Sample records for ecologically sensitive area

  1. Sensitive ecological areas and species inventory of Actun Chapat Cave, Vaca Plateau, Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynne, J.J.; Pleytez, W.

    2005-01-01

    Cave ecosystems are considered one of the most poorly studied and fragile systems on Earth. Belize caves are no exception. This paper represents the first effort to synthesize information on both invertebrate and vertebrate observations from a Belize cave. Based on limited field research and a review of literature, we identified two ecologically sensitive areas, and developed a species inventory list containing 41 vertebrate and invertebrate morphospecies in Actun Chapat, Vaca Plateau, west-central Belize. Actun Chapat contains two ecologically sensitive areas: (1) a large multiple species bat roost, and (2) a subterranean pool containing troglobites and stygobites. The inventory list is a product of sporadic research conducted between 1973 and 2001. Ecological research in this cave system remains incomplete. An intensive systematic ecological survey of Actun Chapat with data collection over multiple seasons using a suite of survey techniques will provide a more complete inventory list. To minimize human disturbance to the ecologically sensitive areas, associated with ecotourism, we recommend limited to no access in the areas identified as "sensitive".

  2. Framework to evaluate the worth of hydraulic conductivity data for optimal groundwater resources management in ecologically sensitive areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyen, Luc; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2005-03-01

    We propose a framework that combines simulation optimization with Bayesian decision analysis to evaluate the worth of hydraulic conductivity data for optimal groundwater resources management in ecologically sensitive areas. A stochastic simulation optimization management model is employed to plan regionally distributed groundwater pumping while preserving the hydroecological balance in wetland areas. Because predictions made by an aquifer model are uncertain, groundwater supply systems operate below maximum yield. Collecting data from the groundwater system can potentially reduce predictive uncertainty and increase safe water production. The price paid for improvement in water management is the cost of collecting the additional data. Efficient data collection using Bayesian decision analysis proceeds in three stages: (1) The prior analysis determines the optimal pumping scheme and profit from water sales on the basis of known information. (2) The preposterior analysis estimates the optimal measurement locations and evaluates whether each sequential measurement will be cost-effective before it is taken. (3) The posterior analysis then revises the prior optimal pumping scheme and consequent profit, given the new information. Stochastic simulation optimization employing a multiple-realization approach is used to determine the optimal pumping scheme in each of the three stages. The cost of new data must not exceed the expected increase in benefit obtained in optimal groundwater exploitation. An example based on groundwater management practices in Florida aimed at wetland protection showed that the cost of data collection more than paid for itself by enabling a safe and reliable increase in production.

  3. Human-Related Factors Regulate the Spatial Ecology of Domestic Cats in Sensitive Areas for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Joaquim P.; Leitão, Inês; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Revilla, Eloy

    2011-01-01

    Background Domestic cats ranging freely in natural areas are a conservation concern due to competition, predation, disease transmission or hybridization with wildcats. In order to improve our ability to design effective control policies, we investigate the factors affecting their numbers and space use in natural areas of continental Europe. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe the patterns of cat presence, abundance and space use and analyse the associated environmental and human constraints in a well-preserved Mediterranean natural area with small scattered local farms. We failed in detecting cats in areas away from human settlements (trapping effort above 4000 trap-nights), while we captured 30 individuals near inhabited farms. We identified 130 cats, all of them in farms still in use by people (30% of 128 farms). All cats were free-ranging and very wary of people. The main factor explaining the presence of cats was the presence of people, while the number of cats per farm was mostly affected by the occasional food provisioning with human refuse and the presence of people. The home ranges of eight radio tagged cats were centred at inhabited farms. Males went furthest away from the farms during the mating season (3.8 km on average, maximum 6.3 km), using inhabited farms as stepping-stones in their mating displacements (2.2 km of maximum inter-farm distance moved). In their daily movements, cats notably avoided entering in areas with high fox density. Conclusions The presence, abundance and space use of cats were heavily dependent on human settlements. Any strategy aiming at reducing their impact in areas of conservation concern should aim at the presence of settlements and their spatial spread and avoid any access to human refuse. The movements of domestic cats would be limited in areas with large patches of natural vegetation providing good conditions for other carnivore mammals such as red foxes. PMID:22043298

  4. 100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

    1993-09-01

    This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Reactive Ecological Dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariane Verdy; Hal Caswell

    2008-01-01

    Ecological systems with asymptotically stable equilibria may exhibit significant transient dynamics following perturbations.\\u000a In some cases, these transient dynamics include the possibility of excursions away from the equilibrium before the eventual\\u000a return; systems that exhibit such amplification of perturbations are called reactive. Reactivity is a common property of ecological\\u000a systems, and the amplification can be large and long-lasting. The transient

  6. Ecological sensitivity: a biospheric view of climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon C. Bergengren; Duane E. Waliser; Yuk L. Yung

    2011-01-01

    Climate change is often characterized in terms of climate sensitivity, the globally averaged temperature rise associated with\\u000a a doubling of the atmospheric CO2 (equivalent) concentration. In this study, we develop and apply two new ecological sensitivity metrics, analogs of climate\\u000a sensitivity, to investigate the potential degree of plant community changes over the next three centuries. We use ten climate\\u000a simulations

  7. Ecological science and the management of protected areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. May

    1994-01-01

    This paper aims to survey a few among many ecological principles that are particularly relevant to the management of protected areas. Various aspects of the relation between area of protected habitat and numbers of constituent species preserved are discussed, with emphasis of edge effects and other factors. Particular attention is given to those species which persist via local extinctions and

  8. Ecological problems of oil exploitation in the Caspian Sea area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M Efendiyeva

    2000-01-01

    Presently, the Republic of Azerbaijan is undergoing a historical period of social, economical and political changes. These reforms are bringing about problems that require immediate solutions. The pivotal point of the reforms taking place in Azerbaijan is the closure of agreements with foreign companies who are contracted for oil exploitation in the Caspian Sea region. The ecological sensitivity of this

  9. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  10. Radiation sensitive area detection device and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (inventor); Hecht, Diana L. (inventor); Witherow, William K. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A radiation sensitive area detection device for use in conjunction with an X ray, ultraviolet or other radiation source is provided which comprises a phosphor containing film which releases a stored diffraction pattern image in response to incoming light or other electromagnetic wave. A light source such as a helium-neon laser, an optical fiber capable of directing light from the laser source onto the phosphor film and also capable of channelling the fluoresced light from the phosphor film to an integrating sphere which directs the light to a signal processing means including a light receiving means such as a photomultiplier tube. The signal processing means allows translation of the fluoresced light in order to detect the original pattern caused by the diffraction of the radiation by the original sample. The optical fiber is retained directly in front of the phosphor screen by a thin metal holder which moves up and down across the phosphor screen and which features a replaceable pinhole which allows easy adjustment of the resolution of the light projected onto the phosphor film. The device produces near real time images with high spatial resolution and without the distortion that accompanies prior art devices employing photomultiplier tubes. A method is also provided for carrying out radiation area detection using the device of the invention.

  11. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

  12. X ray sensitive area detection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (inventor); Witherow, William K. (inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (inventor); Yost, Vaughn H. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A radiation sensitive area detection device is disclosed which comprises a phosphor-containing film capable of receiving and storing an image formed by a pattern of incoming x rays, UV, or other radiation falling on the film. The device is capable of fluorescing in response to stimulation by a light source in a manner directly proportional to the stored radiation pattern. The device includes: (1) a light source capable of projecting light or other appropriate electromagnetic wave on the film so as to cause it to fluoresce; (2) a means to focus the fluoresced light coming from the phosphor-containing film after light stimulation; and (3) at least one charged coupled detector or other detecting element capable of receiving and digitizing the pattern of fluoresced light coming from the phosphor-containing film. The device will be able to generate superior x ray images of high resolution from a crystal or other sample and will be particularly advantageous in that instantaneous near-real-time images of rapidly deteriorating samples can be obtained. Furthermore, the device can be made compact and sturdy, thus capable of carrying out x ray or other radiation imaging under a variety of conditions, including those experienced in space.

  13. Ecological significance of seed desiccation sensitivity in Quercus ilex

    PubMed Central

    Joët, Thierry; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Dussert, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Several widespread tree species of temperate forests, such as species of the genus Quercus, produce recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) seeds. However, the ecological significance of seed desiccation sensitivity in temperate regions is largely unknown. Do seeds of such species suffer from drying during the period when they remain on the soil, between shedding in autumn and the return of conditions required for germination in spring? Methods To test this hypothesis, the Mediterranean holm oak (Quercus ilex) forest was used as a model system. The relationships between the climate in winter, the characteristics of microhabitats, acorn morphological traits, and the water status and viability of seeds after winter were then investigated in 42 woodlands sampled over the entire French distribution of the species. Key Results The percentages of germination and normal seedling development were tightly linked to the water content of seeds after the winter period, revealing that in situ desiccation is a major cause of mortality. The homogeneity of seed response to drying suggests that neither intraspecific genetic variation nor environmental conditions had a significant impact on the level of desiccation sensitivity of seeds. In contrast, the water and viability status of seeds at the time of collection were dramatically influenced by cumulative rainfall and maximum temperatures during winter. A significant effect of shade and of the type of soil cover was also evidenced. Conclusions The findings establish that seed desiccation sensitivity is a key functional trait which may influence the success of recruitment in temperate recalcitrant seed species. Considering that most models of climate change predict changes in rainfall and temperature in the Mediterranean basin, the present work could help foresee changes in the distribution of Q. ilex and other oak species, and hence plant community alterations. PMID:23388882

  14. The role of ecological compensation areas in conservation biological control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Burgio

    2007-01-01

    Ecological compensation areas (ECAs), defined as all natural vegetation and non-crop plants within the rural landscape, are considered an important tool in multifunctional agriculture. In particular, ECAs are crucial in enhancing functional biodiversity for pest suppression and for the conservation of rare species. In my PhD thesis I focused on the role of ECAs on functional biodiversity, which is associated

  15. Detecting Area Sensitivity: A Comment on Previous Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID JOSEPH HORN; ROBERT J. FLETCHER; ROLF R. KOFORD

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT.—Several studies have reported,that some,grassland birds are area sensitive; they exhibit a nonrandom avoidance of small fields. The methods used to test for area sensitivity, however, differed among studies. Some investigators sampled fields with sampling effort pro- portional to field size, whereas others used equal sampling effort in all fields. We created a simulation model,with the same,number,of fields and field

  16. Chapter 6: Ecology of the Everglades Protection Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred Sklar; Mark Cook; Erynn Call; Robert Shuford; Mac Kobza; Robert Johnson; Shili Miao; Michael Korvela; Carlos Coronado; Laura Bauman; Jennifer Leeds; Brian Garrett; Jana Newman; Eric Cline; Susan Newman; Ken Rutchey; Christopher McVoy

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The studies and findings discussed in this chapter of the 2006 South Florida Environmental Report - Volume I are presented within four main fields: (1) wildlife ecology, (2) plant ecology, (3) ecosystem ecology, and (4) landscape ecology. Programs of study were based on the short-term and long-term needs of the South Florida Water Management District (District or SFWMD) including

  17. Ecological Modelling 153 (2002) 131142 Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration and its effects on

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    2002-01-01

    Ecological Modelling 153 (2002) 131­142 Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration and its effects of the nonlinearity in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration, several commonly used ecosystem models produce substantially different estimates of soil respiration with the same or similar model input. In this paper we

  18. Ecological approach to resource survey and planning for environmentally significant Areas: The ABC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastedo, Jamie D.; Nelson, J. Gordon; Theberge, John B.

    1984-03-01

    A resource survey and planning method for parks, reserves, and other environmentally significant areas (ESAs) is presented in the context of a holistic balanced approach to land use and environmental management. This method provides a framework for the acquisition, analysis, presentation, and application of diverse ecological data pertinent to land use planning and resource management within ESAs. Through the independent analysis and subsequent integration of abiotic, biotic, and cultural or ABC information, land areas within an ESA are identified in terms of their relative environmental significance and environmental constraints. The former term encompasses wildlife, historic, and other resource values, while the latter term reflects biophysical hazards and sensitivities, and land use conflicts. The method thus calls for a matching of an ESA's distinctive attributes with appropriate land use and institutional arrancements through an analysis of available acts, regulations, agencies, and other conservation and land use management mechanisms. The method culminates with a management proposal showing proposed park or reserve allocations, buffer areas, or other land use controls aimed at preserving an ESA's special ecological qualities, while providing for resource development. The authors suggest that all resource management decisions affecting ESA's should be governed by a philosophical stance that recognizes a spectrum of broad land use types, ranging from preservation to extractive use and rehabilitation.

  19. Robot Skin Based on Touch-Area-Sensitive Tactile Element

    E-print Network

    Shinoda, Hiroyuki

    propose a new tactile sensor skin ("Skin by Touch Area Receptor" or STAR). The skin consists of two robot skin including no long wires. Index Terms - Tactile sensor, Robot skin, Haptic interface, Contact such a robot skin, various arrays of pressure-sensitive tactile sensor elements [6]-[11] have been tried. One

  20. Pulsar Sensitivity Studies of the GLAST Large Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Razzano; Alice K. Harding

    In this contribution we present our prelimi- nary investigation on pulsar sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope, the main instrument aboard the GLAST mis- sion. In particular we concentrated our attention to pul- sars located at low galactic latitudes. We created a set of simulated pulsars having different fluxes in an array of galactic coordinates separated by a distance greater

  1. Retrofitting SBR systems to nutrient removal in sensitive tourist areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Tasli; N. Artan; D. Orhon

    2001-01-01

    Retrofitting of existing SBR systems for nutrient removal is evaluated and defined for small communities in sensitive coastal areas, with seasonal fluctuations in wastewater quantity and quality. The proposed approach is developed by means of basic process stoichiometry and verified using ASM2d. The efficiency of retrofitting is found to rely on the delicate balance between the overall sludge age, the

  2. [Spatial-temporal pattern and obstacle factors of cultivated land ecological security in major grain producing areas of northeast China: a case study in Jilin Province].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Ma, Yan-Ji

    2014-02-01

    According to the cultivated land ecological security in major grain production areas of Northeast China, this paper selected 48 counties of Jilin Province as the research object. Based on the PSR-EES conceptual framework model, an evaluation index system of cultivated land ecological security was built. By using the improved TOPSIS, Markov chains, GIS spatial analysis and obstacle degree models, the spatial-temporal pattern of cultivated land ecological security and the obstacle factors were analyzed from 1995 to 2011 in Jilin Province. The results indicated that, the composite index of cultivated land ecological security appeared in a rising trend in Jilin Province from 1995 to 2011, and the cultivated land ecological security level changed from being sensitive to being general. There was a pattern of 'Club Convergence' in cultivated land ecological security level in each county and the spatial discrepancy tended to become larger. The 'Polarization' trend of cultivated land ecological security level was obvious. The distributions of sensitive level and critical security level with ribbon patterns tended to be dispersed, the general security level and relative security levels concentrated, and the distributions of security level scattered. The unstable trend of cultivated land ecological security level was more and more obvious. The main obstacle factors that affected the cultivated land ecological security level in Jilin Province were rural net income per capita, economic density, the proportion of environmental protection investment in GDP, degree of machinery cultivation and the comprehensive utilization rate of industrial solid wastes. PMID:24830253

  3. The ecological basis of sensitivity of brown treecreepers to habitat fragmentation: a preliminary assessment

    E-print Network

    Walters, Jeffrey R.

    The ecological basis of sensitivity of brown treecreepers to habitat fragmentation: a preliminary January 1999 Abstract We attempted to identify the mechanisms responsible for adverse eects of habitat due to patch isolation, reduced fecundity due to elevated nest predation, and reduced food

  4. Pulsar sensitivity studies of the GLAST large area telescope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Massimiliano Razzano; Alice K. Harding

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution we present our preliminary investigation on pulsar sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope, the main\\u000a instrument aboard the GLAST mission. In particular we concentrated our attention to pulsars located at low galactic latitudes.\\u000a We created a set of simulated pulsars having different fluxes in an array of galactic coordinates separated by a distance\\u000a greater than the LAT

  5. Pulsar sensitivity studies of the GLAST large area telescope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Massimiliano Razzano; Alice K. Harding

    \\u000a In this contribution we present our preliminary investigation on pulsar sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope, the main\\u000a instrument aboard the GLAST mission. In particular we concentrated our attention to pulsars located at low galactic latitudes.\\u000a We created a set of simulated pulsars having different fluxes in an array of galactic coordinates separated by a distance\\u000a greater than the LAT

  6. Large area x-ray sensitive video camera: overall feasibility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randy Luhta; John A. Rowlands

    1997-01-01

    A large area x-ray sensitive vidicon is an alternative to the x-ray image intensifier and television camera combination. The proposed x-ray vidicon utilizes an amorphous selenium photoconductive layer which has a higher intrinsic resolution in comparison to the input phosphor of an XRII. This higher resolution could benefit diagnostic cardiac angiography as well as interventional cardiac procedures which now frequency

  7. Representation of Ecological Systems within the Protected Areas Network of the Continental United States

    PubMed Central

    Aycrigg, Jocelyn L.; Davidson, Anne; Svancara, Leona K.; Gergely, Kevin J.; McKerrow, Alexa; Scott, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    If conservation of biodiversity is the goal, then the protected areas network of the continental US may be one of our best conservation tools for safeguarding ecological systems (i.e., vegetation communities). We evaluated representation of ecological systems in the current protected areas network and found insufficient representation at three vegetation community levels within lower elevations and moderate to high productivity soils. We used national-level data for ecological systems and a protected areas database to explore alternative ways we might be able to increase representation of ecological systems within the continental US. By following one or more of these alternatives it may be possible to increase the representation of ecological systems in the protected areas network both quantitatively (from 10% up to 39%) and geographically and come closer to meeting the suggested Convention on Biological Diversity target of 17% for terrestrial areas. We used the Landscape Conservation Cooperative framework for regional analysis and found that increased conservation on some private and public lands may be important to the conservation of ecological systems in Western US, while increased public-private partnerships may be important in the conservation of ecological systems in Eastern US. We have not assessed the pros and cons of following the national or regional alternatives, but rather present them as possibilities that may be considered and evaluated as decisions are made to increase the representation of ecological systems in the protected areas network across their range of ecological, geographical, and geophysical occurrence in the continental US into the future. PMID:23372754

  8. Contact sensitization in the anal and genital area.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Oehme, S; Geier, J

    2011-01-01

    We analysed the patch test results in 1,374 patients suffering from dermatoses in the anogenital area (n = 561 genital dermatoses, n = 470 anal dermatoses, n = 343 anogenital dermatoses) patch tested in 44 dermatological departments of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology from 2004 to 2008. All other patients patch tested during this time period without anogenital dermatoses formed the control group (n = 49, 142). Of the total study group, 662 (48.2%) patients were male. 179 (13%) had a past or present atopic dermatitis. The vast majority of the patients was older than 40 years (n = 989, 72%). Suspected allergen sources were first of all topical medicaments, followed by cosmetics, cleansing agents, clothes, rubber products, systemic medicaments and disinfectants. Allergic contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 409 (29.8%) of the tested patients. Patients with anogenital dermatoses were sensitized mainly to active agents of topical medicaments, in particular bufexamac (5.3%). Sensitization pattern and sensitization rates observed in patients with genital and anal involvement differed significantly. Patients with anal disease had significantly higher sensitization rates for bufexamac (9.4 vs. 1.1%), fragrance mix I (8.7 vs. 4.2%) and II (4.5 vs. 2.6%), propolis (5.4 vs. 1.9%) and methyldibromoglutaronitrile (6.3 vs. 4.1%). Patients with chronic anal dermatoses seem to have a higher risk to develop sensitizations to topically applied products and drugs than patients with genital dermatoses. Recommended patch test series (German Contact Dermatitis Research Group) are standard series, local anaesthetics series, topical antibiotics, antimycotics, steroids, ointment bases and preservative series as well as the patients' own products. PMID:21325848

  9. Quantitative Study of Green Area for Climate Sensitive Terraced Housing Area Design in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, O. T. S.; Saito, K.; Said, I.

    2014-02-01

    Neighbourhood plays a significant role in peoples' daily lives. Nowadays, terraced housing is common in Malaysia, and green areas in the neighborhood are not used to their maximum. The aim of the research is to quantify the types of green area that are most efficient for cooling the environment for thermal comfort and mitigation of Urban Heat Island. Spatial and environmental inputs are manipulated for the simulation using Geographic Information System (GIS) integrated with computational microclimate simulation. The outcome of this research is a climate sensitive housing environment model framework on the green area to solve the problem of Urban Heat Island.

  10. The Timing of Noise-Sensitive Activities in Residential Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Data from a nationally representative survey of time use was analyzed to provide estimates of the percentage of the population which is engaged in noise sensitive activities during each hour of the day on weekdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Estimates are provided of the percentage engaged in aural communication activities at home, sleeping at home, or simply at home. The day can be roughly divided into four noise sensitivity periods consisting of two relatively steady state periods, night and day and the early morning and evening transition periods. Weekends differ from weekdays in that the morning transition period is one hour later and the numbers of people engaged in aural communication during the day at home are approximately one-half to three-quarters greater. The extent and timing of noise sensitive activities was found to be similiar for all parts of the United States, for different sizes of urban areas, and for the three seasons surveyed (September through May). The timing of activity periods does not differ greatly by sex or age even though women and people over 65 are much more likely to be at home during the daytime.

  11. The timing of noise-sensitive activities in residential areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-07-01

    Data from a nationally representative survey of time use was analyzed to provide estimates of the percentage of the population which is engaged in noise sensitive activities during each hour of the day on weekdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Estimates are provided of the percentage engaged in aural communication activities at home, sleeping at home, or simply at home. The day can be roughly divided into four noise sensitivity periods consisting of two relatively steady state periods, night and day and the early morning and evening transition periods. Weekends differ from weekdays in that the morning transition period is one hour later and the numbers of people engaged in aural communication during the day at home are approximately one-half to three-quarters greater. The extent and timing of noise sensitive activities was found to be similiar for all parts of the United States, for different sizes of urban areas, and for the three seasons surveyed (September through May). The timing of activity periods does not differ greatly by sex or age even though women and people over 65 are much more likely to be at home during the daytime.

  12. Hydrological and Ecological Sensitivities to Climate Change for Four Western U.S. Mountain Ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L.; Tague, C. L.; Baron, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    National Parks in Western U.S. mountain ecosystems are rapidly changing as a result of the direct and indirect effects of climate change. With warming temperatures, these systems are expected to experience earlier melt and reductions in snow accumulation. The impact of these changes on other hydrologic patterns, such as summer streamflow, and ecosystem structure and function maybe significant, but is likely to vary across the Western U.S. Park managers need quantitative estimates of these potential changes for development of long- term management strategies. A systematic approach can be used to define where and why these mountain ecosystems are affected by climate, focusing on net ecosystem exchange, net primary production, evapotranspiration, and streamflow trends. We used RHESSys, a spatially distributed, dynamic process model of water, carbon, and nitrogen fluxes, to examine the interplay between ecological and hydrological sensitivities to climate in four National Parks across the Western U.S., including watersheds in the North Cascades (WA), Glacier (MT), Rocky Mountain (CO), and Yosemite (CA) National Park. Analyses show while some systems are more hydrologically sensitive to climate variations, others are more ecologically sensitive. For example, with warm temperatures, the greatest reduction of summer streamflow is likely to occur in Glacier, while greatest sensitivities of vegetation responses, e.g. transpiration, net primary productivity, are predicted for the Cascades. Understanding the degree to which these watersheds are sensitive to climate variability and change will help to predict site specific vulnerabilities and allow park managers to tailor climate change management plans to individual locations.

  13. Assessment of ecological security in Changbai Mountain Area, China based on MODIS data and PSR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Ping; Qi, Xin

    2014-11-01

    The assessment of ecological security is to identify the stability of the ecosystem, and to distinguish the capacity of sustainable health and integrity under different kinds of risks. Using MODIS time series images from 2000 to 2008 as the main data source, the derived parameters including NDVI, the ratio of NPP and GPP, forest coverage, landscape diversity and ecological flexibility etc. are integrated to depict the properties of the ecological system. The pressure and response indicators such as population density, industrial production intensity, arable land per capita, fertilizer consumption, highway density, agricultural mechanization level and GDP per capita are also collected and managed by ArcGIS. The `pressure-state-response' (PSR) conceptual model and a hierarchical weighted model are applied to construct an evaluation framework and determine the state of ecological security in Changbai Mountain area. The results show that the ecological security index (ESI) values in 2000 and 2008 were 5.75 and 5.59 respectively, indicating the ecological security state in Changbai Mountain area degraded. In 2000, the area of in good state of ecological security was 21901km2, occupying 28.96% of the study region. 48201 km2 of the land were with moderate level. The grades of ESI in Dunhua, Longjing and Antu decreased from moderate to poor. Though the ESI value of Meihekou increased by 0.12 during 2000-2008, it was still in a very poor state of ecological security induced by intensive human activities. The ecological security situation of Changbai Mountain region was not optimistic on the whole.

  14. Research on the Placement of the Ecological Shelter Zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, N.; Ruan, X.

    2011-12-01

    The Three Gorges Dam is built on the middle reaches of Yangtze River (Changjiang) in south-central China, which is the world's third longest river. The Three Gorges Reservoir Region (TGRR), including the entire inundated area and 19 administrative units (counties and cities) on both sides of the river, is regarded as an environmentally sensitive area. The total area of the TGRR is approximately 58000 km2. As the Three Gorges Dam fully operated, for the flood control, the water level should be kept in the range between 145 m and 175 m and the reservoir surface water area(over 1080 km2)at a water level of 175 m, with a length of 600 km. Many of cities, villages and farms have been submerged. Moreover, as a result of reservoir operation, the water-level alternation of the reservoir is opposite to the nature, which is low water level (145m) in summer and high water level (175m) in winter. The Hydro-Fluctuation Belt, with a height of 30m, will become a new pollution source due to the riparian being flooded and the submerged areas may still contain trace amounts of toxic or radioactive materials. The environmental impacts associated with large scale reservoir area often have significant negative impacts on the environment. It affects forest cover, species in the area, some endangered, water quality, increase the likelihood of earthquakes and mudslides in the area. To solve these problems, it is necessarily to construct the Ecological Shelter Zone (ESZ) along with the edge of the reservoir area. The function of the ESZ is similar to the riparian zone in reducing flood damage, improving water quality, decreasing the levels of the nonpoint source pollution load and soil erosion and rebuilding the migration routes of plant and wildlife. However, the research of the ESZ is mainly focused on rivers at field scale by now, lack of research method on reservoir at the watershed scale. As the special nature of the Three Gorges Reservoir, the construction of the ESZ in the TGRA is very complex. This paper focus on the development of a methodology to target the ESZ based on currently available tools (Remote Sensing, GIS and Hydrologic Model). According to the features of the TGRR, a spatially explicit and process-based method was introduced to help plan the placement of the ESZ in the TGRR for water quality benefits. The methods presented here were based on the integration of grid-based terrain analysis and nonpoint source pollution estimates. Firstly, the contribution of nonpoint source pollution from upslope farmland and urban to the TGRR was determined by grid-based terrain analysis. The upslope contributing area beyond the ESZ was defined as a "source". The SWAT model was used to analyze the characteristics of the pollution load. Secondly, the ESZ was defined as a "sink" and the reducing pollution loads in each grid cell of the ESZ was calculated by the REMM model. Finally, the key areas in the TGRA where the ESZ have the greatest potential to improve water quality were identified and the formula of the width of the ESZ was determined. However, the method in this article considers only the function of pollutants reduction in the ESZ, the next stage of the study will involve detailed modeling for the function of ecological corridor in the ESZ.

  15. Spatial ecology of krill, micronekton and top predators in the central California Current: Implications for defining ecologically important areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santora, Jarrod A.; Field, John C.; Schroeder, Isaac D.; Sakuma, Keith M.; Wells, Brian K.; Sydeman, William J.

    2012-11-01

    Marine spatial planning and ecosystem models that aim to predict and protect fisheries and wildlife benefit greatly from syntheses of empirical information on physical and biological partitioning of marine ecosystems. Here, we develop spatially-explicit oceanographic and ecological descriptions of the central California Current region. To partition this region, we integrate data from 20 years of shipboard surveys with satellite remote-sensing to characterize local seascapes of ecological significance, focusing on krill, other micronekton taxa, and top predators (seabirds and marine mammals). Specifically, we investigate if micronekton and predator assemblages co-vary spatially with mesoscale oceanographic conditions. The first principal component of environmental and micronekton seascapes indicates significant coupling between physics, primary productivity, and secondary and tertiary marine consumers. Subsequent principal components indicate latitudinal variability in niche-community space due to varying habitat characteristics between Monterey Bay (deep submarine canyon system) and the Gulf of the Farallones (extensive continental shelf), even though both of these sub-regions are located downstream from upwelling centers. Overall, we identified five ecologically important areas based on spatial integration of environmental and biotic features. These areas, characterized by proximity to upwelling centers, shallow pycnoclines, and high chlorophyll-a and krill concentrations, are potential areas of elevated trophic focusing for specific epipelagic and mesopelagic communities. This synthesis will benefit ecosystem-based management approaches for the central California Current, a region long-impacted by anthropogenic factors.

  16. Ecologically enhanced areas – a key habitat structure for re-introduced grey partridges Perdix perdix

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Buner; Markus Jenny; Niklaus Zbinden; Beat Naef-Daenzer

    2005-01-01

    We analysed the spatial distribution of home-ranges and the habitat use of re-introduced grey partridges Perdix perdix in relation to newly established ecologically enhanced areas, i.e. wild-flower strips and hedges, within an intensively cultivated area in Switzerland from which the species had become extinct. All birds settled within the ca. 30% of the study area where the proportion of enhanced

  17. Socio-Ecological Risk Factors for Prime-Age Adult Death in Two Coastal Areas of Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok Ryun; Ali, Mohammad; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Wierzba, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hierarchical spatial models enable the geographic and ecological analysis of health data thereby providing useful information for designing effective health interventions. In this study, we used a Bayesian hierarchical spatial model to evaluate mortality data in Vietnam. The model enabled identification of socio-ecological risk factors and generation of risk maps to better understand the causes and geographic implications of prime-age (15 to less than 45 years) adult death. Methods and Findings The study was conducted in two sites: Nha Trang and Hue in Vietnam. The study areas were split into 500×500 meter cells to define neighborhoods. We first extracted socio-demographic data from population databases of the two sites, and then aggregated the data by neighborhood. We used spatial hierarchical model that borrows strength from neighbors for evaluating risk factors and for creating spatially smoothed risk map after adjusting for neighborhood level covariates. The Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure was used to estimate the parameters. Male mortality was more than twice the female mortality. The rates also varied by age and sex. The most frequent cause of mortality was traffic accidents and drowning for men and traffic accidents and suicide for women. Lower education of household heads in the neighborhood was an important risk factor for increased mortality. The mortality was highly variable in space and the socio-ecological risk factors are sensitive to study site and sex. Conclusion Our study suggests that lower education of the household head is an important predictor for prime age adult mortality. Variability in socio-ecological risk factors and in risk areas by sex make it challenging to design appropriate intervention strategies aimed at decreasing prime-age adult deaths in Vietnam. PMID:24587031

  18. Radar backscatter sensitivity of soil moisture in vegetation covered areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faisal Karim; Susan Steele-Dunne; Nick van de Giesen

    2010-01-01

    Radar backscatter is sensitive to the water content of bare soil surface. Vegetation cover masks the soil surface, reducing the sensitivity of the radar backscatter to soil moisture. The water-cloud model is used to account for vegetation effects on the copolarized backscatter coefficient in C and L band. In this sensitivity study, two different models for opacity are compared to

  19. Primary productivity of the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research Area and the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. C.; Baker, K. S.; Byers, M. L.; Stammerjohn, S. E.

    1998-11-01

    A major objective of the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research (Palmer LTER) project is to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the various components of the Antarctic marine ecosystem. Phytoplankton production plays a key role in this so-called high nutrient, low chlorophyll environment, and factors that regulate production include those that control cell growth (light, temperature, and nutrients) and those that control cell accumulation rate and hence population growth (water column stability, grazing, and sinking). Sea ice mediates several of these factors and frequently conditions the water column for a spring bloom which is characterized by a pulse of production restricted in both time and space. This study models the spatial and temporal variability of primary production within the Palmer LTER area west of the Antarctic Peninsula and discusses this production in the context of historical data for the Southern Ocean. Primary production for the Southern Ocean and the Palmer LTER area have been computed using both light-pigment production models [Smith, R.C., Bidigare, R.R., Prézelin, B.B., Baker, K.S., Brooks, J.M., 1987. Optical characterization of primary productivity across a coastal front. Mar. Biol. (96), 575-591; Bidigare, R.R., Smith, R.C., Baker, K.S., Marra, J., 1987. Oceanic primary production estimates from measurements of spectral irradiance and pigment concentrations. Global Biogeochem. Cycles (1), 171-186; Morel, A., Berthon, J.F., 1989. Surface pigments, algal biomass profiles and potential production of the euphotic layer—relationships reinvestigated in view of remote-sensing applications. Limnol. Oceanogr. (34), 1545-1562] and an ice edge production model [Nelson, D.M., Smith, W.O., 1986. Phytoplankton bloom dynamics of the western Ross Sea ice edge: II. Mesoscale cycling of nitrogen and silicon. Deep-Sea Res. (33), 1389-1412; Wilson, D.L., Smith, W.O., Nelson, D.M., 1986. Phytoplankton bloom dynamics of the Western Ross Sea ice edge: I. primary productivity and species-specific production. Deep-Sea Res., 33, 1375-1387; Smith, W.O., Nelson, D.M., 1986. Importance of ice edge phytoplankton production in the Southern Ocean. BioScience (36), 251-257]. Chlorophyll concentrations, total photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and sea ice concentrations were derived from satellite data. These same parameters, in addition to hydrodynamic conditions, have also been determined from shipboard and Palmer Station observations during the LTER program. Model results are compared, sensitivity studies evaluated, and productivity of the Palmer LTER region is discussed in terms of its space time distribution, seasonal and interannual variability, and overall contribution to the marine ecology of the Southern Ocean.

  20. [Ecological security evolvement trend of drinking water source areas along Liaohe River].

    PubMed

    Wang, Geng; Wang, Li; Wu, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Based on the investigation of potential dangerous factors for the ecological security of drinking water source areas along Liaohe River, a total of 59 drinking water source counties along the River in Liaoning Province were selected, and their ecological security evolvement trend was evaluated by using the theories of safety risk assessment and the GIS grid techniques. The results indicated that among the 59 drinking water source counties, 19 counties were in high potential danger (scores < or = 0.3), with their security status having a stronger deterioration trend, 32 counties were in medium potential danger (0.3 < scores < or = 0.7), whose security status had no obvious deterioration, and 8 counties were in low potential danger (scores > 0.7), with the security status less deteriorated. Based on the evaluation, corresponding countermeasures for ecological protection of these areas were proposed. PMID:18260462

  1. Area Fish and Game Ecology [Sahuarita High School Career Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esser, Robert

    This course entitled "Area Fish and Game Ecology" is one of a series of instructional guides prepared by teachers for the Sahuarita High School (Arizona) Career Curriculum Project. It consists of nine units of study, and 18 behavioral objectives relating to these units are stated. The topics covered include map projections, map symbols and…

  2. Linking irreplaceable landforms in a self-organizing landscape to sensitivity of population vital rates for an ecological specialist.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Wade A; Hill, Michael T; Painter, Charles W; Fitzgerald, Lee A

    2015-06-01

    Irreplaceable, self-organizing landforms and the endemic and ecologically specialized biodiversity they support are threatened globally by anthropogenic disturbances. Although the outcome of disrupting landforms is somewhat understood, little information exists that documents population consequences of landform disturbance on endemic biodiversity. Conservation strategies for species dependent upon landforms have been difficult to devise because they require understanding complex feedbacks that create and maintain landforms and the consequences of landform configuration on demography of species. We characterized and quantified links between landform configuration and demography of an ecological specialist, the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus), which occurs only in blowouts (i.e., wind-blown sandy depressions) of Shinnery oak (Quercus havardii) sand-dune landforms. We used matrix models to estimate vital rates from a multisite mark-recapture study of 6 populations occupying landforms with different spatial configurations. Sensitivity and elasticity analyses demonstrated demographic rates among populations varied in sensitivity to different landform configurations. Specifically, significant relationships between blowout shape complexity and vital rate elasticities suggested direct links between S. arenicolus demography and amount of edge in Shinnery oak sand-dune landforms. These landforms are irreplaceable, based on permanent transition of disturbed areas to alternative grassland ecosystem states. Additionally, complex feedbacks between wind, sand, and Shinnery oak maintain this landform, indicating restoration through land management practices is unlikely. Our findings that S. arenicolus population dynamics depended on landform configuration suggest that failure to consider processes of landform organization and their effects on species' population dynamics may lead to incorrect inferences about threats to endemic species and ineffective habitat management for threatened or endangered species. As such, successful conservation of these systems and the biodiversity they support must be informed by research linking process-oriented studies of self-organized landforms with studies of movement, behavior, and demography of species that dwell in them. PMID:25472888

  3. Integrated Surveying Techniques for Sensitive Areas: San Felice Sul Panaro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarin, M.; Buttolo, V.; Guerra, F.; Vernier, P.

    2013-07-01

    The last few years have marked an exponential growth in the use of electronic and computing technologies that opened new possibilities and new scenarios in the Geomatic field. This evolution of tools and methods has led to new ways of approaching survey. For what concerns architecture, the new tools for survey acquisition and 3D modelling allow the representation of an object through a digital model, combining the visual potentials of images, normally used for documentation, with the precision of a metric survey. This research focuses on the application of these new technologies and methodologies on sensitive areas, such as portions of the cities affected by earthquakes. In this field the survey is intended to provide a useful support for other structural analysis, in conservation as well as for restoration studies. However, survey in architecture is still a very complex operation both from a methodological and a practical point of view: it requires a critical interpretation of the artefacts and a deep knowledge of the existing techniques and technologies, which often are very different but need to be integrated within a single general framework. This paper describes the first results of the survey conducted on the church of San Geminiano in San Felice sul Panaro (Modena). Here, different tools and methods were used, in order to create a new system that integrates the most recent and cutting-edge technologies in the Geomatic field. The methodologies used were laser scanning, UAV photogrammetry and topography for the definition of the reference system. The present work will focus on the data acquisition and processing whit these techniques and their integration.

  4. Precision control of an invasive ant on an ecologically sensitive tropical island: a principle with wide applicability.

