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Sample records for echo acquisition mri

  1. Single echo acquisition MRI using RF encoding.

    PubMed

    Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2009-11-01

    Encoding of spatial information in magnetic resonance imaging is conventionally accomplished by using magnetic field gradients. During gradient encoding, the position in k-space is determined by a time-integral of the gradient field, resulting in a limitation in imaging speed due to either gradient power or secondary effects such as peripheral nerve stimulation. Partial encoding of spatial information through the sensitivity patterns of an array of coils, known as parallel imaging, is widely used to accelerate the imaging, and is complementary to gradient encoding. This paper describes the one-dimensional limit of parallel imaging in which all spatial localization in one dimension is performed through encoding by the radiofrequency (RF) coil. Using a one-dimensional array of long and narrow parallel elements to localize the image information in one direction, an entire image is obtained from a single line of k-space, avoiding rapid or repeated manipulation of gradients. The technique, called single echo acquisition (SEA) imaging, is described, along with the need for a phase compensation gradient pulse to counteract the phase variation contained in the RF coil pattern which would otherwise cause signal cancellation in each imaging voxel. Image reconstruction and resolution enhancement methods compatible with the speed of the technique are discussed. MR movies at frame rates of 125 frames per second are demonstrated, illustrating the ability to monitor the evolution of transverse magnetization to steady state during an MR experiment as well as demonstrating the ability to image rapid motion. Because this technique, like all RF encoding approaches, relies on the inherent spatially varying pattern of the coil and is not a time-integral, it should enable new applications for MRI that were previously inaccessible due to speed constraints, and should be of interest as an approach to extending the limits of detection in MR imaging. PMID:19441080

  2. 3D hyperpolarized He-3 MRI of ventilation using a multi-echo projection acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, James H.; O’Halloran, Rafael L.; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Jung, Youngkyoo; Block, Walter F.; Fain, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented for high resolution 3D imaging of the whole lung using inhaled hyperpolarized (HP) He-3 MR with multiple half-echo radial trajectories that can accelerate imaging through undersampling. A multiple half-echo radial trajectory can be used to reduce the level of artifact for undersampled 3D projection reconstruction (PR) imaging by increasing the amount of data acquired per unit time for HP He-3 lung imaging. The point spread functions (PSFs) for breath-held He-3 MRI using multiple half-echo trajectories were evaluated using simulations to predict the effects of T2* and gas diffusion on image quality. Results from PSF simulations were consistent with imaging results in volunteer studies showing improved image quality with increasing number of echoes using up to 8 half-echoes. The 8 half-echo acquisition is shown to accommodate lost breath-holds as short as 6 s using a retrospective reconstruction at reduced resolution as well as to allow reduced breath-hold time compared to an equivalent Cartesian trajectory. Furthermore, preliminary results from a 3D dynamic inhalation-exhalation maneuver are demonstrated using the 8 half-echo trajectory. Results demonstrate the first high resolution 3D PR imaging of ventilation and respiratory dynamics in humans using HP He-3 MR. PMID:18429034

  3. Reference-free unwarping of single-shot spatiotemporally encoded MRI using asymmetric self-refocused echoes acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Song; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a phase evolution rewinding algorithm for correcting the geometric and intensity distortions in single-shot spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) MRI with acquisition of asymmetric self-refocused echo trains. Using the field map calculated from the phase distribution of the source image, the off-resonance induced phase errors are successfully rewound through deconvolution. The alias-free partial Fourier transform reconstruction helps improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the field maps and the output images. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was validated through 7 T MRI experiments on a lemon, a water phantom, and in vivo rat head. SPEN imaging was evaluated using rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing (RASER) which produces uniform T2 weighting. The results indicate that the new technique can more robustly deal with the cases in which the images obtained with conventional single-shot spin-echo EPI are difficult to be restored due to serious field variations.

  4. Single Echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous nonlinear gradient research has focused on trajectories that reconstruct images with a minimum number of echoes. Here we describe sequences where the nonlinear gradients vary in time to acquire the image in a single readout. The readout is designed to be very smooth so that it can be compressed to minimal time without violating peripheral nerve stimulation limits, yielding an image from a single 4 ms echo. Theory and Methods This sequence was inspired by considering the code of each voxel, i.e. the phase accumulation that a voxel follows through the readout, an approach connected to traditional encoding theory. We present simulations for the initial sequence, a low slew rate analog, and higher resolution reconstructions. Results Extremely fast acquisitions are achievable, though as one would expect, SNR is reduced relative to the slower Cartesian sampling schemes because of the high gradient strengths. Conclusions The prospect that nonlinear gradients can acquire images in a single <10 ms echo makes this a novel and interesting approach to image encoding. PMID:24465837

  5. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  6. Elasticity reconstructive imaging by means of stimulated echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Skovoroda, A R; O'Donnell, M; Emelianov, S Y

    1998-03-01

    A method is introduced to measure internal mechanical displacement and strain by means of MRI. Such measurements are needed to reconstruct an image of the elastic Young's modulus. A stimulated echo acquisition sequence with additional gradient pulses encodes internal displacements in response to an externally applied differential deformation. The sequence provides an accurate measure of static displacement by limiting the mechanical transitions to the mixing period of the simulated echo. Elasticity reconstruction involves definition of a region of interest having uniform Young's modulus along its boundary and subsequent solution of the discretized elasticity equilibrium equations. Data acquisition and reconstruction were performed on a urethane rubber phantom of known elastic properties and an ex vivo canine kidney phantom using <2% differential deformation. Regional elastic properties are well represented on Young's modulus images. The long-term objective of this work is to provide a means for remote palpation and elasticity quantitation in deep tissues otherwise inaccessible to manual palpation. PMID:9498605

  7. Functional MRI Using Regularized Parallel Imaging Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Belliveau, John W.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Kwong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions. PMID:16032694

  8. Fast REDOR with CPMG multiple-echo acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo Double Resonance (REDOR) is a widely used experiment for distance measurements in solids. The conventional REDOR experiment measures the signal dephasing from hetero-nuclear recoupling under magic-angle spinning (MAS) in a point by point manner. A modified Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple-echo scheme is introduced for fast REDOR measurement. REDOR curves are measured from the CPMG echo amplitude modulation under dipolar recoupling. The real time CPMG-REDOR experiment can speed up the measurement by an order of magnitude. The effects from hetero-nuclear recoupling, the Bloch-Siegert shift and echo truncation to the signal acquisition are discussed and demonstrated.

  9. Scalable multichannel MRI data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Bodurka, Jerzy; Ledden, Patrick J; van Gelderen, Peter; Chu, Renxin; de Zwart, Jacco A; Morris, Doug; Duyn, Jeff H

    2004-01-01

    A scalable multichannel digital MRI receiver system was designed to achieve high bandwidth echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions for applications such as BOLD-fMRI. The modular system design allows for easy extension to an arbitrary number of channels. A 16-channel receiver was developed and integrated with a General Electric (GE) Signa 3T VH/3 clinical scanner. Receiver performance was evaluated on phantoms and human volunteers using a custom-built 16-element receive-only brain surface coil array. At an output bandwidth of 1 MHz, a 100% acquisition duty cycle was achieved. Overall system noise figure and dynamic range were better than 0.85 dB and 84 dB, respectively. During repetitive EPI scanning on phantoms, the relative temporal standard deviation of the image intensity time-course was below 0.2%. As compared to the product birdcage head coil, 16-channel reception with the custom array yielded a nearly 6-fold SNR gain in the cerebral cortex and a 1.8-fold SNR gain in the center of the brain. The excellent system stability combined with the increased sensitivity and SENSE capabilities of 16-channel coils are expected to significantly benefit and enhance fMRI applications. PMID:14705057

  10. Quantification of severe liver iron overload using MRI offset echoes

    PubMed Central

    Rydén, Henric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the clinical standard to estimate liver iron overload. The most commonly used method is to measure the transversal relaxation time, T2*, from a multi gradient recalled echo sequence (MGRE). While this technique is reliable in low to moderate liver iron concentrations (LIC), it will be inaccurate when it is severe. We report a case with severe liver hemochromatosis and show the benefit of using an easily implemented MRI offset echo sequence to more accurately estimate LIC. After adjusting treatment, both Ferritin and LIC decreased. Using standard MGRE this reduction could not have been detected. PMID:26060576

  11. Quantification of severe liver iron overload using MRI offset echoes.

    PubMed

    Rydén, Henric; Skorpil, Mikael

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the clinical standard to estimate liver iron overload. The most commonly used method is to measure the transversal relaxation time, T2*, from a multi gradient recalled echo sequence (MGRE). While this technique is reliable in low to moderate liver iron concentrations (LIC), it will be inaccurate when it is severe. We report a case with severe liver hemochromatosis and show the benefit of using an easily implemented MRI offset echo sequence to more accurately estimate LIC. After adjusting treatment, both Ferritin and LIC decreased. Using standard MGRE this reduction could not have been detected. PMID:26060576

  12. fMRI of the brainstem using dual-echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Florian; Deichmann, Ralf; Baudrexel, Simon

    2011-04-15

    The brainstem is the part of the human brain that plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of many critical body functions. Due to the elevated level of cardiogenic noise, few fMRI studies have investigated the brainstem so far. Cardiac-gated echo-planar imaging with acquisition of two echoes per excitation (dual-echo EPI) is one method that significantly reduces cardiogenic noise and, thus, allows for fMRI measurements of the brainstem. As information on optimal preprocessing approaches for brainstem-fMRI data is still scarce, the goal of this study was to compare different combinations of normalization and smoothing procedures as implemented in standard fMRI software packages and to identify the combinations yielding optimal results for dual-echo EPI. 21 healthy subjects were measured while executing a simple motor paradigm to activate the facial and trigeminal motor nucleus in the brainstem. After motion correction and calculation of T(2)*-maps the data were preprocessed with 24 combinations of standard normalization (SPM classic, SPM unified, FSL, ABC) and smoothing procedures (pre-/post-smoothing with 3mm-, 4.5mm- and 6mm-kernel) before undergoing first- and second-level statistical analysis. Activation results were compared for first-level and second-level statistics using two anatomically defined regions of interest. Five methods were found to be sensitive for activation of both nuclei. These included FSL normalization with 3mm and 4.5mm pre-smoothing as well as 3mm post-smoothing, SPM unified normalization with 3mm pre-smoothing and ABC normalization with 4.5mm pre-smoothing. All these methods can be recommended for normalization and smoothing when analyzing fMRI data of the brainstem acquired by cardiac-gated dual-echo EPI. PMID:21256220

  13. Fast REDOR with CPMG multiple-echo acquisition.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo Double Resonance (REDOR) is a widely used experiment for distance measurements in solids. The conventional REDOR experiment measures the signal dephasing from hetero-nuclear recoupling under magic-angle spinning (MAS) in a point by point manner. A modified Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple-echo scheme is introduced for fast REDOR measurement. REDOR curves are measured from the CPMG echo amplitude modulation under dipolar recoupling. The real time CPMG-REDOR experiment can speed up the measurement by an order of magnitude. The effects from hetero-nuclear recoupling, the Bloch-Siegert shift and echo truncation to the signal acquisition are discussed and demonstrated. PMID:24316818

  14. Multi-Echo Acquisition of O-Space Data

    PubMed Central

    Galiana, Gigi; Peters, Dana; Tam, Leo; Constable, R. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nonlinear gradient encoding methods, such as O-Space imaging, have been shown to provide good images from very few echoes. Acquiring data in a train of spin or gradient echoes is a very flexible way to further speed acquisition time. However, combining these strategies presents significant challenges, both in terms of the contrast and artifacts. We present strategies in both pulse sequence design and image processing to mitigate these effects. Theory and Methods The three strategies include a new echo ordering that takes into account the unique way that O-Space samples the k-space of the image; a new post-processing filter that allows tuning of T2-weighting by emphasizing the contribution of low frequency spatial information at selectable points in space and time; and an offset between linear and nonlinear gradients that makes the central point of each echo unique. Results Simulations indicate that these strategies mitigate artifacts introduced by T2 (or T2*) decay and produce contrast that reflects relaxation at a given TE. Conclusion Turbo spin echo O-Space is theoretically feasible, and the greater undersampling should make it possible to use shorter echo trains for a given scan time. PMID:24459076

  15. Probing lung microstructure with hyperpolarized 3He gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Sukstanskii, Alexander L; Quirk, James D; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that gradient echo MRI with hyperpolarized (3)He gas can be used for simultaneously extracting in vivo information about lung ventilation properties, alveolar geometrical parameters, and blood vessel network structure. This new approach is based on multi-gradient-echo experimental measurements of hyperpolarized (3)He gas MRI signal from human lungs and a proposed theoretical model of this signal. Based on computer simulations of (3)He atoms diffusing in the acinar airway tree in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field induced by the susceptibility differences between lung tissue (alveolar septa, blood vessels) and lung airspaces, we derive analytical expressions relating the time-dependent MR signal to the geometrical parameters of acinar airways and the blood vessel network. Data obtained on eight healthy volunteers are in good agreement with literature values. This information is complementary to the information obtained by means of the in vivo lung morphometry technique with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI previously developed by our group, and opens new opportunities to study lung microstructure in health and disease. PMID:24920182

  16. Optimized 3D Ultrashort Echo Time Pulmonary MRI

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Fain, Sean B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Nagle, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To optimize 3D radial ultrashort echo time MRI for high resolution whole-lung imaging. Methods 3D radial ultrashort echo time was implemented on a 3T scanner to investigate the effects of: (1) limited field-of-view excitation, (2) variable density readouts, and (3) radial oversampling. Improvements in noise performance and spatial resolution were assessed through simulation and phantom studies. Their effects on lung and airway visualization in five healthy male human subjects (mean age 32 years) were compared qualitatively through blinded ordinal scoring by two cardiothoracic radiologists using a nonparametric Friedman test (P < 0.05). Relative signal difference between endobronchial air and adjacent lung tissue, normalized to nearby vessel, was used as a surrogate for lung tissue signal. Quantitative measures were compared using the paired Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Finally, clinical feasibility was investigated in a patient with interstitial fibrosis. Results Simulation and phantom studies showed up to 67% improvement in SNR and reduced blurring for short T2* species using all three optimizations. In vivo images showed decreased artifacts and improved lung tissue and airway visualization both qualitatively and quantitatively. Conclusion The use of limited field-of-view excitation, variable readout gradients, and radial oversampling significantly improve the technical quality of 3D radial ultrashort echo time lung images. PMID:23213020

  17. Matched-filter acquisition for BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lars; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Wilm, Bertram J; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Brunner, David O; Ruff, Christian C; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2014-10-15

    We introduce matched-filter fMRI, which improves BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) sensitivity by variable-density image acquisition tailored to subsequent image smoothing. Image smoothing is an established post-processing technique used in the vast majority of fMRI studies. Here we show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the resulting smoothed data can be substantially increased by acquisition weighting with a weighting function that matches the k-space filter imposed by the smoothing operation. We derive the theoretical SNR advantage of this strategy and propose a practical implementation of 2D echo-planar acquisition matched to common Gaussian smoothing. To reliably perform the involved variable-speed trajectories, concurrent magnetic field monitoring with NMR probes is used. Using this technique, phantom and in vivo measurements confirm reliable SNR improvement in the order of 30% in a "resting-state" condition and prove robust in different regimes of physiological noise. Furthermore, a preliminary task-based visual fMRI experiment equally suggests a consistent BOLD sensitivity increase in terms of statistical sensitivity (average t-value increase of about 35%). In summary, our study suggests that matched-filter acquisition is an effective means of improving BOLD SNR in studies that rely on image smoothing at the post-processing level. PMID:24844745

  18. Comparison of Parallel MRI Reconstruction Methods for Accelerated 3D Fast Spin-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhikui; Hoge, W. Scott; Mulkern, R.V.; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Guangshu; Kyriakos, Walid E.

    2014-01-01

    Parallel MRI (pMRI) achieves imaging acceleration by partially substituting gradient-encoding steps with spatial information contained in the component coils of the acquisition array. Variable-density subsampling in pMRI was previously shown to yield improved two-dimensional (2D) imaging in comparison to uniform subsampling, but has yet to be used routinely in clinical practice. In an effort to reduce acquisition time for 3D fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) sequences, this work explores a specific nonuniform sampling scheme for 3D imaging, subsampling along two phase-encoding (PE) directions on a rectilinear grid. We use two reconstruction methods—2D-GRAPPA-Operator and 2D-SPACE RIP—and present a comparison between them. We show that high-quality images can be reconstructed using both techniques. To evaluate the proposed sampling method and reconstruction schemes, results via simulation, phantom study, and in vivo 3D human data are shown. We find that fewer artifacts can be seen in the 2D-SPACE RIP reconstructions than in 2D-GRAPPA-Operator reconstructions, with comparable reconstruction times. PMID:18727083

  19. Comparison of Echo and MRI in the Imaging Evaluation of Intracardiac Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, G. Sharma, S.; Kothari, S.S.; Juneja, R.; Saxena, A.; Talwar, K.K.

    2004-09-15

    We compared the efficacy of echocardiography (ECHO) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating intracardiac masses. Over an 8-yr period, 28 patients, 21 males, 7 females, 16 days-60 years of age (mean 25 years) with a suspected intracardiac mass on ECHO (transthoracic in all; transesophageal in 9) underwent an MRI examination. Five patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI. ECHO and MRI were compared with respect to their technical adequacy, ability to detect and suggest the likely etiology of the mass, and provide additional information (masses not seen with the other technique, inflow or outflow obstruction, and intramural component of an intracavitary mass). With MRI, the image morphology (including signal intensity changes on the various sequences) and extracardiac manifestations were also evaluated. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology in 18, surgical inspection in 4, by follow- up imaging on conservative management in 5, and by typical extracardiac manifestations of the disease in 1 patient.Fifteen (54%) patients had tumors (benign 12, malignant 3), 5 had a thrombus or hematoma, and 4 each had infective or vascular lesions. Thirty-four masses (13 in ventricle, 11 septal, 7 atrial, 2 on valve and 1 in pulmonary artery) were seen on MRI, 28 of which were detected by ECHO. Transthoracic ECHO (TTE) and MRI were technically optimal in 82% and 100% of cases, respectively. Nine patients needed an additional transesophageal ECHO (TEE). Overall, MRI showed a mass in all patients, whereas ECHO missed it in 2 cases. In cases with a mass on both modalities, MRI detected 4 additional masses not seen on ECHO. MRI suggested the etiology in 21 (75%) cases, while the same was possible with ECHO (TTE and TEE) in 8 (29%) cases. Intramural component, extension into the inflow or outflow, outflow tract obstruction, and associated pericardial or extracardiac masses were better depicted on MRI. We conclude that MRI is advantageous over a combination of TTE and TEE for

  20. Echo Planar Imaging before and after fMRI: A personal history

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark S.; Schmitt, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) plays a crucial role in functional MRI. Focusing especially on the period from 1988 to 1992, the authors offer personal recollections, on the development of practical means of deploying EPI, the people that participated, and its impact on MRI in general. PMID:22266173

  1. BOLD sensitivity and SNR characteristics of parallel imaging-accelerated single-shot multi-echo EPI for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Saurabh; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Mathiak, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) is a standard procedure in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for measuring changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal associated with neuronal activity. The images obtained from fMRI with EPI, however, exhibit signal dropouts and geometric distortions. Parallel imaging (PI), due to its short readout, accelerates image acquisition and might reduce dephasing in phase-encoding direction. The concomitant loss of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) might be compensated through single-shot multi-echo EPI (mEPI). We systematically compared the temporal SNR and BOLD sensitivity of single echoes (TE=15, 45, and 75ms) and contrast-optimized mEPI with and without PI and mEPI-based denoising. Audio-visual stimulation under natural viewing conditions activated distributed neural networks. Heterogeneous SNR, noise gain, and sensitivity maps emerged. In single echoes, SNR and BOLD sensitivity followed the predicted dependency on echo time (TE) and were reduced under PI. However, the combination of echoes with mEPI recovered the quality parameters and increased BOLD signal changes at circumscribed fronto-polar and deep brain structures. We suggest applying PI only in combination with mEPI to reduce imaging artifacts and conserve BOLD sensitivity. PMID:23954488

  2. Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    'William J. O'Sullivan, the father of the Echo balloon, was also the father of five children. ... The NASA public affairs office distributed copies of this family portrait to the news media along with stories about O'Sullivan's ingenious invention of the Echo balloon.' 'O'Sullivan became one of NASA's most highly publicized scientists. In December 1960, the U.S. Post Office Department issued a commemorative 4-cent stamp in honor of his beloved Echo balloon. For his concept of the inflatable space vehicle, NASA would award him one of its distinguished service medals, in addition to $5000 cash. In 1962, O'Sullivan would appear as a guest on the popular TV game show 'What's My Line?'; all four of the celebrity panelists correctly picked him from the lineup as the father of the Echo satelloons.'

  3. Accuracy and Precision for EchoMRI-Infants™ Body Composition Analysis in Piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Body Composition Analysis is used to evaluate infant growth patterns, efficacy of nutritional and medical interventions, progression of chronic disease, and recovery from malnutrition. EchoMRI-Infants is a new Quantitative Magnetic Resonance (QMR) method to measure Total Body Fat, Lean Tissue Mass, ...

  4. Size Distribution Imaging by Non-Uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin Echo (NOGSE) MRI.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Noam; Álvarez, Gonzalo A; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Objects making up complex porous systems in Nature usually span a range of sizes. These size distributions play fundamental roles in defining the physicochemical, biophysical and physiological properties of a wide variety of systems - ranging from advanced catalytic materials to Central Nervous System diseases. Accurate and noninvasive measurements of size distributions in opaque, three-dimensional objects, have thus remained long-standing and important challenges. Herein we describe how a recently introduced diffusion-based magnetic resonance methodology, Non-Uniform-Oscillating-Gradient-Spin-Echo (NOGSE), can determine such distributions noninvasively. The method relies on its ability to probe confining lengths with a (length)6 parametric sensitivity, in a constant-time, constant-number-of-gradients fashion; combined, these attributes provide sufficient sensitivity for characterizing the underlying distributions in μm-scaled cellular systems. Theoretical derivations and simulations are presented to verify NOGSE's ability to faithfully reconstruct size distributions through suitable modeling of their distribution parameters. Experiments in yeast cell suspensions - where the ground truth can be determined from ancillary microscopy - corroborate these trends experimentally. Finally, by appending to the NOGSE protocol an imaging acquisition, novel MRI maps of cellular size distributions were collected from a mouse brain. The ensuing micro-architectural contrasts successfully delineated distinctive hallmark anatomical sub-structures, in both white matter and gray matter tissues, in a non-invasive manner. Such findings highlight NOGSE's potential for characterizing aberrations in cellular size distributions upon disease, or during normal processes such as development. PMID:26197220

  5. Dynamic diffusion tensor measurements in muscle tissue using Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Baete, Steven H.; Cho, Gene; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    When diffusion biomarkers display transient changes, i.e. in muscle following exercise, traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) methods lack temporal resolution to resolve the dynamics. This paper presents an MRI method for dynamic diffusion tensor acquisitions on a clinical 3T scanner. This method, SL-MEDITATE (Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique) achieves a high temporal resolution (4s) (1) by rapid diffusion encoding through the acquisition of multiple echoes with unique diffusion sensitization and (2) by limiting the readout to a single line volume. The method is demonstrated in a rotating anisotropic phantom, in a flow phantom with adjustable flow speed, and in in vivo skeletal calf muscle of healthy volunteers following a plantar flexion exercise. The rotating and flow-varying phantom experiments show that SL-MEDITATE correctly identifies the rotation of the first diffusion eigenvector and the changes in diffusion tensor parameter magnitudes, respectively. Immediately following exercise, the in vivo mean diffusivity (MD) time-courses show, before the well-known increase, an initial decrease which is not typically observed in traditional DTI. In conclusion, SL-MEDITATE can be used to capture transient changes in tissue anisotropy in a single line. Future progress might allow for dynamic DTI when combined with appropriate k-space trajectories and compressed sensing reconstruction. PMID:25900166

  6. Dual-echo fMRI can detect activations in inferior temporal lobe during intelligible speech comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Halai, Ajay D.; Parkes, Laura M.; Welbourne, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of speech comprehension has been investigated intensively during the past few decades. Incoming auditory signals are analysed for speech-like patterns and meaningful information can be extracted by mapping these sounds onto stored semantic representations. Investigation into the neural basis of speech comprehension has largely focused on the temporal lobe, in particular the superior and posterior regions. The ventral anterior temporal lobe (vATL), which includes the inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) and temporal fusiform gyrus (TFG) is consistently omitted in fMRI studies. In contrast, PET studies have shown the involvement of these ventral temporal regions. One crucial factor is the signal loss experienced using conventional echo planar imaging (EPI) for fMRI, at tissue interfaces such as the vATL. One method to overcome this signal loss is to employ a dual-echo EPI technique. The aim of this study was to use intelligible and unintelligible (spectrally rotated) sentences to determine if the vATL could be detected during a passive speech comprehension task using a dual-echo acquisition. A whole brain analysis for an intelligibility contrast showed bilateral superior temporal lobe activations and a cluster of activation within the left vATL. Converging evidence implicates the same ventral temporal regions during semantic processing tasks, which include language processing. The specific role of the ventral temporal region during intelligible speech processing cannot be determined from this data alone, but the converging evidence from PET, MEG, TMS and neuropsychology strongly suggest that it contains the stored semantic representations, which are activated by the speech decoding process. PMID:26037055

  7. Size Distribution Imaging by Non-Uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin Echo (NOGSE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Noam; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Objects making up complex porous systems in Nature usually span a range of sizes. These size distributions play fundamental roles in defining the physicochemical, biophysical and physiological properties of a wide variety of systems – ranging from advanced catalytic materials to Central Nervous System diseases. Accurate and noninvasive measurements of size distributions in opaque, three-dimensional objects, have thus remained long-standing and important challenges. Herein we describe how a recently introduced diffusion-based magnetic resonance methodology, Non-Uniform-Oscillating-Gradient-Spin-Echo (NOGSE), can determine such distributions noninvasively. The method relies on its ability to probe confining lengths with a (length)6 parametric sensitivity, in a constant-time, constant-number-of-gradients fashion; combined, these attributes provide sufficient sensitivity for characterizing the underlying distributions in μm-scaled cellular systems. Theoretical derivations and simulations are presented to verify NOGSE’s ability to faithfully reconstruct size distributions through suitable modeling of their distribution parameters. Experiments in yeast cell suspensions – where the ground truth can be determined from ancillary microscopy – corroborate these trends experimentally. Finally, by appending to the NOGSE protocol an imaging acquisition, novel MRI maps of cellular size distributions were collected from a mouse brain. The ensuing micro-architectural contrasts successfully delineated distinctive hallmark anatomical sub-structures, in both white matter and gray matter tissues, in a non-invasive manner. Such findings highlight NOGSE’s potential for characterizing aberrations in cellular size distributions upon disease, or during normal processes such as development. PMID:26197220

  8. Spectroscopic Localization by Simultaneous Acquisition of the Double-Spin and Stimulated Echoes

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Assaf; Gonen, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design a proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) localization sequence that combines the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) benefits of Point Resolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) with the high pulse bandwidths, low chemical shift displacements (CSD), low specific absorption rates (SAR), short echo times (TE) and superior radio-frequency transmit field (B1+) immunity of Stimulated Echo Acquisition Mode (STEAM), by simultaneously refocusing and acquiring both the double-spin and stimulated echo coherence pathways from the volume of interest. Methods We propose a family of 1H-MRS sequences comprising three orthogonal spatially-selective pulses with flip angles 90°<α, β, γ<128°. The stimulated and double-spin echo are refocused in-phase simultaneously by altering the pulses’ phases, flip angles and timing, as well as the inter-pulse gradient spoiling moments. The ≈90° nutations of α, β, γ provide STEAM-like advantages (lower SAR, in-plane CSD and TE; greater B1+ immunity), but with SNRs comparable with PRESS. Results Phantom and in vivo brain experiments show that 83–100% of the PRESS SNR (metabolite-dependent) is achieved at under 75% of the SAR and 66% lower in-plane CSD. Conclusion The advantages of STEAM can be augmented with the higher SNR of PRESS by combining the spin and stimulated echoes. Quantification, especially of J-coupled resonances and intermediate and long TEs, must be carefully considered. PMID:24664399

  9. Future image acquisition trends for PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Boss, Andreas; Weiger, Markus; Wiesinger, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Hybrid PET/MRI scanners have become commercially available in the past years but are not yet widely distributed. The combination of a state-of-the-art PET with a state-of-the-art MRI scanner provides numerous potential advantages compared with the established PET/CT hybrid systems, namely, increased soft tissue contrast; functional information from MRI such as diffusion, perfusion, and blood oxygenation level-dependent techniques; true multiplanar data acquisition; and reduced radiation exposure. On the contrary, current PET/MRI technology is hampered by several shortcomings compared with PET/CT, the most important issues being how to use MR data for PET attenuation correction and the low sensitivity of MRI for small-scale pulmonary pathologies compared with high-resolution CT. Moreover, the optimal choice for hybrid PET/MRI acquisition protocols needs to be defined providing the highest possible degree of sensitivity and specificity within the constraints of the available measurement time. A multitude of new acquisition strategies of PET and MRI not only offer to overcome current obstacles of hybrid PET/MRI but also provide deeper insights into the pathophysiology of oncological, inflammatory, or degenerative diseases from the combination of molecular and functional imaging techniques. PMID:25841275

  10. A framework for accurate determination of the T2 distribution from multiple echo magnitude MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Koay, Cheng Guan; Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Basser, Peter J.

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of the T2 distribution in tissues provides biologically relevant information about normal and abnormal microstructure and organization. Typically, the T2 distribution is obtained by fitting the magnitude MR images acquired by a multi-echo MRI pulse sequence using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm. It is well known that the ideal magnitude MR signal follows a Rician distribution. Unfortunately, studies attempting to establish the validity and efficacy of the ILT algorithm assume that these input signals are Gaussian distributed. Violation of the normality (or Gaussian) assumption introduces unexpected artifacts, including spurious cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-like long T2 components; bias of the true geometric mean T2 values and in the relative fractions of various components; and blurring of nearby T2 peaks in the T2 distribution. Here we apply and extend our previously proposed magnitude signal transformation framework to map noisy Rician-distributed magnitude multi-echo MRI signals into Gaussian-distributed signals with high accuracy and precision. We then perform an ILT on the transformed data to obtain an accurate T2 distribution. Additionally, we demonstrate, by simulations and experiments, that this approach corrects the aforementioned artifacts in magnitude multi-echo MR images over a large range of signal-to-noise ratios.

