, and high-order axially symmetric polarized vortex beams. The results indicate that sharper doughnut spots and thus higher resolutions can be achieved, showing more flexibility than previous schemes based on flexible modulation of both phase and polarization for incident beams. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61108047 and 61475021), the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing, China (Grant No. 4152015), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in Universities of China (Grant No. NCET-13-0667), and the Top Young Talents Support Program of Beijing, China (Grant No. CIT&TCD201404113).

  19. Axial length influence on the performance of centrifugal impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zubaidy, S. N. J.

    1992-12-01

    This article describes a general direct-design method for radial flow impellers (based on a prescribed relative velocity schedule). The design procedure has been used as a systematic means of studying the effects of impeller length along its axis of rotation on performance. This was achieved by analyzing a group of impellers with the same performance requirements, inlet and exit geometry, and meridional profile, but different in the blade-angle distributions. The axial length of each impeller was varied systematically in order to assess its impact on the efficiency. The results have shown that for impellers capable of delivering 1 kg of air/s and having a total-to-total pressure ratio of 6:1, there is a specific region of axial length band where the highest efficiency for all designs were calculated and found to vary between 37-49 mm (the measured axial length does not include the disk thickness).

  20. Stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2011-11-01

    The stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow is studied analytically. The base flow is obtained by solving the Euler equation perturbatively assuming small ratio of core to curvature radius, which is denoted by ɛ, and Rankine vortex with uniform axial flow at the leading order. We apply both local and modal stability analysis. By local stability analysis we show that the flow is subject to not only curvature instability but also Coriolis instability, both having the same resonance condition. The unstable growth rate is O(ɛ) and given by the magnitude of a sum of the complex numbers corresponding to the two instabilities. Combined effects of the axial flow and the torsion of the helical vortex tube appear as O(ɛ2) modification. These results are confirmed by the modal stability analysis.

  1. Some problems of sensitivity analysis of axially loaded piles

    SciTech Connect

    Budkowska, B.B.; Szymczak, C.

    1994-12-31

    The first variations of an axial displacement and an axial force at a specified cross-section of an axially loaded pile due to the changes of the design variables are derived. The parameters describing the pile material and the soil behavior as well as the pile cross-section dimensions are assumed to be the design variables. A simple one-dimensional idealization of the pile in conjunction with a nonlinear Winkler-type model of the soil is adopted. The considerations based on the virtual work theorems are valid for both linear and nonlinear ranges of the pile material and the soil behavior. Some presented numerical examples allow one to investigate the accuracy of approximation of changes of internal forces and displacements due to the increments of the design variables by means of their first order variations.

  2. Axial current generation from electric field: chiral electric separation effect.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2013-06-01

    We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the chiral electric separation effect (CESE). On a very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to μ(V)μ(A) with μ(V) and μ(A) the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable effects of CESE in heavy-ion collisions are also discussed. PMID:25167486

  3. Three-Dimensional Photon Counting Imaging with Axially Distributed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review three-dimensional (3D) photon counting imaging with axially distributed sensing. Under severely photon-starved conditions, we have proposed various imaging and algorithmic approaches to reconstruct a scene in 3D, which are not possible by using conventional imaging system due to lack of sufficient number of photons. In this paper, we present an overview of optical sensing and imaging system along with dedicated algorithms for reconstructing 3D scenes by photon counting axially distributed sensing, which may be implemented by moving a single image sensor along its optical axis. To visualize the 3D image, statistical estimation methods and computational reconstruction of axially distributed sensing is applied. PMID:27483262

  4. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  5. Linear optical response of carbon nanotubes under axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-04-01

    We considered single walled carbon naotubes (SWCNTs) as real three dimensional (3D) systems in a cylindrical coordinate. The optical matrix elements and linear susceptibility, χ(ω), in the tight binding approximation in terms of one-dimensional wave vector, kz and subband index, l are calculated. In an external axial magnetic field optical frequency dependence of linear susceptibility are investigated. We found that axial magnetic field has two effects on the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility spectrum, in agreement with experimental results. The first effect is broadening and the second, splitting. Also we found that for all metallic zigzag and armchair SWCNTs, the axial magnetic field leads to the creation of a peak with energy less than 1.5 eV, contrary to what is observed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  6. Temporal and Spatial Variability in the Geochemistry of Axial and CoAxial Segment Lavas and their Mantle Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. C.; Perfit, M. R.; Davis, C.; Kamenov, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    Three spatially related volcanic eruptions along the CoAxial Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) have documented emplacements between 1981 and 1993. Two of the historic flows outcrop at the "Flow Site" and were emplaced within less than 12 years and 500 m from one another. The third was emplaced at the "Floc Site" to the south in the 1980s. Previous studies have documented that CoAxial lavas are among the most incompatible element and isotopically depleted lavas along the entire JdFR, whereas the Axial Seamount segment immediately south of CoAxial has erupted the most chemically enriched lavas south of the Endeavor Segment. Geochemical studies have shown little temporal change in the chemistry of recent Axial Seamount eruptives, whereas CoAxial lavas exhibit distinct chemical differences over short time periods. Significant chemical differences observed among depleted CoAxial lavas emplaced close to one another in space and time are in marked contrast to the relatively constant chemical characteristics of enriched lavas erupted at the magmatically more robust Axial segment only 10's of kilometers to the south and west. New trace element and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Pb) geochemical analyses of historic and older CoAxial lavas have resulted in better documentation of interflow and intraflow chemical variation providing an improved understanding of spatial/temporal chemical variability in lavas, and further insight into JdFR magmatic processes. Modeling of major and trace element abundances suggest that the observed intraflow chemical variation within CoAxial lavas is largely due to shallow-level fractional crystallization but that a single fractional crystallization model cannot account for all interflow chemical variation. In fact, elemental and isotopic data require different parental magmas for each of the three recent CoAxial Segment lava flows suggesting very short-term differences or changes in the chemical character of the mantle source region. In particular

  7. Validation of CT doses of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Sera, Terez; Porubszky, Tamas; Papos, Miklos; Elek, Richard; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Gion, Katalin; Bartha, Andras; Pellet, Sandor; Pavics, Laszlo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to check the validity of computed tomographic (CT) doses exhibited by SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices. Dose measurements were taken from four SPECT/CT and four PET/CT cameras commercially available from different manufacturers. A calibrated ionization chamber was placed in whole-body or head phantoms for the acquisition of CT images with clinically used parameters. Computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values were calculated according to the IEC 60601-2-44:1999 formula. The measured CTDIvol doses were compared with those preprogrammed by the manufacturer. In the case of the whole-body phantom, the differences between the measured and displayed values varied between -31 and +24% [European document RP162 (2012) sets up the limit for acceptance criterion as ±20%]. The head phantom data showed either an agreement between -10 and +24%, or an underestimation by two-fold. The latter seemed to be because, while preprogramming the doses, the manufacturer had used the whole-body phantom instead of a proper head phantom. The results of the work demonstrate the need for individual dosimetric calibration of every single X-ray tube. Dosimetric checks should be included in the regular quality control programmes of the SPECT/CT and PET/CT devices. Special attention should be paid to head-and-neck and paediatric protocols, in which the use of a head phantom is recommended for dose calibration. PMID:24499726

  8. NASA Low-speed Axial Compressor for Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.; Weaver, Harold F.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A low-speed multistage axial compressor built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this compressor is to increase the understanding of the complex flow phenomena within multistage axial compressors and to obtain detailed data from a multistage compressor environment for use in developing and verifying models for computational fluid dynamic code assessment. The compressor has extensive pressure instrumentation in both stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The compressor will accommodate rotational speeds to 1050 rpm and is rated at a pressure ratio of 1.042.

  9. Axial crack propagation and arrest in pressurized fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosai, M.; Shimamoto, A.; Yu, C.-T.; Walker, S. I.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Tan, P.

    1994-01-01

    The crack arrest capability of a tear strap in a pressurized precracked fuselage was studied through instrumented axial rupture tests of small scale models of an idealized fuselage. Upon pressurization, rapid crack propagation initiated at an axial through crack along the stringer and immediately kinked due to the mixed modes 1 and 2 state caused by the one-sided opening of the crack flap. The diagonally running crack further turned at the tear straps. Dynamic finite element analysis of the rupturing cylinder showed that the crack kinked and also ran straight in the presence of a mixed mode state according to a modified two-parameter crack kinking criterion.

  10. Reflective correctors for the Hubble Space Telescope axial instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottema, Murk

    1993-01-01

    Reflective correctors to compensate the spherical aberration in the Hubble Space Telescope are placed in front of three of the axial scientific instruments (a camera and two spectrographs) during the first scheduled refurbishment mission. The five correctors required are deployed from a new module that replaces the fourth axial instrument. Each corrector consists of a field mirror and an aspherical, aberration-correcting reimaging mirror. In the camera the angular resolution capability is restored, be it in reduced fields, and in the spectrographs the potential for observations in crowded areas is regained along with effective light collection at the slits.

  11. Fatigue life prediction in bending from axial fatigue information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Muralidharan, U.

    1982-01-01

    Bending fatigue in the low cyclic life range differs from axial fatigue due to the plastic flow which alters the linear stress-strain relation normally used to determine the nominal stresses. An approach is presented to take into account the plastic flow in calculating nominal bending stress (S sub bending) based on true surface stress. These functions are derived in closed form for rectangular and circular cross sections. The nominal bending stress and the axial fatigue stress are plotted as a function of life (N sub S) and these curves are shown for several materials of engineering interest.

  12. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  13. [CT colonography in daily practice].

    PubMed

    Stoker, Jaap; Dekker, Evelien

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal carcinoma and large polyps (≥ 10 mm) is comparable with that of colonoscopy. Acceptance in symptomatic patients is higher than for colonoscopy. The accuracy of CT colonography for polyps of 6-9 mm, for flat polyps and in particular for polyps < 6 mm is lower than for colonoscopy. Indication for CT colonography depends on the a prior chance of finding something relevant, as colonoscopy is necessary in the case of relevant findings. CT colonography can be an alternative to colonoscopy in patients with symptoms consistent with colorectal cancer when colonoscopy is not possible or appears incomplete. It can be used as primary technique in older patients with comorbidity and low a prior chance of relevant findings. CT colonography is less appropriate for surveillance as the accuracy for flat polyps is lower. CT colonography is not suitable in hereditary syndromes due to the lower accuracy for polyps < 10 mm. CT colonography can be a good alternative in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in the case of a low suspicion of colorectal cancer. PMID:24168847

  14. Buckling of Beams and Columns under Combined Axial and Horizontal Loading with Various Axial Loading Application Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidinejad, Amir

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the buckling behaviour of an I-beam under combined axial and horizontal side loading is examined. It is to shown that the actual application location of the axial loading governs the buck- ling behaviour of the long I-beam. Theoretical formulation is developed to determine the critical buckling load for such combined loading configura- tion from the elastic static theory. Both, the beam deflection theoretical model and the critical load capacity are derived for this combined loading condition. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is utilized to apply the axial load on the beam at various configuration locations and it is shown that this application location determines the buckling behaviour and the critical load of the buckling of the I-beam. Numerical example is given.

  15. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in [1] to 3D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in [1] with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT. PMID:25361500

  16. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Abdelnour, A F; Nehmeh, S A; Pan, T; Humm, J L; Vernon, P; Schöder, H; Rosenzweig, K E; Mageras, G S; Yorke, E; Larson, S M; Erdi, Y E

    2007-06-21

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2pi rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error mue+/-sigmae in PB ranged from 18%+/-20% to 30%+/-35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11%+/-14% to 20%+/-24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis. PMID:17664557

  17. Detection of melorheostosis in a young lady with upper limb pain on Three Phase Bone Scintigram/SPECT-CT

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Aamna; Khalid, Madeeha; Khawar, Saquib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Melorheostosis is a benign, noninheritable bone dysplasia characterized by its classic radiographic features of dense, flowing hyperostosis. It frequently affects one limb, usually the lower extremity and rarely the axial skeleton. A 26-year-old lady with obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome and scalp dandruff presented with a long standing history of upper extremity pain and inability to adduct the arm completely. A Tc-99m MDP whole body and SPECT/CT scan performed for suspected fibrous dysplasia showed increased radiotracer uptake in densely sclerotic humeral and radial melorheostosis. This case highlighted the role of SPECT/CT imaging in this rare condition. PMID:27252746

  18. Four-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Axial Body Area as Respiratory Surrogate: Initial Patient Results

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a retrospective binning technique for 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using body area (BA) as a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (4 of 7) or liver metastases (3 of 7) were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. All patients were simulated with both computed tomography (CT) and MRI to acquire 3-dimensinal and 4D images for treatment planning. Multiple-slice multiple-phase cine-MR images were acquired in the axial plane for 4D-MRI reconstruction. Image acquisition time per slice was set to 10-15 seconds. Single-slice 2-dimensinal cine-MR images were also acquired across the center of the tumor in orthogonal planes. Tumor motion trajectories from 4D-MRI, cine-MRI, and 4D-CT were analyzed in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions, respectively. Their correlation coefficients (CC) and differences in tumor motion amplitude were determined. Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured and compared between 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and conventional T2-weighted fast spin echo MRI. Results: The means (±standard deviations) of CC comparing 4D-MRI with cine-MRI were 0.97 ± 0.03, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.99 ± 0.04 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.61 ± 0.17 mm, 0.32 ± 0.17 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.06 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The means of CC comparing 4D-MRI and 4D-CT were 0.95 ± 0.02, 0.94 ± 0.02, and 0.96 ± 0.02 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.74 ± 0.02 mm, 0.33 ± 0.13 mm, and 0.18 ± 0.07 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean tumor-to-tissue CNRs were 2.94 ± 1.51, 19.44 ± 14.63, and 39.47 ± 20.81 in 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and T2-weighted MRI, respectively. Conclusions: The preliminary evaluation of our 4D-MRI technique results in oncologic patients demonstrates its

  19. Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chak-Hei; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Pounder, Neill M; de Ana, F Javier; Harrison, Andrew; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously. PMID:24239510

  20. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  1. Kilovoltage CT using a linac-CT scanner combination.

    PubMed

    Thieke, C; Malsch, U; Schlegel, W; Debus, J; Huber, P; Bendl, R; Thilmann, C

    2006-09-01

    Modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulation are capable of generating complex dose distributions whose high dose areas tightly conform to the tumour target volume, sparing critical organs even when they are located in close proximity. This potential can only be exploited to its full extent when the accumulated dose actually delivered over the complete treatment course is sufficiently close to the dose computed on the initial CT scan used for treatment planning. Exact patient repositioning is mandatory, but also other sources of error, e.g. changes of the patient's anatomy under therapy, should be taken into account. At the German Cancer Research Center, we use a combination of a linear accelerator and a CT scanner installed in one room and sharing the same couch. It allows the quantification and correction of interfractional variations between planning and treatment delivery. In this paper, we describe treatments of prostate, paraspinal and head and neck tumours. All patients were immobilized by customized fixation devices and treated in a stereotactic setup. For each patient, frequent CT scans were taken during the treatment course. Each scan was compared with the original planning CT using manual checks and automatic rigid matching algorithms. Depending on the individual case, the adaptation to variations was carried out offline after several fractions or in real-time between the CT scan and linac irradiation. We discuss the techniques for detecting and correcting interfractional errors and outline the procedural steps of a linac-CT scanner-supported radiation treatment course. PMID:16980687

  2. Diffuse Infiltrative Splenic Lymphoma: Diagnostic Efficacy of Arterial-Phase CT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Kyung Sook; Kim, Song Soo; You, Sun Kyoung; Park, Jae Woo; Shin, Hye Soo; Yoon, Yeo Chang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen (ONHES) on arterial phase (AP) computed tomography (CT) images in diffuse infiltrative splenic lymphoma (DISL). Materials and Methods One hundred and thirty-six patients with lymphoma who had undergone two-phase (arterial and portal venous) abdominal CT were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of ONHES on AP CT in diagnosing DISL. Two observers evaluated ONHES on AP CT using the 5-point confidence level and assessed the presence or absence of subjective splenomegaly on axial CT images. Another two observers measured the splenic index as proposed by objective CT criteria. Statistical analysis included interobserver agreement and diagnostic performance of CT findings. Results Eleven of the 136 patients with lymphoma had DISL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of ONHES (0.948 for observer 1 and 0.922 for observer 2) was superior to that of the splenic index (0.872 for observer 3 and 0.877 for observer 4), but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The diagnostic performance of ONHES in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly showed higher diagnostic performance, as compared with subjective splenomegaly alone (accuracy: 100% and 85.3% for observer 1, 98.5% and 87.5% for observer 2; positive predictive value: 100% and 35.5% for observer 1, 90.9% and 39.3% for observer 2, respectively). Conclusion Obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly can improve the diagnostic performance for DISL. Our results suggest that ONHES on AP CT images could be useful as an adjunctive diagnostic indicator of DISL in patients with lymphoma. PMID:27587962

  3. A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G

    1955-01-01

    A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature is presented in the form of brief reviews of the methods, results, and conclusions of selected reports. The reports are organized into several main categories with subdivisions, and frequent references are made within the individual reviews to pertinent material elsewhere in the survey.

  4. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-01-01

    The results of high-temperature axial and torsional low-cycle fatigue experiments performed on Haynes 188, a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, are reported. Fatigue tests were performed at 760 C in air on thin-walled tubular specimens at various ranges under strain control. Data are also presented for coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, and shear modulus at various temperatures from room to 1000 C, and monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves in tension and in shear at 760 C. The data set is used to evaluate several multiaxial fatigue life models (most were originally developed for room temperature multiaxial life prediction) including von Mises equivalent strain range (ASME boiler and pressure vessel code), Manson-Halford, Modified Multiaxiality Factor (proposed here), Modified Smith-Watson-Topper, and Fatemi-Socie-Kurath. At von Mises equivalent strain ranges (the torsional strain range divided by the square root of 3, taking the Poisson's ratio to be 0.5), torsionally strained specimens lasted, on average, factors of 2 to 3 times longer than axially strained specimens. The Modified Multiaxiality Factor approach shows promise as a useful method of estimating torsional fatigue life from axial fatigue data at high temperatures. Several difficulties arose with the specimen geometry and extensometry used in these experiments. Cracking at extensometer probe indentations was a problem at smaller strain ranges. Also, as the largest axial and torsional strain range fatigue tests neared completion, a small amount of specimen buckling was observed.

  5. A general representation for axial-flow fans and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W; Tucker, M

    1945-01-01

    A general representation of fan and turbine arrangements on a single classification chart is presented that is made possible by a particular definition of the stage of an axial-flow fan or turbine. Several unconventional fan and turbine arrangements are indicated and the applications of these arrangements are discussed.