    PubMed

    Gaigher, R; Samways, M J; Jolliffe, K G; Jolliffe, S

    2012-07-01

    Effective management of invasive ants is an important priority for many conservation programs but can be difficult to achieve, especially within ecologically sensitive habitats. This study assesses the efficacy and nontarget risk of a precision ant baiting method aiming to reduce a population of the invasive big-headed ant Pheidole megacephala on a tropical island of great conservation value. Area-wide application of a formicidal bait, delivered in bait stations, resulted in the rapid decline of 8 ha of P. megacephala. Effective suppression remained throughout the succeeding 11-month monitoring period. We detected no negative effects of baiting on nontarget arthropods. Indeed, species richness of nontarget ants and abundance of other soil-surface arthropods increased significantly after P. megacephala suppression. This bait station method minimized bait exposure to nontarget organisms and was cost effective and adaptable to target species density. However, it was only effective over short distances and required thorough bait placement. This method would therefore be most appropriate for localized P. megacephala infestations where the prevention of nontarget impacts is essential. The methodology used here would be applicable to other sensitive tropical environments. PMID:22908700

  5. Low Sensitivity to Alcohol: Relations With Hangover Occurrence and Susceptibility in an Ecological Momentary Assessment Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Piasecki, Thomas M.; Alley, Kyle J.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Wood, Phillip K.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Shiffman, Saul; Heath, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The current investigation tested whether low sensitivity to alcohol, as measured by the Self-Rating of the Effects of Alcohol (SRE) form, is associated with hangover occurrence or resistance, two potentially important predictors of later problematic drinking outcomes. Method: Drinkers who reported using alcohol at least four times in the past month (N = 402) completed the SRE at baseline and used ecological momentary assessment methods with an electronic diary to record drinking behaviors and related experiences over 21 days. Each morning, the diary assessed prior-night drinking behaviors and the presence of current hangover. Results: After adjustments for sex, body weight, age, and smoking status, higher SRE scores (indicating lower alcohol sensitivity) predicted hangover occurrence on postdrinking mornings (odds ratio [OR] = 1.24 per interquartile range [IQR], p = .003). However, when the number of drinks consumed in the drinking episode was covaried, SRE scores were negatively associated with hangover (OR = 0.67 per IQR, p <.001). An interaction between SRE scores and the number of drinks consumed indicated that low-sensitivity drinkers tend to be differentially resistant to hangover at a given number of drinks. Higher SRE scores were associated with consuming more drinks on average (generalized estimating equations coefficient = 2.20 per IQR, p <.001). Conclusions: Individuals lower in alcohol sensitivity appear to be more resistant to hangovers per unit of alcohol. However, they are also more likely to engage in excessive drinking, and this may account for their increased odds of experiencing hangover during an arbitrary monitoring period. Heavy consumption, hangover resistance, and hangover frequency may each be manifestations of low sensitivity to alcohol, an established risk factor for alcohol use disorder. PMID:23036210

  6. Last Updated 4/19/2013 Ecology and Evolution Emphasis Area Checklist

    E-print Network

    Field Biology ____BI 474 Marine Ecology ____BI 448 Field Botany ____BI 475 Freshwater Ecology ____BI 452 Botany ____BI 476 Terrestrial Ecosyst Ecology ____BI 448 Field Botany ____BI 478/79 Neotropical Ecology

  7. Differences in sensitivity to neural timing among cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zador, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The basic circuitry of auditory, visual, somatosensory and other cortical areas is highly stereotyped (Douglas & Martin, 2004). However, it remains unclear whether this anatomical stereotypy implies functional homogeneity, or whether instead different cortical areas are specialized to process the diverse sensory inputs they receive. Here we have used a two alternative forced choice task to assess modality-specific differences in the ability of rats to exploit precise neuronal timing. We delivered pairs of electrical pulses directly to different areas of cortex to determine the minimum timing differences subjects could detect. By stimulating the cortex directly, we isolated differences due to cortical circuitry rather than to sensory transduction and subcortical processing. Surprisingly, the minimum detectable timing differences varied over more than an order of magnitude, ranging from 1 ms in barrel cortex to 15 ms in visual cortex. Furthermore, these modality-specific differences depended upon sensory experience: although animals subjected to whisker clipping initially showed an impaired ability to exploit fine timing in barrel cortical stimulation, behavioral training partially rescued this deficit. Our results suggest that different cortical areas are adapted to the specific structure of the input signals they process, and that precise spike timing may play a more important role for some cortical areas than for others. PMID:23100435

  8. Contact Sensitization in the Anal and Genital Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bauer; S. Oehme; J. Geier

    2011-01-01

    We analysed the patch test results in 1,374 patients suffering from dermatoses in the anogenital area (n = 561 genital dermatoses, n = 470 anal dermatoses, n = 343 anogenital dermatoses) patch tested in 44 dermatological departments of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology from 2004 to 2008. All other patients patch tested during this time period without anogenital

  9. PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS Forest ecology, with an emphasis on productivity, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem dynamics. Current areas of research

    E-print Network

    Binkley, Dan

    Stewardship, Colorado State University; 1987present. Research and outreach on forest dynamics, includingApril 2012 PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS Forest ecology, with an emphasis on productivity, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem dynamics. Current areas of research focus on longterm changes in ecosystems

  10. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army`s Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  11. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army's Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  12. Dose metrics in the acquisition of skin sensitization: thresholds and importance of dose per unit area.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J; Basketter, David A; Ryan, Cindy A; Gerberick, G Frank; McNamee, Pauline M; Lalko, Jon; Api, Anne Marie

    2008-10-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common occupational and environmental health problem and many hundreds of chemicals have been implicated as skin sensitizers. Sensitization is acquired following topical exposure to a contact allergen and induction of a cutaneous immune response of an appropriate magnitude. For effective assessment and management of human health risks there is a need to appreciate the dose metrics that drive the induction of skin sensitization. The available evidence suggests that under most normal conditions of exposure it is the dose per unit area of chemical that has over-riding impact on the effectiveness of sensitization. The exception to this rule is when the area of the application site drops below a certain critical level. Here we review in detail the evidence which supports dose per unit area as being the critical exposure metric in the induction of skin sensitization, and the mechanistic bases for this relationship. PMID:18423821

  13. Assessment of Ecological and Seismological Situations In The Geothermal Area of Tbilisi By Hydrodynamic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelidze, T.; Buntebarth, G.; Melikadze, G.; Kumsiashvili, G.; Bendukidze, G.

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the hydrodynamic regime of deep aquifers of the Tbilisi hydrothermal area, in order to delineate the spatial distribution of ther- mal water basins and to understand recorded anomalies quantitatively. Thermal min- eral waters or "sulphur springs" of Tbilisi have been of particular importance for its population during the 1,5 thousand years history of Tbilisi. Water of these springs is hot (40-50 C) and somewhat sulphurous: contain sulphuretted hydrogen and it is used for therapeutic and recreation purposes. The water resort is based on them. Hot natural springs are connected to the exposed sediments of middle Eocene in the river Mtkvari gorge. The water-bearing complex of volcanic type of middle Eocene is abundant at the Tbilisi thermal fields. Through drilling in the North - West part of the city (Lisi dis- trict), several boreholes were opened, where the sulphurous thermal water of 60-70 oC has been encountered. This water is used for room heating. Drilling will be continued for providing the city with hot water. It is planned to warm 30-40 % of the whole Tbil- isi using the geothermal water circulation system. From west to east, these deposits are buried under younger rocks. 20-30 km far from the deposit, oil has been found in an anticline structure. Intensive exploitation of this oil deposit caused the perturbation of the hydraulic regime with consequences in its central part where the thermal springs partly faded out in the eighties. Until present, the hydrodynamical interdependence be- tween these 3 districts has been studied by various authors, but its true character is still unclear. The spatial extent of the thermal waters has also to be investigated. Without detailed research, the sustainable and ecologically correct use of the thermal reservoir is impossible. In the period from July 1999 to July 2001 the monitoring network of water level in boreholes (WLB) and microtemperatures was operating on three wells: Botanical Garden (B.G.), Lisi (L.) and Varketili (V.). It is evident that the regime of natural thermal water is influenced by many factors: exogenous (precipitation, atmo- spheric pressure, tides) and endogenous (earthquakes, creep, tectonic strain impacts). In the reporting period, several seismic and meteorological events happened which allow to judge of connections between thermal fields. The strain-sensitivity of wells using slug-test data and the response of water level to the exogenous impacts confirm 1 the closeness of responses of Lisi and Balneological boreholes and partial deviation of response of Oil production area. In the period of observation, several local earthquakes occurred in the region (Tbilisi-12.2000; 2.2001 etc.). The hydrodynamical precursors of these earthquakes have been recorded in all three wells. The response of aquifers to the strain impact which was caused by the earthquakes, confirms the hydrodynamical connection of Balneological and Oil production area. It means that a reckless exploita- tion of the Oil deposit can strongly decrease the fluid ressure in the Balneological well and can even cause the depletion of the Balneological resort and the Lisi thermal water deposit. The obtained results demonstrate big potential of the applied network of hy- drodynamical monitoring. It allows not only the recognition of short-term precursory phenomena of earthquakes but also operates as a monitor of environmental situation of the Tbilisi region. 2

  14. Polycrystalline CVD diamond detector: Fast response and high sensitivity with large area

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Linyue, E-mail: liulinyue@gmail.com; Zhang, Xianpeng; Zhong, Yunhong [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)] [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Ouyang, Xiaoping, E-mail: oyxp@yahoo.com; Zhang, Jianfu [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China) [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Polycrystalline diamond was successfully used to fabricate a large area (diameter up to 46 mm) radiation detector. It was proven that the developed detector shows a fast pulsed response time and a high sensitivity, therefore its rise time is lower than 5 ns, which is two times faster than that of a Si-PIN detector of the same size. And because of the large sensitive area, this detector shows good dominance in fast pulsed and low density radiation detection.

  15. Can Sacrificial Feeding Areas Protect Aquatic Plants from Herbivore Grazing? Using Behavioural Ecology to Inform Wildlife Management

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kevin A.; Stillman, Richard A.; Daunt, Francis; O’Hare, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Effective wildlife management is needed for conservation, economic and human well-being objectives. However, traditional population control methods are frequently ineffective, unpopular with stakeholders, may affect non-target species, and can be both expensive and impractical to implement. New methods which address these issues and offer effective wildlife management are required. We used an individual-based model to predict the efficacy of a sacrificial feeding area in preventing grazing damage by mute swans (Cygnus olor) to adjacent river vegetation of high conservation and economic value. The accuracy of model predictions was assessed by a comparison with observed field data, whilst prediction robustness was evaluated using a sensitivity analysis. We used repeated simulations to evaluate how the efficacy of the sacrificial feeding area was regulated by (i) food quantity, (ii) food quality, and (iii) the functional response of the forager. Our model gave accurate predictions of aquatic plant biomass, carrying capacity, swan mortality, swan foraging effort, and river use. Our model predicted that increased sacrificial feeding area food quantity and quality would prevent the depletion of aquatic plant biomass by swans. When the functional response for vegetation in the sacrificial feeding area was increased, the food quantity and quality in the sacrificial feeding area required to protect adjacent aquatic plants were reduced. Our study demonstrates how the insights of behavioural ecology can be used to inform wildlife management. The principles that underpin our model predictions are likely to be valid across a range of different resource-consumer interactions, emphasising the generality of our approach to the evaluation of strategies for resolving wildlife management problems. PMID:25077615

  16. Dynamic and Static Facial Expressions Decoded from Motion-Sensitive Areas in the Macaque Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Furl, Nicholas; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Liu, Ning; Averbeck, Bruno B.; Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    2012-01-01

    Humans adeptly use visual motion to recognize socially-relevant facial information. The macaque provides a model visual system for studying neural coding of expression movements, as its superior temporal sulcus (STS) possesses brain areas selective for faces and areas sensitive to visual motion. We employed functional magnetic resonance imaging and facial stimuli to localize motion-sensitive areas (Mf areas), which responded more to dynamic faces compared to static faces, and face-selective areas, which responded selectively to faces compared to objects and places. Using multivariate analysis, we found that information about both dynamic and static facial expressions could be robustly decoded from Mf areas. By contrast, face-selective areas exhibited relatively less facial expression information. Classifiers trained with expressions from one motion type (dynamic or static) showed poor generalization to the other motion type, suggesting that Mf areas employ separate and non-confusable neural codes for dynamic and static presentations of the same expressions. We also show that some of the motion sensitivity elicited by facial stimuli was not specific to faces but could also be elicited by moving dots, particularly in FST and STPm/LST, confirming their already well-established low-level motion sensitivity. A different pattern was found in anterior STS, which responded more to dynamic than static faces but was not sensitive to dot motion. Overall, we show that emotional expressions are mostly represented outside of face-selective cortex, in areas sensitive to motion. These regions may play a fundamental role in enhancing recognition of facial expression despite the complex stimulus changes associated with motion. PMID:23136433

  17. Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of nine Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing teachers and students with informational reading on various ecological topics. The bulletins have these titles: Schoolyard Laboratories, Owls and Predators, The Forest Community, Life in Freshwater Marshes, Camouflage in the Animal World, Life in the Desert, The…

  18. Characterization of the VEGA ASIC coupled to large area position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, R.; Evangelista, Y.; Fuschino, F.; Ahangarianabhari, M.; Macera, D.; Bertuccio, G.; Grassi, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Malcovati, P.; Rachevski, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Andreani, L.; Baldazzi, G.; Del Monte, E.; Favre, Y.; Feroci, M.; Muleri, F.; Rashevskaya, I.; Vacchi, A.; Ficorella, F.; Giacomini, G.; Picciotto, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2014-08-01

    Low-noise, position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) are particularly useful for experiments in which a good energy resolution combined with a large sensitive area is required, as in the case of X-ray astronomy space missions and medical applications. This paper presents the experimental characterization of VEGA, a custom Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) used as the front-end electronics for XDXL-2, a large-area (30.5 cm2) SDD prototype. The ASICs were integrated on a specifically developed PCB hosting also the detector. Results on the ASIC noise performances, both stand-alone and bonded to the large area SDD, are presented and discussed.

  19. Characterization of the VEGA ASIC coupled to large area position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors

    E-print Network

    Campana, R; Fuschino, F; Ahangarianabhari, M; Macera, D; Bertuccio, G; Grassi, M; Labanti, C; Marisaldi, M; Malcovati, P; Rachevski, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Andreani, L; Baldazzi, G; Del Monte, E; Favre, Y; Feroci, M; Muleri, F; Rashevskaya, I; Vacchi, A; Ficorella, F; Giacomini, G; Picciotto, A; Zuffa, M

    2014-01-01

    Low-noise, position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) are particularly useful for experiments in which a good energy resolution combined with a large sensitive area is required, as in the case of X-ray astronomy space missions and medical applications. This paper presents the experimental characterization of VEGA, a custom Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) used as the front-end electronics for XDXL-2, a large-area (30.5 cm^2) SDD prototype. The ASICs were integrated on a specifically developed PCB hosting also the detector. Results on the ASIC noise performances, both stand-alone and bonded to the large area SDD, are presented and discussed.

  20. Characterization of the VEGA ASIC coupled to large area position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors

    E-print Network

    R. Campana; Y. Evangelista; F. Fuschino; M. Ahangarianabhari; D. Macera; G. Bertuccio; M. Grassi; C. Labanti; M. Marisaldi; P. Malcovati; A. Rachevski; G. Zampa; N. Zampa; L. Andreani; G. Baldazzi; E. Del Monte; Y. Favre; M. Feroci; F. Muleri; I. Rashevskaya; A. Vacchi; F. Ficorella; G. Giacomini; A. Picciotto; M. Zuffa

    2014-07-07

    Low-noise, position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) are particularly useful for experiments in which a good energy resolution combined with a large sensitive area is required, as in the case of X-ray astronomy space missions and medical applications. This paper presents the experimental characterization of VEGA, a custom Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) used as the front-end electronics for XDXL-2, a large-area (30.5 cm^2) SDD prototype. The ASICs were integrated on a specifically developed PCB hosting also the detector. Results on the ASIC noise performances, both stand-alone and bonded to the large area SDD, are presented and discussed.

  1. Managing artisanal and small-scale mining in forest areas: perspectives from a poststructural political ecology.

    PubMed

    Hirons, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) is an activity intimately associated with social deprivation and environmental degradation, including deforestation. This paper examines ASM and deforestation using a broadly poststructural political ecology framework. Hegemonic discourses are shown to consistently influence policy direction, particularly in emerging approaches such as Corporate Social Responsibility and the Forest Stewardship Council. A review of alternative discourses reveals that the poststructural method is useful for critiquing the international policy arena but does not inform new approaches. Synthesis of the analysis leads to conclusions that echo a growing body of literature advocating for policies to become increasingly sensitive to local contexts, synergistic between actors at difference scales, and to be integrated across sectors. PMID:22180922

  2. Effective Area Effects on the Final Device Sensitivity of Ion Sensor Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Jessica Colnaghi; Mulato, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    Fluorine-doped tin oxide (SnO2:F) was used as the ion-sensing layer of an EGFET-pH sensor. The effective area affects the final results, as well as the sensor surface potential and sensitivity. The sensor miniaturization is highly required on medical applications, with that the effective area must be properly understood. Routine insertion and removal of total and partial surface areas in buffer solution were analyzed and compared. The results show that the routine changes considerable the sensor sensitivity. Variations in the double layer, Helmholtz plane, and Gouy-Chapman region play a significant role. The final sensitivities of the samples were compared with values available in the literature, even for other materials. The role that area normalization plays in quality assessment is discussed for proper future technological miniaturizations.

  3. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  4. Ecological and physiological factors affecting brood patch area and prolactin levels in arctic-nesting geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonsson, J.E.; Afton, A.D.; Alisauskas, R.T.; Bluhm, C.K.; El Halawani, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated effects of ecological and physiological factors on brood patch area and prolactin levels in free-ranging Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens; hereafter "Snow Geese") and Ross's Geese (C. rossii). On the basis of the body-size hypothesis, we predicted that the relationships between prolactin levels, brood patch area, and body condition would be stronger in Ross's Geese than in the larger Snow Geese. We found that brood patch area was positively related to clutch volume and inversely related to prolactin levels in Ross's Geese, but not in Snow Geese. Nest size, nest habitat, and first egg date did not affect brood patch area in either species. Prolactin levels increased as incubation progressed in female Snow Geese, but this relationship was not significant in Ross's Geese. Prolactin levels and body condition (as indexed by size-adjusted body mass) were inversely related in Ross's Geese, but not in Snow Geese. Our findings are consistent with the prediction that relationships between prolactin levels, brood patch area, and body condition are relatively stronger in Ross's Geese, because they mobilize endogenous reserves at faster rates than Snow Geese. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2006. Printed in USA.

  5. Structural and effective connectivity reveals potential network-based influences on category-sensitive visual areas

    PubMed Central

    Furl, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Visual category perception is thought to depend on brain areas that respond specifically when certain categories are viewed. These category-sensitive areas are often assumed to be “modules” (with some degree of processing autonomy) and to act predominantly on feedforward visual input. This modular view can be complemented by a view that treats brain areas as elements within more complex networks and as influenced by network properties. This network-oriented viewpoint is emerging from studies using either diffusion tensor imaging to map structural connections or effective connectivity analyses to measure how their functional responses influence each other. This literature motivates several hypotheses that predict category-sensitive activity based on network properties. Large, long-range fiber bundles such as inferior fronto-occipital, arcuate and inferior longitudinal fasciculi are associated with behavioral recognition and could play crucial roles in conveying backward influences on visual cortex from anterior temporal and frontal areas. Such backward influences could support top-down functions such as visual search and emotion-based visual modulation. Within visual cortex itself, areas sensitive to different categories appear well-connected (e.g., face areas connect to object- and motion sensitive areas) and their responses can be predicted by backward modulation. Evidence supporting these propositions remains incomplete and underscores the need for better integration of DTI and functional imaging. PMID:25999841

  6. Activity in human reward-sensitive brain areas is strongly context dependent.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; von Geusau, Niels J Alting; Mars, Rogier B; Holroyd, Clay B; Yeung, Nick

    2005-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging research in humans has identified a number of brain areas that are activated by the delivery of primary and secondary reinforcers. The present study investigated how activity in these reward-sensitive regions is modulated by the context in which rewards and punishments are experienced. Fourteen healthy volunteers were scanned during the performance of a simple monetary gambling task that involved a "win" condition (in which the possible outcomes were a large monetary gain, a small gain, or no gain of money) and a "lose" condition (in which the possible outcomes were a large monetary loss, a small loss, or no loss of money). We observed reward-sensitive activity in a number of brain areas previously implicated in reward processing, including the striatum, prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and inferior parietal lobule. Critically, activity in these reward-sensitive areas was highly sensitive to the range of possible outcomes from which an outcome was selected. In particular, these regions were activated to a comparable degree by the best outcomes in each condition-a large gain in the win condition and no loss of money in the lose condition-despite the large difference in the objective value of these outcomes. In addition, some reward-sensitive brain areas showed a binary instead of graded sensitivity to the magnitude of the outcomes from each distribution. These results provide important evidence regarding the way in which the brain scales the motivational value of events by the context in which these events occur. PMID:15945130

  7. Coupling ecology and GIS to evaluate efficacy of marine protected areas in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Alan M; Brown, Eric K; Monaco, Mark E

    2007-04-01

    In order to properly determine the efficacy of marine protected areas (MPAs), a seascape perspective that integrates ecosystem elements at the appropriate ecological scale is necessary. Over the past four decades, Hawaii has developed a system of 11 Marine Life Conservation Districts (MLCDs) to conserve and replenish marine resources around the state. Initially established to provide opportunities for public interaction with the marine environment, these MLCDs vary in size, habitat quality, and management regimes, providing an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses concerning MPA design and function using multiple discrete sampling units. Digital benthic habitat maps for all MLCDs and adjacent habitats were used to evaluate the efficacy of existing MLCDs using a spatially explicit stratified random sampling design. Analysis of benthic cover validated the a priori classification of habitat types and provided justification for using these habitat strata to conduct stratified random sampling and analyses of fish habitat utilization patterns. Results showed that a number of fish assemblage characteristics (e.g., species richness, biomass, diversity) vary among habitat types, but were significantly higher in MLCDs compared with adjacent fished areas across all habitat types. Overall fish biomass was 2.6 times greater in the MLCDs compared to open areas. In addition, apex predators and other species were more abundant and larger in the MLCDs, illustrating the effectiveness of these closures in conserving fish populations within their boundaries. Habitat type, protected area size, and level of protection from fishing were all important determinates of MLCD effectiveness with respect to their associated fish assemblages. Although size of these protected areas was positively correlated with a number of fish assemblage characteristics, all appear too small to have any measurable influence on the adjacent fished areas. These protected areas were not designed for biodiversity conservation or fisheries enhancement yet still provide varying degrees of protection for fish populations within their boundaries. Implementing this type of biogeographic process, using remote sensing technology and sampling across the range of habitats present within the seascape, provides a robust evaluation of existing MPAs and can help to define ecologically relevant boundaries for future MPA design in a range of locations. PMID:17494391

  8. Ecological Characteristics of a Gonystylus bancanus-rich Area in Pekan Forest Reserve, Pahang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hamzah, Khali Aziz; Ismail, Parlan; Kassim, Abd Rahman; Hassan, Che Hashim; Akeng, Grippin; Said, Nizam Mohd

    2009-01-01

    Tropical peat swamp forest (PSF) is a unique wetland ecosystem with distinct vegetation types. Due to the waterlogged environment, the stand characteristics in this ecosystem are different from those of other inland forests. This paper highlights stand characteristics of a PSF based on our investigation of a 1 ha ecological plot established in a Virgin Jungle Reserve (VJR) at Compartment 100, Pekan Forest Reserve, Pahang, Malaysia. This site is considered a Gonystylus bancanus-rich area. From the inventory, we recorded a total of 49 tree species from 38 genera and 25 families among all trees of ? 10 cm in diameter at breast height. Calophyllum ferrugineum var. ferrugineum was the most abundant species, followed by G. bancanus. The forest appeared healthy, as all tree characteristics (crown shape, log grade and climber infestation) generally fell within Classes 1 and 2 (good and moderate categories), with the exception of crown illumination which majority of the trees were rated as class 3 (received less sunlight). The latter finding indicates that most of the trees living under the canopy received minimal illumination. In terms of total tree biomass, we estimated that about 414.6 tonnes exist in this 1 ha area; this tree biomass is higher than in some PSF areas of Sumatra, Indonesia. PMID:24575176

  9. Effects of cell area on the performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Khatani, Mehboob, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Hamid, Nor Hisham, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Sahmer, Ahmad Zahrin, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Samsudin, Adel, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), UTP (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have significant advantage over the current silicon cells by having low manufacturing cost and potentially high conversion efficiency. Therefore, DSCs are expected to be used as the next generation solar cell device that covers wide range of new applications. In order to achieve highly efficient DSCs for practical application, study on the effect of increasing the cell’s area on the performance of dye sensitized solar need to be carried out. Three different DSC cell areas namely, 1, 12.96 and 93.5 cm{sup 2} respectively were fabricated and analyzed through solar simulator and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the analysis of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), it was observed that the cell’s electron lifetime was influenced significantly by the cell’s area. Although the collection efficiency of all cells recorded to be approximately 100% but higher recombination rate with increased cell area reduced the performance of the cell.

  10. Land use changes and its driving forces in hilly ecological restoration area based on gis and rs of northern china.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Land use change is one of the important aspects of the regional ecological restoration research. With remote sensing (RS) image in 2003, 2007 and 2012, using geographic information system (GIS) technologies, the land use pattern changes in Yimeng Mountain ecological restoration area in China and its driving force factors were studied. Results showed that: (1) Cultivated land constituted the largest area during 10 years, and followed by forest land and grass land; cultivated land and unused land were reduced by 28.43% and 44.32%, whereas forest land, water area and land for water facilities and others were increased. (2) During 2003-2007, forest land change showed the largest, followed by unused land and grass land; however, during 2008-2012, water area and land for water facilities change showed the largest, followed by grass land and unused land. (3) Land use degree was above the average level, it was in the developing period during 2003-2007 and in the degenerating period during 2008-2012. (4) Ecological Restoration Projects can greatly change the micro topography, increase vegetation coverage, and then induce significant changes in the land use distribution, which were the main driving force factors of the land use pattern change in the ecological restoration area. PMID:26047160

  11. Land use changes and its driving forces in hilly ecological restoration area based on gis and rs of northern china

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Land use change is one of the important aspects of the regional ecological restoration research. With remote sensing (RS) image in 2003, 2007 and 2012, using geographic information system (GIS) technologies, the land use pattern changes in Yimeng Mountain ecological restoration area in China and its driving force factors were studied. Results showed that: (1) Cultivated land constituted the largest area during 10 years, and followed by forest land and grass land; cultivated land and unused land were reduced by 28.43% and 44.32%, whereas forest land, water area and land for water facilities and others were increased. (2) During 2003–2007, forest land change showed the largest, followed by unused land and grass land; however, during 2008–2012, water area and land for water facilities change showed the largest, followed by grass land and unused land. (3) Land use degree was above the average level, it was in the developing period during 2003–2007 and in the degenerating period during 2008–2012. (4) Ecological Restoration Projects can greatly change the micro topography, increase vegetation coverage, and then induce significant changes in the land use distribution, which were the main driving force factors of the land use pattern change in the ecological restoration area. PMID:26047160

  12. Large-area x-ray sensitive video camera: design of electron optics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gendi Pang; Randy Luhta; John A. Rowlands

    1997-01-01

    Large-area x-ray sensitive vidicons have the potential to be superior to conventional x-ray image intensifiers for medical fluoroscopy. To build a large-area x-ray vidicon, an electron lens system is necessary to provide perpendicular beam landing. In this paper, we presented the results of the lens design for this purpose. In this paper, we discus in detail the method used in

  13. Simulation of a fire-sensitive ecological threshold: a case study of Ashe juniper on the Edwards Plateau of Texas, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel D. Fuhlendorf; Fred E. Smeins; William E. Grant

    1996-01-01

    A model was developed to represent the establishment of a fire-sensitive woody species from seeds and subsequent survival and growth through five size classes. Simulations accurately represent structural changes associated with increased density and cover of the fire-sensitive Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei, Buckholz) and provide substantial evidence for multiple steady states and ecological thresholds. Without fire, Ashe juniper increases and

  14. Structure, function and context : the impact of morphometry and ecology on olfactory sensitivity

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Jennifer, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the relationships of olfactory sensitivity to three biological variables were tested. The sensitivity of a marine mammal, the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) was measured in order to determine whether a marine ...

  15. FACTORS AFFECTING SENSITIVITY OF CHEMICAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF MARINE EMBAYMEMTS TO NITROGEN LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes an ongoing examination of the primary factors that affect sensitivity of marine embayment responses to nitrogen loading. Included is a discussion of two methods for using these factors: classification of embayments into discrete sensitivity classes and norma...

  16. Investigating area-sensitivity in shrubland birds: Responses to patch size in a forested landscape

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah E. Lehnen; Amanda D. Rodewald

    2009-01-01

    Population declines of shrubland birds in the eastern United States have been attributed to loss of early-successional habitat. Given that shrubland habitats are often ephemeral and patchily distributed, understanding the sensitivity of shrubland birds to patch characteristics is important for conservation. We tested the extent to which patch area was related to shrubland bird density, annual survival, and productivity by

  17. Activity in human reward-sensitive brain areas is strongly context dependent

    E-print Network

    Yeung, Nick

    , or no gain of money) and a bloseQ condition (in which the possible outcomes were a large monetary loss, a small loss, or no loss of money). We observed reward-sensitive activity in a number of brain areas activated to a comparable degree by the best outcomes in each condition­a large gain in the win condition

  18. Assessing noise pollution in sensitive areas: Soundscape analysis in an alpine valley by psychoacoustic means

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Lercher; Klaus Genuit; Urs Reichart; Dietrich Heimann

    2001-01-01

    Alpine valleys are sensitive areas due to topography, meteorology, housing, and land-use pattern, that modify noise propagation and make protection against noise pollution rather difficult. The ``amphitheater'' effect was mentioned as explanation for deviating noise-annoyance curves and health effects observed at lower sound levels. However, detailed empirical analyses are lacking. In this study a series of simultaneous, binaural sound recordings

  19. A magnetotelluric study of the sensitivity of an area to seismoelectric signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, G.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2005-11-01

    During recent years, efforts at better understanding the physical properties of precursory ultra-low frequency pre-seismic electric signals (SES) have been intensified. Experiments show that SES cannot be observed at all points of the Earth's surface but only at certain so-called sensitive sites. Moreover, a sensitive site is capable of collecting SES from only a restricted number of seismic areas (selectivity effect). Therefore the installation of a permanent station appropriate for SES collection should necessarily be preceded by a pilot study over a broad area and for a long duration. In short, a number of temporary stations are installed and, after the occurrence of several significant earthquakes (EQs) from a given seismic area, the most appropriate (if any) of these temporary stations, in the sense that they happen to collect SES, can be selected as permanent. Such a long experiment constitutes a serious disadvantage in identifying a site as SES sensitive. However, the SES sensitivity of a site should be related to the geoelectric structure of the area that hosts the site as well as the regional geoelectric structure between the station and the seismic focal area. Thus, knowledge of the local and regional geoelectric structure can dramatically reduce the time involved in identifying SES sites. In this paper the magnetotelluric method is used to investigate the conductivity structure of an area where a permanent SES station is in operation. Although general conclusions cannot be drawn, the area surrounding an SES site near Ioannina, Greece is characterized by: (1) major faults in the vicinity; (2) highly resistive structure flanked by abrupt conductivity contrasts associated with large-scale geologic contacts, and (3) local inhomogeneities in conductivity structure. The above results are consistent with the fact that electric field amplitudes from remotely-generated signals should be appreciably stronger at such sites when compared to neighboring sites.

  20. A magnetotelluric study of the sensitivity of an area to seismoelectric signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balasis, G.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2005-01-01

    During recent years, efforts at better understanding the physical properties of precursory ultra-low frequency pre-seismic electric signals (SES) have been intensified. Experiments show that SES cannot be observed at all points of the Earth's surface but only at certain so-called sensitive sites. Moreover, a sensitive site is capable of collecting SES from only a restricted number of seismic areas (selectivity effect). Tberefore the installation of a permanent station appropriate for SES collection should necessarily be preceded by a pilot study over a broad area and for a long duration. In short, a number of temporary stations are installed and, after the occurrence of several significant earthquakes (EQs) from a given seismic area, the most appropriate (if any) of these temporary stations, in the sense that they happen to collect SES, can be selected as permanent. Such a long experiment constitutes a serious disadvantage in identifying a site as SES sensitive. However, the SES sensitivity of a site should be related to the geoelectric structure of the area that hosts the site as well as the regional geoelectric structure between the station and the seismic focal area. Thus, knowledge of the local and regional geoelectric structure can dramatically reduce the time involved in identifying SES sites. hi this paper the magnetotelluric method is used to investigate the conductivity structure of an area where a permanent SES station is in operation. Although general conclusions cannot be drawn, the area surrounding an SES site near Ioannina, Greece is characterized by: (1) major faults in the vicinity; (2) highly resistive structure flanked by abrupt conductivity contrasts associated with large-scale geologic contacts, and (3) local inhomogeneities in conductivity structure. The above results are consistent with the fact that electric field amplitudes from remotely-generated signals should be appreciably stronger at such sites when compared to neighboring sites. European Geosciences Union ?? 2005 Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

  1. Social differences in avoidable mortality between small areas of 15 European cities: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health and inequalities in health among inhabitants of European cities are of major importance for European public health and there is great interest in how different health care systems in Europe perform in the reduction of health inequalities. However, evidence on the spatial distribution of cause-specific mortality across neighbourhoods of European cities is scarce. This study presents maps of avoidable mortality in European cities and analyses differences in avoidable mortality between neighbourhoods with different levels of deprivation. Methods We determined the level of mortality from 14 avoidable causes of death for each neighbourhood of 15 large cities in different European regions. To address the problems associated with Standardised Mortality Ratios for small areas we smooth them using the Bayesian model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié. Ecological regression analysis was used to assess the association between social deprivation and mortality. Results Mortality from avoidable causes of death is higher in deprived neighbourhoods and mortality rate ratios between areas with different levels of deprivation differ between gender and cities. In most cases rate ratios are lower among women. While Eastern and Southern European cities show higher levels of avoidable mortality, the association of mortality with social deprivation tends to be higher in Northern and lower in Southern Europe. Conclusions There are marked differences in the level of avoidable mortality between neighbourhoods of European cities and the level of avoidable mortality is associated with social deprivation. There is no systematic difference in the magnitude of this association between European cities or regions. Spatial patterns of avoidable mortality across small city areas can point to possible local problems and specific strategies to reduce health inequality which is important for the development of urban areas and the well-being of their inhabitants. PMID:24618273

  2. Ecological footprint analysis applied to a sub-national area: the case of the Province of Siena (Italy).

    PubMed

    Bagliani, Marco; Galli, Alessandro; Niccolucci, Valentina; Marchettini, Nadia

    2008-01-01

    This work is part of a larger project, which aims at investigating the environmental sustainability of the Province of Siena and of its communes, by means of different indicators and methods of analysis. The research presented in this article uses ecological footprint and biocapacity as indicators to monitor the environmental conditions of the area of Siena, thus complementing previous studies carried out using Emergy, greenhouse gases balance and other methods. The calculations have been performed in such a way as to enable a disaggregation of the final results according to the classical categories of ecologically productive land and of consumption, but also according to citizen's and public administration's areas of influence. This information allows us to investigate in detail the socio-economic aspects of environmental resource use. Among the notable results, the Siena territory is characterized by a nearly breakeven total ecological balance, a result contrasting with the national average and most of the other Italian provinces. Furthermore, the analysis has been carried out at different spatial scales (province, districts and communes), highlighting an inhomogeneous territorial structure consisting of subareas in ecological deficit compensated by zones in ecological surplus. PMID:17110019

  3. VARIABILITY, PATTERN, AND SENSITIVITY OF ECOLOGICAL INDICAORS FOR NEARSHORE REGIONS OF THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Associated with the Great Lakes Environmental Indicators (GLEI) project of the EaGLe program, we are evaluating a suite of indicators of ecological condition for the nearshore region of U.S. shorelines of the Great Lakes. The evaluation includes sampling conducted at limited fix...

  4. The Dispersal Ecology of Rhodesian Sleeping Sickness Following Its Introduction to a New Area

    PubMed Central

    Wardrop, Nicola A.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Welburn, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Tsetse-transmitted human and animal trypanosomiasis are constraints to both human and animal health in sub-Saharan Africa, and although these diseases have been known for over a century, there is little recent evidence demonstrating how the parasites circulate in natural hosts and ecosystems. The spread of Rhodesian sleeping sickness (caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) within Uganda over the past 15 years has been linked to the movement of infected, untreated livestock (the predominant reservoir) from endemic areas. However, despite an understanding of the environmental dependencies of sleeping sickness, little research has focused on the environmental factors controlling transmission establishment or the spatially heterogeneous dispersal of disease following a new introduction. In the current study, an annually stratified case-control study of Rhodesian sleeping sickness cases from Serere District, Uganda was used to allow the temporal assessment of correlations between the spatial distribution of sleeping sickness and landscape factors. Significant relationships were detected between Rhodesian sleeping sickness and selected factors, including elevation and the proportion of land which was “seasonally flooding grassland” or “woodlands and dense savannah.” Temporal trends in these relationships were detected, illustrating the dispersal of Rhodesian sleeping sickness into more ‘suitable’ areas over time, with diminishing dependence on the point of introduction in concurrence with an increasing dependence on environmental and landscape factors. These results provide a novel insight into the ecology of Rhodesian sleeping sickness dispersal and may contribute towards the implementation of evidence-based control measures to prevent its further spread. PMID:24130913

  5. A novel application of the ecological field theory to the definition of physiographic and climatic potential areas of forest species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafael Alonso Ponce; Eduardo López Senespleda; Otilio Sánchez Palomares

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to the definition of physiographic and climatic potential areas for forest species, based on the ecological\\u000a field theory, is outlined in this paper. The proposed formulation is tested on the Spanish juniper (Juniperus thurifera L.), using data from 883 permanent and temporary plots throughout its distribution area in the Spanish autonomous region\\u000a of Castilla y León. The

  6. An ecological approach supporting the management of sea-uses and natural capital in marine coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, Marco; Carli, Filippo M.; Bonamano, Simone; Frattarelli, Francesco; Mancini, Emanuele; Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Peviani, Maximo; Piermattei, Viviana

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of our work is to create a multi-layer map of marine areas and adjacent territories (SeaUseMap), which takes into account both the different sea uses and the value of marine ecosystems, calculated on the basis of services and benefits produced by the different biocenosis. Marine coastal areas are characterized by the simultaneous presence of ecological conditions favorable to life and, at the same time, they are home to many human activities of particular economic relevance. Ecological processes occurring in coastal areas are particularly important and when we consider their contribution to the value of the "natural capital" (Costanza et Al. 1997, 2008, 2014), we can observe that this is often higher than the contribution from terrestrial ecosystems. Our work is done in northern Lazio (Civitavecchia), a highly populated area where many uses of the sea are superimposed: tourism, fisheries, industry, shipping and ports, historical and cultural heritage. Our goal is to create a tool to support decision-making, where ecosystem values and uses of the sea can be simultaneously represented. The ecosystem values are calculated based on an analysis of benthic biocoenoses: the basic ecological units that, in the Mediterranean Sea, have been identified, defined, analyzed and used since the 60s (Perez & Picard 1964) to date as a working tool (Boudouresque & Fresi 1976). Land surface, instead, was analyzed from available maps, produced within the Corine Land Cover project. Some application examples to support the decision-making are shown, with particular reference to the localization of suitable areas for wave energy production and the esteem of ecological damages generated in case of maritime accidents (e.g., Costa Concordia). According to Costanza 2008, we have developed our own operational method, which is suitable for this specific case of benefit assessment from benthic communities. In this framework, we base our strategy on the ability of the benthic biocenosis to provide excellent information on ecological processes from which ecosystem benefits arise.

  7. Stimulus-Rate Sensitivity Discerns Area 3b of the Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hlushchuk, Yevhen; Simões-Franklin, Cristina; Nangini, Cathy; Hari, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the hemodynamic response of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) to electrical median nerve stimulation doubles in strength when the stimulus rate (SR) increases from 1 to 5 Hz. Here we investigated whether such sensitivity to SR is homogenous within the functionally different subareas of the SI cortex, and whether SR sensitivity would help discern area 3b among the other SI subareas. We acquired 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from nine healthy adults who received pneumotactile stimuli in 25-s blocks to three right-hand fingers, either at 1, 4, or 10 Hz. The main contrast (all stimulations pooled vs. baseline), applied to the whole brain, first limited the search to the whole SI cortex. The conjunction of SR-sensitive contrasts [4 Hz ? 1 Hz] > 0 and [10 Hz ? 1 Hz] > 0 ([4Hz ? 1Hz] + [10Hz ? 1Hz] > 0), applied to the SI cluster, then revealed an anterior-ventral subcluster that reacted more strongly to both 10-Hz and 4-Hz stimuli than to the 1-Hz stimuli. No other SR-sensitive clusters were found at the group-level in the whole-brain analysis. The site of the SR-sensitive SI subcluster corresponds to the canonical position of area 3b; such differentiation was also possible at the individual level in 5 out of 9 subjects. Thus the SR sensitivity of the BOLD response appears to discern area 3b among other subareas of the human SI cortex. PMID:26020639

  8. Potential impact of climate change on aquatic insects: A sensitivity analysis for European caddisflies (Trichoptera) based on distribution patterns and ecological preferences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Hering; Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber; John Murphy; Sofie Lücke; Carmen Zamora-Muñoz; Manuel Jesús López-Rodríguez; Thomas Huber; Wolfram Graf

    2009-01-01

    .  We analysed the sensitivity of European Trichoptera (caddisfly) species to climate change impacts based on their distribution\\u000a and ecological preferences, and compared the fraction of species potentially endangered by climate change between the European\\u000a ecoregions. The study covers 23 European ecoregions as defined by Illies (1978). For 1134 Trichoptera species and subspecies,\\u000a we coded 29 parameters describing biological and ecological

  9. A unifying concept of coccolithophore sensitivity to changing carbonate chemistry embedded in an ecological framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Lennart Thomas; Riebesell, Ulf; Gutowska, Magdalena A.; Federwisch, Luisa; Schulz, Kai Georg

    2015-06-01

    Coccolithophores are a group of unicellular phytoplankton species whose ability to calcify has a profound influence on biogeochemical element cycling. Calcification rates are controlled by a large variety of biotic and abiotic factors. Among these factors, carbonate chemistry has gained considerable attention during the last years as coccolithophores have been identified to be particularly sensitive to ocean acidification. Despite intense research in this area, a general concept harmonizing the numerous and sometimes (seemingly) contradictory responses of coccolithophores to changing carbonate chemistry is still lacking to date. Here, we present the "substrate-inhibitor concept" which describes the dependence of calcification rates on carbonate chemistry speciation. It is based on observations that calcification rate scales positively with bicarbonate (HCO3-), the primary substrate for calcification, and carbon dioxide (CO2), which can limit cell growth, whereas it is inhibited by protons (H+). This concept was implemented in a model equation, tested against experimental data, and then applied to understand and reconcile the diverging responses of coccolithophorid calcification rates to ocean acidification obtained in culture experiments. Furthermore, we (i) discuss how other important calcification-influencing factors (e.g. temperature and light) could be implemented in our concept and (ii) embed it in Hutchinson's niche theory, thereby providing a framework for how carbonate chemistry-induced changes in calcification rates could be linked with changing coccolithophore abundance in the oceans. Our results suggest that the projected increase of H+ in the near future (next couple of thousand years), paralleled by only a minor increase of inorganic carbon substrate, could impede calcification rates if coccolithophores are unable to fully adapt. However, if calcium carbonate (CaCO3) sediment dissolution and terrestrial weathering begin to increase the oceans' HCO3- and decrease its H+ concentrations in the far future (10-100 kyears), coccolithophores could find themselves in carbonate chemistry conditions which may be more favorable for calcification than they were before the Anthropocene.