  11. Evaluation of a multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition with SENSE acceleration: applications for perfusion imaging in and outside the brain.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jack T; Robison, Ryan K; Elder, Christopher P; Newton, Allen T; Damon, Bruce M; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion-based changes in MR signal intensity can occur in response to the introduction of exogenous contrast agents and endogenous tissue properties (e.g. blood oxygenation). MR measurements aimed at capturing these changes often implement single-shot echo planar imaging (ssEPI). In recent years ssEPI readouts have been combined with parallel imaging (PI) to allow fast dynamic multi-slice imaging as well as the incorporation of multiple echoes. A multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition has recently been developed to allow measurement of transverse relaxation rate (R2 and R2(*)) changes in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI experiments in the brain. With SAGE EPI, the use of PI can influence image quality, temporal resolution, and achievable echo times. The effect of PI on dynamic SAGE measurements, however, has not been evaluated. In this work, a SAGE EPI acquisition utilizing SENSE PI and partial Fourier (PF) acceleration was developed and evaluated. Voxel-wise measures of R2 and R2(*) in healthy brain were compared using SAGE EPI and conventional non-EPI multiple echo acquisitions with varying SENSE and PF acceleration. A conservative SENSE factor of 2 with PF factor of 0.73 was found to provide accurate measures of R2 and R2(*) in white (WM) (rR2=[0.55-0.79], rR2*=[0.47-0.71]) and gray (GM) matter (rR2=[0.26-0.59], rR2*=[0.39-0.74]) across subjects. The combined use of SENSE and PF allowed the first dynamic SAGE EPI measurements in muscle, with a SENSE factor of 3 and PF factor of 0.6 providing reliable relaxation rate estimates when compared to multi-echo methods. Application of the optimized SAGE protocol in DSC-MRI of high-grade glioma patients provided T1 leakage-corrected estimates of CBV and CBF as well as mean vessel diameter (mVD) and simultaneous measures of DCE-MRI parameters K(trans) and ve. Likewise, application of SAGE in a muscle reperfusion model allowed dynamic measures of R2', a parameter that has been shown to correlate

  12. Evaluation of a Multiple Spin- and Gradient-Echo (SAGE) EPI Acquisition with SENSE Acceleration: Applications for Perfusion Imaging In and Outside the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jack T.; Robison, Ryan K.; Elder, Christopher P.; Newton, Allen T.; Damon, Bruce M.; Quarles, C. Chad

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion-based changes in MR signal intensity can occur in response to the introduction of exogenous contrast agents and endogenous tissue properties (e.g. blood oxygenation). MR measurements aimed at capturing these changes often implement single-shot echo planar imaging (ssEPI). In recent years ssEPI readouts have been combined with parallel imaging (PI) to allow fast dynamic multi-slice imaging as well as the incorporation of multiple echoes. A multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition has recently been developed to allow measurement of transverse relaxation rate (R2 and R2*) changes in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI experiments in the brain. With SAGE EPI, the use of PI can influence image quality, temporal resolution, and achievable echo times. The effect of PI on dynamic SAGE measurements, however, has not been evaluated. In this work, a SAGE EPI acquisition utilizing SENSE PI and partial Fourier (PF) acceleration was developed and evaluated. Voxel-wise measures of R2 and R2* in healthy brain were compared using SAGE EPI and conventional non-EPI multiple echo acquisitions with varying SENSE and PF acceleration. A conservative SENSE factor of 2 with PF factor of 0.73 was found to provide accurate measures of R2 and R2* in white (WM) (rR2 = [0.55–0.79], rR2* = [0.47–0.71]) and gray (GM) matter (rR2 = [0.26–0.59], rR2* = [0.39–0.74]) across subjects. The combined use of SENSE and PF allowed the first dynamic SAGE EPI measurements in muscle, with a SENSE factor of 3 and PF factor of 0.6 providing reliable relaxation rate estimates when compared to multi-echo methods. Application of the optimized SAGE protocol in DSC-MRI of high-grade glioma patients provided T1 leakage-corrected estimates of CBV and CBF as well as mean vessel diameter (mVD) and simultaneous measures of DCE-MRI parameters Ktrans and ve. Likewise, application of SAGE in a muscle reperfusion model allowed dynamic measures of R2′, a parameter that has been shown to

  13. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  14. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz–McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (≤16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)≥5 for echo train lengths (ETLs)≥4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and∕or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with ≥4 echoes and for T2* (<1.0%) with ≥7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire ≤16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo and in vivo

  15. Evaluation of Multiband EPI Acquisitions for Resting State fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bührer, Martin; Riedl, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and particularly resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) is widely used to investigate resting state brain networks (RSNs) on the systems level. Echo planar imaging (EPI) is the state-of-the-art imaging technique for most fMRI studies. Therefore, improvements of EPI might lead to increased sensitivity for a large amount of studies performed every day. A number of developments to shorten acquisition time have been recently proposed and the multiband technique, allowing the simultaneous acquisition of multiple slices yielding an equivalent reduction of measurement time, is the most promising among them. While the prospect to significantly reduce acquisition time by means of high multiband acceleration factors (M) appears tempting, signal quality parameters and the sensitivity to detect common RSNs with increasing M-factor have only been partially investigated up to now. In this study, we therefore acquired rs-fMRI data from 20 healthy volunteers to systematically investigate signal characteristics and sensitivity for brain network activity in datasets with increasing M-factor, M = 2 − 4. Combined with an inplane, sensitivity encoding (SENSE), acceleration factor, S = 2, we applied a maximal acceleration factor of 8 (S2×M4). Our results suggest that an M-factor of 2 (total acceleration of 4) only causes negligible SNR decrease but reveals common RSN with increased sensitivity and stability. Further M-factor increase produced random artifacts as revealed by signal quality measures that may affect interpretation of RSNs under common scanning conditions. Given appropriate hardware, a mb-EPI sequence with a total acceleration of 4 significantly reduces overall scanning time and clearly increases sensitivity to detect common RSNs. Together, our results suggest mb-EPI at moderate acceleration factors as a novel standard for fMRI that might increase our understanding of network dynamics in healthy and diseased brains. PMID:26375666

  16. Evaluation of Multiband EPI Acquisitions for Resting State fMRI.

    PubMed

    Preibisch, Christine; Castrillón G, J Gabriel; Bührer, Martin; Riedl, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and particularly resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) is widely used to investigate resting state brain networks (RSNs) on the systems level. Echo planar imaging (EPI) is the state-of-the-art imaging technique for most fMRI studies. Therefore, improvements of EPI might lead to increased sensitivity for a large amount of studies performed every day. A number of developments to shorten acquisition time have been recently proposed and the multiband technique, allowing the simultaneous acquisition of multiple slices yielding an equivalent reduction of measurement time, is the most promising among them. While the prospect to significantly reduce acquisition time by means of high multiband acceleration factors (M) appears tempting, signal quality parameters and the sensitivity to detect common RSNs with increasing M-factor have only been partially investigated up to now. In this study, we therefore acquired rs-fMRI data from 20 healthy volunteers to systematically investigate signal characteristics and sensitivity for brain network activity in datasets with increasing M-factor, M = 2 - 4. Combined with an inplane, sensitivity encoding (SENSE), acceleration factor, S = 2, we applied a maximal acceleration factor of 8 (S2×M4). Our results suggest that an M-factor of 2 (total acceleration of 4) only causes negligible SNR decrease but reveals common RSN with increased sensitivity and stability. Further M-factor increase produced random artifacts as revealed by signal quality measures that may affect interpretation of RSNs under common scanning conditions. Given appropriate hardware, a mb-EPI sequence with a total acceleration of 4 significantly reduces overall scanning time and clearly increases sensitivity to detect common RSNs. Together, our results suggest mb-EPI at moderate acceleration factors as a novel standard for fMRI that might increase our understanding of network dynamics in healthy and diseased brains. PMID:26375666

  17. Sideband separation experiments in NMR with phase incremented echo train acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Brennan J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Kaseman, Derrick C.; Baltisberger, Jay H.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2013-05-01

    A general approach for enhancing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance sideband separation experiments, such as Two-Dimensional One Pulse (TOP), Magic-Angle Turning (MAT), and Phase Adjust Spinning Sidebands (PASS) experiments, with phase incremented echo-train acquisition (PIETA) is described. This approach is applicable whenever strong inhomogeneous broadenings dominate the unmodulated frequency resonances, such as in non-crystalline solids or in samples with large residual frequency anisotropy. PIETA provides significant sensitivity enhancements while also eliminating spectral artifacts would normally be present with Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill acquisition. Additionally, an intuitive approach is presented for designing and processing echo train acquisition magnetic resonance experiments on rotating samples. Affine transformations are used to relate the two-dimensional signals acquired in TOP, MAT, and PASS experiments to a common coordinate system. Depending on sequence design and acquisition conditions two significant artifacts can arise from truncated acquisition time and discontinuous damping in the T2 decay. Here we show that the former artifact can always be eliminated through selection of a suitable affine transformation, and give the conditions in which the latter can be minimized or removed entirely.

  18. Phosphorus-31 MRI of bones using quadratic echo line-narrowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Merideth; Barrett, Sean; Insogna, Karl; Vanhouten, Joshua

    2012-02-01

    There is a great need to probe the internal composition of bone on the sub-0.1 mm length scale, both to study normal features and to look for signs of disease. Despite the obvious importance of the mineral fraction to the biomechanical properties of skeletal tissue, few non-destructive techniques are available to evaluate changes in its chemical structure and functional microarchitecture on the interior of bones. MRI would be an excellent candidate, but bone is a particularly challenging tissue to study given the relatively low water density and wider linewidths of its solid components. Recent fundamental research in quantum computing gave rise to a new NMR pulse sequence - the quadratic echo - that can be used to narrow the broad NMR spectrum of solids. This offers a new route to do high spatial resolution, 3D ^31P MRI of bone that complements conventional MRI and x-ray based techniques to study bone physiology and structure. We have used our pulse sequence to do 3D ^31P MRI of ex vivo bones with a spatial resolution of (sub-450 μm)^3, limited only by the specifications of a conventional 4 Tesla liquid-state MRI system. We will describe our plans to push this technique towards the factor of 1000 increase in spatial resolution imposed by fundamental limits.

  19. π Echo-Planar Imaging with concomitant field compensation for porous media MRI.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2015-11-01

    The π Echo Planar Imaging (PEPI) method was modified to compensate for concomitant magnetic fields by waveform symmetrization. Samples with very short T2(∗) (a few hundred microseconds) and short T2 (tens of milliseconds to hundreds of milliseconds) were investigated. Echo spacings as short as 1.2 ms were achieved with the gradient pre-equalization method, enabling rapid 3D imaging of short relaxation time species with sub-millimeter resolution. The PEPI method yields superior quality images, compared to the Fast Spin Echo (FSE) method, with significantly reduced gradient duty cycle. Accelerated PEPI measurements with a variable number of centric interleaves are presented. Restricted k-space sampling was demonstrated for specific sample geometries, notably a Locharbriggs sandstone core plug, with the acquisition time further reduced. These methods generate proton density weighted images considering the echo time to sample T2 ratio. These methods are principally designed for 3D studies of fluid saturation in rock core plugs, evolving in time due to some manner of external perturbation, such as water flooding. PMID:26398928

  20. Tailored slice selection in solid-state MRI by DANTE under magic-echo line narrowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Shigeru; Masumoto, Hidefumi; Hashimoto, Takeyuki

    2007-06-01

    We propose a method of slice selection in solid-state MRI by combining DANTE selective excitation with magic-echo (ME) line narrowing. The DANTE RF pulses applied at the ME peaks practically do not interfere with the ME line narrowing in the combined ME DANTE sequence. This allows straightforward tailoring of the slice profile simply by introducing an appropriate modulation, such as a sinc modulation, into the flip angles of the applied DANTE RF pulses. The utility of the method has been demonstrated by preliminary experiments performed on a test sample of adamantane.

  1. Prospective motion correction of 3D echo-planar imaging data for functional MRI using optical tracking

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Nick; Josephs, Oliver; Callaghan, Martina F.; Lutti, Antoine; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of an optical camera based prospective motion correction (PMC) system in improving the quality of 3D echo-planar imaging functional MRI data. An optical camera and external marker were used to dynamically track the head movement of subjects during fMRI scanning. PMC was performed by using the motion information to dynamically update the sequence's RF excitation and gradient waveforms such that the field-of-view was realigned to match the subject's head movement. Task-free fMRI experiments on five healthy volunteers followed a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design with the following factors: PMC on or off; 3.0 mm or 1.5 mm isotropic resolution; and no, slow, or fast head movements. Visual and motor fMRI experiments were additionally performed on one of the volunteers at 1.5 mm resolution comparing PMC on vs PMC off for no and slow head movements. Metrics were developed to quantify the amount of motion as it occurred relative to k-space data acquisition. The motion quantification metric collapsed the very rich camera tracking data into one scalar value for each image volume that was strongly predictive of motion-induced artifacts. The PMC system did not introduce extraneous artifacts for the no motion conditions and improved the time series temporal signal-to-noise by 30% to 40% for all combinations of low/high resolution and slow/fast head movement relative to the standard acquisition with no prospective correction. The numbers of activated voxels (p < 0.001, uncorrected) in both task-based experiments were comparable for the no motion cases and increased by 78% and 330%, respectively, for PMC on versus PMC off in the slow motion cases. The PMC system is a robust solution to decrease the motion sensitivity of multi-shot 3D EPI sequences and thereby overcome one of the main roadblocks to their widespread use in fMRI studies. PMID:25783205

  2. Sparse and optimal acquisition design for diffusion MRI and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Cheng Guan; Özarslan, Evren; Johnson, Kevin M.; Meyerand, M. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with functional MRI promises a whole new vista for scientists to investigate noninvasively the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain—the human connectome, which had heretofore been out of reach. As with other imaging modalities, diffusion MRI data are inherently noisy and its acquisition time-consuming. Further, a faithful representation of the human connectome that can serve as a predictive model requires a robust and accurate data-analytic pipeline. The focus of this paper is on one of the key segments of this pipeline—in particular, the development of a sparse and optimal acquisition (SOA) design for diffusion MRI multiple-shell acquisition and beyond. Methods: The authors propose a novel optimality criterion for sparse multiple-shell acquisition and quasimultiple-shell designs in diffusion MRI and a novel and effective semistochastic and moderately greedy combinatorial search strategy with simulated annealing to locate the optimum design or configuration. The goal of the optimality criteria is threefold: first, to maximize uniformity of the diffusion measurements in each shell, which is equivalent to maximal incoherence in angular measurements; second, to maximize coverage of the diffusion measurements around each radial line to achieve maximal incoherence in radial measurements for multiple-shell acquisition; and finally, to ensure maximum uniformity of diffusion measurement directions in the limiting case when all the shells are coincidental as in the case of a single-shell acquisition. The approach taken in evaluating the stability of various acquisition designs is based on the condition number and the A-optimal measure of the design matrix. Results: Even though the number of distinct configurations for a given set of diffusion gradient directions is very large in general—e.g., in the order of 10232 for a set of 144 diffusion gradient directions, the proposed search

  3. Depiction of Achilles Tendon Microstructure In-Vivo Using High-Resolution 3D Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Liu, Jing; Krug, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of depicting the internal structure of the Achilles tendon in vivo using high-resolution 3D ultrashort echo-time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7T. Materials and Methods For our UTE imaging, a minimum-phase radiofrequency pulse and an anisotropic field-of-view 3D radial acquisition were used to minimize the echo time and scan time. A fat saturation pulse was applied every eight spoke acquisitions to reduce blurring and chemical shift artifacts from fat and to improve dynamic range of the tendon signal. Five healthy volunteers and one patient were scanned with an isotropic spatial resolution of up to 0.6 mm. Fat-suppressed UTE images were qualitatively evaluated and compared to non-fat-suppressed UTE images and longer echo-time images. Results High-resolution UTE imaging was able to visualize the microstructure of the Achilles tendon. Fat suppression substantially improved the depiction of the internal structure. The UTE images revealed a fascicular pattern in the Achilles tendon and fibrocartilage at the tendon insertion. In a patient who had tendon elongation surgery after birth there was clear depiction of disrupted tendon structure. Conclusions High-resolution fat-suppressed 3D UTE imaging at 7T allows for evaluation of the Achilles tendon microstructure in vivo. PMID:24500089

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luke; Layton, Anita T; Wang, Nian; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Jeff L; Lee, Vivian S; Liu, Chunlei; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent, which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics. However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03 mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology. PMID:26447222

  5. Calibration and Validation of EchoMRI Whole Body Composition Analysis Based on Chemical Analysis of Piglets, in comparison with the same for DXA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and precision of a new quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) EchoMRI device body for composition analysis (BCA) of infants and to compare it with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The EchoMRI device measured fat, lean, free water, and total water,...

  6. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M.; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (23Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (23Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a 23Na resonator was constructed for whole body 23Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B1-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body 23Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm3 and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the 23Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, 23Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  7. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI. PMID:26413518

  8. Rapid brain MRI acquisition techniques at ultra-high fields.

    PubMed

    Setsompop, Kawin; Feinberg, David A; Polimeni, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI provides large increases in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as well as enhancement of several contrast mechanisms in both structural and functional imaging. Combined, these gains result in a substantial boost in contrast-to-noise ratio that can be exploited for higher-spatial-resolution imaging to extract finer-scale information about the brain. With increased spatial resolution, however, there is a concurrent increased image-encoding burden that can cause unacceptably long scan times for structural imaging and slow temporal sampling of the hemodynamic response in functional MRI - particularly when whole-brain imaging is desired. To address this issue, new directions of imaging technology development - such as the move from conventional 2D slice-by-slice imaging to more efficient simultaneous multislice (SMS) or multiband imaging (which can be viewed as "pseudo-3D" encoding) as well as full 3D imaging - have provided dramatic improvements in acquisition speed. Such imaging paradigms provide higher SNR efficiency as well as improved encoding efficiency. Moreover, SMS and 3D imaging can make better use of coil sensitivity information in multichannel receiver arrays used for parallel imaging acquisitions through controlled aliasing in multiple spatial directions. This has enabled unprecedented acceleration factors of an order of magnitude or higher in these imaging acquisition schemes, with low image artifact levels and high SNR. Here we review the latest developments of SMS and 3D imaging methods and related technologies at ultra-high field for rapid high-resolution functional and structural imaging of the brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26835884

  9. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Subashi, Ergys; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO{sub 4} phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K{sup trans} with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1{sub 0}). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model

  10. Quantitative ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI of human cortical bone: correlation with porosity and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won C; Chen, Peter C; Chung, Christine B; Masuda, Koichi; D'Lima, Darryl; Du, Jiang

    2012-04-01

    In this study we describe the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate short and long T2* components as well as the water content of cortical bone. Fourteen human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia were sectioned to produce 44 rectangular slabs of cortical bone for quantitative UTE MR imaging, microcomputed tomography (µCT), and biomechanical testing. A two-dimensional (2D) UTE pulse sequence with a minimal nominal TE of 8 µseconds was used together with bicomponent analysis to quantify the bound and free water in cortical bone using a clinical 3T scanner. Total water concentration was measured using a 3D UTE sequence together with a reference water phantom. UTE MR measures of water content (total, free, and bound), T2* (short and long), and short and long T2* fractions were compared with porosity assessed with µCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress, and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain, and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation. Porosity significantly correlated positively with total (R(2)  = 0.23; p < 0.01) and free (R(2)  = 0.31; p < 0.001) water content as well as long T2* fraction (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001), and negatively with short T2* fraction and short T2* (R(2)  = 0.24; p < 0.01). Failure strain significantly correlated positively with short T2* (R(2)  = 0.29; p < 0.001), ultimate stress significantly correlated negatively with total (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001) and bound (R(2)  = 0.22; p < 0.01) water content, and failure energy significantly correlated positively with both short (R(2)  = 0 30; p < 0.001) and long (R(2)  = 0.17; p < 0.01) T2* values. These results suggest that UTE MR measures are sensitive to the structure and failure properties of human cortical bone, and may provide a novel way of evaluating cortical bone quality. PMID:22190232

  11. A voxel-based investigation for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain using ultra short echo times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Kjer, Hans M.; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.; Andersen, Jon AL; Andreasen, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, so-called MRI-only RT, would remove the systematic registration error between MR and computed tomography (CT), and provide co-registered MRI for assessment of treatment response and adaptive RT. Electron densities, however, need to be assigned to the MRI images for dose calculation and patient setup based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Here, we investigate the geometric and dosimetric performance for a number of popular voxel-based methods to generate a so-called pseudo CT (pCT). Five patients receiving cranial irradiation, each containing a co-registered MRI and CT scan, were included. An ultra short echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization was used. Six methods were investigated for three popular types of voxel-based approaches; (1) threshold-based segmentation, (2) Bayesian segmentation and (3) statistical regression. Each approach contained two methods. Approach 1 used bulk density assignment of MRI voxels into air, soft tissue and bone based on logical masks and the transverse relaxation time T2 of the bone. Approach 2 used similar bulk density assignments with Bayesian statistics including or excluding additional spatial information. Approach 3 used a statistical regression correlating MRI voxels with their corresponding CT voxels. A similar photon and proton treatment plan was generated for a target positioned between the nasal cavity and the brainstem for all patients. The CT agreement with the pCT of each method was quantified and compared with the other methods geometrically and dosimetrically using both a number of reported metrics and introducing some novel metrics. The best geometrical agreement with CT was obtained with the statistical regression methods which performed significantly better than the threshold and Bayesian segmentation methods (excluding spatial information). All methods agreed significantly better with CT than a reference water MRI

  12. Three-dimensional accurate detection of lung emphysema in rats using ultra-short and zero echo time MRI.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a life-threatening pathology that causes irreversible destruction of alveolar walls. In vivo imaging techniques play a fundamental role in the early non-invasive pre-clinical and clinical detection and longitudinal follow-up of this pathology. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using high resolution radial three-dimensional (3D) zero echo time (ZTE) and 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) MRI to accurately detect lung pathomorphological changes in a rodent model of emphysema.Porcine pancreas elastase (PPE) was intratracheally administered to the rats to produce the emphysematous changes. 3D ZTE MRI, low and high definition 3D UTE MRI and micro-computed tomography images were acquired 4 weeks after the PPE challenge. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in PPE-treated and control rats. T2* values were computed from low definition 3D UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements were made after euthanizing the animals. Both ZTE and UTE MR images showed a significant decrease in the SNR measured in PPE-treated lungs compared with controls, due to the pathomorphological changes taking place in the challenged lungs. A significant decrease in T2* values in PPE-challenged animals compared with controls was measured using UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements showed a significant increase in the mean linear intercept in PPE-treated lungs. UTE yielded significantly higher SNR compared with ZTE (14% and 30% higher in PPE-treated and non-PPE-treated lungs, respectively).This study showed that optimized 3D radial UTE and ZTE MRI can provide lung images of excellent quality, with high isotropic spatial resolution (400 µm) and SNR in parenchymal tissue (>25) and negligible motion artifacts in freely breathing animals. These techniques were shown to be useful non-invasive instruments to accurately and reliably detect the pathomorphological alterations taking place in emphysematous lungs, without incurring the risks of cumulative radiation

  13. Comparative accuracy of CT, dual-echo MRI and MR spectroscopy for preoperative liver fat quantification in living related liver donors

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Gupta, Subhash; Garg, Bhavya; Vohra, Sandeep; Wadhawan, Manav; Rastogi, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is of significant importance to assess the extent of hepatic steatosis in living donor liver transplant (LDLT) surgery to ensure optimum graft regeneration as well as donor safety. Aim: To establish the accuracy of non-invasive imaging methods including computed tomography (CT), dual-echo in- and opposed-phase magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) for quantification of liver fat content (FC) in prospective LDLT donors with histopathology as reference standard. Settings and Design: This retrospective study was conducted at our institution on LDLT donors being assessed for biliary and vascular anatomy depiction by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and CT scan, respectively, between July 2013 and October 2014. Materials and Methods: Liver FC was measured in 73 donors by dual-echoT1 MRI and MRS. Of these, CT liver attenuation index (LAI) values were available in 62 patients. Statistical Analysis: CT and MRI FC were correlated with histopathological reference standard using Spearman correlation coefficient. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predicative value, and positive and negative likelihood ratios with 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Results: CT LAI, dual-echo MRI, and MRS correlated well with the histopathology results (r = 0.713, 0.871, and 0.882, respectively). An accuracy of 95% and 96% was obtained for dual-echo MRI and MRS in FC estimation with their sensitivity being 97% and 94%, respectively. False-positive rate, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predicative value (NPV) were 0.08, 0.92, and 0.97, respectively, for dual-echo MRI and 0.03, 0.97, and 0.95, respectively, for MRS. CT LAI method of fat estimation has a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 73%, 77.7%, 70.4%, and 80%, respectively. Conclusion: Dual-echo MRI, MRS, and CT LAI are accurate measures to quantify the degree of hepatic steatosis in LDLT donors, thus reducing the need for invasive

  14. Usefulness of diffusion-weighted MRI with echo-planar technique in the evaluation of cellularity in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, T; Korogi, Y; Kochi, M; Ikushima, I; Shigematu, Y; Hirai, T; Okuda, T; Liang, L; Ge, Y; Komohara, Y; Ushio, Y; Takahashi, M

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with echo-planar imaging (EPI) technique in depicting the tumor cellularity and grading of gliomas. Twenty consecutive patients (13 men and 7 women, ranging in age from 13 to 69 years) with histologically proven gliomas were examined using a 1.5 T superconducting imager. Tumor cellularity, analyzed with National Institutes of Health Image 1.60 software on a Macintosh computer, was compared with the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. The relationship of the minimum ADC to the tumor grade was also evaluated. Tumor cellularity correlated well with the minimum ADC value of the gliomas (P = 0.007), but not with the signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. The minimum ADC of the high-grade gliomas was significantly higher than that of the low-grade gliomas. Diffusion-weighted MRI with EPI is a useful technique for assessing the tumor cellularity and grading of gliomas. This information is not obtained with conventional MRI and is useful for the diagnosis and characterization of gliomas. PMID:10030650

  15. MRI in neuro-Behçet's syndrome: comparison of conventional spin-echo and FLAIR pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Jäger, H R; Albrecht, T; Curati-Alasonatti, W L; Williams, E J; Haskard, D O

    1999-10-01

    We compared the sensitivity of a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequence with that of a conventional dual-echo spin-echo (SE) sequence) to brain lesions in 20 patients with Behçet's syndrome. They underwent 25 MRI examinations. The images were independently analysed for the number, type and anatomical location of lesions shown. There were 18 abnormal studies (13 initial and 5 follow-up). The FLAIR sequence detected significantly more lesions than the SE TE 80 (P < 0.05) and SE TE 20 (P < 0.01) sequences. It was particularly useful for demonstrating lesions in the juxtacortical white matter, which accounted for over half the lesions detected on the FLAIR images. Of patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms such as headache, seven had normal and five had abnormal studies. All patients presenting with focal neurological signs had abnormal imaging. We found supratentorial and, in particular, juxtacortical lesions to be more frequent than previously described. PMID:10552026

  16. Determination of blood circulation times of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by T2* relaxometry using ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI.

    PubMed

    Scharlach, Constantin; Warmuth, Carsten; Schellenberger, Eyk

    2015-11-01

    Blood circulation is an important determinant of the biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Here we present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique based on the use of ultrafast echo times (UTE) for the noninvasive determination of blood half-lives at high particle concentrations, when conventional pulse sequences fail to produce a useful MR signal. Four differently coated iron oxide nanoparticles were administered intravenously at a dose of 500 μmol Fe/kg bodyweight and UTE images of C57BL/6 mice were acquired on a 1-T ICON scanner (Bruker). T2* relaxometry was done by acquiring UTE images with echo times of 0.1, 0.8 and 1.6 ms. Blood circulation time was then determined by fitting an exponential curve to the time course of the measured relaxation rates. Circulation time was shortest for particles coated with malic acid (t1/2=23 min) and longest for particles coated with tartaric acid (t1/2=63 min). UTE-based T2* relaxometry allows noninvasive determination of blood circulation time and is especially useful when high particle concentrations are present. PMID:26119420

  17. Geometrically undistorted MRI in the presence of field inhomogeneities using compressed sensing accelerated broadband 3D phase encoded turbo spin-echo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gorp, Jetse S.; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Bouwman, Job G.; Smink, Jouke; Zijlstra, Frank; Seevinck, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential of compressed sensing (CS) accelerated broadband 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (3D-PE-TSE) for the purpose of geometrically undistorted imaging in the presence of field inhomogeneities. To achieve this goal 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE sequences with broadband rf pulses and dedicated undersampling patterns were implemented on a clinical scanner. Additionally, a 3D multi-spectral spin-echo (ms3D-SE) sequence was implemented for reference purposes. First, we demonstrated the influence of susceptibility induced off-resonance effects on the spatial encoding of broadband 3D-SE, ms3D-SE, 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE using a grid phantom containing a titanium implant (Δχ = 182 ppm) with x-ray CT as a gold standard. These experiments showed that the spatial encoding of 3D-PE-(T)SE was unaffected by susceptibility induced off-resonance effects, which caused geometrical distortions and/or signal hyper-intensities in broadband 3D-SE and, to a lesser extent, in ms3D-SE frequency encoded methods. Additionally, an SNR analysis was performed and the temporally resolved signal of 3D-PE-(T)SE sequences was exploited to retrospectively decrease the acquisition bandwidth and obtain field offset maps. The feasibility of CS acceleration was studied retrospectively and prospectively for the 3D-PE-SE sequence using an existing CS algorithm adapted for the reconstruction of 3D data with undersampling in all three phase encoded dimensions. CS was combined with turbo-acceleration by variable density undersampling and spherical stepwise T2 weighting by randomly sorting consecutive echoes in predefined spherical k-space layers. The CS-TSE combination resulted in an overall acceleration factor of 60, decreasing the original 3D-PE-SE scan time from 7 h to 7 min. Finally, CS accelerated 3D-PE-TSE in vivo images of a titanium screw were obtained within 10 min using a micro-coil demonstrating the feasibility of geometrically undistorted MRI near severe

  18. Geometrically undistorted MRI in the presence of field inhomogeneities using compressed sensing accelerated broadband 3D phase encoded turbo spin-echo imaging.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Bakker, Chris J G; Bouwman, Job G; Smink, Jouke; Zijlstra, Frank; Seevinck, Peter R

    2015-01-21

    In this study, we explore the potential of compressed sensing (CS) accelerated broadband 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (3D-PE-TSE) for the purpose of geometrically undistorted imaging in the presence of field inhomogeneities. To achieve this goal 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE sequences with broadband rf pulses and dedicated undersampling patterns were implemented on a clinical scanner. Additionally, a 3D multi-spectral spin-echo (ms3D-SE) sequence was implemented for reference purposes. First, we demonstrated the influence of susceptibility induced off-resonance effects on the spatial encoding of broadband 3D-SE, ms3D-SE, 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE using a grid phantom containing a titanium implant (Δχ = 182 ppm) with x-ray CT as a gold standard. These experiments showed that the spatial encoding of 3D-PE-(T)SE was unaffected by susceptibility induced off-resonance effects, which caused geometrical distortions and/or signal hyper-intensities in broadband 3D-SE and, to a lesser extent, in ms3D-SE frequency encoded methods. Additionally, an SNR analysis was performed and the temporally resolved signal of 3D-PE-(T)SE sequences was exploited to retrospectively decrease the acquisition bandwidth and obtain field offset maps. The feasibility of CS acceleration was studied retrospectively and prospectively for the 3D-PE-SE sequence using an existing CS algorithm adapted for the reconstruction of 3D data with undersampling in all three phase encoded dimensions. CS was combined with turbo-acceleration by variable density undersampling and spherical stepwise T2 weighting by randomly sorting consecutive echoes in predefined spherical k-space layers. The CS-TSE combination resulted in an overall acceleration factor of 60, decreasing the original 3D-PE-SE scan time from 7 h to 7 min. Finally, CS accelerated 3D-PE-TSE in vivo images of a titanium screw were obtained within 10 min using a micro-coil demonstrating the feasibility of geometrically undistorted MRI near severe

  19. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  20. Design of laser echo data acquisition system based on USB2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Fuzhou; Song, Yong; Hao, Qun; Zhang, Kai; Li, Meinan; Zhang, Wenlong

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a high-speed data acquisition system based on the technology of USB2.0 (Universal Serial Bus) is designed, in which USB master logic is implemented in an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array). Firstly, the hardware of data acquisition system is discussed, which includes chip selection, data acquisition and transmission circuit and power conversion circuit. Secondly, the corresponding software including USB firmware program, USB device driver and application program as well as its modifications have been described. The designed hardware and software will help to achieve a data acquisition system with the characterstics of high speed and high accuracy, etc.