  6. Computational analysis of an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Lim, David Scott; Peeler, Ben B; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    Longer-term (>2 weeks) mechanical circulatory support will provide an improved quality of life for thousands of pediatric cardiac failure patients per year in the United States. These pediatric patients suffer from severe congenital or acquired heart disease complicated by congestive heart failure. There are currently very few mechanical circulatory support systems available in the United States as viable options for this population. For that reason, we have designed an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD) with an impeller that is fully suspended by magnetic bearings. As a geometrically similar, smaller scaled version of our axial flow pump for the adult population, the PVAD has a design point of 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg to meet the full physiologic needs of pediatric patients. Conventional axial pump design equations and a nondimensional scaling technique were used to estimate the PVAD's initial dimensions, which allowed for the creation of computational models for performance analysis. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the axial flow PVAD, which measures approximately 65 mm in length by 35 mm in diameter, shows that the pump will produce 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg for 8000 rpm. Fluid forces (approximately 1 N) were also determined for the suspension and motor design, and scalar stress values remained below 350 Pa with maximum particle residence times of approximately 0.08 milliseconds in the pump. This initial design demonstrated acceptable performance, thereby encouraging prototype manufacturing for experimental validation. PMID:15384993

  7. Calculation of the nucleon axial charge in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    D. B. Renner; R. G. Edwards; G. Fleming; Ph. Hagler; J. W. Negele; K. Orginos; A. V. Pochinsky; D. G. Richards; W. Schroers

    2006-09-01

    Protons and neutrons have a rich structure in terms of their constituents, the quarks and gluons. Understanding this structure requires solving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). However QCD is extremely complicated, so we must numerically solve the equations of QCD using a method known as lattice QCD. Here we describe a typical lattice QCD calculation by examining our recent computation of the nucleon axial charge.

  8. Correction of axial optical aberrations in hyperspectral imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špiclin, Žiga; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    In hyper-spectral imaging systems with a wide spectral range, axial optical aberrations may lead to a significant blurring of image intensities in certain parts of the spectral range. Axial optical aberrations arise from the indexof- refraction variations that is dependent on the wavelength of incident light. To correct axial optical aberrations the point-spread function (PSF) of the image acquisition system needs to be identified. We proposed a multiframe joint blur identification and image restoration method that maximizes the likelihood of local image energy distributions between spectral images. Gaussian mixture model based density estimate provides a link between corresponding spatial information shared among spectral images so as to find and restore the image edges via a PSF update. Model of the PSF was assumed to be a linear combination of Gaussian functions, therefore the blur identification process had to find only the corresponding scalar weights of each Gaussian function. Using the identified PSF, image restoration was performed by the iterative Richardson-Lucy algorithm. Experiments were conducted on four different biological samples using a hyper-spectral imaging system based on acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range (0.55 - 1.0 μm). By running the proposed method, the quality of raw spectral images was substantially improved. Image quality improvements were quantified by a measure of contrast and demonstrate the potential of the proposed method for the correction of axial optical aberrations.

  9. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1988-07-19

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

  10. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

  11. 247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open vistas to either side of the roadway. These are maintained through vegetation management. The wood guide rail is a primary safety feature. View is to the northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  12. Performance analysis of axial-flow mixing impellers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Pullum, L.

    2000-03-01

    Theoretical formulations for impeller performance were evaluated based on a blade-element theory. These enable the calculation of the head and power vs. flow-rate curves of axial-flow impellers. The technique uses the life and drag coefficients of the blade section of an impeller to calculate the spanwise swirl-velocity distribution. Using the angular-momentum equation, it is possible to calculate the corresponding spanwise distribution of the energy head of the impeller. Integration of these distributions of head and torque gives the impeller's performance. Parameters including the flow number, the power number, the thrust force number, and the swirl velocity can be found at the impeller operating point, determined using the head curve and an experimentally calibrated resistance curve. A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure the velocity distribution for different axial flow impellers in mixing tanks. Calculated flow and power numbers agreed well with the experimental results. Using the blade's spanwise head distribution and a set of calibrated flow-resistance data, it is also possible to estimate an impeller's outlet axial-velocity distribution. Predictions compared well with LDV experimental data. The effect of impeller-blade angle, number of blades, blade camber, and blade thickness on the performance of axial-flow impellers was investigated using the Agitator software.

  13. Electromagnetic fields in axial symmetric waveguides with variable cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1980-02-15

    A new class of separable variables is found which allows one to find an approximate analytical solution of the Maxwell equations for axial symmetric waveguides with slow (but not necessarily small) varying boundary surfaces. An example of the solution is given. Possible applications and limitations of this approach are discussed. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Perturbation approximation for orbits in axially symmetric funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A perturbation method that can be traced back to Isaac Newton is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for objects sliding in axially symmetric funnels in near circular orbits. Some experimental observations are presented for balls rolling in inverted cones with different opening angles, and in a funnel with a hyperbolic surface that approximately simulates the gravitational force.

  15. Axial-Loading Circumferential Dovetail Turbine-Blade Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Martin J.; Ward, Steven D.; Eskridge, Ronald R.

    1992-01-01

    In new configuration, retaining ring holds base of blades in circumferential dovetail slot. Blades inserted axially via loading slots into circumferential dovetail slot. Ring placed over loading slots and fastened with split ring held by arm of disk. Blades less likely to be shaken loose during operation.

  16. Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Daniel G.; Gerth, Howard L.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

  17. Modifications to Axially Symmetric Simulations Using New DSMC (2007) Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications aimed at improving physical accuracy are proposed for solving axially symmetric problems building on the DSMC (2007) algorithms introduced by Bird. Originally developed to solve nonequilibrium, rarefied flows, the DSMC method is now regularly used to solve complex problems over a wide range of Knudsen numbers. These new algorithms include features such as nearest neighbor collisions excluding the previous collision partners, separate collision and sampling cells, automatically adaptive variable time steps, a modified no-time counter procedure for collisions, and discontinuous and event-driven physical processes. Axially symmetric solutions require radial weighting for the simulated molecules since the molecules near the axis represent fewer real molecules than those farther away from the axis due to the difference in volume of the cells. In the present methodology, these radial weighting factors are continuous, linear functions that vary with the radial position of each simulated molecule. It is shown that how one defines the number of tentative collisions greatly influences the mean collision time near the axis. The method by which the grid is treated for axially symmetric problems also plays an important role near the axis, especially for scalar pressure. A new method to treat how the molecules are traced through the grid is proposed to alleviate the decrease in scalar pressure at the axis near the surface. Also, a modification to the duplication buffer is proposed to vary the duplicated molecular velocities while retaining the molecular kinetic energy and axially symmetric nature of the problem.

  18. Momentos centrados en sistemas estelares a simetria axial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Subirana, J.; Juan Zornoza, J. M.; Català Poch, M. A.

    Centered moments in the galactic plane have been analytically determined up to the fourth order for a non-stationary stellar system model with a distribution of peculiar velocities of the stars symmetric under point-axial transformations and equatorial plane reflexions. The obtained results explain satisfactorily the peculiar velocities distribution of the considered stellar samples in the solar neighborhood.

  19. On the Applications of Axial Representation of Trigonometric Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siadat, M. Vali

    2006-01-01

    In terms of modern pedagogy, having visual interpretation of trigonometric functions is useful and quite helpful. This paper presents, pictorially, an easy approach to prove all single angle trigonometric identities on the axes. It also discusses the application of axial representation in calculus--finding the derivative of trigonometric functions.

  20. Novel axially disubstituted non-aggregated silicon phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Çakır, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of a range of new axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines with 2-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy] or 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy] groups as axial ligands. 2-[2-(Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethanol 2, 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy]ethanol 4 are reacted with silicon phthalocyanine 1, to give an axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines 3 and 5. Axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanine complexes were synthesized at the first time. Newly synthesized silicon phthalocyanines were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry. These new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 showed excellent solubility in organic solvents such as CHCl3, CH2Cl2, acetone, DMF, DMSO, THF, EtOAc. The aggregation behavior of these compounds were investigated in different concentrations of DMSO. The effect of solvents on absorption spectra were studied in various organic solvents. The thermal stabilities of the silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 were determined by thermogravimetric analysis.

  1. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-06-01

    The results of high-temperature axial and torsional low-cycle fatigue experiments performed on Haynes 188, a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, are reported. Fatigue tests were performed at 760 C in air on thin-walled tubular specimens at various ranges under strain control. Data are also presented for coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, and shear modulus at various temperatures from room to 1000 C, and monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves in tension and in shear at 760 C. The data set is used to evaluate several multiaxial fatigue life models (most were originally developed for room temperature multiaxial life prediction) including von Mises equivalent strain range (ASME boiler and pressure vessel code), Manson-Halford, Modified Multiaxiality Factor (proposed here), Modified Smith-Watson-Topper, and Fatemi-Socie-Kurath. At von Mises equivalent strain ranges (the torsional strain range divided by the square root of 3, taking the Poisson's ratio to be 0.5), torsionally strained specimens lasted, on average, factors of 2 to 3 times longer than axially strained specimens. The Modified Multiaxiality Factor approach shows promise as a useful method of estimating torsional fatigue life from axial fatigue data at high temperatures. Several difficulties arose with the specimen geometry and extensometry used in these experiments. Cracking at extensometer probe indentations was a problem at smaller strain ranges. Also, as the largest axial and torsional strain range fatigue tests neared completion, a small amount of specimen buckling was observed.

  2. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with an axially levitated motor.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ezoe, Shiroh; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Yohji

    2003-07-01

    The longevity of a rotary blood pump is mainly determined by the durability of its wearing mechanical parts such as bearings and seals. Magnetic suspension techniques can be used to eliminate these mechanical parts altogether. This article describes a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump using an axially levitated motor. The motor comprises an upper stator, a bottom stator, and a levitated rotor-impeller between the stators. The upper stator has permanent magnets to generate an attractive axial bias force on the rotor and electric magnets to control the inclination of the rotor. The bottom stator has electric magnets to generate attractive forces and rotating torque to control the axial displacement and rotation of the rotor. The radial displacement of the rotor is restricted by passive stability. A shrouded impeller is integrated within the rotor. The performance of the magnetic suspension and pump were evaluated in a closed mock loop circuit filled with water. The maximum amplitude of the rotor displacement in the axial direction was only 0.06 mm. The maximum possible rotational speed during levitation was 1,600 rpm. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 120 mm Hg and 7 L/min, respectively. The pump shows promise as a ventricular assist device. PMID:12823418

  3. Dynamics of Axial Separation in Long Rotating Drums

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I.S.; Tsimring, L.S.

    1999-06-01

    We propose a continuum description for the axial separation of granular materials in a long rotating drum. The model, operating with two local variables, concentration difference and the dynamic angle of repose, describes both initial transient traveling wave dynamics and long-term segregation of the binary mixture. Segregation proceeds through ultraslow logarithmic coarsening. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Parametric study of axial trapping forces on an elliptically symmetric dielectric in the ray optics regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque, Kristine Faith J.; Tapang, Giovanni A.; Saloma, Caesar A.

    2015-07-01

    We present the parametric investigation of the axial trapping forces generated by the interaction of an ellipsoidal dielectric and a focused, randomly polarized Gaussian beam in the geometrical optics regime. We show that particle elongation along the optical axis results to a more unstable axial trap compared to that of a reference sphere due to the more positive axial forces for positive axial displacements. Decreasing the refractive index difference between the particle and the surrounding medium (Δn = 0.09) decreases the magnitude of the axial force for positive particle displacements; and for a narrow range of axial displacements an axial trap can be achieved. Increasing the beam wavelength increases the magnitude of the axial force and for 1060 nm an axial trap can be achieved.

  5. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Morteza; Bajoghli, Farshad; Tayari, Nazila; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computerized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic procedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be present during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible. PMID:21566776

  6. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  7. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  8. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... scanning combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the ... being studied can then be examined on a computer monitor, printed or transferred to a CD. CT ...

  9. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-08-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures.

  10. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics are: CT of the Sacrum, The Postoperative Spine, Film Organizations and Case Reporting, Degeneration and Disc Disease of the Intervertebral Joint, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, and Cervical and Thoracic Spine.

  11. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiman, J.S.; McLeod, R.A.; Kyle, R.A.; Beabout, J.W.

    1985-02-01

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs.

  12. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part I. Development and validation of a Monte Carlo program

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Radiation-dose awareness and optimization in CT can greatly benefit from a dose-reporting system that provides dose and risk estimates specific to each patient and each CT examination. As the first step toward patient-specific dose and risk estimation, this article aimed to develop a method for accurately assessing radiation dose from CT examinations. Methods: A Monte Carlo program was developed to model a CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The geometry of the system, the energy spectra of the x-ray source, the three-dimensional geometry of the bowtie filters, and the trajectories of source motions during axial and helical scans were explicitly modeled. To validate the accuracy of the program, a cylindrical phantom was built to enable dose measurements at seven different radial distances from its central axis. Simulated radial dose distributions in the cylindrical phantom were validated against ion chamber measurements for single axial scans at all combinations of tube potential and bowtie filter settings. The accuracy of the program was further validated using two anthropomorphic phantoms (a pediatric one-year-old phantom and an adult female phantom). Computer models of the two phantoms were created based on their CT data and were voxelized for input into the Monte Carlo program. Simulated dose at various organ locations was compared against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimetry chips for both single axial and helical scans. Results: For the cylindrical phantom, simulations differed from measurements by -4.8% to 2.2%. For the two anthropomorphic phantoms, the discrepancies between simulations and measurements ranged between (-8.1%, 8.1%) and (-17.2%, 13.0%) for the single axial scans and the helical scans, respectively. Conclusions: The authors developed an accurate Monte Carlo program for assessing radiation dose from CT examinations. When combined with computer models of actual patients, the program can provide accurate dose

  13. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part I. Development and validation of a Monte Carlo program

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-dose awareness and optimization in CT can greatly benefit from a dose-reporting system that provides dose and risk estimates specific to each patient and each CT examination. As the first step toward patient-specific dose and risk estimation, this article aimed to develop a method for accurately assessing radiation dose from CT examinations. Methods: A Monte Carlo program was developed to model a CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The geometry of the system, the energy spectra of the x-ray source, the three-dimensional geometry of the bowtie filters, and the trajectories of source motions during axial and helical scans were explicitly modeled. To validate the accuracy of the program, a cylindrical phantom was built to enable dose measurements at seven different radial distances from its central axis. Simulated radial dose distributions in the cylindrical phantom were validated against ion chamber measurements for single axial scans at all combinations of tube potential and bowtie filter settings. The accuracy of the program was further validated using two anthropomorphic phantoms (a pediatric one-year-old phantom and an adult female phantom). Computer models of the two phantoms were created based on their CT data and were voxelized for input into the Monte Carlo program. Simulated dose at various organ locations was compared against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimetry chips for both single axial and helical scans. Results: For the cylindrical phantom, simulations differed from measurements by −4.8% to 2.2%. For the two anthropomorphic phantoms, the discrepancies between simulations and measurements ranged between (−8.1%, 8.1%) and (−17.2%, 13.0%) for the single axial scans and the helical scans, respectively. Conclusions: The authors developed an accurate Monte Carlo program for assessing radiation dose from CT examinations. When combined with computer models of actual patients, the program can provide accurate dose

  14. Extra-axial primary non-Hodgkin's CNS lymphoma mimicking meningioma, in a 5-year-old immunocompetent child: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Mukesh Kumar; Ojha, Balkrishna; Jaiswal, Manish; Sagar, Mala

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 5-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with features of raised intracranial pressure with left eye ptosis of 1-month duration. CT scan and MRI of the brain showed an extra-axial, intensely contrast enhancing lesion in the left temporoparieto-occipital region, consistent with meningioma. On open tissue biopsy and immunohistochemistry staining, a diagnosis of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was made. Six cycles of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisolone regimen were given and showed a good clinical outcome without any recurrence during follow-up of 5 months. PMID:27118750

  15. Automated flexure testing of axially rotated optical fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachim, B. L.; Gaylord, T. K.

    2002-10-01

    The design and performance of an automated system for flexure testing of optical fiber gratings is described. In addition to flexing (bending) a fiber grating through a specified curvature range, the system can change the axial rotational orientation of the grating relative to the plane of curvature. Flexure is accomplished by holding the grating against a smooth plastic platform. A linear stage deflects the center of the pinned platform to create a curved surface. Two small weights, hanging on the optical fiber, hold the fiber grating against the curved platform and provide constant tension on the optical fiber over the entire range of curvatures. The fiber grating is axially rotated to a different orientation by returning the platform to zero curvature, removing the weights from the optical fiber, and rotating the optical fiber about its axis using a pair of rotation stages. After replacing the weights on the optical fiber, flexure testing resumes at the new axial rotational orientation. The grating transmission spectrum during flexure is monitored with a broadband source and optical spectrum analyzer. All of these steps are done in an automated fashion (unattended) under computer program control. The testing system allows complete characterization of the fiber grating response for curvatures from 0 to 4 m-1 and for axial rotational orientations from 0° to 360°. Use of this automated test fixture eliminates the need for human intervention during the measurements and greatly decreases the testing time while still allowing complete characterization of the flexure response with axial rotational orientation as a parameter. Additional advantages of the testing system include an absolute zero curvature starting position, an absence of hysteresis effects, and accurate frictionless rotation.