  10. 40 CFR 144.87 - How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water areas affect me? 144.87 Section 144...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND...

  11. 40 CFR 144.87 - How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water areas affect me? 144.87 Section 144...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND...

  12. 40 CFR 144.87 - How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water areas affect me? 144.87 Section 144...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND...

  13. 40 CFR 144.87 - How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water areas affect me? 144.87 Section 144...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND...

  14. 40 CFR 144.87 - How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false How does the identification of ground water protection areas and other sensitive ground water areas affect me? 144.87 Section 144...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND...

  15. Ecology of Anopheles stephensi in a malarious area, southeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mehravaran, Ahmad; Vatandoost, Hassan; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Edalat, Hamideh; Javadian, Ezatoddin; Mashayekhi, Minoo; Piazak, Norair; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali

    2012-01-01

    District of Jiroft is situated in south-east of Iran which is one of the malarious regions. Anopheles stephensi is considered as one of the main malaria vector in this region. Ecology of this species was studied in the area to understand its vector behavior for implementation of effective vector control measures. Different methods like total catch, pit shelter, night bite collection on human and animal, larval dipping methods were used for species identification, seasonal activity, anthropophilic index and egg morphological characteristics. Anthropophilicity index was assessed by ELISA test. Activity of Anopheles species started at the beginning of April, and its peak occurs in late spring. The larvae were found in the river bed with pools, stagnant streams, slow foothill streams, temporary pools, and slowly moving water with and without vegetation, drainage containers of air conditioner and palm irrigation canals. From different methods of adult collection, it was found that spray sheet collection is the appropriate method. ELISA testing of 144 blood meals of females revealed the anthropophilicity of 11.8% indicating host preference on animal, mainly cow. Ridge length and their number on the egg floats confirmed Anopheles stephensi mysorensis form. This study showed that Anopheles stephensi is the main vector of malaria in the region, although some other species may play a role. Our findings could provide a valuable clue for epidemiology and control of malaria in the southeast of Iran. PMID:22267381

  16. Ecology of malaria infections in western lowland gorillas inhabiting Dzanga Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Mapua, Mwanahamisi I; Qablan, Moneeb A; Pomajbíková, Kate?ina; Petrželková, Klára J; H?zová, Zuzana; Rádrová, Jana; Votýpka, Jan; Todd, Angelique; Jirk?, Milan; Leendertz, Fabian H; Lukeš, Julius; Neel, Cecile; Modrý, David

    2015-06-01

    African great apes are susceptible to infections with several species of Plasmodium, including the predecessor of Plasmodium falciparum. Little is known about the ecology of these pathogens in gorillas. A total of 131 gorilla fecal samples were collected from Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas to study the diversity and prevalence of Plasmodium species. The effects of sex and age as factors influencing levels of infection with Plasmodium in habituated gorilla groups were assessed. Ninety-five human blood samples from the same locality were also analysed to test for cross-transmission between humans and gorillas. According to a cytB PCR assay 32% of gorilla's fecal samples and 43·1% human individuals were infected with Plasmodium spp. All Laverania species, Plasmodium vivax, and for the first time Plasmodium ovale were identified from gorilla samples. Plasmodium praefalciparum was present only from habituated individuals and P. falciparum was detected from human samples. Although few P. vivax and P. ovale sequences were obtained from gorillas, the evidence for cross-species transmission between humans and gorillas requires more in depth analysis. No association was found between malaria infection and sex, however, younger individuals aged ?6 years were more susceptible. Switching between two different Plasmodium spp. was observed in three individuals. Prolonged monitoring of Plasmodium infection during various seasons and recording behavioural data is necessary to draw a precise picture about the infection dynamics. PMID:25736484

  17. ENHANCING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MODIFIED ATMOSPHERES TO CONTROL INSECT PESTS IN MUSEUMS AND SIMILAR SENSITIVE AREAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. REIERSON; M. K. RUST; J. M. KENNEDY; V. DANIEL; S. MAEKAWA

    1996-01-01

    Abstract-Anoxia resulting from contained atmospheres of ~0.1% oxygen (1,000 ppm) was lethal to all stadia of a variety of insect pests commonly,encountered,in museums,and other sensitive areas. Low % 02 in a closed system,was achieved,and maintained,by displacement,with gaseous,nitrogen. The effect of anoxia on representative species of cockroaches (Dictyoptera), fabric beetles (Dermestidae), stored product beetles (Anobiidae), termites (Rhinotermitidae), and wood-boring beetles (Lyctidae)

  18. Estimate of the Area Affected Ecologically by the Road System in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard T. T. Forman

    2000-01-01

    In view of an extensive road system, abundant and rapidly growing vehicular traffic, and a scat- tered literature indicating that some ecological effects of roads extend outward for . 100 m, it seems likely that the cumulative ecological effect of the road system in the United States is considerable. Two recent studies in The Netherlands and Massachusetts (U.S.A.) evaluated several

  19. Ecological Succession, Land use Changes and Soil Organic C Stock in a Lake Retreat Area (Main Ethiopian Rift Valley)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyssen, J.; Temesgen, H.; Lemenih, M.; Zenebe, A.; Kindu, M.; Haile, M.

    2007-12-01

    In the Main Ethiopian Rift Valley, ecological succession is related to continuous lake retreat (Nyssen et al., 2004). Human activities, through their impact on land use and cover, affect this ecological succession. Through a remote sensing study, we extricated ecological succession and human activity as causative factors for land use and cover changes (LUCC) and explored which impact this has on soil organic C (SOC) stock in lake retreat areas. Remote sensing data used include a Landsat MSS from 1973, a Landsat TM from 1986 and a Landsat ETM+ from 2000. A conventional type of classification was used whereby supervised classification of the 2000 image was supplemented by unsupervised classification of the older datasets. Due to decreased rainfall and water abstraction for intense irrigated agriculture and floriculture in its catchment, Lake Abijata lost 46 % of its area between 2000 and 2006. On the emerged lands, a good ecological succession was observed between 1973 and 1986, with clear evidence for: emerged land -> grassland -> Acacia bushes -> open woodland. Between 1986 and 2000, LUCC tendencies were totally reversed and woody vegetation decreased strongly, indicating increased human impact (Habtamu et al., 2007). Based on an analysis of the Landsat imagery, coupled with soil and land use studies, determinants for SOC stock were found. Firstly, SOC stock significantly differs between cultivated land and grazing land (3301 and 2626 g m-2) on the one hand, and woodland (4594 g m-2) on the other. The strongest explanation of SOC stock is related to the duration of emergence and hence of pedogenesis. Its proxy, elevation, explains much of the variability of SOC (R2 = 0.48). Using a multiple regression model involving elevation and IR reflectance, the SOC stock in the study area could be assessed at 2196 (+ - 1517) g m-2 SOC in 2000, against 3222 (+ - 1639) g m-2 in 1973 (Nyssen et al., 2007), which is related to the post-1986 reversing of ecological succession in the lake retreat areas. Habtamu Temesgen, Nyssen, J., Amanuel Zenebe, Mengistie Kindu, Mitiku Haile, 2007. Ecological succession and land use changes in a lake retreat area (Main Ethiopian Rift Valley). Journal of Arid Environments, submitted. Nyssen, J., Poesen, J., Moeyersons, J., Deckers, J., Mitiku Haile, and Lang, A., 2004. Human impact on the environment in the Ethiopian and Eritrean Highlands - a state of the art. Earth Science Reviews, 64: 273-320. Nyssen, J., Habtamu Temesgen, Mulugeta Lemenih, Amanuel Zenebe, Mitiku Haile, 2007. Soil organic C stock in a lake retreat area under increased human pressure (Main Ethiopian Rift Valley). Global Change Biology, submitted.

  20. Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and [sup 137]Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

  1. Sensitivity of ecological soil-screening levels for metals to exposure model parameterization and toxicity reference values

    PubMed Central

    Sample, Bradley E; Fairbrother, Anne; Kaiser, Ashley; Law, Sheryl; Adams, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Ecological soil-screening levels (Eco-SSLs) were developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for the purposes of setting conservative soil screening values that can be used to eliminate the need for further ecological assessment for specific analytes at a given site. Ecological soil-screening levels for wildlife represent a simplified dietary exposure model solved in terms of soil concentrations to produce exposure equal to a no-observed-adverse-effect toxicity reference value (TRV). Sensitivity analyses were performed for 6 avian and mammalian model species, and 16 metals/metalloids for which Eco-SSLs have been developed. The relative influence of model parameters was expressed as the absolute value of the range of variation observed in the resulting soil concentration when exposure is equal to the TRV. Rank analysis of variance was used to identify parameters with greatest influence on model output. For both birds and mammals, soil ingestion displayed the broadest overall range (variability), although TRVs consistently had the greatest influence on calculated soil concentrations; bioavailability in food was consistently the least influential parameter, although an important site-specific variable. Relative importance of parameters differed by trophic group. Soil ingestion ranked 2nd for carnivores and herbivores, but was 4th for invertivores. Different patterns were exhibited, depending on which parameter, trophic group, and analyte combination was considered. The approach for TRV selection was also examined in detail, with Cu as the representative analyte. The underlying assumption that generic body-weight–normalized TRVs can be used to derive protective levels for any species is not supported by the data. Whereas the use of site-, species-, and analyte-specific exposure parameters is recommended to reduce variation in exposure estimates (soil protection level), improvement of TRVs is more problematic. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;33:2386–2398. PMID:24944000

  2. Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 20, No. 11, 1994 RISK-SENSITIVE HABITAT USE BY BROOK

    E-print Network

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    (Culaea inconstans) IN AREAS ASSOCIATED WITH MINNOW ALARM PHEROMONE BRIAN D. WISENDEN,* DOUGLAS P. CHIVERS OWO (Received March 30, 1994; accepted JuLy 11, 1994) Abstract--Brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans Words--Predation risk, area avoidance, brook stickleback, Culaea inconstans, fathead minnow, Pimephales

  3. Clark et al.: Sensitivity Analysis of a Fire Spread Model Fire Ecology

    E-print Network

    Moritz, Max A.

    Sitivity AnAlySiS of A fire SpreAd Model in A ChApArrAl lAndSCApe R.E. Clark1,* , A.S. Hope1 , S. Tarantola2. Tarantola, D. Gatelli, P.E. Dennison, and M.A. Moritz. 2008. Sensitivity analysis of a fire spread model

  4. Variability of magnetoencephalographic sensor sensitivity measures as a function of age, brain volume and cortical area

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Erhart, Matthew J.; Brown, Timothy T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and appropriateness of magnetoencephalography (MEG) for both adult and pediatric studies, as well as for the developmental comparison of these factors across a wide range of ages. Methods For 45 subjects with ages from 1 to 24 years (infants, toddlers, school-age children and young adults), lead fields (LFs) of MEG sensors are computed using anatomically realistic boundary element models (BEMs) and individually-reconstructed cortical surfaces. Novel metrics are introduced to quantify MEG sensor focality. Results The variability of MEG focality is graphed as a function of brain volume and cortical area. Statistically significant differences in total cerebral volume, cortical area, MEG global sensitivity and LF focality are found between age groups. Conclusions Because MEG focality and sensitivity differ substantially across the age groups studied, the cortical LF maps explored here can provide important insights for the examination and interpretation of MEG signals from early childhood to young adulthood. Significance This is the first study to (1) investigate the relationship between MEG cortical LFs and brain volume as well as cortical area across development, and (2) compare LFs between subjects with different head sizes using detailed cortical reconstructions. PMID:24589347

  5. Mercury in streams at Grand Portage National Monument (Minnesota, USA): assessment of ecosystem sensitivity and ecological risk.

    PubMed

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R; Wiener, James G; Haro, Roger J; Sandheinrich, Mark B; Bailey, Sean W; Seitz, Brandon R

    2015-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) in water, sediment, soils, seston, and biota were quantified for three streams in the Grand Portage National Monument (GRPO) in far northeastern Minnesota to assess ecosystem contamination and the potential for harmful exposure of piscivorous fish, wildlife, and humans to methylmercury (MeHg). Concentrations of total Hg in water, sediment, and soil were typical of those in forest ecosystems within the region, whereas MeHg concentrations and percent MeHg in these ecosystem components were markedly higher than values reported elsewhere in the western Great Lakes Region. Soils and sediment were Hg-enriched, containing approximately 4-fold more total Hg per unit of organic matter. We hypothesized that localized Hg enrichment was due in part to anthropogenic pollution associated with historic fur-trading activity. Bottom-up forcing of bioaccumulation was evidenced by MeHg concentrations in larval dragonflies, which were near the maxima for dragonflies sampled concurrently from five other national park units in the region. Despite its semi-remote location, GRPO is a Hg-sensitive landscape in which MeHg is produced and bioaccumulated in aquatic food webs to concentrations that pose ecological risks to MeHg-sensitive piscivores, including predatory fish, belted kingfisher, and mink. PMID:25666279

  6. Traditional ecological knowledge trends in the transition to a market economy: empirical study in the Doñana natural areas.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Mingorría, Sara; Reyes-García, Victoria; Calvet, Laura; Montes, Carlos

    2010-06-01

    Researchers and conservation managers largely agree on the relevance of traditional ecological knowledge for natural resource management in indigenous communities, but its prevalence and role as societies modernize are contested. We analyzed the transmission of traditional knowledge among rural local people in communities linked to protected areas in Doñana, southwestern Spain. We studied changes in knowledge related to local practices in agriculture and livestock farming among 198 informants from three generations that cover the period in which the area transited from an economy strongly dependent on local ecosystem services to a market economy with intensified production systems. Our results suggest an abrupt loss of traditional agricultural knowledge related to rapid transformations and intensification of agricultural systems, but maintenance of knowledge of traditional livestock farming, an activity allowed in the protected areas that maintains strong links with local cultural identity. Our results demonstrate the potential of protected areas in protecting remaining bodies of traditional ecological knowledge in developed country settings. Nevertheless, we note that strict protection in cultural-landscape-dominated areas can disrupt transmission of traditional knowledge if local resource users and related practices are excluded from ecosystem management. PMID:20067484

  7. Auditory sensitivity and ecological relevance: the functional audiogram as modelled by the bat detecting moth ear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew E. Jackson; Navdeep S. Asi; James H. Fullard

    2010-01-01

    Auditory sensitivity has often been measured by identifying neural threshold in real-time (online) which can introduce bias\\u000a in the audiograms that are produced. We tested this by recording auditory nerve activity of the notodontid moth Nadata gibbosa elicited by bat-like ultrasound and analysing the response offline. We compared this audiogram with a published online audiogram\\u000a showing that the bias introduced

  8. The results of an ecological risk assessment screening at the Idaho National Engineering`s waste area group 2

    SciTech Connect

    VanHorn, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern Idaho and occupies approximately 890 square miles on the northwestern portion of the eastern Snake River Plain. INEL has been devoted to nuclear energy research and related activities since its establishment in 1949. In the process of fulfilling this mission, wastes were generated, including radioactive and hazardous materials. Most materials were effectively stored or disposed of, however, some release of contaminants to the environment has occurred. For this reason, the INEL was listed by the US environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List (NPL), in November, 1989. This report describes the results of an ecological risk assessment performed for the Waste Area Groups 2 (WAG 2) at the INEL. It also summarizes the performance of screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERA).

  9. Magnetolelluric data collection and analysis in the SES sensitive site of Ioannina area (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokityansky, Igor I.; Varotsos, Panayiotis A.

    Two independent magnetotelluric sounding (MTS) studies in Ioannina (NW Greece) area have been reported. Their conclusions, however, differ essentially. To proceed in the correct understanding of the geoelectrical structure in that area, additional detailed observations in several sites were made. The analysis of the new data proves that the conclusion of Pham et al. [Pham, V.N., Boyer, D., Le Mouel, J.L., Chouliaras, G., Stavrakakis, G.N., 1999. Electromagnetic signals generated in the solid Earth by digital transmission of radio-waves as a plausible source for some so-called “seismic electric signals”. Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors, 114, 141 163] claiming a globally high resistivity structure in the area does not hold. Moreover the present analysis strengthens the model that the main geoelectrical structure of Ioannina area (being considered along a regional profile of the NE SW direction) is characterized by a high resistive formation in the upper crust, but inside it a set of narrow conductors (elongated in the NW SE direction) exists. These conductors provide support for the possibility that seismic electric signals emitted from distances of the order of 100 km can be recorded at the Ioannina SES sensitive site.

  10. Temporal frequency tuning of cortical face-sensitive areas for individual face perception.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Rossion, Bruno

    2014-04-15

    In a highly dynamic visual environment the human brain needs to rapidly differentiate complex visual patterns, such as faces. Here, we defined the temporal frequency tuning of cortical face-sensitive areas for face discrimination. Six observers were tested with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) when the same or different faces were presented in blocks at 11 frequency rates (ranging from 1 to 12 Hz). We observed a larger fMRI response for different than same faces - the repetition suppression/adaptation effect - across all stimulation frequency rates. Most importantly, the magnitude of the repetition suppression effect showed a typical Gaussian-shaped tuning function, peaking on average at 6 Hz for all face-sensitive areas of the ventral occipito-temporal cortex, including the fusiform and occipital "face areas" (FFA and OFA), as well as the superior temporal sulcus. This effect was due both to a maximal response to different faces in a range of 3 to 6 Hz and to a sharp drop of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal from 6 Hz onward when the same face was repeated during a block. These observations complement recent scalp EEG observations (Alonso-Prieto et al., 2013), indicating that the cortical face network can discriminate each individual face when these successive faces are presented every 160-170 ms. They also suggest that a relatively fast 6 Hz rate may be needed to isolate the contribution of high-level face perception processes during behavioral discrimination tasks. Finally, these findings carry important practical implications, allowing investigators to optimize the stimulation frequency rates for observing the largest repetition suppression effects to faces and other visual forms in the occipito-temporal cortex. PMID:24321556

  11. Ecology of water areas associated with coal strip-mined lands in Ohio

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHARLES V. RILEY

    1960-01-01

    With the advent of the open-pit method of coal mining in Ohio in 1914, com- monly referred to as strip mining, a new ecological habitat developed in the state. For a period of 35 years, subsequent to that date, the majority of the spoil banks created were left ungraded. In the ravines between the spoil banks, in the final cuts

  12. uploaded April 2012 Ecological Systems and Research is one of four research areas for the

    E-print Network

    Debinski, Diane M.

    , including crop-livestock integration. Program Information: The Leopold Center has an annual call for pre: *Conservation practices are practices primarily intended to increase biotic integrity and improve soil health #12;Bright Futures! A picture of prairie strips integrated with annual row-crops. Our Leopold Ecology

  13. Trophic ecology of Mustelus schmitti (Springer, 1939) in a nursery area of northern Patagonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Manuel Molina; Andrea López Cazorla

    2011-01-01

    Mustelus schmitti is an endangered endemic shark of the southwest Atlantic, and an important economical resource in Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. The objective of this study was to describe the trophic ecology of M. schmitti in Anegada Bay, its feeding strategy and diet composition, along with the possible dietary shifts, due to season, sex, ontogeny and the different geographical features

  14. METHODS DEVELOPMENT AT THE NEAR LAB ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH AREA (NLERA) LOCATED IN THE NEUSE RIVER BASIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task supports the Agency's efforts on developing a proper risk assessment tools to address Ecological and eventually Human exposures. The Agency needs to be able to identify, measure and estimate ecosystem exposure to multiple stressors. The research under this task suppor...

  15. Ecological modulation of plant defense via phytochrome control of jasmonate sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Javier E.; Tao, Yi; Chory, Joanne; Ballaré, Carlos L.

    2009-01-01

    For plants, the tradeoff between resource investment in defense and increased growth to out-compete neighbors creates an allocation dilemma. How plants resolve this dilemma, at the mechanistic level, is unclear. We found that Arabidopsis plants produced an attenuated defense phenotype under conditions of crowding and when exposed to far-red (FR) radiation, a light signal that plants use to detect the proximity of neighbors via the photoreceptor phytochrome. This phenotype was detectable through standard bioassays that measured the growth of Spodoptera frugiperda caterpillars. Two possible explanations for the effect of FR are: (i) a simple by-product of the diversion of resources to competition, and (ii) a specific effect of phytochrome on defense signaling. The first possibility was ruled out by the fact that the auxin-deficient sav3 mutant, which fails to induce growth responses to FR, still responded to FR with an attenuated defense phenotype. In support of the second hypothesis, we found that phytochrome inactivation by FR caused a strong reduction of plant sensitivity to jasmonates, which are key regulators of plant immunity. The effects of FR on jasmonate sensitivity were restricted to certain elements of the pathway. Supporting the idea that the FR effects on jasmonate signaling are functionally significant, we found that FR failed to increase tissue quality in jar1, a mutant impaired in jasmonate response. We conclude that the plant modulates its investment in defense as a function of the perceived risk of competition, and that this modulation is effected by phytochrome via selective desensitization to jasmonates. PMID:19251652

  16. Ecological conditions in wintering and passage areas as determinants of timing of spring migration in trans-Saharan migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Robson, David; Barriocanal, Carles

    2011-03-01

    1.?Climate change has been associated with shifts in the timing of biological events, including the spring arrival of migratory birds. Early arrival at breeding sites is an important life-history trait, usually associated with higher breeding success and therefore, susceptible to selection and evolution in response to changing climatic conditions. 2.?Here, we examine the effect of changes in the environmental conditions of wintering and passage areas on the mean passage time of 13 trans-Saharan passerines during their spring migration through the western Mediterranean over the 15 years from 1993 to 2007. 3.?We found that most of the species studied have been advancing the timing of their passage in recent years. However, annual variation in the mean date of passage was positively correlated with vegetation growth (measured as the normalized difference vegetation index [NDVI]) both in the Sahel (the region of departure) and in northern Africa (the passage area). Thus, migration dates were delayed in years with high primary productivity in passage and wintering zones. All species seem to respond similarly to NDVI in the Sahel; however, late migrants were less affected by ecological conditions in northern Africa than those migrating earlier, suggesting differences based on species ecology. 4.?Mean timing of passage was not related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), temperature or NDVI in the species-specific wintering areas (the overwintering region) when analysed in combination with the other covariates. 5.?Our findings show that ecological conditions in the winter quarters (specifically the Sahel) and en route are relevant factors influencing trends in the passage dates of trans-Saharan migratory birds on the southern fringe of Europe. Possible long-term consequences for late arriving spring migrants are discussed. PMID:21073454

  17. The Use of Ecological Niche Modeling to Infer Potential Risk Areas of Snakebite in the Mexican State of Veracruz

    PubMed Central

    Yañez-Arenas, Carlos; Peterson, A. Townsend; Mokondoko, Pierre; Rojas-Soto, Octavio; Martínez-Meyer, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Many authors have claimed that snakebite risk is associated with human population density, human activities, and snake behavior. Here we analyzed whether environmental suitability of vipers can be used as an indicator of snakebite risk. We tested several hypotheses to explain snakebite incidence, through the construction of models incorporating both environmental suitability and socioeconomic variables in Veracruz, Mexico. Methodology/Principal Findings Ecological niche modeling (ENM) was used to estimate potential geographic and ecological distributions of nine viper species' in Veracruz. We calculated the distance to the species' niche centroid (DNC); this distance may be associated with a prediction of abundance. We found significant inverse relationships between snakebites and DNCs of common vipers (Crotalus simus and Bothrops asper), explaining respectively 15% and almost 35% of variation in snakebite incidence. Additionally, DNCs for these two vipers, in combination with marginalization of human populations, accounted for 76% of variation in incidence. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that niche modeling and niche-centroid distance approaches can be used to mapping distributions of environmental suitability for venomous snakes; combining this ecological information with socioeconomic factors may help with inferring potential risk areas for snakebites, since hospital data are often biased (especially when incidences are low). PMID:24963989

  18. Optimizing line intercept sampling and estimation for feral swine damage levels in ecologically sensitive wetland plant communities.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jacob F; Engeman, Richard M; Tillman, Eric A; Fischer, Justin W; Orzell, Steve L; Glueck, Deborah H; Felix, Rodney K; Avery, Michael L

    2013-03-01

    Ecological sampling can be labor intensive, and logistically impractical in certain environments. We optimize line intercept sampling and compare estimation methods for assessing feral swine damage within fragile wetland ecosystems in Florida. Sensitive wetland sites, and the swine damage within them, were mapped using GPS technology. Evenly spaced parallel transect lines were simulated across a digital map of each site. The length of each transect and total swine damage under each transect were measured and percent swine damage within each site was estimated by two methods. The total length method (TLM) combined all transects as a single long transect, dividing the sum of all damage lengths across all transects by the combined length of all transect lines. The equal weight method (EWM) calculated the damage proportion for each transect line and averaged these proportions across all transects. Estimation was evaluated using transect spacings of 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 m. Based on relative root mean squared error and relative bias measures, the TLM produced higher quality estimates than EWM at all transect spacings. Estimation quality decreased as transect spacing increased, especially for TLM. Estimation quality also increased as the true proportion of swine damage increased. Diminishing improvements in estimation quality as transect spacings decreased suggested 5 m as an optimal tradeoff between estimation quality and labor. An inter-transect spacing of 5 m with TLM estimation appeared an optimal starting point when designing a plan for estimating swine damage, with practical, logistical, economic considerations determining final design details. PMID:22707203

  19. Comparison of large-area position-sensitive solid-state photomultipliers for small animal PET.

    PubMed

    Schmall, Jeffrey P; Du, Junwei; Yang, Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; McClish, Mickel; Christian, James; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2012-12-21

    This paper evaluates the performance of two large-area position-sensitive solid-state photomultipliers (PS-SSPM) for use in small animal PET detector designs. Both PS-SSPM device designs are 1 cm² in area, the first being a 2 × 2 tiled array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs and the second being a 10 mm × 10 mm continuous PS-SSPM. Signal-to-noise measurements were performed to investigate the optimal operating parameters for each device and to compare the performance of the two PS-SSPM designs. A maximum signal-to-noise ratio of 29.3 was measured for the 5 mm PS-SSPM array and 15.1 for the 10 mm PS-SSPM, both measurements were made at 0 °C and at the optimal bias voltage. The best energy resolution measured with an array of 1.3 mm polished LSO crystals was 16% for the 5 mm PS-SSPM array and 18% for the 10 mm PS-SSPM. The timing properties of both devices were similar, with a best timing resolution (in coincidence with an LSO/PMT detector) of 6.8 ns (range 6.8-8.9 ns) and 7.1 ns (range 7.1-9.6 ns) for the 5 mm PS-SSPM and 10 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The 2 × 2 array of 5 mm PS-SSPMs was able to visually resolve the elements in an 0.5 × 0.5 × 20 mm LYSO scintillator array (unpolished, diffuse reflector) with an average peak-to-valley ratio in the flood histograms of ?11 indicating clear separation of the crystals. Advantages and drawbacks of PET detector designs using PS-SSPM photodetectors are addressed and comparisons to other small-animal PET detector designs using position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes are made. PMID:23172720

  20. Comparison of large-area position-sensitive solid-state photomultipliers for small animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Du, Junwei; Yang, Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; McClish, Mickel; Christian, James; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of two large-area position-sensitive solid-state photomultipliers (PS-SSPM) for use in small animal PET detector designs. Both PS-SSPM device designs are 1 cm2 in area, the first being a 2 × 2 tiled array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs and the second being a 10 mm × 10 mm continuous PS-SSPM. Signal-to-noise measurements were performed to investigate the optimal operating parameters for each device and to compare the performance of the two PS-SSPM designs. A maximum signal-to-noise ratio of 29.3 was measured for the 5 mm PS-SSPM array and 15.1 for the 10 mm PS-SSPM, both measurements were made at 0 °C and at the optimal bias voltage. The best energy resolution measured with an array of 1.3 mm polished LSO crystals was 16% for the 5 mm PS-SSPM array and 18% for the 10 mm PS-SSPM. The timing properties of both devices were similar, with a best timing resolution (in coincidence with an LSO/PMT detector) of 6.8 ns (range 6.8-8.9 ns) and 7.1 ns (range 7.1-9.6 ns) for the 5 mm PS-SSPM and 10 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The 2 × 2 array of 5 mm PS-SSPMs was able to visually resolve the elements in an 0.5 × 0.5 × 20 mm LYSO scintillator array (unpolished, diffuse reflector) with an average peak-to-valley ratio in the flood histograms of ˜11 indicating clear separation of the crystals. Advantages and drawbacks of PET detector designs using PS-SSPM photodetectors are addressed and comparisons to other small-animal PET detector designs using position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes are made.

  1. Estradiol-sensitive projection neurons in the female rat preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the preoptic area (POA) interrupts the lordosis reflex, a combined contraction of back muscles, in response to male mounts and the major receptive component of sexual behavior in female rat in estrus, without interfering with the proceptive component of this behavior or solicitation. Axon-sparing POA lesions with an excitotoxin, on the other hand, enhance lordosis and diminish proceptivity. The POA effect on the reflex is mediated by its estrogen-sensitive projection to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) as shown by the behavioral effect of VTA stimulation as well as by the demonstration of an increased threshold for antidromic activation of POA neurons from the VTA in ovariectomized females treated with estradiol benzoate (EB). EB administration increases the antidromic activation threshold in ovariectomized females and neonatally castrated males, but not in neonatally androgenized females; the EB effect is limited to those that show lordosis in the presence of EB. EB causes behavioral disinhibition of lordosis through an inhibition of POA neurons with axons to the VTA, which eventually innervate medullospinal neurons innervating spinal motoneurons of the back muscle. The EB-induced change in the threshold or the axonal excitability may be a result of EB-dependent induction of BK channels. Recordings from freely moving female rats engaging in sexual interactions revealed separate subpopulations of POA neurons for the receptive and proceptive behaviors. Those POA neurons engaging in the control of proceptivity are EB-sensitive and project to the midbrain locomotor region (MLR). EB thus enhances lordosis by reducing excitatory neural impulses from the POA to the VTA. An augmentation of the POA effect to the MLR may culminate in an increased locomotion that embodies behavioral estrus in the female rat. PMID:25852453

  2. Predicted infiltration for sodic/saline soils from reclaimed coastal areas: sensitivity to model parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongdong; She, Dongli; Yu, Shuang'en; Shao, Guangcheng; Chen, Dan

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the influences of soil surface conditions and initial soil water content on water movement in unsaturated sodic soils of reclaimed coastal areas. Data was collected from column experiments in which two soils from a Chinese coastal area reclaimed in 2007 (Soil A, saline) and 1960 (Soil B, nonsaline) were used, with bulk densities of 1.4 or 1.5?g/cm(3). A 1D-infiltration model was created using a finite difference method and its sensitivity to hydraulic related parameters was tested. The model well simulated the measured data. The results revealed that soil compaction notably affected the water retention of both soils. Model simulations showed that increasing the ponded water depth had little effect on the infiltration process, since the increases in cumulative infiltration and wetting front advancement rate were small. However, the wetting front advancement rate increased and the cumulative infiltration decreased to a greater extent when ?? was increased. Soil physical quality was described better by the S parameter than by the saturated hydraulic conductivity since the latter was also affected by the physical chemical effects on clay swelling occurring in the presence of different levels of electrolytes in the soil solutions of the two soils. PMID:25197699

  3. Assessing WRF model parameter sensitivity: A case study with 5 day summer precipitation forecasting in the Greater Beijing Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Zhenhua; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Wang, Chen; Gan, Yanjun; Quan, Jiping; Li, Jianduo; Miao, Chiyuan; Ye, Aizhong; Tong, Charles

    2015-01-01

    global sensitivity analysis method was used to identify the parameters of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that exert the most influence on precipitation forecasting. Twenty-three adjustable parameters were selected from seven physical components of the WRF model. The sensitivity was evaluated based on skill scores calculated over nine 5 day precipitation forecasts during the summer seasons from 2008 to 2010 in the Greater Beijing Area in China. We found that eight parameters are more sensitive than others. Storm type seems to have no impact on the list of sensitive parameters but does influence the degree of sensitivity. We also examined the physical interpretation of parameter sensitivity. This analysis is useful for further optimization of the WRF model parameters to improve precipitation forecasting.

  4. Ecological Degradation in Protected Areas: The Case of Wolong Nature Reserve for Giant Pandas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianguo Liu; Marc Linderman; Zhiyun Ouyang; Li An; Jian Yang; Hemin Zhang

    2001-01-01

    It is generally perceived that biodiversity is better protected from human activities after an area is designated as a protected area. However, we found that this common perception was not true in Wolong Nature Reserve (southwestern China), which was established in 1975 as a ``flagship'' protected area for the world-renowned endangered giant pandas. Analyses of remote sensing data from pre-

  5. Interpretation of models of fundamental ecological niches and species' distributional areas

    E-print Network

    Soberó n, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    of Chicago Press, Chicago. Etterson, J. R., and R. G. Shaw. 2001. Constraint to adaptive evolution in response to global warming. Science 294:151-153. Fielding, A. H., and J. F. Bell. 1997. A review of methods for the assessment of prediction errors.... Evolutionary Ecology 9:38-44. Nix, H. A. 1986. A biogeographic analysis of Australian elapid snakes. Pages 4-15 in R. Longmore, editor. Atlas of elapid snakes of Australia. Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra. Pearson, R. G., and T. P...

  6. Areas with forest soils sensitive to acidic deposition under alternative damage hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    This project reviews the potential for acidic deposition to induce changes in forest soils and examines the hypothesized roles of these soil changes in decreased tree growth and forest dieback. Several damage mechanisms will be examined, and maps will be made for each set of hypotheses showing the areal distribution of those soils that could change to a chemical state injurious or less conductive to tree growth. Phase I reviews hypotheses concerning acid deposition effects on soil processes. The hypotheses fall into two categories: (1) changes in soil-plant nutrient relationships; and (2) changes in the availability of toxic elements to plants. Phase II, the development of criteria for spatially estimating soil and forest effects for each hypothesis selected, will consider numerous environmental factors and depends on availability of data spatially quantifying each factor. The factors examined will depend on the specific hypothesis, but primary reliance will be placed on soil chemical properties, vegetation cover and type, and the properties and amount of deposition. Phase III includes mapping potentially sensitive ecosystems, using computer manipulation of the environmental data identified in Phase II. Boundaries will be drawn based on criteria selected in Phase II for each hypothesis. In Phase IV, selected areas shown on the maps as being sensitive to change or damage by acid deposition will be checked in the field or checked against results of ongling or previous research to assess the validity of the maps. Site assessments will include general observations of condition and dynamics of the ecosystems, tree growth-increment cores, and soil and vegetation sampling for laboratory analyses. 6 references.

  7. Satellite images as primers to target priority areas for field surveys of indicators of ecological sustainability in tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Amuchastegui, Naikoa

    Sustainable management of tropical forests has been identified as one of the main objectives for global conservation of carbon stocks. In order to achieve this, managers need tools to establish whether or not their management practices are sustainable. Several tool development initiatives have undertaken the creation of sets of criteria and indicators to aid managers to target, if not achieve, sustainability. The question of how to assess these indicators remains to be answered from an operational viewpoint, where logistical constraints become critical and priorization becomes necessary. The present dissertation sought to determine whether satellite imagery can be used, in conjunction with standard forest management data, to identify priority areas for field surveys of indicators of ecological sustainability of managed tropical forests. It presents a novel approach to the assessment of CIFOR indicator I.2.1.2: "The change in diversity of habitats as a result of human interventions is maintained within critical limits as defined by natural variation and/or regional conservation objectives" by means of semivariography of remote sensing data. It shows the Wide Dynamic Range Vegetation Index (WDRVI) is a good alternative for the detection and quantification of tropical forests structural heterogeneity and its dynamic change. The differences observed between forest management units and natural areas forest structural heterogeneity were used to identify priority areas for field survey of ecological sustainability indicators and evaluate how these priorities were reflected in dung beetles community structure and composition. The link between forest structural heterogeneity dynamic change, forest logging intensity and dung beetle community structure and composition is established. A logging intensity threshold of 4 trees per hectare is identified as the limit between significant or not significant differences in forest structure dynamic changes and dung beetles community total species richness and diversity estimates.

  8. Local Scale Comparisons of Biodiversity as a Test for Global Protected Area Ecological Performance: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bernard W. T.; Gaston, Kevin J.; Chown, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial protected areas (PAs) are cornerstones of global biodiversity conservation. Their efficacy in terms of maintaining biodiversity is, however, much debated. Studies to date have been unable to provide a general answer as to PA conservation efficacy because of their typically restricted geographic and/or taxonomic focus, or qualitative approaches focusing on proxies for biodiversity, such as deforestation. Given the rarity of historical data to enable comparisons of biodiversity before/after PA establishment, many smaller scale studies over the past 30 years have directly compared biodiversity inside PAs to that of surrounding areas, which provides one measure of PA ecological performance. Here we use a meta-analysis of such studies (N?=?86) to test if PAs contain higher biodiversity values than surrounding areas, and so assess their contribution to determining PA efficacy. We find that PAs generally have higher abundances of individual species, higher assemblage abundances, and higher species richness values compared with alternative land uses. Local scale studies in combination thus show that PAs retain more biodiversity than alternative land use areas. Nonetheless, much variation is present in the effect sizes, which underscores the context-specificity of PA efficacy. PMID:25162620

  9. A low noise small area self switched CMOS charge sensitive readout chain

    SciTech Connect

    Kapnistis, C.; Misiakos, K.; Haralabidis, N. [N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Athens (Greece). Inst. of Microelectronics] [N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Athens (Greece). Inst. of Microelectronics

    1999-06-01

    A CMOS charge sensitive readout chain with self switched output and small layout area, suitable for pixel applications, has been developed. The system is capable of simultaneous position sensing and energy measurement on a real time basis. Each pixel circuit incorporates both analog and digital features to perform the dual task. The performance of several charge amplifiers was tested. The impact of type and channel length of the input transistor on the system noise was investigated. The read out electronics have been designed and fabricated in CMOS 0.8 {micro}m technology. The overall gain of the chain is 620 mV/fC, while the ENC is 58 e{sup {minus}} rms at a 140 nsec shaping time and a 105 fF detector capacitance. With a power consumption of 1.8 mW per pixel at 3.3V, it is a promising solution for X-ray pixel detectors. The paper describes the system architecture and reports experimental measurements.

  10. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

  11. Large-area synthesis of monolayer WS? and its ambient-sensitive photo-detecting performance.

    PubMed

    Lan, Changyong; Li, Chun; Yin, Yi; Liu, Yong

    2015-04-14

    We demonstrate the synthesis of large-area monolayer WS2 films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and investigate their photoresponse properties by fabricating n-type field effect transistors (FETs) with Al as the ohmic contact. Our CVD-grown monolayer WS2 shows an electron mobility of 0.91 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an ON/OFF ratio of 10(6), indicating its comparable electronic properties to the mechanically exfoliated flake sample. In a vacuum, by applying a gate bias (60 V), the responsivity of the monolayer WS2 phototransistor can increase up to 18.8 mA W(-1) and a decent sub-second level response time can be maintained. In contrast, in air, it shows a very fast response time of less than 4.5 ms, but at the cost of responsivity reduction to 0.2 ?A W(-1). Such a distinctive ambient-sensitive photo-detecting performance can be well-explained by the pronounced effect of charge-acceptor-like O2/H2O molecule adsorption/desorption on the photocarrier transport. Our CVD-grown high quality monolayer WS2 may pave the way for developing industrial-scale optoelectronic devices for photo-detecting and chemical sensing applications. PMID:25782370

  12. Area Disadvantage and Intimate Partner Homicide: An Ecological Analysis of North Carolina Counties, 2004–2006

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Martin, Sandra L.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Schoenbach, Victor J.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System and other sources, we examined ecologic relationships between county (n=100) disadvantage and intimate partner homicide (IPH), variability by victim gender and county urbanicity, and potential mediators. County disadvantage was related to female-victim homicide only in metropolitan counties (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.25); however, disadvantage was associated with male-victim IPH regardless of county urbanicity (IRR 1.17). None of the potential intervening variables examined (shelter availability, intimate partner violence services’ funding), was supported as a mediator. Results suggest disparities across North Carolina counties in IPH according to county disadvantage. Future research should explore other potential mediators (i.e., service accessibility and law enforcement responses), as well as test the robustness of findings using additional years of data. PMID:20565007

  13. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    E-print Network

    Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  14. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    E-print Network

    Hao Li; Lu Zhang; Lixing You; Xiaoyan Yang; Weijun Zhang; Xiaoyu Liu; Sijing Chen; Zhen Wang; Xiaoming Xie

    2015-06-25

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  15. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lu; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-06-01

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  16. Acid deposition sensitivity map of the Southern Appalachian Assessment area; Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, John D.; Grosz, Andrew E.; Kress, Thomas H.; Collins, Thomas K.; Kappesser, Gary B.; Huber, Cindy M.; Webb, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Project Summary: The following digital product represents the Acid Deposition Sensitivity of the Southern Appalachian Assessment Area. Areas having various susceptibilities to acid deposition from air pollution are designated on a three tier ranking in the region of the Southern Appalachian Assessment (SAA). The assessment is being conducted by Federal agencies that are members of the Southern Appalachian Man and Biosphere (SAMAB) Cooperative. Sensitivities to acid deposition, ranked high, medium, and low are assigned on the basis of bedrock compositions and their associated soils, and their capacities to neutralize acid precipitation.