  1. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI. PMID:23008151

  2. Hybrid two-dimensional navigator correction: a new technique to suppress respiratory-induced physiological noise in multi-shot echo-planar functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Robert L.; Klassen, L. Martyn; Williams, Joy M.; Menon, Ravi S.

    2008-01-01

    A troublesome source of physiological noise in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is due to the spatio-temporal modulation of the magnetic field in the brain caused by normal subject respiration. fMRI data acquired using echo-planar imaging is very sensitive to these respiratory-induced frequency offsets, which cause significant geometric distortions in images. Because these effects increase with main magnetic field, they can nullify the gains in statistical power expected by the use of higher magnetic fields. As a study of existing navigator correction techniques for echo-planar fMRI has shown that further improvements can be made in the suppression of respiratory-induced physiological noise, a new hybrid two-dimensional (2D) navigator is proposed. Using a priori knowledge of the slow spatial variations of these induced frequency offsets, 2D field maps are constructed for each shot using spatial frequencies between ±0.5 cm−1 in k-space. For multi-shot fMRI experiments, we estimate that the improvement of hybrid 2D navigator correction over the best performance of one-dimensional navigator echo correction translates into a 15% increase in the volume of activation, 6% and 10% increases in the maximum and average t-statistics, respectively, for regions with high t-statistics, and 71% and 56% increases in the maximum and average t-statistics, respectively, in regions with low t-statistics due to contamination by residual physiological noise. PMID:18024159

  3. High frequency functional brain networks in neonates revealed by rapid acquisition resting state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Smith-Collins, Adam P R; Luyt, Karen; Heep, Axel; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2015-07-01

    Understanding how spatially remote brain regions interact to form functional brain networks, and how these develop during the neonatal period, provides fundamental insights into normal brain development, and how mechanisms of brain disorder and recovery may function in the immature brain. A key imaging tool in characterising functional brain networks is examination of T2*-weighted fMRI signal during rest (resting state fMRI, rs-fMRI). The majority of rs-fMRI studies have concentrated on slow signal fluctuations occurring at <0.1 Hz, even though neuronal rhythms, and haemodynamic responses to these fluctuate more rapidly, and there is emerging evidence for crucial information about functional brain connectivity occurring more rapidly than these limits. The characterisation of higher frequency components has been limited by the sampling frequency achievable with standard T2* echoplanar imaging (EPI) sequences. We describe patterns of neonatal functional brain network connectivity derived using accelerated T2*-weighted EPI MRI. We acquired whole brain rs-fMRI data, at subsecond sampling frequency, from preterm infants at term equivalent age and compared this to rs-fMRI data acquired with standard EPI acquisition protocol. We provide the first evidence that rapid rs-fMRI acquisition in neonates, and adoption of an extended frequency range for analysis, allows identification of a substantial proportion of signal power residing above 0.2 Hz. We thereby describe changes in brain connectivity associated with increasing maturity which are not evident using standard rs-fMRI protocols. Development of optimised neonatal fMRI protocols, including use of high speed acquisition sequences, is crucial for understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of the developing brain. PMID:25787931

  4. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and R2* values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher R2* and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in R2* and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2–8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies. PMID:26661253

  5. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Klohs, Jan; Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and [Formula: see text] values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher [Formula: see text] and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in [Formula: see text] and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2-8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies. PMID:26661253

  6. k-t FASTER: Acceleration of functional MRI data acquisition using low rank constraints

    PubMed Central

    Chiew, Mark; Smith, Stephen M; Koopmans, Peter J; Graedel, Nadine N; Blumensath, Thomas; Miller, Karla L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In functional MRI (fMRI), faster sampling of data can provide richer temporal information and increase temporal degrees of freedom. However, acceleration is generally performed on a volume-by-volume basis, without consideration of the intrinsic spatio-temporal data structure. We present a novel method for accelerating fMRI data acquisition, k-t FASTER (FMRI Accelerated in Space-time via Truncation of Effective Rank), which exploits the low-rank structure of fMRI data. Theory and Methods Using matrix completion, 4.27× retrospectively and prospectively under-sampled data were reconstructed (coil-independently) using an iterative nonlinear algorithm, and compared with several different reconstruction strategies. Matrix reconstruction error was evaluated; a dual regression analysis was performed to determine fidelity of recovered fMRI resting state networks (RSNs). Results The retrospective sampling data showed that k-t FASTER produced the lowest error, approximately 3–4%, and the highest quality RSNs. These results were validated in prospectively under-sampled experiments, with k-t FASTER producing better identification of RSNs than fully sampled acquisitions of the same duration. Conclusion With k-t FASTER, incoherently under-sampled fMRI data can be robustly recovered using only rank constraints. This technique can be used to improve the speed of fMRI sampling, particularly for multivariate analyses such as temporal independent component analysis. Magn Reson Med 74:353–364, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25168207

  7. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  8. Real-time MR artifacts filtering during continuous EEG/fMRI acquisition.

    PubMed

    Garreffa, G; Carnì, M; Gualniera, G; Ricci, G B; Bozzao, L; De Carli, D; Morasso, P; Pantano, P; Colonnese, C; Roma, V; Maraviglia, B

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was the development of a real-time filtering procedure of MRI artifacts in order to monitor the EEG activity during continuous EEG/fMRI acquisition. The development of a combined EEG and fMRI technique has increased in the past few years. Preliminary "spike-triggered" applications have been possible because in this method, EEG knowledge was only necessary to identify a trigger signal to start a delayed fMRI acquisition. In this way, the two methods were used together but in an interleaved manner. In real simultaneous applications, like event-related fMRI study, artifacts induced by MRI events on EEG traces represent a substantial obstacle for a right analysis. Up until now, the methods proposed to solve this problem are mainly based on procedures to remove post-processing artifacts without the possibility to control electrophysiological behavior of the patient during fMRI scan. Moreover, these methods are not characterized by a strong "prior knowledge" of the artifact, which is an imperative condition to avoid any loss of information on the physiological signals recovered after filtering. In this work, we present a new method to perform simultaneous EEG/fMRI study with real-time artifacts filtering characterized by a procedure based on a preliminary analytical study of EPI sequence parameters-related EEG-artifact shapes. Standard EEG equipment was modified in order to work properly during ultra-fast MRI acquisitions. Changes included: high-performance acquisition device; electrodes/cap/wires/cables materials and geometric design; shielding box for EEG signal receiver; optical fiber link; and software. The effects of the RF pulse and time-varying magnetic fields were minimized by using a correct head cap wires-locked environment montage and then removed during EEG/fMRI acquisition with a subtraction algorithm that takes in account the most significant EPI sequence parameters. The on-line method also allows a further post

  9. Fast and accurate simulations of diffusion-weighted MRI signals for the evaluation of acquisition sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensonnet, Gaëtan; Jacobs, Damien; Macq, Benoît.; Taquet, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is a powerful tool to probe the diffusion of water through tissues. Through the application of magnetic gradients of appropriate direction, intensity and duration constituting the acquisition parameters, information can be retrieved about the underlying microstructural organization of the brain. In this context, an important and open question is to determine an optimal sequence of such acquisition parameters for a specific purpose. The use of simulated DW-MRI data for a given microstructural configuration provides a convenient and efficient way to address this problem. We first present a novel hybrid method for the synthetic simulation of DW-MRI signals that combines analytic expressions in simple geometries such as spheres and cylinders and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations elsewhere. Our hybrid method remains valid for any acquisition parameters and provides identical levels of accuracy with a computational time that is 90% shorter than that required by MC simulations for commonly-encountered microstructural configurations. We apply our novel simulation technique to estimate the radius of axons under various noise levels with different acquisition protocols commonly used in the literature. The results of our comparison suggest that protocols favoring a large number of gradient intensities such as a Cube and Sphere (CUSP) imaging provide more accurate radius estimation than conventional single-shell HARDI acquisitions for an identical acquisition time.

  10. Automatic generation of digital anthropomorphic phantoms from simulated MRI acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C.; Gennert, M. A.; KÓ§nik, A.; Dasari, P. K.; King, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, motion from patient respiration and body motion can introduce image artifacts that may reduce the diagnostic quality of the images. Simulation studies using numerical phantoms with precisely known motion can help to develop and evaluate motion correction algorithms. Previous methods for evaluating motion correction algorithms used either manual or semi-automated segmentation of MRI studies to produce patient models in the form of XCAT Phantoms, from which one calculates the transformation and deformation between MRI study and patient model. Both manual and semi-automated methods of XCAT Phantom generation require expertise in human anatomy, with the semiautomated method requiring up to 30 minutes and the manual method requiring up to eight hours. Although faster than manual segmentation, the semi-automated method still requires a significant amount of time, is not replicable, and is subject to errors due to the difficulty of aligning and deforming anatomical shapes in 3D. We propose a new method for matching patient models to MRI that extends the previous semi-automated method by eliminating the manual non-rigid transformation. Our method requires no user supervision and therefore does not require expert knowledge of human anatomy to align the NURBs to anatomical structures in the MR image. Our contribution is employing the SIMRI MRI simulator to convert the XCAT NURBs to a voxel-based representation that is amenable to automatic non-rigid registration. Then registration is used to transform and deform the NURBs to match the anatomy in the MR image. We show that our automated method generates XCAT Phantoms more robustly and significantly faster than the previous semi-automated method.

  11. Whole brain, high resolution multiband spin-echo EPI fMRI at 7 T: a comparison with gradient-echo EPI using a color-word Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Boyacioğlu, Rasim; Schulz, Jenni; Müller, Nils C J; Koopmans, Peter J; Barth, Markus; Norris, David G

    2014-08-15

    A whole brain, multiband spin-echo (SE) echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence employing a high spatial (1.5 mm isotropic) and temporal (TR of 2 s) resolution was implemented at 7 T. Its overall performance (tSNR, sensitivity and CNR) was assessed and compared to a geometrically matched gradient-echo (GE) EPI multiband sequence (TR of 1.4 s) using a color-word Stroop task. PINS RF pulses were used for refocusing to reduce RF amplitude requirements and SAR, summed and phase-optimized standard pulses were used for excitation enabling a transverse or oblique slice orientation. The distortions were minimized with the use of parallel imaging in the phase encoding direction and a post-acquisition distortion correction. In general, GE-EPI shows higher efficiency and higher CNR in most brain areas except in some parts of the visual cortex and superior frontal pole at both the group and individual-subject levels. Gradient-echo EPI was able to detect robust activation near the air/tissue interfaces such as the orbito-frontal and subcortical regions due to reduced intra-voxel dephasing because of the thin slices used and high in-plane resolution. PMID:24736172

  12. Advances in diffusion MRI acquisition and processing in the Human Connectome Project.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Jbabdi, Saad; Xu, Junqian; Andersson, Jesper L; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Glasser, Matthew F; Hernandez, Moises; Sapiro, Guillermo; Jenkinson, Mark; Feinberg, David A; Yacoub, Essa; Lenglet, Christophe; Van Essen, David C; Ugurbil, Kamil; Behrens, Timothy E J

    2013-10-15

    The Human Connectome Project (HCP) is a collaborative 5-year effort to map human brain connections and their variability in healthy adults. A consortium of HCP investigators will study a population of 1200 healthy adults using multiple imaging modalities, along with extensive behavioral and genetic data. In this overview, we focus on diffusion MRI (dMRI) and the structural connectivity aspect of the project. We present recent advances in acquisition and processing that allow us to obtain very high-quality in-vivo MRI data, whilst enabling scanning of a very large number of subjects. These advances result from 2 years of intensive efforts in optimising many aspects of data acquisition and processing during the piloting phase of the project. The data quality and methods described here are representative of the datasets and processing pipelines that will be made freely available to the community at quarterly intervals, beginning in 2013. PMID:23702418

  13. Advances in diffusion MRI acquisition and processing in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Jbabdi, Saad; Xu, Junqian; Andersson, Jesper L; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Glasser, Matthew F; Hernandez, Moises; Sapiro, Guillermo; Jenkinson, Mark; Feinberg, David A; Yacoub, Essa; Lenglet, Christophe; Ven Essen, David C; Ugurbil, Kamil; Behrens, Timothy EJ

    2013-01-01

    The Human Connectome Project (HCP) is a collaborative 5-year effort to map human brain connections and their variability in healthy adults. A consortium of HCP investigators will study a population of 1200 healthy adults using multiple imaging modalities, along with extensive behavioral and genetic data. In this overview, we focus on diffusion MRI (dMRI) and the structural connectivity aspect of the project. We present recent advances in acquisition and processing that allow us to obtain very high-quality in-vivo MRI data, while enabling scanning of a very large number of subjects. These advances result from 2 years of intensive efforts in optimising many aspects of data acquisition and processing during the piloting phase of the project. The data quality and methods described here are representative of the datasets and processing pipelines that will be made freely available to the community at quarterly intervals, beginning in 2013. PMID:23702418

  14. Associations between Dietary Nutrient Intakes and Hepatic Lipid Contents in NAFLD Patients Quantified by ¹H-MRS and Dual-Echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yipeng; Zhang, Kewei; Chen, Yang; Li, Yanchuan; Li, Yuzheng; Fu, Kuang; Feng, Rennan

    2016-01-01

    Dietary habits are crucial in the progression of hepatic lipid accumulation and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, there are limited studies using ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) and dual-echo in-phase and out-phase magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (dual-echo MRI) to assess the effects of dietary nutrient intakes on hepatic lipid contents. In the present study, we recruited 36 female adults (NAFLD:control = 19:17) to receive questionnaires and medical examinations, including dietary intakes, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, and ¹H-MRS and dual-echo MRI examinations. NAFLD patients were found to consume diets higher in energy, protein, fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Total energy intake was positively associated with hepatic fat fraction (HFF) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) after adjustment for age and body-mass index (BMI) (HFF: β = 0.24, p = 0.02; IHL: β = 0.38, p = 0.02). Total fat intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustment for age, BMI and total energy intake (HFF: β = 0.36, p = 0.03; IHL: β = 0.42, p = 0.01). SFA intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustments (HFF: β = 0.45, p = 0.003; IHL: β = 1.16, p = 0.03). In conclusion, hepatic fat content was associated with high energy, high fat and high SFA intakes, quantified by ¹H-MRS and dual-echo MRI in our population. Our findings are useful to provide dietary targets to prevent the hepatic lipid accumulation and NAFLD. PMID:27618908

  15. Impact of radial and angular sampling on multiple shells acquisition in diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Merlet, Sylvain; Caruyer, Emmanuel; Deriche, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of radial and angular sampling on multiple shells (MS) acquisition in diffusion MRI. The validation of our results is based on a new and efficient method to accurately reconstruct the Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) in term of the Spherical Polar Fourier (SPF) basis from very few diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images (DW-MRI). This approach nicely exploits the duality between SPF and a closely related basis in which one can respectively represent the EAP and the diffusion signal using the same coefficients. We efficiently combine this relation to the recent acquisition and reconstruction technique called Compressed Sensing (CS). Based on results of multi-tensors models reconstruction, we show how to construct a robust acquisition scheme for both neural fibre orientation detection and attenuation signal/EAP reconstruction. PMID:21995020

  16. ICA-based artefact and accelerated fMRI acquisition for improved Resting State Network imaging

    PubMed Central

    Griffanti, Ludovica; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Beckmann, Christian F.; Auerbach, Edward J.; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Sexton, Claire E.; Zsoldos, Enikő; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Filippini, Nicola; Mackay, Clare E.; Moeller, Steen; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ugurbil, Kamil; Miller, Karla L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of resting state networks (RSNs) and the quantification of their functional connectivity in resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) are seriously hindered by the presence of artefacts, many of which overlap spatially or spectrally with RSNs. Moreover, recent developments in fMRI acquisition yield data with higher spatial and temporal resolutions, but may increase artefacts both spatially and/or temporally. Hence the correct identification and removal of non-neural fluctuations is crucial, especially in accelerated acquisitions. In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of three data-driven cleaning procedures, compare standard against higher (spatial and temporal) resolution accelerated fMRI acquisitions, and investigate the combined effect of different acquisitions and different cleanup approaches. We applied single-subject independent component analysis (ICA), followed by automatic component classification with FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) to identify artefactual components. We then compared two first-level (within-subject) cleaning approaches for removing those artefacts and motion-related fluctuations from the data. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedures were assessed using timeseries (amplitude and spectra), network matrix and spatial map analyses. For timeseries and network analyses we also tested the effect of a second-level cleaning (informed by group-level analysis). Comparing these approaches, the preferable balance between noise removal and signal loss was achieved by regressing out of the data the full space of motion-related fluctuations and only the unique variance of the artefactual ICA components. Using similar analyses, we also investigated the effects of different cleaning approaches on data from different acquisition sequences. With the optimal cleaning procedures, functional connectivity results from accelerated data were statistically comparable or significantly better than the standard (unaccelerated) acquisition

  17. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method. PMID:19369023

  18. Inter- and intra-rater reliability of patellofemoral kinematic and contact area quantification by fast spin echo MRI and correlation with cartilage health by quantitative T1ρ MRI☆

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Brian C.; Thuillier, Daniel U.; Pedoia, Valentina; Chen, Ellison Y.; Zhang, Zhihong; Feeley, Brian T.; Souza, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patellar maltracking is a leading cause of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The aim of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of a semi-automated program for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based patellofemoral kinematics. Methods Sixteen subjects (10 with PFPS [mean age 32.3; SD 5.2; eight females] and six controls without PFPS 19 [mean age 28.6; SD 2.8; three females]) participated in the study. One set of T2-weighted, fat-saturated fast spin-echo (FSE) MRIs were acquired from each subject in full extension and 30° of knee flexion. MRI including axial T1ρ relaxation time mapping sequences was also performed on each knee. Following image acquisitions, regions of interest for kinematic MRI, and patellar and trochlear cartilage were segmented and quantified with in-house designed spline- based MATLAB semi-automated software. Results Intraclass Correlations Coefficients (ICC) of calculated kinematic parameters were good to excellent, ICC > 0.8 in patellar flexion, rotation, tilt, and translation (anterior -posterior, medial -lateral, and superior -inferior), and contact area translation. Only patellar tilt in the flexed position and motion from extended to flexed state was significantly different between PFPS and control patients (p = 0.002 and p = 0.006, respectively). No significant correlations were identified between patellofemoral kinematics and contact area with T1ρ relaxation times. Conclusions A semi-automated, spline-based kinematic MRI technique for patellofemoral kinematic and contact area quantification is highly reproducible with the potential to help better understand the role of patellofemoral maltracking in PFPS and other knee disorders. PMID:26746045

  19. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  20. Enhancement of temporal resolution and BOLD sensitivity in real-time fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Rick, Jochen; Shane, Matthew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2012-05-15

    In this study, a new approach to high-speed fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (EVI) is developed that minimizes geometrical image distortion and spatial blurring, and enables nonaliased sampling of physiological signal fluctuation to increase BOLD sensitivity compared to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). Real-time fMRI using whole brain 4-slab EVI with 286 ms temporal resolution (4mm isotropic voxel size) and partial brain 2-slab EVI with 136 ms temporal resolution (4×4×6 mm(3) voxel size) was performed on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI scanner equipped with 12-channel head coil. Four-slab EVI of visual and motor tasks significantly increased mean (visual: 96%, motor: 66%) and maximum t-score (visual: 263%, motor: 124%) and mean (visual: 59%, motor: 131%) and maximum (visual: 29%, motor: 67%) BOLD signal amplitude compared with EPI. Time domain moving average filtering (2s width) to suppress physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations further improved mean (visual: 196%, motor: 140%) and maximum (visual: 384%, motor: 200%) t-scores and increased extents of activation (visual: 73%, motor: 70%) compared to EPI. Similar sensitivity enhancement, which is attributed to high sampling rate at only moderately reduced temporal signal-to-noise ratio (mean: -52%) and longer sampling of the BOLD effect in the echo-time domain compared to EPI, was measured in auditory cortex. Two-slab EVI further improved temporal resolution for measuring task-related activation and enabled mapping of five major resting state networks (RSNs) in individual subjects in 5 min scans. The bilateral sensorimotor, the default mode and the occipital RSNs were detectable in time frames as short as 75 s. In conclusion, the high sampling rate of real-time multi-slab EVI significantly improves sensitivity for studying the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic responses and for characterizing functional networks at high field strength in short measurement times. PMID:22398395

  1. Enhancement of Temporal Resolution and BOLD Sensitivity in Real-Time fMRI using Multi-Slab Echo-Volumar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Rick, Jochen; Shane, Matthew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a new approach to high-speed fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (EVI) is developed that minimizes geometrical image distortion and spatial blurring, and enables nonaliased sampling of physiological signal fluctuation to increase BOLD sensitivity compared to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). Real-time fMRI using whole brain 4-slab EVI with 286 ms temporal resolution (4 mm isotropic voxel size) and partial brain 2-slab EVI with 136 ms temporal resolution (4×4×6 mm3 voxel size) was performed on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI scanner equipped with 12-channel head coil. Four-slab EVI of visual and motor tasks significantly increased mean (visual: 96%, motor: 66%) and maximum t-score (visual: 263%, motor: 124%) and mean (visual: 59%, motor: 131%) and maximum (visual: 29%, motor: 67%) BOLD signal amplitude compared with EPI. Time domain moving average filtering (2 s width) to suppress physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations further improved mean (visual: 196%, motor: 140%) and maximum (visual: 384%, motor: 200%) t-scores and increased extents of activation (visual: 73%, motor: 70%) compared to EPI. Similar sensitivity enhancement, which is attributed to high sampling rate at only moderately reduced temporal signal-to-noise ratio (mean: − 52%) and longer sampling of the BOLD effect in the echo-time domain compared to EPI, was measured in auditory cortex. Two-slab EVI further improved temporal resolution for measuring task-related activation and enabled mapping of five major resting state networks (RSNs) in individual subjects in 5 min scans. The bilateral sensorimotor, the default mode and the occipital RSNs were detectable in time frames as short as 75 s. In conclusion, the high sampling rate of real-time multi-slab EVI significantly improves sensitivity for studying the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic responses and for characterizing functional networks at high field strength in short measurement times. PMID:22398395

  2. Improving robustness and reliability of phase-sensitive fMRI analysis using temporal off-resonance alignment of single-echo timeseries (TOAST).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andrew D; Nencka, Andrew S; Rowe, Daniel B

    2009-02-01

    Echo Planar Imaging (EPI), often utilized in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments, is well known for its vulnerability to inconsistencies in the static magnetic field (B(0)). Correction for these field inhomogeneities usually involves measuring the magnetic field at a single time point, and using this static information to correct a series of images collected over the course of one or multiple experiments. However, common phenomena, such as respiration and motion, change the characteristics of the B(0) field homogeneity in a time-dependent and often unpredictable manner, rendering previous field measurements invalid. The effects of these changes are particularly large in the image phase, due to its direct and sensitive relationship to the magnetic field, and methods utilizing complex information can suffer enormously. This dependence can be exploited to estimate the temporal dynamics of the B(0) field. Use of this information to correct fMRI data can provide more effective motion correction, reduce temporal "noise," and can substantially restore statistically significant power to complex fMRI data analysis. All of the necessary information is embedded in complex EPI images, and results indicate this is a robust way to improve the quality of fMRI data, especially when used with complex analysis. PMID:18992826

  3. Reducing acquisition time in clinical MRI by data undersampling and compressed sensing reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Kieren Grant

    2015-11-01

    MRI is often the most sensitive or appropriate technique for important measurements in clinical diagnosis and research, but lengthy acquisition times limit its use due to cost and considerations of patient comfort and compliance. Once an image field of view and resolution is chosen, the minimum scan acquisition time is normally fixed by the amount of raw data that must be acquired to meet the Nyquist criteria. Recently, there has been research interest in using the theory of compressed sensing (CS) in MR imaging to reduce scan acquisition times. The theory argues that if our target MR image is sparse, having signal information in only a small proportion of pixels (like an angiogram), or if the image can be mathematically transformed to be sparse then it is possible to use that sparsity to recover a high definition image from substantially less acquired data. This review starts by considering methods of k-space undersampling which have already been incorporated into routine clinical imaging (partial Fourier imaging and parallel imaging), and then explains the basis of using compressed sensing in MRI. The practical considerations of applying CS to MRI acquisitions are discussed, such as designing k-space undersampling schemes, optimizing adjustable parameters in reconstructions and exploiting the power of combined compressed sensing and parallel imaging (CS-PI). A selection of clinical applications that have used CS and CS-PI prospectively are considered. The review concludes by signposting other imaging acceleration techniques under present development before concluding with a consideration of the potential impact and obstacles to bringing compressed sensing into routine use in clinical MRI.

  4. Reducing acquisition time in clinical MRI by data undersampling and compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Kieren Grant

    2015-11-01

    MRI is often the most sensitive or appropriate technique for important measurements in clinical diagnosis and research, but lengthy acquisition times limit its use due to cost and considerations of patient comfort and compliance. Once an image field of view and resolution is chosen, the minimum scan acquisition time is normally fixed by the amount of raw data that must be acquired to meet the Nyquist criteria. Recently, there has been research interest in using the theory of compressed sensing (CS) in MR imaging to reduce scan acquisition times. The theory argues that if our target MR image is sparse, having signal information in only a small proportion of pixels (like an angiogram), or if the image can be mathematically transformed to be sparse then it is possible to use that sparsity to recover a high definition image from substantially less acquired data. This review starts by considering methods of k-space undersampling which have already been incorporated into routine clinical imaging (partial Fourier imaging and parallel imaging), and then explains the basis of using compressed sensing in MRI. The practical considerations of applying CS to MRI acquisitions are discussed, such as designing k-space undersampling schemes, optimizing adjustable parameters in reconstructions and exploiting the power of combined compressed sensing and parallel imaging (CS-PI). A selection of clinical applications that have used CS and CS-PI prospectively are considered. The review concludes by signposting other imaging acceleration techniques under present development before concluding with a consideration of the potential impact and obstacles to bringing compressed sensing into routine use in clinical MRI. PMID:26448064

  5. MRI Compatible Ultrasound Transducers for Simultaneous Acquisition of Coregistered Ultrasound to MRI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speicher, Daniel; Bartscherer, T.; Becker, F. J.; Jenne, J. W.; Mrosk, K.; Degel, C.; Günther, M.; Tretbar, S.

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become an important part of radiological diagnostics as it shows high resolution volumes of human tissue without any radiation exposure. Beside the high costs for MR imaging the greatest disadvantage of this technology is that it is not real-time capable which leads to possible motion artifacts. Whereas Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool in radiology as it is real-time capable and cost effective. Therefore a combination of both modalities is obvious, not only to reduce motion artifacts in MR imaging but to save costs by reducing time in the MR scanner through coregistering ultrasound and MR images for deformation analysis. This work presents the manufacturing and measurement results of MR compatible ultrasound transducers for motion compensation and deformation analyses for clinical interventions under MRI conditions, based on ultrasound volumes acquired by a full MR compatible 180° rotating 8 MHz phased array.

  6. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  7. Reliability of brain volumes from multicenter MRI acquisition: a calibration study.