  16. Patient-specific CT dosimetry calculation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Thomas; Xie, Huchen; Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Current estimation of radiation dose from computed tomography (CT) scans on patients has relied on the measurement of Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) in standard cylindrical phantoms, and calculations based on mathematical representations of "standard man". Radiation dose to both adult and pediatric patients from a CT scan has been a concern, as noted in recent reports. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of adapting a radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) to provide patient-specific CT dosimetry. A radiation treatment planning system was modified to calculate patient-specific CT dose distributions, which can be represented by dose at specific points within an organ of interest, as well as organ dose-volumes (after image segmentation) for a GE Light Speed Ultra Plus CT scanner. The RTPS calculation algorithm is based on a semi-empirical, measured correction-based algorithm, which has been well established in the radiotherapy community. Digital representations of the physical phantoms (virtual phantom) were acquired with the GE CT scanner in axial mode. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLDs) measurements in pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms were utilized to validate the dose at specific points within organs of interest relative to RTPS calculations and Monte Carlo simulations of the same virtual phantoms (digital representation). Congruence of the calculated and measured point doses for the same physical anthropomorphic phantom geometry was used to verify the feasibility of the method. The RTPS algorithm can be extended to calculate the organ dose by calculating a dose distribution point-by-point for a designated volume. Electron Gamma Shower (EGSnrc) codes for radiation transport calculations developed by National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) were utilized to perform the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In general, the RTPS and MC dose calculations are within 10% of the TLD measurements for the infant and child chest scans. With

  17. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter

  18. National Survey of Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Adult CT Head Scans in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Mok, Greta S. P.; Tsai, Mang-Fen; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different variables on radiation dose and image quality based on a national database. Materials and Methods Taiwan’s Ministry of Health and Welfare requested all radiology departments to complete a questionnaire for each of their CT scanners. Information gathered included all scanning parameters for CT head scans. For the present analysis, CT machines were divided into three subgroups: single slice CT (Group A); multi-detector CT (MDCT) with 2-64 slices (Group B); and MDCT with more than 64 slices (Group C). Correlations between computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with cumulated tube rotation number (CTW(n)) and cumulated tube rotation time (CTW(s)), and sub group analyses of CTDI and SNR across the three groups were performed. Results CTDI values demonstrated a weak correlation (r = 0.33) with CTW(n) in Group A. SNR values demonstrated a weak negative correlation (r = -0.46) with CTW(n) in Group C. MDCT with higher slice numbers used more tube potential resulting in higher effective doses. There were both significantly lower CTDI and SNR values in helical mode than in axial mode in Group B, but not Group C. Conclusion CTW(n) and CTW(s) did not influence radiation output. Helical mode is more often used in MDCT and results in both lower CTDI and SNR compared to axial mode in MDCT with less than 64 slices. PMID:26125549

  19. Time-Domain Terahertz Computed Axial Tomography NDE System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimdars, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified the need for advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to characterize aging and durability in aircraft materials to improve the safety of the nation's airline fleet. 3D THz tomography can play a major role in detection and characterization of flaws and degradation in aircraft materials, including Kevlar-based composites and Kevlar and Zylon fabric covers for soft-shell fan containment where aging and durability issues are critical. A prototype computed tomography (CT) time-domain (TD) THz imaging system has been used to generate 3D images of several test objects including a TUFI tile (a thermal protection system tile used on the Space Shuttle and possibly the Orion or similar capsules). This TUFI tile had simulated impact damage that was located and the depth of damage determined. The CT motion control gan try was designed and constructed, and then integrated with a T-Ray 4000 control unit and motion controller to create a complete CT TD-THz imaging system prototype. A data collection software script was developed that takes multiple z-axis slices in sequence and saves the data for batch processing. The data collection software was integrated with the ability to batch process the slice data with the CT TD-THz image reconstruction software. The time required to take a single CT slice was decreased from six minutes to approximately one minute by replacing the 320 ps, 100-Hz waveform acquisition system with an 80 ps, 1,000-Hz waveform acquisition system. The TD-THZ computed tomography system was built from pre-existing commercial off-the-shelf subsystems. A CT motion control gantry was constructed from COTS components that can handle larger samples. The motion control gantry allows inspection of sample sizes of up to approximately one cubic foot (.0.03 cubic meters). The system reduced to practice a CT-TDTHz system incorporating a COTS 80- ps/l-kHz waveform scanner. The incorporation of this scanner in the system allows acquisition of 3D

  20. Automatic identification of intracranial hemorrhage in non-contrast CT with large slice thickness for trauma cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Acharyya, Mausumi

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we propose a technique for automatic detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) and acute intracranial hemorrhage (AIH) in brain Computed Tomography (CT) for trauma cases where no contrast can be applied and the CT has large slice thickness. ICH or AIH comprise of internal bleeding (intra-axial) or external (extra-axial) to the brain substance. Large bleeds like in intra-axial region are easy to diagnose whereas it can be challenging if small bleed occurs in extra-axial region particularly in the absence of contrast. Bleed region needs to be distinguished from bleed-look-alike brain regions which are abnormally bright falx and fresh flowing blood. We propose an algorithm for detection of brain bleed in various anatomical locations. A preprocessing step is performed to segment intracranial contents and enhancement of region of interests(ROIs). A number of bleed and bleed-look-alike candidates are identified from a set of 11 available cases. For each candidate texture based features are extracted from non-separable quincunx wavelet transform along with some other descriptive features. The candidates are randomly divided into a training and test set consisting of both bleed and bleed-look- alike. A supervised classifier is designed based on the training sample features. A performance accuracy of 96% is attained for the independent test candidates.

  1. Comparison of Preoperative Temporal Bone CT with Intraoperative Findings in Patients with Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Rogha, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Sayyed Mostafa; Mokhtarinejad, Farhad; Eshaghian, Afrooz; Dadgostar, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cholesteatoma is traditionally diagnosed by otoscopic examination and treated by surgery. The necessity for imaging in an uncomplicated case is controversial. This study was planned to investigate the usefulness of a preoperative high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan in depicting the status of middle ear structures in the presence of cholesteatoma and also to compare the correspondence between pre- and intraoperative CT findings in patients with cholesteatoma. Materials and Methods: This prospective descriptive study was performed from January 2009 to May 2011 in 36 patients with cholesteatoma who were referred to the Kashani and Al-Zahra Clinics of Otolaryngology. Preoperative high-resolution temporal bone CT scans (axial and coronal views) were carried out and compared with intraoperative findings. Results: Evaluation of 36 patients and their CT scans revealed excellent correlation for sigmoid plate erosion, widening of aditus, and erosion of scutum; good correlation for erosion of malleus and tegmen; moderate correlation for lateral canal fistula (LCF) and erosion of mastoid air cells; and poor correlation for facial nerve dehiscence (FND), incus, and stapes erosion. Conclusion: A preoperative CT scan may be helpful in relation to diagnosis and decision making for surgery in cases of cholesteatoma and ossicular erosion. The CT scan can accurately predict the extent of disease and is helpful for detection of lateral canal fistula, erosions of dural plate, and ossicular erosions. However it is not able to distinguish between cholesteatoma and mucosal disease, facial nerve dehiscency, incus, and stapes erosion. PMID:24505568

  2. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  3. A method for smoothing segmented lung boundary in chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Yeny; Hong, Helen

    2007-03-01

    To segment low density lung regions in chest CT images, most of methods use the difference in gray-level value of pixels. However, radiodense pulmonary vessels and pleural nodules that contact with the surrounding anatomy are often excluded from the segmentation result. To smooth lung boundary segmented by gray-level processing in chest CT images, we propose a new method using scan line search. Our method consists of three main steps. First, lung boundary is extracted by our automatic segmentation method. Second, segmented lung contour is smoothed in each axial CT slice. We propose a scan line search to track the points on lung contour and find rapidly changing curvature efficiently. Finally, to provide consistent appearance between lung contours in adjacent axial slices, 2D closing in coronal plane is applied within pre-defined subvolume. Our method has been applied for performance evaluation with the aspects of visual inspection, accuracy and processing time. The results of our method show that the smoothness of lung contour was considerably increased by compensating for pulmonary vessels and pleural nodules.

  4. Human airway measurement from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.; Fotin, Sergei; Apanasovich, Tatiyana; Yankelevitz, David

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary diseases, including common ones such as COPD, affect the airways. If the dimensions of airway can be measured with high confidence, the clinicians will be able to better diagnose diseases as well as monitor progression and response to treatment. In this paper, we introduce a method to assess the airway dimensions from CT scans, including the airway segments that are not oriented axially. First, the airway lumen is segmented and skeletonized, and subsequently each airway segment is identified. We then represent each airway segment using a segment-centric generalized cylinder model and assess airway lumen diameter (LD) and wall thickness (WT) for each segment by determining inner and outer wall boundaries. The method was evaluated on 14 healthy patients from a Weill Cornell database who had two scans within a 2 month interval. The corresponding airway segments were located in two scans and measured using the automated method. The total number of segments identified in both scans was 131. When 131 segments were considered altogether, the average absolute change over two scans was 0.31 mm for LD and 0.12 mm for WT, with 95% limits of agreement of [-0.85, 0.83] for LD and [-0.32, 0.26] for WT. The results were also analyzed on per-patient basis, and the average absolute change was 0.19 mm for LD and 0.05 mm for WT. 95% limits of agreement for per-patient changes were [-0.57, 0.47] for LD and [-0.16, 0.10] for WT.

  5. Deformation associated with the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Chadwick, W.; Caress, D. W.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Yoerger, D.; Sasagawa, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    On April 24th 2015, an eruption began at Axial Seamount, a seafloor volcano located about 480 km west of the Oregon coast at the intersection of the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This eruption was first detected in real time by the newly operational Ocean Observatories Initiative cabled instrumentation at Axial (Delaney, AGU-2015, Wilcock, AGU-2015, Caplan-Auerbach, AGU-2015). Two prior eruptions have been observed since routine observations began in the 1990's, one in January 1998 and the other in April 2011. Precise water pressure measurements made on the volcano have documented an inflation/deflation cycle within Axial's summit caldera for the past 15 years. These data are now being supplemented by repeat bathymetric mapping by AUV. The long-term pattern appears to be "inflation predictable", in which eruptions are triggered at or near the same level of inflation. This pattern allowed us to successfully forecast in September 2014 that the next eruption was expected to occur at Axial sometime in 2015 (a 1-year time window). It is noteworthy that the rate of inflation between the 2011 and 2015 eruptions was about 4 times higher than between the 1998 and 2011 eruptions (60 cm/yr vs. 15 cm/yr). Subsidence at the caldera center began at 06:00 on 24 April (all times GMT) and amounted to 2.2 m by 02:00 on 25 April (20 hours in), 2.4 m by 00:00 on 28 April, and 2.45 m by 05 May when subsidence ended and re-inflation began (which has continued ever since). This amount of subsidence is similar to that observed during the 2011 eruption, but in 2015 the initial rate of subsidence was higher (11 cm/hr during the first 20 hours vs. 7 cm/hr in 2011) and the duration appears to have been longer (11 days vs. 6 days). Also, the 1998 and 2011 eruptions occurred along the southeastern edge of the caldera and along Axial's south rift zone, whereas the 2015 eruption occurred along the north rift zone (Kelley, AGU-2015). Here we present preliminary results of our August

  6. Modelling larval transport in a axial convergence front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, P.

    2010-12-01

    Marine larvae exhibit different vertical swimming behaviours, synchronised by factors such as tidal currents and daylight, in order to aid retention near the parent populations and hence promote production, avoid predation, or to stimulate digestion. This paper explores two types of larval migration in an estuarine axial convergent front which is an important circulatory mechanism in many coastal regions where larvae are concentrated. A parallelised, three-dimensional, ocean model was applied to an idealised estuarine channel which was parameterised from observations of an axial convergent front which occurs in the Conwy Estuary, U.K. (Nunes and Simpson, 1985). The model successfully simulates the bilateral cross-sectional recirculation of an axial convergent front, which has been attributed to lateral density gradients established by the interaction of the lateral shear of the longitudinal currents with the axial salinity gradients. On the flood tide, there is surface axial convergence whereas on the ebb tide, there is (weaker) surface divergence. Further simulations with increased/decreased tidal velocities and with stronger/weaker axial salinity gradients are planned so that the effects of a changing climate on the secondary flow can be understood. Three-dimensional Lagrangian Particle Tracking Models (PTMs) have been developed which use the simulated velocity fields to track larvae in the estuarine channel. The PTMs take into account the vertical migrations of two shellfish species that are commonly found in the Conwy Estuary: (i) tidal migration of the common shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and (ii), diel (daily) migration of the Great scallop (Pecten maximus). These migration behaviours are perhaps the most widespread amongst shellfish larvae and have been compared with passive (drifting) particles in order to assess their relative importance in terms of larval transport. Preliminary results suggest that the net along-estuary dispersal over a typical larval

  7. Three Dimensional Pore Geometry change under different axial differential stress and Fluid Flow of Berea sandstone by LBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Takada, N.; Li, X.

    2013-12-01

    The Berea sandstone has a clear bedding plane and not clear cross lamina in cm size specimen, which is mainly caused by grain orientation and void space in microscopic scale. During the confined triaxial compression test, we measured permeability of Berea sandstone by constant head test for three mutually perpendicular directions under increasing differential axial stress. In general, the permeability of Berea sandstones decreased slightly with increasing the effective confining pressure and axial differential stress. Permeability anisotropy was also observed in the normal and two parallel directions to the bedding planes. We introduced the three-dimensional medial axis (3DMA) method of Lindquist et al. (2000) to quantify the flow-relevant geometric properties of the voids structure in Berea sandstone. Using these data, we also evaluated the number of connecting path between two faces, tortuosity and the shortest path distribution within an arbitrary region of Berea sandstone specimen. Geometrical information on the number of connecting path in an arbitrary volume CT data shows reasonable correlation between permeability anisotropy and mutually perpendicular directions normal and parallel to bedding planes. In addition, we introduced numerical simulation of fluid flow of pressurized Berea sandstone by LBM, to discuss the permeability change caused by pressurization on effective confining pressure and differential axial stress. We obtained the detail distributions of fluid pressure, fluid velocity and its vector distribution in rather narrow voids space more than 10 μm. It is confirmed that pressurization effect on permeability caused by the decrease of the connecting path and the shortest path between arbitrary faces, and then caused a complex condition of on fluid pressure and fluid velocity.

  8. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  9. Axial SiGe Heteronanowire Tunneling Field-Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Son T.; Jannaty, P.; Luo, Xu; Zaslavsky, A.; Perea, Daniel E.; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Picraux, Samuel T.

    2012-10-31

    We present silicon-compatible tri-gated p-Ge/i-Si/n-Si axial heteronanowire tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs), where on-state tunneling occurs in the Ge drain section, while off-state leakage is dominated by the Si junction in the source. Our TFETs have high ION ~ 2 µA/µm, fully suppressed ambipolarity, and a sub-threshold slope SS ~ 140 mV/decade over 4 decades of current with lowest SS ~ 50 mV/decade. Device operation in the tunneling mode is confirmed by three-dimensional TCAD simulation. Interestingly, in addition to the TFET mode, our devices work as standard nanowire FETs with good ION/IOFF ratio when the source-drain junction is forward-biased. The improved transport in both biasing modes confirms the benefits of utilizing bandgap engineered axial nanowires for enhancing device performance.

  10. Buckling Imperfection Sensitivity of Axially Compressed Orthotropic Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Structural stability is a major consideration in the design of lightweight shell structures. However, the theoretical predictions of geometrically perfect structures often considerably over predict the buckling loads of inherently imperfect real structures. It is reasonably well understood how the shell geometry affects the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed cylindrical shells; however, the effects of shell anisotropy on the imperfection sensitivity is less well understood. In the present paper, the development of an analytical model for assessing the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed orthotropic cylinders is discussed. Results from the analytical model for four shell designs are compared with those from a general-purpose finite-element code, and good qualitative agreement is found. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed, and potential design implications of this line of research are discussed.

  11. Investigation of performance limits in axial groove heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, K. T.

    1976-01-01

    The entrainment-shear performance limit which occurs in axial groove heat pipes was investigated and explained. In the existing heat pipe literature the entrainment heat flux limit is defined as the condition where the Weber number is greater than or equal to one. In this analysis, the critical value for the entrainment Weber number is found to be 2 pi less than or equal to 3 pi. Perhaps more important to the heat pipe designer than the entrainment performance limit is the prediction of the performance degradation due to vapor-liquid shearing stress which is also described. Preliminary qualitative experiments were conducted to observe the shear. stress wave formation phenomena. The equations presented may be used to predict and minimize the vapor-liquid shear stress performance effects that occur in axial groove and puddle flow artery heat pipes.

  12. Experimentally studying of axial compressor operation with steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenin, V. M.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kosoi, A. S.; Datsenko, V. V.; Sinkevich, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    Steam offers numerous benefits when used as the working fluid in thermodynamic cycles. In lowtemperature cycles, where thermal energy is switched from one temperature potential to another (thermal transformers), steam is much less commonly used as a working fluid than in high-temperature cycles. The deficiencies of difficulties in using steam in thermal transformers include low pressure at the working temperatures and hence large specific volume. A compressor capable of high productivity having high discharge and relatively large increase in pressure is required. To that end, a multistage axial compressor from an airplane aircraft engine may be employed. To confirm the viability of this approach, the compressor of an AL-21 airplane aircraft engine is tested on a custom test bench. Experimental results are presented for a multistage axial compressor working with steam, when the input pressure is 0.5-5 kPa.

  13. Axially Tapered And Bilayer Microchannels For Evaporative Cooling Devices

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, Robert; Griffiths, Stewart

    2005-10-04

    The invention consists of an evaporative cooling device comprising one or more microchannels whose cross section is axially reduced to control the maximum capillary pressure differential between liquid and vapor phases. In one embodiment, the evaporation channels have a rectangular cross section that is reduced in width along a flow path. In another embodiment, channels of fixed width are patterned with an array of microfabricated post-like features such that the feature size and spacing are gradually reduced along the flow path. Other embodiments incorporate bilayer channels consisting of an upper cover plate having a pattern of slots or holes of axially decreasing size and a lower fluid flow layer having channel widths substantially greater than the characteristic microscale dimensions of the patterned cover plate. The small dimensions of the cover plate holes afford large capillary pressure differentials while the larger dimensions of the lower region reduce viscous flow resistance.

  14. Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capper, D.M.; Leibbrandt, G.

    1982-02-15

    We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge n/sub ..mu../phi/sub munu/ = 0, n/sup 2/not =0, where phi/sub munu/ is the physical graviton field and n/sub ..mu../ is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and n/sub ..mu../ dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a ''pincer'' Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All axial-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

  15. Fully Characterizing Axially Symmetric Szekeres Models with Three Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, Marie-Nöelle Mishra, Priti; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous exact solutions of General Relativity with zero cosmological constant have been used in the literature to challenge the ΛCDM model. From one patch Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models to axially symmetric quasi-spherical Szekeres (QSS) Swiss-cheese models, some of them are able to reproduce to a good accuracy the cosmological data. It has been shown in the literature that a zero Λ LTB model with a central observer can be fully determined by two data sets. We demonstrate that an axially symmetric zero Λ QSS model with an observer located at the origin can be fully reconstructed from three data sets, number counts, luminosity distance and redshift drift. This is a first step towards a future demonstration involving five data sets and the most general Szekeres model.

  16. Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Sanuel T; Daych, Shadi A

    2010-01-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of semiconductor nanowires allows doping and composition modulation along their axis and the realization of axial 1 D heterostructures. This provides additional flexibility in energy band-edge engineering along the transport direction which is difficult to attain by planar materials growth and processing techniques. We report here on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of asymmetric heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFETs) based on 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial NWs for high on-current operation and low ambipolar transport behavior. We discuss the optimization of band-offsets and Schottky barrier heights for high performance HTFETs and issues surrounding their experimental realization. Our HTFET devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a measured current drive exceeding 100 {mu}A/{mu}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios.

  17. Fuel axial relocation in ballooning fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel movement, in the longitudinal direction in ballooning fuel rods, shifts the position of heat generation and may cause an increase in cladding temperature in the ballooning region. This paper summarizes the axial fuel relocation data obtained in fuel rod tests conducted in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany, describes a model for calculating fuel axial relocation, and gives a quantitative analysis of the impact of fuel relocation on cladding temperature. The amount of fuel relocation in 18 ballooned fuel rods was determined from neutron radiographs, niobium gamma decay counts, and photomicrographs. The fuel rods had burnups in the range of 0 to 35,000 MWd/t and cladding hoop strains varying from 0 to 72%.