  17. Ecological characteristics of small mammals on a radioactive waste disposal area in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, C.R.; Keller, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Species composition, diversity, biomass and densities of small mammal populations were examined in crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) and Russian thistle (Salsola kali) habitats on a solid radioactive waste disposal area and in native sagebrush (Artemisia tridentala) habitat surrounding the disposal area. The 15-month live-trapping study resulted in the marketing of 2384 individuals representing 10 species of small mammals. The deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the most common rodent in both disposal area habitats and the adjacent sagebrush habitat; Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) was also an abundant rodent in all vegetation types. The montane vole (Microtus montanus) was common only in crested wheatgrass stands on the disposal area. Although the adjacent native sagebrush habitat had the highest species diversity and the Russian thistle habitat on the disposal area had the lowest, the total rodent density was not significantly different among the three vegetation types. Crested wheatgrass within the disposal area contained the largest rodent biomass throughout the study, in part due to an increasing M. montanus population. The peak small mammal biomass of 5000 g/ha in creasted wheatgrass and sagebrush habitats was considerably higher than previously reported for similar habitats. Differences in diversity and biomass between the disposal area and surrounding native habitat are most likely related to differences in soil compaction and vegetation between these two areas.

  18. [Ecological and hygienic condition urbanized area in the geographical center of New Moscow].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, N A

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of ecological and hygienic condition of the environment was performed by ourselves in the geographical center of New Moscow--in the city of Troitsk. There was made an analysis as the published results of similar assessments in the times of the 1990s, data of Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare concerning the control for soils quality (at a single point of the city) and drinking water for 2010-2011, and the author's materials on the chemical contamination of soils and grounds in July 2013. Local foci of moderately dangerous pollution of soil were found at lots close to the motorway and in the Worsted factory: Zc (SrBaCrVNiCoCuAgZnPbBeMoWB) = 17-20, benzo (a) pyrene to 218 mcg/kg and Zn up to 233.4 mg/kg. At the point of monitoring soils complied with the requirements according to toxicological, microbiological and parasitological characteristics.. In the drinking tap water there was observed, along with the increased total hardness, the presence up to 1.6 MAC of such natural pollutants as F and Li. In the undergrounds potable water the situation is worsening according to the content of Si, As, B, Br, U. There was no monitoring of surface water and air. However, pockets of soil contamination trace the possible occurrence in the air near the ground of hygienically dangerous anomalies of heavy metals and hydrocarbons. Modern ecological and sanitary situation in Troitsk, in general, can be considered to be quite safe if compared to the quality of the environment in industrialized cities. The thing that does cause concern is the quality of drinking water. PMID:26031042

  19. A forest without trees: Development of high-surface-area materials for enhanced-sensitivity SAW arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yelton, W.G.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.

    1998-08-01

    Chemical sensor arrays are an alternative to the tedious development of highly specific single-analyte detectors. Recent efforts have focused on the chemical and physical diversity of interface materials for SAW sensor arrays. However, the issues of wide dynamic range and high sensitivity must also be addressed for sensor arrays to compete in applications requiring low detection limits. Because SAW devices respond in proportion to change in mass per nominal unit area of the device surface, sensitivity is enhanced by surface modification with high-area, thin-film coating materials: a greater mass of analyte is adsorbed at a given ambient concentration. The authors are exploring several classes of electrochemically prepared high-area films, materials whose formulations and processing are well documented for applications other than chemical sensors. They present results from films formed by anodization, chemical conversion, and electroplating, yielding surface area enhancements as high as 170x.

  20. Toxicity screening of soils from different mine areas--a contribution to track the sensitivity and variability of Arthrobacter globiformis assay.

    PubMed

    Marques, Catarina R; Caetano, Ana L; Haller, Andreas; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Ruth; Römbke, Jörg

    2014-06-15

    This study used the Arthrobacter globiformis solid-contact test for assessing the quality of soils collected in areas subjected to past and present mine activities in Europe (uranium mine, Portugal) and North Africa (phosphogypsum pile, Tunisia; iron mine, Morocco). As to discriminate the influence of soils natural variability from the effect of contaminants, toxicity thresholds were derived for this test, based on the dataset of each study area. Furthermore, the test sensitivity and variability was also evaluated. As a result, soils that inhibited A. globiformis dehydrogenase activity above 45% or 50% relatively to the control, were considered to be toxic. Despite the soil metal content determined, the properties of soils seemed to influence dehydrogenase activity. Overall, the contact test provided a coherent outcome comparing to other more time-consuming and effort-demanding ecotoxicological assays. Our results strengthened the feasibility and ecological relevance of this assay, which variability was quite reduced hence suggesting its potential integration within the test battery of tier 1 of soil risk assessment schemes. PMID:24797906

  1. Levels of metals, arsenic and phosphorus in sediments from two sectors of a Brazilian Marine Protected Area (Tupinambás Ecological Station).

    PubMed

    Hoff, Natasha T; Figueira, Rubens C L; Abessa, Denis M S

    2015-02-28

    The Tupinambás Ecological Station (TES) is a Marine Protected Area consisting of two sectors: the Archipelago of Alcatrazes and the Cabras and Palmas islets. This investigation aimed to provide a first diagnosis of the concentrations of metals (Al,Cr,Cu,Fe,Hg,Ni,Pb,Zn), As and P in sediments from the TES. 24 sediment samples were collected in both sectors using a Van Veen grab sampler. Sediment textures and levels of Organic Matter (OM) and CaCO3 were determined, as well as the concentrations of the above-mentioned elements after partial acid digestion. Sediments were predominantly sandy. Higher levels of CaCO3 occurred in the Alcatrazes sector, whereas the OM contents were higher in the islets sector. Metals concentrations were low and associated with fines, while P and As presented a different behavior. The observed concentrations to all studies elements in sediments from the TES were considered as background values. PMID:25467864

  2. A contact-area model for rail-pads connections in 2-D simulations: sensitivity analysis of train induced vibrations

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A contact-area model for rail-pads connections in 2-D simulations: sensitivity analysis of train systems by means of a finite and discrete elements method. The rail defects and the case of out-of-round wheels are considered. The dynamic interaction between the wheel-sets and the rail is accomplished

  3. [Radio-ecological situation in the area of JSC "Priargunsky Production Mining and Chemical Association"].

    PubMed

    Shandala, N K; Semenova, M P; Isaev, D V; Kiselev, S M; Seregin, V A; Titov, A V; Filonova, A A; Zhuravleva, L A; Marenny, A M

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the radioecological situation created in the area of the location of diversified uranium mining enterprise "Priargunsky Production Mining and Chemical Association" (PIMCU) there was investigated the radioactivity of a number of the compartments of environment, both at the industrial site and beyond it, as well as the volume activity of radon inside the ground and working premises. Radioecological situation in the vicinity of the uranium mines was performed in comparison with the background (fixed reference, control) district, where there is no uranium mining. Performed studies have shown the significant excess content of 226Ra, 232Th, 210Pb, 222Rn in soil, water open water bodies and local foods near uranium mines compared to areas outside the zone of influence of uranium mining that allows to make a conclusion about the significant technogenic pollution of local areas of the plant and adjoining territory. PMID:25842487

  4. On the origin and robustness of power-law species–area relationships in ecology

    PubMed Central

    García Martín, Héctor; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-01-01

    We present an explanation for the widely reported power-law species–area relationship (SAR), which relates the area occupied by a biome to the number of species that it supports. We argue that power-law SARs are a robust consequence of a skewed species abundance distribution resembling a lognormal with higher rarity, together with the observation that individuals of a given species tend to cluster. We show that the precise form of the SAR transcends the specific details of organism interactions, enabling us to characterize its broad trends across taxa. PMID:16801556

  5. Effects of urbanization on the distribution of area-sensitive forest birds in Prince George's County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, D.K.; Robbins, C.S.; Darr, L.J.

    2001-01-01

    Bird survey data from Prince George's County, Maryland, were used to evaluate the effects of urbanization on the distribution of forest bird species that are area sensitive. We developed models that predict the probability of occurrence for species during the nesting season as a function of forest area and degree of urbanization. All of the 21 bird species considered occurred in a higher proportion of forests in portions of the county with low or moderate urbanization than in forests in highly urbanized areas, but species differed in their response to urbanization. We calculated the predicted probability of occurrence for each species in each forest in Prince George's County, summed the probabilities to obtain an estimate of the expected number of area-sensitive species, and integrated the expected numbers with a geographic information system coverage of Prince George's County forests to map patterns of species richness countywide. This information can be used to focus efforts to conserve habitat for area-sensitive forest birds, both in Prince George's County and throughout the Chesapeake Bay region.

  6. The nesting ecology of paper wasps (Polistes) in a Texas urban area 

    E-print Network

    Reed, Hal Clyde

    1978-01-01

    nests in houses in the Ithaca, New York area were made by this species. ~Ves a ~tro ica Van der Vecht, a Singapore hornet, appears to be assoriarf d with man 1 showing a rli sty ibiitinn cnincii)( nt wC I h chat of hualan habitations, Another...

  7. Research, demonstration, and extension: the ARS area-wide ecologically based invasive plant management project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Area-wide project is a collaborative five year effort funded in 2008 by USDA-ARS that has brought together scientists with the USDA-ARS, universities, land managers, and policy makers throughout the Great Basin. A primary goal of the project is to develop and implement a comprehensive, regional...

  8. An Ecological Characterization and Landscape Assessment of the Muddy-Virgin River Project Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Muddy-Virgin River Project Area covers a large part of southern Nevada. Very little is known about the water quality of the entire Basin. The Muddy and Virgin Rivers drain into Lake Mead which provides drinking water for communities located in the Las Vegas Valley. The are...

  9. Emergency Post-fire Rehabilitation Treatment Effects on Burned Area Ecology and Long-term Restoration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter R. Robichaud; Sarah A. Lewis; Robert E. Brown; Louise E. Ashmun

    2009-01-01

    The predicted continuation of strong drying and warming trends in the southwestern Unit- ed States underlies the associated prediction of increased frequency, area, and severity of wildfires in the coming years. As a result, the management of wildfires and fire effects on public lands will continue to be a major land management priority for the foreseeable fu- ture. Following fire

  10. [Remote sensing based monitoring of vegetation dynamics and ecological restoration in Beijing mountainous area].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Liu, Liang-yun; Jia, Jian-hua

    2010-11-01

    By using the Landsat images in 1979, 1988, 1999, 2005, and 2009, and the linear unmixed model at pixel scale, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal variation of vegetation coverage in Beijing mountainous area. After detecting the areas of vegetation degradation or restoration, the impacts of elevation, slope, and soil type on vegetation restoration were studied. From 1979 to 1988, the vegetation coverage in the study area had no obvious change, but in the following 12 years, the vegetation coverage was seriously destroyed due to the fast development of social economy. Fortunately, many protective measures were taken since 2000, which improved the vegetation coverage to 72% in 2009, with an increment of 13% compared to the vegetation coverage in 1999. A significant correlation was observed between the variations of vegetation coverage and territorial features. The areas with poor soil or large slope were more easily suffered from degradation than other places, and the flat regions with low elevation were more affected by human activities. PMID:21361013

  11. Epidemiological study of bovine brucellosis in three agro-ecological areas of central Oromiya, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Jergefa, T; Kelay, B; Bekana, M; Teshale, S; Gustafson, H; Kindahl, H

    2009-12-01

    A cross-sectional sero-epidemiological study of bovine brucellosis was conducted between September 2005 and March 2006 in three separate agroecological areas of central Oromiya, Ethiopia. In this study, a total of 176 clusters (farms) and 1,238 animals were selected, using the one-stage cluster sampling method. Fifty-nine clusters and 423 animals were selected from the lowland areas; 58 clusters and 385 animals from the midland areas and 59 clusters and 430 animals from the highlands. Serum samples were collected from a total of 1,238 animals older than six months. The rose bengal plate test and complement fixation test were used as screening and confirmatory tests, respectively, to detect Brucella seropositivity. Questionnaires were also administered to 176 households to gather information on the farm and livestock. Results showed that the overall seroprevalence of bovine brucellosis at the individual animal level was 2.9% (low). The seroprevalence was 4.2% in the lowlands, 1.0% in the midlands and 3.4% in the highlands. The overall seroprevalence at the herd level was 13.6% (moderate). At the herd level, seroprevalence in the lowlands was 17%; in the midlands: 5.1%; and in highland areas: 18.6%. Logistic regression analysis, revealed that the breed of cattle and the method of disposing of aborted foetuses and foetal membranes had a statistically significant effect on individual animal seroprevalence (p < 0.05). In lowland areas, the breed (p < 0.05), animal management system (p <0.05), mating method (p < 0.05), herd size (p < 0.05) and source of replacement stock (p <0.05) all had significant effects on individual animal seroprevalence. PMID:20462151

  12. [Dynamics of plant community species diversity in the process of ecological rehabilitation in north Shaanxi loess area].

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Zhu, Qing-Ke; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Zhao, Lei-Lei

    2009-02-01

    Based on the vegetation survey on 18 sampling plots in Wuqi County of Shaanxi Province, and by using the methods of substituting space series for time series and of contrastive analysis, the dynamics of plant community species diversity in the process of ecological rehabilitation in the County was analyzed from the aspects of succession time, rehabilitation mode, and slope direction. The results showed that in the 25 years natural succession series, the natural restoration community on previous cropland experienced the sequence of Salsola collina, Artemisia scoparia, Lespedeza davurica, Artemisia sacrorum, and Bothriochloa ischcemum, with the dominant species tended to be changed from annual to perennial and from low-class to high-class. The variations of species number, Margalef index, Simpson index, Shannon-Wiener index, and Pielou index in the succession process could all be described by a quadratic function y = at2 + bt + c, suggesting that after the outside pressure removed, the degraded ecosystem in loess area could naturally restore to an advanced and steady state, but the restoration rate would be very slow. With the same site factors and restoration periods, the Margalef index, Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou index of herb layer decreased in the order of naturally restoring on previous cropland (I) > converting cropland to grassland (II) > converting cropland to forestland (III) > afforestation on barren hills (IV), while Simpson index changed in adverse. Comparing with natural restoration, the community types of herb layer in II and III were at the more advanced stage of natural succession series though the species diversity index was lower, indicating that artificial planting would accelerate the succession process. In the same period of rehabilitation, the Margalef index, Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou index of natural restoration community were obviously higher on shady slope than on sunny slope, and the community type was at the more advanced stage of natural succession series, suggesting that the basic ecological rehabilitation condition on sunny slope was worse, and the succession rate was slower. PMID:19459383

  13. [Dynamic characteristics of leaf area index and allocation characters of ecological resources for different yielding spring maize populations].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yu-hong; Chen, Chuan-yong; Guo, Zhi-qiang; Hou, Li-bai; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Ming

    2009-01-01

    By using 3-year field experimental results and related meteorological observation data, the dynamic characteristics of leaf area index (LAI) and the allocation characters of ecological resources for different yielding spring maize (Zea Mays L.) population in Huadian of Jilin Province were studied. The results showed that the dynamic characteristics of relative LAI, with the relative growth days of test population, relative effective accumulated temperature, relative sunshine hours and relative rainfall as independent variables, fitted rational formula y = (a + bx) /(1 + cx + dx2), and the regression equation of maize yield with the ratios of growth days before and after silking (x1), effective accumulated temperature before and after silking (x2), rainfall before and after silking (x3), and sunshine hours before and after silking (x4) was y = 5465.19 + 17810.64x(1) - 23236.14x(2) + 4093.41x(3) + 6287.37x(4) (R2 = 0. 8187, P < 0.01), with the effects of these ecological factors on yield being in the sequence of x1 > x2 > x3 > x4 according to the absolute values of partial regression coefficients. In super high yielding (15499.86 kg x hm(-2)) spring maize population, the allocation ratios of x1, x2, x3, and x4 were 1.43, 1.41, 1.44, and 1.40, respectively. Therefore, in Northeast China, appropriate early sowing of spring maize to prolong its growth days with more rainfall and sunshine hours before silking could attain high yielding, and high or super high yield could be achieved when the allocation ratios of x1, x2, x3, and x4 were all about 1.4. PMID:19449577

  14. Concentration Levels and Ecological Risks of Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Surface Sediments of Tianjin Coastal Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Chaoqi; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Zhen; Yang, Junjun

    2013-01-01

    Sediments were sampled from different surface water bodies in Tianjin coastal area, China, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured using GC/MS or GC/ECD. The purposes were to investigate the concentration levels of the POPs and to assess their ecological risks. The results showed that all the 16 priority PAHs were detected from the 10 sediments sampled with the total concentrations of the 16?PAHs ranging from 274.06??g/kg to 2656.65??g/kg, while the concentrations of the halogenated POPs were generally low except in the Dagu waste discharging river where the total concentrations of 24?OCPs, 35?PCBs, and 14?PBDEs were 3103.36??g/kg, 87.31??g/kg, and 13.88??g/kg, respectively. In the studied sediments, PAHs exhibited risks to benthonic organisms; particularly the concentrations of naphthalene and/or acenaphthene exceeded their probable effect concentrations in several locations. In comparison, only in the Dagu waste discharging river, OCPs exhibited risks with the concentrations of heptachlor epoxide and lindane exceeding their probable effect concentrations. PCBs and PBDEs posed rare risks in the studied area. PMID:23401668

  15. An ecological analysis of the population in impoverished areas in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, C

    1996-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of environmental conditions and efforts at environmental protection in impoverished areas in China. China began in 1980 to alleviate poverty by investing 500 million yuan in promoting agricultural production in impoverished areas. The state established a standard for measuring impoverishment in 1986. 664 counties fit the impoverishment criteria, of which 301 received national government support and 363 received provincial government support. These 664 counties comprised 30% of total population and were situated in 22 provinces. 27 impoverished counties were added in 1988 to those supported by provincial government, and 77 counties in Tibet were recognized as impoverished. In 1988 there were 35.13% impoverished counties in the country, or 24.01% of total population. This population resided on 40.82% of land area. Impoverishment was greatest in the provinces of Tibet (77 counties), Jianxi (56 counties), and Sichuan (51 counties). 24.89% (172 out of 691 counties) were situated in 10 provinces along the eastern coast and Shanghai. 34.50% (256 out of 742 counties) were situated in 9 central provinces. 44.83% (347 out of 774 counties) were situated in western provinces. Impoverishment increased from coastal areas to the western boundaries. During 1988-92 the number of impoverished counties declined from 775 to 592 (to 105 in the east, 180 in the central region, and 307 in the west). During 1986-92 impoverished population declined from 125 million to 80 million. Most impoverished counties have poor environmental conditions and low yields: deforestation, desertification, soil erosion, salinization, drought, and pollution. The author describes each of the environmental conditions. Resources above the ground are overused, while there are vast reserves of water, energy sources, and minerals underground. The author describes five policy and program directions for environmental protection and poverty alleviation. PMID:12291967

  16. Ecological change as a factor in renewed malaria transmission in an eradicated area

    PubMed Central

    Giglioli, George

    1963-01-01

    In British Guiana, the successful eradication of Anopheles darlingi and malaria from the coastal areas has caused a very rapid increase in the population and has favoured a considerable social and economic improvement and expansion of both agriculture and industry. Housing and industrial developments and the constantly expanding rice cultivation have taken over most of the accessible pasture-lands, displacing the livestock which previously abounded around villages and settlements. Mechanization on the roads and in the fields increases daily, and the horse, the mule, the donkey and the ploughing oxen are gradually becoming obsolete. In some areas these changes have already caused such an upset in the balance between the human and the livestock population that A. aquasalis, a very abundant species all along the coast, but until recently entirely “fixed” by the livestock population, is now shifting its attention from livestock to man. On the Demerara river estuary, an area where malaria transmission was interrupted sixteen years ago and where eradication has been continually maintained, this mosquito has been responsible for a sharp, but localized, outbreak of P. vivax malaria. An entirely new epidemiological problem thus presents itself. Environmental changes, introduced and fostered by successful malaria eradication, may thus cause an anopheline species, potentially capable of malaria transmission, but originally inactive and harmless as a vector, to alter its feeding habits and thereby renew transmission. The immediate and long-term significance of some secondary and potential vectors may therefore require renewed evaluation in the planning of malaria eradication campaigns. PMID:14056265

  17. Ecological determinants of the occurrence and dynamics of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in offshore areas

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Blanco-Abad, Veronica; Rodriguez-Castro, Alba; Ansede-Bermejo, Juan; Miranda, Ana; Rodriguez-Alvarez, M Xose

    2012-01-01

    The life cycle of Vibrio parahaemolyticus has been conventionally associated with estuarine areas characterized by moderate salinity and warm seawater temperatures. Recent evidence suggests that the distribution and population dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus may be shaped by the existence of an oceanic transport of communities of this organism mediated by zooplankton. To evaluate this possibility, the presence of V. parahaemolyticus in the water column of offshore areas of Galicia was investigated by PCR monthly over an 18-month period. Analysis of zooplankton and seawater showed that the occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus in offshore areas was almost exclusively associated with zooplankton and was present in 80% of the samples. The influence of environmental factors assessed by generalized additive models revealed that the abundance and seasonality of V. parahaemolyticus in zooplankton was favoured by the concurrence of downwelling periods that promoted the zooplankton patchiness. These results confirm that offshore waters may be common habitats for V. parahaemolyticus, including strains with virulent traits. Additionally, genetically related populations were found in offshore zooplankton and in estuaries dispersed along 1500?km. This finding suggests that zooplankton may operate as a vehicle for oceanic dispersal of V. parahaemolyticus populations, connecting distant regions and habitats, and thereby producing impacts on the local community demography and the spread of Vibrio-related diseases. PMID:22094349

  18. Ecological risk assessment of impacted estuarine areas: integrating histological and biochemical endpoints in wild Senegalese sole.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cátia; Martins, Marta; Costa, Maria H; Caeiro, Sandra; Costa, Pedro M

    2013-09-01

    The analysis of multiple biomarker responses is nowadays recognized as a valuable tool to circumvent potential confounding factors affecting biomonitoring studies and allows a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying exposure to natural mixtures of toxicants. For the purpose of an environmental risk assessment (ERA) in an impacted estuary in SW Europe (the Sado, Portugal), juvenile Solea senegalensis from commercial fishing areas were surveyed for histopathological liver alterations and biochemical biomarkers. Although the findings revealed moderate differences in the patterns of histopathological traits between urban/industrial- and agricultural-influenced areas within the same estuary, no significant distinction was found between the cumulative alterations in animals from the two sites. The overall level of histopathological injury was low and severe traits like neoplasms or pre-neoplastic foci were absent. While metallothionein induction and lipid peroxidation could relate to histopathological condition indices, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes appeared to be impaired in animals collected off the estuary's heavy-industry belt (the most contaminated site), which may partially explain some degree of hepatic integrity loss. Overall, the results are consistent with low-moderate contamination of the estuary and indicate that oxidative stress is the most important factor accounting for differences between sites. The study highlights the need of integrating multiple biomarkers when multiple environmental stressors are involved and the advantages of surveying toxicity effects in field-collected, foraging, organisms. PMID:23810368

  19. Ecology of Greater Sage-Grouse in the Bi-State Planning Area Final Report, September 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casazza, Michael L.; Overton, Cory T.; Farinha, Melissa A.; Torregrosa, Alicia; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Miller, Michael R.; Sedinger, James S.; Kolada, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Conservation efforts for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), hereafter sage-grouse, are underway across the range of this species. Over 70 local working groups have been established and are implementing on-the-ground sage-grouse oriented conservation projects. Early on in this process, the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) recognized the need to join in these efforts and received funding from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under the Candidate Species Conservation Program to help develop a species conservation plan for sage-grouse in the Mono County area. This conservation plan covers portions of Alpine, Mono, and Inyo counties in California and Douglas, Esmeralda, Lyon, and Mineral counties in Nevada. A concurrent effort underway through the Nevada Governor's Sage-grouse Conservation Team established Local Area Working Groups across Nevada and eastern California. The Mono County populations of sage-grouse were encompassed by the Bi-State Local Planning Area, which was comprised of six population management units (PMUs). The state agencies from California (CDFG) and Nevada (Nevada Department of Wildlife; NDOW) responsible for the management of sage-grouse agreed to utilize the process that had begun with the Nevada Governor's Team in order to develop local plans for conservation planning and implementation. Resources from the USFWS were applied to several objectives in support of the development of the Bi-State Local Area Sage-grouse Conservation Plan through a grant to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Objectives included: (1) participate in the development of the Bi-State Conservation Plan, (2) compile and synthesize existing sage-grouse data, (3) document seasonal movements of sage-grouse, (4) identify habitats critical to sage-grouse, (5) determine survival rates and identify causal factors of mortality, (6) determine nest success and brood success of sage-grouse, and (7) identify sage-grouse lek sites. Progress reports completed in 2004 and 2005 addressed each of the specific objectives and this final report focuses on the biological information gathered in support of local conservation efforts. Participation in the development of the Bi-State Local Area Conservation Plan was accomplished on multiple scales. Beginning in the fall of 2002, USGS personnel began participating in meetings of local stakeholders involved in the development of a sage-grouse conservation plan for the Bi-State planning area. This included attendance at numerous local PMU group meetings and field trips as well as participating on the technical advisory committee (TAC) for the Bi-State group. Whenever appropriate, ongoing results and findings regarding sage-grouse ecology in the local area were incorporated into these working group meetings. In addition, the USGS partnered with CDFG to help reorganize one of the local PMU groups (South Mono) and edited that portion of the Bi-State plan. The USGS also worked closely with CDFG to draft a description of the state of knowledge for sage-grouse genetic information for inclusion in the Bi-State Conservation Plan. The first edition of the Bi-State Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-Grouse was completed in June 2004 (Bi-State Sage-grouse Conservation Team 2004). This report is organized primarily by PMU to facilitate the incorporation of these research findings into the individual PMU plans that compose the Bi-State plan. Information presented in this report was derived from over 7,000 radio-telemetry locations obtained on 145 individual sage-grouse during a three year period (2003-2005). In addition, we collected detailed vegetation measurements at over 590 habitat sampling plots within the study area including canopy cover, shrubs, forbs, and grasses diversity. Vegetation data collection focused on sage-grouse nests, and brood-use areas. Additionally we collected data at random sites to examine sage-grouse habitat relationships within the study area. The majori

  20. Soil-ecological conditions of Korean pine growth in its natural area and upon introduction in the European part of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Socioeconomic expediency and soil-ecological potential of introducing Korean pine ( Pinus koraiensis) in the forest zone of the European part of Russia are discussed. The specificity of soil-ecological conditions and technologies applied for growing Korean pine in some tree farms in the Far East region and in the European part of Russia are compared. The main soil-ecological factors and optimum soil parameters for the successful development of Korean pine in its natural and introduction areas are determined. It is shown that development of Korean pine seedlings on well-drained soils depends on the contents of potassium, humus, and physical clay in the soils. The seedlings gain maximum size upon their growing on soddypodzolic soils (Retisols). The analysis of mineral nutrition of pine seedlings of different ages, soil conditions, and seasonal growth phases shows that the contents of potassium and some microelements play the leading role in the successful growth of introduced Korean pine.

  1. Very efficient visible light energy harvesting and conversion by spectral sensitization of high surface area polycrystalline titanium dioxide films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nick. Vlachopoulos; Paul. Liska; Jan. Augustynski; Michael. Graetzel

    1988-01-01

    By using high surface area (roughness factor ca. 200) polycrystalline anatase films together with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate)ruthenium(II), RuLâ\\/sup 4 -\\/, as a sensitizer, the authors have achieved unprecedentedly high visible light to electric current conversion efficiencies in regenerative photoeletrochemical cells. Incident photon to current conversion efficiencies of 73% have been obtained at the wavelength of maximum absorption of the dye in the

  2. Trophic ecology of bottom fishes assemblage along coastal areas of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajisamae, Sukree

    2009-04-01

    Food preferences, feeding attributes, trophic guilds, and ontogenetic changes in diet compositions of 45 fish species collected along coastal waters in the southern areas of the South China Sea, Thailand were examined. Most species had high food intake and fed on specific ranges of food types. Shrimp was the most important food (31.7%), followed by calanoid copepod (16.8%), fish (12.7%) and gammarid amphipod (8.3%). These fishes can be categorized into six different trophic guilds and further divided into four categories namely; piscivore, zooplanktivore, zoobenthivore and miscellaneous/opportunist. Numbers of feeding guilds at each depth vary between four and five. Four of these are consistently found throughout the year at all zones; shrimp predator, piscivore, calanoid copepod feeder and a combination of polychaete and other food feeders. Ontogenetic studies indicate that fishes are more likely to group according to species rather than size. This scientific information is important when examining the complex association between fishes and identifying groups of species using similar resources.

  3. Forest ecosystem processes at the watershed scale: sensitivity to remotely-sensed Leaf Area Index estimates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Nemani; L. Pierce; S. Running; L. Band

    1993-01-01

    Recent research has shown that general trends in forest leaf area index along regional climatic gradients can be adequately characterized by using ratios of near-infrared and red reflectances. However it has proven difficult to represent properly the spatial distribution of Leaf Area Index (LAI) at sub-regional scales such as small catchments. The key problem at Thematic Mapper scale is the

  4. Magnetolelluric data collection and analysis in the SES sensitive site of Ioannina area (Greece)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor I. Rokityansky; Panayiotis A. Varotsos

    2006-01-01

    Two independent magnetotelluric sounding (MTS) studies in Ioannina (NW Greece) area have been reported. Their conclusions, however, differ essentially. To proceed in the correct understanding of the geoelectrical structure in that area, additional detailed observations in several sites were made. The analysis of the new data proves that the conclusion of Pham et al. [Pham, V.N., Boyer, D., Le Mouel,

  5. Large-area semi-transparent light-sensitive nanocrystal skins

    E-print Network

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    . Sargent, "Colloidal quantum dot solar cells," Nat. Photonics 6(3), 133­135 (2012). 4. G. Konstantatos. J. Nozik, "Schottky solar cells based on colloidal nanocrystal films," Nano Lett. 8(10), 3488-of-concept devices using CdTe nanocrystals with ligand removal, we observed a substantial sensitivity enhancement

  6. Slow Light Waveguide and Enhanced Area Microcavity Engineering for High Sensitivity Photonic Crystal Sensors

    E-print Network

    Chen, Ray

    denotes radiation loss time constant from the microcavity and QWG =WG, WG denotes leakage loss time demonstrated methods to increase the quality factor (Q) and sensitivity by tailoring the radiation loss of the W1 PCW. (Fig. 1(a) in water, refractive index n=1.33; Fig. 1(b) in glycerol, n=1.46). Fig. 2 plots

  7. Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

  8. Soils of regeneration: Exploring conceptualizations of the natural world as a context for an ecologically sensitive curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoor, Emily A.

    David Orr (1994) asserts that the ecological crisis is a crisis of education. This study explores the relationship between the ecological crisis and education by examining the role that language plays in shaping perceptions of the natural world. Toward this end it analyzes narratives of science, literature and other disciplines that conceptualize the natural world as object and as subject. It evaluates how particular metaphors used in reference to the natural world enhance or impede ecological understanding and the cultivation of responsibility and stewardship and considers ways in which these conceptualizations might be used as a basis for new curriculum theorizing. In looking at our relationship to Earth, this dissertation explores the notion of intersubjectivity (Abram, 1996) as expressed in philosophical and theoretical writings on participatory consciousness (Berman, 1981, Abram, 1996), empathic fusion (Goizueta, 1995), and bodymind or embodied knowing (Hocking, Haskell, & Linds, 1999). Marginal or in-between spaces emerge from these narratives as important and potentially transformative sites of relationship and meaning making wherein dualities are reconciled and physical and metaphysical realms merge. The implications of these particular findings form the theoretical core of this work's conclusions. This dissertation makes an original contribution to the field of curriculum theory in the following ways: It situates discursive knowledge in the larger context of the natural world, with nature as text and conversation partner in the process of knowledge construction. In dialog with the natural world, it explores new curricular spaces of mystery and spirit. It suggests soil, roots, and mycorrhizae as rich and regenerative metaphors for curriculum theorizing. It highlights the work of the nature writers as a resource for engendering new understandings of the natural world as having voice, identity, and agency, suggests this body of literature as a curricular resource for cultivating ecological understandings, and places this literature in conversation with the field of curriculum theory. Finally, it argues for a both/and dialogic position regarding the notions of local knowledge and metanarrative. In these ways, it seeks to philosophically fund a move away from an ecologically disabling anthropocentrism and toward a greater intimacy with the natural world.

  9. Optimizations of large area quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matteo Biancardo; Keld West; Frederik C. Krebs

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we address optimizations of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) through the combination of important issues like semi-transparency, quasi-solid-state constructions and low-cost realization of serially connected modules. DSSCs with a transparency of 50% in the visible region, moderate efficiency ?1%, and long lifetime allow solar cells application in building elements like windows, façades and semi-transparent roofs. The use

  10. Capybaras and ticks in the urban areas of Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil: ecological aspects for the epidemiology of tick-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Queirogas, V L; Del Claro, K; Nascimento, A R T; Szabó, M P J

    2012-05-01

    In Brazil capybara, the biggest existing rodent species, and associated tick species, Amblyomma cajennense and Amblyomma dubitatum, are undergoing an unplanned host and parasite population expansion in both urban and rural areas. However, scientific information about such issue, particularly in urban areas, is scanty. Such rodent and ticks are associated in some municipalities, particularly in southeastern Brazil, with the transmission of the highly lethal Rickettsia rickettsia caused spotted-fever. In this study ecological aspects related to the establishment and expansion of capybaras and ticks in urban areas of Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil were evaluated. For this purpose, capybara and tick abundance in four urban areas and an ecological reserve was determined. Abundance of capybaras varied between areas and over the sampling period and these differences were related to human activities. A positive correlation was found between capybara and tick abundance, however, the tick species had an uneven distribution within the municipality and environmental factors rather than host availability were blamed for such. On the whole these observations show that capybara populations in urban areas are associated to high environmental infestation of ticks and the increased risk of bites and of pathogen transmission to humans. At the same time the uneven distribution of tick species might implicate in an unequal risk of tick-borne diseases within the same urban area. PMID:22349945

  11. A legal and ecological perspective of 'site integrity' to inform policy development and management of Special Areas of Conservation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rees, Siân E; Sheehan, Emma V; Jackson, Emma L; Gall, Sarah C; Cousens, Sophie L; Solandt, Jean-Luc; Boyer, Matthew; Attrill, Martin J

    2013-07-15

    The European Union Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) provides for the designation and management of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and requires that impacting activities are subject to 'an appropriate assessment' of their implications for the 'integrity' of the site. We define the term 'site integrity' from a legal and an ecological perspective. We demonstrate that 'site integrity' is the maintenance of ecological processes and functions that support the wider delivery of ecosystem services. 'Site integrity' can be influenced by SAC management. Management that seeks to support 'site integrity' may include the use of buffer zones or connecting areas that extend beyond the SAC site's designated features. We conclude that 'site integrity' and 'favourable conservation status' are powerful legal terms that if fully transposed into the law and policy of Member States can enable the achievement of broader European and International goals for marine conservation. PMID:23628546

  12. Novel Data on the Ecology of Cochranella mache (Anura: Centrolenidae) and the Importance of Protected Areas for This Critically Endangered Glassfrog in the Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Andrade, H. Mauricio; Rojas-Soto, Octavio; Paucar, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We studied a population of the endangered glassfrog, Cochranella mache, at Bilsa Biological Station, northwestern Ecuador, from 2008 and 2009. We present information on annual abundance patterns, behavioral ecology, habitat use and a species distribution model performed with MaxEnt. We evaluate the importance of the National System of Protected Areas (SNAP) in Colombia and Ecuador, under scenarios of climate change and habitat loss. We predicted a restricted environmental suitability area from 48,509 Km2 to 65,147 Km2 along western Ecuador and adjacent Colombia; ?8% of the potential distribution occurs within SNAP. We examined four aspects of C. mache ecology: (1) ecological data suggests a strong correlation between relative abundance and rainfall, with a high probability to observe frogs through rainy months (February–May); (2) habitat use and the species distribution model suggest that this canopy dweller is restricted to small streams and rivulets in primary and old secondary forest in evergreen lowland and piedmont forest of western Ecuador, with predictions of suitability areas in adjacent southern Colombia; (3) the SNAP of Colombia and Ecuador harbor a minimum portion of the predicted model of distribution (<10%); and (4) synergetic effects of habitat loss and climate change reduces in about 95% the suitability areas for this endangered frog along its distributional range in Protected Areas. The resulting model allows the recognition of areas to undertake conservation efforts and plan future field surveys, as well as forecasting regions with high probability of C. mache occurrence in western Ecuador and southern Colombia. Further research is required to assess population tendencies, habitat fragmentation and target survey zones to accelerate the discovery of unknown populations in unexplored areas with high probability of suitability. We recommend that Cochranella mache must be re-categorized as “Critically Endangered” species in national and global status, according with criteria and sub-criteria A4, B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv),E. PMID:24339973

  13. Novel data on the ecology of Cochranella mache (Anura: Centrolenidae) and the importance of protected areas for this critically endangered glassfrog in the neotropics.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Andrade, H Mauricio; Rojas-Soto, Octavio; Paucar, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We studied a population of the endangered glassfrog, Cochranella mache, at Bilsa Biological Station, northwestern Ecuador, from 2008 and 2009. We present information on annual abundance patterns, behavioral ecology, habitat use and a species distribution model performed with MaxEnt. We evaluate the importance of the National System of Protected Areas (SNAP) in Colombia and Ecuador, under scenarios of climate change and habitat loss. We predicted a restricted environmental suitability area from 48,509 Km(2) to 65,147 Km(2) along western Ecuador and adjacent Colombia; ? 8% of the potential distribution occurs within SNAP. We examined four aspects of C. mache ecology: (1) ecological data suggests a strong correlation between relative abundance and rainfall, with a high probability to observe frogs through rainy months (February-May); (2) habitat use and the species distribution model suggest that this canopy dweller is restricted to small streams and rivulets in primary and old secondary forest in evergreen lowland and piedmont forest of western Ecuador, with predictions of suitability areas in adjacent southern Colombia; (3) the SNAP of Colombia and Ecuador harbor a minimum portion of the predicted model of distribution (<10%); and (4) synergetic effects of habitat loss and climate change reduces in about 95% the suitability areas for this endangered frog along its distributional range in Protected Areas. The resulting model allows the recognition of areas to undertake conservation efforts and plan future field surveys, as well as forecasting regions with high probability of C. mache occurrence in western Ecuador and southern Colombia. Further research is required to assess population tendencies, habitat fragmentation and target survey zones to accelerate the discovery of unknown populations in unexplored areas with high probability of suitability. We recommend that Cochranella mache must be re-categorized as "Critically Endangered" species in national and global status, according with criteria and sub-criteria A4, B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv),E. PMID:24339973

  14. Sensitivity of two dispersion models (AERMOD and ISCST3) to input parameters for a rural ground-level area source.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, William B; Shaw, Bryan W; Grosch, Tom

    2008-10-01

    As of December 2006, the American Meteorological Society/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model with Plume Rise Model Enhancements (AERMOD-PRIME; hereafter AERMOD) replaced the Industrial Source Complex Short Term Version 3 (ISCST3) as the EPA-preferred regulatory model. The change from ISCST3 to AERMOD will affect Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) increment consumption as well as permit compliance in states where regulatory agencies limit property line concentrations using modeling analysis. Because of differences in model formulation and the treatment of terrain features, one cannot predict a priori whether ISCST3 or AERMOD will predict higher or lower pollutant concentrations downwind of a source. The objectives of this paper were to determine the sensitivity of AERMOD to various inputs and compare the highest downwind concentrations from a ground-level area source (GLAS) predicted by AERMOD to those predicted by ISCST3. Concentrations predicted using ISCST3 were sensitive to changes in wind speed, temperature, solar radiation (as it affects stability class), and mixing heights below 160 m. Surface roughness also affected downwind concentrations predicted by ISCST3. AERMOD was sensitive to changes in albedo, surface roughness, wind speed, temperature, and cloud cover. Bowen ratio did not affect the results from AERMOD. These results demonstrate AERMOD's sensitivity to small changes in wind speed and surface roughness. When AERMOD is used to determine property line concentrations, small changes in these variables may affect the distance within which concentration limits are exceeded by several hundred meters. PMID:18939775

  15. Parametric sensitivity analysis of noise impact of multihighways in urban areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mutasem El-Fadel; Shady Shazbak; M. Hadi Baaj; Elie Saliby

    2002-01-01

    Traffic noise along highways varies with the projected growth in future traffic use, particularly near developing urban areas, and the conditions of the tire–road surfacing interface. When traffic demand increases and those interface conditions deteriorate, highway noise impacts become significant and mitigation strategies required. This paper presents a leading application of the US Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)—a newly released Traffic

  16. [Ecological characteristics of preferred habitat of reindeer of Daxing'an Mountain forest area Northeast China in summer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Meng, Fan-Lu; Zeng, Zhi; Wang, Wei-Ping; Sheng, Yan; Feng, Jin-Chao; Zhou, Yi-Jun; Xue, Da-Yuan; Meng, Xiu-Xiang

    2014-09-01

    In July and August of 2012 and 2013, habitat selection and use patterns of reindeer were studied using both line and strip-transect surveys. Twenty-three habitat factors were measured and compared in known reindeer range areas in northwestern China. A total of 72 sampling sites were designated as being used by reindeer, and 162 sites were designated as unused control plots. The results indicated that, compared to the non-used habitat plots, reindeer selected summer habitats with higher values in altitude (26.9 ± 0.8 m), arbor canopy (17.9% ± 2.4%), arbor DBH (35.5 ± 2.1 cm), arbor height (8.2 ± 0.5 m), arbor density (6.9 ± 0.5 ind · 400 m(-2)) and stump quan- tity (1.3 ± 0.2 ind · 400 m(-2)), and with a lower shrub height (54.2 ± 2.0 cm). Moreover, reindeer also selected habitats at intermediate positions of intermediate slope gradient, which provided good water accessibility, more distance from human disturbance and herder influence, but bad concealment and lee condition. Results of the principal component analysis showed that the disturbance intensity (i. e. residential dispersion, anthropogenic-disturbance dispersion), arbor characteristics (arbor height and arbor density, arbor DBH and arbor canopy), geography characteristics (i. e. slope position, slope aspect and soil moisture), food abundance (ground-plant cover and shrub cover), openness (concealment and lee condition) and slope gradient were the most important factors influencing the habitat selection of reindeer in summer. In summary, the summer habitat selection of reindeer is a multidimensional process, through which reindeer adapt according to their ecological needs of food resources, safety and anti-predation. Furthermore, the pattern of habitat selection of reindeer showed that reindeer in China has not yet been domesticated, and reindeer populations and their core habitats should be conserved from intensive disturbance. PMID:25757301

  17. A sensitivity analysis of a surface energy balance model to LAI (Leaf Area Index)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Cannarozzo, M.; Capodici, F.; La Loggia, G.; Santangelo, T.