    PubMed

    Schnack, Hugo G; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Picchioni, Marco; Weisbrod, Matthias; Sauer, Heinrich; Cannon, Tyrone; Huttunen, Matti; Murray, Robin; Kahn, René S

    2004-08-01

    Multicenter studies can provide additional information over single center studies because of their increased statistical power. Because similar acquisition protocols are being used internationally for structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the human brain, volumetric MRI data studies seem suitable for this purpose. Possible systematic differences between sites should be avoided, however, particularly when subtle differences in tissue volume are being searched for, such as in neuropsychiatric diseases. In this calibration study, the brains of six healthy volunteers were (re)scanned with MR scanners from four different manufacturers at five different sites, using the local acquisition protocols. The images were segmented at a central reference site. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined for the whole brain, gray and white matter, cerebellum, and lateral and third ventricle volumes. When required, the processing algorithms were calibrated for each site. Calibration of the histogram analysis was needed for segmentation of total brain volume at one site and for gray and white matter volume at all sites. No (additional) calibration was needed for cerebellum and ventricle volumes. The ICCs were > or = 0.96 for total brain, > or = 0.92 for cerebellum, > or = 0.96 for lateral ventricle, > or = 0.21 for third ventricle, > or = 0.84 for gray matter, and > or = 0.78 for white matter volume. Calibration of segmentation procedures allows morphologic MRI data acquired at different research sites to be combined reliably in multicenter studies. PMID:15202109

  8. Hybrid Utrasound and MRI Acquisitions for High-Speed Imaging of Respiratory Organ Motion

    PubMed Central

    Preiswerk, Frank; Toews, Matthew; Hoge, W. Scott; Chiou, Jr-yuan George; Panych, Lawrence P.; Wells, William M.; Madore, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging provides excellent image quality at a high cost and low frame rate. Ultrasound (US) provides poor image quality at a low cost and high frame rate. We propose an instance-based learning system to obtain the best of both worlds: high quality MR images at high frame rates from a low cost single-element US sensor. Concurrent US and MRI pairs are acquired during a relatively brief offine learning phase involving the US transducer and MR scanner. High frame rate, high quality MR imaging of respiratory organ motion is then predicted from US measurements, even after stopping MRI acquisition, using a probabilistic kernel regression framework. Experimental results show predicted MR images to be highly representative of actual MR images. PMID:27135063

  9. Functional connectivity analysis in resting state fMRI with echo-state networks and non-metric clustering for network structure recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; DSouza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2015-03-01

    Echo state networks (ESN) are recurrent neural networks where the hidden layer is replaced with a fixed reservoir of neurons. Unlike feed-forward networks, neuron training in ESN is restricted to the output neurons alone thereby providing a computational advantage. We demonstrate the use of such ESNs in our mutual connectivity analysis (MCA) framework for recovering the primary motor cortex network associated with hand movement from resting state functional MRI (fMRI) data. Such a framework consists of two steps - (1) defining a pair-wise affinity matrix between different pixel time series within the brain to characterize network activity and (2) recovering network components from the affinity matrix with non-metric clustering. Here, ESNs are used to evaluate pair-wise cross-estimation performance between pixel time series to create the affinity matrix, which is subsequently subject to non-metric clustering with the Louvain method. For comparison, the ground truth of the motor cortex network structure is established with a task-based fMRI sequence. Overlap between the primary motor cortex network recovered with our model free MCA approach and the ground truth was measured with the Dice coefficient. Our results show that network recovery with our proposed MCA approach is in close agreement with the ground truth. Such network recovery is achieved without requiring low-pass filtering of the time series ensembles prior to analysis, an fMRI preprocessing step that has courted controversy in recent years. Thus, we conclude our MCA framework can allow recovery and visualization of the underlying functionally connected networks in the brain on resting state fMRI.

  10. ACQUISITION OF ANTIBODIES TO VARIOUS COXSACKIE AND ECHO VIRUSES AND HEPATITIS A VIRUS IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNAL SETTLEMENTS IN ISRAEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seroepidemiological study was conducted to measure the antibody prevalence for eight different enteric viruses. These include seven 'classical' enteroviruses, ie, Coxsackie virus types A9, B1, B3, B4 and three ECHO virus types 4,7, and 9, as well as hepatitis A virus (HAV), rec...

  11. MR physics in practice: How to optimize acquisition quality and time for cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Saloner, David; Liu, Jing; Haraldsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Quality of the medical imaging is a key component for accurate disease diagnosis. How to optimize image quality while maintain scan time efficiency and patient comfort is important for the clinical routine MRI exams. In this chapter, we review both practical and advanced techniques to achieve high image quality, especially focusing on optimizing the trade-offs between the image quality (such as signal-to-noise and spatial resolution) and acquisition time. We provide practical examples for optimizing the image quality and scan time. PMID:25476668

  12. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  13. An investigation of the value of spin-echo-based fMRI using a Stroop color-word matching task and EPI at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Norris, David G; Zysset, Stefan; Mildner, Toralf; Wiggins, Christopher J

    2002-03-01

    This study examines the value of spin-echo-based fMRI for cognitive studies at the main magnetic field strength of 3 T using a spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI) sequence and a Stroop color-word matching task. SE-EPI has the potential advantage over conventional gradient-echo EPI (GE-EPI) that signal losses caused by dephasing through the slice are not present, and hence although image distortion will be the same as for an equivalent GE-EPI sequence, signal voids will be eliminated. The functional contrast in SE-EPI will be lower than for GE-EPI, as static dephasing effects do not contribute. As an auxiliary experiment interleaved diffusion-weighted and non-diffusion-weighted SE-EPI was performed in the visual cortex to further elucidate the mechanims of functional contrast. In the Stroop experiment activation was detected in all areas previously found using GE-EPI. Additional frontopolar and ventral frontomedian activations were also found, which could not be detected using GE-EPI. The experiments from visual cortex indicated that at 3 T the BOLD signal change has contributions from the extravascular space and larger blood vessels in roughly equal amounts. In comparison with GE-EPI the absence of static dephasing effects would seem to result in a superior intrinsic spatial resolution. In conclusion the sensitivity of SE-EPI at 3 T is sufficient to make it the method of choice for fMR studies that require a high degree of spatial localization or where the requirement is to detect activation in regions affected by strong susceptibility gradients. PMID:11848715

  14. PBPK model of methotrexate in cerebrospinal fluid ventricles using a combined microdialysis and MRI acquisition.

    PubMed

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Noury, Fanny; Bruyère, Arnaud; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Le Corre, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the distribution of methotrexate (MTX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lateral ventricles and in cisterna magna after 3rd intraventricular CSF administration in a rabbit model. MTX or gadolinium chelate (Gd-DOTA) was administered in the 3rd ventricle with a local microdialysis to study the pharmacokinetics at the site of administration and with a simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition in the 3rd ventricle, the lateral ventricles and in the cisterna magna. A specific CSF Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was then extrapolated for MTX from Gd-DOTA data. The relative contribution of elimination and distribution processes to the overall disposition of MTX and Gd-DOTA in the 3rd ventricle was similar (i.e., around 60% for CLE and 40% for CLI) suggesting that Gd-DOTA was a suitable surrogate marker for MTX disposition in ventricular CSF. The PBPK predictions for MTX both in CSF of the 3rd ventricle and in plasma were in accordance with the in vivo results. The present study showed that the combination of local CSF microdialysis with MRI acquisition of the brain ventricles and a PBPK model could be a useful methodology to estimate the drug diffusion within CSF ventricles after direct brain CSF administration. Such a methodology would be of interest to clinicians for a rationale determination and optimization of drug dosing parameters in the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases. PMID:27142258

  15. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Edna; Frigau, Luca; Voyvodic-Casabo, Clara; Voyvodic, James; Wright, John

    2013-01-01

    BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1) already proficient in at least two languages; or (2) are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1) longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2) statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition. PMID:24961428

  16. Resting state BOLD functional connectivity at 3T: spin echo versus gradient echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Chiacchiaretta, Piero; Ferretti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Previous evidence showed that, due to refocusing of static dephasing effects around large vessels, spin-echo (SE) BOLD signals offer an increased linearity and promptness with respect to gradient-echo (GE) acquisition, even at low field. These characteristics suggest that, despite the reduced sensitivity, SE fMRI might also provide a potential benefit when investigating spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity. However, there are no reports on the application of spin-echo fMRI for connectivity studies at low field. In this study we compared resting state functional connectivity as measured with GE and SE EPI sequences at 3T. Main results showed that, within subject, the GE sensitivity is overall larger with respect to that of SE, but to a less extent than previously reported for activation studies. Noteworthy, the reduced sensitivity of SE was counterbalanced by a reduced inter-subject variability, resulting in comparable group statistical connectivity maps for the two sequences. Furthermore, the SE method performed better in the ventral portion of the default mode network, a region affected by signal dropout in standard GE acquisition. Future studies should clarify if these features of the SE BOLD signal can be beneficial to distinguish subtle variations of functional connectivity across different populations and/or treatments when vascular confounds or regions affected by signal dropout can be a critical issue. PMID:25749359

  17. A study of quantification of aortic compliance in mice using radial acquisition phase contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuandong

    Spatiotemporal changes in blood flow velocity measured using Phase contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to quantify Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) and Wall Shear Stress (WSS), well known indices of vessel compliance. A study was conducted to measure the PWV in the aortic arch in young healthy children using conventional phase contrast MRI and a post processing algorithm that automatically track the peak velocity in phase contrast images. It is shown that the PWV calculated using peak velocity-time data has less variability compared to that using mean velocity and flow. Conventional MR data acquisition techniques lack both the spatial and temporal resolution needed to accurately calculate PWV and WSS in in vivo studies using transgenic animal models of arterial diseases. Radial k-space acquisition can improve both spatial and temporal resolution. A major part of this thesis was devoted to developing technology for Radial Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance (RPCMR) cine imaging on a 7 Tesla Animal scanner. A pulse sequence with asymmetric radial k-space acquisition was designed and implemented. Software developed to reconstruct the RPCMR images include gridding, density compensation and centering of k-Space that corrects the image ghosting introduced by hardware response time. Image processing software was developed to automatically segment the vessel lumen and correct for phase offset due to eddy currents. Finally, in vivo and ex vivo aortic compliance measurements were conducted in a well-established mouse model for atherosclerosis: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO). Using RPCMR technique, a significantly higher PWV value as well as a higher average WSS was detected among 9 months old ApoE-KO mice compare to in wild type mice. A follow up ex-vivo test of tissue elasticity confirmed the impaired distensibility of aortic arteries among ApoE-KO mice.

  18. Long-term follow-up results of linear accelerator-based radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma using serial three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takayuki; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Kamada, Kensaku; Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Izumi

    2015-02-01

    We examined the characteristic changes in vestibular schwannoma (VS) volume after treatment with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery (LBRS) and the long-term therapeutic effects, by performing three-dimensional (3D) MRI evaluations of tumor volumes. We included 44 patients in whom tumor volume changes could be observed using 3D-spoiled gradient-echo MRI for at least 5 years. Examinations were performed every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after treatment and every 6-12 months thereafter. Enlargement or shrinkage was determined as a change of at least 20% from the volume at the time of treatment. The median observation period was 13.8 years (range, 5.5-19.5 years). The tumor control rates at 5 and 10 years after treatment and at the final MRI were 90.9%, 90.0%, and 88.6%, respectively. Tumor volume changes were categorized into the following four patterns: enlargement, five patients (11.4%); stable, three patients (6.8%); transient enlargement, 24 patients (54.5%); and direct shrinkage, 12 patients (27.3%). Bimodal peaks were observed in three of the 24 patients with transient enlargement. Tumor volume changes from 5 and 10 years post-LBRS to the final observation point were observed in 27 (64.2%) and 10 patients (33.3%), respectively. The long-term tumor volume changes observed after LBRS suggest that radiation exerts long-term effects on tumors. Furthermore, while transient enlargements in tumor volume were characteristic, true tumor enlargements should be characterized by increased volumes of more than two-fold and continued growth for at least 2 years. PMID:25443082

  19. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  20. Ultrashort-TE stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) improves the quantification of lipids and fatty acid chain unsaturation in the human liver at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Gajdošík, Martin; Chadzynski, Grzegorz L; Hangel, Gilbert; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Chmelík, Marek; Valkovič, Ladislav; Bogner, Wolfgang; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Ultrahigh-field, whole-body MR systems increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and improve the spectral resolution. Sequences with a short TE allow fast signal acquisition with low signal loss as a result of spin-spin relaxation. This is of particular importance in the liver for the precise quantification of the hepatocellular content of lipids (HCL). In this study, we introduce a spoiler Gradient-switching Ultrashort STimulated Echo AcqUisition (GUSTEAU) sequence, which is a modified version of a stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequence, with a minimum TE of 6 ms. With the high spectral resolution at 7 T, the efficient elimination of water sidebands and the post-processing suppression of the water signal, we estimated the composition of fatty acids (FAs) via the detection of the olefinic lipid resonance and calculated the unsaturation index (UI) of hepatic FAs. The performance of the GUSTEAU sequence for the assessment of UI was validated against oil samples and provided excellent results in agreement with the data reported in the literature. When measuring HCL with GUSTEAU in 10 healthy volunteers, there was a high correlation between the results obtained at 7 and 3 T (R(2) = 0.961). The test-retest measurements yielded low coefficients of variation for HCL (4 ± 3%) and UI (11 ± 8%) when measured with the GUSTEAU sequence at 7 T. A negative correlation was found between UI and HCL (n = 10; p < 0.033). The ultrashort TE MRS sequence (GUSTEAU; TE = 6 ms) provided high repeatability for the assessment of HCL. The improved spectral resolution at 7 T with the elimination of water sidebands and the offline water subtraction also enabled an assessment of the unsaturation of FAs. This all highlights the potential use of this MRS acquisition scheme for studies of hepatic lipid composition in vivo. PMID:26313737

  1. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  2. ECHO virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that lead to ...

  3. The Role of Age of Acquisition on Past Tense Generation in Spanish-English Bilinguals: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Eric J.; Hernandez, Arturo E.

    2013-01-01

    At its most basic sense, the sensorimotor/emergentist (S/E) model suggests that early second language (L2) learning is preferentially reliant upon sensory and motor processes, while later L2 learning is accomplished by greater reliance on executive abilities. To investigate the S/E model using fMRI, neural correlates of L2 age of acquisition were…

  4. The PRESTO technique for fMRI

    PubMed Central

    van Gelderen, P.; Duyn, J.H.; Ramsey, N.F.; Liu, G.; Moonen, C.T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In the early days of BOLD fMRI, the acquisition of T2* weighted data was greatly facilitated by rapid scan techniques such as EPI. The latter, however, was only available on a few MRI systems that were equipped with specialized hardware that allowed rapid switching of the imaging gradients. For this reason, soon after the invention of fMRI, the scan technique PRESTO was developed to make rapid T2* weighted scanning available on standard clinical scanning. This method combined echo shifting, which allows for echo times longer than the sequence repetition time, with acquisition of multiple k-space lines per excitation. These two concepts were combined in order to achieve a method fast enough for fMRI, while maintaining a sufficiently long echo time for optimal contrast. PRESTO has been primarily used for 3D scanning, which minimized the contribution of large vessels due to inflow effects. Although PRESTO is still being used today, its appeal has lessened somewhat due to increased gradient performance of modern MRI scanners. Compared to 2D EPI, PRESTO may have somewhat reduced temporal stability, which is a disadvantage for fMRI that may not outweigh the advantage of reduced inflow effects provided by 3D scanning. In this overview, the history of the development of the PRESTO is presented, followed by a qualitative comparison with EPI. PMID:22245350

  5. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  6. Measurement of global brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease with unsupervised segmentation of spin-echo MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, A; Postiglione, A; Tedeschi, E; Ciarmiello, A; Quarantelli, M; Covelli, E M; Milan, G; Larobina, M; Soricelli, A; Sodano, A; Alfano, B

    2000-03-01

    In 16 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD; NINDS criteria, age range 56-78 years), gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absolute and fractional volumes were measured with an unsupervised multiparametric post-processing segmentation method based on estimates of relaxation rates R1, R2 (R1 = 1/T1; R2 = 1/T2) and proton density [N(H)] from conventional spin-echo studies (Alfano et al. Magn. Reson. Med. 1997;37:84-93). Global brain atrophy, and GM and WM fractions significantly correlated with Mini-Mental Status Examination and Blessed Dementia Scale scores. Compared with normals, brain compartments in AD patients showed decreased GM (-6.84 +/- 1.58%) and WM fractions (-9.79 +/- 2.47%) and increased CSF fractions (+58.80 +/- 10.37%). Changes were more evident in early-onset AD patients. In AD, measurement of global brain atrophy obtained by a computerized procedure based on routine magnetic resonance studies could complement the information provided by neuropsychological tests for the assessment of disease severity. PMID:10739557

  7. Correlated displacement- T2 MRI by means of a Pulsed Field Gradient-Multi Spin Echo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, Carel W.; Vergeldt, Frank J.; Van As, Henk

    2007-04-01

    A method for correlated displacement- T2 imaging is presented. A Pulsed Field Gradient-Multi Spin Echo (PFG-MSE) sequence is used to record T2 resolved propagators on a voxel-by-voxel basis, making it possible to perform single voxel correlated displacement- T2 analyses. In spatially heterogeneous media the method thus gives access to sub-voxel information about displacement and T2 relaxation. The sequence is demonstrated using a number of flow conducting model systems: a tube with flowing water of variable intrinsic T2's, mixing fluids of different T2's in an "X"-shaped connector, and an intact living plant. PFG-MSE can be applied to yield information about the relation between flow, pore size and exchange behavior, and can aid volume flow quantification by making it possible to correct for T2 relaxation during the displacement labeling period Δ in PFG displacement imaging methods. Correlated displacement- T2 imaging can be of special interest for a number of research subjects, such as the flow of liquids and mixtures of liquids or liquids and solids moving through microscopic conduits of different sizes (e.g., plants, porous media, bioreactors, biomats).

  8. Correlated displacement-T2 MRI by means of a Pulsed Field Gradient-Multi Spin Echo Method.

    PubMed

    Windt, Carel W; Vergeldt, Frank J; Van As, Henk

    2007-04-01

    A method for correlated displacement-T2 imaging is presented. A Pulsed Field Gradient-Multi Spin Echo (PFG-MSE) sequence is used to record T2 resolved propagators on a voxel-by-voxel basis, making it possible to perform single voxel correlated displacement-T2 analyses. In spatially heterogeneous media the method thus gives access to sub-voxel information about displacement and T2 relaxation. The sequence is demonstrated using a number of flow conducting model systems: a tube with flowing water of variable intrinsic T2's, mixing fluids of different T2's in an "X"-shaped connector, and an intact living plant. PFG-MSE can be applied to yield information about the relation between flow, pore size and exchange behavior, and can aid volume flow quantification by making it possible to correct for T2 relaxation during the displacement labeling period Delta in PFG displacement imaging methods. Correlated displacement-T2 imaging can be of special interest for a number of research subjects, such as the flow of liquids and mixtures of liquids or liquids and solids moving through microscopic conduits of different sizes (e.g., plants, porous media, bioreactors, biomats). PMID:17236795

  9. Evaluation of the partial flip angle spin echo method to improve non-uniformity in T1-weighted imaging with the 3-tesla MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Youhei; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi; Ishibashi, Kazuto; Sakurai, Yasuo

    2008-03-01

    The higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) contributes to an improvement in the spatial and temporal resolution. However, T1-weighted images of the brain obtained by the spin-echo (SE) method using 3T MRI are unsuitable for clinical use because of the inhomogeneity of the radio frequency (RF) field B1 non-uniformity. And it is clear by SE method. In addition, the prolongation of the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of most tissues leads to a decrease in the T1 contrast. Therefore, many hospitals that utilize 3TMRI use the GRE method instead of the SE method in order to obtain an adequate T1 contrast, as can be obtained using FLASH (fast low angle shot), and high uniformity of images. Further, many studies have been performed to improve the non uniformity using techniques such as spatial presaturation. However, when filters are used, the high intensity of the influence in susceptible regions, signal deficits, and original contrast are lost, and a distortion can be clearly observed when the GRE method is used. Therefore, we obtained the T1-weighted images by using the partial flip angle SE method instead of the GRE method or SE method. We attempted to improve the image non-uniformity by using the partial flip angle SE method. Using this method, we could improve the image uniformity and also realize an adequate T1 contrast. As a result, the uniformity was found to improve by 6% and it became 82.6% at 110°. These results indicate that the use of the partial flip angle SE method is effective for obtaining adequate uniformity in the T1-weighted images of the brain.

  10. Single-shot echo-planar imaging with Nyquist ghost compensation: interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) echo-planar imaging (EPI).

    PubMed

    Poser, Benedikt A; Barth, Markus; Goa, Pål-Erik; Deng, Weiran; Stenger, V Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) is most commonly used for blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI, owing to its sensitivity and acquisition speed. A major problem with EPI is Nyquist (N/2) ghosting, most notably at high field. EPI data are acquired under an oscillating readout gradient and hence vulnerable to gradient imperfections such as eddy current delays and off-resonance effects, as these cause inconsistencies between odd and even k-space lines after time reversal. We propose a straightforward and pragmatic method herein termed "interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) EPI": two k-spaces (echoes) are acquired under the positive and negative readout lobes, respectively, by performing phase encoding blips only before alternate readout gradients. From these two k-spaces, two almost entirely ghost free images per shot can be constructed, without need for phase correction. The doubled echo train length can be compensated by parallel imaging and/or partial Fourier acquisition. The two k-spaces can either be complex averaged during reconstruction, which results in near-perfect cancellation of residual phase errors, or reconstructed into separate images. We demonstrate the efficacy of IDEA EPI and show phantom and in vivo images at both 3 T and 7 T. PMID:22411762

  11. Effect of Task-Correlated Physiological Fluctuations and Motion in 2D and 3D Echo-Planar Imaging in a Higher Cognitive Level fMRI Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Ladstein, Jarle; Evensmoen, Hallvard R.; Håberg, Asta K.; Kristoffersen, Anders; Goa, Pål E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare 2D and 3D echo-planar imaging (EPI) in a higher cognitive level fMRI paradigm. In particular, to study the link between the presence of task-correlated physiological fluctuations and motion and the fMRI contrast estimates from either 2D EPI or 3D EPI datasets, with and without adding nuisance regressors to the model. A signal model in the presence of partly task-correlated fluctuations is derived, and predictions for contrast estimates with and without nuisance regressors are made. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one healthy volunteers were scanned using 2D EPI and 3D EPI during a virtual environmental learning paradigm. In a subgroup of 7 subjects, heart rate and respiration were logged, and the correlation with the paradigm was evaluated. FMRI analysis was performed using models with and without nuisance regressors. Differences in the mean contrast estimates were investigated by analysis-of-variance using Subject, Sequence, Day, and Run as factors. The distributions of group level contrast estimates were compared. Results: Partially task-correlated fluctuations in respiration, heart rate and motion were observed. Statistically significant differences were found in the mean contrast estimates between the 2D EPI and 3D EPI when using a model without nuisance regressors. The inclusion of nuisance regressors for cardiorespiratory effects and motion reduced the difference to a statistically non-significant level. Furthermore, the contrast estimate values shifted more when including nuisance regressors for 3D EPI compared to 2D EPI. Conclusion: The results are consistent with 3D EPI having a higher sensitivity to fluctuations compared to 2D EPI. In the presence partially task-correlated physiological fluctuations or motion, proper correction is necessary to get expectation correct contrast estimates when using 3D EPI. As such task-correlated physiological fluctuations or motion is difficult to avoid in paradigms exploring higher cognitive functions, 2

  12. Comparison of Twice Refocused Spin Echo versus Stimulated Echo Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Tracking Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Andersen, Anders; Feiweier, Thorsten; Damon, Bruce; Hardy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision of measuring the pennation angle and fiber length in the Vastus Lateralis (VL) using two distinctly different diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Materials and Methods We imaged the thigh of ten normal subjects on a 3T MR imager with twice refocused spin echo (TRSE) and stimulated echo (STEAM) DTI-MRI techniques. Both techniques took the same total acquisition time, employed the same diffusion weighting and gradient directions. Using the diffusion tensor images produced by each sequence muscle fiber bundles were tracked from the aponeurosis by following the first eigenvector of the diffusion tensor. From these tracks we calculated the pennation angle and fiber length. Results The STEAM acquisition resulted in significantly higher SNR, lower ADC, higher FA values and longer fibers than the TRSE. Although no difference in the pennation angle between the two acquisitions was found, the TRSE sequence had a significantly greater within subject dispersion in the pennation angle of tracked fibers which may indicate a reduction in the coherence of fiber bundles. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging of muscle using a STEAM acquisition resulted in significant improvements in the SNR and FA, resulting in tracking a larger number of muscle fiber bundles over longer distances and with less within subject dispersion. PMID:24554376

  13. Head motion during MRI acquisition reduces gray matter volume and thickness estimates.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Martin; Tisdall, M Dylan; Qureshi, Abid; Buckner, Randy L; van der Kouwe, André J W; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-02-15

    Imaging biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data are used to quantify normal development, disease, and the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, motion during image acquisition introduces image artifacts that, in turn, affect derived markers. A systematic effect can be problematic since factors of interest like age, disease, and treatment are often correlated with both a structural change and the amount of head motion in the scanner, confounding the ability to distinguish biology from artifact. Here we evaluate the effect of head motion during image acquisition on morphometric estimates of structures in the human brain using several popular image analysis software packages (FreeSurfer 5.3, VBM8 SPM, and FSL Siena 5.0.7). Within-session repeated T1-weighted MRIs were collected on 12 healthy volunteers while performing different motion tasks, including two still scans. We show that volume and thickness estimates of the cortical gray matter are biased by head motion with an average apparent volume loss of roughly 0.7%/mm/min of subject motion. Effects vary across regions and remain significant after excluding scans that fail a rigorous quality check. In view of these results, the interpretation of reported morphometric effects of movement disorders or other conditions with increased motion tendency may need to be revisited: effects may be overestimated when not controlling for head motion. Furthermore, drug studies with hypnotic, sedative, tranquilizing, or neuromuscular-blocking substances may contain spurious "effects" of reduced atrophy or brain growth simply because they affect motion distinct from true effects of the disease or therapeutic process. PMID:25498430

  14. Head Motion during MRI Acquisition Reduces Gray Matter Volume and Thickness Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Martin; Tisdall, M. Dylan; Qureshi, Abid; Buckner, Randy L.; van der Kouwe, André J. W.; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data are used to quantify normal development, disease, and the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, motion during image acquisition introduces image artifacts that, in turn, affect derived markers. A systematic effect can be problematic since factors of interest like age, disease, and treatment are often correlated with both a structural change and the amount of head motion in the scanner, confounding the ability to distinguish biology from artifact. Here we evaluate the effect of head motion during image acquisition on morphometric estimates of structures in the human brain using several popular image analysis software packages (FreeSurfer 5.3, VBM8 SPM, and FSL Siena 5.0.7). Within-session repeated T1-weighted MRIs were collected on 12 healthy volunteers while performing different motion tasks, including two still scans. We show that volume and thickness estimates of the cortical gray matter are biased by head motion with an average apparent volume loss of roughly 0.7%/mm/min of subject motion. Effects vary across regions and remain significant after excluding scans that fail a rigorous quality check. In view of these results, the interpretation of reported morphometric effects of movement disorders or other conditions with increased motion tendency may need to be revisited: effects may be overestimated when not controlling for head motion. Furthermore, drug studies with hypnotic, sedative, tranquillizing, or neuromuscular-blocking substances may contain spurious “effects” of reduced atrophy or brain growth simply because they affect motion distinct from true effects of the disease or therapeutic process. PMID:25498430

  15. Exploring the acquisition and production of grammatical constructions through human-robot interaction with echo state networks

    PubMed Central

    Hinaut, Xavier; Petit, Maxime; Pointeau, Gregoire; Dominey, Peter Ford

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal functions of human language is to allow people to coordinate joint action. This includes the description of events, requests for action, and their organization in time. A crucial component of language acquisition is learning the grammatical structures that allow the expression of such complex meaning related to physical events. The current research investigates the learning of grammatical constructions and their temporal organization in the context of human-robot physical interaction with the embodied sensorimotor humanoid platform, the iCub. We demonstrate three noteworthy phenomena. First, a recurrent network model is used in conjunction with this robotic platform to learn the mappings between grammatical forms and predicate-argument representations of meanings related to events, and the robot's execution of these events in time. Second, this learning mechanism functions in the inverse sense, i.e., in a language production mode, where rather than executing commanded actions, the robot will describe the results of human generated actions. Finally, we collect data from naïve subjects who interact with the robot via spoken language, and demonstrate significant learning and generalization results. This allows us to conclude that such a neural language learning system not only helps to characterize and understand some aspects of human language acquisition, but also that it can be useful in adaptive human-robot interaction. PMID:24834050

  16. Exploring the acquisition and production of grammatical constructions through human-robot interaction with echo state networks.

    PubMed

    Hinaut, Xavier; Petit, Maxime; Pointeau, Gregoire; Dominey, Peter Ford

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal functions of human language is to allow people to coordinate joint action. This includes the description of events, requests for action, and their organization in time. A crucial component of language acquisition is learning the grammatical structures that allow the expression of such complex meaning related to physical events. The current research investigates the learning of grammatical constructions and their temporal organization in the context of human-robot physical interaction with the embodied sensorimotor humanoid platform, the iCub. We demonstrate three noteworthy phenomena. First, a recurrent network model is used in conjunction with this robotic platform to learn the mappings between grammatical forms and predicate-argument representations of meanings related to events, and the robot's execution of these events in time. Second, this learning mechanism functions in the inverse sense, i.e., in a language production mode, where rather than executing commanded actions, the robot will describe the results of human generated actions. Finally, we collect data from naïve subjects who interact with the robot via spoken language, and demonstrate significant learning and generalization results. This allows us to conclude that such a neural language learning system not only helps to characterize and understand some aspects of human language acquisition, but also that it can be useful in adaptive human-robot interaction. PMID:24834050

  17. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  18. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: Distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Amy Metcalfe, Peter; Liney, Gary; Holloway, Lois; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. Methods: A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. Results: MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%–70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through

  19. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  20. Spatio-temporal registration in multiplane MRI acquisitions for 3D colon motiliy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Berkovich, Marina; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing and visualizing dynamic peristaltic motion of the colon in 3D from two series of differently oriented 2D MRI images. To this end, we have defined an MRI examination protocol, and introduced methods for spatio-temporal alignment of the two MRI image series into a common reference. This represents the main contribution of this paper, which enables the 3D analysis of peristaltic motion. The objective is to provide a detailed insight into this complex motion, aiding in the diagnosis and characterization of colon motion disorders. We have applied the proposed spatio-temporal method on Cine MRI data sets of healthy volunteers. The results have been inspected and validated by an expert radiologist. Segmentation and cylindrical approximation of the colon results in a 4D visualization of the peristaltic motion.

  1. Echo's Legacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Echo 1 Satellite is simply a very large balloon, the diameter of a 10 story building. Metallized Products, Inc. developed a special material for NASA used for the balloons's skin. For "bouncing signals," material had to be reflective, lightweight, and thin enough to be folded into a beach ball size canister for delivery into orbit, where it would automatically inflate. Material selected was mylar polyester, with a reflective layer of tiny aluminum particles so fine that Echo's skin had a thickness half that of cellophane on a cigarette package.