  18. The axial-torsional vibration of pretwisted beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang-Chen; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the coupled axial-torsional vibration of pretwisted beams. The equations of motion governing the extension, torsion, and cross-sectional warping of pretwisted beams are derived from Hamiltons principle, and the common assumptions used to simplify the equations are carefully examined through scaling analysis. Inconsistencies in previous works—such as the neglect of spatial and time derivatives of torsion in the Lagrangian functional—are remedied, giving rise to fourth-order terms in the equations of motion that are significant for higher harmonics. Furthermore, scaling analysis of the governing equations yields a set of objective criteria for checking the validity of the frequently misused assumption that the warping function under pretwist is locally identical to that of a prismatic beam; we show that this simplification is responsible for the common poor prediction of axial resonance frequencies for pretwisted beams.

  19. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual. PMID:9365340

  20. Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

  1. First Calculation of Hyperon Axial Couplings from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin; Konstantinos Orginos

    2007-12-06

    In this work, we report the first lattice calculation of the hyperon axial couplings, using the 2+1-flavor MILC configurations and domain-wall fermion valence quarks. Both the $\\Sigma$ and $\\Xi$ axial couplings are for the first time done in lattice QCD, and we find the numbers with greater precision than previous chiral perturbation theory and large-$N_c$ theory estimate: $g_{\\Sigma\\Sigma} = 0.450(21)_{\\rm stat}(22)_{\\rm syst}$ and $g_{\\Xi\\Xi} = -0.277(15)_{\\rm stat}(16)_{\\rm syst}$. As a side product, we also determine the low-energy chiral parameters $D$ and $F$ extracted from these coupling constants: $D=0.715(6)_{\\rm stat}(6)_{\\rm syst}$ and $F=0.453(5)_{\\rm stat}(5)_{\\rm syst}$.

  2. The type 1 copper site of pseudoazurin: axial and rhombic.

    PubMed

    Gast, Peter; Broeren, Freek G J; Sottini, Silvia; Aoki, Risa; Takashina, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Kohzuma, Takamitsu; Groenen, Edgar J J

    2014-08-01

    We report on a high-frequency electron-paramagnetic-resonance study of the type 1 copper site of pseudoazurin. The spectra fully resolve the contribution of a nearly axial spectrum besides the rhombic spectrum, which unequivocally proves the existence of two conformations of the copper site. Pseudoazurins have been considered from Achromobacter cycloclastes including eight mutants and from Alcaligenes faecalis. The two conformations are virtually the same for all pseudoazurins, but the rhombic/axial population varies largely, between 91/9 and 33/67. These observations are discussed in relation to optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction structures. A similar observation for fern plastocyanin from Dryopteris crassirhizoma suggests that dual conformations of type 1 copper sites are more common. PMID:24813397

  3. CT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Françoise; Engelke, Klaus

    This chapter presents the principle of X-ray CT and its evolution during the last 40 years. The first section describes the physical basis of X-ray CT, tomographic image reconstruction algorithms, and the source of artifacts in X-ray CT images. The second section is devoted to the evolution of CT technology from the first translation-rotation systems to multi-slice spiral CTs currently used today. The next section addresses specific developments of CT technology and applications, like perfusion CT, quantitative CT, and spectral CT. The fourth section introduces the problem of radiation exposure delivered to the patient and its evaluation. Finally the last section addresses the development in micro- and even nano-CT which is a rapidly evolving area in preclinical imaging and biology.

  4. Development of optimized, graded-permeability axial groove heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapolnek, Michael R.; Holmes, H. Rolland

    1988-01-01

    Heat pipe performance can usually be improved by uniformly varying or grading wick permeability from end to end. A unique and cost effective method for grading the permeability of an axial groove heat pipe is described - selective chemical etching of the pipe casing. This method was developed and demonstrated on a proof-of-concept test article. The process improved the test article's performance by 50 percent. Further improvement is possible through the use of optimally etched grooves.

  5. Axial form factor of the nucleon at large momentum transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, I. V.; Braun, V. M.; Offen, N.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the emerging possibilities to study threshold pion electroproduction at large momentum transfers at Jefferson Laboratory following the 12 GeV upgrade, we provide a short theory summary and an estimate of the nucleon axial form factor for large virtualities in the Q2=1 - 10 GeV2 range using next-to-leading-order light-cone sum rules.

  6. The nucleon axial charge in full lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; George Fleming; P Hagler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers

    2005-10-13

    The nucleon axial charge is calculated as a function of the pion mass in full QCD. Using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks, we present the first calculation with pion masses as light as 354 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm)3. We show that finite volume effects are small for our volumes and that a constrained fit based on finite volume chiral perturbation theory agrees with experiment within 5% statistical errors.

  7. Axial Seamount - Under the hood of the volcano machine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    On the Juan de Fuca ridge, Axial volcano is the most volcanically active site of the northwestern Pacific and it has been continuously monitored through two complete eruption cycles, with an increased number of seafloor instruments, leading in 2014 to the deployment of a permanent, wired-to-shore, seafloor observatory. Accurate imaging of the internal structure of volcanic systems is critical in order to characterize and quantify mass and energy transport mechanisms in such dynamic environments. To produce high-resolution velocity/reflectivity structures of Axial volcano, here, we combined a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 3-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and a reverse time migration (RTM) formalism.We present an updated and more complete outlook of Axial volcano upper crustal structure. We find that the addition of 469,891 traveltime arrivals, from twelve different multichannel seismic lines, to a previous OBSs-based traveltime tomography inversion, greatly improved the resolution of the three-dimensional velocity structure. We observe two elongated crustal magma reservoir beneath the central volcano. We investigate the extent, volume and physical state of those magma reservoirs and provide images of the volcanic plumbing system. We use our 3D velocity structure to relocate several months of seismicity and track magma movements between the caldera and the eruption site. We show that crustal-aging is controlled by pipe-like pattern of focused hydrothermal circulation. We suggest that the subsiding caldera floor at Axial Volcano was initiated ~720kyr +/-100kyr and provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows.

  8. Axial Anomaly, Dirac Sea, and the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.E.

    2010-05-26

    Gribov viewed the axial anomaly as a manifestation of the collective motion of Dirac fermions with arbitrarily high momenta in the vacuum. In the presence of an external magnetic field and a chirality imbalance, this collective motion becomes directly observable in the form of the electric current - this is the chiral magnetic effect (CME). I give an elementary introduction into the physics of CME, and discuss the experimental status and recent developments.

  9. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  10. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.

    2015-06-01

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  11. The axial anomaly and the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz; Ito, Hiroshi; Buck, Warren

    1991-10-01

    Using the quark triangle diagram for the Adler-Bell-Jackiw axial anomaly, we calculate the form factor for the {gamma}{sup *}{pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma} transition. This form factor depends on the quark mass, and we predict the right behavior with m{sub q}{approx_equal}250 MeV, the same quark mass generated by the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry through a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio mechanism.

  12. Rotary-To-Axial Motion Converter For Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H.; Mohtar, Rafic

    1991-01-01

    Nearly frictionless mechanism converts rotary motion into axial motion. Designed for use in electronically variable pressure-regulator valve. Changes rotary motion imparted by motor into translation that opens and closes valve poppet. Cables spaced equidistantly around edge of fixed disk support movable disk. As movable disk rotated, cables twist, lifting it. When rotated in opposite direction, cables untwist, lowering it. Spider disk helps to prevent cables from tangling. Requires no lubrication and insensitive to contamination in fluid flowing through valve.

  13. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-08-15

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  14. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.

    2015-06-15

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  15. Numerical analysis of a microwave torch with axial gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M.

    2013-07-15

    The characteristics of a microwave discharge in an argon jet injected axially into a coaxial channel with a shortened inner electrode are numerically analyzed using a self-consistent equilibrium gas-dynamic model. The specific features of the excitation and maintenance of the microwave discharge are determined, and the dependences of the discharge characteristics on the supplied electromagnetic power and gas flow rate are obtained. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

  16. Axial Spondylectomy and Circumferential Reconstruction via a Posterior Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jandial, Rahul; Kelly, Brandon; Bucklen, Brandon; Khalil, Saif; Chen, Mike Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal metastases of the second cervical vertebra are a subset of tumors that is particularly difficult to address surgically. Previously described techniques require highly morbid circumferential dissection posterior to the pharynx for resection and reconstruction. Objective To perform a biomechanical analysis of instrumented reconstruction configurations used after axial spondylectomy and demonstrate safe use of a novel construct in a patient case report. Methods Several different published and novel reconstruction configurations were inserted into 7 occipitocervical spines that underwent axial spondylectomy. A biomechanical analysis of the constructs’ stiffness in flexion and extension, lateral bending, and rotation was performed. A patient then underwent a posterior-only approach for axial spondylectomy and circumferential reconstruction. Results Biomechanical analysis of different constructs demonstrated that anterior column reconstruction with bilateral cages spanning C1 lateral mass to C3 facet in combination with occipitocervical instrumentation was superior in flexion-extension and equivalent in lateral bending and rotation to currently used constructs. In the patient in which this construct was placed via a posterior-only approach for axial spondylectomy and instrumentation, the patient remained at neurological baseline and demonstrated no recurrence of local disease or failure of instrumentation to date. Conclusion When comparing C1 lateral mass to C3 facet bilateral cage plus occipitocervical instrumentation to existing anterior and posterior constructs, this novel reconstruction is biomechanically equivalent if not superior in performance. In a patient, the posterior-only approach for C2 spondylectomy with the novel reconstruction was safe, durable, and avoided the morbidity of the anterior approach. PMID:23149951

  17. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-08-01

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  18. Quantification and elimination of windmill artifacts in multi slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrup, Steven J.; Brown, Kevin M.

    2008-03-01

    In multi-slice cone beam CT imaging, there are artifacts known as windmill artifacts. These artifacts are due to not satisfying the Nyquist criteria in the patient longitudinal direction. This paper quantifies and compares these artifacts as a function of the number of rows, pitch, collimation, and image thickness of the CT scanner. Scanners with rows of 16, 64 and 128 are measured and compared with simulated data, using both Helical and Axial scanning modes. In addition three focal spot switching modes are compared: the traditional within image plane mode; diagonal mode; and quad mode. All images are compared via four criteria: artifacts, MTF, SSP and noise. Results show that the frequency of the artifact, or number of blades on the windmill and magnitude of each blade, is dependent on the rate at which the rows are crossed for an image. For example, for a given pitch, doubling the rows doubles the frequency of the artifact, with each artifact approximately the magnitude. A similar result can be obtained by keeping the number of rows constant and varying the pitch. The artifact disappears as the Nyquist criteria is satisfied by either increasing the slice thickness or incorporating one of the focal spot switching modes that switch in the patient longitudinal direction. For a given MTF and SSP, the diagonal focal spot switching mode has slightly more noise while the other two are approximately equal. The artifact varies with the quad mode being the best and traditional mode being the worse.

  19. 3D dosimetry by optical-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The need for an accurate, practical, low-cost 3D dosimetry system is becoming ever more critical as modern dose delivery techniques increase in complexity and sophistication. A recent report from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) (1), revealed that 38% of institutions failed the head-and-neck IMRT phantom credentialing test at the first attempt. This was despite generous passing criteria (within 7% dose-difference or 4mm distance-to-agreement) evaluated at a half-dozen points and a single axial plane. The question that arises from this disturbing finding is – what percentage of institutions would have failed if a comprehensive 3D measurement had been feasible, rather than measurements restricted to the central film-plane and TLD points? This question can only be adequately answered by a comprehensive 3D-dosimetry system, which presents a compelling argument for its development as a clinically viable low cost dosimetry solution. Optical-CT dosimetry is perhaps the closest system to providing such a comprehensive solution. In this article, we review the origins and recent developments of optical-CT dosimetry systems. The principle focus is on first generation systems known to have highest accuracy but longer scan times. PMID:17460781

  20. Resolution and noise trade-off analysis for volumetric CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojun; Avinash, Gopal B.; Hsieh, Jiang

    2007-10-15

    Until recently, most studies addressing the trade-off between spatial resolution and quantum noise were performed in the context of single-slice CT. In this study, we extend the theoretical framework of previous works to volumetric CT and further extend it by taking into account the actual shapes of the preferred reconstruction kernels. In the experimental study, we also attempt to explore a three-dimensional approach for spatial resolution measurement, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional approaches that were widely adopted in previously published studies. By scanning a finite-sized sphere phantom, the MTF was measured from the edge profile along the spherical surface. Cases of different resolutions (and noise levels) were generated by adjusting the reconstruction kernel. To reduce bias, the total photon fluxes were matched: 120 kVp, 200 mA, and 1 s per gantry rotation. All data sets were reconstructed using a modified FDK algorithm under the same condition: Scan field-of-view (SFOV)=10 cm, and slice thickness=0.625 mm. The theoretical analysis indicated that the variance of noise is proportional to >4th power of the spatial resolution. Our experimental results supported this conclusion by showing the relationship is 4.6th (helical) or 5th (axial) power.

  1. Direct oblique sagittal CT of orbital wall fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.B. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    Direct oblique sagittal CT was used to evaluate trauma to 77 orbits. Sixty-seven orbital wall fractures with intact orbital rims (36 floor, 22 medial wall, nine roof) were identified in 47 orbits. Since persistent diplopia and/or enophthalmos may warrant surgical repair of orbital floor fractures, optimal imaging should include an evaluation of extraocular muscle status, the nature and amount of displaced orbital contents, and an accurate definition of fracture margins. For orbital floor fractures, a combination of the direct oblique sagittal and direct coronal projections optimally displayed all fracture margins, the fracture's relationship to the inferior orbital rim and medial orbital wall, and the amount of displacement into the maxillary sinus. Inferior rectus muscle status with 36 floor fractures was best seen on the direct oblique sagittal projection in 30 fractures (83.3%) and was equally well seen on sagittal and coronal projections in two fractures (5.5%). Floor fractures were missed on 100% of axial, 5.5% of sagittal, and 0% of coronal projections. Since the direct oblique sagittal projection complements the direct coronal projection in evaluating orbital floor fractures, it should not be performed alone. A technical approach to the CT evaluation or orbital wall fractures is presented.

  2. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix misdiagnosed as convexity meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yan; Yi, Lei; Ouyang, Yian; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isolated cerebral varix is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly, which is easily misdiagnosed as other brain tumors. A 59-year-old female patient with noncontributory medical history presented with headache and insomnia for the last 2 months. Upon admission, her neurological examination was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-demarcated extra medullary mass, 11 × 11 mm in size, within the subdural space at the right frontal lobe. The lesion was initially interpreted as a convexity meningioma. After conducting a craniotomy on the patient, an extra-axial varix was exposed and resected subsequently. The patient's headache was resolved soon after surgery and charged without neurologic sequelae. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix is mimicking convexity meningioma on MR images and should be considered as a differential diagnosis. The focal erosion in the inner table of the skull could be an important character of extra-axial isolated cerebral varix. An extremely round shape and smooth contour of the lesion was another important character. Isolated cerebral varix is rare vascular lesion that is treated surgically in the case of rupture or compression of adjacent structures. The information obtained with noninvasive imaging techniques should include CTA to make a clinical decision. PMID:27368037

  3. Axial stress localization facilitates pressure propagation in gelled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrman, Jens; Skjæraasen, Olaf; Oschmann, Hans-Jörg; Paso, Kristofer; Sjöblom, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Paraffin wax-oil gels are unique rheological fluids which undergo shear degradation starting at a deformation (shear strain level) of approximately 1%. Flow commencement in pipelines filled with wax-oil gels is a complex hydrodynamic process involving propagation of acoustic, diffusive, and rheological degradation pressure wave fronts. Dynamic simulation informed by qualified rheological relations provides useful insight into the physical nature of these flow processes. Eulerian simulations are presented which emulate known physical phenomena and essential characteristics of wax-gel flow dynamics. A constitutive rheological equation set accounts for deformation-driven reduction in yield stress and viscosity terms. No explicit time-dependent rheological parameters are utilized in the equations. Rheological yielding alters the nature of the dominant pressure wave from inherently diffusive towards self-sharpening. Axial stress localization effectively sequentializes the gel breakage process, quantified by reduced length of the pressure wave-front zone. Ultimately, axial stress localization allows flow in longer pipe segments, albeit with a concomitant time delay. Viscous behavior and yielding degradation behavior are shown to account for upward and downward concavity in transient axial pressure profiles, respectively. Overall, a unique synergy between gel compressibility and gel degradation is revealed. Deformation-coupled interaction between compressibility and degradation allows pressure propagation and subsequent sustained flow through a gel material which is otherwise immobile in the incompressible case.

  4. Axial and Centrifugal Compressor Mean Line Flow Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate key aerodynamic parameters of single and multistage axial and centrifugal compressors. This mean-line compressor code COMDES provides the capability of sizing single and multistage compressors quickly during the conceptual design process. Based on the compressible fluid flow equations and the Euler equation, the code can estimate rotor inlet and exit blade angles when run in the design mode. The design point rotor efficiency and stator losses are inputs to the code, and are modeled at off design. When run in the off-design analysis mode, it can be used to generate performance maps based on simple models for losses due to rotor incidence and inlet guide vane reset angle. The code can provide an improved understanding of basic aerodynamic parameters such as diffusion factor, loading levels and incidence, when matching multistage compressor blade rows at design and at part-speed operation. Rotor loading levels and relative velocity ratio are correlated to the onset of compressor surge. NASA Stage 37 and the three-stage NASA 74-A axial compressors were analyzed and the results compared to test data. The code has been used to generate the performance map for the NASA 76-B three-stage axial compressor featuring variable geometry. The compressor stages were aerodynamically matched at off-design speeds by adjusting the variable inlet guide vane and variable stator geometry angles to control the rotor diffusion factor and incidence angles.

  5. Free-Surface Induced Axial Flows in Oscillating Cylinder Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, A. V.; Wei, T.

    1999-11-01

    The problem to be discussed is that of the effect of a free surface on flow along the cores of Karman vortices shed from an inverted pendulum type cylinder. The motivation for this research was to determine the nature and extent of free surface effects in flow induced vibrations of structures aligned perpendicular to and penetrating a free surface. The 2.54 cm diameter cylinder studied had a low mass ratio and was attached at the bottom end by a leaf spring; the free, upper end protruded through the free surface of a large water tunnel. It has been observed that the vortex induced oscillations of the cylinder resulted in very strong axial flows upward toward the free surface, even for small amplitude motions. Approaching the free surface, however, there was an equal likelyhood that the axial flows would be directed down away from the surface. The connection between the direction of axial flow and the cylinder motion will be described using single and two view flow visualization techniques.

  6. Behavior of unbonded flexible risers subject to axial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shao-fei; Tang, Wen-yong; Guo, Jin-ting

    2014-04-01

    Owing to nonlinear contact problems with slip and friction, a lot of limiting assumptions are made when developing analytical models to simulate the behavior of an unbonded flexible riser. Meanwhile, in order to avoid convergence problems and excessive calculating time associated with running the detailed finite element (FE) model of an unbonded flexible riser, interlocked carcass and zeta layers with complicated cross section shapes are replaced by simple geometrical shapes (e.g. hollow cylindrical shell) with equivalent orthotropic materials. But the simplified model does not imply the stresses equivalence of these two layers. To solve these problems, based on ABAQUS/Explicit, a numerical method that is suitable for the detailed FE model is proposed. In consideration of interaction among all component layers, the axial stiffness of an eight-layer unbonded flexible riser subjected to axial tension is predicted. Compared with analytical and experimental results, it is shown that the proposed numerical method not only has high accuracy but also can substantially reduce the calculating time. In addition, the impact of the lay angle of helical tendons on axial stiffness is discussed.