    2008-10-01

    The LAI is a key parameter in hydrological processes, especially in the physically based distribution models. It is a critical ecosystem attribute since physiological processes such as photosynthesis, transpiration and evaporation depend on it. The diffusion of water vapor, momentum, heat and light through the canopy is regulated by the distribution and density of the leaves, branches, twigs and stems. The LAI influences the sensible heat flux H in the surface energy balance single source models through the calculation of the roughness length and of the displacement height. The aerodynamic resistance between the soil and within-canopy source height is a function of the LAI through the roughness length. This research carried out a sensitivity analysis of some of the most important parameters of surface energy balance models to the LAI time variation, in order to take into account the effects of the LAI variation with the phenological period. Finally empirical retrieved relationships between field spectroradiometric data and the field LAI measured via a light-sensitive instrument are presented for a cereal field.

  18. Determination of warm, sensitive permafrost areas in near-vertical rockwalls and evaluation of distributed models by electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnin, Florence; Krautblatter, Michael; Deline, Philip; Ravanel, Ludovic; Malet, Emmanuel; Bevington, Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    Alpine rockwalls with warm permafrost (near 0°C) are the most active rockfall detachment zones in the Mont Blanc massif (MBM, French Alps) with more than 380 recent events. Near-vertical rockwall permafrost is spatially controlled by variations in rock fractures, snow cover, and microtopography. A reliable method to validate the distribution of permafrost in critical and unstable areas does not yet exist. We present seven electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys measured on five near-vertical rockwalls in the MBM from 2012 and 2013 that have been calibrated with measurements on a granite sample in the laboratory. ERT shows consistent measurements of remaining sensitive permafrost relating to inferred temperatures from 0 to -1.5°C. ERT results demonstrate evidence of topographic controls on permafrost distribution and resistivity gradients that appear to reflect crest width. ERT results are compared to two permafrost index maps that use topoclimatic factors and combine effects of thin snow and fractures, where index model spatial resolution is crucial for the validation with ERT. In cryospheric environments, index maps seem to overestimate permafrost conditions in glacial environments. As a consequence, the sensitive areas of permafrost may slightly deviate from the results from distributed models that are only constrained by topoclimatic factors and interpreted with consideration of local fracture and snow conditions. This study demonstrates (i) that the sensitive and hazardous areas of permafrost in near-vertical rock faces can be assessed and monitored by the means of temperature-calibrated ERT and (ii) that ERT can be used for distributed model validation.

  19. Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Proposed Hampton Roads Area Sites for a Possible Small Modular Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R. J. [ORNL; Omitaomu, O. A. [ORNL

    2014-08-01

    The overall objective of this research project is to use the OR-SAGE tool to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) in evaluating future electrical generation deployment options for small modular reactors (SMRs) in areas with significant energy demand from the federal sector. Deployment of SMRs in zones with high federal energy use can provide a means of meeting federal clean energy goals.

  20. Application of ecological modelling to investigate the impact of domestic waste water to one natural river system in tropical area (the nhue river, outskirts of hanoi, vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh Anh, D.; Bonnet, M. P.; Prieur, N.

    2003-04-01

    Water quality modelling has been employed as an effective tool to investigate the ecological situation of surface water sources. Within a researching collaboration of Vietnamese and French scientists, one portion, 40 km, of the Nhue river, outskirts of Hanoi city, northern Vietnam, has been investigated since the river has been highly impacted from anthropogenic activities and one 1-D ecological river model was formed based on the investigation. In this paper, biochemical process equations integrated with hydraulic conditions and human alterations are presented as the basis for ecological variation of this river system. Investigation showed that at the origin the river water remains untouched (nutrients are low in natural tropical water) while downstream the river is full of domestic pollutants (organic materials and nutrients). From the hydraulic, biological, chemical data and fieldwork experiments, the sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation have been carried out to verify the biochemical processes and optimise this model. Most calculations (simulation, sensitivity functions and parameter estimation) were performed with AQUASIM, a computer program designed for simulation and data analysis of 1-D river and other aquatic systems. The other supporting calculations for system analysis were implemented with IDENT based on output of a sensitivity analysis carried out with AQUASIM. The simulation results accomplished with available data indicate that the sediment exchanges and biodegradation processes emerge as the most important features that influence the water quality of the river where water is usually overloaded by domestic wastewater and where hydraulic characters are less pronounced. The model construction and simulation results have also pointed out that the river water quality has been spoiled dramatically after the main open-air sewer of the Hanoi city, the To Lich river, excesses to the Nhue. Beside, a metal speciation module was proposed to integrate with existing biochemical model in order to simulate the metal fractions in water column and metal exchange between river water and sediment.

  1. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Contaminant Travel Times from the Upgradient Nevada Test Site to the Yucca Mountain Area

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhu; K. Pohlmann; J. Chapman; C. Russell; R.W.H. Carroll; D. Shafer

    2009-09-10

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy as the nation’s first permanent geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and highlevel radioactive waste. In this study, the potential for groundwater advective pathways from underground nuclear testing areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to intercept the subsurface of the proposed land withdrawal area for the repository is investigated. The timeframe for advective travel and its uncertainty for possible radionuclide movement along these flow pathways is estimated as a result of effective-porosity value uncertainty for the hydrogeologic units (HGUs) along the flow paths. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the most influential HGUs on the advective radionuclide travel times from the NTS to the YM area. Groundwater pathways are obtained using the particle tracking package MODPATH and flow results from the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Effectiveporosity values for HGUs along these pathways are one of several parameters that determine possible radionuclide travel times between the NTS and proposed YM withdrawal areas. Values and uncertainties of HGU porosities are quantified through evaluation of existing site effective-porosity data and expert professional judgment and are incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulations to estimate mean travel times and uncertainties. The simulations are based on two steady-state flow scenarios, the pre-pumping (the initial stress period of the DVRFS model), and the 1998 pumping (assuming steady-state conditions resulting from pumping in the last stress period of the DVRFS model) scenarios for the purpose of long-term prediction and monitoring. The pumping scenario accounts for groundwater withdrawal activities in the Amargosa Desert and other areas downgradient of YM. Considering each detonation in a clustered region around Pahute Mesa (in the NTS operational areas 18, 19, 20, and 30) under the water table as a particle, those particles from the saturated zone detonations were tracked forward using MODPATH to identify hydraulically downgradient groundwater discharge zones and to determine the particles from which detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area. Out of the 71 detonations in the saturated zone, the flowpaths from 23 of the 71 detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area under the pre-pumping scenario. For the 1998 pumping scenario, the flowpaths from 55 of the 71 detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area. Three different effective-porosity data sets compiled in support of regional models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport developed for the NTS and the proposed YM repository are used. The results illustrate that mean minimum travel time from underground nuclear testing areas on the NTS to the proposed YM repository area can vary from just over 700 to nearly 700,000 years, depending on the locations of the underground detonations, the pumping scenarios considered, and the effective-porosity value distributions used. Groundwater pumping scenarios are found to significantly impact minimum particle travel time from the NTS to the YM area by altering flowpath geometry. Pumping also attracts many more additional groundwater flowpaths from the NTS to the YM area. The sensitivity analysis further illustrates that for both the pre-pumping and 1998 pumping scenarios, the uncertainties in effective-porosity values for five of the 27 HGUs considered account for well over 90 percent of the effective-porosity-related travel time uncertainties for the flowpaths having the shortest mean travel times to YM.

  2. Initial evaluation of acoustic reflectors for the preservation of sensitive abdominal skin areas during MRgFUS treatment.

    PubMed

    Gorny, Krzysztof R; Chen, Shigao; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J; Hesley, Gina K; Woodrum, David A; Brown, Douglas L; Felmlee, Joel P

    2009-04-21

    During MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments of uterine fibroids using ExAblate(R)2000 (InSightec, Haifa, Israel), individual tissue ablations are performed extracorporeally through the patient's abdomen using an annular array FUS transducer embedded within the MR table. Ultrasound intensities in the near field are below therapeutic levels and, under normal conditions, heating of the patient skin is minimal. However, increased absorption of ultrasound energy within sensitive skin areas or areas with differing acoustic properties, such as scars, may lead to skin burns and therefore these areas must be kept outside the near field of the FUS beam. Depending on their location and size the sensitive areas may either obstruct parts of the fibroid from being treated or prevent the entire MRgFUS treatment altogether. The purpose of this work is to evaluate acoustic reflector materials that can be applied to protect skin and the underlying sensitive areas. Reflection coefficients of cork (0.88) and foam (0.91) based materials were evaluated with a hydrophone. An ExAblate 2000 MRgFUS system was used to simulate clinical treatment with discs of reflector materials placed in a near field underneath a gel phantom. MR thermometry was used to monitor temperature elevations as well as the integrity of the focal spot. The phantom measurements showed acoustic shadow zones behind the reflectors with zone depths changing between 7 and 27 mm, for reflector disc diameters increasing from 10 to 30 mm (40 mm diameter discs completely blocked the FUS beam at the depth evaluated). The effects on thermal lesions due to the presence of the reflectors in the FUS beam were found to diminish with decreasing disc diameter and increasing sonication depth. For a 20 mm diameter disc and beyond 50 mm sonication depth, thermal lesions were minimally affected by the presence of the disc. No heating was observed on the skin side of the foam reflectors, as confirmed by measurements performed with adhesive temperature labels. We present these data and discuss possible applications to clinical MRgFUS treatments. PMID:19305044

  3. Risk Reduction and Soil Ecosystem Restoration in an Active Oil Producing Area in an Ecologically Sensitive Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry L. Sublette; Greg Thoma; Kathleen Duncan

    2006-01-01

    The empowerment of small independent oil and gas producers to solve their own remediation problems will result in greater environmental compliance and more effective protection of the environment as well as making small producers more self-reliant. In Chapter 1 we report on the effectiveness of a low-cost method of remediation of a combined spill of crude oil and brine in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Osage County, OK. Specifically, we have used hay and fertilizer as amendments for remediation of both the oil and the brine. No gypsum was used. Three spills of crude oil plus produced water brine were treated with combinations of ripping, fertilizers and hay, and a downslope interception trench in an effort to demonstrate an inexpensive, easily implemented, and effective remediation plan. There was no statistically significant effect of treatment on the biodegradation of crude oil. However, TPH reduction clearly proceeded in the presence of brine contamination. The average TPH half-life considering all impacted sites was 267 days. The combination of hay addition, ripping, and a downslope interception trench was superior to hay addition with ripping, or ripping plus an interception trench in terms of rates of sodium and chloride leaching from the impacted sites. Reductions in salt inventories (36 months) were 73% in the site with hay addition, ripping and an interception trench, 40% in the site with hay addition and ripping only, and < 3% in the site with ripping and an interception trench.

  4. Multiple pathways carry signals from short-wavelength-sensitive (‘blue’) cones to the middle temporal area of the macaque

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Jaikishan; Roy, Sujata; Dreher, Bogdan; Martin, Paul R; Vidyasagar, Trichur R

    2013-01-01

    We recorded spike activity of single neurones in the middle temporal visual cortical area (MT or V5) of anaesthetised macaque monkeys. We used flashing, stationary spatially circumscribed, cone-isolating and luminance-modulated stimuli of uniform fields to assess the effects of signals originating from the long-, medium- or short- (S) wavelength-sensitive cone classes. Nearly half (41/86) of the tested MT neurones responded reliably to S-cone-isolating stimuli. Response amplitude in the majority of the neurones tested further (19/28) was significantly reduced, though not always completely abolished, during reversible inactivation of visuotopically corresponding regions of the ipsilateral primary visual cortex (striate cortex, area V1). Thus, the present data indicate that signals originating in S-cones reach area MT, either via V1 or via a pathway that does not go through area V1. We did not find a significant difference between the mean latencies of spike responses of MT neurones to signals that bypass V1 and those that do not; the considerable overlap we observed precludes the use of spike-response latency as a criterion to define the routes through which the signals reach MT. PMID:23070701

  5. Large area and high sensitivity a-Si:H/a-SiC:H based detectors for visible and ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandracci, P.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C. F.; Rastello, M. L.

    1999-05-01

    In this article we discuss the fabrication and performance of a-Si:H/a-SiC:H based ultraviolet sensitive devices. They were deposited over a large area (10 cm×10 cm) in p-i-n configuration using a new, multichamber, ultrahigh vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition facility. The intrinsic layer thickness was 10-100 nm. The devices were characterized in the spectral range 365-660 nm and showed good sensitivity in the UV (365 nm). A good rejection of visible light was also measured. Responsivity as high as 0.30 A/W was measured at 365 nm for samples where the p layer and i layer were 5 and 10 nm thick, respectively. The linearity of the photogenerated current as a function of photon flux was measured. It was found that over an area of 25 cm2 the uniformity was within 15%. Using a laser (200 mW at 351 and 363 nm) the aging characteristics were measured and showed a 25% decrease in responsivity after the absorption of 105J cm-2 under operating conditions.

  6. Establishing the Ecological Status of Mining-Impacted Freshwaters from Abrud River Catchment Area Using Benthic Diatom Communities (Ros, ia MontanÄ?, Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenici, Adriana; Baciu, Calin; Momeu, Laura; Cozma, Alexandra; Brahaita, Dorian; Pop, Cristian; Lazar, Laura; Popita, Gabriela; Teodosiu, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: diatom communities, indicator species, mine waters, water quality, Romania. Diatoms are a very distinct group of algae, identifiable under the light microscope by their yellow - brown coloration and by the presence of a thick silica cell wall. The potential for freshwater organisms to reflect changes in environmental conditions was first noted by Kolenati (1848) and Cohn (1853), who observed that biota in polluted waters were different from those in non-polluted situations. Diatoms are widely used to monitor river pollution because they are sensitive to water chemistry, especially to ionic content, pH, dissolved organic matter and nutrients. Wide geographic distribution and well-studied ecology of most diatom species are mentioned as major advantages of using diatoms as indicator organisms. At the same time water quality has begun to deteriorate increasingly, mainly as a result of the physical, chemical and bacteriological alterations, and the aquatic ecosystems are evermore affected by various types of pollution, the anthropic one being almost always included. A good example is Abrud River and its main tributaries (Ro?ia Montan? and surrounding areas, Romania), which has suffered along the years because of the mining waters discharge. In this context, this study presents data on benthic diatom communities from the Abrud River catchment area. Sixteen sites have been sampled seasonal and the best represented diatom genera were Navicula, Nitzschia, Cymbella, Gomphonema, Achnantes, Surirella and Fragilaria. Qualitatively, the number of diatom species exhibited significant variation among sampling sites, also suggesting seasonal dynamics. For instance, in some sampling sites, algal assemblages were absent, as diatom communities were strongly affected by acid mine waters, released from old mining works and waste rocks depots. Some dominant taxa have been observed as well, suggesting critical saprobic levels of the Abrud River and some of its tributaries. The large quantity of organic matter, originating from untreated municipal water, together with the high concentrations of NO3-, draw attention to the mediocre quality of water in the area. Moreover, the values of the measured physical and chemical parameters (i.e. pH, salinity, conductivity, O2) and the concentrations of SO42-, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cu, Cd and Zn also indicates quality alterations caused by the mine waters flowing into some tributaries and the river. Besides diatoms, the study also referrs to the determination of bacterial communities existing in the same sampling area, that revealed the presence of the main groups of microorganisms involved in the biogeochemical cycles of C, N, Fe and S, and the absence of pathogenic bacteria such as total and faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci. The heterotrophic bacteria strains obtained which are highly adapted to the heavy metals occuring in the investigated habitats could be used as new microorganisms in the bioremediation processes of this water resource in future studies. Acknowledgments: The present contribution was financially supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, CCCDI - UEFISCDI, project 3-005 Tools for sustainable gold mining in EU (SUSMIN). Dorian Brahaita has benefited from the financial support provided by the project POSDRU/159/1.5/S/132400.

  7. Enhancing knowledge of rangeland ecological processes with benchmark ecological sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A benchmark ecological site is one that has the greatest potential to yield data and information about ecological functions, processes, and the effects of management or climate changes on a broad area or critical ecological zone. A benchmark ecological site represents other similar sites in a major ...

  8. Areas having soil characteristics that may indicate sensitivity to acidic deposition under alternative forest damage hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.; Olson, R.J.; Brandt, C.C.

    1986-09-01

    Recent evidence of forest decline and dieback has revived interest in mapping soil characteristics that may be useful in predicting areas where further forest damage could occur. Hypothesized causes of forest decline include direct effects of air pollutants on aboveground tree tissues and indirect effects on trees via belowground, soil-mediated processes. This report (1) reviews the potential for forest soil changes caused by acidic deposition and the role of these changes in damage to trees and (2) uses recently available soils data and computer display techniques to map the areal extent of soil characteristics that may indicate where such changes could occur. Hypotheses on causes of forest decline and dieback mediated by soil changes caused by acidic deposition generally fall into two categories: (1) reduction in available base cation plant nutrients below a level required to support the standing biomass and (2) increased availability of substances toxic to plants or other soil organisms. Chemical and physical characteristics of soils were selected as mapping criteria based on a review of experimental results and conceptual and mathematical models of biogeochemical processes occurring in forest soils. The data base and computer analysis and display techniques developed here can facilitate future regional-scale ecosystem modeling and assessment of resources available or at risk. 81 refs.

  9. High-surface-area architectures for improved charge transfer kinetics at the dark electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffeditz, William L; Katz, Michael J; Deria, Pravas; Martinson, Alex B F; Pellin, Michael J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2014-06-11

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) redox shuttles other than triiodide/iodide have exhibited significantly higher charge transfer resistances at the dark electrode. This often results in poor fill factor, a severe detriment to device performance. Rather than moving to dark electrodes of untested materials that may have higher catalytic activity for specific shuttles, the surface area of platinum dark electrodes could be increased, improving the catalytic activity by simply presenting more catalyst to the shuttle solution. A new copper-based redox shuttle that experiences extremely high charge-transfer resistance at conventional Pt dark electrodes yields cells having fill-factors of less than 0.3. By replacing the standard Pt dark electrode with an inverse opal Pt electrode fabricated via atomic layer deposition, the dark electrode surface area is boosted by ca. 50-fold. The resulting increase in interfacial electron transfer rate (decrease in charge-transfer resistance) nearly doubles the fill factor and therefore the overall energy conversion efficiency, illustrating the utility of this high-area electrode for DSCs. PMID:24828106

  10. Application of multiple ecological risk indices for the evaluation of heavy metal contamination in a coastal dredging area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y.-T. Kwon; C.-W. Lee

    1998-01-01

    Toxic compounds such as heavy metals exert chronic and lethal effects in animals and plants. There is a need to analyze the contamination level and the biological effect rather than to simply compare the heavy metal contents. Heavy metal contamination in sediments from Masan Bay were evaluated by multiple ecological risk indices before and after a sediment dredging process. The

  11. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J. (Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Ecology of Estuaries: Anthropogenic Effects represents the most definitive and comprehensive source of reference information available on the human impact on estuarine ecosystems. The book discusses both acute and insidious pollution problems plaguing these coastal ecotones. It also provides a detailed examination of the deleterious and pervasive effects of human activities on biotic communities and sensitive habitat areas in estuaries. Specific areas covered include organic loading, oil pollution, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, heavy metals, dredging and dredge-spoil disposal, radionuclides, as well as other contaminants and processes. The diverse components of these anthropogenic influences are assembled in an organized framework and presented in a clear and concise style that will facilitate their understanding.

  12. Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950.

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. White

    2004-01-01

    White, D.L. 2004. Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950. Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 324 pp. Abstract: The history of land use for an area is the history of the way in which humans have manipulated or altered the environment. Most land use activities can be viewed as disturbance to ecosystems. Within a given climatic regime, the interaction of the disturbance regime with vegetation, soil, and landform factors largely determines the distribution and composition of plant and associated animal communities. For these reasons, a greater understanding of the ecological impacts of both human and non-human related disturbance is needed to improve our ability to make natural resource management decisions. This document outlines the land use history of the Savannah River Site and surrounding areas from about 1780 thru 1950, when the site was converted to a government facility for the purposes of national defense.

  13. Functionalization of nanomaterials by non-thermal large area atmospheric pressure plasmas: application to flexible dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heesoo; Park, Jaeyoung; Yoo, Eun Sang; Han, Gill-Sang; Jung, Hyun Suk; Ko, Min Jae; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho

    2013-08-01

    A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of non-thermal radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the non-thermal APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti3+ ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of non-thermal APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing.A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of non-thermal radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the non-thermal APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti3+ ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of non-thermal APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01889j

  14. Sensitivity Analysis in Agent-Based Models of Socio-Ecological Systems: An Example in Agricultural Land Conservation for Lake Water Quality Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligmann-Zielinska, A.; Kramer, D. B.; Spence Cheruvelil, K.; Soranno, P.

    2012-12-01

    Socio-ecological systems are dynamic and nonlinear. To account for this complexity, we employ agent-based models (ABMs) to study macro-scale phenomena resulting from micro-scale interactions among system components. Because ABMs typically have many parameters, it is challenging to identify which parameters contribute to the emerging macro-scale patterns. In this paper, we address the following question: What is the extent of participation in agricultural land conservation programs given heterogeneous landscape, economic, social, and individual decision making criteria in complex lakesheds? To answer this question, we: [1] built an ABM for our model system; [2] simulated land use change resulting from agent decision making, [3] estimated the uncertainty of the model output, decomposed it and apportioned it to each of the parameters in the model. Our model system is a freshwater socio-ecological system - that of farmland and lake water quality within a region containing a large number of lakes and high proportions of agricultural lands. Our study focuses on examining how agricultural land conversion from active to fallow reduces freshwater nutrient loading and improves water quality. Consequently, our ABM is composed of farmer agents who make decisions related to participation in a government-sponsored Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) managed by the Farm Service Agency (FSA). We also include an FSA agent, who selects enrollment offers made by farmers and announces the signup results leading to land use change. The model is executed in a Monte Carlo simulation framework to generate a distribution of maps of fallow lands that are used for calculating nutrient loading to lakes. What follows is a variance-based sensitivity analysis of the results. We compute sensitivity indices for individual parameters and their combinations, allowing for identification of the most influential as well as the insignificant inputs. In the case study, we observe that farmland conservation is first and foremost driven by the FSA signup choices. Environmental criteria used in FSA offer selection play a secondary role in farmland-to-fallow-land conversion. Farmer decision making is mainly influenced by the willingness to reduce the potential annual rental payments. As the case study demonstrates, our approach leads to ABM simplification without the loss of outcome variability. It also shows how to represent the magnitude of ABM complexity and isolate the effects of the interconnected explanatory variables on the simulated emergent phenomena. More importantly, the results of our research indicate that some of the parameters exert influence on model outcomes only if analyzed in combination with other parameters. Without evaluating the interaction effects among inputs, we risk losing important functional relationships among ABM components and, consequently, we potentially reduce its explanatory power.

  15. February 2006 99CONTEMPORARY STATISTICS AND ECOLOGY Ecological Applications, 16(1), 2006, pp. 99116

    E-print Network

    Fuentes, Montserrat

    after input errors dropped. Key words: Bayesian inference; ecological numerical models; krigingFebruary 2006 99CONTEMPORARY STATISTICS AND ECOLOGY 99 Ecological Applications, 16(1), 2006, pp. 99­116 2006 by the Ecological Society of America SENSITIVITY OF ECOLOGICAL MODELS TO THEIR CLIMATE DRIVERS

  16. Ecoinformatics: supporting ecology as a data-intensive science

    E-print Network

    Michener, William H.; Jones, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    science are pronounced in areas where ecological andEcological and evolutionary informatics Ecoinformatics: supporting ecology as a data-intensive scienceScience Foundation awards #0918635, and the National Center for Ecological

  17. Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Stellenbosch University ecological network research (Mondi

    E-print Network

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    (Mondi Ecological Network Programme (MENP) Ecological networks (ENs) reduce the isolation of populations species to recolonize areas after localized extinctions. This reduction of isolation and fragmentation large mammals and birds), continuous corridors of good quality habitat in ENs are preferable

  18. USE OF ECOLOGICAL REGIONS IN AQUATIC ASSESSMENTS OF ECOLOGICAL CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological regions are areas of similar climate, landform, soil, potential natural vegetation, hydrology, or other ecologically relevant variables. The makeup of aquatic biological assemblages (e.g., fish, macroinvertebrates, algae, riparian birds, etc.) varies dramatically over ...

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of a Conceptual HBV Ra?nfall-Runoff MODEL Using Eumetsat Snow Covered Area Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyurek, Z.; Surer, S.; Parajka, J.

    2014-12-01

    HBV is a conceptual hydrological model extensively used in operational hydrological forecasting and water balance studies. In this study, we apply the HBV model on the upper Euphrates basin in Turkey, which has 10 624 km2 area. The Euphrates basin is largely fed from snow precipitation whereby nearly two-thirds occur in winter and may remain in the form of snow for half of the year. We analyze individual sensitivity of the parameters by calibrating the model using the Multi-Objective Shuffled Complex Evolution (MOSCEM) algorithm. The calibration is performed against snow cover area (SCA) in addition to runoff data for the water years 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013. The SCA product has been developed in the framework of the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) Project. The product is generated by using data from Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instrument making observations from a geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the previous study evaluation of the model was done with commonly used statistical performance metrics (Nash-Sutcliffe) for high and low flows, volume error and root mean square error (RMSE). In this study signature metrics, which are based on the flow duration curve (FDC) are used to see the performance of the model for low flows. In order to consider a fairly balanced evaluation between high and low flow phases we divided the flow duration curve into segments of high, medium and low flow phases, and additionally into very high and very low phases. Root mean square error (RMSE) is used to evaluate the performance in these segments. The sensitivity analysis of the parameters around the calibrated optimum points showed that parameters of the soil moisture and evapotranspiration (FC, beta and LPrat) have a strong effect in the total volume error of the model. The parameters from the response and transformation routines (LSUZ, K1, K0 and bmax) have a significant influence on the peak flows. It is observed that the parameters of snow routine (Tmelt, CSF and DDF) have strong effect in high flows and total volume. The parameters FC, K0, K1 And K2 are found to have effect on low flows from the signature metrics.

  20. Large-area synthesis of monolayer WS2 and its ambient-sensitive photo-detecting performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Changyong; Li, Chun; Yin, Yi; Liu, Yong

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of large-area monolayer WS2 films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and investigate their photoresponse properties by fabricating n-type field effect transistors (FETs) with Al as the ohmic contact. Our CVD-grown monolayer WS2 shows an electron mobility of 0.91 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an ON/OFF ratio of 106, indicating its comparable electronic properties to the mechanically exfoliated flake sample. In a vacuum, by applying a gate bias (60 V), the responsivity of the monolayer WS2 phototransistor can increase up to 18.8 mA W-1 and a decent sub-second level response time can be maintained. In contrast, in air, it shows a very fast response time of less than 4.5 ms, but at the cost of responsivity reduction to 0.2 ?A W-1. Such a distinctive ambient-sensitive photo-detecting performance can be well-explained by the pronounced effect of charge-acceptor-like O2/H2O molecule adsorption/desorption on the photocarrier transport. Our CVD-grown high quality monolayer WS2 may pave the way for developing industrial-scale optoelectronic devices for photo-detecting and chemical sensing applications.We demonstrate the synthesis of large-area monolayer WS2 films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and investigate their photoresponse properties by fabricating n-type field effect transistors (FETs) with Al as the ohmic contact. Our CVD-grown monolayer WS2 shows an electron mobility of 0.91 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an ON/OFF ratio of 106, indicating its comparable electronic properties to the mechanically exfoliated flake sample. In a vacuum, by applying a gate bias (60 V), the responsivity of the monolayer WS2 phototransistor can increase up to 18.8 mA W-1 and a decent sub-second level response time can be maintained. In contrast, in air, it shows a very fast response time of less than 4.5 ms, but at the cost of responsivity reduction to 0.2 ?A W-1. Such a distinctive ambient-sensitive photo-detecting performance can be well-explained by the pronounced effect of charge-acceptor-like O2/H2O molecule adsorption/desorption on the photocarrier transport. Our CVD-grown high quality monolayer WS2 may pave the way for developing industrial-scale optoelectronic devices for photo-detecting and chemical sensing applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01205h

  1. The effect of broadleaf woodland on aluminium speciation in stream water in an acid-sensitive area in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennifer L; Lynam, Philippa; Heal, Kate V; Palmer, Sheila M

    2012-11-15

    Acidification can result in the mobilisation and release of toxic inorganic monomeric aluminium (Al) species from soils into aquatic ecosystems. Although it is well-established that conifer trees enhance acidic atmospheric deposition and exacerbate soil and water acidification, the effect of broad-leaved woodland on soil and water acidification is less clear. This study investigated the effect of broadleaf woodland cover on the acid-base chemistry and Al species present in stream water, and processes controlling these in the acid-sensitive area around Loch Katrine, in the central Highlands, Scotland, UK, where broadleaf woodland expansion is occurring. A nested sampling approach was used to identify 22 stream sampling locations, in sub-catchments of 3.2-61 ha area and 0-45% broadleaf woodland cover. In addition, soils sampled from 68 locations were analysed to assess the influence of: (i) broadleaf woodland cover on soil characteristics and (ii) soil characteristics on stream water chemistry. Stream water pH was negatively correlated with sub-catchment % woodland cover, indicating that woodland cover is enhancing stream water acidification. Concentrations of all stream water Al species (monomeric total, organic and inorganic) were positively correlated with % woodland cover, although not significantly, but were below levels that are toxic to fish. Soil depth, O horizon depth and soil chemistry, particularly of the A horizon, appeared to be the dominant controls on stream water chemistry rather than woodland cover. There were significant differences in soil acid-base chemistry, with significantly lower O horizon pH and A horizon base saturation and higher A horizon exchangeable Al in the wooded catchments compared to the control. This is evidence that the mobile anion effect is already occurring in the study catchments and suggests that stream water acidification arising from broadleaf woodland expansion could occur, especially where tree density is high and acid deposition is predominantly in dry or occult forms. PMID:23085669

  2. Observed and simulated sensitivities of summertime urban surface air temperatures to anthropogenic heat in downtown areas of two Japanese Major Cities, Tokyo and Osaka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikegawa, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Ai; Ohashi, Yukitaka; Ihara, Tomohiko; Shigeta, Yoshinori

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the sensitivities of surface air temperatures to anthropogenic heat (AH) were investigated in downtowns of the two Japanese major cities, Tokyo and Osaka. First, meteorological measurements were made with the simultaneous monitoring of electricity demand in a contrastive couple of a downtown commercial area (C-area) and a residential area (R-area) within each city in summer 2007. From the measurements, the areal-mean surface air temperatures were obtained as and for each of the C-area and R-area, respectively. Using the actual electricity demand and the estimated motor fuels consumption, their areal total was evaluated as the energy-consumption-basis AH. The estimated C-areas' AH indicated greater values up to 220 W/m2 on weekdays and remarkable decrease about by half on weekends, whereas that in the R-areas showed less values of 10-20 W/m2 stably. Then, on calm and fine days were found to be systematically decreased from weekdays to weekends in both cities roughly indicating a proportional relationship with the reductions in the C-areas' AH on weekends. The result suggested a common afternoon sensitivity for both C-areas of around 1.0°C/100 W/m2, which indicated an intensity of the AH impact on surface air temperature there. Next, to simulate the observed AH impact, the authors' CM-BEM (a multilayer urban canopy model coupled with a building energy model) was newly implemented in the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WMF) model. This new system, WRF-CM-BEM, was applied to Tokyo and almost reasonably validated from the aspects of the reproducibility of urban surface air temperature and electricity demand in the observation areas. The simulations also suggested that WRF-CM-BEM underestimated the observed air temperature sensitivity to AH in the Tokyo C-area roughly by half but still in the same order of magnitude.

  3. Tectonic ecology.

    PubMed

    Muir Wood, R

    1987-09-01

    Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions affect ecosystems on a variety of scales. Trees are particularly susceptible to land movements associated with major fault activity and dendrological studies offer ways of dating past earthquakes, thereby assisting in the prediction of future events. Major eruptions and the largest earthquakes can cause damage that affects patterns of ecological diversity across wide areas, offering a possible measure of earthquake frequency from community composition. PMID:21227867

  4. High-Surface-Area Architectures for Improved Charge Transfer Kinetics at the Dark Electrode in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    ABSTRACT: Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) redox shuttles other than triiodide/iodide have exhibited: dark electrode, inverse opal, dye cell, fill factor INTRODUCTION Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs-Sensitized Solar Cells William L. Hoffeditz,, Michael J. Katz, Pravas Deria, Alex B.F. Martinson,,§ Michael J

  5. Transfer and assembly of large area TiO2 nanotube arrays onto conductive glass for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Siqian; Ding, Hao; Li, Quantong; Wang, Baoyuan; Wang, Xina; Wang, Hao

    2014-02-01

    Highly ordered titanium oxide nanotube arrays are synthesized by a two-step anodic oxidation of pure titanium foil at constant voltage. It is found that the length of nanotube arrays firstly increased rapidly with the anodization time, and then the growth rate gradually slowed down with further increasing the anodization time. The mechanism of anodization time-dependent tube length growth is discussed. Large area free-standing TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays are detached from the underlying Ti foil and transferred onto the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conductive glass substrates to serve as the photoanodes of the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The photoelectric performance of the DSSCs assembled by TNT/FTO films is strongly related to the tube length of titania and the surface treatment. For the photoanodes without any surface modification, the highest overall photovoltaic conversion efficiency (PCE) that can be achieved is 4.12% in the DSSC assembled with 33-?m-thick TNT arrays, while the overall PCE of DSSC based on the 33-?m-thick TNT arrays increases to 9.02% in response to the treatment with TiCl4.

  6. New beam line for time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering with large area position sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallen, A. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, Integrated Circuits and Devices, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden); Astroem, J.; Primetzhofer, D.; Legendre, S.; Possnert, G. [Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Department of Physics, Ion Physics, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    A new beam line for medium energy ion mass scattering (MEIS) has been designed and set up at the Angstroem laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. This MEIS system is based on a time-of-flight (ToF) concept and the electronics for beam chopping relies on a 4 MHz function generator. Repetition rates can be varied between 1 MHz and 63 kHz and pulse widths below 1 ns are typically obtained by including beam bunching. A 6-axis goniometer is used at the target station. Scattering angle and energy of backscattered ions are extracted from a time-resolved and position-sensitive detector. Examples of the performance are given for three kinds of probing ions, {sup 1}H{sup +}, {sup 4}He{sup +}, and {sup 11}B{sup +}. Depth resolution is in the nanometer range and 1 and 2 nm thick Pt layers can easily be resolved. Mass resolution between nearby isotopes can be obtained as illustrated by Ga isotopes in GaAs. Taking advantage of the large size detector, a direct imaging (blocking pattern) of crystal channels are shown for hexagonal, 4H-SiC. The ToF-MEIS system described in this paper is intended for use in semiconductor and thin film areas. For example, depth profiling in the sub nanometer range for device development of contacts and dielectric interfaces. In addition to applied projects, fundamental studies of stopping cross sections in this medium energy range will also be conducted.

  7. New beam line for time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering with large area position sensitive detector.

    PubMed

    Linnarsson, M K; Hallén, A; Åström, J; Primetzhofer, D; Legendre, S; Possnert, G

    2012-09-01

    A new beam line for medium energy ion mass scattering (MEIS) has been designed and set up at the A?ngstro?m laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. This MEIS system is based on a time-of-flight (ToF) concept and the electronics for beam chopping relies on a 4 MHz function generator. Repetition rates can be varied between 1 MHz and 63 kHz and pulse widths below 1 ns are typically obtained by including beam bunching. A 6-axis goniometer is used at the target station. Scattering angle and energy of backscattered ions are extracted from a time-resolved and position-sensitive detector. Examples of the performance are given for three kinds of probing ions, (1)H(+), (4)He(+), and (11)B(+). Depth resolution is in the nanometer range and 1 and 2 nm thick Pt layers can easily be resolved. Mass resolution between nearby isotopes can be obtained as illustrated by Ga isotopes in GaAs. Taking advantage of the large size detector, a direct imaging (blocking pattern) of crystal channels are shown for hexagonal, 4H-SiC. The ToF-MEIS system described in this paper is intended for use in semiconductor and thin film areas. For example, depth profiling in the sub nanometer range for device development of contacts and dielectric interfaces. In addition to applied projects, fundamental studies of stopping cross sections in this medium energy range will also be conducted. PMID:23020419

  8. New beam line for time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering with large area position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.; Åström, J.; Primetzhofer, D.; Legendre, S.; Possnert, G.

    2012-09-01

    A new beam line for medium energy ion mass scattering (MEIS) has been designed and set up at the Ångström laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. This MEIS system is based on a time-of-flight (ToF) concept and the electronics for beam chopping relies on a 4 MHz function generator. Repetition rates can be varied between 1 MHz and 63 kHz and pulse widths below 1 ns are typically obtained by including beam bunching. A 6-axis goniometer is used at the target station. Scattering angle and energy of backscattered ions are extracted from a time-resolved and position-sensitive detector. Examples of the performance are given for three kinds of probing ions, 1H+, 4He+, and 11B+. Depth resolution is in the nanometer range and 1 and 2 nm thick Pt layers can easily be resolved. Mass resolution between nearby isotopes can be obtained as illustrated by Ga isotopes in GaAs. Taking advantage of the large size detector, a direct imaging (blocking pattern) of crystal channels are shown for hexagonal, 4H-SiC. The ToF-MEIS system described in this paper is intended for use in semiconductor and thin film areas. For example, depth profiling in the sub nanometer range for device development of contacts and dielectric interfaces. In addition to applied projects, fundamental studies of stopping cross sections in this medium energy range will also be conducted.

  9. An ecological study of the relationship between socioeconomic isolation and mental health in the most deprived areas in Auckland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Amber L; Griffin, Edward; Davies, Anna; Kingham, Simon

    2013-01-01

    International debate posits that when groups feel deprived relative to reference groups in society, there may be psychosocial impacts. Deprivation varies geographically and deprived areas may be proximal to advantaged areas. In theory, this leads to chronic stress and poor mental health. This research explored whether socioeconomically isolated deprived areas experience increased levels of anxiety/mental disorder treatment, compared to other deprived areas. We developed a spatial isolation measure to characterise deprived areas surrounded by advantaged areas in Auckland, New Zealand. We found that isolated areas were characterised by fewer M?ori and Pacific people, high density and shorter travel time to General Practitioners. We found significantly higher rates of anxiety/mood disorder treatment in highly isolated versus non-isolated areas and a statistically significant relationship with anxiety/mood disorders for each isolation level, both before and after confounder adjustment. This evidence suggests that mental health within small areas may be sensitive to the neighbourhood interactions, through social comparison or discrimination which lead to psychosocial stress. PMID:23262453

  10. Sensitivity of Mediterranean woody seedlings to copper, nickel and zinc

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Fuentes; Karen B. Disante; Alejandro Valdecantos; Jordi Cortina; V. Ramón Vallejo

    2007-01-01

    The restoration of heavy metal contaminated areas requires information on the response of native plant species to these contaminants. The sensitivity of most Mediterranean woody species to heavy metals has not been established, and little is known about phytotoxic thresholds and environmental risks. We have evaluated the response of four plant species commonly used in ecological restoration, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia

  11. Beyond positivist ecology: toward an integrated ecological ethics.

    PubMed

    Norton, Bryan G

    2008-12-01

    A post-positivist understanding of ecological science and the call for an "ecological ethic" indicate the need for a radically new approach to evaluating environmental change. The positivist view of science cannot capture the essence of environmental sciences because the recent work of "reflexive" ecological modelers shows that this requires a reconceptualization of the way in which values and ecological models interact in scientific process. Reflexive modelers are ecological modelers who believe it is appropriate for ecologists to examine the motives for their choices in developing models; this self-reflexive approach opens the door to a new way of integrating values into public discourse and to a more comprehensive approach to evaluating ecological change. This reflexive building of ecological models is introduced through the transformative simile of Aldo Leopold, which shows that learning to "think like a mountain" involves a shift in both ecological modeling and in values and responsibility. An adequate, interdisciplinary approach to ecological valuation, requires a re-framing of the evaluation questions in entirely new ways, i.e., a review of the current status of interdisciplinary value theory with respect to ecological values reveals that neither of the widely accepted theories of environmental value-neither economic utilitarianism nor intrinsic value theory (environmental ethics)-provides a foundation for an ecologically sensitive evaluation process. Thus, a new, ecologically sensitive, and more comprehensive approach to evaluating ecological change would include an examination of the metaphors that motivate the models used to describe environmental change. PMID:18946726

  12. Ecological modeling of the spatial distribution of wild waterbirds to identify the main areas where avian influenza viruses are circulating in the Inner Niger Delta, Mali.