  2. Multishot diffusion-weighted SPLICE PROPELLER MRI of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie; Omary, Reed A; Larson, Andrew C

    2008-05-01

    Multishot FSE (fast spin echo)-based diffusion-weighted (DW)-PROPELLER (periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction) MRI offers the potential to reduce susceptibility artifacts associated with single-shot DW-EPI (echo-planar imaging) approaches. However, DW-PROPELLER in the abdomen is challenging due to the large field-of-view and respiratory motion during DW preparation. Incoherent signal phase due to motion will violate the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) conditions, leading to destructive interference between spin echo and stimulated echo signals and consequent signal cancellation. The SPLICE (split-echo acquisition of FSE signals) technique can mitigate non-CPMG artifacts in FSE-based sequences. For SPLICE, spin echo and stimulated echo are separated by using imbalanced readout gradients and extended acquisition window. Two signal families each with coherent phase properties are acquired at different intervals within the readout window. Separate reconstruction of these two signal families can avoid destructive phase interference. Phantom studies were performed to validate signal phase properties with different initial magnetization phases. This study evaluated the feasibility of combining SPLICE and PROPELLER for DW imaging of the abdomen. It is demonstrated that DW-SPLICE-PROPELLER can effectively mitigate non-CPMG artifacts and improve DW image quality and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map homogeneity. PMID:18429036

  3. ECHO virus

    MedlinePlus

    Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that lead to gastrointestinal infection and skin rashes. ... Echovirus is one of several families of viruses that affect the ... are common. In the United States, they are most common in ...

  4. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Wyrwicz, A. M.; Li, L.; Kao, C.-M.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 T small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2×8 LYSO scintillators (5.0×5.0×10.0 mm3 with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner.

  5. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Li, Limin; Kao, C.-M.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2 × 8 LYSO scintillators (5.0 × 5.0 × 10.0 mm3 with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner. PMID:25937685

  6. Becoming a pianist. An fMRI study of musical literacy acquisition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lauren; Henson, Rik; Kampe, Knut; Walsh, Vincent; Turner, Robert; Frith, Uta

    2003-11-01

    Musically naïve subjects were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after they had been taught to read music and play keyboard. When subjects played melodies from musical notation after training, activation was seen in a cluster of voxels within the right superior parietal cortex consistent with the view that music reading involves spatial sensorimotor mapping. PMID:14681142

  7. A new technique for MR elastography of the supraspinatus muscle: A gradient-echo type multi-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daiki; Numano, Tomokazu; Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Takamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Takaaki; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can measure tissue stiffness quantitatively and noninvasively. Supraspinatus muscle injury is a significant problem among throwing athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an MRE technique for application to the supraspinatus muscle by using a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRE acquisitions were performed with a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence at 100Hz pneumatic vibration. A custom-designed vibration pad was used as a pneumatic transducer in order to adapt to individual shoulder shapes. In a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence, without motion encoding gradient (MEG) that synchronizes with vibrations, bipolar readout gradient lobes achieved a similar function to MEG (MEG-like effect). In other words, a dedicated MRE sequence (built-in MEG) is not always necessary for MRE. In this study, 7 healthy volunteers underwent MRE. We investigated the effects of direction of the MEG-like effect and selected imaging planes on the patterns of wave propagation (wave image). The results indicated that wave images showed clear wave propagation on a condition that the direction of the MEG-like effect was nearly perpendicular to the long axis of the supraspinatus muscle, and that the imaging plane was superior to the proximal supraspinatus muscle. This limited condition might be ascribed to specific features of fibers in the supraspinatus muscle and wave reflection from the boundaries of the supraspinous fossa. The mean stiffness of the supraspinatus muscle was 10.6±3.17kPa. Our results demonstrated that using MRE, our method can be applied to the supraspinatus muscle by using conventional MRI. PMID:27374984

  8. Handling changes in MRI acquisition parameters in modeling whole brain lesion volume and atrophy data in multiple sclerosis subjects: Comparison of linear mixed-effect models

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Alicia S.; Egorova, Svetlana; Anderson, Mark C.; Polgar-Turcsanyi, Mariann; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L.; Guttmann, Charles R.G.; Bakshi, Rohit; Healy, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides important outcome measures in the longitudinal evaluation of disease activity and progression in MS subjects. Two common measures derived from brain MRI scans are the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) and T2 hyperintense lesion volume (T2LV), and these measures are routinely assessed longitudinally in clinical trials and observational studies. When measuring each outcome longitudinally, observed changes may be potentially confounded by variability in MRI acquisition parameters between scans. In order to accurately model longitudinal change, the acquisition parameters should thus be considered in statistical models. In this paper, several models for including protocol as well as individual MRI acquisition parameters in linear mixed models were compared using a large dataset of 3453 longitudinal MRI scans from 1341 subjects enrolled in the CLIMB study, and model fit indices were compared across the models. The model that best explained the variance in BPF data was a random intercept and random slope with protocol specific residual variance along with the following fixed-effects: baseline age, baseline disease duration, protocol and study time. The model that best explained the variance in T2LV was a random intercept and random slope along with the following fixed-effects: baseline age, baseline disease duration, protocol and study time. In light of these findings, future studies pertaining to BPF and T2LV outcomes should carefully account for the protocol factors within longitudinal models to ensure that the disease trajectory of MS subjects can be assessed more accurately. PMID:26199872

  9. Ultrasound echoes as biometric navigators.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin M; McDannold, Nathan J

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a new method of using ultrasound data to achieve prospective motion compensation in MRI, especially for respiratory motion during interventional MRI procedures in moving organs such as the liver. The method relies on fingerprint-like biometrically distinct ultrasound echo patterns produced by different locations in tissue, which are collated with geometrical information from MRI during a training stage to form a mapping table that relates ultrasound measurements to positions. During prospective correction, the system makes frequent ultrasound measurements and uses the map to determine the corresponding position. Results in motorized linear motion phantoms and freely breathing animals indicate that the system performs well. Apparent motion is reduced by up to 97.8%, and motion artifacts are reduced or eliminated in two-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo images. The motion compensation is sufficient to permit MRI thermometry of focused ultrasound heating during respiratory-like motion, with results similar to those obtained in the absence of motion. This new technique may have applications for MRI thermometry and other dynamic imaging in the abdomen during free breathing. PMID:22648783

  10. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  11. Magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging signal and texture features for the prediction of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Early diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) would confer many benefits. Several biomarkers have been proposed to achieve such a task, where features extracted from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have played an important role. However, studies have focused exclusively on morphological characteristics. This study aims to determine whether features relating to the signal and texture of the image could predict mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD progression. Clinical, biological, and positron emission tomography information and MRI images of 62 subjects from the AD neuroimaging initiative were used in this study, extracting 4150 features from each MRI. Within this multimodal database, a feature selection algorithm was used to obtain an accurate and small logistic regression model, generated by a methodology that yielded a mean blind test accuracy of 0.79. This model included six features, five of them obtained from the MRI images, and one obtained from genotyping. A risk analysis divided the subjects into low-risk and high-risk groups according to a prognostic index. The groups were statistically different (p-value=2.04e−11). These results demonstrated that MRI features related to both signal and texture add MCI to AD predictive power, and supported the ongoing notion that multimodal biomarkers outperform single-modality ones. PMID:26158047

  12. Age of second language acquisition affects nonverbal conflict processing in children: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Struys, Esli; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background In their daily communication, bilinguals switch between two languages, a process that involves the selection of a target language and minimization of interference from a nontarget language. Previous studies have uncovered the neural structure in bilinguals and the activation patterns associated with performing verbal conflict tasks. One question that remains, however is whether this extra verbal switching affects brain function during nonverbal conflict tasks. Methods In this study, we have used fMRI to investigate the impact of bilingualism in children performing two nonverbal tasks involving stimulus–stimulus and stimulus–response conflicts. Three groups of 8–11-year-old children – bilinguals from birth (2L1), second language learners (L2L), and a control group of monolinguals (1L1) – were scanned while performing a color Simon and a numerical Stroop task. Reaction times and accuracy were logged. Results Compared to monolingual controls, bilingual children showed higher behavioral congruency effect of these tasks, which is matched by the recruitment of brain regions that are generally used in general cognitive control, language processing or to solve language conflict situations in bilinguals (caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus, STG, precuneus). Further, the activation of these areas was found to be higher in 2L1 compared to L2L. Conclusion The coupling of longer reaction times to the recruitment of extra language-related brain areas supports the hypothesis that when dealing with language conflicts the specialization of bilinguals hampers the way they can process with nonverbal conflicts, at least at early stages in life. PMID:25328840

  13. Ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging using gradient pre-equalization and compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Fabich, Hilary T; Benning, Martin; Sederman, Andrew J; Holland, Daniel J

    2014-08-01

    Ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging is a well-known technique used in medical MRI, however, the implementation of the sequence remains non-trivial. This paper introduces UTE for non-medical applications and outlines a method for the implementation of UTE to enable accurate slice selection and short acquisition times. Slice selection in UTE requires fast, accurate switching of the gradient and r.f. pulses. Here a gradient "pre-equalization" technique is used to optimize the gradient switching and achieve an effective echo time of 10μs. In order to minimize the echo time, k-space is sampled radially. A compressed sensing approach is used to minimize the total acquisition time. Using the corrections for slice selection and acquisition along with novel image reconstruction techniques, UTE is shown to be a viable method to study samples of cork and rubber with a shorter signal lifetime than can typically be measured. Further, the compressed sensing image reconstruction algorithm is shown to provide accurate images of the samples with as little as 12.5% of the full k-space data set, potentially permitting real time imaging of short T2(*) materials. PMID:25036293

  14. Micro-MRI-based image acquisition and processing system for assessing the response to therapeutic intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilić, B.; Ladinsky, G. A.; Saha, P. K.; Wehrli, F. W.

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is the cause of over 1.5 million bone fractures annually. Most of these fractures occur in sites rich in trabecular bone, a complex network of bony struts and plates found throughout the skeleton. The three-dimensional structure of the trabecular bone network significantly determines mechanical strength and thus fracture resistance. Here we present a data acquisition and processing system that allows efficient noninvasive assessment of trabecular bone structure through a "virtual bone biopsy". High-resolution MR images are acquired from which the trabecular bone network is extracted by estimating the partial bone occupancy of each voxel. A heuristic voxel subdivision increases the effective resolution of the bone volume fraction map and serves a basis for subsequent analysis of topological and orientational parameters. Semi-automated registration and segmentation ensure selection of the same anatomical location in subjects imaged at different time points during treatment. It is shown with excerpts from an ongoing clinical study of early post-menopausal women, that significant reduction in network connectivity occurs in the control group while the structural integrity is maintained in the hormone replacement group. The system described should be suited for large-scale studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in subjects with metabolic bone disease.

  15. The role of age of acquisition on past tense generation in Spanish-English bilinguals: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Eric J; Hernandez, Arturo E

    2013-04-01

    At its most basic sense, the sensorimotor/emergentist (S/E) model suggests that early second language (L2) learning is preferentially reliant upon sensory and motor processes, while later L2 learning is accomplished by greater reliance on executive abilities. To investigate the S/E model using fMRI, neural correlates of L2 age of acquisition were examined by employing a past-tense generation task on 22 L2 proficient bilinguals. Early bilinguals preferentially recruited left hemisphere sensorimotor regions involved in motoric control and articulation. In contrast, later learners, to a greater degree, engaged regions involved in executive cognitive control and lexical access. The data support the notion that early L2 learners devote neural resources to motor control during lexical retrieval. In contrast, later L2 learners recruit executive control mechanisms to generate the past tense. These data are consistent with the S/E model of bilingual language learning, and serve as an extension of cognitive control theories. PMID:23454071

  16. Comparison of Diffusion MRI Acquisition Protocols for the In Vivo Characterization of the Mouse Spinal Cord: Variability Analysis and Application to an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Model.

    PubMed

    Figini, Matteo; Scotti, Alessandro; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Bonanno, Silvia; Padelli, Francesco; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Zucca, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) has relevant applications in the microstructural characterization of the spinal cord, especially in neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have a pivotal role in the study of such diseases; however, in vivo spinal dMRI of small animals entails additional challenges that require a systematical investigation of acquisition parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare three acquisition protocols and identify the scanning parameters allowing a robust estimation of the main diffusion quantities and a good sensitivity to neurodegeneration in the mouse spinal cord. For all the protocols, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to noise ratios and the mean value and variability of Diffusion Tensor metrics were evaluated in healthy controls. For the estimation of fractional anisotropy less variability was provided by protocols with more diffusion directions, for the estimation of mean, axial and radial diffusivity by protocols with fewer diffusion directions and higher diffusion weighting. Intermediate features (12 directions, b = 1200 s/mm2) provided the overall minimum inter- and intra-subject variability in most cases. In order to test the diagnostic sensitivity of the protocols, 7 G93A-SOD1 mice (model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) at 10 and 17 weeks of age were scanned and the derived diffusion parameters compared with those estimated in age-matched healthy animals. The protocols with an intermediate or high number of diffusion directions provided the best differentiation between the two groups at week 17, whereas only few local significant differences were highlighted at week 10. According to our results, a dMRI protocol with an intermediate number of diffusion gradient directions and a relatively high diffusion weighting is optimal for spinal cord imaging. Further work is needed to confirm these results and for a finer tuning of acquisition parameters. Nevertheless, our findings could be important for the

  17. Comparison of Diffusion MRI Acquisition Protocols for the In Vivo Characterization of the Mouse Spinal Cord: Variability Analysis and Application to an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzo, Stefania; Bonanno, Silvia; Padelli, Francesco; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Zucca, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) has relevant applications in the microstructural characterization of the spinal cord, especially in neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have a pivotal role in the study of such diseases; however, in vivo spinal dMRI of small animals entails additional challenges that require a systematical investigation of acquisition parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare three acquisition protocols and identify the scanning parameters allowing a robust estimation of the main diffusion quantities and a good sensitivity to neurodegeneration in the mouse spinal cord. For all the protocols, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to noise ratios and the mean value and variability of Diffusion Tensor metrics were evaluated in healthy controls. For the estimation of fractional anisotropy less variability was provided by protocols with more diffusion directions, for the estimation of mean, axial and radial diffusivity by protocols with fewer diffusion directions and higher diffusion weighting. Intermediate features (12 directions, b = 1200 s/mm2) provided the overall minimum inter- and intra-subject variability in most cases. In order to test the diagnostic sensitivity of the protocols, 7 G93A-SOD1 mice (model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) at 10 and 17 weeks of age were scanned and the derived diffusion parameters compared with those estimated in age-matched healthy animals. The protocols with an intermediate or high number of diffusion directions provided the best differentiation between the two groups at week 17, whereas only few local significant differences were highlighted at week 10. According to our results, a dMRI protocol with an intermediate number of diffusion gradient directions and a relatively high diffusion weighting is optimal for spinal cord imaging. Further work is needed to confirm these results and for a finer tuning of acquisition parameters. Nevertheless, our findings could be important for the

  18. Two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging with combined free induction decay and long-TE acquisition (FID echo spectroscopic imaging, FIDESI) for the detection of intramyocellular lipids in calf muscle at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Just Kukurova, Ivica; Valkovič, Ladislav; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdošík, Martin; Krššák, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Chmelík, Marek

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D CSI) sequence, with simultaneous acquisition of free induction decay (FID) and long TEs, for the detection and quantification of intramyocellular lipids (IMCLs) in the calf at 7 T. The feasibility of the new 2D CSI sequence, which acquires FID (acquisition delay, 1.3 ms) and an echo (long TE) in one measurement, was evaluated in phantoms and volunteers (n = 5): TR/TE*/TE = 800/1.3/156 ms; 48 × 48 matrix; field of view, 200 × 200 × 20 mm(3) ; Hamming filter; no water suppression; measurement time, 22 min 2 s. The IMCL concentration and subcutaneous lipid contamination were assessed. Spectra in the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SOL) muscles were analyzed. The water signal from the FID acquisition was used as an internal concentration reference. In the spectra from subcutaneous adipose tissue (SUB) and bone marrow (BM), an unsaturation index (UI) of the vinyl-H (5.3 ppm) to methyl-CH3 ratio, and a polyunsaturation index (pUI) of the diallylic-H (2.77 ppm) to -CH3 ratio, were calculated. Long-TE spectra from muscles showed a simplified spectral pattern with well-separated IMCL for several muscle groups in the same scan. The IMCL to water ratio was largest in SOL (0.66% ± 0.23%), and lower in GM (0.37% ± 0.14%) and TA (0.36% ± 0.12%). UI and pUI for SUB were 0.65 ± 0.06 and 0.18 ± 0.04, respectively, and for BM were 0.60 ± 0.16 and 0.18 ± 0.08, respectively. The new sequence, with the proposed name 'free induction decay echo spectroscopic imaging' (FIDESI), provides information on both specific lipid resonances and water signal from different tissues in the calf, with high spectral and spatial resolution, as well as minimal voxel bleeding and subcutaneous lipid contamination, in clinically acceptable measurement times. PMID:24912448

  19. An open-source hardware and software system for acquisition and real-time processing of electrophysiology during high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Purdon, Patrick L; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-11-15

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open-source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (<0.6microV p-p input noise), electromagnetic compatibility for MRI (tested up to 7T), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has been used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7T examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3T fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level. PMID:18761038

  20. An Open-Source Hardware and Software System for Acquisition and Real-Time Processing of Electrophysiology during High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, Patrick L.; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (< 0.6 uV p-p input noise), electromagnetic compatibility for MRI (tested up to 7 Tesla), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7 Tesla examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3 Tesla fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level. PMID:18761038

  1. Appropriate selection of MRI sequences for common scenarios in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Govind B

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about sequence properties is essential to plan and acquire a diagnostic MRI examination. The broad four categories of sequences include spin echo (SE), gradient echo (GRE), inversion recovery (IR) and echoplanar imaging (EPI). Varieties of sequences from these four categories are available for clinical application. They have different contrast mechanisms, spatial and contrast resolution and speed of acquisition. Choice of sequence differs in various scenarios in clinical practice such as solid organ imaging, moving target imaging, bone and bone marrow imaging, cartilage imaging and vessel imaging, taking into consideration properties of sequences to answer the clinical question. Broad classification of sequences and differences in their contrast, spatial and contrast resolution, and speed of acquisition are discussed in this review. A few common clinical scenarios of MRI imaging are illustrated, along with reasons for the given sequence choices. PMID:27229493

  2. Tracking of an interventional catheter with a ferromagnetic tip using dual-echo projections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Maier, Florian; Krafft, Axel Joachim; Umathum, Reiner; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Interventional devices with ferromagnetic components can be manipulated remotely using forces induced by the MRI gradients. To deflect the tip of an endovascular catheter, large ferromagnetic spheres of 2 mm diameter are required to exert sufficiently high magnetic forces; however, tracking of these devices is difficult due to the large image artifacts. In this study, a new dual-echo technique is proposed to improve the stability of localizing and tracking medical devices with ferromagnetic components. MR tracking methods with selective off-resonant excitation and phase compensation with a rephasing gradient can detect ferromagnetic spheres up to a diameter of 1 mm only. In this work, a dual-echo technique is used with two rephasing gradients to stabilize the off-set localization. With rephasing being applied in orthogonal directions, an SNR of 5 was achieved in the signal projections. Compared to a single-echo acquisition the dual-echo method reduces the position error in a phantom from 8 mm to 1.6 mm. In an in vivo study a tracking precision of 4 mm was measured without steering gradients at an image update rate of 2 images per second. Steering experiments were successfully performed with a prototype catheter with ferromagnetic sphere in an aorta phantom and in the vena cava of a pig. PMID:23892103

  3. Liver acquisition with volume acceleration flex on 70-cm wide-bore and 60-cm conventional-bore 3.0-T MRI.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Keiko; Hashido, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the uniformity of fat suppression and image quality between liver acquisition with volume acceleration flex (LAVA-Flex) and LAVA on 60-cm conventional-bore and 70-cm wide-bore 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The uniformity of fat suppression by LAVA-Flex and LAVA was assessed as the efficiency of suppression of superficial fat at the levels of the liver dome, porta, and renal hilum. Percentage standard deviation (%SD) was calculated using the following equation: %SD (%) = 100 × SD of the regions of interest (ROIs)/mean value of the signal intensity (SI) in the ROIs. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast ratio (CR) were calculated. In the LAVA sequence, the %SD in all slices on wide-bore 3.0-T MRI was significantly higher than that on conventional-bore 3.0-T MRI (P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in fat signal uniformity between the conventional and wide-bore scanners when LAVA-Flex was used. In the liver, there were no significant differences in SNR between the two sequences. However, the SNR in the pancreas was lower for the wide-bore scanner than for the conventional-bore scanner for both sequences (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CR for the liver and fat between LAVA-Flex and LAVA in both scanners. The CR in the LAVA-Flex images obtained by wide-bore MRI was significantly higher than that in the LAVA-Flex images recorded by conventional-bore MRI (P < 0.001). LAVA-Flex offers more homogenous fat suppression in the upper abdomen than LAVA for both conventional and wide-bore 3.0-T MRI. PMID:26739299

  4. Are Nonlinguistic Functions in ''Broca's Area'' Prerequisites for Language Acquisition? fMRI Findings from an Ontogenetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ralph-Axel; Basho, Surina

    2004-01-01

    There is incomplete consensus on the anatomical demarcation of Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus and its functional characterization remains a matter of debate. Exclusive syntactic specialization has been proposed, but is overall inconsistent with the neuroimaging literature. We examined three functional MRI (fMRI) datasets on…

  5. Physiological neuronal decline in healthy aging human brain - An in vivo study with MRI and short echo-time whole-brain (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Qi; Maudsley, Andrew A; Sabati, Mohammad; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Schmitz, Birte; Schütze, Martin; Bronzlik, Paul; Kahl, Kai G; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2016-08-15

    Knowledge of physiological aging in healthy human brain is increasingly important for neuroscientific research and clinical diagnosis. To investigate neuronal decline in normal aging brain eighty-one healthy subjects aged between 20 and 70years were studied with MRI and whole-brain (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging. Concentrations of brain metabolites N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), total creatine (tCr), myo-inositol (mI), and glutamine+glutamate (Glx) in ratios to internal water, and the fractional volumes of brain tissue were estimated simultaneously in eight cerebral lobes and in cerebellum. Results demonstrated that an age-related decrease in gray matter volume was the largest contribution to changes in brain volume. Both lobar NAA and the fractional volume of gray matter (FVGM) decreased with age in all cerebral lobes, indicating that the decreased NAA was predominantly associated with decreased gray matter volume and neuronal density or metabolic activity. In cerebral white matter Cho, tCr, and mI increased with age in association with increased fractional volume, showing altered cellular membrane turn-over, energy metabolism, and glial activity in human aging white matter. In cerebellum tCr increased while brain tissue volume decreased with age, showing difference to cerebral aging. The observed age-related metabolic and microstructural variations suggest that physiological neuronal decline in aging human brain is associated with a reduction of gray matter volume and neuronal density, in combination with cellular aging in white matter indicated by microstructural alterations and altered energy metabolism in the cerebellum. PMID:27164326

  6. Sparse Reconstruction Challenge for diffusion MRI: Validation on a physical phantom to determine which acquisition scheme and analysis method to use?

    PubMed

    Ning, Lipeng; Laun, Frederik; Gur, Yaniv; DiBella, Edward V R; Deslauriers-Gauthier, Samuel; Megherbi, Thinhinane; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Zucchelli, Mauro; Menegaz, Gloria; Fick, Rutger; St-Jean, Samuel; Paquette, Michael; Aranda, Ramon; Descoteaux, Maxime; Deriche, Rachid; O'Donnell, Lauren; Rathi, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is the modality of choice for investigating in-vivo white matter connectivity and neural tissue architecture of the brain. The diffusion-weighted signal in dMRI reflects the diffusivity of water molecules in brain tissue and can be utilized to produce image-based biomarkers for clinical research. Due to the constraints on scanning time, a limited number of measurements can be acquired within a clinically feasible scan time. In order to reconstruct the dMRI signal from a discrete set of measurements, a large number of algorithms have been proposed in recent years in conjunction with varying sampling schemes, i.e., with varying b-values and gradient directions. Thus, it is imperative to compare the performance of these reconstruction methods on a single data set to provide appropriate guidelines to neuroscientists on making an informed decision while designing their acquisition protocols. For this purpose, the SPArse Reconstruction Challenge (SPARC) was held along with the workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (at MICCAI 2014) to validate the performance of multiple reconstruction methods using data acquired from a physical phantom. A total of 16 reconstruction algorithms (9 teams) participated in this community challenge. The goal was to reconstruct single b-value and/or multiple b-value data from a sparse set of measurements. In particular, the aim was to determine an appropriate acquisition protocol (in terms of the number of measurements, b-values) and the analysis method to use for a neuroimaging study. The challenge did not delve on the accuracy of these methods in estimating model specific measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) or mean diffusivity, but on the accuracy of these methods to fit the data. This paper presents several quantitative results pertaining to each reconstruction algorithm. The conclusions in this paper provide a valuable guideline for choosing a suitable algorithm and the corresponding

  7. Analysis of speech-related variance in rapid event-related fMRI using a time-aware acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S; Grabowski, T J; Razavi, M; Eaton, B; Bolinger, L

    2006-02-15

    Speech production introduces signal changes in fMRI data that can mimic or mask the task-induced BOLD response. Rapid event-related designs with variable ISIs address these concerns by minimizing the correlation of task and speech-related signal changes without sacrificing efficiency; however, the increase in residual variance due to speech still decreases statistical power and must be explicitly addressed primarily through post-processing techniques. We investigated the timing, magnitude, and location of speech-related variance in an overt picture naming fMRI study with a rapid event-related design, using a data acquisition system that time-stamped image acquisitions, speech, and a pneumatic belt signal on the same clock. Using a spectral subtraction algorithm to remove scanner gradient noise from recorded speech, we related the timing of speech, stimulus presentation, chest wall movement, and image acquisition. We explored the relationship of an extended speech event time course and respiration on signal variance by performing a series of voxelwise regression analyses. Our results demonstrate that these effects are spatially heterogeneous, but their anatomic locations converge across subjects. Affected locations included basal areas (orbitofrontal, mesial temporal, brainstem), areas adjacent to CSF spaces, and lateral frontal areas. If left unmodeled, speech-related variance can result in regional detection bias that affects some areas critically implicated in language function. The results establish the feasibility of detecting and mitigating speech-related variance in rapid event-related fMRI experiments with single word utterances. They further demonstrate the utility of precise timing information about speech and respiration for this purpose. PMID:16412665

  8. Whole brain 3D T2-weighted BOLD fMRI at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Pekar, James J.; Jones, Craig K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. Methods It employs a T2-preparation module to induce BOLD contrast, followed by a single-shot 3D fast gradient-echo readout with short TE. It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the “dead time” due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed “3D T2prep-GRE”, was implemented at 7T with a typical spatial (2.5×2.5×2.5mm3) and temporal (TR=2.3s) resolution for fMRI and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. Results In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. Conclusion This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. PMID:24338901

  9. Orientation and Alignment Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-04-01

    We present one of the simplest classical systems featuring the echo phenomenon—a collection of randomly oriented free rotors with dispersed rotational velocities. Following excitation by a pair of time-delayed impulsive kicks, the mean orientation or alignment of the ensemble exhibits multiple echoes and fractional echoes. We elucidate the mechanism of the echo formation by the kick-induced filamentation of phase space, and provide the first experimental demonstration of classical alignment echoes in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  10. MRI simulator: a teaching tool for radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, Debra A.; Kishore, Sheel; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    1990-08-01

    The increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a clinical modality has put an enormous burden on medical institutions to cost-effectively teach Mill scanning techniques to technologists and physicians. Since MRI scanner time is a scarce resource, it would be ideal if the teaching could be effectively performed off-line. In order to meet this goal, the Radiology Department has designed and developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Simulator. The Simulator in its current implementation mimics the General Electric Signa scanner's user-interface for image acquisition. The design is general enough to be applied to other MRI scanners. One unique feature of the simulator is its incorporation of an image-synthesis module which permits the user to derive images for any arbitrary combination of pulsing parameters for spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion recovery pulse sequences. These images are computed in five seconds. The development platform chosen is a standard Apple Macintosh-Il computer with no specialized hardware peripherals. The user-interface is implemented in HyperCard. All other software development including synthesis and display functions are implemented under the MPW 'C' environment. The scan parameters, demographics and images are tracked using an Oracle database. Images are currently stored on magnetic disk but could be stored on optical media with minimal effort.

  11. Spin-Echo Resting-State Functional Connectivity in High-Susceptibility Regions: Accuracy, Reliability, and the Impact of Physiological Noise.

    PubMed

    Khatamian, Yasha B; Golestani, Ali M; Ragot, Don M; Chen, J Jean

    2016-05-01

    Gradient-echo (GE) echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the method of choice in blood-oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) studies, as it demonstrates substantially higher BOLD sensitivity than its spin-echo (SE) counterpart. However, it is also well known that the GE-EPI signal is prone to signal dropouts and shifts due to susceptibility effects near air-tissue interfaces. SE-EPI, in contrast, is minimally affected by these artifacts. In this study, we quantify, for the first time, the sensitivity and specificity of SE and GE EPI for resting-state fMRI functional connectivity (fcMRI) mapping, using the 1000-brain fcMRI atlas (Yeo et al., 2011 ) as the pseudoground truth. Moreover, we assess the influence of physiological processes on resting-state BOLD measured using both regular and ultrafast GE and SE acquisitions. Our work demonstrates that SE-EPI and GE-EPI are associated with similar sensitivities, specificities, and intersubject reproducibility in fcMRI for most brain networks, generated using both seed-based analysis and independent component analysis. More importantly, SE-based fcMRI measurements demonstrated significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and intersubject reproducibility in high-susceptibility regions, spanning the limbic and frontal networks in the 1000-brain atlas. In addition, SE-EPI is significantly less sensitive to prominent sources of physiological noise, including low-frequency respiratory volume and heart rate variations. Our work suggests that SE-EPI should be increasingly adopted in the study of networks spanning susceptibility-affected brain regions, including those that are important to memory, language, and emotion. PMID:26842962

  12. Comparison between optimized GRE and RARE sequences for 19F MRI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffientini, Chiara D.; Mastropietro, Alfonso; Caffini, Matteo; Cocco, Sara; Zucca, Ileana; Scotti, Alessandro; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2014-03-01

    In 19F-MRI studies limiting factors are the presence of a low signal due to the low concentration of 19F-nuclei, necessary for biological applications, and the inherent low sensitivity of MRI. Hence, acquiring images using the pulse sequence with the best signal to noise ratio (SNR) by optimizing the acquisition parameters specifically to a 19F compound is a core issue. In 19F-MRI, multiple-spin-echo (RARE) and gradient-echo (GRE) are the two most frequently used pulse sequence families; therefore we performed an optimization study of GRE pulse sequences based on numerical simulations and experimental acquisitions on fluorinated compounds. We compared GRE performance to an optimized RARE sequence. Images were acquired on a 7T MRI preclinical scanner on phantoms containing different fluorinated compounds. Actual relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) were evaluated in order to predict SNR dependence on sequence parameters. Experimental comparisons between spoiled GRE and RARE, obtained at a fixed acquisition time and in steady state condition, showed RARE sequence outperforming the spoiled GRE (up to 406% higher). Conversely, the use of the unbalanced-SSFP showed a significant increase in SNR compared to RARE (up to 28% higher). Moreover, this sequence (as GRE in general) was confirmed to be virtually insensitive to T1 and T2 relaxation times, after proper optimization, thus improving marker independence from the biological environment. These results confirm the efficacy of the proposed optimization tool and foster further investigation addressing in-vivo applicability.