  7. Preoperative Embolization of Extra-axial Hypervascular Tumors with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Matthew R.; Salem, Mohamed M.; Reddy, Arra S.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Thomas, Ajith J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative endovascular embolization of intracranial tumors is performed to mitigate anticipated intraoperative blood loss. Although the usage of a wide array of embolic agents, particularly polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has been described for a variety of tumors, literature detailing the efficacy, safety and complication rates for the usage of Onyx is relatively sparse. Materials and Methods We reviewed our single institutional experience with pre-surgical Onyx embolization of extra-axial tumors to evaluate its efficacy and safety and highlight nuances of individualized cases. Results Five patients underwent pre-surgical Onyx embolization of large or giant extra-axial tumors within 24 hours of surgical resection. Four patients harbored falcine or convexity meningiomas (grade I in 2 patients, grade II in 1 patient and grade III in one patient), and one patient had a grade II hemangiopericytoma. Embolization proceeded uneventfully in all cases and there were no complications. Conclusion This series augments the expanding literature confirming the safety and efficacy of Onyx in the preoperative embolization of extra-axial tumors, underscoring its advantage of being able to attain extensive devascularization via only one supplying pedicle. PMID:27114961

  8. Whispering gallery resonators with broken axial symmetry: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Fürst, J; Sturman, B; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2016-09-01

    Axial symmetry is the cornerstone for theory and applications of high-Q optical whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). Nevertheless, research on birefringent crystalline material persistently pushes towards breaking this symmetry. We show theoretically and experimentally that the effect of broken axial symmetry, caused by optical anisotropy, is modest for the resonant frequencies and Q-factors of the WGR modes. Thus, the most important equatorial whispering gallery modes can be quantitatively described and experimentally identified. At the same time, the effect of broken axial symmetry on the light field distribution of the whispering gallery modes is typically very strong. This qualitatively modifies the phase-matching for the χ(2) nonlinear processes and enables broad-band second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation. The effect of weak geometric ellipticity in nominally symmetric WGRs is also considered. Altogether our findings pave the way for an extensive use of numerous birefringent (uniaxial and biaxial) crystals with broad transparency window and large χ(2) coefficients in nonlinear optics with WGRs. PMID:27607622

  9. The new performance calculation method of fouled axial flow compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huadong; Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  10. Axial inlet conversion to a centrifugal compressor with magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Novecosky, T. )

    1994-01-01

    NOVA's Alberta Gas Transmission Division transports natural gas via pipeline throughout the province of Alberta, Canada, exporting it to eastern Canada, US, and British Columbia. There is a continuing effort to operate the facilities and pipeline at the highest possible efficiency. One area being addressed to improve efficiency is compression of the gas. By improving compressor efficiency, fuel consumption and hence operating costs can be reduced. One method of improving compressor efficiency is by converting the compressor to an axial inlet configuration, a conversion that has been carried out more frequently in the past years. Concurrently, conventional hydrodynamic bearings have been replaced with magnetic bearings on many centrifugal compressors. This paper discusses the design and installation for converting a radial overhung unit to an axial inlet configuration, having both magnetic bearings and a thrust reducer. The thrust reducer is required to reduce axial compressor shaft loads, to a level that allows the practical installation of magnetic bearings within the space limitations of the compressor (Bear and Gibson, 1992).

  11. Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.

    2000-04-03

    Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in irradiated Zircaloy cladding have been investigated by microstructural characterization and analytical modeling, with emphasis on application of the results to understand high-burnup fuel failure under RIA situations. Optical microscopy, SEM, and TEM were conducted on BWR and PWR fuel cladding tubes that were irradiated to fluence levels of 3.3 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} to 5.9 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) and tested in hot cell at 292--325 C in Ar. The morphology, distribution, and habit planes of macroscopic and microscopic hydrides in as-irradiated and posttest cladding were determined by stereo-TEM. The type and magnitude of the residual stress produced in association with oxide-layer growth and dense hydride precipitation, and several synergistic factors that strongly influence axial-splitting behavior were analyzed. The results of the microstructural characterization and stress analyses were then correlated with axial-splitting behavior of high-burnup PWR cladding reported for simulated-RIA conditions. The effects of key test procedures and their implications for the interpretation of RIA test results are discussed.

  12. Axial power monitoring uncertainty in the Savannah River Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Revolinski, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of this analysis quantified the uncertainty associated with monitoring the Axial Power Shape (APS) in the Savannah River Reactors. Thermocouples at each assembly flow exit map the radial power distribution and are the primary means of monitoring power in these reactors. The remaining uncertainty in power monitoring is associated with the relative axial power distribution. The APS is monitored by seven sensors that respond to power on each of nine vertical Axial Power Monitor (APM) rods. Computation of the APS uncertainty, for the reactor power limits analysis, started with a large database of APM rod measurements spanning several years of reactor operation. A computer algorithm was used to randomly select a sample of APSs which were input to a code. This code modeled the thermal-hydraulic performance of a single fuel assembly during a design basis Loss-of Coolant Accident. The assembly power limit at Onset of Significant Voiding was computed for each APS. The output was a distribution of expected assembly power limits that was adjusted to account for the biases caused by instrumentation error and by measuring 7 points rather than a continuous APS. Statistical analysis of the final assembly power limit distribution showed that reducing reactor power by approximately 3% was sufficient to account for APS variation. This data confirmed expectations that the assembly exit thermocouples provide all information needed for monitoring core power. The computational analysis results also quantified the contribution to power limits of the various uncertainties such as instrumentation error.

  13. Axial power monitoring uncertainty in the Savannah River Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Revolinski, S.M.

    1990-12-31

    The results of this analysis quantified the uncertainty associated with monitoring the Axial Power Shape (APS) in the Savannah River Reactors. Thermocouples at each assembly flow exit map the radial power distribution and are the primary means of monitoring power in these reactors. The remaining uncertainty in power monitoring is associated with the relative axial power distribution. The APS is monitored by seven sensors that respond to power on each of nine vertical Axial Power Monitor (APM) rods. Computation of the APS uncertainty, for the reactor power limits analysis, started with a large database of APM rod measurements spanning several years of reactor operation. A computer algorithm was used to randomly select a sample of APSs which were input to a code. This code modeled the thermal-hydraulic performance of a single fuel assembly during a design basis Loss-of Coolant Accident. The assembly power limit at Onset of Significant Voiding was computed for each APS. The output was a distribution of expected assembly power limits that was adjusted to account for the biases caused by instrumentation error and by measuring 7 points rather than a continuous APS. Statistical analysis of the final assembly power limit distribution showed that reducing reactor power by approximately 3% was sufficient to account for APS variation. This data confirmed expectations that the assembly exit thermocouples provide all information needed for monitoring core power. The computational analysis results also quantified the contribution to power limits of the various uncertainties such as instrumentation error.

  14. Notchless Is Required for Axial Skeleton Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Cormier, Sarah; Escande, Marie; Souilhol, Céline; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Sourice, Sophie; Pilet, Paul; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of cell survival is essential for proper embryonic development. In the mouse, Notchless homolog 1 (Drosophila) (Nle1) is instrumental for survival of cells of the inner cell mass upon implantation. Here, we analyze the function of Nle1 after implantation using the Meox2tm1(cre)Sor mouse that expresses the Cre recombinase specifically in the epiblast at E5.5. First, we find that NLE1 function is required in epiblast cells, as Nle1-deficient cells are rapidly eliminated. In this report, we also show that the Meox2Cre transgene is active in specific tissues during organogenesis. In particular, we detect high Cre expression in the vertebral column, ribs, limbs and tailbud. We took advantage of this dynamic expression profile to analyze the effects of inducing mosaic deletion of Nle1 in the embryo. We show that Nle1 deletion in this context, results in severe developmental anomalies leading to lethality at birth. Mutant embryos display multiple developmental defects in particular during axial skeletal formation. We also provide evidence that axial defects are due to an increase in apoptotic cell death in the somite at E9.5. These data demonstrate an essential role for Nle1 during organogenesis and in particular during axial development. PMID:24875805

  15. ASAS classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis: time to modify.

    PubMed

    Akkoc, Nurullah; Khan, Muhammad A

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between ankylosing spondylitis and the recently proposed entity called axial spondyloarthritis with its radiographic and non-radiographic forms that have been defined by the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), is currently being debated. The Food and Drug Agency (FDA) had criticized the ASAS criteria and the studies which used these criteria to enroll patients in a clinical trial of certolizumab and adalimumab for the treatment of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis. The primary aim of classification criteria is to create homogenous patient populations for basic and clinical research. But the multi-arm construct of the ASAS criteria is a potential source of heterogeneity reducing their utility. Criteria sets should be regarded as dynamic concepts open to modifications or updates as our knowledge advances. We provide evidence to conclude that it is time to modify the ASAS Criteria for axSpA, and we propose some of the steps that can be taken to start moving forward in improving the validity of these criteria. PMID:27094940

  16. A mini axial and a permanent maglev radial heart pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun-Xi; Ru, Wei-Min; Wang, Hao; Jing, Teng

    2007-01-01

    The implantability and durability have been for decades the focus of artificial heart R&D. A mini axial and a maglev radial pump have been developed to meet with such requirements.The mini axial pump weighing 27g (incl.5g rotor) has an outer diameter of 21mm and a length of 10mm in its largest point, but can produce a maximal blood flow of 6l/min with 50mmHg pressure increase. Therefore, it is suitable for the patients of 40-60kg body weight. For other patients of 60-80kg or 80-100kg body weight, the mini axial pumps of 23mm and 25mm outer diameter had been developed before, these devices were acknowledged to be the world smallest LVADs by Guinness World Record Center in 2004.The permanent maglev radial pump weighing 150g is a shaft-less centrifugal pump with permanent magnetic bearings developed by the author. It needs no second coil for suspension of the rotor except the motor coil, different from all other maglev pumps developed in USA, Japan, European, etc. Thus no detecting and controlling systems as well as no additional power supply for maglev are necessary. The pump can produce a blood flow up to as large as 10l/min against 100mmHg pressure.An implantable and durable blood pump will be a viable alternative to natural donor heart for transplantation. PMID:19662120

  17. Axial length effects on lean NOx trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Nguyen, Ke; Choi, Jae-Soon; Daw, C Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The effect of axial length on the NO{sub x} reduction performance of two different commercial Lean NO{sub x} Trap (LNT) monolithic catalysts was experimentally investigated in a bench flow reactor. The washcoat composition of one of the catalysts consisted of Pt and K on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; whereas the other catalyst contained a complex mixture of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ba, Ce, Zr, Mg, Al and others. The NO{sub x} removal characteristics of cylindrical monolith segments of constant diameter (2.22 cm) and axial lengths of 2.54, 5.08 and 7.62 cm were evaluated using a simulated lean engine exhaust containing water and carbon dioxide at a constant space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1}. No significant effects of length were observed when the catalysts were fully reduced with hydrogen between NO{sub x} capture phases. However when the catalysts were only partially regenerated NO{sub x} reduction efficiency increased with monolith length. Intra-catalyst H{sub 2} measurements at different axial locations indicated that at least some of the efficiency loss during partial regeneration occurred when back-mixed H{sub 2} was directly oxidized and became unavailable for nitrate reduction.

  18. Imaging results and TOF studies with axial PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator setup which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the field of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations (<2 mm FWHM in all three coordinates over the complete field of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-crystal scatter) in the reconstruction without noticeable performance loss. Our recent studies focus on a TOF extension of the AX-PET concept making use of the novel digital SiPM detectors by Philips. After reproducing comparable energy and spatial resolution on a small digital AX-PET set-up with 100 mm long crystals, we demonstrated a coincidence resolving time of about 210 ps FWHM.

  19. The New Performance Calculation Method of Fouled Axial Flow Compressor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  20. Period of vibration of axially vibrating truly nonlinear rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cveticanin, L.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the axial vibration of a muscle whose fibers are parallel to the direction of muscle compression is investigated. The model is a clamped-free rod with a strongly nonlinear elastic property. Axial vibration is described by a nonlinear partial differential equation. A solution of the equation is constructed for special initial conditions by using the method of separation of variables. The partial differential equation is separated into two uncoupled strongly nonlinear second order differential equations. Both equations, with displacement function and with time function are exactly determined. Exact solutions are given in the form of inverse incomplete and inverse complete Beta function. Using boundary and initial conditions, the frequency of vibration is obtained. It has to be mentioned that the determined frequency represents the exact analytic description for the axially vibrating truly nonlinear clamped-free rod. The procedure suggested in this paper is applied for calculation of the frequency of the longissimus dorsi muscle of a cow. The influence of elasticity order and elasticity coefficient on the frequency property is tested.

  1. Can the nucleon axial charge be O(Nc0)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojo, Toru

    2013-02-01

    The nucleon self-energy and its relation to the nucleon axial charge gA are discussed at large Nc. The energy is compared for the hedgehog, conventional, and recently proposed dichotomous nucleon wavefunctions which give different values for gA. We consider their energies at both perturbative and non-perturbative levels. In perturbative estimates, we take into account the pion exchanges among quarks up to the third orders of axial charge vertices, including the many-body forces such as the Wess-Zumino terms. It turns out that the perturbative pion exchanges among valence quarks give the same leading Nc contributions for three wavefunctions, while their mass differences are O(ΛQCD). The signs of splittings flip for different orders of the axial charge vertices, so it is hard to conclude which one is the most energetically favored. For non-perturbative estimates involving the modification of quark bases, we use the chiral quark soliton model as an illustration. With the hedgehog quark wavefunctions with gA of O(Nc), we investigate whether solutions with coherent pions are energetically favored. Again it is hard to give decisive conclusions, but it is possible that adding the confining effects disfavors the solution with the coherent pions, making a pion cloud around a nucleon quantum rather than coherent. The nuclear matter at large Nc is also discussed in light of the value of gA.

  2. Regional Mapping of Aortic Wall Stress by Using Deformable, Motion-coherent Modeling based on Electrocardiography-gated Multidetector CT Angiography: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Heye, Tobias J; Makar, Ryan A; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Marin, Daniele; Boll, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of deformable, motion-coherent modeling based on electrocardiography-gated multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography of the thoracic aorta and to evaluate whether quantifiable information on aortic wall stress as a function of patient-specific cardiovascular parameters can be gained. Materials and Methods For this institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, thoracic electrocardiography-gated dual-source multidetector CT angiographic images were used from 250 prospectively enrolled patients (150 men, 100 women; mean age, 79 years). On reconstructed 50-phase CT angiographic images, aortic strain and deformation were determined at seven cardiac and aortic locations. One-way analysis of variance was used by assessing the magnitude for longitudinal and axial strain and axial deformation, as well as time-resolved peak and maxima count for longitudinal strain and axial deformation. Interdependencies between aortic strain and deformation with extracted hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results With increasing heart rates, there was a significant decrease in longitudinal strain (P = .009, R(2) = 0.95) and a decrease in the number of longitudinal strain peaks (P < .001, R(2) = 0.79); however, a significant increase in axial deformation (P < .001, R(2) = 0.31) and axial strain (P = .009, R(2) = 0.61) was observed. Increasing aortic blood velocity led to increased longitudinal strain (P = .018, R(2) = 0.42) and longitudinal strain peak counts (P = .011, R(2) = 0.48). Pronounced motion in the longitudinal direction limited motion in the axial plane (P < .019, R(2) = 0.29-0.31). Conclusion The results of this study render a clinical basis and provide proof of principle for the use of deformable, motion-coherent modeling to provide quantitative information on physiological motion of the aorta under various hemodynamic circumstances. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article

  3. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging. PMID:27010938

  4. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  5. A comparative analysis of the dependences of the hemodynamic parameters on changes in ROI's position in perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Namgung, Jang-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yoon, Dae-Young; Lee, Han-Joo

    2013-05-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and mean time-to-peak (TTP) obtained by changing the region of interest's (ROI) anatomical positions, during CT brain perfusion. We acquired axial source images of perfusion CT from 20 patients undergoing CT perfusion exams due to brain trauma. Subsequently, the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values were calculated through data-processing of the perfusion CT images. The color scales for the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps were obtained using the image data. Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was taken as the standard ROI for the calculations of the perfusion values. Differences in the hemodynamic average values were compared in a quantitative analysis by placing ROI and the dividing axial images into proximal, middle, and distal segments anatomically. By performing the qualitative analysis using a blind test, we observed changes in the sensory characteristics by using the color scales of the CBV, CBF, and MTT maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. According to the qualitative analysis, no differences were found in CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values of the proximal, middle, and distal segments and no changes were detected in the color scales of the the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. We anticipate that the results of the study will useful in assessing brain trauma patients using by perfusion imaging.