    PubMed

    Cappelle, Julien; Girard, Olivier; Fofana, Bouba; Gaidet, Nicolas; Gilbert, Marius

    2010-09-01

    Predicting areas of disease emergence when no epidemiological data is available is essential for the implementation of efficient surveillance programs. The Inner Niger Delta (IND) in Mali is a major African wetland where >1 million Palearctic and African waterbirds congregate. Waterbirds are the main reservoir of Avian Influenza Viruses (AIV). Our objective was to model their spatial distribution in order to predict where these viruses would be more likely to circulate. We developed a generalized linear model (GLM) and a boosted regression trees (BRT) model based on total aerial bird counts taken in winter over 6 years. We used remotely sensed environmental variables with a high temporal resolution (10 days) to predict the spatial distribution of four waterbird groups. The predicted waterbird abundances were weighted with an epidemiological indicator based on the prevalence of low pathogenic AIV reported in the literature. The BRT model had the best predictive power and allowed prediction of the high variability of waterbird distribution. Years with low flood levels showed areas with a higher risk of circulation and had better spatial distribution predictions. Each year, the model identified a few areas with a higher risk of AIV circulation. This model can be applied every 10 days to evaluate the risk of AIV emergence in wild waterbirds. By taking into account the IND's ecological variability, it allows better targeting of areas considered for surveillance. This could enhance the control of emerging diseases at a local and regional scale, especially when resources available for surveillance programs are scarce. PMID:20865438

  13. The Conservation and Habitat Ecology of Antillean Manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) in the Drowned Cayes Area of Belize, Central America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Spencer LaCommare

    2011-01-01

    The Drowned Cayes area of Belize, Central America is regionally important for the conservation of Antillean manatees in the Caribbean (Lefebvre et al. 2001; Quintana-Rizzo & Reynolds 2008). These islands are increasingly threatened by human activities such as tourism, development and population growth. The objective of this dissertation is to evaluate manatee habitat use and status in this area. The

  14. The ecology of primate retroviruses - an assessment of 12 years of retroviral studies in the Taï national park area, Côte d?Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Gogarten, Jan F; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Calvignac-Spencer, Sebastien; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Weiss, Sabrina; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Koné, Inza; Peeters, Martine; Wittig, Roman M; Boesch, Christophe; Hahn, Beatrice H; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2014-07-01

    The existence and genetic make-up of most primate retroviruses was revealed by studies of bushmeat and fecal samples from unhabituated primate communities. For these, detailed data on intra- and within-species contact rates are generally missing, which makes identification of factors influencing transmission a challenging task. Here we present an assessment of 12 years of research on primate retroviruses in the Taï National Park area, Côte d'Ivoire. We discuss insights gained into the prevalence, within- and cross-species transmission of primate retroviruses (including towards local human populations) and the importance of virus-host interactions in determining cross-species transmission risk. Finally we discuss how retroviruses ecology and evolution may change in a shifting environment and identify avenues for future research. PMID:25010280

  15. The ecology of primate retroviruses – An assessment of 12 years of retroviral studies in the Taï national park area, Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, Jan F.; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Calvignac-Spencer, Sebastien; Leendertz, Siv Aina J.; Weiss, Sabrina; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Koné, Inza; Peeters, Martine; Wittig, Roman M.; Boesch, Christophe; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Leendertz, Fabian H.

    2014-01-01

    The existence and genetic make-up of most primate retroviruses was revealed by studies of bushmeat and fecal samples from unhabituated primate communities. For these, detailed data on intra- and within-species contact rates are generally missing, which makes identification of factors influencing transmission a challenging task. Here we present an assessment of 12 years of research on primate retroviruses in the Taï National Park area, Côte d’Ivoire. We discuss insights gained into the prevalence, within- and cross-species transmission of primate retroviruses (including towards local human populations) and the importance of virus–host interactions in determining cross-species transmission risk. Finally we discuss how retroviruses ecology and evolution may change in a shifting environment and identify avenues for future research. PMID:25010280

  16. Balancing the Need to Develop Coastal Areas with the Desire for an Ecologically Functioning Coastal Environment: Is Net Ecosystem Improvement Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2005-03-01

    The global human population is growing exponentially, a majority lives and works near the coast, and coastal commerce and development are critical to the economies of many nations. Hence, coastal areas will continue to be a major focus of development and economic activity. People want and need the economics provided by coastal development but they also want and need the fisheries and social commodities supported by estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Because of these facts, we view the challenge of balancing coastal development with enhancing nearshore marine and estuarine ecosystems (i.e., net ecosystem improvement) as the top priority for coastal researchers in this century. Our restoration research in Pacific Northwest estuaries and participation in the design and mitigation of nearshore structures has largely dealt with these competing goals. To this end, we have applied conceptual models, comprehensive assessment methods, and principles of restoration ecology, conservation biology and adaptive management to incorporate science into decisions about use of estuarine systems. Case studies of Bainbridge Island and the Columbia River demonstrate the use of objective, defensible methods to prioritize estuarine areas for preservation, conservation and restoration. Case studies of Clinton, WA and Port Townsend, WA demonstrate the incorporation of an ecological perspective and technological solutions into design projects that affect the nearshore. Adaptive management has allowed coastal development and restoration uncertainties to be better evaluated, with the information used to improve management decisions. Although unproven on a large scale, we think that these kinds of methods can contribute to the net improvement of already degraded ecosystems. The challenges include applied science to understand the issues, education, incentives, empirical data (not rehashing of reviews), cumulative impact analysis, and an effective adaptive management program. Because the option of net ecosystem improvement is often more costly than other alternatives, commitment by the local or regional community to this approach is essential.

  17. Population ecology of the mallard: I. A Review of Previous Studies and the Distribution and Migration from Breeding Areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.R.; Henny, C.J.

    1972-01-01

    This report, the first of a series of reports on a comprehensive analysis of population data on the? millIard at? the continental level, provides background information including a review of the history of waterfowl management and a resume of previous studies of the mallard. The breeding range of the mallard was subdivided into 16 major and 44 minor reference areas. Each area is discussed in terms of habitat type, quantity of data available, importance to the continental mallard population, and previous waterfowl studies conducted within it.? Two of the 16 major areas have insufficient .bandings prior to the hunting season. These areas represent breeding sites for 18 to 30 percent of the continental mallard population and constitute a serious deficiency in the data base. Locations and femporal distributions of band recoveries from mallards banded in each breeding area are presented on maps and in tables. Possible biases in using band recovery distributions for harvest distributions are outllned; the major problem is variable band reporting rates. Limited evidence suggests that band reporting rates during the 1960's were substantially higher in Canada than in the United States. Detailed tabulations of the locations of recoveries from bandings in each minor reference area are presented in an appendix. Topics of future reports in the series inciude the analysis of harvest and wing survey statistics, breeding population data, relative importance of breeding ground reference areas to the various harvest areas, band recovery rates, the infiuence of harvest and harvest regulations on survival, and factors affecting production inclnding density-dependent relationships.

  18. Ecology of streams draining forested and non-forested catchments in an area of central Scotland subject to acid precipitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Harriman; B. R. S. Morrison

    1982-01-01

    A study of 12 streams draining forested and non-forested catchments was made in an area of central Scotland where slow-weathering bedrock was predominantly quartzite, schists and slates. Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis Carriere) was the most common tree species. Precipitation in the area had an annual mean pH in the range 4.3–4.5. Streams within the planted zone were always more acid

  19. Mathematical models have been increasingly used in more areas of biology, ecology, and medicine in the last 20-30 years, mostly because of an

    E-print Network

    Milner, Fabio Augusto

    ecology, epidemiology of infectious diseases, cancer, molecular and cell biology, and genetics. Some, epidemiology, immunology, medicine, etc. A better appreciation of mathematics is evidenced by the increased, Computational Biology in Clinical and Ecological Trials, Stochastic and Numerical Approaches, Spatial Diffusion

  20. Ecological Study on Hospitalizations for Cancer, Cardiovascular, and Respiratory Diseases in the Industrial Area of Etang-de-Berre in the South of France

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laurence; Stempfelet, Morgane; Declercq, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The Etang-de-Berre area is a large industrialized area in the South of France, exposing 300,000 inhabitants to the plumes of its industries. The possible associated health risks are of the highest concern to the population, who asked for studies investigating their health status. A geographical ecological study based on standardized hospitalizations ratios for cancer, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases was carried out over the 2004–2007 period. Exposure to air pollution was assessed using dispersion models coupled with a geographic information system to estimate an annual mean concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2) for each district. Results showed an excess risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction in women living in districts with medium or high SO2 exposure, respectively, 38% [CI 95% 4?:?83] and 54% [14?:?110] greater than women living in districts at the reference level exposure. A 26% [2?:?57] excess risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction was also observed in men living in districts with high SO2 levels. No excess risk of hospitalization for respiratory diseases or for cancer was observed, except for acute leukemia in men only. Results illustrate the impact of industrial air pollution on the cardiovascular system and call for an improvement of the air quality in the area. PMID:23864868

  1. Risk-sensitive habitat use by brook stickleback ( Culaea inconstans ) in areas associated with minnow alarm pheromone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian D. Wisenden; Douglas P. Chivers; R. Jan F. Smith

    1994-01-01

    Brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) share habitat and predators with cyprinid species, and they exploit the alarm pheromone of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to avoid areas of high predation risk. In this field experiment, we measured the retention and duration of area avoidance by brook stickleback from areas marked with alarm pheromone of fathead minnows. Area avoidance was greatest during the

  2. Application of ecological sanitation and permaculture techniques: food and water security for indigenous tribes and rural areas in Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriana F. Galbiati; Gustavo C. da Silva; Marcos V. G. Affonso; Paula L. Paulo

    This paper describes a demonstration project carried out in an indigenous tribe in Brazil. The project works with around 20 families and carries a demonstration site at the local school, including rainwater harvesting, greywater treatment and reuse, and application of urine as fertilizer. Around the area, 13 arborloo-type toilets and 2 banana tree circles receiving greywater were implemented. The project

  3. Ecological analysis in a polluted area of Algeciras Bay (southern Spain): External ‘versus’ internal outfalls and environmental implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. Estacio; E. M. García-adiego; D. A. Fa; J. C. García-Gómez; J. L. Daza; F. Hortas; J. L. Gómez-Ariza

    1997-01-01

    The effects of organic effluents both inside and outside the Saladillo Harbour (Algeciras, southern Spain) are investigated. Although the external outfall has a greater rate of discharge, the low levels of hydrodynamism inside the harbour create an area of relatively stagnant water, with markedly different environmental conditions. A clear gradient of decreasing pollution levels was observed from the interior to

  4. Studies on the ecology of Bulinus globosus, the intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium in the Ifakara area, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Marti, H P; Tanner, M; Degrémont, A A; Freyvogel, T A

    1985-06-01

    During a period of 2 years, the ecology of Bulinus globosus was studied in 8 habitats in two streams near Ifakara, SE-Tanzania. The relative Bulinus densities were followed monthly. Two different methods for estimating snail densities (man/time vs. palmleaf traps) gave comparable results. Bulinus densities were constantly low throughout the year in the stream, but they showed distinct seasonal fluctuations in adjacent pools, with a density-peak at the end of the small rainy season. B. globosus, identified by starch gel electrophoresis, was found to be the only intermediate host for urinary schistosomiasis in the investigated streams. A correlation of the Bulinus densities with several abiotic and biotic factors revealed that pH, temperature and conductivity had little effect on the Bulinus population, as they oscillated within the tolerated limits. No correlation of the distribution of B. globosus and other snail species was found. Rainfall patterns have a distinct influence on snail densities. They determine the duration of desiccation and affect the snails by fluctuations of the water level and by the fast increase of water velocity after heavy rains. B. globosus shows a clear predilection for the sedge Cyperus exaltatus as support for oviposition. It is also preferred as food and/or food-support. During the dry season, oviposition of B. globosus is concentrated in clearly defined sites ("breeding pockets"), which, due to the lowering of the water level, become isolated from the stream or retain only a small connection to it. These sites form important reservoirs of B. globosus, from where the snails are spread when the sites are flooded during the subsequent rainy season. The significance of these observations for control measures is discussed. PMID:2862780

  5. Risk-sensitive habitat use by brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) in areas associated with minnow alarm pheromone.

    PubMed

    Wisenden, B D; Chivers, D P; Smith, R J

    1994-11-01

    Brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) share habitat and predators with cyprinid species, and they exploit the alarm pheromone of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to avoid areas of high predation risk. In this field experiment, we measured the retention and duration of area avoidance by brook stickleback from areas marked with alarm pheromone of fathead minnows. Area avoidance was greatest during the first 2 hr after the source of the alarm pheromone was removed (P<0.05), but after 4 hr, area use was not significantly different from premarking levels. This study shows that brook stickleback: (1) use the alarm pheromone of fathead minnows to avoid high risk areas, (2) continue to avoid locations associated with predation risk after the source of the pheromone has gone, and (3) avoid risky areas temporarily, and resume use of risky areas after 2-4 hr. This behavioral response by stickleback to minnow alarm pheromone could serve to minimize risk of predation. PMID:24241929

  6. Ecological and geographical analysis of the distribution of the mountain tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) in Ecuador: importance of protected areas in future scenarios of global warming.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Andrade, H Mauricio; Prieto-Torres, David A; Gómez-Lora, Ignacio; Lizcano, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    In Ecuador, Tapirus pinchaque is considered to be critically endangered. Although the species has been registered in several localities, its geographic distribution remains unclear, and the effects of climate change and current land uses on this species are largely unknown. We modeled the ecological niche of T. pinchaque using MaxEnt, in order to assess its potential adaptation to present and future climate change scenarios. We evaluated the effects of habitat loss due by current land use, the ecosystem availability and importance of Ecuadorian System of Protected Areas into the models. The model of environmental suitability estimated an extent of occurrence for species of 21,729 km2 in all of Ecuador, mainly occurring along the corridor of the eastern Ecuadorian Andes. A total of 10 Andean ecosystems encompassed ~98% of the area defined by the model, with herbaceous paramo, northeastern Andean montane evergreen forest and northeastern Andes upper montane evergreen forest being the most representative. When considering the effect of habitat loss, a significant reduction in model area (~17%) occurred, and the effect of climate change represented a net reduction up to 37.86%. However, the synergistic effect of both climate change and habitat loss, given current land use practices, could represent a greater risk in the short-term, leading to a net reduction of 19.90 to 44.65% in T. pinchaque's potential distribution. Even under such a scenarios, several Protected Areas harbor a portion (~36 to 48%) of the potential distribution defined by the models. However, the central and southern populations are highly threatened by habitat loss and climate change. Based on these results and due to the restricted home range of T. pinchaque, its preference for upland forests and paramos, and its small estimated population size in the Andes, we suggest to maintaining its current status as Critically Endangered in Ecuador. PMID:25798851

  7. Ecological and Geographical Analysis of the Distribution of the Mountain Tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) in Ecuador: Importance of Protected Areas in Future Scenarios of Global Warming

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Andrade, H. Mauricio; Prieto-Torres, David A.; Gómez-Lora, Ignacio; Lizcano, Diego J.

    2015-01-01

    In Ecuador, Tapirus pinchaque is considered to be critically endangered. Although the species has been registered in several localities, its geographic distribution remains unclear, and the effects of climate change and current land uses on this species are largely unknown. We modeled the ecological niche of T. pinchaque using MaxEnt, in order to assess its potential adaptation to present and future climate change scenarios. We evaluated the effects of habitat loss due by current land use, the ecosystem availability and importance of Ecuadorian System of Protected Areas into the models. The model of environmental suitability estimated an extent of occurrence for species of 21,729 km2 in all of Ecuador, mainly occurring along the corridor of the eastern Ecuadorian Andes. A total of 10 Andean ecosystems encompassed ~98% of the area defined by the model, with herbaceous paramo, northeastern Andean montane evergreen forest and northeastern Andes upper montane evergreen forest being the most representative. When considering the effect of habitat loss, a significant reduction in model area (~17%) occurred, and the effect of climate change represented a net reduction up to 37.86%. However, the synergistic effect of both climate change and habitat loss, given current land use practices, could represent a greater risk in the short-term, leading to a net reduction of 19.90 to 44.65% in T. pinchaque’s potential distribution. Even under such a scenarios, several Protected Areas harbor a portion (~36 to 48%) of the potential distribution defined by the models. However, the central and southern populations are highly threatened by habitat loss and climate change. Based on these results and due to the restricted home range of T. pinchaque, its preference for upland forests and paramos, and its small estimated population size in the Andes, we suggest to maintaining its current status as Critically Endangered in Ecuador. PMID:25798851

  8. Application of artificial neural network to predict clay sensitivity in a high landslide prone area using CPTu data- A case study in Southwest of Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahri, Abbas; Mousavinaseri, Mahsasadat; Naderi, Shima; Espersson, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) in many areas of engineering, in particular to geotechnical engineering problems such as site characterization has demonstrated some degree of success. The present paper aims to evaluate the feasibility of several various types of ANN models to predict the clay sensitivity of soft clays form piezocone penetration test data (CPTu). To get the aim, a research database of CPTu data of 70 test points around the Göta River near the Lilli Edet in the southwest of Sweden which is a high prone land slide area were collected and considered as input for ANNs. For training algorithms the quick propagation, conjugate gradient descent, quasi-Newton, limited memory quasi-Newton and Levenberg-Marquardt were developed tested and trained using the CPTu data to provide a comparison between the results of field investigation and ANN models to estimate the clay sensitivity. The reason of using the clay sensitivity parameter in this study is due to its relation to landslides in Sweden.A special high sensitive clay namely quick clay is considered as the main responsible for experienced landslides in Sweden which has high sensitivity and prone to slide. The training and testing program was started with 3-2-1 ANN architecture structure. By testing and trying several various architecture structures and changing the hidden layer in order to have a higher output resolution the 3-4-4-3-1 architecture structure for ANN in this study was confirmed. The tested algorithm showed that increasing the hidden layers up to 4 layers in ANN can improve the results and the 3-4-4-3-1 architecture structure ANNs for prediction of clay sensitivity represent reliable and reasonable response. The obtained results showed that the conjugate gradient descent algorithm with R2=0.897 has the best performance among the tested algorithms. Keywords: clay sensitivity, landslide, Artificial Neural Network

  9. [Ecological adaptability of leaf epidermis of erosion-resistant plants in hilly-gully area of Loess Plateau, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Miao, Fang; Du, Hua-Dong; Qin, Cui-Ping; Jiao, Ju-Ying

    2012-10-01

    By the temporary slide method of leaf epidermis, an observation was made on the morphological characteristics of the leaf epidermis of six erosion-resistant plant species in different soil erosion environments (gully, inter-gully, and inter-gully artificial Robinia pseudoacacia forest land) in hilly-gully area of Loess Plateau. Compared with those in the gully, the stomata aperture, stomata density, stomata index, stomata apparatus length/width plasticity, stomata apparatus area plasticity, epidermal hair density, and epidermal cell density of the leaf upper and lower epidermis of the plants in the inter-gully were 93.8% and 90.4%, 66.8% and 76.6%, 17.9% and 9.8%, 36.4% and 47.1%, 42.3% and 43.9%, 199.4% and 98.2%, and 46.5% and 50.1% higher, respectively; while in the inter-gully artificial R. pseudoacacia forest land, the same morphological indices of the leaf upper and lower epidermis of the plants were 66.7% and 106.7%, 20.5% and 45.8%, 11.9% and 11.9%, 37.9% and 41.3%, 19.8% and 21.2%, 113.1% and 52.2%, and 10.8% and 28.1% higher than those in the gully, respectively. The epidermal hair length and epidermal cell area of the leaf upper and lower epidermis of the plants in the inter-gully were 58.8% and 29.7%, and 40.3% and 37.0% lower than those in the gully, and the same morphological indices of the leaf upper and lower epidermis of the plants in the intergully artificial R. pseudoacacia forest land were respectively 25.0% and 23.6%, and 22.2% and 19.2% lower than those in the gully, respectively. The results suggested that the erosion-resistant plants in the study area were able to adapt to various soil erosion environments by increasing their leaf stomata aperture, stomata density, stomata index, stomata apparatus length/width plasticity, stomata apparatus area plasticity, epidermal hair density, and epidermal cell density, and by reducing their epidermal hair length and epidermal cell area. PMID:23359923

  10. How landscape scale changes affect ecological processes in conservation areas: external factors influence land use by zebra (Equus burchelli) in the Okavango Delta.

    PubMed

    Bartlam-Brooks, Hattie L A; Bonyongo, Mpaphi C; Harris, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Most large-bodied wildlife populations in sub-Saharan Africa only survive in conservation areas, but are continuing to decline because external changes influence ecological processes within reserves, leading to a lack of functionality. However, failure to understand how landscape scale changes influence ecological processes limits our ability to manage protected areas. We used GPS movement data to calculate dry season home ranges for 14 zebra mares in the Okavango Delta and investigated the effects of a range of landscape characteristics (number of habitat patches, mean patch shape, mean index of juxtaposition, and interspersion) on home range size. Resource utilization functions (RUF) were calculated to investigate how specific landscape characteristics affected space use. Space use by all zebra was clustered. In the wetter (Central) parts of the Delta home range size was negatively correlated with the density of habitat patches, more complex patch shapes, low juxtaposition of habitats and an increased availability of floodplain and grassland habitats. In the drier (Peripheral) parts of the Delta, higher use by zebra was also associated with a greater availability of floodplain and grassland habitats, but a lower density of patches and simpler patch shapes. The most important landscape characteristic was not consistent between zebra within the same area of the Delta, suggesting that no single foraging strategy is substantially superior to others, and so animals using different foraging strategies may all thrive. The distribution and complexity of habitat patches are crucial in determining space use by zebra. The extent and duration of seasonal flooding is the principal process affecting habitat patch characteristics in the Okavango Delta, particularly the availability of floodplains, which are the habitat at greatest risk from climate change and anthropogenic disturbance to the Okavango's catchment basin. Understanding how the factors that determine habitat complexity may change in the future is critical to the conservation of large mammal populations. Our study shows the importance of maintaining flood levels in the Okavango Delta and how the loss of seasonal floodplains will be compounded by changes in habitat configuration, forcing zebra to change their relative space use and enlarge home ranges, leading to increased competition for key resources and population declines. PMID:24101973

  11. Ecology and technological capability of lactic acid bacteria isolated during Grillo grape vinification in the Marsala production area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Francesca; Luca Settanni; Ciro Sannino; Maria Aponte; Giancarlo Moschetti

    2011-01-01

    Grapes of the “Grillo” variety, used to produce Marsala wine, were harvested from five vineyards with different climatic and\\u000a agronomic parameters, in order to obtain a first mapping of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inhabiting the production area. Marsala\\u000a base wine production was followed at a large-scale, and also two experimental vinifications, with different lysozyme and SO2 concentrations and in combination,

  12. GIS Mapping of Areas of Critical Ecological Concern on the U.S.Mexican Border: Selected Binational Watersheds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Brown; Robert Czerniak; Christopher Buscaglia

    Contemporary urbanization and economic development patterns in the U.S.-Mexican borderlands are generating increasing pressures on the viability of important ecosystems. Binational watersheds in the U.S.-Mexican border region are especially important and interesting areas of concern. In this research, the authors employ the use of geo- graphic information systems (GIS) to map the physical geography of five target basins in the

  13. Improving ecological risk assessment in the Mediterranean area: selection of reference soils and evaluating the influence of soil properties on avoidance and reproduction of two oligochaete species.

    PubMed

    Chelinho, Sónia; Domene, Xavier; Campana, Paolo; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Scheffczyk, Adam; Römbke, Jörg; Andrés, Pilar; Sousa, José Paulo

    2011-05-01

    A current challenge in soil ecotoxicology is the use of natural soils as test substrates to increase ecological relevance of data. Despite the existence of six natural reference soils (the Euro-soils), some parallel projects showed that these soils do not accurately represent the diversity of European soils. Particularly, Mediterranean soils are not properly represented. To fill this gap, 12 natural soils from the Mediterranean regions of Alentejo, Portugal; Cataluña, Spain; and Liguria, Italy, were selected and used in reproduction and avoidance tests to evaluate the soil habitat function for earthworms (Eisenia andrei) and enchytraeids (Enchytraeus crypticus). Predictive models on the influence of soil properties on the responses of these organisms were developed using generalized linear models. Results indicate that the selected soils can impact reproduction and avoidance behavior of both Oligochaete species. Reproduction of enchytraeids was affected by different soil properties, but the test validity criteria were fulfilled. The avoidance response of enchytraeids was highly variable, but significant effects of texture and pH were found. Earthworms were more sensitive to soil properties. They did not reproduce successfully in three of the 10 soils, and a positive influence of moisture, fine sand, pH, and organic matter and a negative influence of clay were found. Moreover, they strongly avoided soils with extreme textures. Despite these limitations, most of the selected soils are suitable substrates for ecotoxicological evaluations. PMID:21305581

  14. Hydrothermal growth of high surface area anatase TiO2 nanoparticles for dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthi, G.; Navaneethan, M.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Hayakawa, Y.; Ponnusamy, S.

    2012-06-01

    High surface area of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles have been prepared by hydrothermal method. The enhanced surface area was achieved by controlling optimized experimental procedure. The properties of as synthesized TiO2 nano particle was compared with Degussa P25. The structures of TiO2 nano particles have been characterized in detail by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Specific surface area analysis(BET), Scanning electron microscope, UV-vis spectroscopy.

  15. Evaluating Social and Ecological Vulnerability of Coral Reef Fisheries to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Cinner, Joshua E.; Huchery, Cindy; Darling, Emily S.; Humphries, Austin T.; Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Hicks, Christina C.; Marshall, Nadine; McClanahan, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing need to evaluate the links between the social and ecological dimensions of human vulnerability to climate change. We use an empirical case study of 12 coastal communities and associated coral reefs in Kenya to assess and compare five key ecological and social components of the vulnerability of coastal social-ecological systems to temperature induced coral mortality [specifically: 1) environmental exposure; 2) ecological sensitivity; 3) ecological recovery potential; 4) social sensitivity; and 5) social adaptive capacity]. We examined whether ecological components of vulnerability varied between government operated no-take marine reserves, community-based reserves, and openly fished areas. Overall, fished sites were marginally more vulnerable than community-based and government marine reserves. Social sensitivity was indicated by the occupational composition of each community, including the importance of fishing relative to other occupations, as well as the susceptibility of different fishing gears to the effects of coral bleaching on target fish species. Key components of social adaptive capacity varied considerably between the communities. Together, these results show that different communities have relative strengths and weaknesses in terms of social-ecological vulnerability to climate change. PMID:24040228

  16. Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change.

    PubMed

    Cinner, Joshua E; Huchery, Cindy; Darling, Emily S; Humphries, Austin T; Graham, Nicholas A J; Hicks, Christina C; Marshall, Nadine; McClanahan, Tim R

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing need to evaluate the links between the social and ecological dimensions of human vulnerability to climate change. We use an empirical case study of 12 coastal communities and associated coral reefs in Kenya to assess and compare five key ecological and social components of the vulnerability of coastal social-ecological systems to temperature induced coral mortality [specifically: 1) environmental exposure; 2) ecological sensitivity; 3) ecological recovery potential; 4) social sensitivity; and 5) social adaptive capacity]. We examined whether ecological components of vulnerability varied between government operated no-take marine reserves, community-based reserves, and openly fished areas. Overall, fished sites were marginally more vulnerable than community-based and government marine reserves. Social sensitivity was indicated by the occupational composition of each community, including the importance of fishing relative to other occupations, as well as the susceptibility of different fishing gears to the effects of coral bleaching on target fish species. Key components of social adaptive capacity varied considerably between the communities. Together, these results show that different communities have relative strengths and weaknesses in terms of social-ecological vulnerability to climate change. PMID:24040228

  17. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55?mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  18. Demography and ecology of mangrove diamondback terrapins in a wilderness area of Everglades National Park, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, K.M.; McIvor, C.C.

    2008-01-01

    Diamondback Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are distributed in brackish water habitats along the U.S. east coast from Massachusetts to Texas, but many populations may be in decline. Whereas ample morphological, behavioral, and reproductive information has been collected for terrapins living in temperate salt marsh habitats, comparatively little is known about mangrove terrapins. To understand population structure of mangrove M. terrapin living in a wilderness area, we conducted a capture-recapture study in the remote, protected Big Sable Creek complex of Everglades National Park, Florida. The goals of the study were to collect baseline demographic data and to compare population structure and growth rates of mangrove terrapins with what is known for more well studied salt marsh terrapins in locations that experience human-imposed threats. We marked 300 terrapins; the sex ratio was 1 female:1.2 males. Considerable sexual size dimorphism was apparent, with reproductively mature females three times larger (by mass) than mature males. Eighty percent of females and 94% of males were classified as mature, based on straight plastron length (SPL). For a subset of terrapins not yet at maximum size (n = 39), we measured growth as a change in straight carapace length over time of 0.3-26.4 mm/yr for females (n = 26) and 0.9-14.5 mm/yr for males (n = 13). Our study presents the first demographic data on mangrove M. terrapin in the coastal Everglades. ?? 2008 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  19. [Ecology of Culex pipiens fatigans larvae in an area of high endemicity of Bancroftian filariasis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Subra, R; Hebrard, G

    1975-03-01

    Culex pipiens fatigans in the main vector of bancroftian filariasis in the Mayotte island (Comores) where it imposes an important health problem. The breeding-sites of C. p. fatigans are either man-made (latrines, cesspools, various containers), or natural (polluted water of estuaries of some rivers). The man-made breeding-sites are not similarly distributed in the different localities of the island. Their distribution varies according to the customs of the inhabitants, size and site of the community. They are mainly represented by latrines, where Anjouan ethnic group is predominent; by cesspools in localities inhabited by Sakalava (a Malagasian ethnic group) and by other latrines and cesspools in mahoraises (inhabitants of Mayotte) and cosmopolitan localities. In rural areas, the percentage of habitations with cesspools usually increases with the size of the villages. The various breeding-sites are primarily productive when they are built on a ground with poor permeability. The importance of the present information is further discussed with relation to the population dynamics of C.p. fatigans and to the measures which may be useful for a control program of this mosquito. PMID:1096384

  20. REVIEW PAPER General principles in the community ecology

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    REVIEW PAPER General principles in the community ecology of ectomycorrhizal fungi Roger T. Koide is essential in many areas of practical significance including conservation, habitat restoration, prevention to these goals, however, community ecology, in general, and ectomycorrhizal fungal community ecology

  1. Applying the Fuzzy Delphi Method for determining socio-ecological factors that influence adherence to mammography screening in rural areas of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lezama, Ana Paola; Cavazos-Arroyo, Judith; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio

    2014-02-01

    In Mexico, regular participation in mammography screening is low, despite higher survival rates. The objective of our research is to highlight healthcare procedures to be optimized and target areas to encourage investment and to raise awareness about the benefits of early diagnosis. Those socio-ecological factors (community, interpersonal and individual) were collected through a review of literature and based on the spatial interaction model of mammography use developed by Mobley et al. The opinion of diverse groups of experts on the importance of those factors was collected by survey. The Fuzzy Delphi Method helped to solve the inherent uncertainty of the survey process. Our findings suggest that population health behaviors, proximity-density to facilities/ physicians and predisposing factors are needed to increase the screening rate. Variations in expert group size could affect the accuracy of the conclusions. However, the application of the enhanced aggregation method provided a group consensus that is less susceptible to misinterpretation and that weighs the opinion of each expert according to their clinical experience in mammography research. PMID:24627054

  2. The ecology of Bulinus truncatus and Biomphalaria alexandrina and its implications for the control of bilharziasis in the Egypt-49 project area

    PubMed Central

    Dazo, B. C.; Hairston, Nelson G.; Dawood, I. K.

    1966-01-01

    The respective vectors of the two forms of bilharziasis in Egypt do not have the same ecological distribution. Bulinus truncatus is most abundant in large canals, and decreases in density as the water approaches and flows into drains. Biomphalaria alexandrina is most abundant in drains, and decreases in density upstream from these habitats. Both species are most abundant in the presence of aquatic vegetation, but they differ in their respective associations with the water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. Biomph. alexandrina reaches maximum abundance in the presence of this plant, but Bul. truncatus is as uncommon in the absence of plants as in the presence of E. crassipes. Calculation of life-table parameters from field data shows that, under optimum field conditions, both species can double their populations in 14-16 days. The reproductive rates of both species are greatest in March and the death rates in midsummer. The observed peak densities in May and June give a false impression of optima because of undercollection of young snails, which are most abundant in March and April. Control operations should take advantage of the findings on population parameters. A single area-wide treatment with molluscicide in April is recommended. During the remainder of the year, search for isolated foci of snail breeding and individual treatment of these will effect large savings of chemical and will be effective in controlling the transmission of the parasites. PMID:5297630

  3. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Light scattering of nanocrystalline TiO2 film used in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bi-Tao Xiong; Bao-Xue Zhou; Jing Bai; Qing Zheng; Yan-Biao Liu; Wei-Min Cai; Jun Cai

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the light scattering and adsorption of nanocrystalline TiO2 porous films used in dye-sensitized solar cells composed of anatase and\\/or rutile particles by using an optical four-flux radiative transfer model. These light properties are difficult to measure directly on the functioning solar cells and they can not be calculated easily from the first-principle computational or quantitative theoretical evaluations.

  4. Area under the Maximum Expiratory Flow-Volume Curve – A Sensitive Parameter in the Evaluation of Airway Patency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alois Zapletal; Marie Hladíková; Jana Chalupová; Tamara Svobodová; Véra Vávrová

    2008-01-01

    Background: The most frequently used parameters for assessing bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation are forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and peak expiratory flow (PEF). Objectives: To assess the sensitivity of other parameters after induced bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation. Methods: From maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves, forced vital capacity, FEV1, PEF, maximum expiratory flows (MEF) at 25, 50 and 75% of vital

  5. Polymerase chain reaction for the amplification of the 121-bp repetitive sequence of Schistosoma mansoni: a highly sensitive potential diagnostic tool for areas of low endemicity.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, E; Pérez, F; Bello, I; Bolívar, A; Lares, M; Osorio, A; León, L; Amarista, M; Incani, R N

    2014-08-20

    Schistosomiasis is a disease caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, whose diagnosis has limitations, such as the low sensitivity and specificity of parasitological and immunological methods, respectively. In the present study an alternative molecular technique requiring previous standardization was carried out using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the amplification of a 121-bp highly repetitive sequence for Schistosoma mansoni. DNA was extracted from eggs of S. mansoni by salting out. Different conditions were standardized for the PCR technique, including the concentration of reagents and the DNA template, annealing temperature and number of cycles, followed by the determination of the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the technique. Furthermore, the standardized PCR technique was employed in DNA extracted, using Chelex®100, from samples of sera of patients with an immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. The optimal conditions for the PCR were 2.5 mm MgCl2, 150 mm deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), 0.4 ?m primers, 0.75 U DNA polymerase, using 35 cycles and an annealing temperature of 63°C. The analytical sensitivity of the PCR was 10 attograms of DNA and the specificity was 100%. The DNA sequence was successfully detected in the sera of two patients, demonstrating schistosomiasis transmission, although low, in the community studied. The standardized PCR technique, using smaller amounts of reagents than in the original protocol, is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of DNA from S. mansoni and could be an important tool for diagnosis in areas of low endemicity. PMID:25141275

  6. [Uncertainty analysis of ecological risk assessment caused by heavy-metals deposition from MSWI emission].

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhi-Heng; Sun, Jia-Ren; Wu, Dui; Fan, Shao-Jia; Ren, Ming-Zhong; Lü, Jia-Yang

    2014-06-01

    The CALPUFF model was applied to simulate the ground-level atmospheric concentrations of Pb and Cd from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants, and the soil concentration model was used to estimate soil concentration increments after atmospheric deposition based on Monte Carlo simulation, then ecological risk assessment was conducted by the potential ecological risk index method. The results showed that the largest atmospheric concentrations of Pb and Cd were 5.59 x 109-3) microg x m(-3) and 5.57 x 10(-4) microg x m(-3), respectively, while the maxima of soil concentration incremental medium of Pb and Cd were 2.26 mg x kg(-1) and 0.21 mg x kg(-1), respectively; High risk areas were located next to the incinerators, Cd contributed the most to the ecological risk, and Pb was basically free of pollution risk; Higher ecological hazard level was predicted at the most polluted point in urban areas with a 55.30% probability, while in rural areas, the most polluted point was assessed to moderate ecological hazard level with a 72.92% probability. In addition, sensitivity analysis of calculation parameters in the soil concentration model was conducted, which showed the simulated results of urban and rural area were most sensitive to soil mix depth and dry deposition rate, respectively. PMID:25158505

  7. Differential Sensitivity to the Wake-Promoting Actions of Norepinephrine Within the Medial Preoptic Area and the Substantia Innominata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig W. Berridge; John ONeill

    2001-01-01

    Mapping studies were conducted to delineate the site(s) of action for the arousal-enhancing actions of norepinephrine (NE) within the basal forebrain region encompassing the medial preoptic area (MPOA) and the substantia innominata (SI). Varying doses of NE, the ?-agonist, isoproterenol, or the ?1-agonist, phenylephrine, were infused into the MPOA or SI in the resting rat. Infusions of NE (4 nmol,

  8. ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An international symposium on ecological indicators was developed to explore both the potential of ecological indicators and the issues surrounding their development and implementation. his symposium presented state-of-the-science information on the identification, application re...

  9. Ecological Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Bruce H.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a summary of the research literature on students' ecological conceptions and the implications of misconceptions. Topics include food webs, ecological adaptation, carrying capacity, ecosystem, and niche. (Contains 35 references.) (MKR)

  10. Scanning-free grazing emission x-ray fluorescence by means of an angular dispersive arrangement with a two-dimensional position-sensitive area detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, Y.; Szlachetko, J.; Sà, J.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the application of a two-dimensional position-sensitive area detector towards grazing emission x-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) spectroscopy. GEXRF allows for surface-sensitive studies with nanometer-scale accuracy in the depth direction by measuring the intensity variation of an x-ray fluorescence line with the grazing emission angle. The presented experimental setup is based on a fixed sample-detector arrangement and does not require any moving components. We show that the dispersion of the grazing emission angle along a position-sensitive detector allows to acquire with an excellent angular resolution a full GEXRF profile in a single measurement. Moreover, the use of a two-dimensional detector allows to perform experiments with an increased solid angle of detection per emission angle. This results in combination with the nonsequential and simultaneous acquisition of the GEXRF profiles of different emission lines in considerably reduced acquisition times. The realization, the demands, and the main characteristics of the scanning-free GEXRF setup will be presented. A few experimental examples will serve to illustrate the analytical possibilities offered by the presented setup.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (regional atmospheric modeling system)-CMAQ (community multi-scale air quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008. Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind, temperature and ozone, but NOx concentration is overestimated. Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics, high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 microg/m3 at Aoyuncun site, respectively. The analysis of sensitive test, with and without emission controls, shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning. The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate. Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August, horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer. On 24 July, as the wind velocity was smaller, the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious. PMID:22783614

  12. Patterns of Enquiry in Ecology: 1: Principles of Biological Enquiry and Problems of Ecological Enquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, F. Michael

    This is the first paper in a two-part series describing the patterns of inquiry used in ecology. Ecological knowledge and research are analyzed in terms of two sets of concepts: ecological problem areas, and principles of biological inquiry. Problem areas identified are classification and taxonomy, energetics, nutrition and metabolism, genecology,…

  13. Ecological Footprint

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-01-01

    Students explore their own Ecological Footprint in the context of how many Earths it would take if everyone used the same amount of resources they did. They compare this to the Ecological Footprint of individuals in other parts of the world and to the Ecological footprint of a family member when they were the student's age.