  13. High-Resolution 3-T Endorectal Prostate MRI: A Multireader Study of Radiologist Preference and Perceived Interpretive Quality of 2D and 3D T2-Weighted Fast Spin-Echo MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Noworolski, Susan M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Jhaveri, Kartik S.; Raman, Steve S.; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Zagoria, Ronald J.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to compare the perceived quality of 3-T axial T2-weighted high-resolution 2D and high-resolution 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) endorectal MR images of the prostate. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six radiologists independently reviewed paired 3-T axial T2-weighted high-resolution 2D and 3D FSE endorectal MR images of the prostates of 85 men in two sessions. In the first session (n = 85), each reader selected his or her preferred images; in the second session (n = 28), they determined their confidence in tumor identification and compared the depiction of the prostatic anatomy, tumor conspicuity, and subjective intrinsic image quality of images. A meta-analysis using a random-effects model, logistic regression, and the paired Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used for statistical analyses. RESULTS Three readers preferred the 2D acquisition (67–89%), and the other three preferred the 3D images (70–80%). The option for one of the techniques was not associated with any of the predictor variables. The 2D FSE images were significantly sharper than 3D FSE (p < 0.001) and significantly more likely to exhibit other (nonmotion) artifacts (p = 0.002). No other statistically significant differences were found. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that there are strong individual preferences for the 2D or 3D FSE MR images, but there was a wide variability among radiologists. There were differences in image quality (image sharpness and presence of artifacts not related to motion) but not in the sequences’ ability to delineate the glandular anatomy and depict a cancerous tumor. PMID:26491891

  14. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM). PMID:19381963

  15. Project Echo Task Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'A technician assigned to the Project Echo Task Group separates the two hemispheres of the Echo 1 container for inspection. The charge that freed the balloon was placed inside of a ring encircling the canister at its equator.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 181.

  16. PARACEST MRI With Improved Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanshu; Ali, M. Meser; Yoo, Byunghee; Griswold, Mark A.; Tkach, Jean A.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) is a novel contrast mechanism for MRI. A PARACEST MRI methodology with high temporal resolution is highly desired for in vivo MRI applications of molecular imaging. To address this need, a strategy has been developed that includes a long selective saturation period before each repetition of a Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence. This strategy is suitable for the application of PARACEST contrast agents to environments with long T1 relaxation times. An alternative strategy uses short selective saturation periods before the acquisition of each k-space trajectory to maintain steady state conditions, which can be implemented with a Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) pulse sequence. These short saturation periods lengthen the total scan time as compared to the first approach but compensate for the loss in PARACEST contrast related to T1 relaxation. Both approaches have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo with significantly improved temporal resolutions as compared to a conventional gradient-echo PARACEST method without sacrificing CNR efficiency. These demonstrations also adopted a strategy for measuring the PARACEST effect that only requires selective saturation at a single MR frequency, which further improves temporal resolution for PARACEST detection. PMID:19165903

  17. Gradient-Modulated PETRA MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Goerke, Ute; Wang, Luning; Ellermann, Jutta; Metzger, Gregory J.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2* signal decay is a common issue in radial ultrashort echo time MRI sequences. One solution is to use a higher readout bandwidth, but this may be impractical for some techniques like pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), which is a hybrid method of zero echo time and single point imaging techniques. Specifically, PETRA has severe specific absorption rate (SAR) and radiofrequency (RF) pulse peak power limitations when using higher bandwidths in human measurements. In this study, we introduce gradient modulation (GM) to PETRA to reduce image blurring artifacts while keeping SAR and RF peak power low. Tolerance of GM-PETRA to image blurring was evaluated in simulations and experiments by comparing with the conventional PETRA technique. We performed inner ear imaging of a healthy subject at 7T. GM-PETRA showed significantly less image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2* signal decay compared to PETRA. In in vivo imaging, GM-PETRA nicely captured complex structures of the inner ear such as the cochlea and semicircular canals. Gradient modulation can improve the PETRA image quality and mitigate SAR and RF peak power limitations without special hardware modification in clinical scanners. PMID:26771005

  18. Retrospective correction of B0-field-induced geometric distortions in multislice echo planar images: a 3D solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, Roderick W.; Coburn, Edward A.

    2000-04-01

    A method has been developed to utilize a 3D B0 fieldmap, with a multi-volume-of-interest segmentation map, to quantify and correct geometric distortions in echo-planar images. The purpose is to provide accurate co-registration of anatomical MRI to functional MRI time course sequences. A data structure capable of extracting and reporting the necessary information forms a central part of the solution. Images were obtained from a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an experimental y-gradient insert coil. Two 3D-gradient echo sequences supply the data needed to calculate the B0 map across the volume. Segmentation of the volume into brain/background produces the data needed for the phase unwrapping and volume(s) of interest generation, from which the global B0 variation map is obtained. Subsequent EPI acquisition yields the fMRI time- course information. Tests were carried out on a phantom and a human volunteer engaged in a motor task (finger-tapping). Strong distortions were measured, and subsequently corrected, particularly near the petrous bone/mastoid air cells and in the frontal and maxillary sinuses. Additionally, a strong eddy current resulting from the unshielded y-gradient was detected. The method facilitates geometric distortion correction through an imaging volume, containing multiple regions of interest within a slice, starting from a single starting point.

  19. Light echoes - Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1988-01-01

    The sudden brilliance of a nova eruption will be reflected on surrounding dust grains to create a phantom nebula. Previous searches for these light echoes have used relatively short exposures with photograhic detectors. This paper reports on a search around eight recent novae with long exposures using a CCD camera. Despite an increase of sensitivity by over an order of magnitude, no light echoes were detected. It is found that the average grain density must be less than about 10 to the -9th per cu cm for distances from 0.1 pc to 1000 pc from the novae. The light echo around Nova Persei 1901 was caused by reflection off clouds with grain densities of several times 10 to the -9th per cu cm which are at distances between 0.1 pc and 10 pc. Echoes from dust in a circumstellar shell or ejected during a previous eruption will be effectively unobservable.

  20. Accelerated self-gated UTE MRI of the murine heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Noorman, Nils; De Graaf, Wolter L.; Florack, Luc J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain radial Ultra-Short TE (UTE) MRI Cine of the beating mouse heart within reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated UTE with golden angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The stochastic nature of the retrospective triggering acquisition scheme produces an under-sampled and random kt-space filling that allows for compressed sensing reconstruction, hence reducing scan time. As a standard, an intragate multislice FLASH sequence with an acquisition time of 4.5 min per slice was used to produce standard Cine movies of 4 mice hearts with 15 frames per cardiac cycle. The proposed self-gated sequence is used to produce Cine movies with short echo time. The total scan time was 11 min per slice. 6 slices were planned to cover the heart from the base to the apex. 2X, 4X and 6X under-sampled k-spaces cine movies were produced from 2, 1 and 0.7 min data acquisitions for each slice. The accelerated cine movies of the mouse hearts were successfully reconstructed with a compressed sensing algorithm. Compared to the FLASH cine images, the UTE images showed much less flow artifacts due to the short echo time. Besides, the accelerated movies had high image quality and the undersampling artifacts were effectively removed. Left ventricular functional parameters derived from the standard and the accelerated cine movies were nearly identical.

  1. RF excitation using time interleaved acquisition of modes (TIAMO) to address B1 inhomogeneity in high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Orzada, Stephan; Maderwald, Stefan; Poser, Benedikt Andreas; Bitz, Andreas K; Quick, Harald H; Ladd, Mark E

    2010-08-01

    As the field strength and, therefore, the operational frequency in MRI is increased, the wavelength approaches the size of the human head/body, resulting in wave effects, which cause signal decreases and dropouts. Several multichannel approaches have been proposed to try to tackle these problems, including RF shimming, where each element in an array is driven by its own amplifier and modulated with a certain (constant) amplitude and phase relative to the other elements, and Transmit SENSE, where spatially tailored RF pulses are used. In this article, a relatively inexpensive and easy to use imaging scheme for 7 Tesla imaging is proposed to mitigate signal voids due to B(1)(+) field inhomogeneity. Two time-interleaved images are acquired using a different excitation mode for each. By forming virtual receive elements, both images are reconstructed together using GRAPPA to achieve a more homogeneous image, with only small SNR and SAR penalty in head and body imaging at 7 Tesla. PMID:20574991

  2. Light echoes from ancient supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Rest, Armin; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, R Chris; Welch, Douglas L; Becker, Andrew; Bergmann, Marcel; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Cook, Kem; Garg, Arti; Huber, Mark; Miknaitis, Gajus; Minniti, Dante; Nikolaev, Sergei; Stubbs, Christopher

    2005-12-22

    The light from historical supernovae could in principle still be visible as scattered-light echoes centuries after the explosion. The detection of light echoes could allow us to pinpoint the supernova event both in position and age and, most importantly, permit the acquisition of spectra to determine the 'type' of the supernova centuries after the direct light from the explosion first reached Earth. Although echoes have been discovered around some nearby extragalactic supernovae, targeted searches have not found any echoes in the regions of historical Galactic supernovae. Here we report three faint variable-surface-brightness complexes with high apparent proper motions pointing back to three of the six smallest (and probably youngest) previously catalogued supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which are believed to have been thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae. Using the distance and apparent proper motions of these echo arcs, we estimate ages of 610 and 410 years for two of them. PMID:16372003

  3. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; Reese, Timothy G.; Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  4. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Reese, Timothy G.; Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  5. fMRI contrast at high and ultrahigh magnetic fields: insight from complementary methods.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Luisa; Solomon, Eddy; Pyatigorskaya, Nadya; Roussel, Tangi; Le Bihan, Denis; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-06-01

    This manuscript examines the origins and nature of the function-derived activation detected by magnetic resonance imaging at ultrahigh fields using different encoding methods. A series of preclinical high field (7 T) and ultra-high field (17.2 T) fMRI experiments were performed using gradient echo EPI, spin echo EPI and spatio-temporally encoded (SPEN) strategies. The dependencies of the fMRI signal change on the strength of the magnetic field and on different acquisition and sequence parameters were investigated. Artifact-free rat brain images with good resolution in all areas, as well as significant localized activation maps upon forepaw stimulation, were obtained in a single scan using fully refocused SPEN sequences devoid of T2* effects. Our results showed that, besides the normal T2-weighted BOLD contribution that arises in spin-echo sequences, fMRI SPEN signals contain a strong component caused by apparent T1-related effects, demonstrating the potential of such technique for exploring functional activation in rodents and on humans at ultrahigh fields. PMID:25795340

  6. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  7. Restoring Susceptibility Induced MRI Signal Loss in Rat Brain at 9.4 T: A Step towards Whole Brain Functional Connectivity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rupeng; Liu, Xiping; Sidabras, Jason W.; Paulson, Eric S.; Jesmanowicz, Andrzej; Nencka, Andrew S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-01-01

    The aural cavity magnetic susceptibility artifact leads to significant echo planar imaging (EPI) signal dropout in rat deep brain that limits acquisition of functional connectivity fcMRI data. In this study, we provide a method that recovers much of the EPI signal in deep brain. Needle puncture introduction of a liquid-phase fluorocarbon into the middle ear allows acquisition of rat fcMRI data without signal dropout. We demonstrate that with seeds chosen from previously unavailable areas, including the amygdala and the insular cortex, we are able to acquire large scale networks, including the limbic system. This tool allows EPI-based neuroscience and pharmaceutical research in rat brain using fcMRI that was previously not feasible. PMID:25844644

  8. ECHO Status for International Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Beth; Lubelczyk, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The EOS Clearinghouse (ECHO) is a clearinghouse of spatial and temporal metadata, inclusive of NASA's Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) data holdings, that enables the science community to more easily exchange NASA data and information. Currently, ECHO has metadata descriptors for over 55 million individual data granules and 13 million browse images. The majority of ECHO's holdings come directly from data held in the NASA DAACs. The science disciplines and domains represented in ECHO are diverse and include metadata for all of NASA's Science Focus Area data. As middleware for a service-oriented enterprise, ECHO offers access to its capabilities through a set of publicly available Application Program Interfaces (APIs). More information about ECHO is available at http://eos.nasa.gov.echo. The presentation will discuss the status of the ECHO Partners, holdings, and activities, including the transition from the EOS Data Gateway to the Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST)

  9. Echo Boom Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordai, Phillipe; Rizzo, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Like their baby-boomer parents, the echo-boom generation is reshaping the college and university landscape. At 80 million strong, this group of children and young adults born between 1980 and 1995 now is flooding the college and university system, spurring a college building boom. According to Campus Space Crunch, a Hillier Architecture survey of…

  10. Resting-state fMRI in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen M; Andersson, Jesper; Auerbach, Edward J.; Beckmann, Christian F; Bijsterbosch, Janine; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Duff, Eugene; Feinberg, David A; Griffanti, Ludovica; Harms, Michael P; Kelly, Michael; Laumann, Timothy; Miller, Karla L; Moeller, Steen; Petersen, Steve; Power, Jonathan; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Snyder, Abraham Z; Vu, An; Woolrich, Mark W; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Van Essen, David; Glasser, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) allows one to study functional connectivity in the brain by acquiring fMRI data while subjects lie inactive in the MRI scanner, and taking advantage of the fact that functionally related brain regions spontaneously co-activate. rfMRI is one of the two primary data modalities being acquired for the Human Connectome Project (the other being diffusion MRI). A key objective is to generate a detailed in vivo mapping of functional connectivity in a large cohort of healthy adults (over 1,000 subjects), and to make these datasets freely available for use by the neuroimaging community. In each subject we acquire a total of one hour of whole-brain rfMRI data at 3 Tesla, with a spatial resolution of 2×2×2mm and a temporal resolution of 0.7s, capitalizing on recent developments in slice-accelerated echo-planar imaging. We will also scan a subset of the cohort at higher field strength and resolution. In this paper we outline the work behind, and rationale for, decisions taken regarding the rfMRI data acquisition protocol and pre-processing pipelines, and present some initial results showing data quality and example functional connectivity analyses. PMID:23702415

  11. The Rapid Development of High Speed, Resolution and Precision in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, David A.; Yacoub, Essa

    2012-01-01

    MRI pulse sequences designed to increase the speed and spatial resolution of fMRI have always been a hot topic. Here, we review and chronicle the history behind some of the pulse sequence ideas that have contributed not only to the enhancement of fMRI acquisition but also to diffusion imaging. (i) Partial Fourier EPI allows lengthening echo trains for higher spatial resolution while maintaining optimal TE and BOLD sensitivity. (ii) Inner-volume EPI renamed zoomed-EPI, achieves extremely high spatial resolution and has been applied to fMRI at 7 Tesla to resolve cortical layer activity and columnar level fMRI. (iii) An early non-BOLD approach while unsuccessful for fMRI created a diffusion sequence of bipolar pulses called ‘twice refocused spin echo’ now widely used for high resolution DTI and HARDI neuronal fiber track imaging. (iv) Multiplexed EPI shortens TR to a few hundred millisecond, increasing sampling rates and statistical power in fMRI. PMID:22281677

  12. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  13. Quantitative Characterizations of Ultrashort Echo (UTE) Images for Supporting Air-Bone Separation in the Head

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina; Feng, Mary; Grodzki, David M.; Balter, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate separation of air and bone is critical for creating synthetic CT from MRI to support Radiation Oncology workflow. This study compares two different ultrashort echo-time sequences in the separation of air from bone, and evaluates post-processing methods that correct intensity nonuniformity of images and account for intensity gradients at tissue boundaries to improve this discriminatory power. CT and MRI scans were acquired on 12 patients under an institution review board-approved prospective protocol. The two MRI sequences tested were ultra-short TE imaging using 3D radial acquisition (UTE), and using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA). Gradient nonlinearity correction was applied to both MR image volumes after acquisition. MRI intensity nonuniformity was corrected by vendor-provided normalization methods, and then further corrected using the N4itk algorithm. To overcome the intensity-gradient at air-tissue boundaries, spatial dilations, from 0 to 4 mm, were applied to threshold-defined air regions from MR images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, by comparing predicted (defined by MR images) versus “true” regions of air and bone (defined by CT images), were performed with and without residual bias field correction and local spatial expansion. The post-processing corrections increased the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) from 0.944 ± 0.012 to 0.976 ± 0.003 for UTE images, and from 0.850 ± 0.022 to 0.887 ± 0.012 for PETRA images, compared to without corrections. When expanding the threshold-defined air volumes, as expected, sensitivity of air identification decreased with an increase in specificity of bone discrimination, but in a non-linear fashion. A 1-mm air mask expansion yielded AUC increases of 1% and 4% for UTE and PETRA images, respectively. UTE images had significantly greater discriminatory power in separating air from bone than PETRA images. Post-processing strategies improved the

  14. Quantitative characterizations of ultrashort echo (UTE) images for supporting air-bone separation in the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina; Feng, Mary; Grodzki, David M.; Balter, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate separation of air and bone is critical for creating synthetic CT from MRI to support Radiation Oncology workflow. This study compares two different ultrashort echo-time sequences in the separation of air from bone, and evaluates post-processing methods that correct intensity nonuniformity of images and account for intensity gradients at tissue boundaries to improve this discriminatory power. CT and MRI scans were acquired on 12 patients under an institution review board-approved prospective protocol. The two MRI sequences tested were ultra-short TE imaging using 3D radial acquisition (UTE), and using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA). Gradient nonlinearity correction was applied to both MR image volumes after acquisition. MRI intensity nonuniformity was corrected by vendor-provided normalization methods, and then further corrected using the N4itk algorithm. To overcome the intensity-gradient at air-tissue boundaries, spatial dilations, from 0 to 4 mm, were applied to threshold-defined air regions from MR images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, by comparing predicted (defined by MR images) versus ‘true’ regions of air and bone (defined by CT images), were performed with and without residual bias field correction and local spatial expansion. The post-processing corrections increased the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) from 0.944 ± 0.012 to 0.976 ± 0.003 for UTE images, and from 0.850 ± 0.022 to 0.887 ± 0.012 for PETRA images, compared to without corrections. When expanding the threshold-defined air volumes, as expected, sensitivity of air identification decreased with an increase in specificity of bone discrimination, but in a non-linear fashion. A 1 mm air mask expansion yielded AUC increases of 1 and 4% for UTE and PETRA images, respectively. UTE images had significantly greater discriminatory power in separating air from bone than PETRA images. Post-processing strategies improved the

  15. In Vivo Visualization of Alzheimer’s Amyloid Plaques by MRI in Transgenic Mice Without a Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R.; Garwood, Michael; Wengenack, Thomas M.; Borowski, Bret; Curran, Geoffrey L.; Lin, Joseph; Adriany, Gregor; Grohn, Olli H.J.; Grimm, Roger; Poduslo, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    One of the cardinal pathologic features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is formation of senile, or amyloid, plaques. Transgenic mice have been developed that express one or more of the genes responsible for familial AD in humans. Doubly transgenic mice develop “human-like” plaques, providing a mechanism to study amyloid plaque biology in a controlled manner. Imaging of labeled plaques has been accomplished with other modalities, but only MRI has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution to visualize individual plaques non-invasively. Methods to optimize visualization of plaques in vivo in transgenic mice at 9.4 T using a spin echo sequence based on adiabatic pulses are described. Preliminary results indicate that a spin echo acquisition more accurately reflects plaque size, while a T2* weighted gradient echo sequence reflects plaque iron content not plaque size. In vivo MRI – ex vivo MRI – in vitro histological correlations are provided. Histologically verified plaques as small as 50 μm in diameter were visualized in the living animal. To our knowledge this work represents the first demonstration of non-invasive in vivo visualization of individual AD plaques without the use of a contrast agent. PMID:15562496

  16. Detecting Fleeting MRI Signals with Frequency-Modulated Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis; Moeller, Steen; Chamberlain, Ryan; O'Connell, Robert; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Garwood, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally different approach to MRI referred to as SWIFT (sweep imaging with Fourier transformation). SWIFT exploits time-shared RF excitation and signal acquisition, allowing capture of signal from spins with extremely short transverse relaxation time, T2*. The MR signal is acquired in gaps inserted into a broadband frequency-swept excitation pulse, which results in acquisition delays of only 1 – 2 microseconds. In SWIFT, 3D k-space is sampled in a radial manner, whereby one projection of the object is acquired in the gaps of each frequency-swept pulse, allowing a repetition time (TR) on the order of the pulse length (typically 1 – 3 milliseconds). Since the orientation of consecutive projections varies in a smooth manner (i.e., only small increments in the values of the x, y, z gradients occur from view to view), SWIFT scanning is close to inaudible and is insensitive to gradient timing errors and eddy currents. SWIFT images can be acquired in scan times similar to and sometimes faster than conventional 3D gradient echo techniques. With its ability to capture signals from ultrashort T2* spins, SWIFT promises to expand the role of MRI in areas of research where MRI previously played no or negligible role. In this article, we show wood and tooth images obtained with SWIFT as examples of materials with ultrashort T2*. Early experience suggests SWIFT can play a role in materials science and porous media research. PMID:22661791

  17. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Echo in cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Asrress, Kaleab; Redwood, Simon; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical cardiac arrest is challenging. The internationally agreed approach is highly protocolised with therapy and diagnosis occurring in parallel. Early identification of the precipitating cause increases the likelihood of favourable outcome. Echocardiography provides an invaluable diagnostic tool in this context. Acquisition of echo images can be challenging in cardiac arrest and should occur in a way that minimises disruption to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this article, the reversible causes of cardiac arrest are reviewed with associated echocardiography findings. Case A 71-year-old patient underwent right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. On the 2nd post-operative day, he developed respiratory failure with rising oxygen requirement and right middle and lower lobe collapse and consolidation on chest X-ray. He was commenced on high-flow oxygen therapy and antibiotics. His condition continued to deteriorate and on the 3rd post-operative day he was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Six hours after intubation, he became suddenly hypotensive with a blood pressure of 50 systolic and then lost cardiac output. ECG monitoring showed pulseless electrical activity. CPR was commenced and return of circulation occurred after injection of 1 mg of adrenaline. Focused echocardiography was performed, which demonstrated signs of massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator was given and his condition stabilised. PMID:26693304

  18. Reference-free unwarping of EPI data using dynamic off-resonance correction with multiecho acquisition (DOCMA).

    PubMed

    Visser, Eelke; Poser, Benedikt A; Barth, Markus; Zwiers, Marcel P

    2012-10-01

    Inhomogeneities of the main magnetic field cause geometric distortion in echo-planar imaging, a method central to functional MRI. A number of correction methods have been proposed, most of which are based on the acquisition of a fieldmap providing the local offsets to the main magnetic field. Here, accelerated multiecho echo-planar imaging is used, with echo times short enough to enable the construction of a fieldmap of comparable quality from the data themselves. This way, each volume in a time series can be unwarped using a fieldmap obtained from that volume, avoiding volume-to-volume field-motion interactions that invalidate reference data in conventional approaches that use a single, static, fieldmap. The combination of accelerated acquisition with dynamic distortion correction yields volumes with very low distortion at repetition times similar to conventional echo-planar imaging. The method is applied to data acquired at 3 and 7 T and is shown to effectively correct image geometry. Furthermore, it is shown that dynamic distortion correction yields better temporal signal stability than correction using a static fieldmap in the presence of subject motion. PMID:22851507

  19. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  20. Imaging tooth enamel using zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Kevin M.; Zhu, Gang; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Nemani, Venkata K.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Flood, Ann B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-03-01

    In an event where many thousands of people may have been exposed to levels of radiation that are sufficient to cause the acute radiation syndrome, we need technology that can estimate the absorbed dose on an individual basis for triage and meaningful medical decision making. Such dose estimates may be achieved using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth biodosimetry, which measures the number of persistent free radicals that are generated in tooth enamel following irradiation. However, the accuracy of dose estimates may be impacted by individual variations in teeth, especially the amount and distribution of enamel in the inhomogeneous sensitive volume of the resonator used to detect the radicals. In order to study the relationship between interpersonal variations in enamel and EPR-based dose estimates, it is desirable to estimate these parameters nondestructively and without adding radiation to the teeth. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is capable of acquiring structural and biochemical information without imparting additional radiation, which may be beneficial for many EPR dosimetry studies. However, the extremely short T2 relaxation time in tooth structures precludes tooth imaging using conventional MRI methods. Therefore, we used zero echo time (ZTE) MRI to image teeth ex vivo to assess enamel volumes and spatial distributions. Using these data in combination with the data on the distribution of the transverse radio frequency magnetic field from electromagnetic simulations, we then can identify possible sources of variations in radiation-induced signals detectable by EPR. Unlike conventional MRI, ZTE applies spatial encoding gradients during the RF excitation pulse, thereby facilitating signal acquisition almost immediately after excitation, minimizing signal loss from short T2 relaxation times. ZTE successfully provided volumetric measures of tooth enamel that may be related to variations that impact EPR dosimetry and facilitate the development

  1. Imaging tooth enamel using zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rychert, Kevin M.; Zhu, Gang; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Nemani, Venkata K.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Flood, Ann Barry; Swartz, Harold M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-01-01

    In an event where many thousands of people may have been exposed to levels of radiation that are sufficient to cause the acute radiation syndrome, we need technology that can estimate the absorbed dose on an individual basis for triage and meaningful medical decision making. Such dose estimates may be achieved using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth biodosimetry, which measures the number of persistent free radicals that are generated in tooth enamel following irradiation. However, the accuracy of dose estimates may be impacted by individual variations in teeth, especially the amount and distribution of enamel in the inhomogeneous sensitive volume of the resonator used to detect the radicals. In order to study the relationship between interpersonal variations in enamel and EPR-based dose estimates, it is desirable to estimate these parameters nondestructively and without adding radiation to the teeth. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is capable of acquiring structural and biochemical information without imparting additional radiation, which may be beneficial for many EPR dosimetry studies. However, the extremely short T2 relaxation time in tooth structures precludes tooth imaging using conventional MRI methods. Therefore, we used zero echo time (ZTE) MRI to image teeth ex vivo to assess enamel volumes and spatial distributions. Using these data in combination with the data on the distribution of the transverse radio frequency magnetic field from electromagnetic simulations, we then can identify possible sources of variations in radiation-induced signals detectable by EPR. Unlike conventional MRI, ZTE applies spatial encoding gradients during the RF excitation pulse, thereby facilitating signal acquisition almost immediately after excitation, minimizing signal loss from short T2 relaxation times. ZTE successfully provided volumetric measures of tooth enamel that may be related to variations that impact EPR dosimetry and facilitate the development

  2. Simultaneous fMRI and local field potential measurements during epileptic seizures in medetomidine sedated rats using RASER pulse sequence

    PubMed Central

    Airaksinen, Antti M; Niskanen, Juha-Pekka; Chamberlain, Ryan; Huttunen, Joanna K; Nissinen, Jari; Garwood, Michael; Pitkänen, Asla; Gröhn, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of animal models of epilepsy are methodologically challenging, but essential to better understand abnormal brain activity and hemodynamics during seizures. In the present study, fMRI of medetomidine sedated rats was performed using novel Rapid Acquisition by Sequential Excitation and Refocusing (RASER) fast imaging pulse sequence and simultaneous local field potential (LFP) measurements during kainic acid (KA) induced seizures. The image distortion caused by the hippocampal measuring electrode was clearly seen in echo planar imaging (EPI) images, whereas no artifact was seen in RASER images. Robust blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses were observed in the hippocampus during KA induced seizures. The recurrent epileptic seizures were detected in the LFP signal after KA injection. The presented combination of deep electrode LFP measurements and fMRI under medetomidine anesthesia, that does not significantly suppress KA induced seizures, provides a unique tool for studying abnormal brain activity in rats. PMID:20725933

  3. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  4. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  5. Tissue electrical property mapping from zero echo-time magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bulumulla, Selaka; Wiesinger, Florian; Sacolick, Laura; Sun, Wei; Hancu, Ileana

    2015-02-01

    The capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce spatially resolved estimation of tissue electrical properties (EPs) in vivo has been a subject of much recent interest. In this work we introduce a method to map tissue EPs from low-flip-angle, zero-echo-time (ZTE) imaging. It is based on a new theoretical formalism that allows calculation of EPs from the product of transmit and receive radio-frequency (RF) field maps. Compared to conventional methods requiring separation of the transmit RF field (B(1)(+)) from acquired MR images, the proposed method has such advantages as: 1) reduced theoretical error, 2) higher acquisition speed, and 3) flexibility in choice of different transmit and receive RF coils. The method is demonstrated in electrical conductivity and relative permittivity mapping in a salt water phantom, as well as in vivo measurement of brain conductivity in healthy volunteers. The phantom results show the validity and scan-time efficiency of the proposed method applied to a piece-wise homogeneous object. Quality of in vivo EP results was limited by reconstruction errors near tissue boundaries, which highlights need for image segmentation in EP mapping in a heterogeneous medium. Our results show the feasibility of rapid EP mapping from MRI without B(1)(+) mapping. PMID:25312919

  6. ‘Snap-shot’ velocity vector mapping using echo-planar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Alexander B.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Newling, Benedict; Mantle, Mick D.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2010-06-01

    A 'snap-shot' ultra-fast MRI velocimetry technique based upon the echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence is presented. The new technique is an extension of the GERVAIS pulse sequence previously developed by Sederman et al. (2004) and is capable of acquiring both reference and velocity encoded phase maps following a single excitation for generation of three-component velocity vectors in under 125 ms. This approach allows velocity images of systems with a dynamic, non-periodic geometry to be obtained by MRI. The technique proved to be accurate within 5% error by comparison with Poiseuille flow in a pipe and for the transverse plane flow field in a Couette cell. It was further applied to obtain the velocity field around an impeller in a stirred vessel; an unsteady yet periodic system which otherwise could only be studied by triggered acquisitions. Good agreement was evident between the present technique and triggered conventional velocity encoded pulse sequences. Finally, new experimental data attainable only by the new sequence is demonstrated as the flow field within a mobile droplet of oil is captured as it rises through a column of water. The technique promises to be highly useful in velocimetric measurements of dynamic, non-periodic systems, and in particular for the characterisation of multiphase flow systems.