  6. Prosthesis alignment affects axial rotation motion after total knee replacement: a prospective in vivo study combining computed tomography and fluoroscopic evaluations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical consequences of alignment errors in total knee replacement (TKR) have led to the rigorous evaluation of surgical alignment techniques. Rotational alignment in the transverse plane has proven particularly problematic, with errors due to component malalignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and an overall mismatch between the femoral and tibial components’ relative positions. Ranges of nominal rotational alignment are not well defined, especially for the tibial component and for relative rotational mismatch, and some studies advocate the use of mobile-bearing TKR to accommodate the resulting small rotation errors. However, the relationships between prosthesis rotational alignment and mobile-bearing polyethylene insert motion are poorly understood. This prospective, in vivo study evaluates whether component malalignment and mismatch affect axial rotation motions during passive knee flexion after TKR. Methods Eighty patients were implanted with mobile-bearing TKR. Rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components was measured from postoperative CT scans. All TKR were categorized into nominal or outlier groups based on defined norms for surgical rotational alignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and relative rotational mismatch between the femoral and tibial components. Axial rotation motion of the femoral, tibial and polyethylene bearing components was measured from fluoroscopic images acquired during passive knee flexion. Results Axial rotation motion was generally accomplished in two phases, dominated by polyethylene bearing rotation on the tibial component in early to mid-flexion and then femoral component rotation on the polyethylene articular surface in later flexion. Opposite rotations of the femur-bearing and bearing-baseplate articulations were evident at flexion greater than 80°. Knees with outlier alignment had lower magnitudes of axial rotation and distinct transitions from external to internal rotation during mid

  7. Artery Remodeling Under Axial Twist in Three Days Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Xiao, Yangming; Voorhees, Andrew; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-08-01

    Arteries often endure axial twist due to body movement and surgical procedures, but how arteries remodel under axial twist remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate early stage arterial wall remodeling under axial twist. Porcine carotid arteries were twisted axially and maintained for three days in ex vivo organ culture systems while the pressure and flow remained the same as untwisted controls. Cell proliferation, internal elastic lamina (IEL) fenestrae shape and size, endothelial cell (EC) morphology and orientation, as well as the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) were quantified using immunohistochemistry staining and immunoblotting. Our results demonstrated that cell proliferation in both the intima and media were significantly higher in the twisted arteries compared to the controls. The cell proliferation in the intima increased from 1.33 ± 0.21% to 7.63 ± 1.89%, and in the media from 1.93 ± 0.84% to 8.27 ± 2.92% (p < 0.05). IEL fenestrae total area decreased from 26.07 ± 2.13% to 14.74 ± 0.61% and average size decreased from 169.03 ± 18.85 μm(2) to 80.14 ± 1.96 μm(2) (p < 0.01), but aspect ratio increased in the twist group from 2.39 ± 0.15 to 2.83 ± 0.29 (p < 0.05). MMP-2 expression significantly increased (p < 0.05) while MMP-9 and TIMP-2 showed no significant difference in the twist group. The ECs in the twisted arteries were significantly elongated compared to the controls after three days. The angle between the major axis of the ECs and blood flow direction under twist was 7.46 ± 2.44 degrees after 3 days organ culture, a decrease from the initial 15.58 ± 1.29 degrees. These results demonstrate that axial twist can stimulate artery remodeling. These findings complement our understanding of arterial wall remodeling under mechanical stress resulting from pressure and flow variations. PMID:25503524

  8. Automated matching and segmentation of lymphoma on serial CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Jiayong; Zhao Binsheng; Curran, Sean; Zelenetz, Andrew; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2007-01-15

    In patients with lymphoma, identification and quantification of the tumor extent on serial CT examinations is critical for assessing tumor response to therapy. In this paper, we present a computer method to automatically match and segment lymphomas in follow-up CT images. The method requires that target lymph nodes in baseline CT images be known. A fast, approximate alignment technique along the x, y, and axial directions is developed to provide a good initial condition for the subsequent fast free form deformation (FFD) registration of the baseline and the follow-up images. As a result of the registration, the deformed lymph node contours from the baseline images are used to automatically determine internal and external markers for the marker-controlled watershed segmentation performed in the follow-up images. We applied this automated registration and segmentation method retrospectively to 29 lymph nodes in 9 lymphoma patients treated in a clinical trial at our cancer center. A radiologist independently delineated all lymph nodes on all slices in the follow-up images and his manual contours served as the ''gold standard'' for evaluation of the method. Preliminary results showed that 26/29 (89.7%) lymph nodes were correctly matched; i.e., there was a geometrical overlap between the deformed lymph node from the baseline and its corresponding mass in the follow-up images. Of the matched 26 lymph nodes, 22 (84.6%) were successfully segmented; for these 22 lymph nodes, several metrics were calculated to quantify the method's performance. Among them, the average distance and the Hausdorff distance between the contours generated by the computer and those generated by the radiologist were 0.9 mm (stdev. 0.4 mm) and 3.9 mm (stdev. 2.1 mm), respectively.

  9. A new look at CT dose measurement: beyond CTDI.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Robert L

    2003-06-01

    Equations are derived for generating accumulated dose distributions and the dose line integral in a cylindrical dosimetry phantom for a helical CT scan series from the single slice dose profiles using convolution methods. This exposition will better clarify the nature of the dose distribution in helical CT, as well as providing the medical physicist with a better understanding of the physics involved in dose delivery and the measurement process. Also addressed is the concern that as radiation beam widths for multi-slice scanners get wider, the current methodology based on the measurement of the integral of the single slice profile using a 10 cm long ion chamber (CTDI100) may no longer be adequate. It is shown that this measurement would underestimate the equilibrium dose and dose line integral by about 20% in the center of the body phantom, and by about 10% in the center of the head phantom for a 20 mm nominal beam width in a multi-slice scanner. Rather than making the ion chamber even longer to collect the broad scatter tails of the single slice profile, an alternative to the CTDI method is suggested which involves using a small volume ion chamber, and scanning a length of phantom long enough to establish dose equilibrium at the location of the chamber. With a modern CT scanner, such a scan length can be covered in 15 s or less with a helical or axial series, so this method is not significantly more time-consuming than the long chamber method. The method is demonstrated experimentally herein. PMID:12852553

  10. CT of the gluteal region

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Schilling, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Although the buttock can be involved in many pathologic processes, most physicians pay little attention to this area of the body. Because pelvic computed tomography (CT) delineates gluteal anatomy exquisitely, pathologic processes in the buttock are now frequently seen. Inflammation, neoplasm, or trauma involving the buttock may be difficult to differentiate without clinical history. However, spread of these processes to or from the pelvis or retroperitoneum is easily documented by CT. A number of these pathologic processes and the pathways of spread of disease involving the pelvis or retroperitoneum are described in this review.

  11. In Defense of Body CT

    PubMed Central

    McCollough, Cynthia H.; Guimarães, Luís; Fletcher, Joel G.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid technical developments, and an expanding list of applications that have supplanted less accurate or more invasive diagnostic tests, have led to a dramatic increase in the use of body CT imaging in medical practice since its introduction in 1975. Our purpose here is to discuss medical justification of the small risk associated with the ionizing radiation used in CT and to provide perspectives on practice-specific decisions that can maximize overall patient benefit. In addition, we review available dose management and optimization technique. PMID:19542392

  12. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  13. Validation of calculation algorithms for organ doses in CT by measurements on a 5 year old paediatric phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabin, Jérémie; Mencarelli, Alessandra; McMillan, Dayton; Romanyukha, Anna; Struelens, Lara; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-06-01

    Many organ dose calculation tools for computed tomography (CT) scans rely on the assumptions: (1) organ doses estimated for one CT scanner can be converted into organ doses for another CT scanner using the ratio of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) between two CT scanners; and (2) helical scans can be approximated as the summation of axial slices covering the same scan range. The current study aims to validate experimentally these two assumptions. We performed organ dose measurements in a 5 year-old physical anthropomorphic phantom for five different CT scanners from four manufacturers. Absorbed doses to 22 organs were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters for head-to-torso scans. We then compared the measured organ doses with the values calculated from the National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT (NCICT) computer program, developed at the National Cancer Institute. Whereas the measured organ doses showed significant variability (coefficient of variation (CoV) up to 53% at 80 kV) across different scanner models, the CoV of organ doses normalised to CTDIvol substantially decreased (12% CoV on average at 80 kV). For most organs, the difference between measured and simulated organ doses was within  ±20% except for the bone marrow, breasts and ovaries. The discrepancies were further explained by additional Monte Carlo calculations of organ doses using a voxel phantom developed from CT images of the physical phantom. The results demonstrate that organ doses calculated for one CT scanner can be used to assess organ doses from other CT scanners with 20% uncertainty (k  =  1), for the scan settings considered in the study.

  14. Validation of calculation algorithms for organ doses in CT by measurements on a 5 year old paediatric phantom.

    PubMed

    Dabin, Jérémie; Mencarelli, Alessandra; McMillan, Dayton; Romanyukha, Anna; Struelens, Lara; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-06-01

    Many organ dose calculation tools for computed tomography (CT) scans rely on the assumptions: (1) organ doses estimated for one CT scanner can be converted into organ doses for another CT scanner using the ratio of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) between two CT scanners; and (2) helical scans can be approximated as the summation of axial slices covering the same scan range. The current study aims to validate experimentally these two assumptions. We performed organ dose measurements in a 5 year-old physical anthropomorphic phantom for five different CT scanners from four manufacturers. Absorbed doses to 22 organs were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters for head-to-torso scans. We then compared the measured organ doses with the values calculated from the National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT (NCICT) computer program, developed at the National Cancer Institute. Whereas the measured organ doses showed significant variability (coefficient of variation (CoV) up to 53% at 80 kV) across different scanner models, the CoV of organ doses normalised to CTDIvol substantially decreased (12% CoV on average at 80 kV). For most organs, the difference between measured and simulated organ doses was within  ±20% except for the bone marrow, breasts and ovaries. The discrepancies were further explained by additional Monte Carlo calculations of organ doses using a voxel phantom developed from CT images of the physical phantom. The results demonstrate that organ doses calculated for one CT scanner can be used to assess organ doses from other CT scanners with 20% uncertainty (k  =  1), for the scan settings considered in the study. PMID:27192093

  15. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  16. Automated Axial Right Ventricle to Left Ventricle Diameter Ratio Computation in Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, Sara; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; San José Estépar, Raúl; Rybicki, Frank J.; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Right Ventricular to Left Ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio has been shown to be a prognostic biomarker for patients suffering from acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography (CTPA) images used to confirm a clinical suspicion of PE do include information of the heart, a numerical RV/LV diameter ratio is not universally reported, likely because of lack in training, inter-reader variability in the measurements, and additional effort by the radiologist. This study designs and validates a completely automated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) system to compute the axial RV/LV diameter ratio from CTPA images so that the RV/LV diameter ratio can be a more objective metric that is consistently reported in patients for whom CTPA diagnoses PE. Materials and Methods The CAD system was designed specifically for RV/LV measurements. The system was tested in 198 consecutive CTPA patients with acute PE. Its accuracy was evaluated using reference standard RV/LV radiologist measurements and its prognostic value was established for 30-day PE-specific mortality and a composite outcome of 30-day PE-specific mortality or the need for intensive therapies. The study was Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved and HIPAA compliant. Results The CAD system analyzed correctly 92.4% (183/198) of CTPA studies. The mean difference between automated and manually computed axial RV/LV ratios was 0.03±0.22. The correlation between the RV/LV diameter ratio obtained by the CAD system and that obtained by the radiologist was high (r=0.81). Compared to the radiologist, the CAD system equally achieved high accuracy for the composite outcome, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.75 vs. 0.78. Similar results were found for 30-days PE-specific mortality, with areas under the curve of 0.72 vs. 0.75. Conclusions An automated CAD system for determining the CT derived RV/LV diameter ratio in patients with acute PE has high

  17. Micro-CT of Carotid Arteries: A Tool for Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Andreas; Wenke, Ruediger; Roemer, Frank W.; Lynch, John A.; Gatzka, Christian; Priebe, Markus; Guermazi, Ali; Grigorian, Mikayel; Heller, Martin; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan

    2004-11-15

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a high-resolution, nondestructive tool for two- and three-dimensional imaging and quantification. The ability of this technique to assess atherosclerosis of the carotid artery was evaluated in three human cadaver samples based on the original axial acquisitions, multiplanar reconstructions and volume rendering techniques. Quantitative analysis included the calculation of: (1) the original lumen perimeter, original lumen area, plaque area, residual lumen area, calcified area and gross sectional area reduction of the vascular lumen from two-dimensional slices; (2) the total tissue volume, soft tissue volume and calcified tissue volume from the three-dimensional data set. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of micro-CT as a supplementary method for the two- and three-dimensional ex vivo evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis.

  18. Pocket atlas of normal CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.B.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a quick reference for interpreting CT scans of the extracranial organs. This collection of 41 CT scans covers all the major organs of the body: neck and larynx; chest; abdomen; male pelvis; and female pelvis.

  19. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  20. [CT diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Pan, J S

    1989-02-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of CT in CWP, 100 coal workers were examined with both chest radiograph and CT scan. Comparison was done, the result indicated that both modalities yielded similar sensitivity to simple CWP. The CT score of simple CWP correlated well with ILO classification and 1986 Chinese criteria for staging of pneumoconiosis, whereas in complicated CWP, the CT scan was significantly superior to chest radiograph. CT scan identified readily large opacities. It could detect large opacities in 40% of simple CWP diagnosed on the basis of chest radiograph. CT scan also identified more cavities and calcifications within large opacities. The CT attenuation values were less reliable. The authors were of the opinion that at present CT attenuation values is not recommended for routine evaluation of CWP. PMID:2758921

  1. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  2. Research on axial thrust of the waterjet pump based on CFD under cavitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. H.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Based on RANS equations, performance of a contra-rotating axial-flow waterjet pump without hydrodynamic cavitation state had been obtained combined with shear stress transport turbulence model. Its cavitation hydrodynamic performance was calculated and analysed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations. The results shows that the cavitation causes axial thrust of waterjet pump to drop. Furthermore, axial thrust and head cavitation characteristic curve is similar. However, the drop point of the axial thrust is postponed by 5.1% comparing with one of head, and the critical point of the axial thrust is postponed by 2.6%.

  3. THE EFFECT OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION ON THE ASSESSMENT OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGE QUALITY AND VISUALISATION OF ANATOMICAL STRUCTURES IN PAEDIATRIC CEREBRAL CT EXAMINATIONS.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Joel; Båth, Magnus; Ledenius, Kerstin; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) on the visualisation of anatomical structures and diagnostic image quality in paediatric cerebral computed tomography (CT) examinations. Forty paediatric patients undergoing routine cerebral CT were included in the study. The raw data from CT scans were reconstructed into stacks of 5 mm thick axial images at various levels of ASiR. Three paediatric radiologists rated six questions related to the visualisation of anatomical structures and one question on diagnostic image quality, in a blinded randomised visual grading study. The evaluated anatomical structures demonstrated enhanced visibility with increasing level of ASiR, apart from the cerebrospinal fluid space around the brain. In this study, 60 % ASiR was found to be the optimal level of ASiR for paediatric cerebral CT examinations. This shows that the commonly used 30 % ASiR may not always be the optimal level. PMID:26873712

  4. SU-E-T-93: Creation of Standardized APBI SAVI Cavities Using CT Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop a consistent and rapid method of generating the initial cavity structure for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using the SAVI applicator. Methods: Four SAVI (Cianna Medical) applicators (6-1 Mini, 6-1, 8-1, and 10-1) were scanned on a CT simulator. The applicators were scanned in air with the CT slices (0.625mm axial thickness) perpendicular to the long axis of the applicator. Following scanning the CT images were transferred to Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) and contours of the cavity were drawn. The cavity proximal and distal locations were defined according to MD specification. The scans and contours were then re-imported into the CT virtual simulation workstation.At the time of patient planning the appropriate applicator scan is anonymized and imported into Eclipse. In Brachytherapy Planning two Marker points are placed, one at the distal band location (cavity start) and the second at a defined distance along the applicator (cavity end). The actual patient scan is then registered to the applicator scan. A three point match is used to quickly get the two scans in approximate alignment. Manually matching is then used to fine tune the alignment of the cavity contour and Marker points. Results: The standard applicator scans have shown to agree well with the applicators in the patient scans. The time taken to register the scans has shown to be less than generating the cavities using the standard methods of contouring on the axial slices or using the dose shaper with sources in the central channel. Conclusion: The registration of a standard applicator scan and contour has improved the consistency in the generation of the initial cavity (SAVI) structure. Planning structures used for dose calculation are created with that structure as a starting point so accuracy and consistency are important for dose evaluation and plan comparison.

  5. The evolution of PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bettye G

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) was the first fused or combined medical imaging technique. Although PET-CT has received widespread acclaim as a major imaging advancement, many questions have surfaced regarding its use. This article answers some of these questions and examines what PET-CT means to medicine and the medical imaging community. PMID:15835615

  6. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  7. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  8. Mechanical axial flow blood pump to support cavopulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, A L; Kapadia, J; Madduri, D

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a collapsible, percutaneously inserted, axial flow blood pump to support the cavopulmonary circulation in infants with a failing single ventricle physiology. An initial design of the impeller for this axial flow blood pump was performed using computational fluid dynamics analysis, including pressure-flow characteristics, scalar stress estimations, blood damage indices, and fluid force predictions. A plastic prototype was constructed for hydraulic performance testing, and these experimental results were compared with the numerical predictions. The numerical predictions and experimental findings of the pump performance demonstrated a pressure generation of 2-16 mm Hg for 50-750 ml/min over 5,500-7,500 RPM with deviation found at lower rotational speeds. The axial fluid forces remained below 0.1 N, and the radial fluid forces were determined to be virtually zero due to the centered impeller case. The scalar stress levels remained below 250 Pa for all operating conditions. Blood damage analysis yielded a mean residence time of the released particles, which was found to be less than 0.4 seconds for both flow rates that were examined, and a maximum residence time was determined to be less than 0.8 seconds. We are in the process of designing a cage with hydrodynamically shaped filament blades to act as a diffuser and optimizing the impeller blade shape to reduce the flow vorticity at the pump outlet. This blood pump will improve the clinical treatment of patients with failing Fontan physiology and provide a unique catheter-based therapeutic approach as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. PMID:19089799

  9. Crustal structure beneath the Kenya Rift from axial profile data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mechie, J.; Keller, Gordon R.; Prodehl, C.; Gaciri, S.; Braile, L.W.; Mooney, W.D.; Gajewski, D.; Sandmeier, K.-J.

    1994-01-01

    Modelling of the KRISP 90 axial line data shows that major crustal thinning occurs along the axis of the Kenya Rift from Moho depths of 35 km in the south beneath the Kenya Dome in the vicinity of Lake Naivasha to 20 km in the north beneath Lake Turkana. Low Pn velocities of 7.5-7.7 km/s are found beneath the whole of the axial line. The results indicate that crustal extension increases to the north and that the low Pn velocities are probably caused by magma (partial melt) rising from below and being trapped in the uppermost kilometres of the mantle. Along the axial line, the rift infill consisting of volcanics and a minor amount of sediments varies in thickness from zero where Precambrian crystalline basement highs occur to 5-6 km beneath the lakes Turkana and Naivasha. Analysis of the Pg phase shows that the upper crystalline crust has velocities of 6.1-6.3 km/s. Bearing in mind the Cainozoic volcanism associated with the rift, these velocities most probably represent Precambrian basement intruded by small amounts of igneous material. The boundary between the upper and lower crusts occurs at about 10 km depth beneath the northern part of the rift and 15 km depth beneath the southern part of the rift. The upper part of the lower crust has velocities of 6.4-6.5 km/s. The basal crustal layer which varies in thickness from a maximum of 2 km in the north to around 9 km in the south has a velocity of about 6.8 km/s. ?? 1994.

  10. Volcanic inflation of Axial Seamount since the 1998 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Chadwick, W.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2000, ambient seawater pressure has been precisely measured at five seafloor benchmarks inside the summit caldera at Axial Seamount in order to measure their relative depth and monitor volcanic inflation that has been occurring since an eruption in 1998. A remotely operated vehicle has been used to deploy a mobile pressure recorder (MPR) in campaign-style surveys, with additional seawater pressure data collected at the caldera center with multiyear deployments of continuously recording bottom pressure recorders (BPRs). Our previous measurements at Axial Seamount have shown steady inflation of the caldera center through 2007 and the spatial pattern of uplift has been consistent with magma storage in a shallow reservoir underlying the caldera at a depth of 3.5 km. This is the only location in the world where long-term monitoring of volcanic inflation has been accomplished at a submarine volcano. Here we present the results of new pressure data (both MPR and BPR) collected during a cruise on board the R/V Thomas Thompson in August-September 2010 and using the Jason ROV. Three years have passed since the previous survey, providing enough time to distinguish between two alternative models of inflation and magma recharge for the volcano. This allows us to refine our forecast for the next eruption at Axial and estimate total uplift that has occurred since the 1998 eruption. During the 2010 survey we also deployed new concrete benchmarks to replace our original galvanized steel benchmarks. The new benchmarks are larger and much heavier, and we expect them to be much more durable and stable over long time periods and help keep measurement errors as small as possible. We installed a sixth benchmark at a new site within the caldera, near the Ashes vent field, which will help constrain our modeling of the inflation signal in future years.