  14. Ecology, 82(2), 2001, pp. 374388 2001 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-print Network

    Nathan, Ran

    374 Ecology, 82(2), 2001, pp. 374­388 2001 by the Ecological Society of America FIELD VALIDATION AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF A MECHANISTIC MODEL FOR TREE SEED DISPERSAL BY WIND RAN NATHAN,1,2 URIEL N. SAFRIEL,1 AND IMANUEL NOY-MEIR1,3 1 Department of Evolution, Systematics and Ecology, The Silberman Institute of Life

  15. Sensitivity analyses for the DTMs derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in gully erosion mapping: Nallihan badland area (Ankara, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdan, Ugur; Gorum, Tolga; Comert, Resul; Nefeslioglu, Hakan

    2015-04-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the spatial resolutions for the Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in gully erosion mapping. For the purpose, Nallihan badland area (Ankara, Turkey) was selected to be the experimental site. The investigations were carried out in 3 stages; (i) production of the DTMs having 3 cm and 9 cm spatial resolutions by using the orthophoto imagery acquired from the UAV at 97.5 m and 292.4 m altitudes, respectively, (ii) Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) of the experimental site and production of the DTMs derived from the TLS data resampled at 3 cm and 9 cm spatial resolutions, and (iii) spatial and profile comparisons of the derived data. The average altitude differences were obtained on the intervals (-0.1, 0.1) m and (-0.2, 0.2) m for the comparisons between TLS-3cm and UAV-3cm, and TLS-9cm and UAV-9cm data, respectively. Additionally, considering the profile comparisons, it is revealed that depending on the decreasing of spatial resolution, the erosion rates calculated from the DTMs increase artificially.

  16. Identification of limiting case between DBA and SBDBA (CL break area sensitivity): A new model for the boron injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F. [San Piero A Grado Nuclear Research Group GRNSPG, Univ. of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291-56122, San Piero a Grado - Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, O. [Nucleo-electrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and (e.g., oblique Control Rods, Positive Void coefficient) required a developed and validated complex three dimensional (3D) neutron kinetics (NK) coupled thermal hydraulic (TH) model. Reactor shut-down is obtained by oblique CRs and, during accidental conditions, by an emergency shut-down system (JDJ) injecting a highly concentrated boron solution (boron clouds) in the moderator tank, the boron clouds reconstruction is obtained using a CFD (CFX) code calculation. A complete LBLOCA calculation implies the application of the RELAP5-3D{sup C} system code. Within the framework of the third Agreement 'NA-SA - Univ. of Pisa' a new RELAP5-3D control system for the boron injection system was developed and implemented in the validated coupled RELAP5-3D/NESTLE model of the Atucha 2 NPP. The aim of this activity is to find out the limiting case (maximum break area size) for the Peak Cladding Temperature for LOCAs under fixed boundary conditions. (authors)

  17. Anemone-like nanostructures for non-lithographic, reproducible, large-area, and ultra-sensitive SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Daglar, Bihter; Demirel, Gokcen Birlik; Khudiyev, Tural; Dogan, Tamer; Tobail, Osama; Altuntas, Sevde; Buyukserin, Fatih; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-11-01

    The melt-infiltration technique enables the fabrication of complex nanostructures for a wide range of applications in optics, electronics, biomaterials, and catalysis. Here, anemone-like nanostructures are produced for the first time under the surface/interface principles of melt-infiltration as a non-lithographic method. Functionalized anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are used as templates to provide large-area production of nanostructures, and polycarbonate (PC) films are used as active phase materials. In order to understand formation dynamics of anemone-like structures finite element method (FEM) simulations are performed and it is found that wetting behaviour of the polymer is responsible for the formation of cavities at the caps of the structures. These nanostructures are examined in the surface-enhanced-Raman-spectroscopy (SERS) experiment and they exhibit great potential in this field. Reproducible SERS signals are detected with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 7.2-12.6% for about 10,000 individual spots. SERS measurements are demonstrated at low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G (R6G), even at the picomolar level, with an enhancement factor of ?10(11). This high enhancement factor is ascribed to the significant electric field enhancement at the cavities of nanostructures and nanogaps between them, which is supported by finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. These novel nanostructured films can be further optimized to be used in chemical and plasmonic sensors and as a single molecule SERS detection platform. PMID:25220106

  18. Anemone-like nanostructures for non-lithographic, reproducible, large-area, and ultra-sensitive SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglar, Bihter; Demirel, Gokcen Birlik; Khudiyev, Tural; Dogan, Tamer; Tobail, Osama; Altuntas, Sevde; Buyukserin, Fatih; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-10-01

    The melt-infiltration technique enables the fabrication of complex nanostructures for a wide range of applications in optics, electronics, biomaterials, and catalysis. Here, anemone-like nanostructures are produced for the first time under the surface/interface principles of melt-infiltration as a non-lithographic method. Functionalized anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are used as templates to provide large-area production of nanostructures, and polycarbonate (PC) films are used as active phase materials. In order to understand formation dynamics of anemone-like structures finite element method (FEM) simulations are performed and it is found that wetting behaviour of the polymer is responsible for the formation of cavities at the caps of the structures. These nanostructures are examined in the surface-enhanced-Raman-spectroscopy (SERS) experiment and they exhibit great potential in this field. Reproducible SERS signals are detected with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 7.2-12.6% for about 10 000 individual spots. SERS measurements are demonstrated at low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G (R6G), even at the picomolar level, with an enhancement factor of ~1011. This high enhancement factor is ascribed to the significant electric field enhancement at the cavities of nanostructures and nanogaps between them, which is supported by finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. These novel nanostructured films can be further optimized to be used in chemical and plasmonic sensors and as a single molecule SERS detection platform.The melt-infiltration technique enables the fabrication of complex nanostructures for a wide range of applications in optics, electronics, biomaterials, and catalysis. Here, anemone-like nanostructures are produced for the first time under the surface/interface principles of melt-infiltration as a non-lithographic method. Functionalized anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are used as templates to provide large-area production of nanostructures, and polycarbonate (PC) films are used as active phase materials. In order to understand formation dynamics of anemone-like structures finite element method (FEM) simulations are performed and it is found that wetting behaviour of the polymer is responsible for the formation of cavities at the caps of the structures. These nanostructures are examined in the surface-enhanced-Raman-spectroscopy (SERS) experiment and they exhibit great potential in this field. Reproducible SERS signals are detected with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 7.2-12.6% for about 10 000 individual spots. SERS measurements are demonstrated at low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G (R6G), even at the picomolar level, with an enhancement factor of ~1011. This high enhancement factor is ascribed to the significant electric field enhancement at the cavities of nanostructures and nanogaps between them, which is supported by finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. These novel nanostructured films can be further optimized to be used in chemical and plasmonic sensors and as a single molecule SERS detection platform. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images of the AAO membrane and bare polymer film, FEM simulations of anemone-like polymeric nanopillars depending on the time and pressure, and detailed calculation of the enhancement factor both including experimental and theoretical approaches. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03909b

  19. Heterogeneity of competition at decameter scale: patches of high canopy leaf area in a shade-intolerant larch stand transpire less yet are more sensitive to drought.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Oren, Ram; Wang, Yanhui; Yu, Pengtao; Liu, Hailong; Cao, Gongxiang; Xu, Lihong; Wang, Yunni; Zuo, Haijun

    2015-05-01

    Small differences in the sensitivity of stomatal conductance to light intensity on leaf surfaces may lead to large differences in total canopy transpiration (EC) with increasing canopy leaf area (L). Typically, the increase of L would more than compensate for the decrease of transpiration per unit of leaf area (EL), resulting in concurrent increase of EC. However, highly shade-intolerant species, such as Larix principis-rupprechtii Mayr., may be so sensitive to increased shading that such compensation is not complete. We hypothesized that in such a stand, windfall-induced spatial variation at a decameter scale would result in greatly reduced EL in patches of high L leading to lower EC than low competition patches of sparse canopy. We further hypothesized that quicker extraction of soil moisture in patches of lower competition will result in earlier onset of drought symptoms in these patches. Thus, patches of low L will transition from light to soil moisture as the factor dominating EL. This process should progressively homogenize EC in the stand even as the variation of soil moisture is increasing. We tested the hypotheses utilizing sap flux of nine trees, and associated environmental and stand variables. The results were consistent with only some of the expectations. Under non-limiting soil moisture, EL was very sensitive to the spatial variation of L, decreasing sharply with increasing L and associated decrease of mean light intensity on leaf surfaces. Thus, under the conditions of ample soil moisture maximum EC decreased with increasing patch-scale L. Annual EC and biomass production also decreased with L, albeit more weakly. Furthermore, variation of EC among patches decreased as average stand soil moisture declined between rain events. However, contrary to expectation, high L plots which transpired less showed a greater EL sensitivity to decreasing stand-scale soil moisture, suggesting a different mechanism than simple control by decreasing soil moisture. We offer potential explanations to the observed phenomenon. Our results demonstrate that spatial variation of L at decameter scale, even within relatively homogeneous, single-species, even-aged stands, can produce large variation of transpiration, soil moisture and biomass production and should be considered in 1-D soil-plant-atmosphere models. PMID:25836360

  20. Spatial uncertainty and ecological models

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; King, Anthony Wayne [ORNL

    2004-07-01

    Applied ecological models that are used to understand and manage natural systems often rely on spatial data as input. Spatial uncertainty in these data can propagate into model predictions. Uncertainty analysis, sensitivity analysis, error analysis, error budget analysis, spatial decision analysis, and hypothesis testing using neutral models are all techniques designed to explore the relationship between variation in model inputs and variation in model predictions. Although similar methods can be used to answer them, these approaches address different questions. These approaches differ in (a) whether the focus is forward or backward (forward to evaluate the magnitude of variation in model predictions propagated or backward to rank input parameters by their influence); (b) whether the question involves model robustness to large variations in spatial pattern or to small deviations from a reference map; and (c) whether processes that generate input uncertainty (for example, cartographic error) are of interest. In this commentary, we propose a taxonomy of approaches, all of which clarify the relationship between spatial uncertainty and the predictions of ecological models. We describe existing techniques and indicate a few areas where research is needed.

  1. Sensitivity tests on the criterion of potential vorticity index for discriminating the location of ozone sources and sinks over large continental areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacòpardo, T.; Ferrarese, S.; Longhetto, A.; Cassardo, C.

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a sensitivity analysis of a statistical-dynamic model (ISOGASP, standing for Identification of SOurces of greenhouse GAS Plus), developed by our research group to reconstruct 3D concentration patterns of greenhouse gases in large and deep atmospheric regions over continental or oceanic areas and extending vertically from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere. The results of this analysis have shown the ability of the ISOGASP model to discriminate the locations of ozone sources, according to the geographical distribution patterns of atmospheric O3 concentration inside a limited number of atmospheric layers at different heights above sea level, reconstructed through the method of backward trajectories simulating the travel of air parcels from each different layer to the receptor points at their own height. The potential vorticity index has been used to discriminate the sub-sets of trajectories belonging to stratosphere or troposphere.

  2. A Convenient Route to High Area, Nanoparticulate TiO2 Photoelectrodes Suitable for High-Efficiency Energy Conversion in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells,

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, N.C.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol-soluble amphiphilic TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) of average diameter ?9 nm were synthesized, and an ?-terpineol-based TiO{sub 2} paste was readily prepared from them in comparatively few steps. When used for fabrication of photoelectrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), the paste yielded highly transparent films and possessing greater-than-typical, thickness-normalized surface areas. These film properties enabled the corresponding DSSCs to produce high photocurrent densities (17.7 mA cm{sup ?2}) and a comparatively high overall light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency (9.6%) when deployed with the well-known ruthenium-based molecular dye, N719. These efficiencies are about ?1.4 times greater than those obtained from DSSCs containing photoelectrodes derived from a standard commercial source of TiO{sub 2} paste.

  3. Cocaine disinhibits dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area via use-dependent blockade of GABA neuron voltage-sensitive sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Scott C; Taylor, Seth R; Horton, Malia L; Barber, Elise N; Lyle, Laura T; Stobbs, Sarah H; Allison, David W

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cocaine on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Utilizing single-unit recordings in vivo, microelectrophoretic administration of DA enhanced the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons via D2/D3 DA receptor activation. Lower doses of intravenous cocaine (0.25-0.5 mg/kg), or the DA transporter (DAT) blocker methamphetamine, enhanced VTA GABA neuron firing rate via D2/D3 receptor activation. Higher doses of cocaine (1.0-2.0 mg/kg) inhibited their firing rate, which was not sensitive to the D2/D3 antagonist eticlopride. The voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) blocker lidocaine inhibited the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons at all doses tested (0.25-2.0 mg/kg). Cocaine or lidocaine reduced VTA GABA neuron spike discharges induced by stimulation of the internal capsule (ICPSDs) at dose levels 0.25-2 mg/kg (IC(50) 1.2 mg/kg). There was no effect of DA or methamphetamine on ICPSDs, or of DA antagonists on cocaine inhibition of ICPSDs. In VTA GABA neurons in vitro, cocaine reduced (IC(50) 13 microm) current-evoked spikes and TTX-sensitive sodium currents in a use-dependent manner. In VTA DA neurons, cocaine reduced IPSCs (IC(50) 13 microm), increased IPSC paired-pulse facilitation and decreased spontaneous IPSC frequency, without affecting miniature IPSC frequency or amplitude. These findings suggest that cocaine acts on GABA neurons to reduce activity-dependent GABA release on DA neurons in the VTA, and that cocaine's use-dependent blockade of VTA GABA neuron VSSCs may synergize with its DAT inhibiting properties to enhance mesolimbic DA transmission implicated in cocaine reinforcement. PMID:19046384

  4. Cocaine disinhibits dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area via use-dependent blockade of GABA neuron voltage-sensitive sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Steffensen, Scott C.; Taylor, Seth R.; Horton, Malia L.; Barber, Elise N.; Lyle, Laura T.; Stobbs, Sarah H.; Allison, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cocaine on ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Utilizing single-unit recordings in vivo, microelectrophoretic administration of DA enhanced the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons via D2/D3 DA receptor activation. Lower doses of intravenous cocaine (0.25–0.5 mg/kg), or the DA transporter (DAT) blocker methamphetamine, enhanced VTA GABA neuron firing rate via D2/D3 receptor activation. Higher doses of cocaine (1.0–2.0 mg/kg) inhibited their firing rate, which was not sensitive to the D2/D3 antagonist eticlopride. The voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) blocker lidocaine inhibited the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons at all doses tested (0.25–2.0 mg/kg). Cocaine or lidocaine reduced VTA GABA neuron spike discharges induced by stimulation of the internal capsule (ICPSDs) at dose levels 0.25–2 mg/kg (IC50 1.2 mg/kg). There was no effect of DA or methamphetamine on ICPSDs, or of DA antagonists on cocaine inhibition of ICPSDs. In VTA GABA neurons in vitro, cocaine reduced (IC50 13 ?m) current-evoked spikes and TTX-sensitive sodium currents in a use-dependent manner. In VTA DA neurons, cocaine reduced IPSCs (IC50 13 ?m), increased IPSC paired-pulse facilitation and decreased spontaneous IPSC frequency, without affecting miniature IPSC frequency or amplitude. These findings suggest that cocaine acts on GABA neurons to reduce activity-dependent GABA release on DA neurons in the VTA, and that cocaine's use-dependent blockade of VTA GABA neuron VSSCs may synergize with its DAT inhibiting properties to enhance mesolimbic DA transmission implicated in cocaine reinforcement. PMID:19046384

  5. The fractal perimeter dimension of noctilucent clouds: Sensitivity analysis of the area-perimeter method and results on the seasonal and hemispheric dependence of the fractal dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkhoff, L. A.; von Savigny, C.; Randall, C. E.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-05-01

    The fractal perimeter dimension is a fundamental property of clouds. It describes the cloud shape and is used to improve the understanding of atmospheric processes responsible for cloud shapes. von Savigny et al. (2011) determined the fractal perimeter dimension of noctilucent clouds (or polar mesospheric clouds) for the first time based on a limited data set of cloud images observed with the CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size) instrument on board the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) satellite. This paper builds on von Savigny et al. (2011) by first presenting a sensitivity analysis of the determination of the fractal perimeter dimension, and secondly presenting results on the seasonal and interhemispheric differences of the perimeter dimension of noctilucent clouds (NLCs). The same method as in the earlier study is applied to an extended data set of satellite images of noctilucent cloud fields taken with the CIPS experiment. The sensitivity studies reveal that cloud holes play an important role for the area-perimeter method, since excluding clouds with holes reduces the dimension value by up to 3%. The results on the fractal perimeter dimension over six NLC seasons from 2007 to 2009 demonstrate that the dimension values of the NLCs neither show significant differences between the seasons nor between the hemispheres.

  6. Knowledge-based environmental information system for sustainable development of wetland area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wu Bingshan; Zhang Weiguo; Luo Jun

    2010-01-01

    Unsuitable development of wetland area will cause serious environmental problems in flooding, the depredation of ecology, and the pollution of water quality on account of environmental sensitivity of wetland. Thus, wetland development and environmental protection has become an issue of national emphasis for the environmental management in the world. There is a demand for planning and decision strategies in this

  7. Ecological Field Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Field studies are an excellent way for students to learn ecological concepts and practice doing science. This article presents an approach for the secondary science classroom that permits students to ask and answer their own questions, a prerequisite for truly experiencing the process of science. Students explore a local natural area and, in…

  8. General Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This tutorial explains how environmental conditions and organism interactions determine animal and tree distribution and abundance. There are definitions of important ecological terms such as ecology, interactions, and abundance; descriptions of the environmental conditions needed for rainforests and how they provide habitat for many species; and an explanation of the spawning process. The tutorial also introduces food chain concepts and the unique ecology of riparian habitats. A quiz is also available.

  9. Evaluating Functionality and Sustainability of River widenings at the Kamp River\\/Austria concerning to flood protection and aquatic ecology including a numerical sensitivity test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hauer Christoph; Schober Bernhard; Habersack Helmut

    The catastrophic flood events of the years 2002 and 2005 in Central Europe showed clearly the necessity to act in terms of flood protection. The meaning of floodplain areas and the errors in land use management of the past became obvious by the occurred extraordinary discharges. Unfortunately a high use pressure exists in the surrounding of rivers and the important

  10. Job Announcement PhD-student Position in Microbial Ecology

    E-print Network

    Horn, Matthias

    in one or more of the following areas/techniques will be of advantage: soil microbial ecologyJob Announcement PhD-student Position in Microbial Ecology Division of Microbial Ecology (www.microbial-ecology of the diazotroph microbial seed bank in soils and the active drivers in this important process and the factors

  11. Mesoporous TiO{sub 2} aggregate photoanode with high specific surface area and strong light scattering for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chunhui; Luo, Yanhong; Guo, Xiaozhi; Li, Dongmei [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Mi, Jianli; So, Lasse; Hald, Peter [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)] [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Meng, Qingbo, E-mail: qbmeng@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Iversen, Bo B., E-mail: bo@chem.au.dk [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    Phase-pure anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallite aggregates synthesized by a continuous supercritical fluid process have been first used for fabricating mesoporous photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Due to the small size (11 nm) of the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites in the aggregates, the mesoporous photoanode provides a high specific surface area, 80 m{sup 2}/g, which ensures high dye loading. At the same time, the submicrometer-sized aggregates endow the mesoporous photoanode with strong light scattering effect. Therefore, the light harvesting efficiency of the photoanode is increased. With an improved short-circuit current density, a high overall power conversion efficiency of 8.65% (100 mW/cm{sup 2}, AM 1.5) is achieved without additional scattering layers, 12% enhanced compared with the DSCs fabricated from commercial Degussa P25 with exactly the same procedures. In addition, this supercritical fluid process is scalable and rapid (less than one minute) for TiO{sub 2} aggregates synthesis, which will push the commercialization of DSCs in the future. - Graphical abstract: Due to the special morphology and structure, the photoanode of DSCs provides high specific surface area and strong light scattering at the same time, which results in high conversion efficiencies of the DSCs. Table of contents: Thanks to the synchronous realization of high specific surface area and strong light scattering, a high efficiency of 8.65% was achieved based on a novel mesoporous TiO{sub 2} aggregates photoanode for DSCs. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TiO{sub 2} aggregate photoanode provides a possible route for highly efficient DSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoanode with high dye loading and light scattering is successfully fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} synthesized by a supercritical fluid process is first applied to DSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis method and high efficiency will push the commercialization of DSCs.

  12. Soil Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killham, Ken

    1994-04-01

    Soil Ecology is designed to meet the increasing challenge faced by today's environmental scientists, ecologists, agriculturalists, and biotechnologists for an integrated approach to soil ecology. It emphasizes the interrelations among plants, animals, and microbes, by first establishing the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the soil habitat and then functionally characterizing the major components of the soil biota and some of their most important interactions. The fundamental principles underpinning soil ecology are established and this then enables an integrated approach to explore and understand the processes of soil nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) cycling and the ecology of extreme soil conditions such as soil-water stress. Two of the most topical aspects of applied soil ecology are then selected. First, the ecology of soil pollution is examined, focusing on acid deposition and radionuclide pollution. Second, manipulation of soil ecology through biotechnology is discussed, illustrating the use of pesticides and microbial inocula in soils and pointing toward the future by considering the impact of genetically modified inocula on soil ecology.

  13. Warfare Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Gary E. Machlis (University of Idaho; )

    2008-09-01

    Among human activities causing ecological change, war is both intensive and far-reaching. Yet environmental research related to warfare is limited in depth and fragmented by discipline. Here we (1) outline a field of study called "warfare ecology," (2) provide a taxonomy of warfare useful for organizing the field, (3) review empirical studies, and (4) propose research directions and policy implications that emerge from the ecological study of warfare. Warfare ecology extends to the three stages of warfare - preparations, war, and postwar activities - and treats biophysical and socioeconomic systems as coupled systems. A review of empirical studies suggests complex relationships between warfare and ecosystem change. Research needs include the development of theory and methods for examining the cascading effects of warfare on specific ecosystems. Policy implications include greater incorporation of ecological science into military planning and improved rehabilitation of postwar ecosystem services, leading to increased peace and security.

  14. An ultra-sensitive assay targeting the circulating anodic antigen for the diagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum in a low-endemic area, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Govert J; Xu, Jing; Bergquist, Robert; de Dood, Claudia J; Utzinger, Jürg; Qin, Zhi-Qiang; Guan, Wei; Feng, Ting; Yu, Xin-Ling; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Ma; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Corstjens, Paul L A M

    2015-01-01

    The downward trend in prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma japonicum infection in the People's Republic of China (P.R. China) has reached a level where accurate methods are required for monitoring the national schistosomiasis control programme and to verify whether transmission has been interrupted. We have assessed the prevalence of active S. japonicum infection by use of an up-converting phosphor lateral-flow (UCP-LF) assay for determination of circulating anodic antigens (CAA) in urine and serum, and compared the findings with those of the Kato-Katz technique for egg detection in stool and an immunohaemagglutination assay (IHA) for specific antibodies in serum. The study was carried out in three villages located in a remaining S. japonicum-endemic area in P.R. China. Overall, 423 individuals were investigated by Kato-Katz, 395 by IHA, 371 with the UCP-LF CAA assay adapted for urine and 178 with the UCP-LF CAA assay applied on serum. The IHA showed the highest number of positive results (n=107, 27.1%). The UCP-LF CAA urine assay detected 36 CAA positives (9.7%) and the serum-based CAA assay 21 positives (11.8%). The Kato-Katz technique revealed only six positive stool samples (1.4%). Among those 166 individuals with complete data records, sensitivities of the different assays were determined versus a combined 'gold' standard, showing the highest sensitivity for the urine CAA assay (93%), followed by the serum CAA (73%) and IHA (53%), whilst triplicate Kato-Katz thick smears had a very low sensitivity (13%). Serum CAA concentrations were about 10-fold higher than in urine and were significantly correlated. Highest prevalences as determined by CAA were found in older age groups (>40 years). Half of the CAA- or egg-positive cases were negative for antibodies by IHA, thereby revealing an important obstacle for the effectiveness of the current schistosomiasis control and elimination efforts. The significantly higher prevalence of active schistosome infections as shown by the urine and serum UCP-LF CAA assays has implications for the national control and elimination programme in P.R. China, particularly in respect to case-finding and intervention strategies. PMID:25128703

  15. Ecological Applications, 24(6), 2014, pp. 13231340 2014 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-print Network

    Uriarte, Maria

    Ecological Applications, 24(6), 2014, pp. 1323­1340 Ó 2014 by the Ecological Society of America of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, 1200 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, New each focal burned pixel, was modeled as a function of land cover configuration and area, dry- season

  16. High prevalence of breast cancer in light polluted areas in urban and rural regions of South Korea: An ecologic study on the treatment prevalence of female cancers based on National Health Insurance data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Hyo Sun; Kim, Mari; Park, Man Sik

    2015-06-01

    It has been reported that excessive artificial light at night (ALAN) could harm human health since it disturbs the natural bio-rhythm and sleep. Such conditions can lead to various diseases, including cancer. In this study, we have evaluated the association between ALAN and prevalence rates of cancer in females on a regional basis, after adjusting for other risk factors, including obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption rates and PM10 levels. The prevalence rates for breast cancer were found to be significantly associated with ALAN in urban and rural areas. Furthermore, no association was found with ALAN in female lung, liver, cervical, gastric and colon cancer. Despite the limitations of performing ecological studies, this report suggests that ALAN might be a risk factor for breast cancer, even in rural areas. PMID:25955405

  17. Geochemically induced shifts in catabolic energy yields explain past ecological changes of diffuse vents in the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N area

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°50'N hosts a hydrothermal vent field (Bio9) where the change in fluid chemistry is believed to have caused the demise of a tubeworm colony. We test this hypothesis and expand on it by providing a thermodynamic perspective in calculating free energies for a range of catabolic reactions from published compositional data. The energy calculations show that there was excess H2S in the fluids and that oxygen was the limiting reactant from 1991 to 1997. Energy levels are generally high, although they declined in that time span. In 1997, sulfide availability decreased substantially and H2S was the limiting reactant. Energy availability dropped by a factor of 10 to 20 from what it had been between 1991 and 1995. The perishing of the tubeworm colonies began in 1995 and coincided with the timing of energy decrease for sulfide oxidizers. In the same time interval, energy availability for iron oxidizers increased by a factor of 6 to 8, and, in 1997, there was 25 times more energy per transferred electron in iron oxidation than in sulfide oxidation. This change coincides with a massive spread of red staining (putative colonization by Fe-oxidizing bacteria) between 1995 and 1997. For a different cluster of vents from the EPR 9°50'N area (Tube Worm Pillar), thermodynamic modeling is used to examine changes in subseafloor catabolic metabolism between 1992 and 2000. These reactions are deduced from deviations in diffuse fluid compositions from conservative behavior of redox-sensitive species. We show that hydrogen is significantly reduced relative to values expected from conservative mixing. While H2 concentrations of the hydrothermal endmember fluids were constant between 1992 and 1995, the affinities for hydrogenotrophic reactions in the diffuse fluids decreased by a factor of 15 and then remained constant between 1995 and 2000. Previously, these fluids have been shown to support subseafloor methanogenesis. Our calculation results corroborate these findings and indicate that the 1992-1995 period was one of active growth of hydrogenotrophic communities, while the system was more or less at steady state between 1995 and 2000. PMID:22283983

  18. Gram-scale synthesis of catalytic Co9S8 nanocrystal ink as a cathode material for spray-deposited, large-area dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Hao; Lu, Ming-De; Tung, Yung-Liang; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-10-22

    We report the development of Co9S8 nanocrystals as a cost-effective cathode material that can be readily combined with spraying techniques to fabricate large-area dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices and can be further connected with series or parallel cell architectures to obtain a relatively high output voltage or current. A gram-scale synthesis of Co9S8 nanocrystal is carried out via a noninjection reaction by mixing anhydrous CoCl2 with trioctylphosphine (TOP), dodecanethiol and oleylamine (OLA) at 250 °C. The Co9S8 nanocrystals possess excellent catalytic ability with respect to I(-)/I3(-) redox reactions. The Co9S8 nanocrystals are prepared as nanoinks to fabricate uniform, crack-free Co9S8 thin films on different substrates by using a spray deposition technique. These Co9S8 films are used as counter electrodes assembled with dye-adsorbed TiO2 photoanodes to fabricate DSSC devices having a working area of 2 cm(2) and an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.02 ± 0.18% under AM 1.5 solar illumination, which is comparable with the PCE of 7.2 ± 0.12% obtained using a Pt cathode. Furthermore, six 2 cm(2)-sized DSSC devices connected in series output an open-circuit voltage of 4.2 V that can power a wide range of electronic devices such as LED arrays and can charge commercial lithium ion batteries. PMID:23992127

  19. Ecological Description of Silviculture Systems Research Sites in the Prince George Forest Region

    E-print Network

    Coxson, Darwyn

    Ecological Description of Silviculture Systems Research Sites in the Prince George Forest Region;_____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Madrone Consultants Ltd. 2 Ecological Description of Silviculture Systems Research Sites in the Prince...............................................................................................................5 Ecological Description of the Lunate study area

  20. Development and applications of a new neutron single-crystal diffractometer based on a two-dimensional large-area curved position-sensitive detector

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Noda, Yukio; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Kim, Shin Ae; Moon, Myungkook; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masashi; Dohi, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    A new single-crystal neutron diffractometer based on a large-area curved two-dimensional position-sensitive detector (C-2DPSD) has been developed. The diffractometer commissioning is almost complete, together with development of the measurement methodology and the raw data processing software package, the Reciprocal Analyzer, and the instrument is now ready to be launched for users. Position decoding of the C-2DPSD is via a delay-line readout method with an effective angular range of 110 × 54° in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, with a nominal radius of curvature of 530?mm. The diffractometer is equipped with a Ge(311) mosaic monochromator and two supermirror vacuum guide paths, one before and one after the monochromator position. The commissioning incorporates corrections and calibration of the instrument using an NaCl crystal, various applications such as crystallographic and magnetic structure measurements, a crystallinity check on large crystals, and a study on the composition or dopant content of a mixed crystal of (TmxYb1?x)Mn2O5. The installation of the diffractometer and the measurement method, the calibration procedure and results, the raw data treatment and visualization, and several applications using the large C-2DPSD-based diffractometer are reported. PMID:23682194

  1. Specialized ommatidia of the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area in the eye of monarch butterflies have non-functional reflecting tapeta.

    PubMed

    Labhart, Thomas; Baumann, Franziska; Bernard, Gary D

    2009-12-01

    Many insects exploit sky light polarization for navigation or cruising-course control. The detection of polarized sky light is mediated by the ommatidia of a small specialized part of the compound eye: the dorsal rim area (DRA). We describe the morphology and fine structure of the DRA in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus). The DRA consists of approximately 100 ommatidia forming a narrow ribbon along the dorsal eye margin. Each ommatidium contains two types of photoreceptor with mutually orthogonal microvilli orientations occurring in a 2:6 ratio. Within each rhabdomere, the microvilli are well aligned. Rhabdom structure and orientation remain constant at all retinal levels, but the rhabdom profiles, as seen in tangential sections through the DRA, change their orientations in a fan-like fashion from the frontal to the caudal end of the DRA. Whereas these properties (two microvillar orientations per rhabdom, microvillar alignment along rhabdomeres, ommatidial fan array) are typical for insect DRAs in general, we also report and discuss here a novel feature. The ommatidia of monarch butterflies are equipped with reflecting tapeta, which are directly connected to the proximal ends of the rhabdoms. Although tapeta are also present in the DRA, they are separated from the rhabdoms by a space of approximately 55 mum effectively inactivating them. This reduces self-screening effects, keeping polarization sensitivity of all photoreceptors of the DRA ommatidia both high and approximately equal. PMID:19876649

  2. Mesoporous TiO2 aggregate photoanode with high specific surface area and strong light scattering for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Luo, Yanhong; Guo, Xiaozhi; Li, Dongmei; Mi, Jianli; Sø, Lasse; Hald, Peter; Meng, Qingbo; Iversen, Bo B.

    2012-12-01

    Phase-pure anatase TiO2 nanocrystallite aggregates synthesized by a continuous supercritical fluid process have been first used for fabricating mesoporous photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Due to the small size (11 nm) of the TiO2 nanocrystallites in the aggregates, the mesoporous photoanode provides a high specific surface area, 80 m2/g, which ensures high dye loading. At the same time, the submicrometer-sized aggregates endow the mesoporous photoanode with strong light scattering effect. Therefore, the light harvesting efficiency of the photoanode is increased. With an improved short-circuit current density, a high overall power conversion efficiency of 8.65% (100 mW/cm2, AM 1.5) is achieved without additional scattering layers, 12% enhanced compared with the DSCs fabricated from commercial Degussa P25 with exactly the same procedures. In addition, this supercritical fluid process is scalable and rapid (less than one minute) for TiO2 aggregates synthesis, which will push the commercialization of DSCs in the future.

  3. Early diagenesis of redox-sensitive trace metals in the Peru upwelling area - response to ENSO-related oxygen fluctuations in the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Noffke, Anna; Rohde, Anne; Liebetrau, Volker; Wallmann, Klaus

    2011-11-01

    Pore water and solid phase data for redox-sensitive metals (Mn, Fe, V, Mo and U) were collected on a transect across the Peru upwelling area (11°S) at water depths between 78 and 2025 m and bottom water oxygen concentrations ranging from ˜0 to 93 ?M. By comparing authigenic mass accumulation rates and diffusive benthic fluxes, we evaluate the respective mechanisms of trace metal accumulation, retention and remobilization across the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and with respect to oxygen fluctuations in the water column related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Sediments within the permanent OMZ are characterized by diffusive uptake and authigenic fixation of U, V and Mo as well as diffusive loss of Mn and Fe across the benthic boundary. Some of the dissolved Mn and Fe in the water column re-precipitate at the oxycline and shuttle particle-reactive trace metals to the sediment surface at the lower and upper boundary of the OMZ. At the lower boundary, pore waters are not sufficiently sulfidic as to enable an efficient authigenic V and Mo fixation. As a consequence, sediments below the OMZ are preferentially enriched in U which is delivered via both in situ precipitation and lateral supply of U-rich phosphorites from further upslope. Trace metal cycling on the Peruvian shelf is strongly affected by ENSO-related oxygen fluctuations in bottom water. During periods of shelf oxygenation, surface sediments receive particulate V and Mo with metal (oxyhydr)oxides that derive from both terrigenous sources and precipitation at the retreating oxycline. After the recurrence of anoxic conditions, metal (oxyhydr)oxides are reductively dissolved and the hereby liberated V and Mo are authigenically removed. This alternation between supply of particle-reactive trace metals during oxic periods and fixation during anoxic periods leads to a preferential accumulation of V and Mo compared to U on the Peruvian shelf. The decoupling of V, Mo and U accumulation is further accentuated by the varying susceptibility to re-oxidation of the different authigenic metal phases. While authigenic U and V are readily re-oxidized and recycled during periods of shelf oxygenation, the sequestration of Mo by authigenic pyrite is favored by the transient occurrence of oxidizing conditions. Our findings reveal that redox-sensitive trace metals respond in specific manner to short-term oxygen fluctuations in the water column. The relative enrichment patterns identified might be useful for the reconstruction of past OMZ extension and large-scale redox oscillations in the geological record.

  4. Phytoplankton Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site describes phytoplankton ecology research by marine ecologists at Mote Marine Laboratory (MML), an independent, nonprofit research organization based in Sarasota, Florida. The emphasis of MML's phytoplankton ecology research is the photophysiology of marine algae -- with recent emphasis on the ability to predict and possibly mitigate blooms of the toxic marine dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium breve. The no-frills phytoplankton ecology homepage describes research and offers data (maps, figures, tables) from 1998 and 1999 projects on Red Tide transects, Nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations, and Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) transect data, among several others. The site also offers general information on Red Tides, Red Tide conditions in Southwest Florida, a chronology of historic Red Tide events, and links to related resources.

  5. Northwestern Florida ecological characterization: An ecological atlas: Map narratives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. Palik; J. T. Kunneke

    1984-01-01

    This study provides an atlas of ecological resources along the Big Bend and Panhandle coastline of Florida. The study area comprises 18 coastal counties, an area of 30,460 square kilometers (11,764 square miles). This atlas is designed to provide information and assist government and industry decisionmakers in coastal resource and environmental planning. In particular, results of this study will be

  6. Ecological Niche Modelling of the Bacillus anthracis A1.a sub-lineage in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a globally distributed zoonotic pathogen that continues to be a veterinary and human health problem in Central Asia. We used a database of anthrax outbreak locations in Kazakhstan and a subset of genotyped isolates to model the geographic distribution and ecological associations of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan. The aims of the study were to test the influence of soil variables on a previous ecological niche based prediction of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan and to determine if a single sub-lineage of B. anthracis occupies a unique ecological niche. Results The addition of soil variables to the previously developed ecological niche model did not appreciably alter the limits of the predicted geographic or ecological distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan. The A1.a experiment predicted the sub-lineage to be present over a larger geographic area than did the outbreak based experiment containing multiple lineages. Within the geographic area predicted to be suitable for B. anthracis by all ten best subset models, the A1.a sub-lineage was associated with a wider range of ecological tolerances than the outbreak-soil experiment. Analysis of rule types showed that logit rules predominate in the outbreak-soil experiment and range rules in the A1.a sub-lineage experiment. Random sub-setting of locality points suggests that models of B. anthracis distribution may be sensitive to sample size. Conclusions Our analysis supports careful consideration of the taxonomic resolution of data used to create ecological niche models. Further investigations into the environmental affinities of individual lineages and sub-lineages of B. anthracis will be useful in understanding the ecology of the disease at large and small scales. With model based predictions serving as approximations of disease risk, these efforts will improve the efficacy of public health interventions for anthrax prevention and control. PMID:22152056

  7. Campus Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Wildlife Federation

    This website from the National Wildlife Federation showcases environmental conservation projects that have been successfully undertaken by various universities. The site features example projects and resources for doing your own campus project. Topics include building design, energy, environmental literacy, habitat restoration, water, transportation and waste reduction. Links to the online Campus Ecology Yearbook and the Campus Ecology Research Station and other resources are also included.

  8. Quaternary ecology: A paleoecological perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Delcourt, H.R.; Delcourt, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    This book considers issues and problems in ecology which may be illuminated, if not solved, by considering paleoecology. The five central chapters include a discussion of application of Quaternary ecology to future global climate change, including global warming. Other areas presented include: population dispersal, invasions, expansions, and migrations; plant successions; ecotones; factors in community structure; ecosystem patterns and processes. Published case studies are numerous. The role played by continuing climatic change in vegetation change is acknowledged but not stressed.

  9. Intra-ventral tegmental area HIV-1 Tat1–86 attenuates nicotine-mediated locomotor sensitization and alters mesocorticolimbic ERK and CREB signaling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Midde, Narasimha M.; Gomez, Adrian M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Harrod, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking prevalence in the HIV-positive individuals is profoundly higher than that in the HIV-negative individuals. We have demonstrated that HIV-1 transgenic rats exhibit attenuated nicotine-mediated locomotor activity, altered cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling in the mesocorticolimbic regions. This study investigated the role of HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein in the alterations of nicotine-mediated behavior and the signaling pathway observed in the HIV-1 transgenic rats. Rats received bilateral microinjection of recombinant Tat1–86 (25 ?g/side) or vehicle directed at ventral tegmental area (VTA) followed by locomotor testing in response to 13 daily intravenous injections of nicotine (0.05 mg/kg, freebase, once/day) or saline. Further, we examined the phosphorylated levels of CREB (pCREB) and ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and VTA. Tat diminished baseline activity in saline control rats, and attenuated nicotine-induced behavioral sensitization. Following repeated saline injection, the basal levels of pERK1 in the NAc and VTA and pERK2 in VTA were lower in the vehicle control group, relative to the Tat group. After repeated nicotine injection, pERK1 in NAc and VTA and pERK2 in VTA were increased in the vehicle group, but not in the Tat group. Moreover, repeated nicotine injections decreased pCREB in the PFC and VTA in the Tat group but not in the vehicle group. Thus, these findings indicate that the direct injection of Tat at the VTA may mediate CREB and ERK activity in response to nicotine-induced locomotor activity. PMID:26150803

  10. Epidemiologic Similarities in Pediatric Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus in the San Francisco Bay Area

    PubMed Central

    Hsiang, Michelle S.; Shiau, Rita; Nadle, Joelle; Chan, Liana; Lee, Brian; Chambers, Henry F.; Pan, Erica

    2012-01-01

    Background. Risk factors differentiating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) infections in the pediatric community have been unclear. Methods. We performed a prospective case-comparison investigation of clinical, epidemiological, and molecular factors in pediatric community–associated (CA) MRSA and MSSA cases in the San Francisco Bay Area. Chart reviews were conducted in 270 CA-MRSA and 313 CA-MSSA cases. Fifty-eight CA-MRSA (21.4%) and 95 CA-MSSA (30.4%) cases were interviewed. Molecular typing was performed on 111 isolates. Results. MSSA represented 53.7% of CA cases and was more likely to cause invasive disease (6.2% vs 1.1%, P = .004). Few potential epidemiologic risk factors distinguished CA-MRSA from CA-MSSA. No differences were found in factors related to crowding, cleanliness, or prior antibiotic use. Compromised skin integrity due to eczema (24.3% vs 13.5%, P = .001) was associated with CA-MSSA. Many exposures to potentially infected or colonized contacts or contaminated objects were assessed; only three were associated with CA-MSSA: having a household contact who had surgery in the past year (18.9% vs 6.0%, P = .02), and regular visits to a public shower (9.1% vs 2.0%, P = .01) or gym (12.6% vs 3.3%, P = .04). Molecular typing identified clonal complex 8 as the predominant genetic lineage among CA-MRSA (96.4%) and CA-MSSA (39.3%) isolates. Conclusions. In the context of recent heightened focus on CA-MRSA, the burden of serious disease caused by CA-MSSA among children should not be overlooked. MRSA and MSSA may be growing epidemiologically similar; thus, research, clinical, and public health efforts should focus on S aureus as a single entity. PMID:23687577

  11. Use of a sensitivity study to identify risk assessment modeling data gaps at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s subsurface disposal area

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    A common question in the CERCLA remedial investigation (RI) process is, {open_quotes}What are the data gaps that must be filled in order to perform a risk assessment for a given site?{close_quotes} Often a method that can be used to identify and rank data gaps is needed to help allocate scarce remedial investigation funds, and to help prepare for a CERCLA site`s baseline risk assessment (BRA). A CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is underway at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is a radioactive waste disposal site where transuranic (TRU) waste, mixed waste (MW), and low-level waste (LLW) has been buried in pits, trenches, and soil vaults since 1952. The procedures described in this paper have been developed for the identification of risk assessment data gaps at the SDA. In preparation for the SDA RI/FS, three major investigations have been performed over the past two years. The first of these investigations identified all of the waste streams that were buried in the SDA from 1952 through 1983. The second investigation identified all of the SDA waste streams that were buried from 1984 through the present, and made predictions of the waste volumes that will be buried through the year 2003. The third investigation was the Preliminary Scoping Risk Assessment (PSRA) for the SDA. The PSRA was an initial evaluation of the human health risk associated with the SDA`s buried waste, and it was developed with the intent of identifying risk assessment data gaps for the SDA. The following paragraphs give a brief description of the PSRA, and of the sensitivity study within the PSRA that was used to identify data gaps.