  7. Light Echoes of Historic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Sinnott, B.; Welch, D. L.; Prieto, J. L.; Bianco, F.

    2014-01-01

    Light echoes, light from a variable source scattered off dust, have been observed for over a century. The recent discovery of light echoes around centuries-old supernovae in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud have allowed the spectroscopic characterization of these events, even without contemporaneous photometry and spectroscopy using modern instrumentation. Here we review the recent scientific advances using light echoes of ancient and historic transients, and focus on our latest work on SN 1987A's and Eta Carinae's light echoes.

  8. TRANSVERSE ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-09-18

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  9. Transverse Echo Measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Wolfram

    2006-03-20

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular we examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  10. Echo 1 container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Echo 1 container: The design of this container was one of the most difficult technical tasks. Hansen writes: 'After several weeks of examining potential solutions to this problem, the Langley engineers narrowed the field of ideas to five. They then built working models of these five container designs, and 12-foot-diameter models of the satellite for simulation studies. With help from Langley's Engineering Service and Mechanical Service divisions, the Echo group built a special 41-foot-diameter spherical vacuum chamber equipped with pressure-proof windows. There the dynamics of opening the container and inflating the satelloon could be studies as the satelloon fell to the bottom of the tank.' 'The container-opening mechanism that eventually resulted from these vacuum tests was surely one of the oddest explosive devices ever contrived. The container was a sphere that opened at its equator into top and bottom hemispheres. the top half fit on the bottom half much like a lid fits snugly atop a kitchen pot. The joint between the two hemispheres, therefore, formed a sliding valve. The halves had to move apart an inch or two before the canister was actually open. It was in this joint between the hemispheres that the charge was placed.' The whole whole system was laced together with fishing line which resulted in many disdainful comments from visiting scientists and engineers but the system worked. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 180.

  11. Detection and quantification of recent myocardial infarction: diagnostic value of multiecho multislice spin echo imaging.

    PubMed

    Kastler, B; Germain, P; Roul, G; Constantinesco, A; Dietemmen, J L; Sacrez, A; Wackenheim, A

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with documented transmural MI were studied with gated three echo, multislice MR imaging. In 12 patients MRI MI size was compared with CK release measurement, Tl-201 SPECT defect, and with Tc-99m LVEF. Infarct was visualised in 29/34 patients on 3rd echo images (18/34 on 2nd and 6/34 on 1st echo images). Mean MR infarct size (planimetered from 3rd echo images): 33.1 +/- 9% overestimated the SPECT defect (mean value of 23.8 +/- 15%). However, the overall correlation between MRI and Tl-201 sizing was significant: r = 0.82; p less than 0.001; SEE = 5.5%. The correlation with LVEF also appeared significant: r = -0.61; p less than 0.038. PMID:2059944

  12. A comparative quantitative analysis of the IDEAL (iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation) and the CHESS (chemical shift selection suppression) techniques in 3.0 T L-spine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eng-Chan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Ki-Hong; Choi, Cheon-Woong; Seok, Jong-min; Na, Kil-Ju; Han, Man-Seok

    2013-03-01

    This study was conducted on 20 patients who had undergone pedicle screw fixation between March and December 2010 to quantitatively compare a conventional fat suppression technique, CHESS (chemical shift selection suppression), and a new technique, IDEAL (iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least squares estimation). The general efficacy and usefulness of the IDEAL technique was also evaluated. Fat-suppressed transverse-relaxation-weighed images and longitudinal-relaxation-weighted images were obtained before and after contrast injection by using these two techniques with a 1.5T MR (magnetic resonance) scanner. The obtained images were analyzed for image distortion, susceptibility artifacts and homogenous fat removal in the target region. The results showed that the image distortion due to the susceptibility artifacts caused by implanted metal was lower in the images obtained using the IDEAL technique compared to those obtained using the CHESS technique. The results of a qualitative analysis also showed that compared to the CHESS technique, fewer susceptibility artifacts and more homogenous fat removal were found in the images obtained using the IDEAL technique in a comparative image evaluation of the axial plane images before and after contrast injection. In summary, compared to the CHESS technique, the IDEAL technique showed a lower occurrence of susceptibility artifacts caused by metal and lower image distortion. In addition, more homogenous fat removal was shown in the IDEAL technique.

  13. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  14. Neutron phase spin echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Hautle, Patrick; Schanzer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A novel neutron spin resonance technique is presented based on the well-known neutron spin echo method. In a first proof-of-principle measurement using a monochromatic neutron beam, it is demonstrated that relative velocity changes of down to a precision of 4 ×10-7 can be resolved, corresponding to an energy resolution of better than 3 neV. Currently, the sensitivity is only limited by counting statistics and not by systematic effects. An improvement by another two orders of magnitude can be achieved with a dedicated setup, allowing energy resolutions in the 10 peV regime. The new technique is ideally suited for investigations in the field of precision fundamental neutron physics, but will also be beneficial in scattering applications.

  15. Characterization of signal properties in atherosclerotic plaque components by intravascular MRI.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W J; Prichard, J W; Hu, Y L; Olson, P R; Benckart, D H; Kramer, C M; Vido, D A; Reichek, N

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of distinguishing between atherosclerotic plaque components solely on the basis of biochemical differences. However, to date, the majority of plaque characterization has been performed by using high-field strength units or special coils, which are not clinically applicable. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate MRI properties in histologically verified plaque components in excised human carotid endarterectomy specimens with the use of a 5F catheter-based imaging coil, standard acquisition software, and a clinical scanner operating at 0.5 T. Human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 17 patients were imaged at 37 degrees C by use of an opposed solenoid intravascular radiofrequency coil integrated into a 5F double-lumen catheter interfaced to a 0.5-T General Electric interventional scanner. Cross-sectional intravascular MRI (156x250 microm in-plane resolution) that used different imaging parameters permitted the calculation of absolute T1and T2, the magnetization transfer contrast ratio, the magnitude of regional signal loss associated with an inversion recovery sequence (inversion ratio), and regional signal loss in gradient echo (gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio) in plaque components. Histological staining included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, Kossa, oil red O, and Gomori's iron stain. X-ray micrographs were also used to identify regions of calcium. Seven plaque components were evaluated: fibrous cap, smooth muscle cells, organizing thrombus, fresh thrombus, lipid, edema, and calcium. The magnetization transfer contrast ratio was significantly less in the fibrous cap (0.62+/-13) than in all other components (P<0.05) The inversion ratio was greater in lipid (0.91+/-0.09) than all other components (P<0.05). Calcium was best distinguished by using the gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio, which was lower in calcium (0.36+/-0.2) than in all plaque components, except for the organizing thrombus (P<0

  16. Multi-echo imaging in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Casanova, F; Perlo, J; Blümich, B; Kremer, K

    2004-01-01

    A new pulsed field gradient multi-echo imaging technique to encode position in the phase of every echo generated by a CPMG sequence in the presence of a strongly inhomogeneous static magnetic field is presented. It was applied to improve the sensitivity in an imaging experiment by adding the echo train acquired during the CPMG sequence and to spatially resolve relaxation times of inhomogeneous specimens using single-sided probes. The sequence was implemented in a new bar-magnet MOUSE equipped with a gradient coil system to apply a pulsed magnetic field with a constant gradient along one spatial coordinate. An important reduction by a factor larger than two orders of magnitude in the acquisition time was obtained compared to the previously published single-point imaging technique. PMID:14675822

  17. Phase-corrected Bipolar Gradients in Multiecho Gradient-echo Sequences for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianqi; Chang, Shixin; Liu, Tian; Jiang, Hongwei; Dong, Fang; Pei, Mengchao; Wang, Qianfeng; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Object The large echo spacing of unipolar readout gradients in current multiecho gradient-echo sequences for mapping fields in quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) can be reduced using bipolar readout gradients to improve acquisition efficiency. Materials and Methods Phase discrepancies between odd and even echoes in the bipolar readout gradients caused by non-ideal gradient behaviors were measured, modeled as polynomials in space and corrected for accordingly in field mapping. The bipolar approach for multiecho gradient-echo field mapping was compared with the unipolar approach for QSM. Results The odd-even-echo phase discrepancies were approximately constant along the phase encoding direction and linear along the readout and slice-selection directions. A simple linear phase correction in all three spatial directions was shown to enable accurate QSM in the human brain using a bipolar multiecho GRE sequence. Bipolar multiecho acquisition provides QSM in good quantitative agreement with unipolar acquisition while also reducing noise. Conclusion With a linear phase correction between odd-even echoes, bipolar readout gradients can be used in multiecho gradient-echo sequences for QSM. PMID:25408108

  18. A new application of compressive sensing in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lenti, Flavia; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Image formation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the procedure which allows the generation of the image starting from data acquired in the so called k-space. At the present, many image formation techniques have been presented, working with different k-space filling strategies. Recently, Compressive Sampling (CS) has been successfully used for image formation from non fully sampled k-space acquisitions, due to its interesting property of reconstructing signal from highly undetermined linear systems. The main advantage consists in greatly reducing the acquisition time. Within this manuscript, a novel application of CS to MRI field is presented, named Intra Voxel Analysis (IVA). The idea is to achieve the so-called super resolution, i.e. the possibility of distinguish anatomical structures smaller than the spatial resolution of the image. For this aim, multiple Spin Echo images acquired with different Echo Times are required. The output of the algorithm is the estimation of the number of contributions present in the same pixel, i.e. the number of tissues inside the same voxel, and their spin-spin relaxation times. This allows us not only to identify the number of involved tissues, but also to discriminate them. At the present, simulated case studies have been considered, obtaining interesting and promising results. In particular, a study on the required number of images, on the estimation noise and on the regularization parameter of different CS algorithms has been conducted. As future work, the method will be applied to real clinical datasets, in order to validate the estimations.

  19. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming for Echo-Planar Imaging of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Nixon, Terence W.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (Juchem et al., J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13 Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8 mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3 mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large

  20. Dynamic multi-coil technique (DYNAMITE) shimming for echo-planar imaging of the human brain at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Juchem, Christoph; Umesh Rudrapatna, S; Nixon, Terence W; de Graaf, Robin A

    2015-01-15

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large-scale brain connectivity

  1. Physiological noise in murine solid tumours using T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging: a marker of tumour acute hypoxia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudelet, Christine; Ansiaux, Réginald; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Havaux, Xavier; Macq, Benoit; Gallez, Bernard

    2004-08-01

    T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (T2*-weighted GRE MRI) was used to investigate spontaneous fluctuations in tumour vasculature non-invasively. FSa fibrosarcomas, implanted intramuscularly (i.m.) in the legs of mice, were imaged at 4.7 T, over a 30 min or 1 h sampling period. On a voxel-by-voxel basis, time courses of signal intensity were analysed using a power spectrum density (PSD) analysis to isolate voxels for which signal changes did not originate from Gaussian white noise or linear drift. Under baseline conditions, the tumours exhibited spontaneous signal fluctuations showing spatial and temporal heterogeneity over the tumour. Statistically significant fluctuations occurred at frequencies ranging from 1 cycle/3 min to 1 cycle/h. The fluctuations were independent of the scanner instabilities. Two categories of signal fluctuations were reported: (i) true fluctuations (TFV), i.e., sequential signal increase and decrease, and (ii) profound drop in signal intensity with no apparent signal recovery (SDV). No temporal correlation between tumour and contralateral muscle fluctuations was observed. Furthermore, treatments aimed at decreasing perfusion-limited hypoxia, such as carbogen combined with nicotinamide and flunarizine, decreased the incidence of tumour T2*-weighted GRE fluctuations. We also tracked dynamic changes in T2* using multiple GRE imaging. Fluctuations of T2* were observed; however, fluctuation maps using PSD analysis could not be generated reliably. An echo-time dependency of the signal fluctuations was observed, which is typical to physiological noise. Finally, at the end of T2*-weighted GRE MRI acquisition, a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed to characterize the microenvironment in which tumour signal fluctuations occurred in terms of vessel functionality, vascularity and microvascular permeability. Our data showed that TFV were predominantly located in regions with functional vessels, whereas SDV occurred in regions

  2. Very-low-field MRI of laser polarized xenon-129.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D; Tobias, William A; Mugler, John P; Miller, G Wilson

    2014-10-17

    We describe a homebuilt MRI system for imaging laser-polarized xenon-129 at a very low holding field of 2.2mT. A unique feature of this system was the use of Maxwell coils oriented at so-called "magic angles" to generate the transverse magnetic field gradients, which provided a simple alternative to Golay coils. We used this system to image a laser-polarized xenon-129 phantom with both a conventional gradient-echo and a fully phase-encoded pulse sequence. In other contexts, a fully phase-encoded acquisition, also known as single-point or constant-time imaging, has been used to enable distortion-free imaging of short-T2(∗) species. Here we used this technique to overcome imperfections associated with our homebuilt MRI system while also taking full advantage of the long T2(∗) available at very low field. Our results demonstrate that xenon-129 image quality can be dramatically improved at low field by combining a fully phase-encoded k-space acquisition with auxiliary measurements of system imperfections including B0 field drift and gradient infidelity. PMID:25462954

  3. Very-low-field MRI of laser polarized xenon-129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D.; Tobias, William A.; Mugler, John P.; Miller, G. Wilson

    2014-12-01

    We describe a homebuilt MRI system for imaging laser-polarized xenon-129 at a very low holding field of 2.2 mT. A unique feature of this system was the use of Maxwell coils oriented at so-called 'magic angles' to generate the transverse magnetic field gradients, which provided a simple alternative to Golay coils. We used this system to image a laser-polarized xenon-129 phantom with both a conventional gradient-echo and a fully phase-encoded pulse sequence. In other contexts, a fully phase-encoded acquisition, also known as single-point or constant-time imaging, has been used to enable distortion-free imaging of short-T2∗species. Here we used this technique to overcome imperfections associated with our homebuilt MRI system while also taking full advantage of the long T2∗available at very low field. Our results demonstrate that xenon-129 image quality can be dramatically improved at low field by combining a fully phase-encoded k-space acquisition with auxiliary measurements of system imperfections including B0 field drift and gradient infidelity.

  4. 3-T Breast Diffusion-Weighted MRI by Echo-Planar Imaging with Spectral Spatial Excitation or with Additional Spectral Inversion Recovery: An In Vivo Comparison of Image Quality

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Megan C.; Dogan, Basak E.; Adrada, Beatriz E.; Plaxco, Jeri Sue; Wei, Wei; Son, Jong Bum; Hazle, John D.; Ma, Jingfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare conventional DWI with spectral spatial excitation (cDWI) and an enhanced DWI with additional adiabatic spectral inversion recovery (eDWI) for 3T breast MRI. Methods Twenty-four patients were enrolled in the study with both cDWI and eDWI. Three breast radiologists scored cDWI and eDWI images of each patient for fat-suppression quality, geometric distortion, visibility of normal structure and biopsy-proven lesions, and overall image quality. SNR, CNR and ADC for evaluable tissues were measured. Statistical tests were performed for qualitative and quantitative comparisons. Results eDWI yielded significantly higher CNR and SNR on a lesion and higher glandular CNR and SNR, and muscle SNR on a patient basis. eDWI also yielded significantly higher qualitative scores in all categories. No significant difference was found in ADC values. Conclusion eDWI provided superior image quality and higher CNR and SNR on a lesion basis. eDWI can replace cDWI for 3T breast DWI. PMID:25695868

  5. Fast T(2) relaxometry with an accelerated multi-echo spin-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Sénégas, Julien; Liu, Wei; Dahnke, Hannes; Song, Hotaek; Jordan, E Kay; Frank, Joseph A

    2010-10-01

    A new method has been developed to reduce the number of phase-encoding steps in a multi-echo spin-echo imaging sequence allowing fast T(2) mapping without loss of spatial resolution. In the proposed approach, the k-space data at each echo time were undersampled and a reconstruction algorithm that exploited the temporal correlation of the MR signal in k-space was used to reconstruct alias-free images. A specific application of this algorithm with multiple-receiver acquisition, offering an alternative to existing parallel imaging methods, has also been introduced. The fast T(2) mapping method has been validated in human brain T(2) measurements in a group of nine volunteers with acceleration factors up to 3.4. The results demonstrated that the proposed method exhibited excellent linear correlation with the regular T(2) mapping with full sampling and achieved better image reconstruction and T(2) mapping with respect to SNR and reconstruction artifacts than the selected reference acceleration techniques. The new method has also been applied for quantitative tracking of injected magnetically labeled breast cancer cells in the rat brain with acceleration factors of 1.8 and 3.0. The proposed technique can provide an effective approach for accelerated T(2) quantification, especially for experiments with single-channel coil when parallel imaging is not applicable. PMID:20878973

  6. Balanced echo state networks.

    PubMed

    Koryakin, Danil; Lohmann, Johannes; Butz, Martin V

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigates the interaction between the driving output feedback and the internal reservoir dynamics in echo state networks (ESNs). The interplay is studied experimentally on the multiple superimposed oscillators (MSOs) benchmark. The experimental data reveals a dual effect of the output feedback strength on the network dynamics: it drives the dynamic reservoir but it can also block suitable reservoir dynamics. Moreover, the data shows that the reservoir size crucially co-determines the likelihood of generating an effective ESN. We show that dependent on the complexity of the MSO dynamics somewhat smaller networks can yield better performance. Optimizing the output feedback weight range and the network size is thus crucial for generating an effective ESN. With proper parameter choices, we show that it is possible to generate ESNs that approximate MSOs with several orders of magnitude smaller errors than those previously reported. We conclude that there appears to be still much more potential in ESNs than previously thought and sketch-out some promising future research directions. PMID:23037774

  7. Simple echoes and subtle reverberations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2010-03-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can be used for the study of reverberation are suggested. Additionally, methods of adding reverberation to recorded sound are discussed.

  8. A new method for joint susceptibility artefact correction and super-resolution for dMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthotto, Lars; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has become increasingly relevant in clinical research and neuroscience. It is commonly carried out using the ultra-fast MRI acquisition technique Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI). While offering crucial reduction of acquisition times, two limitations of EPI are distortions due to varying magnetic susceptibilities of the object being imaged and its limited spatial resolution. In the recent years progress has been made both for susceptibility artefact correction and increasing of spatial resolution using image processing and reconstruction methods. However, so far, the interplay between both problems has not been studied and super-resolution techniques could only be applied along one axis, the slice-select direction, limiting the potential gain in spatial resolution. In this work we describe a new method for joint susceptibility artefact correction and super-resolution in EPI-MRI that can be used to increase resolution in all three spatial dimensions and in particular increase in-plane resolutions. The key idea is to reconstruct a distortion-free, high-resolution image from a number of low-resolution EPI data that are deformed in different directions. Numerical results on dMRI data of a human brain indicate that this technique has the potential to provide for the first time in-vivo dMRI at mesoscopic spatial resolution (i.e. 500μm) a spatial resolution that could bridge the gap between white-matter information from ex-vivo histology (≍1μm) and in-vivo dMRI (≍2000μm).

  9. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  10. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  11. SU-D-18C-01: A Novel 4D-MRI Technology Based On K-Space Retrospective Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Current 4D-MRI techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of an entirely new framework of 4D-MRI based on k-space retrospective sorting. Methods: An important challenge of the proposed technique is to determine the number of repeated scans(NR) required to obtain sufficient k-space data for 4D-MRI. To do that, simulations using 29 cancer patients' respiratory profiles were performed to derive the relationship between data acquisition completeness(Cp) and NR, also relationship between NR(Cp=95%) and the following factors: total slice(NS), respiratory phase bin length(Lb), frame rate(fr), resolution(R) and image acquisition starting-phase(P0). To evaluate our technique, a computer simulation study on a 4D digital human phantom (XCAT) were conducted with regular breathing (fr=0.5Hz; R=256×256). A 2D echo planer imaging(EPI) MRI sequence were assumed to acquire raw k-space data, with respiratory signal and acquisition time for each k-space data line recorded simultaneously. K-space data was re-sorted based on respiratory phases. To evaluate 4D-MRI image quality, tumor trajectories were measured and compared with the input signal. Mean relative amplitude difference(D) and cross-correlation coefficient(CC) are calculated. Finally, phase-sharing sliding window technique was applied to investigate the feasibility of generating ultra-fast 4D-MRI. Result: Cp increased with NR(Cp=100*[1-exp(-0.19*NR)], when NS=30, Lb=100%/6). NR(Cp=95%) was inversely-proportional to Lb (r=0.97), but independent of other factors. 4D-MRI on XCAT demonstrated highly accurate motion information (D=0.67%, CC=0.996) with much less artifacts than those on image-based sorting 4D-MRI. Ultra-fast 4D-MRI with an apparent temporal resolution of 10 frames/second was reconstructed using the phase-sharing sliding window technique. Conclusions: A novel 4D-MRI

  12. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  13. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lorenzato, Mário Müller; Salim, Rodrigo; Kfuri-Junior, Maurício; Crema, Michel Daoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE) protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively) and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively). For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively) and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively). In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively) and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively). There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition. PMID:27141127

  14. Three-Dimensional Turbo-Spin-Echo Amide Proton Transfer MR Imaging at 3 Tesla and Its Application to High-Grade Human Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuna; Wen, Zhibo; Zhang, Ge; Huang, Fanheng; Lu, Shilong; Wang, Xianlong; Hu, Shuguang; Chen, Min; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is able to extend the achievable MRI contrast to the protein level. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of applying a turbo spin echo (TSE)-based, three-dimensional (3D) APT sequence into routine clinical practice for patients with brain tumors. Procedures Experiments were performed on a Philips 3T MRI scanner using an eight-channel phased-array coil for reception. A fast 3D APT sequence with a TSE acquisition was proposed (saturation power, 2 μT; saturation time, 500 ms; 8 slices). The gradient echo (GRE)-based field-mapping technique or water-saturation-shift-referencing (WASSR) technique was used to acquire B0 maps to correct for B0-induced artifacts in APT images. The test was performed on a box of homogenous protein solution, four healthy volunteers, and eight patients with high-grade gliomas. Results The experimental data from a homogenous, protein-containing phantom and healthy volunteers show that the sequence produced a uniform contrast across all slices. The average MTRasym(3.5ppm) values with GRE B0-corrected 3D APT imaging and WASSR-corrected 3D APT imaging were both comparable to the values obtained using the undemanding single-slice acquisition. The average APT image intensity was consistently higher in the tumor core than in the peripheral edema and in the contralateral normal-appearing white matter (both P < 0.001). Conclusion 3D APT imaging of brain tumors can be performed in about five minutes at 3T using a routine, commercial eight-channel SENSE coil. PMID:22644987

  15. Physiological noise compensation in gradient-echo myelin water imaging.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoonho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jongho

    2015-10-15

    In MRI, physiological noise which originates from cardiac and respiratory functions can induce substantial errors in detecting small signals in the brain. In this work, we explored the effects of the physiological noise and their compensation methods in gradient-echo myelin water imaging (GRE-MWI). To reduce the cardiac function induced inflow noise, flow saturation RF pulses were applied to the inferior portion of the head, saturating inflow blood signals. For the respiratory function induced B0 fluctuation compensation, a navigator echo was acquired, and respiration induced phase errors were corrected during reconstruction. After the compensations, the resulting myelin water images show substantially improved image quality and reproducibility. These improvements confirm the importance and usefulness of the physiological noise compensations in GRE-MWI. PMID:26172308

  16. Commissioning the Echo-Seeding Experiment Echo-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.a E.Colby; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Woodley, M.; Xiang, D.; Pernet, P-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2011-06-02

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment is intended to test the EEHG principle at low electron beam energy, 120 MeV, and determine the sensitivities and limitations to understand the expected performance at the higher energy scales and harmonic numbers required for x-ray FELs. In this paper we present the experimental results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  17. [MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Libicher, M; Mädler, U; Rumpf, C; Bernd, L

    2003-02-01

    MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy has been mentioned to be a minimally invasive method to obtain specimens for diagnostic purposes in bone tumors. To evaluate the viability, to assess the accuracy, and to record possible complications of this method, clinical data of 19 MRI-guided biopsies were analyzed. Interventions were performed on 18 patients (1-78 years) as an outpatient procedure: 15 skeletal and 4 soft tissue biopsies were taken from the pelvis, upper limb,or lower limb. We used T1-weighted gradient echoes (GE) for locating the puncture site and T2-weighted turbo spin echoes (TSE) for visualization of needle position. In 14 of 18 MRI-guided biopsies, a definite histological diagnosis was obtained. According to the pathologist, the inadequate size of the specimen was the main reason for missing the diagnoses in four cases.Long intervention time and inappropriate biopsy tools proved to be the main disadvantages of MRI-guided biopsy, but technical improvement might solve these technical problems in future.A postbiopsy hematoma was the only complication observed. Once technically improved, MRI-guided biopsy could be a precise alternative routine method for musculoskeletal biopsies in future. PMID:12607083

  18. A hybrid strategy for correcting geometric distortion in echo-planar images.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Neil; Silavi, Ally; Anazodo, Udunna

    2014-06-01

    A hybrid strategy for geometric distortion correction of echo-planar images is demonstrated. This procedure utilizes standard field mapping for signal displacement correction and the so-called reverse gradient acquisition for signal intensity correction. (The term reverse gradient refers to an acquisition of two sets of echo-planar images with phase encoding gradients of opposite polarity.) The hybrid strategy is applied to human brain echo-planar images acquired with and without diffusion-weighting. A comparison of the hybrid distortion corrected images to those corrected with standard field mapping only demonstrates much better performance of the hybrid method. A variant of the hybrid method is also demonstrated which requires the acquisition of only one pair of opposite polarity images within a set of images. PMID:24650682

  19. Quantitative pharmacologic MRI in mice.

    PubMed

    Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora-Adriana; Procissi, Daniel; Demyanenko, Andrey V; Jacobs, Russell E

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacologic MRI (phMRI) uses functional MRI techniques to provide a noninvasive in vivo measurement of the hemodynamic effects of drugs. The cerebral blood volume change (ΔCBV) serves as a surrogate for neuronal activity via neurovascular coupling mechanisms. By assessing the location and time course of brain activity in mouse mutant studies, phMRI can provide valuable insights into how different behavioral phenotypes are expressed in deferring brain activity response to drug challenge. In this report, we evaluate the utility of three different intravascular ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agents for phMRI using a gradient-echo technique, with temporal resolution of one min at high magnetic field. The tissue half-life of the USPIOs was studied using a nonlinear detrending model. The three USPIOs are candidates for CBV weighted phMRI experiments, with r(2)/r(1) ratios ≥ 20 and apparent half-lives ≥ 1.5 h at the described doses. An echo-time of about 10 ms or longer results in a functional contrast to noise ratio (fCNR) > 75 after USPIO injection, with negligible decrease between 1.5-2 h. phMRI experiments were conducted at 7 T using cocaine as a psychotropic substance and acetazolamide, a global vasodilator, as a positive control. Cocaine acts as a dopamine-serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, increasing extracellular concentrations of these neurotransmitters, and thus increasing dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. phMRI results showed that CBV was reduced in the normal mouse brain after cocaine challenge, with the largest effects in the nucleus accumbens, whereas after acetazolamide, blood volume was increased in both cerebral and extracerebral tissue. PMID:21793079

  20. A real-time data acquisition and control of gradient coil noise for fMRI identification of hearing disorder in children with history of ear infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeseung; Holte, James; Ritenour, E Russell

    2013-02-01

    Early ear infection and trauma, from birth to age 12 are known to have a significant effect on sensory and cognitive development. This effect can be demonstrated through the fMRI study of children who have a history of ear infection compared to a control group. A second research question is the extent to which brain plasticity at an early age can reduce the impact of infection on hearing and cognitive development. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) provides a mapping of brain activity in cognitive and sensory regions by recording the oxygenation state of the local cerebral blood flow. The gradient coils of fMRI scanners generate intense acoustic noise (GCN) - to which the subject is in close proximity - in the range of 90 to 140 db SPL during the imaging process. Clearly this noise will impress its signature on low level brain response patterns. An Active Noise Canceller (ANC) system can suppress the effect of GCN on the subject's perception of a phonetic stimulus at the phoneme, word or phrase level. Due to a superimposition of the frequency and time domain components of the test signal and GCN for MR test, the ANC filtering system performs its function in real time - we must capture the brain's response to the test signal AFTER the noise has been removed. This goal is achieved through the application of field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology of NI LabVIEW. The presentation (in the noisy fMRI environment) of test words and phrases to hearing impaired children can identify sources of distortion to their perceptual processes associated with GCN. Once this distortion has been identified, learning strategies may be introduced to replace the hearing function distorted by early infection as well as the short term effect of GCN. The study of speech cognition without the confounding effect of GCN and with the varying level of GCN for a repeated test signal at later age can be allowed to a measure of recovery through brain plasticity. PMID:23482910

  1. A real-time data acquisition and control of gradient coil noise for fMRI identification of hearing disorder in children with history of ear infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeseung; Holte, James

    2013-01-01

    Early ear infection and trauma, from birth to age 12 are known to have a significant effect on sensory and cognitive development. This effect can be demonstrated through the fMRI study of children who have a history of ear infection compared to a control group. A second research question is the extent to which brain plasticity at an early age can reduce the impact of infection on hearing and cognitive development. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) provides a mapping of brain activity in cognitive and sensory regions by recording the oxygenation state of the local cerebral blood flow. The gradient coils of fMRI scanners generate intense acoustic noise (GCN) - to which the subject is in close proximity - in the range of 90 to 140 db SPL during the imaging process. Clearly this noise will impress its signature on low level brain response patterns. An Active Noise Canceller (ANC) system can suppress the effect of GCN on the subject’s perception of a phonetic stimulus at the phoneme, word or phrase level. Due to a superimposition of the frequency and time domain components of the test signal and GCN for MR test, the ANC filtering system performs its function in real time - we must capture the brain’s response to the test signal AFTER the noise has been removed. This goal is achieved through the application of field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology of NI LabVIEW. The presentation (in the noisy fMRI environment) of test words and phrases to hearing impaired children can identify sources of distortion to their perceptual processes associated with GCN. Once this distortion has been identified, learning strategies may be introduced to replace the hearing function distorted by early infection as well as the short term effect of GCN. The study of speech cognition without the confounding effect of GCN and with the varying level of GCN for a repeated test signal at later age can be allowed to a measure of recovery through brain plasticity. PMID:23482910

  2. Fluid echoes in a pure electron plasma.

    PubMed

    Yu, J H; O'Neil, T M; Driscoll, C F

    2005-01-21

    Experimental observations of diocotron wave echoes on a magnetized electron column are reported, representing Kelvin wave echoes on a rotating near-ideal fluid. The echoes occur by reversal of an inviscid wave damping process, and the phase-space mixing and unmixing are directly imaged. The basic echo characteristics agree with a simple nonlinear ballistic theory. At late times, the echo is degraded, and the maximal observed echo times agree with a theory of electron-electron collisions acting on separately evolving velocity classes. PMID:15698185

  3. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (vts) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the vts derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  4. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  5. Decorrelation in interferometric radar echoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Villasensor, John

    1992-01-01

    A radar interferometric technique for topographic mapping of surfaces promises a high resolution, globally consistent approach to generation of digital elevation models. One implementation approach, that of utilizing a single SAR system in a nearly repeating orbit, is attractive not only for cost and complexity reasons but also in that it permits inference of changes in the surface over the orbit repeat cycle from the correlation properties of the radar echoes. The various sources contributing to the echo correlation statistics are characterized, and the term which most closely describes surficial change is isolated. There is decorrelation increasing with time, but digital terrain model generation remains feasible.