  11. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; May, L.M.; Potter, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Present-day pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that win make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling-wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations are included to demonstrate the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction.

  12. Cylindrical diffuser axial detection profile is dependent on fiber design

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The axial emission and detection profiles of 1- and 2-cm cylindrical diffusing fibers based on concentration gradients of scatterers were measured. Based on these measurements, we describe a method for determination of the scatterer concentration gradient within the diffusers. Using a Monte Carlo model incorporating these concentrations, detection was simulated and found to agree with measurements. The measured and simulated detection profiles for these diffusers were found to be drastically different from those previously measured in an alternative diffuser design incorporating an end reflector. When using cylindrical diffusers as detection fibers, it is, therefore, important to understand the design of the fiber and characterize the detection behavior. PMID:25839428

  13. Stability analysis of restricted non-static axial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem Ul Haq E-mail: mzaeem.math@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the instability of very restricted class of non-static axially symmetric spacetime with anisotropic matter configuration. The perturbation scheme is established for the Einstein field equations and conservation laws. The instability range in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regions are explored by constructing the collapse equation in this scenario. It is found that the adiabatic index plays an important role in the stability analysis which depends upon the physical parameters i.e., energy density and anisotropic pressure of the fluid distribution.

  14. Lasnex Simulations of Axial Power Diagnostic for ZR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Heidi

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of energy loss through diagnostic and/or laser entrance holes with or without shine shields is of inertial confinement fusion experiments envisioned for the National Ignition and ZR Facilities. 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using Lasnex for power diagnostic experiments using a secondary gold hohlraum fielded at the ZR facility are discussed. The axial radiation exiting the aperture of the dynamic hohlraum is modeled as time and spectrum-dependent 1-D and 2-D sources. Hohlraum energy balance and implications for the measured power are discussed.

  15. Buckling of circular cylindrical shells under dynamically applied axial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulk, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was made of the buckling characteristics of perfect and imperfect circular cylindrical shells subjected to dynamic axial loading. Experimental data included dynamic buckling loads (124 data points), high speed photographs of buckling mode shapes and observations of the dynamic stability of shells subjected to rapidly applied sub-critical loads. A mathematical model was developed to describe the dynamic behavior of perfect and imperfect shells. This model was based on the Donnell-Von Karman compatibility and equilibrium equations and had a wall deflection function incorporating five separate modes of deflection. Close agreement between theory and experiment was found for both dynamic buckling strength and buckling mode shapes.

  16. End-wall boundary layer prediction for axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    An integral boundary layer procedure was developed for the computation of viscous and secondary flows along the annulus walls of an axial compressor. The procedure is an outgrowth and extension of the pitch-averaged methods of Mellor and Horlock. In the present work secondary flow theory is used to develop approximations for the velocity profiles inside a rotating blade row and for the blade force deficit terms in the momentum integral equations. The computer code based on this procedure was iteratively coupled to a quasi-one-dimensional model for the external inviscid flow. Computed results are compared with measurements in a compressor cascade.

  17. Axial cracks in pressurized eroded autofrettaged thick cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, A. A.; Plant, R. C. A.; Parker, A. P.

    1993-09-01

    The stress intensity factors associated with longitudinal axial cracks in pressurized autofrettaged thick cylinders are calculated using the boundary element (BE) method. The effect on the stress intensity factors of the presence of a semicircular erosion on the bore is investigated. Two loading cases are considered: internal pressure and autofrettage residual stresses. The residual stresses are incorporated by using a crack face loading based on the principle of superposition. The effect of the erosions and cracks on the fatigue lifetimes is calculated using the Paris law.

  18. HTS axial flux induction motor with analytic and FEA modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Fan, Y.; Fang, J.; Qin, W.; Lv, G.; Li, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) axial-flux induction motor, which can output levitation force and torque simultaneously. In order to analyze the character of the force, analytic method and finite element method are adopted to model the motor. To make sure the HTS can carry sufficiently large current and work well, the magnetic field distribution in HTS coil is calculated. An effective method to improve the critical current of HTS coil is presented. Then, AC losses in HTS windings in the motor are estimated and tested.

  19. Assignment of Axial Wavenumber in a Plasma Absorption Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Ramaswamy, Kartik

    2007-10-01

    A plasma absorption probe (PAP) developed in previous studies is a novel plasma diagnosis, which is adopted even in a reactive gas. In the previous studies, higher series of measured absorptions were attributed to the higher-order azimuthal modes of plasma surface waves, showing a poor agreement with the theoretical prediction. In this theoretical note, the data from the previous studies are processed by considering that the absorptions are caused by the higher-order axial modes of plasma surface waves. The treated data show a good agreement with the theory within the accuracy of measurement.

  20. Parametric design of tri-axial nested Helmholtz coils

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Jake J.

    2015-05-15

    This paper provides an optimal parametric design for tri-axial nested Helmholtz coils, which are used to generate a uniform magnetic field with controllable magnitude and direction. Circular and square coils, both with square cross section, are considered. Practical considerations such as wire selection, wire-wrapping efficiency, wire bending radius, choice of power supply, and inductance and time response are included. Using the equations provided, a designer can quickly create an optimal set of custom coils to generate a specified field magnitude in the uniform-field region while maintaining specified accessibility to the central workspace. An example case study is included.

  1. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  2. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in spherical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audelott, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter spherical containers in weightlessness. Complete liquid circulation flow patterns were easily established in containers that were less than half full of liquid, while for higher liquid fill conditions, vapor was drawn into the inlet of the simulated mixer unit. Increasing the liquid-jet or lowering the position at which the liquid jet entered the container caused increasing turbulence and bubble formation.

  3. Buckling Test under Axial Compression for Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Mitsumasa; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-08-01

    We have investigated buckling phenomena under axial compression for multiwall carbon nanotubes with the same outer diameter with different wall thicknesses obtained by the extraction of inner shells. According to the Euler’s buckling model described by the continuum model, Young’s moduli of the nanotube before and after the extraction of the inner shells were evaluated to be 0.77 and 0.80 TPa, respectively. This good agreement between the two values indicates that the classical continuum model is effective for describing the mechanical behaviors of multiwall nanotubes.

  4. Blade selection for a modern axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    The procedures leading to successful design of an axial flow compressor are discussed. The three related approaches to cascade selection are: (1) experimental approach which relies on the use of experimental results from identical cascades to satisfy the velocity diagrams calculated, (2) a purely analytical procedure whereby blade shapes are calculated from the theoretical cascade and viscous flow equations, and (3) a semiempirical procedure which used experimental data together with the theoretically derived functional relations to relate the cascade parameters. Diagrams of typical transonic blade sections with uncambered leading edges are presented.

  5. Transfer matrix approach to layered systems with axial symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahar, L. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The stress and displacement distribution in a layered medium is found by means of transfer matrices. The surface loading exhibits axial symmetry, and each layer is of infinite extent in the horizontal direction, of constant depth, and is considered to be linearly elastic, homogeneous, and isotropic. The method developed has the built-in advantage of enforcing interface continuity conditions automatically. Its application to layered composites shows the flexibility with which it predicts the local as well as the global response of the medium.

  6. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis in CT colonography: detection of polyps based on geometric and texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Naeppi, Janne J.; Frimmel, Hans; Dachman, Abraham H.

    2002-05-01

    A computer-aided diagnosis scheme for the detection of colonic polyps in CT colonography has been developed, and its performance has been assessed based on clinical cases with colonoscopy-confirmed polyps. In the scheme, the colon was automatically segmented by use of knowledge-guided segmentation from 3-dimensional isotropic volumes reconstructed from axial CT slices in CT colonography. Polyp candidates are detected by first computing of 3-dimensional geometric features that characterize polyps, and then segmenting of connected components corresponding to suspicious regions by hysteresis thresholding and fuzzy clustering based on these geometric features. False-positive detections are reduced by computation of 3-dimensional texture features characterizing the internal structures of the polyp candidates, followed by application of discriminant analysis to the feature space generated by the geometric and texture features. We applied our scheme to 43 CT colonographic cases with cleansed colon, including 12 polyps larger than 5 mm. In a by-dataset analysis, the CAD scheme yielded a sensitivity of 95% with 1.2 false positives per data set. The false negative was one of the two polyps in a single patient. Consequently, in by-patient analysis, our method yielded 100% sensitivity with 2.0 false positives per patient. The results indicate that our CAD scheme has the potential to detect clinically important polyp cases with a high sensitivity and a relatively low false-positive rate.

  8. Noise performance of statistical model based iterative reconstruction in clinical CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-03-01

    The statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced to clinical CT systems. Due to the nonlinearity of this method, the noise characteristics of MBIR are expected to differ from those of filtered backprojection (FBP). This paper reports an experimental characterization of the noise performance of MBIR equipped on several state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners at our institution. The thoracic section of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned 50 times to generate image ensembles for noise analysis. Noise power spectra (NPS) and noise standard deviation maps were assessed locally at different anatomical locations. It was found that MBIR lead to significant reduction in noise magnitude and improvement in noise spatial uniformity when compared with FBP. Meanwhile, MBIR shifted the NPS of the reconstructed CT images towards lower frequencies along both the axial and the z frequency axes. This effect was confirmed by a relaxed slice thicknesstradeoff relationship shown in our experimental data. The unique noise characteristics of MBIR imply that extra effort must be made to optimize CT scanning parameters for MBIR to maximize its potential clinical benefits.

  9. Pediatric personalized CT-dosimetry Monte Carlo simulations, using computational phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitroulas, P.; Kagadis, G. C.; Ploussi, A.; Kordolaimi, S.; Papamichail, D.; Karavasilis, E.; Syrgiamiotis, V.; Loudos, G.

    2015-09-01

    The last 40 years Monte Carlo (MC) simulations serve as a “gold standard” tool for a wide range of applications in the field of medical physics and tend to be essential in daily clinical practice. Regarding diagnostic imaging applications, such as computed tomography (CT), the assessment of deposited energy is of high interest, so as to better analyze the risks and the benefits of the procedure. The last few years a big effort is done towards personalized dosimetry, especially in pediatric applications. In the present study the GATE toolkit was used and computational pediatric phantoms have been modeled for the assessment of CT examinations dosimetry. The pediatric models used come from the XCAT and IT'IS series. The X-ray spectrum of a Brightspeed CT scanner was simulated and validated with experimental data. Specifically, a DCT-10 ionization chamber was irradiated twice using 120 kVp with 100 mAs and 200 mAs, for 1 sec in 1 central axial slice (thickness = 10mm). The absorbed dose was measured in air resulting in differences lower than 4% between the experimental and simulated data. The simulations were acquired using ∼1010 number of primaries in order to achieve low statistical uncertainties. Dose maps were also saved for quantification of the absorbed dose in several children critical organs during CT acquisition.

  10. Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

    1983-05-01

    The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

  11. Attenuation-based estimation of patient size for the purpose of size specific dose estimation in CT. Part II. Implementation on abdomen and thorax phantoms using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jia; Christner, Jodie A.; Duan Xinhui; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To estimate attenuation using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph (SPR) images in a series of thorax and abdomen phantoms. Methods: Attenuation was quantified in terms of a water cylinder with cross sectional area of A{sub w} from both the CT and SPR images of abdomen and thorax phantoms, where A{sub w} is the area of a water cylinder that would absorb the same dose as the specified phantom. SPR and axial CT images were acquired using a dual-source CT scanner operated at 120 kV in single-source mode. To use the SPR image for estimating A{sub w}, the pixel values of a SPR image were calibrated to physical water attenuation using a series of water phantoms. A{sub w} and the corresponding diameter D{sub w} were calculated using the derived attenuation-based methods (from either CT or SPR image). A{sub w} was also calculated using only geometrical dimensions of the phantoms (anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions or cross sectional area). Results: For abdomen phantoms, the geometry-based and attenuation-based methods gave similar results for D{sub w}. Using only geometric parameters, an overestimation of D{sub w} ranging from 4.3% to 21.5% was found for thorax phantoms. Results for D{sub w} using the CT image and SPR based methods agreed with each other within 4% on average in both thorax and abdomen phantoms. Conclusions: Either the cross sectional CT or SPR images can be used to estimate patient attenuation in CT. Both are more accurate than use of only geometrical information for the task of quantifying patient attenuation. The SPR based method requires calibration of SPR pixel values to physical water attenuation and this calibration would be best performed by the scanner manufacturer.

  12. The term 'non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis' is much more important to classify than to diagnose patients with axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Deodhar, Atul; Strand, Vibeke; Kay, Jonathan; Braun, Juergen

    2016-05-01

    The term axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) now is used frequently to describe patients with predominantly axial symptoms who fit into the spectrum of a well-recognised rheumatic disease that continues to be known as ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The 2009 Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria, developed to identify patients with early or atypical disease which could not be classified by the 1984 modified New York (mNY) criteria for AS, have led to a differentiation between non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) and radiographic axSpA, which is largely synonymous with AS. The main reason to distinguish between these ends of the spectrum of axSpA was that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors (TNFi) approved for AS could obtain additional labelling for nr-axSpA and be used to treat all patients manifesting clinical features of axSpA. These two terms are distinguished by the degree of 'radiographic sacroiliitis' assessed by conventional radiography, according to the 1984 mNY criteria for AS. Since this differentiation has been shown to be not very reliable, we argue that the terms nr-axSpA and AS should only be used for classification of patients with axSpA and not as separate diagnoses. Therefore, we propose that only the term axSpA be used to diagnose patients, unless there is a meaningful medical reason to differentiate nr-axSpA from AS. The available data justify performing randomised controlled trials designed to obtain regulatory approval for therapeutic agents in patients across the entire spectrum of axSpA. PMID:26768406

  13. Micro-CT as a guide for clinical CT development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.; Eaker, Diane R.; Jorgensen, Steven M.

    2006-08-01

    Micro-CT, with voxel size ~10 -5 mm 3, has a great advantage over traditional microscopic methods in its ability to generate detailed 3D images in relatively large, opaque, volumes such as an intact mouse femur, heart or kidney. In addition to providing new insights into tissue structure-to-function interrelationships, micro-CT can contribute to suggesting new applications of clinical CT imaging such as: A. The spatio-density-temporal resolution that is needed to: 1) Quantitate an organ's Basic Functional Unit (smallest collection of diverse cells that behaves like the organ), which requires voxels less than 10 -4 mm 3 in volume; 2) Quantitate new vessel growth which manifests as increased x-ray contrast enhancement in tissues during passage of a bolus of intravascular contrast agent; 3) Quantitate endothelial integrity by the movement of x-ray contrast agents across the endothelial inner lining of vessel walls. B. The use of x-ray scatter for providing the contrast amongst soft tissue components and/or their interfaces for enhanced discrimination of nerve and muscular/tendon fiber directions.

  14. Four Centuries of the Geocentric Axial Dipole Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, L.; Kent, D. V.

    2004-12-01

    William Gilbert first articulated what has come to be known as the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis. The GAD hypothesis is the principle on which paleogeographic reconstructions rely to constrain paleolatitude. For decades there have been calls for permanent non-dipole contributions to the time averaged field. Recently, these have demanded large contributions of the axial octupole, which, if valid, would call into question the general utility of the GAD hypothesis. In the process of geological recording of the geomagnetic field, ``Earth filters'' distort the directions. Many processes, for example, sedimentary inclination error and random tilting lead to a net shallowing of the observed direction. Therefore inclinations that are shallower than expected from GAD can be explained by recording biases, northward transport, or non-dipole geomagnetic fields. Using paleomagnetic data from the last five million years from well constrained lava flow data allows the construction of a statistical geomagnetic field model. Such a model can predict not only the average expected direction for a given latitude, but also the shape of the distribution of directions produced by secular variation. This allows us to differentiate among the possible explanations for shallow bias. We find no compelling reason to abandon the geocentric dipole hypothesis that has served us well for four centuries.

  15. Buffeting of a slender circular beam in axial turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.

    1984-05-01

    This paper deals with the buffeting of a slender, circular, flexible beam-rod in an axial turbulent flow. The principal excitation mechanisms are the turbulent wall pressure fluctuations and the motion-dependent (self-excited) aerodynamic force caused by the beam motion. On the assumption that the turbulent wall pressure fluctuations are independent of the beam motion, a linear forced-vibration model is used to determine the buffeting response of the beam and to investigate the length scale effects of turbulences on the beam buffeting. Transverse buffeting of the beam in an axial turbulent flow depends largely on the ratio of the longitudinal scale of the turbulences to the bending wavelength of the beam and on the ratio of the circumferential scale of the turbulences to the radius of the beam. The spectra and the mean square values of the buffeting displacement of the beam become vanishingly small, both when either of these ratios is very small (<10/sup -2/) and when the latter is very large (>10/sup 2/). When the former ratio is very large the first mode of the buffeting is dominant and other modes are less apparent, especially the high-frequency modes. 27 references, 3 figures.

  16. Dynamics of a flexible cylinder in subsonic axial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Paidoussis, M.P.; Ostoja-Starzewski, M.

    1981-11-01

    This paper examines the dynamics of a flexible cylinder with pinned ends immersed in axial subsonic flow, either bounded or unconfined. The problem proves to be surprisingly resistant to exact solution, as compared to the incompressible flow case, because of difficulties in determining precisely the inviscid aerodynamic forces. This paper presents a number of distinct formulations of these forces, involving different approximations: (1) a slender-body approximation; (2) an approximate three-dimensional formulation where, in the determination of the aerodynamic forces, the axial shape is prescribed in advance; and (3) an exact integral formulation of the generalized aerodynamic forces. In each case, Galerkin-type solutions yield the system eigenfrequencies which describe the dynamical behavior of the system. It is found that for sufficiently high flow velocities, divergence and flutter are possible. The different methods yield similar, but not quantitatively identical results. Interestingly, dependence of the dynamical characteristics on Mach number is shown to be weak for slender cylinders; for nonslender ones, it is stronger. Finally, a brief discussion of wave propagation in an unconstrained cylinder indicates the existence of a cutoff flow velocity for backward propagating waves, followed by wave amplification at higher flow, which is closely related to loss of stability in the constrained system.

  17. Competition between modes with different axial structures in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khutoryan, Eduard M.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.

    2014-09-15

    This study was motivated by some experiments in which it was found that during the voltage rise, instead of expected excitation of a high-frequency parasitic mode, the excitation of a lower-frequency parasitic mode takes place in a certain range of voltages. For explaining this fact, the dependence of start currents of possible competing modes on the beam voltage was carried out in the cold-cavity approximation and by using the self-consistent approach. It was found that in the case of cavities, which consist of the combination of a section of constant radius waveguide and a slightly uptapered waveguide, these two approaches yield completely different results. Thus, experimentally observed excitation of the low-frequency parasitic mode can be explained by the self-consistent modification of the axial profile of the excited field, which has strong influence on the diffractive quality factor of competing modes. This modification is especially pronounced in the case of excitation of modes with many axial variations which can be excited in the region of beam interaction with the backward-wave component of such modes.

  18. Stall inception and development in an axial flow aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. G.; Freeman, C.

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes the phenomenon of stall and surge in an axial flow aeroengine using fast response static pressure measurements from the compressor of a Rolls-Royce VIPER engine. It details the growth of flow instability at various speeds, from a small zone of stalled fluid involving only a few blades into the violent surge motion of the entire machine. Various observations from earlier theoretical and compressor rig results are confirmed by these new engine measurements. The main findings are as follows: (1) The point of stall inception moves rearward as engine speed increases, and is shown to be simply related to the axial matching of the compressor. (2) The final unstable operation of the machine can be divided into rotating stall at low speed and surge or multiple surge at high speed. (3) The inception process is independent of whether the final unstable operation is rotating stall or multiple surge. (4) Stall/surge always starts as a circumferentially small flow disturbance, rotating around the annulus at some fraction of rotor speed.

  19. Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs.

    SciTech Connect

    Dayeh, Shadi A.; Gin, Aaron V.; Huang, Jian Yu; Picraux, Samuel Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Axial Ge/Si heterostructure nanowires (NWs) allow energy band-edge engineering along the axis of the NW, which is the charge transport direction, and the realization of asymmetric devices for novel device architectures. This work reports on two significant advances in the area of heterostructure NWs and tunnel FETs: (i) the realization of 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial heterostructure NWs with lengths suitable for device fabrication and (ii) the design and implementation of Schottky barrier tunnel FETs on these NWs for high-on currents and suppressed ambipolar behavior. Initial prototype devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a very high current drive in excess of 100 {micro}A/{micro}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios. Prior work on the synthesis of Ge/Si axial NW heterostructures through the VLS mechanism have resulted in axial Si/Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} NW heterostructures with x{sub max} {approx} 0.3, and more recently 100% composition modulation was achieved with a solid growth catalyst. In this latter case, the thickness of the heterostructure cannot exceed few atomic layers due to the slow axial growth rate and concurrent radial deposition on the NW sidewalls leading to a mixture of axial and radial deposition, which imposes a big challenge for fabricating useful devices form these NWs in the near future. Here, we report the VLS growth of 100% doping and composition modulated axial Ge/Si heterostructure NWs with lengths appropriate for device fabrication by devising a growth procedure that eliminates Au diffusion on the NW sidewalls and minimizes random kinking in the heterostructure NWs as deduced from detailed microscopy analysis. Fig. 1 a shows a cross-sectional SEM image of epitaxial Ge/Si axial NW heterostructures grown on a Ge(111) surface. The interface abruptness in these Ge/Si heterostructure NWs is of the order of the NW diameter. Some of these NWs develop a crystallographic kink that is {approx

  20. Embryonic Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 Causes Malformations in Axial Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Minsub; Foley, Julie; Anna, Colleen; Mishina, Yuji; Eling, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) have important functions in various physiological and pathological processes. COX-2 expression is highly induced by a variety of stimuli and is observed during certain periods of embryonic development. In this report, the direct effect of COX-2 expression on embryonic development is examined in a novel COX-2 transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses human COX-2 from the early stages of embryonic development. COX-2 transgenic fetuses exhibit severe skeletal malformations and die shortly after birth. Skeletal malformations are localized along the entire vertebral column and rib cage and are linked to defective formation of cartilage anlagen. The cartilage anlagen of axial skeleton fail to properly develop in transgenic embryos because of impaired precartilaginous sclerotomal condensation, which results from the reduction of cell number in the sclerotome. Despite the ubiquitous expression of COX-2, the number of apoptotic cells is highly increased in the sclerotome of transgenic embryos but not in other tissues, suggesting that it is a tissue-specific response. Therefore, the loss of sclerotomal cells due to an increased apoptosis is probably responsible for axial skeletal malformations in transgenic fetuses. In addition, the sclerotomal accumulation of p53 protein is observed in transgenic embryos, suggesting that COX-2 may induce apoptosis via the up-regulation of p53. Our results demonstrate that the aberrant COX-2 signaling during embryonic development is teratogenic and suggest a possible association of COX-2 with fetal malformations of unknown etiology. PMID:20236942

  1. A software tool for tomographic axial superresolution in STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koho, S; Deguchi, T; Hänninen, P E

    2015-11-01

    A method for generating three-dimensional tomograms from multiple three-dimensional axial projections in STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) superresolution microscopy is introduced. Our STED< method, based on the use of a micromirror placed on top of a standard microscopic sample, is used to record a three-dimensional projection at an oblique angle in relation to the main optical axis. Combining the STED< projection with the regular STED image into a single view by tomographic reconstruction, is shown to result in a tomogram with three-to-four-fold improved apparent axial resolution. Registration of the different projections is based on the use of a mutual-information histogram similarity metric. Fusion of the projections into a single view is based on Richardson-Lucy iterative deconvolution algorithm, modified to work with multiple projections. Our tomographic reconstruction method is demonstrated to work with real biological STED superresolution images, including a data set with a limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); the reconstruction software (SuperTomo) and its source code will be released under BSD open-source license. PMID:26258639

  2. Axial standing-wave illumination frequency-domain imaging (SWIF)

    PubMed Central

    Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    Despite their tremendous contribution to biomedical research and diagnosis, conventional spatial sampling techniques such as wide-field, point scanning or selective plane illumination microscopy face inherent limiting trade-offs between spatial resolution, field-of-view, phototoxicity and recording speed. Several of these trade-offs are the result of spatial sampling with diffracting beams. Here, we introduce a new strategy for fluorescence imaging, SWIF, which instead encodes the axial profile of a sample in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate how this can be achieved with propagation-invariant illumination patterns that extend over several millimeters and robustly propagate through layers of varying refractive index. This enabled us to image a lateral field-of-view of 0.8 mm x 1.5 mm with an axial resolution of 2.4 µm – greatly exceeding the lateral field-of-view of conventional illumination techniques (~100 µm) at comparable resolution. Thus, SWIF allowed us to surpass the limitations of diffracting illumination beams and untangle lateral field-of-view from resolution. PMID:24921798

  3. In Vivo Axial Loading of the Mouse Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Katherine M.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Non-invasive methods to apply controlled, cyclic loads to the living skeleton are used as an anabolic agent to stimulate new bone formation in adults and enhance bone mass accrual in growing animals. These methods are also invaluable for understanding bone signaling pathways. Our focus here is on a particular loading model: in vivo axial compression of the mouse tibia. An advantage of loading the tibia is that changes are present in both the cancellous envelope of the proximal tibia and the cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. To load the tibia of the mouse axially in vivo, a cyclic compressive load is applied up to five times a week to a single tibia per mouse for a duration lasting from 1 day to 6 weeks. With the contralateral limb as an internal control, the anabolic response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli can be studied in a pairwise experimental design. Here, we describe the key parameters that must be considered before beginning an in vivo mouse tibial loading experiment, including methods for in vivo strain gauging of the tibial midshaft, and then we describe general methods for loading the mouse tibia for an experiment lasting multiple days. PMID:25331046

  4. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-01

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of nanojoining between axially positioned Ag nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianlei; Theogene, Barayavuga; Wang, Xuewen; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Kedian

    2016-08-01

    The miniaturization of electronics devices into nanometer scale is indispensable for next-generation semiconductor technology. Ag nanowires (Ag NWs) are considered to be the promising candidates for future electronic circuit owing to the excellent electrical and thermal properties. The nanojoining of axially positioned Ag NWs was performed by molecular dynamics simulation. Through the detailed atomic evolution during the nanojoining, the results indicate that the temperature and the distance between Ag NWs in axial direction have a great impact on nanojoining effect. When the nanojoining temperature is relatively high, the atoms are disordered and the atomic queues become to distort with strong thermodynamic properties and weak effect of metal bonds. At the relatively low temperature, the Ag NWs can be well connected with good junction quality and their own morphology, which is similar to the cold welding without fusion, while the distance between Ag NWs should be controlled for interaction and diffusion of interfacial atoms at nanowires head. When the Ag NWs are placed on Si and SiO2 substrate, because the atomic species and lattice structure of substrate material can differently affect the motions of Ag atoms through the interactive force between the atoms, the nanojoining quality of Ag NWs on Si substrate is better than that on the SiO2 substrate. So, for getting effective and reliable nanojoining without nanosolders and other materials, the temperature, distance and substrate surface should be reasonably controlled and selected, providing helpful theoretical guidance for experiment and application of nanojoining.

  6. Tgif1 and Tgif2 Regulate Axial Patterning in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wotton, David

    2016-01-01

    Tgif1 and Tgif2 are transcriptional repressors that inhibit the transcriptional response to transforming growth factor β signaling, and can repress gene expression by direct binding to DNA. Loss of function mutations in TGIF1 are associated with holoprosencephaly (HPE) in humans. In mice, embryos lacking both Tgif1 and Tgif2 fail to complete gastrulation, and conditional double null embryos that survive past gastrulation have HPE and do not survive past mid-gestation. Here we show that in mice of a relatively pure C57BL/6 strain background, loss of Tgif1 alone results in defective axial patterning and altered expression of Hoxc6. The primary defects in Tgif1 null embryos are the presence of extra ribs on the C7 vertebra, consistent with a posterior transformation phenotype. In addition we observed defective cervical vertebrae, primarily C1-C5, in both adult mice and embryos that lacked Tgif1. The combination of Tgif1 and Tgif2 mutations increases the severity and penetrance of the posterior transformation phenotype, without altering the type of defects seen. Similarly, exposure of Tgif1 mutant embryos to retinoic acid at E8.5 increased the severity and penetrance of the Tgif1 phenotype. This suggests that Tgif1 and Tgif2 regulate axial patterning and that reduced TGIF function sensitizes embryos to the effects of retinoic acid. PMID:27187787

  7. Analysis of vortical flow with axial swirl and toroidal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sukalyan

    2006-11-01

    Vortical flows with an axial swirl and a toroidal circulation can be observed in a wide range of fluid mechanical phenomena such as flow around rotary machines or natural vortices like tornadoes and hurricanes. These flows can be described by a general scalar equation if incompressible fluid and negligible viscous dissipation are assumed. We consider one of the simpler cases of this general formulation where the involved equation has a resemblance with the governing equation of the hydrogen problem. As a result, we obtain a quantization relation similar to the expression of quantized energies in an hydrogen atom. We solve the equation for two systems. First, we consider three- dimensional vortices confined between two parallel walls. Our examples include flows between two infinite plates, inside and outside of a vertical cylinder bounded at the ends by walls, and in an axially confined annular region. Then we also use our formulation to compute highly chaotic velocity fields with three-dimensional vortical structures which qualitatively mimic the features of physical flows. Hence, these solutions may be used in modeling of complicated flow systems.

  8. Computational Study of Axial Fatigue for Peripheral Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meoli, Alessio; Dordoni, Elena; Petrini, Lorenza; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2014-07-01

    Despite their success as primary treatment for vascular diseases, Nitinol peripheral stents are still affected by complications related to fatigue failure. Hip and knee movements during daily activities produce large and cyclic deformations of the superficial femoral artery, that concomitant to the effects of pulsatile blood pressure, may cause fatigue failure in the stent. Fatigue failure typically occurs in cases of very extended lesions, which often require the use of two or more overlapping stents. In this study, finite element models were used to study the fatigue behavior of Nitinol stents when subjected to cyclic axial compression in different conditions. A specific commercial Nitinol stent was chosen for the analysis and subjected to cyclic axial compression typical of the femoral vascular region. Three different configurations were investigated: stent alone, stent deployed in a tube, and two overlapping stents deployed in a tube. Results confirm that stent oversizing has an influence in determining both the mean and amplitude strains induced in the stent and plays an important role in determining the fatigue response of Nitinol stents. In case of overlapping stents, numerical results suggest higher amplitude strains concentrate in the region close to the overlapping portion where the abrupt change in stiffness causes higher cyclic compression. These findings help to explain the high incidence of stent fractures observed in various clinical trials located close to the overlapping portion.

  9. Axial translation of field-reversing relativistic electron rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    1981-08-01

    As a consequence of experiments: (1) rings were generated for the first time in a low pressure ambient neutral gas (-10 mTorr H1 and D2), increasing their collisionally limited field-reversal times to over 1 millisecond or more than five times over that previously observed; (2) the first experimental test of adiabatic magnetic compression resulted in greater than factor of ten increases in the ring kinetic energy densities; and (3) two axially separted nonfield-reversed rings, generated from a single accelerator pulse, were successfully combined or stacked to form one field-reversed ring. A quantitative analysis of the translation data is made using retarding force calculations. The rings moved axially at the terminal speed associated with a balance between the accelerating and retarding forces. Conditions were found where the major contribution to the retarding force was due to either the resistive wall or plasma currents. The wall (plasma) force dominated when the rings were moved through the low (high) pressure background gas and inside of the higher (lower) conductivity wall.

  10. Modeling the aeroacoustics of axial fans from CFD calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Alexandre; Hennemand, Vincent; Kouidri, Smaine; Berthelot, Yves

    2002-11-01

    The main source of aeroacoustic noise in axial fans is the distribution of the fluctuating, unsteady, aerodynamic forces on the blades. Numerical simulations were carried out with the CFD code (NUMECA), first with steady flow conditions to validate the aerolic performances (pressure drop as a function of flow rate) of the simulated six-bladed axial fans. Simulations were then made with unsteady flows to compute the fluctuating force distributions on the blades. The turbulence was modeled either with the Baldwin-Lomax model or with the K-epsilon model (extended wall function). The numerical results were satisfactory both in terms of numerical convergence and in terms of the physical characteristic of the forces acting on the blades. The numerical results were then coupled into an in-house aeroacoustics code that computes the farfield radiated noise spectrum and directivity, based on the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings formulation, or alternatively, on the simpler Lowson model. Results compared favorably with data obtained under nonanechoic conditions, based upon ISO 5801 and ISO 5136 standards.

  11. Second axial Fe3+ center in stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malovichko, G.; Petersen, R.; Bäuman, Ch.; Grachev, V.

    2006-07-01

    The axial Fe3+ center Fe1 with the crystal field parameter b20≈3130×10-4cm-1 is well studied in congruent lithium tantalate crystals. The second axial Fe3+ center Fe2 was discovered and investigated by the electron paramagnetic resonance in stoichiometric samples prepared by vapor transport equilibrium treatment. The crystal field parameter of the Fe2 center (b20≈2050×10-4cm-1) is significantly smaller than for Fe1. The electron nuclear double resonance measurements have shown that hyperfine interactions of the Fe3+ electrons with the surrounding Li nuclei for Fe2 are stronger than for Fe1. Therefore, the conclusion was made that in the case of Fe2 center the iron ion substitutes for Ta and has Li nuclei in the nearest neighborhood, whereas in the case of Fe1 center it substitutes for Li, has Ta nuclei as nearest neighbors and Li nuclei in the second shell only.

  12. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-15

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  13. The Effect of Axial Stress on YBCO Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, W.; Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.P.; Gupta, R.C.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Evangelou, E.

    2011-03-28

    The large aspect ratio of typical YBCO conductors makes them ideal for constructing solenoids from pancake style coils. An advantage of this method is that each subunit can be tested before assembly into the finished magnet. The fact that conductors are available in relatively short lengths is another reason for using such a fabrication technique. The principal drawback is the large number of joints required to connect the coils together. When very high field solenoids such as those contemplated for the muon collider are built in this way the magnetic forces between pancakes can be very large. Extensive measurements have been made on the effect of stress on short lengths of conductor, but there is little or no data on the effect of intercoil loading. The experiment described in this paper was designed to test the ability of YBCO coils to withstand these forces. A spiral wound 'pancake' coil made from YBCO coated conductor has been stressed to a pressure of 100MPa in the axial direction at 77K. In this case axial refers to the coil so that the force is applied to the edge of the conductor. The effect on the critical current was small and completely reversible. Repeatedly cycling the pressure had no measureable permanent effect on the coil. The small current change observed exhibited a slight hysteretic behaviour during the loading cycle.

  14. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  15. Effective Fatigue Stress and Criterion for High-Cycle Multi-axial Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaojing; Xu, Jinquan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-axial fatigue criterion corresponding to the limiting condition of complicated multi-axial stress state is very important in application. Stresses and deformations are usually elastic if cyclic loadings are near to the limiting condition. A definition of effective fatigue stress has been proposed. Adopting the effective fatigue stress, a multi-axial fatigue criterion has been proposed by considering the equivalence of multi-axial stresses to a uni-axial problem. To clarify the fatigue criterion for a uni-axial problem with arbitrary mean stress, a quantitative relationship between fatigue limit and mean stress has also been proposed and examined. To verify the multi-axial fatigue criterion, examinations have been carried out for the cases of pure shear, shear and axial, and two-axial fatigue by experimental results. It is found that the criterion agrees well with experimental results, even for the cases with various multi-axial mean stresses and phase differences. It is also found that the shear fatigue limit is not an independent material property in common metals.

  16. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  17. CT colonography: techniques, indications, findings.

    PubMed

    Mang, Thomas; Graser, Anno; Schima, Wolfgang; Maier, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for imaging the entire colon. Based on a helical thin-section CT of the cleansed and air-distended colon, two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections are used for image interpretation. Several clinical improvements in patient preparation, technical advances in CT, and new developments in evaluation software have allowed CTC to develop into a powerful diagnostic tool. It is already well established as a reliable diagnostic tool in symptomatic patients. Many experts currently consider CTC a comparable alternative to conventional colonoscopy, although there is still debate about its sensitivity for the detection of colonic polyps in a screening population. This article summarizes the main indications, the current techniques in patient preparation, data acquisition and data analysis as well as imaging features for common benign and malignant colorectal lesions. PMID:17224254

  18. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  19. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  20. Cyclic Axial-Torsional Deformation Behavior of a Cobalt-Base Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic, high-temperature deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base super-alloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. This is accomplished through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue database has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gage section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. The fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 at 760 C under axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional loads and the monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviors under axial and torsional loads have been previously reported. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress ,versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain. and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic in-phase and out-of-phase axial-torsional tests. For in-phase tests, three different values of the proportionality constant lambda (the ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude, are examined, viz. 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 degrees with lambda equals 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress-strain and the maximum shear stress-maximum engineering shear strain (Tresca) curves. Comparisons are also made between the hardening behaviors of cyclic axial, torsional, and combined in-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 0) and out-of-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 90') axial-torsional fatigue tests. These comparisons