  6. Towards real-time thermometry using simultaneous multislice MRI.

    PubMed

    Borman, P T S; Bos, C; de Boorder, T; Raaymakers, B W; Moonen, C T W; Crijns, S P M

    2016-09-01

    MR-guided thermal therapies, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) and laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) are increasingly being applied in oncology and neurology. MRI is used for guidance since it can measure temperature noninvasively based on the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS). For therapy guidance using PRFS thermometry, high temporal resolution and large spatial coverage are desirable. We propose to use the parallel imaging technique simultaneous multislice (SMS) in combination with controlled aliasing (CAIPIRINHA) to accelerate the acquisition. We compare this with the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acceleration technique. Two experiments were performed to validate that SMS can be used to increase the spatial coverage or the temporal resolution. The first was performed in agar gel using LITT heating and a gradient-echo sequence with echo-planar imaging (EPI), and the second was performed in bovine muscle using HIFU heating and a gradient-echo sequence without EPI. In both experiments temperature curves from an unaccelerated scan and from SMS, SENSE, and SENSE/SMS accelerated scans were compared. The precision was quantified by a standard deviation analysis of scans without heating. Both experiments showed a good agreement between the temperature curves obtained from the unaccelerated, and SMS accelerated scans, confirming that accuracy was maintained during SMS acceleration. The standard deviations of the temperature measurements obtained with SMS were significantly smaller than when SENSE was used, implying that SMS allows for higher acceleration. In the LITT and HIFU experiments SMS factors up to 4 and 3 were reached, respectively, with a loss of precision of less than a factor of 3. Based on these results we conclude that SMS acceleration of PRFS thermometry is a valuable addition to SENSE, because it allows for a higher temporal resolution or bigger spatial coverage, with a higher precision. PMID:27524666

  7. Fast-recovery fast spin-echo T2-weighted MR imaging: a free-breathing alternative to fast spin-echo in the pediatric abdomen.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Hua; Emery, Kathleen H; Laor, Tal; Valentine, Mona; Tiefermann, Jan

    2008-06-01

    In the mid 1990s, the fast spin-echo (FSE) and turbo spin-echo (TSE) T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences became available and are now widely accepted alternatives to conventional spin-echo sequences since they result in reduced acquisition times while maintaining tissue contrast. Since that time, there has been continued development of new sequences to further decrease acquisition times, minimize artifacts, and preserve lesion detection. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to qualitatively illustrate the newly available fast recovery (FR) FSE T2-W MR images of the abdomen compared with the images acquired using the routine FSE T2-W sequence in non-breath-hold studies in children. PMID:18345537

  8. IN VITRO AND PRELIMINARY IN VIVO VALIDATION OF ECHO PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY IN CAROTID VASCULAR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fuxing; Lanning, Craig; Mazzaro, Luciano; Barker, Alex J.; Gates, Philip; Strain, W. David; Fulford, Jonathan; Gosling, Oliver E.; Shore, Angela C.; Bellenger, Nick G.; Rech, Bryan; Chen, Jiusheng; Chen, James; Shandas, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive, easy-to-use and accurate measurements of wall shear stress (WSS) in human blood vessels have always been challenging in clinical applications. Echo particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV) has shown promise for clinical measurements of local hemodynamics and wall shear rate. So far, however, the method has only been validated under simple flow conditions. In this study, we validated Echo PIV under in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. For in-vitro validation, we used an anatomically-correct, compliant carotid bifurcation flow phantom with pulsatile flow conditions, using optical particle image velocimetry (optical PIV) as the reference standard. For in-vivo validation, we compared Echo PIV-derived two dimensional velocity fields obtained at the carotid bifurcation in 5 normal subjects against phase-contrast MRI-derived velocity measurements obtained at the same locations. For both studies, time-dependent, two-dimensional two-component velocity vectors, peak/centerline velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate (WSR) waveforms at the common carotid artery (CCA), carotid bifurcation and distal internal carotid artery (ICA) were examined. Linear regression, correlation analysis and Bland-Altman analysis were used to quantify the agreement of different waveforms measured by the two techniques. In-vitro results showed that Echo PIV produced good images of time-dependent velocity vector maps over the cardiac cycle with excellent temporal (up to 0.7 msec) and spatial (~0.5 mm) resolutions and quality, on par with optical PIV results. Further, good agreement was found between Echo PIV and optical PIV results for velocity and WSR measurements. In-vivo results also showed good agreement between Echo PIV velocities and PC-MRI velocities. We conclude that Echo PIV provides accurate velocity vector and WSR measurements in the carotid bifurcation and has significant potential as a clinical tool for cardiovascular hemodynamics evaluation. PMID:21316562

  9. Acoustic echoes reveal room shape.

    PubMed

    Dokmanic, Ivan; Parhizkar, Reza; Walther, Andreas; Lu, Yue M; Vetterli, Martin

    2013-07-23

    Imagine that you are blindfolded inside an unknown room. You snap your fingers and listen to the room's response. Can you hear the shape of the room? Some people can do it naturally, but can we design computer algorithms that hear rooms? We show how to compute the shape of a convex polyhedral room from its response to a known sound, recorded by a few microphones. Geometric relationships between the arrival times of echoes enable us to "blindfoldedly" estimate the room geometry. This is achieved by exploiting the properties of Euclidean distance matrices. Furthermore, we show that under mild conditions, first-order echoes provide a unique description of convex polyhedral rooms. Our algorithm starts from the recorded impulse responses and proceeds by learning the correct assignment of echoes to walls. In contrast to earlier methods, the proposed algorithm reconstructs the full 3D geometry of the room from a single sound emission, and with an arbitrary geometry of the microphone array. As long as the microphones can hear the echoes, we can position them as we want. Besides answering a basic question about the inverse problem of room acoustics, our results find applications in areas such as architectural acoustics, indoor localization, virtual reality, and audio forensics. PMID:23776236

  10. Does the Novel Integrated PET/MRI Offer the Same Diagnostic Performance as PET/CT for Oncological Indications?

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Dayi; Zhang, Jinming; Chen, Yingmao; An, Ningyu; Xu, Baixuan

    2014-01-01

    Background We compared PET/MRI with PET/CT in terms of lesion detection and quantitative measurement to verify the feasibility of the novel integrated imaging modality for oncological applications. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 285 patients referred to our PET/CT center for oncological indications voluntarily participated in this same-day PET/CT and PET/MRI comparative study. PET/CT images were acquired and reconstructed following routine protocols, and then PET/MRI was performed at a mean time interval of 28±11 min (range 15–45 min). PET/MRI covered the body trunk with a sequence combination of transverse T1WI 3D-volumetric interpolated breath-hold, T2WI turbo spin echo with fat saturation, diffusion-weighted imaging with double b values (50 and 800 s/mm2), and simultaneous PET acquisition over 45 min/5 bed positions. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was assessed by manually drawn regions of interest over fluorodeoxyglucose-positive lesions. Among 285 cases, 57 showed no abnormalities, and 368 lesions (278 malignant, 68 benign and 22 undetermined) were detected in 228 patients. When stand-alone modalities were evaluated, PET revealed 31 and 12 lesions missed by CT and MRI, respectively, and CT and MRI revealed 38 and 61 more lesions, respectively, than PET. Compared to CT, MRI detected 40 more lesions and missed 8. In the integrated mode, PET/CT correctly detected 6 lesions misdiagnosed by PET/MRI, but was false-negative in 30 cases that were detected by PET/MRI. The overall diagnosis did not differ between integrated PET/MRI and PET/CT. SUVmax for lesions were slightly higher from PET/MRI than PET/CT but correlated well (ρ = 0.85–0.91). Conclusions/Significance The novel integrated PET/MRI performed comparatively to PET/CT in lesion detection and quantitative measurements. PET from either scanner modality offered almost the same information despite differences in hardware. Further study is needed to explore features of

  11. MR imaging of ore for heap bioleaching studies using pure phase encode acquisition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Marijke A.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2012-03-01

    Various MRI techniques were considered with respect to imaging of aqueous flow fields in low grade copper ore. Spin echo frequency encoded techniques were shown to produce unacceptable image distortions which led to pure phase encoded techniques being considered. Single point imaging multiple point acquisition (SPI-MPA) and spin echo single point imaging (SESPI) techniques were applied. By direct comparison with X-ray tomographic images, both techniques were found to be able to produce distortion-free images of the ore packings at 2 T. The signal to noise ratios (SNRs) of the SESPI images were found to be superior to SPI-MPA for equal total acquisition times; this was explained based on NMR relaxation measurements. SESPI was also found to produce suitable images for a range of particles sizes, whereas SPI-MPA SNR deteriorated markedly as particles size was reduced. Comparisons on a 4.7 T magnet showed significant signal loss from the SPI-MPA images, the effect of which was accentuated in the case of unsaturated flowing systems. Hence it was concluded that SESPI was the most robust imaging method for the study of copper ore heap leaching hydrology.

  12. Three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the accurate, extensive quantification of microvascular permeability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Lobatto, Mark E; Dyvorne, Hadrien; Robson, Philip M; Millon, Antoine; Senders, Max L; Lairez, Olivier; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Coolen, Bram F; Black, Alexandra; Mulder, Willem J M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques that cause stroke and myocardial infarction are characterized by increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has been proposed as a method to quantify vessel wall microvascular permeability in vivo. Until now, most DCE-MRI studies of atherosclerosis have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice imaging. Although providing the high spatial resolution required to image the arterial vessel wall, these approaches do not allow the quantification of plaque permeability with extensive anatomical coverage, an essential feature when imaging heterogeneous diseases, such as atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, we present the first systematic evaluation of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, DCE-MRI for the extensive quantification of plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed, with validation in atherosclerotic rabbits. We compare two acquisitions: 3D turbo field echo (TFE) with motion-sensitized-driven equilibrium (MSDE) preparation and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE). We find 3D TFE DCE-MRI to be superior to 3D TSE DCE-MRI in terms of temporal stability metrics. Both sequences show good intra- and inter-observer reliability, and significant correlation with ex vivo permeability measurements by Evans Blue near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, we explore the feasibility of using compressed sensing to accelerate 3D DCE-MRI of atherosclerosis, to improve its temporal resolution and therefore the accuracy of permeability quantification. Using retrospective under-sampling and reconstructions, we show that compressed sensing alone may allow the acceleration of 3D DCE-MRI by up to four-fold. We anticipate that the development of high-spatial-resolution 3D DCE-MRI with prospective compressed sensing acceleration may allow for the more accurate and extensive quantification of atherosclerotic plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed. We foresee that this approach may allow for

  13. SU-D-9A-03: STAMP: Simulator for Texture Analysis in MRI/PET

    SciTech Connect

    Laberge, S; Vallieres, M; Levesque, I R.; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a convenient simulation platform to facilitate PET/MR image analysis with the prospect of gaining a better understanding of the influence of acquisition parameters on PET/MRI textural features. The simulation platform is demonstrated by showing textural variations of a representative case study using different image acquisition parameters. Methods: The simulation platform is composed of MRI simulators JEMRIS and SIMRI to achieve simulations of customized MRI sequences on sample tumor models. The PET simulator GATE is used to get 2D and 3D Monte Carlo acquisitions of voxelized PET sources using a phantom geometry and a customized scanner architecture. The platform incorporates a series of graphical user interfaces written in Matlab. Two GUIs are used to facilitate communication with the simulation executables installed on a computer cluster. A third GUI is used to collect and display the clinical and simulated images, as well as fused PET/MRI images, and perform computation of textural features.To illustrate the capabilities of this platform, one FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) digitized tumor models were generated from clinical images of a soft-tissue sarcoma patient. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using 3 different echo times (TE) and 5 different repetition times (TR). PET 2D images were simulated using an OSEM algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. Results: STAMP was successfully used to produce numerically simulated FDG-PET and MRI images, and to calculate their corresponding textures. Three typical textures (GLCM-Contrast, GLSZM-ZSV and NGTDM-Coarseness) were found to vary by a range of 45% on average compared to reference scanning conditions in the case of FDG-PET, and by a range of 40% in the case of T1w MRI. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a Matlab-based simulation platform to facilitate PET/MRI texture image analysis for outcome prediction.

  14. The future of acquisition speed, coverage, sensitivity, and resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    Two decades of technology development has continually improved the image quality, spatial-temporal resolution, and sensitivity of the fMRI acquisition. In this article, I assess our current acquisition needs, briefly examine the technological breakthroughs that have benefited fMRI in the past, and look at some promising technologies that are currently under development to try to envision what the fMRI acquisition protocol of the future might look like. PMID:22421052

  15. Shift-driven modulations of spin-echo signals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pieter E. S.; Bensky, Guy; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Kurizki, Gershon; Frydman, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Since the pioneering works of Carr-Purcell and Meiboom-Gill [Carr HY, Purcell EM (1954) Phys Rev 94:630; Meiboom S, Gill D (1985) Rev Sci Instrum 29:688], trains of π-pulses have featured amongst the main tools of quantum control. Echo trains find widespread use in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and imaging (MRI), thanks to their ability to free the evolution of a spin-1/2 from several sources of decoherence. Spin echoes have also been researched in dynamic decoupling scenarios, for prolonging the lifetimes of quantum states or coherences. Inspired by this search we introduce a family of spin-echo sequences, which can still detect site-specific interactions like the chemical shift. This is achieved thanks to the presence of weak environmental fluctuations of common occurrence in high-field NMR—such as homonuclear spin-spin couplings or chemical/biochemical exchanges. Both intuitive and rigorous derivations of the resulting “selective dynamical recoupling” sequences are provided. Applications of these novel experiments are given for a variety of NMR scenarios including determinations of shift effects under inhomogeneities overwhelming individual chemical identities, and model-free characterizations of chemically exchanging partners. PMID:22474339

  16. Towards higher sensitivity and stability of axon diameter estimation with diffusion‐weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Daniel C.; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Reutens, David C.; Yang, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion‐weighted MRI is an important tool for in vivo and non‐invasive axon morphometry. The ActiveAx technique utilises an optimised acquisition protocol to infer orientationally invariant indices of axon diameter and density by fitting a model of white matter to the acquired data. In this study, we investigated the factors that influence the sensitivity to small‐diameter axons, namely the gradient strength of the acquisition protocol and the model fitting routine. Diffusion‐weighted ex. vivo images of the mouse brain were acquired using 16.4‐T MRI with high (G max of 300 mT/m) and ultra‐high (G max of 1350 mT/m) gradient strength acquisitions. The estimated axon diameter indices of the mid‐sagittal corpus callosum were validated using electron microscopy. In addition, a dictionary‐based fitting routine was employed and evaluated. Axon diameter indices were closer to electron microscopy measures when higher gradient strengths were employed. Despite the improvement, estimated axon diameter indices (a lower bound of ~ 1.8 μm) remained higher than the measurements obtained using electron microscopy (~1.2 μm). We further observed that limitations of pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) acquisition sequences and axonal dispersion could also influence the sensitivity with which axon diameter indices could be estimated. Our results highlight the influence of acquisition protocol, tissue model and model fitting, in addition to gradient strength, on advanced microstructural diffusion‐weighted imaging techniques. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26748471

  17. Sodium MRI of the human heart at 7.0 T: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Graessl, Andreas; Ruehle, Anjuli; Waiczies, Helmar; Resetar, Ana; Hoffmann, Stefan H; Rieger, Jan; Wetterling, Friedrich; Winter, Lukas; Nagel, Armin M; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) and whole heart coverage (23)Na cardiac MRI at 7.0 T including single-cardiac-phase and cinematic (cine) regimes. A four-channel transceiver RF coil array tailored for (23)Na MRI of the heart at 7.0 T (f = 78.5 MHz) is proposed. An integrated bow-tie antenna building block is used for (1)H MR to support shimming, localization and planning in a clinical workflow. Signal absorption rate simulations and assessment of RF power deposition were performed to meet the RF safety requirements. (23) Na cardiac MR was conducted in an in vivo feasibility study. 3D gradient echo (GRE) imaging in conjunction with Cartesian phase encoding (total acquisition time T(AQ)  = 6 min 16 s) and whole heart coverage imaging employing a density-adapted 3D radial acquisition technique (T(AQ)  = 18 min 20 s) were used. For 3D GRE-based (23)Na MRI, acquisition of standard views of the heart using a nominal in-plane resolution of (5.0 × 5.0) mm(2) and a slice thickness of 15 mm were feasible. For whole heart coverage 3D density-adapted radial (23)Na acquisitions a nominal isotropic spatial resolution of 6 mm was accomplished. This improvement versus 3D conventional GRE acquisitions reduced partial volume effects along the slice direction and enabled retrospective image reconstruction of standard or arbitrary views of the heart. Sodium cine imaging capabilities were achieved with the proposed RF coil configuration in conjunction with 3D radial acquisitions and cardiac gating. Cardiac-gated reconstruction provided an enhancement in blood-myocardium contrast of 20% versus the same data reconstructed without cardiac gating. The proposed transceiver array enables (23)Na MR of the human heart at 7.0 T within clinical acceptable scan times. This capability is in positive alignment with the needs of explorations that are designed to examine the potential of (23)Na MRI for the assessment of cardiovascular and

  18. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  19. A comparison of five standard methods for evaluating image intensity uniformity in partially parallel imaging MRI

    PubMed Central

    Goerner, Frank L.; Duong, Timothy; Stafford, R. Jason; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of five different standard measurement methods for determining image uniformity for partially parallel imaging (PPI) acquisitions in terms of consistency across a variety of pulse sequences and reconstruction strategies. Methods: Images were produced with a phantom using a 12-channel head matrix coil in a 3T MRI system (TIM TRIO, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). Images produced using echo-planar, fast spin echo, gradient echo, and balanced steady state free precession pulse sequences were evaluated. Two different PPI reconstruction methods were investigated, generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition algorithm (GRAPPA) and modified sensitivity-encoding (mSENSE) with acceleration factors (R) of 2, 3, and 4. Additionally images were acquired with conventional, two-dimensional Fourier imaging methods (R = 1). Five measurement methods of uniformity, recommended by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) were considered. The methods investigated were (1) an ACR method and a (2) NEMA method for calculating the peak deviation nonuniformity, (3) a modification of a NEMA method used to produce a gray scale uniformity map, (4) determining the normalized absolute average deviation uniformity, and (5) a NEMA method that focused on 17 areas of the image to measure uniformity. Changes in uniformity as a function of reconstruction method at the same R-value were also investigated. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine whether R-value or reconstruction method had a greater influence on signal intensity uniformity measurements for partially parallel MRI. Results: Two of the methods studied had consistently negative slopes when signal intensity uniformity was plotted against R-value. The results obtained comparing mSENSE against GRAPPA found no consistent difference between GRAPPA and mSENSE with regard to signal intensity uniformity

  20. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe kidney problems. People have been harmed in MRI machines when they did not remove metal objects from their clothes or when metal objects were left in the room by others. MRI is most often not recommended for traumatic injuries. ...

  1. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  2. Dance of the Light Echoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This composite image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the remnant of a star that exploded, called Cassiopeia A (center) and its surrounding 'light echoes' -- dances of light through dusty clouds, created when stars blast apart. The light echoes are colored and the surrounding clouds of dust are gray.

    In figure 1, dramatic changes are highlighted in phenomena referred to as light echoes (colored areas) around the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (center). Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died.

    A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. In figure 1, this apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 11,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    This composite consists of six processed images taken over a time span of three years. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Bluer colors represent an earlier time and redder ones, a later time. The progression of the light echo through the dust can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps.

    This

  3. Echo characteristics of two salmon species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealson, Patrick A.; Horne, John K.; Burwen, Debby L.

    2005-04-01

    The Alaska Department of Fish and Game relies on split-beam hydroacoustic techniques to estimate Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returns to the Kenai River. Chinook counts are periodically confounded by large numbers of smaller sockeye salmon (O. nerka). Echo target-strength has been used to distinguish fish length classes, but was too variable to separate Kenai River chinook and sockeye distributions. To evaluate the efficacy of alternate echo metrics, controlled acoustic measurements of tethered chinook and sockeye salmon were collected at 200 kHz. Echo returns were digitally sampled at 48 kHz. A suite of descriptive metrics were collected from a series of 1,000 echoes per fish. Measurements of echo width were least variable at the -3 dB power point. Initial results show echo elongation and ping-to-ping variability in echo envelope width were significantly greater for chinook than for sockeye salmon. Chinook were also observed to return multiple discrete peaks from a single broadcast echo. These characteristics were attributed to the physical width of chinook exceeding half of the broadcast echo pulse width at certain orientations. Echo phase variability, correlation coefficient and fractal dimension distributions did not demonstrate significant discriminatory power between the two species. [Work supported by ADF&G, ONR.

  4. In Situ Deformation of Cartilage in Cyclically Loaded Tibiofemoral Joints by Displacement-Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D.D.; Neu, C.P.; Hull, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Cartilage displacement and strain patterns were documented noninvasively in intact tibiofemoral joints in situ by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study determined the number of compressive loading cycles required to precondition intact joints prior to imaging, the spatial distribution of displacements and strains in cartilage using displacement-encoded MRI, and the depth-dependency of these measures across specimens. Design Juvenile porcine tibiofemoral joints were cyclically compressed at one and two times body weight at 0.1 Hz to achieve quasi-steady state load-displacement response. A 7T MRI scanner was used for displacement-encoded stimulated echoes with a fast spin echo acquisition (DENSE-FSE) in eight intact joints. Two-dimensional displacements and strains were determined throughout the thickness of the tibial and femoral cartilage and then normalized over the tissue thickness. Results Two-dimensional displacements and strains were heterogeneous through the depth of femoral and tibial cartilage under cyclic compression. Strains in the loading direction were compressive and were maximal in the middle zone of femoral and tibial cartilage, and tensile strains were observed in the direction transverse to loading. Conclusions This study determined the depth-dependent displacements and strains in intact juvenile porcine tibiofemoral joints using displacement-encoded imaging. Displacement and strain distributions reflect the heterogeneous biochemistry of cartilage and the biomechanical response of the tissue to compression in the loading environment of an intact joint. This unique information about the biomechanics of cartilage has potential for comparisons of healthy and degenerated tissue and in the design of engineered replacement tissues. PMID:19447213

  5. Mono-Exponential Fitting in T2-Relaxometry: Relevance of Offset and First Echo

    PubMed Central

    Milford, David; Rosbach, Nicolas; Bendszus, Martin; Heiland, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T2 relaxometry has become an important tool in quantitative MRI. Little focus has been put on the effect of the refocusing flip angle upon the offset parameter, which was introduced to account for a signal floor due to noise or to long T2 components. The aim of this study was to show that B1 imperfections contribute significantly to the offset. We further introduce a simple method to reduce the systematic error in T2 by discarding the first echo and using the offset fitting approach. Materials and Methods Signal curves of T2 relaxometry were simulated based on extended phase graph theory and evaluated for 4 different methods (inclusion and exclusion of the first echo, while fitting with and without the offset). We further performed T2 relaxometry in a phantom at 9.4T magnetic resonance imaging scanner and used the same methods for post-processing as in the extended phase graph simulated data. Single spin echo sequences were used to determine the correct T2 time. Results The simulation data showed that the systematic error in T2 and the offset depends on the refocusing pulse, the echo spacing and the echo train length. The systematic error could be reduced by discarding the first echo. Further reduction of the systematic T2 error was reached by using the offset as fitting parameter. The phantom experiments confirmed these findings. Conclusion The fitted offset parameter in T2 relaxometry is influenced by imperfect refocusing pulses. Using the offset as a fitting parameter and discarding the first echo is a fast and easy method to minimize the error in T2, particularly for low to intermediate echo train length. PMID:26678918

  6. A pilot validation of multi-echo based echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging in human calf muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Jon K; Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Roberts, Christian K; Lee, Cathy C; Hahn, Theodore J; Thomas, M Albert

    2014-10-01

    A current limitation of MR spectroscopic imaging of multiple skeletal muscles is prolonged scan duration. A significant reduction in the total scan duration using the echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) sequence was accomplished using two bipolar readout trains with different phase-encoded echoes for one of two spatial dimensions within a single repetition time (TR). The second bipolar readout was used for spatially encoding the outer k-space, whereas the first readout was used for the central k-space only. The performance of this novel sequence, called multi-echo based echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (ME-EPCOSI), was demonstrated by localizing specific key features in calf muscles and bone marrow of 11 healthy volunteers and five subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A 3 T MRI-MRS scanner equipped with a transmit-receive extremity coil was used. Localization of the ME-EPCOSI sequence was in good agreement with the earlier single-readout based EP-COSI sequence and the required scan time was reduced by a factor of two. In agreement with an earlier report using single-voxel based 2D MRS, significantly increased unsaturated pools of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipid (EMCL) and decreased IMCL and EMCL unsaturation indices (UIs) were observed in the soleus and tibialis anterior muscle regions of subjects with T2D compared with healthy controls. In addition, significantly decreased choline content was observed in the soleus of T2D subjects compared with healthy controls. Multi-voxel characterization of IMCL and EMCL ratios and UI in the calf muscle may be useful for the non-invasive assessment of altered lipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of T2D. PMID:25132520

  7. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Moodie, D.S.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Sterba, R.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied 11 adult patients (pts) with atrial septal defect (ASD) and 4 adult pts with ventricular septal defect (VSD) using cine magnetic resonance. All studies were performed using a .6T superconducting magnet with ECG gating and electronic axial rotation when appropriate. Repeated multislice image with no change in physiologic delay of the spin echo pulse sequence, but varying the time by offsetting one slice at each imaging stage allowed for an N x N collection of data where N is the number of slices in one collection set and is equal to the number of sets collected. Algebraic manipulation of the T1 weighted images (TE=30mSec TRMRI. Using this technique, the authors have identified both atrial and ventricular septal defects in all pts preoperatively and have noted an intact atrial septum following surgery. Standard MRI produced 4 false positive studies postoperatively because only 1 phase of the cardiac cycle was reviewed. Cine MRI allows better identification of septal defects than standard static acquisitions. The cine technique also provides better definition and delineation of right sided abnormalities which are maximized when viewed in a cardiac major axis obtained by electronic axial rotation.

  8. DR-BUDDI (Diffeomorphic Registration for Blip-Up blip-Down Diffusion Imaging) Method for Correcting Echo Planar Imaging Distortions

    PubMed Central

    Irfanoglu, M. Okan; Modi, Pooja; Nayak, Amritha; Hutchinson, Elizabeth B.; Sarlls, Joelle; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    We propose an echo planar imaging (EPI) distortion correction method (DR-BUDDI), specialized for diffusion MRI, which uses data acquired twice with reversed phase encoding directions, often referred to as blip-up blip-down acquisitions. DR-BUDDI can incorporate information from an undistorted structural MRI and also use diffusion-weighted images (DWI) to guide the registration, improving the quality of the registration in the presence of large deformations and in white matter regions. DR-BUDDI does not require the transformations for correcting blip-up and blip-down images to be the exact inverse of each other. Imposing the theoretical “blip-up blip-down distortion symmetry” may not be appropriate in the presence of common clinical scanning artifacts such as motion, ghosting, Gibbs ringing, vibrations, and low signal-to-noise. The performance of DR-BUDDI is evaluated with several data sets and compared to other existing blip-up blip-down correction approaches. The proposed method is robust and generally outperforms existing approaches. The inclusion of the DWIs in the correction process proves to be very important to obtain a reliable correction of distortions in the brain stem. Methods that do not use DWIs may produce a visually appealing correction of the non-diffusion weighted b = 0 s/mm2 images, but the directionally encoded color maps computed from the tensor reveal an abnormal anatomy of the white matter pathways. PMID:25433212

  9. The acoustics of the echo cornet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Robert W., Jr.; Klaus, Sabine K.

    2002-11-01

    The echo cornet was an instrument produced by a number of makers in several countries from about the middle of the nineteenth to the early twentieth centuries. It consists of an ordinary three-valve cornet to which a fourth valve has been added, downstream of the three normal valves. The extra valve diverts the airstream from the normal bell to an ''echo'' bell that gives a muted tone quality. Although the air column through the echo bell is typically 15 cm longer than the path through the normal bell, there is no appreciable change of playing pitch when the echo bell is in use. Acoustic input impedance and impulse response measurements and consideration of the standing-wave pattern within the echo bell show how this can be so. Acoustically, the echo bell is more closely related to hand-stopping on the French horn than to the mutes commonly used on the trumpet and cornet.

  10. A radar-echo model for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Moore, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers developed a radar-echo model for Mars based on 12.6 cm continuous wave radio transmissions backscattered from the planet. The model broadly matches the variations in depolarized and polarized total radar cross sections with longitude observed by Goldstone in 1986 along 7 degrees S. and yields echo spectra that are generally similiar to the observed spectra. Radar map units in the model include an extensive cratered uplands unit with weak depolarized echo cross sections, average thermal inertias, moderate normal refelectivities, and moderate rms slopes; the volcanic units of Tharsis, Elysium, and Amazonis regions with strong depolarized echo cross sections, low thermal inertia, low normal reflectivities, and large rms slopes; and the northern planes units with moderate to strong depolarized echo cross sections, moderate to very high thermal inertias, moderate to large normal reflectivities, and moderate rms slopes. The relevance of the model to the interpretation of radar echoes from Mars is discussed.