  12. Fire Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Forest fires have become a regular summertime occurrence in North America, sparking debate about the proper role of fire on the land. The following websites examine fires and fire ecology in different ecosystems, regions, and time periods. The first site (1), from the USGS-Western Ecological Research Center shares information about fire ecology research in the California shrublands, Sierra Nevada forests, and Mohave and Sonoran deserts. The second site (2) features the Fire Ecology Center at Texas Tech University. The Fire Ecology Center focuses on the role of fire in grassland ecosystems and their website contains information on current research, publications, managing pastures, managing problem plants, and more. The third site (3), from the USGS-Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center contains "an annotated bibliography on fire in North American wetland ecosystems and a subject index of all fire-related literature that has appeared in Wildlife Review." Hosted by Yellowstone National Park, the fourth site (4) addresses wildland fires in Yellowstone. The Park website presents brief sections on Fire Ecology, Fire Monitoring, Prescribed Fire, and Fire Effects -- to name a few. The fifth (5) site, from the Canadian Forest Service, provides information about forest fires in Canada including weekly fire statistics, fire research, daily fire maps, a fire database, and more. Part of a great site on the land use history of the Colorado Plateau from Northern Arizona University, the sixth site (6) offers a brief overview of wildfire history and ecology on the Plateau with links to information about ponderosa pine fire ecology, reintroduction of fire to forest ecosystems, and fire ecology research studies. The seventh site (7), from DiscoverySchool.com, contains a lesson plan on forest fire ecology for grade levels 9-12. The lesson spans two class periods and the site provides objectives, materials needed, discussion questions, academic standards, and more. The final (8) website, from the Why Files, "examines the role of fire in natural systems, and the role of science in understanding wildfires." The eleven-page website follows a kid-friendly narrative format and includes a bibliography and glossary.

  13. Energy and ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of any renewable or nonrenewable energy form has ecological and environmental consequences. To comprehend these consequences, we must first understand the technology of each energy form: solar, biomass, coal, petroleum, nuclear, and such alternative energy sources as ocean thermal energy conversion, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, ocean tidal, and ocean wave. The author examines the ecological principles, the food chains, and the effects of physical factors, biogeochemical cycles, and population growth. Separate chapters deal with the atmosphere, individual energy sources, carbon dioxide and climate change, electric power generation, and alternative energy sources. Intended for the lay reader, the book offers a multi-disciplinary awareness of the dangers of energy misuse and overexploitation while encouraging a sensible, sensitive stewardship. 234 references, 106 figures, 23 tables.

  14. Simple In Vitro Assay for Determining the Sensitivity of Plasmodium vivax Isolates from Fresh Human Blood to Antimalarials in Areas where P. vivax Is Endemic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce M. Russell; Rachanee Udomsangpetch; Karl H. Rieckmann; Barbara M. Kotecka; Russell E. Coleman; Jetsumon Sattabongkot

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple, field-practical, and effective in vitro method for determining the sensitivity of fresh erythrocytic Plasmodium vivax isolates to a range of antimalarials. The method used is a modification of the standard World Health Organization (WHO) microtest for determination of P. falciparum drug sensitivity. The WHO method was modified by removing leukocytes

  15. Sensitivity of coefficients for converting entrance surface dose and kerma-area product to effective dose and energy imparted to the patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, K. N.; Sandborg, M.; Persliden, J.; Alm Carlsson, G.

    1999-08-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the conversions from entrance surface dose (ESD) or kerma-area product (KAP) to effective dose (E) or to energy imparted to the patient (varepsilon) to the likely variations in tube potential, field size, patient size and sex which occur in clinical work. As part of a factorial design study for chest and lumbar spine examinations, the tube potentials were varied to be ±10% of the typical values for the examinations while field sizes and the positions of the field centres were varied to be representative of values drawn from measurements on patient images. Variation over sex and patient size was based on anthropomorphic phantoms representing males and females of ages 15 years (small adult) and 21 years (reference adult). All the conversion coefficients were estimated using a mathematical phantom programmed with the Monte Carlo code EGS4 for all factor combinations and analysed statistically to derive factor effects. In general, the factors studied behaved independently in the sense that interaction of the physical factors generally gave no more than a 5% variation in a conversion coefficient. Taken together, variation of patient size, sex, field size and field position can lead to significant variation of E/KAP by up to a factor of 2, of E/ESD by up to a factor of 3, of varepsilon/KAP by a factor of 1.3 and of varepsilon/ESD by up to a factor of 2. While KAP is preferred to determine varepsilon, the results show no strong preference of KAP over ESD in determining E. The mean absorbed dose (barD) in the patient obtained by dividing varepsilon (determined using KAP) by the patient's mass was found to be the most robust measure of E.

  16. Landscape ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dean L. Urban; R. V. ONeill; Herman H. Shugart

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors outline an approach to landscape study that employs a hierarchical paradigm of pattern and behavior. Although emphasis is on forested landscapes, we can generalize a theory of landscape ecology. Attention is focused on the wide range of phenomena in a natural terrestrial landscape by considering the apparent complexity of landscape dynamics and illustrating how a

  17. Winter Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Karl W.; Halfpenny, James C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ecological variables involved with plant and animal survival during the winter months. Addresses the effects of changing climatic conditions on habitats, foot-loading indexes, and the overall concept of adaptation. Provides some simple teaching activities dealing with winter survival. (TW)

  18. Bayesian modelling of environmental risk: example using a small area ecological study of coronary heart disease mortality in relation to modelled outdoor nitrogen oxide levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Haining; Jane Law; Ravi Maheswaran; Tim Pearson; Paul Brindley

    2007-01-01

    Bayesian modelling of health risks in relation to environmental exposures offers advantages over conventional (non-Bayesian)\\u000a modelling approaches. We report an example using research into whether, after controlling for different confounders, air pollution\\u000a (NOx) has a significant effect on coronary heart disease mortality, estimating the relative risk associated with different levels\\u000a of exposure. We use small area data from Sheffield, England

  19. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-print Network

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    on the impacts of marine protected areas. Ecosystems 2:539­554 Numerical assessment in the front seat, ecologyMARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 208: 299­313, 2000 Published December 8 cases for inclusion in the development of fisheries ecology, and in stock management prac- tices

  20. Sensitivity of spectral reflectance values to different burn and vegetation ratios: A multi-scale approach applied in a fire affected area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleniou, Magdalini; Koutsias, Nikos

    2013-05-01

    The aim of our study was to explore the spectral properties of fire-scorched (burned) and non fire-scorched (vegetation) areas, as well as areas with different burn/vegetation ratios, using a multisource multiresolution satellite data set. A case study was undertaken following a very destructive wildfire that occurred in Parnitha, Greece, July 2007, for which we acquired satellite images from LANDSAT, ASTER, and IKONOS. Additionally, we created spatially degraded satellite data over a range of coarser resolutions using resampling techniques. The panchromatic (1 m) and multispectral component (4 m) of IKONOS were merged using the Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening method. This very high-resolution imagery served as the basis to estimate the cover percentage of burned areas, bare land and vegetation at pixel level, by applying the maximum likelihood classification algorithm. Finally, multiple linear regression models were fit to estimate each land-cover fraction as a function of surface reflectance values of the original and the spatially degraded satellite images. The main findings of our research were: (a) the Near Infrared (NIR) and Short-wave Infrared (SWIR) are the most important channels to estimate the percentage of burned area, whereas the NIR and red channels are the most important to estimate the percentage of vegetation in fire-affected areas; (b) when the bi-spectral space consists only of NIR and SWIR, then the NIR ground reflectance value plays a more significant role in estimating the percent of burned areas, and the SWIR appears to be more important in estimating the percent of vegetation; and (c) semi-burned areas comprising 45-55% burned area and 45-55% vegetation are spectrally closer to burned areas in the NIR channel, whereas those areas are spectrally closer to vegetation in the SWIR channel. These findings, at least partially, are attributed to the fact that: (i) completely burned pixels present low variance in the NIR and high variance in the SWIR, whereas the opposite is observed in completely vegetated areas where higher variance is observed in the NIR and lower variance in the SWIR, and (ii) bare land modifies the spectral signal of burned areas more than the spectral signal of vegetated areas in the NIR, while the opposite is observed in SWIR region of the spectrum where the bare land modifies the spectral signal of vegetation more than the burned areas because the bare land and the vegetation are spectrally more similar in the NIR, and the bare land and burned areas are spectrally more similar in the SWIR.

  1. Aspects of the ecology of phlebotomines (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in an area of cutaneous leishmaniasis occurrence, municipality of Angra dos Reis, coast of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Gustavo Marins de; de Azevedo, Alfredo Carlos Rodrigues; Medeiros, Wagner Muniz de; Alves, João Ricardo Carreira; Rendeiro, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Over a complete two-year period, phlebotomine specimens were caught in an area of cutaneous leishmaniasis occurrence in the municipality of Angra dos Reis. A manual suction tube was used to catch phlebotomines on house walls, and also light traps in domestic and peridomestic settings and in the forest. This yielded 14,170 specimens of 13 species: two in the genus Brumptomyia and eleven in the genus Lutzomyia. L. intermedia predominantly in domestic and peridomestic settings, with little presence in the forest, with the same trend being found in relation to L. migonei, thus proving that these species have adapted to the human environment. L. fischeri appeared to be eclectic regarding location, but was seen to be proportionally more endophilic. L. intermedia and L. migonei were more numerous in peridomestic settings, throughout the year, while L. fischeri was more numerous in domestic settings except in March, April, May and September. From the prevalence of L. intermedia, its proven anthropophily and findings of this species naturally infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, it can be incriminated as the main vector for this agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the study area, especially in the peridomestic environment. L. fischeri may be a coadjuvant in carrying the parasite. PMID:24626417

  2. The Impact of Standing Water and Irrigation on AMSR-E Sensitivity to Soil Moisture over the NAFE'06 Experiment Area

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AMSR-E sensitivity to soil moisture and its accuracy have been studied over a wide variety of surface conditions and weather regimes using both in situ measured data and aircraft derived soil moisture estimates. Several extensive soil moisture field campaigns involving ground and air-borne component...

  3. Assessment of environmental sensitivity index of flooding areas in western Amazonia using fuzzy logic in the dual season GRFM JERS-1 SAR image mosaics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Henrique Beisl; F. P. de Miranda; A. G. Evsukoff; Enrico Campos Pedroso

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on improving information about oil spill environmental sensitivity in Western Amazonia, Brazil, using a pair of multiseasonal (1995 low flood to 1996 - high flood) GRFM JERS-1 SAR mosaics. Fuzzy analysis is carried out to extract information about landscape modifications within half hydrological cycle. The oil spill hazard information derived from JERS-1 SAR data is straightforward to

  4. Improved probability of detection of ecological “surprises”

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmayer, D. B.; Likens, G. E.; Krebs, C. J.; Hobbs, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Ecological “surprises” are defined as unexpected findings about the natural environment. They are critically important in ecology because they are catalysts for questioning and reformulating views of the natural world, help shape assessments of the veracity of a priori predictions about ecological trends and phenomena, and underpin questioning of effectiveness of resource management. Despite the importance of ecological surprises, major gaps in understanding remain about how studies might be done differently or done better to improve the ability to identify them. We outline the kinds of ecological surprises that have arisen from long-term research programs that we lead in markedly different ecosystems around the world. Based on these case studies, we identify important lessons to guide both existing studies and new investigations to detect ecological surprises more readily, better anticipate unusual ecological phenomena, and take proactive steps to plan for and alleviate “undesirable” ecological surprises. Some of these lessons include: (i) maintain existing, and instigate new, long-term studies; (ii) conduct a range of kinds of parallel and concurrent research in a given target area; (iii) better use past literature and conceptual models of the target ecosystem in posing good questions and developing hypotheses and alternative hypotheses; and (iv) increase the capacity for ecological research to take advantage of opportunities arising from major natural disturbances. We argue that the increased anticipatory capability resulting from these lessons is critical given that ecological surprises may become more prevalent because of climate change and multiple and interacting environmental stressors. PMID:21098660

  5. Ecology 2005 93, 853862

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    role for species-specific processes. Key-words: community ecology, dispersal assembly, Panama, seed addition experiment, seed limitation, seed size, seedling ecology, seedling recruitment, tropical ecologyJournal of Ecology 2005 93, 853­862 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd

  6. Trichogramma (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) ecology in a tropical bt transgenic cotton cropping system: sampling to improve seasonal pest impact estimates in the Ord River Irrigation Area, Australia.

    PubMed

    Davies, A P; Pufke, U S; Zalucki, M P

    2009-06-01

    Trichogramma Westwood (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) cause high mortality rates in the potentially resistant pest species, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and are considered integral to the resistance management plan for Bacillus thuringiensis transgenic cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., production in the Ord River Irrigation Area (ORIA), Western Australia. Measured as percentage of parasitism, Trichogramma activity seems highly variable over time; yet, it contributes significantly to pest suppression at peak insect pest density. Environmental constraints on Trichogramma survival, especially insecticide applications, may limit their effectiveness. The decision to initiate insecticide applications in ORIA cotton crops is best delayed unless absolutely necessary to avoid disruption of Trichogramma impact on pests. Trichogramma disperse into young crops and display high intrinsic rates of increase effectively stifling Helicoverpa (Hardwick) population increase after initial egg lay during high-density years in the ORIA, and evidence suggests a possible preference for H. armigera host eggs. PMID:19610415

  7. An ecological model for quantitative risk assessment for schistosomiasis: the case of a patchy environment in the coastal tropical area of northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Heitor de Oliveira; Droguett, Enrique Lopez; Moura, Márcio das Chagas; Gomes, Elainne Christine de Souza; Barbosa, Constança; Barbosa, Verônica; Araújo, Moacyr

    2014-05-01

    We developed a stochastic model for quantitative risk assessment for the Schistosoma mansoni (SM) parasite, which causes an endemic disease of public concern. The model provides answers in a useful format for public health decisions, uses data and expert opinion, and can be applied to any landscape where the snail Biomphalaria glabrata is the main intermediate host (South and Central America, the Caribbean, and Africa). It incorporates several realistic and case-specific features: stage-structured parasite populations, periodic praziquantel (PZQ) drug treatment for humans, density dependence, extreme events (prolonged rainfall), site-specific sanitation quality, environmental stochasticity, monthly rainfall variation, uncertainty in parameters, and spatial dynamics. We parameterize the model through a real-world application in the district of Porto de Galinhas (PG), one of the main touristic destinations in Brazil, where previous studies identified four parasite populations within the metapopulation. The results provide a good approximation of the dynamics of the system and are in agreement with our field observations, i.e., the lack of basic infrastructure (sanitation level and health programs) makes PG a suitable habitat for the persistence and growth of a parasite metapopulation. We quantify the risk of SM metapopulation explosion and quasi-extinction and the time to metapopulation explosion and quasi-extinction. We evaluate the sensitivity of the results under varying scenarios of future periodic PZQ treatment (based on the Brazilian Ministry of Health's plan) and sanitation quality. We conclude that the plan might be useful to slow SM metapopulation growth but not to control it. Additional investments in better sanitation are necessary. PMID:24200189

  8. Education for Today's Ecological Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, S. Fred

    1970-01-01

    Describes the university's role in providing education for the ecological crisis, and divides environmental sciences into two major areas: basic and applied. Proposes a curriculum leading to a B.S. degree in physics consisting of a two-year honor physics program followed by specialization in environmental and planetary sciences (EPS). (PR)

  9. Distribution of phytoplankton functional types in high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll waters in a new diagnostic ecological indicator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacz, A. P.; St. John, M. A.; Brewin, R. J. W.; Hirata, T.; Gregg, W. W.

    2013-11-01

    Modeling and monitoring plankton functional types (PFTs) is challenged by the insufficient amount of field measurements of ground truths in both plankton models and bio-optical algorithms. In this study, we combine remote sensing data and a dynamic plankton model to simulate an ecologically sound spatial and temporal distribution of phyto-PFTs. We apply an innovative ecological indicator approach to modeling PFTs and focus on resolving the question of diatom-coccolithophore coexistence in the subpolar high-nitrate and low-chlorophyll regions. We choose an artificial neural network as our modeling framework because it has the potential to interpret complex nonlinear interactions governing complex adaptive systems, of which marine ecosystems are a prime example. Using ecological indicators that fulfill the criteria of measurability, sensitivity and specificity, we demonstrate that our diagnostic model correctly interprets some basic ecological rules similar to ones emerging from dynamic models. Our time series highlight a dynamic phyto-PFT community composition in all high-latitude areas and indicate seasonal coexistence of diatoms and coccolithophores. This observation, though consistent with in situ and remote sensing measurements, has so far not been captured by state-of-the-art dynamic models, which struggle to resolve this "paradox of the plankton". We conclude that an ecological indicator approach is useful for ecological modeling of phytoplankton and potentially higher trophic levels. Finally, we speculate that it could serve as a powerful tool in advancing ecosystem-based management of marine resources.

  10. Distribution of phytoplankton functional types in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll waters in a new diagnostic ecological indicator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacz, A. P.; St. John, M. A.; Brewin, R. J. W.; Hirata, T.; Gregg, W. W.

    2013-05-01

    Modeling and monitoring plankton functional types (PFTs) is challenged by insufficient amount of field measurements to ground-truth both plankton models and bio-optical algorithms. In this study, we combine remote sensing data and a dynamic plankton model to simulate an ecologically-sound spatial and temporal distribution of phyto-PFTs. We apply an innovative ecological indicator approach to modeling PFTs, and focus on resolving the question of diatom-coccolithophore co-existence in the subpolar high-nitrate and low-chlorophyll regions. We choose an artificial neural network as our modeling framework because it has the potential to interpret complex nonlinear interactions governing complex adaptive systems, of which marine ecosystems are a prime example. Using ecological indicators that fulfill the criteria of measurability, sensitivity and specificity, we demonstrate that our diagnostic model correctly interprets some basic ecological rules similar to ones emerging from dynamic models. Our time series highlight a dynamic phyto-PFT community composition in all high latitude areas, and indicate seasonal co-existence of diatoms and coccolithophores. This observation, though consistent with in situ and remote sensing measurements, was so far not captured by state-of-the-art dynamic models which struggle to resolve this "paradox of the plankton". We conclude that an ecological indicator approach is useful for ecological modeling of phytoplankton and potentially higher trophic levels. Finally, we speculate that it could serve as a powerful tool in advancing ecosystem-based management of marine resources.

  11. Organization of radio-ecological monitoring of the areas of the Russian Federation contaminated due to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (on example of the Bryansk region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnik, Vitaly; Korobova, Elena; Vakulovsky, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    A severe accident at the Chernobyl NPP on April 26th, 1986 has led to radioactive contamination of many regions of the former USSR, now belonging to the Ukraine, the Republic of Belarus and the Russian Federation. Both natural and arable ecosystems have been subjected to fallout of radioactive isotopes. However both the distribution of radionuclides that define radioecological situation has depended not only on the initial contamination density but also on the landscape geochemical features of the areas controlling biogenic and abiogenic factors of radionuclide migration. To study and monitor peculiarities of migration of the most radioecologically significant radionuclides of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in different natural landscapes the Russian Scientific and Practical Experimental Center of the former State Chernobyl Committee has organized in 1992 a network of experimental plots in the most contaminated western part of the Bryansk region. It included 19 plots 100 m x 100 m in size which characterized 8 meadow and 11 forested catenas in the basin of the Iput' river. Cs-137 contamination level of the plots varied in 1992 from 740 kBq/m2 to 1850 kBq/m2. Although the study site has been located in the remote zone and the contamination was of condensation type the sampling performed at 11 plots registered some refractory radionuclides (144Ce, 154Eu, 238,239,240Pu and 90Sr) that proved the presence of fuel particles in fallout as far as 200 km from the damaged reactors. The sampling and monitoring scheme was organized to determine: the isotopic composition and contamination density of the plots; 2) estimation of radionuclide vertical and lateral migration; 3) evaluation of radionuclide inventories in different soil horizons; 4) calculation of radionuclide transfer in soil-plant system. Radiation measurements included field gamma-spectrometry using collimated gamma spectrometer "Corad" developed in the Kurchatov Institute and laboratory spectrometry the soil and plant samples by Canberra with HP-Ge detector. To evaluate 137Cs and 90Sr mobility a sequential extraction of radionuclides has been performed in the selected soil in radiochemical laboratory. Obtained data has been compared with the results of air-gamma survey of the area carried out by SSC AEROGEOFIZIKA (grid size: 100 m x100 m) and the data of RPA "TYPHOON" on contamination density of settlements. A comparison of these data with that of the experimental plots at different scales proved the selected monitoring scheme to be suitable for extrapolation of the obtained experimental data on radionuclide contamination the settlement and regional scale.

  12. Simple In Vitro Assay for Determining the Sensitivity of Plasmodium vivax Isolates from Fresh Human Blood to Antimalarials in Areas where P. vivax Is Endemic

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Bruce M.; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Rieckmann, Karl H.; Kotecka, Barbara M.; Coleman, Russell E.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple, field-practical, and effective in vitro method for determining the sensitivity of fresh erythrocytic Plasmodium vivax isolates to a range of antimalarials. The method used is a modification of the standard World Health Organization (WHO) microtest for determination of P. falciparum drug sensitivity. The WHO method was modified by removing leukocytes and using a growth medium supplemented with AB+ serum. We successfully carried out 34 in vitro drug assays on 39 P. vivax isolates collected from the Mae Sod malaria clinic, Tak Province, Thailand. The mean percentage of parasites maturing to schizonts (six or more merozoites) in control wells was 66.5% ± 5.9% (standard deviation). This level of growth in the control wells enabled rapid microscopic determination (5 min per isolate per drug) of the MICs of chloroquine, dihydroartemisinin, WR238605 (tafenoquine), and sulfadoxine. P. vivax was relatively sensitive to chloroquine (MIC = 160 ng/ml, 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 49.8 ng/ml) and dihydroartemisinin (MIC = 0.5 ng/ml, IC50 = 0.47 ng/ml). The poor response of P. vivax to both tafenoquine (MIC = 14,000 ng/ml, IC50 = 9,739 ng/ml) and sulfadoxine (MIC = 500,000 ng/ml, IC50 = 249,000 ng/ml) was due to the slow action of these drugs and the innate resistance of P. vivax to sulfadoxine. The in vitro assay developed in our study should be useful both for assessing the antimalarial sensitivity of P. vivax populations and for screening new antimalarials in the absence of long-term P. vivax cultures. PMID:12499187

  13. Ecology 2005 19, 648655

    E-print Network

    Altwegg, Res

    Functional Ecology 2005 19, 648­655 © 2005 British Ecological Society 648 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd virginianum, trait-mediated indirect effects Functional Ecology (2005) 19, 648­655 doi: 10.1111/j.1365

  14. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary

    E-print Network

    Wilmers, Chris

    physiology Ingrid M. Parker * Plant ecology, plant-pathogen interactions, biological invasions Eric Palkovacs-animal interactions Kathleen Kay * Plant evolutionary ecology A. Marm Kilpatrick * Disease ecology, population biology

  15. Ecology 2005 93, 431440

    E-print Network

    , phenotypic plasticity, population age, reproductive value, senescence, succession Journal of Ecology (2005. Plastic changes in seed dispersal along ecological succession: theoretical predictions from and evolutionary relevance of plastic changes in seed dispersal along ecological succession. Our model describes

  16. ECOGRAPHY 25: 553557, 2002 Integrating the statistical analysis of spatial data in ecology

    E-print Network

    Liebhold, Andrew

    ECOGRAPHY 25: 553­557, 2002 Integrating the statistical analysis of spatial data in ecology A. M of spatial data in ecology. ­ Ecography 25: 553­557. In many areas of ecology there is an increasing emphasis for the analysis of spatial data has yielded considerable insight into various ecological problems, this diversity

  17. Ecology of phlebotomines (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a transitional area between the Amazon and the Cerrado in the State of Maranhão, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campos, A M; Matavelli, R; Santos, C L C dos; Moraes, L S; Rebêlo, J M M

    2013-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest and the Brazilian Cerrado both possess high phlebotomine diversity. The fragmentation of these habitats has resulted in the appearance of human cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In one altered area of mixed primary vegetation (forest and Cerrado) and its adjacent settlement in the northeast state of Maranhão, Brazil, evidence exists for the active transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Accordingly, an entomological investigation was performed in both the forest and the settlement to compare the phlebotomine vector faunain each environment. The study was conducted from September 2009 to August 2010 in the municipality of Itapecuru Mirim in the state of Maranhão, Brazil. The phlebotomine species were captured using 24 light Center for Disease Control and Prevention traps that were placed in the forest and the settlement (peridomicile and intradomicile). The similarity between the phlebotomine compositions in the forest and those in the settlement was determined using a Principal Coordinate Analysis based on a dissimilarity matrix that was calculated using the Bray-Curtis index (relative abundance) and the Jaccard index (presence and absence of species). In total, 29 Lutzomyia species and one Brumptomyia species were collected. The phlebotomines were diverse and abundant in both the forest fragment (27 species, 4,606 specimens) and the settlement (22 species, 753 specimens). The most abundant species were L. infraspinosa (25%), L. davisi (21%), L. antunesi (21%), L. longipalpis (9%), L. saulensis (6%), L. flaviscutellata (5%), and L. wellcomei (4%). Some species were found strictly in the forest, other species were exclusive to the anthropic environment, and some species colonized both of the studied environments. The phlebotomines adaptation to these modified environments explains the autochthonous outbreak of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:23427652

  18. Gaussian dispersion and dosimetric modeling sensitivity to area-specific 1982--86 meteorological data collected at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.; Parker, M.J.

    1991-09-13

    Radiological dose to the offsite maximum individual or the 50-mile population is often estimated assuming that operational atmospheric releases originate from the geographical center of the Savannah River Site. Historically, meteorological data collected from instrumentation on the H-Area tower have been utilized to estimate atmospheric dispersion from centrally located ``releases.`` This paper examines the effect on dose predictions using meteorological data from seven onsite towers located at A, C, D, F, H, K, and P areas to describe meteorological conditions at the central release location. Maximum individual dose estimates using both annual and short-term average air concentrations are well within 20% of the mean prediction. Population dose estimates are also within 20% of the mean prediction. Population dose estimates are also within 20% of the mean except for two-hour doses using H-Area meteorological data, which is less than the average estimate by about 30%.

  19. Gaussian dispersion and dosimetric modeling sensitivity to area-specific 1982--86 meteorological data collected at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.; Parker, M.J.

    1991-09-13

    Radiological dose to the offsite maximum individual or the 50-mile population is often estimated assuming that operational atmospheric releases originate from the geographical center of the Savannah River Site. Historically, meteorological data collected from instrumentation on the H-Area tower have been utilized to estimate atmospheric dispersion from centrally located releases.'' This paper examines the effect on dose predictions using meteorological data from seven onsite towers located at A, C, D, F, H, K, and P areas to describe meteorological conditions at the central release location. Maximum individual dose estimates using both annual and short-term average air concentrations are well within 20% of the mean prediction. Population dose estimates are also within 20% of the mean prediction. Population dose estimates are also within 20% of the mean except for two-hour doses using H-Area meteorological data, which is less than the average estimate by about 30%.

  20. Ecology, 85(1), 2004, pp. 242257 2004 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-print Network

    Helsinki, University of

    the landscape into habitat patches, other open areas, and forests. Edge-mediated behavior is found to have behavior; habitat patch size; heterogeneous landscape; mark­recapture; Melitaea diamina; movement242 Ecology, 85(1), 2004, pp. 242­257 2004 by the Ecological Society of America HABITAT

  1. Ecology Explorers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web site from the Center for Environmental Studies at Arizona State University was developed as part of the Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-term Ecological Research Project (CAP LTER), but can be used by any classrooms interested in exploring urban ecosystems that surround them. Students and teachers learn about the scientific method and several data collection protocols that they can use right in their schoolyard. The site is attractive and easy to navigate; information is explained clearly and logically. A number of lesson plans for a variety of K-12 age groups will help teachers incorporate activities from this Web site into their classroom.

  2. Migration Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alerstam, Thomas

    This site from the University of Lund, Sweden, introduces various research studies in the field of Migration Ecology including research information on "Orientation and navigation," "Flight," "Migration patterns," and "Energetics." The mission of the group is "to forward, by research and teaching, the understanding of adaptive values and evolutionary possibilities and limitations in animal migration, -flight, -orientation and energetics." Many of the group's publications are available for free as PDFs, and the site offers a simple search mechanism to help visitors find the publications they are seeking.

  3. Civic Ecology: A Postmodern Approach to Ecological Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    Human agency is transforming the planetary processes at unprecedented rates risking damaging essential life-support systems. Climate change, massive species extinction, land degradation, resources depletion, overpopulation, poverty and social injustice are all the result of human choices and non-sustainable ways of life. The survival of our modern economic systems depends upon insatiable consumption - a simple way of life no longer satisfies most people. Detached, instrumental rationality has created an ideal of liberalism based on individual pursuit of self-interest, leading the way into unprecedented material progress but bringing with it human alienation, social injustice, and ecological degradation. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce a community-based systems response to a growing sense that the interlocked social-ecological crisis is as much a problem of human thought and behavior as it is about identifying carrying capacities and CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. This approach, referred to here as civic ecology, presents a new and important paradigm shift in sustainability practice that attempts to bring together and integrate ecological ideas and postmodern thinking. As such, it is as much a holistic, dynamic, and synergistic approach to ecological sustainability, as it is a philosophy of life and ethical perspective born of ecological understanding and insight. Civic ecology starts with the proposition that the key factor determining the health of the ecosphere is the behavior of human beings, and therefore many of the most important issues related to sustainability lie in the areas of human thought and culture. Thus, the quest for sustainability must include as a central concern the transformation of psychological and behavioral patterns that have become an imminent danger to planetary health. At the core of this understanding is a fundamental paradigm shift from the basic commitments of modern Western culture to its model of mechanism and fragmentary modes of existence, to a more relational (ecological) view of the world in which balance and harmony are achieved by ever-changing complexity and differentiation. Central to this view is the recognition that human communities will become increasingly more just and sustainable if their citizens understand, are committed to, and share, a set of values and ecological principles. Shared purposes and principles, however, cannot be handed down from above but must be developed from the bottom-up through community engagement and ecological citizenship.

  4. Behavior of redox-sensitive elements during weathering of granite in subtropical area using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuo-Jun; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Cui, Li-Feng; Liu, Wen-Jing; Liu, Tao-Ze; Liu, Bao-Jian; Fan, Bai-Ling

    2015-06-01

    The variation in chemical compositions of regolith along a weathering profile developed on a granite substrate in Jiangxi province, in southern China, was investigated in this paper, with the aim to characterize the speciation of redox-sensitive elements and to evaluate their mobility and redistribution during chemical weathering. Mass balance calculations indicate titanium (Ti) is the most immobile element in this weathering profile. A new method, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, was used to determine the speciation of Fe and Mn along the profile. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra show Fe in saprolith is stabilized mainly in the state of Fe(III), suggesting Fe is as immobile as conservative elements during granite weathering. Mn K-edge XANES spectra show Mn (III/IV) oxides are reduced to Mn(II) in surface soil, where soil organic matter (SOM) acts as an important reductant. Although Ce, Co and V were unable to be analysed by XAFS, their concentrations have significant correlations with that of Mn, indicating that the mobilization and redistribution of Ce, Co and V may also be governed by redox condition. All in all, the results suggest that redox process impacts significantly on the redistribution of Mn, Ce, Co and V along the profile. The successful application of XAFS in the study on migration of redox-sensitive elements during granite chemical weathering has provided valuable information for the understanding and evaluating the geochemical behavior of elements in the environment.

  5. Emphasizing the ecology in parasite community ecology

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Amy B.

    Emphasizing the ecology in parasite community ecology Amy B. Pedersen1 and Andy Fenton2 1 Institute of parasites. However, the significance of interactions between species and the processes that shape within-host parasite communities remain unclear. Studies of parasite community ecology are often descriptive, focusing

  6. Effect of variation of average pore size and specific surface area of ZnO electrode (WE) on efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized with tremendous increase in specific surface area of up to 578 m2/g which was 5.54 m2/g in previous reports (J. Phys. Chem. C 113:14676-14680, 2009). Different mesoporous ZnO nanoparticles with average pore sizes ranging from 7.22 to 13.43 nm and specific surface area ranging from 50.41 to 578 m2/g were prepared through the sol-gel method via a simple evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The hydrolysis rate of zinc acetate was varied using different concentrations of sodium hydroxide. Morphology, crystallinity, porosity, and J-V characteristics of the materials have been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and Keithley instruments. PMID:25339855

  7. A highly sensitive probe detecting low pH area of HeLa cells based on rhodamine B modified beta-cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takuto; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Koizumi, Yukio; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akane; Ito, Shinichi; Hamada, Fumio

    2009-08-15

    Two kinds of rhodamine modified beta-cyclodextrins (R-1 and R-2), which are coupled up ethylene diamine (EDA) and tetraethylene pentamine (TEPA) between Rh B and beta-cyclodextrin, respectively, have been synthesized. R-1 and 2 work as a new fluorogenic probe for monitoring pH of Hela cells, and MTT of assay R-1, R-2, and rhodamine B indicate that less a cytotoxicity of those R-1 and R-2 than that of rhodamine B, where R-1 has much less one than that of R-2. The fluorogenetic probe capability of R-2 was recognized in an area of acidic area in living cell, which is lysosome. PMID:19616959

  8. Critical areas: Satellite power systems concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Critical Areas are defined and discussed in the various areas pertinent to satellite power systems. The presentation is grouped into five areas (General, Space Systems, Solar Energy Conversion, Microwave Systems, and Environment/Ecology) with a sixth area (Power Relay) considered separately in an appendix. Areas for Future Consideration as critical areas are discussed in a second appendix.

  9. [Comparison of sustainable development status in Heilongjiang Province based on traditional ecological footprint method and emergy ecological footprint method].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-feng; Wang, Hong-yan; Xiao, Du-ning; Wang, Da-qing

    2008-11-01

    By using traditional ecological footprint method and its modification, emergy ecological footprint method, the sustainable development status of Heilongjiang Province in 2005 was analyzed. The results showed that the ecological deficits of Heilongjiang Province in 2005 based on emergy and conventional ecological footprint methods were 1.919 and 0.6256 hm2 x cap(-1), respectively. The ecological footprint value based on the two methods both exceeded its carrying capacity, which indicated that the social and economic development of the study area was not sustainable. Emergy ecological footprint method was used to discuss the relationships between human's material demand and ecosystem resources supply, and more stable parameters such as emergy transformity and emergy density were introduced into emergy ecological footprint method, which overcame some of the shortcomings of conventional ecological method. PMID:19238861

  10. Ecology of Wahlberg's velvet gecko, Homopholis wahlbergii, in southern Africa

    E-print Network

    Keogh, Scott

    Ecology of Wahlberg's velvet gecko, Homopholis wahlbergii, in southern Africa § Martin J. Whiting1 and geographic areas. Southern Africa has one of the most diverse gecko faunas per unit area in the world (Branch

  11. Ecology 2004 18, 404413

    E-print Network

    Kerkhoff, Andrew J.

    predictions and fundamental insights. EQUILIBRIUM WATER BALANCE AND THE ECOLOGICAL OPTIMALITY HYPOTHESESFunctional Ecology 2004 18, 404­413 © 2004 British Ecological Society 404 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. An ecological evaluation of Eagleson's optimality hypotheses A. J. KERKHOFF,* S. N. MARTENS* and B. T. MILNE

  12. Ecology 2002 90, 714727

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    , seed- ling establishment Journal of Ecology (2002) 90, 714­727 Introduction Limits to seed dispersal Society, Journal of Ecology, 90, 714­727 in experimental manipulations of seed dispersal, and dueJournal of Ecology 2002 90, 714­727 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science, Ltd Role

  13. Ecology 2004 92, 372383

    E-print Network

    Moles, Angela

    , seed mass, seedling emergence, seedling establishment Journal of Ecology (2004) 92, 372-mail amoles@bio.mq.edu.au). #12;373 Seedling survival and seed size © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Journal of Ecology 2004 92, 372­383 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd

  14. Toward an Ecological Economics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Stanfield; HERMAN E. DALY

    1983-01-01

    Costanza, R. and Daly, H.E., 1987. Toward an ecological economics. Ecol. Modelling, 38: 1-7. Integrating ecology and economics is increasingly important as humanity's impact on the natural world increases. Current paradigms in both fields are too narrow (and seem to be getting narrower). This paper introduces and summarizes this special issue of Ecological Modeling devoted to ecological economics. There are

  15. Plasmodium vivax Drug Resistance Genes; Pvmdr1 and Pvcrt-o Polymorphisms in Relation to Chloroquine Sensitivity from a Malaria Endemic Area of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Rungsihirunrat, Kanchana; Muhamad, Poonuch; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Kuesap, Jiraporn; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possible molecular markers of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium vivax isolates in Thailand. A total of 30 P. vivax isolates were collected from a malaria endemic area along the Thai-Myanmar border in Mae Sot district of Thailand. Dried blood spot samples were collected for analysis of Pvmdr1 and Pvcrt-o polymorphisms. Blood samples (100 ?l) were collected by finger-prick for in vitro chloroquine susceptibility testing by schizont maturation inhibition assay. Based on the cut-off IC50 of 100 nM, 19 (63.3%) isolates were classified as chloroquine resistant P. vivax isolates. Seven non-synonymous mutations and 2 synonymous were identified in Pvmdr1 gene. Y976F and F1076L mutations were detected in 7 (23.3%) and 16 isolates (53.3%), respectively. Analysis of Pvcrt-o gene revealed that all isolates were wild-type. Our results suggest that chloroquine resistance gene is now spreading in this area. Monitoring of chloroquine resistant molecular markers provide a useful tool for future control of P. vivax malaria. PMID:25748708

  16. Effects of forest patch size on physiological stress and immunocompetence in an area-sensitive passerine, the Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris): an experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Suorsa, Petri; Helle, Heikki; Koivunen, Vesa; Huhta, Esa; Nikula, Ari; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2004-01-01

    We manipulated the primary brood size of Eurasian treecreepers (Certhia familiaris) breeding in different sized forest patches (0.5-12.8 ha) in moderately fragmented landscapes. We examined the effects of brood size manipulation (reduced, control, enlarged) and forest patch size on physiological stress (heterophil-lymphocyte ratios; H/L), body condition and cell-mediated immunocompetence (phytohaemagglutinin test). Nestlings' H/L ratios were negatively related to forest patch area in control and enlarged broods, whereas no effects were found in reduced broods. The effects of forest patch area were strongest in enlarged broods, which had, in general, twofold higher H/L ratios than control and reduced broods. The elevated H/L ratios were positively related to nestling mortality and negatively correlated with body-condition indices suggesting that the origin of stress in nestlings was mainly nutritional. Cell-mediated immunity of nestlings was not related to brood manipulation or to forest patch size. Also, the H/L ratios of adults were not related to brood manipulation or forest patch size. In addition, parental H/L ratios and body condition were not related to nestling H/L ratios. Our results suggest that during the breeding period the deleterious effects of habitat loss are seen explicitly in growing young. PMID:15101703

  17. Impact and sensitivity of parameters in debris flow models: A Monte Carlo simulation on fluid rheology, geometry and position of release areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Hergarten, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows are globally abundant threats for settlements and infrastructure in mountainous regions. Crucial influencing factors for hazard zone planning and mitigation strategies are based on numerical models that describe granular flow on general topography by solving a depth-averaged form of the Navier Stokes equations in combination with an appropriate flow resistance law. In case of debris flows, the Voellmy rheology is a widely used constitutive law describing the flow resistance. It combines a velocity independent Coulomb friction term with a term proportional to the square of the velocity as it is commonly used for turbulent flow. Parameters of the Vollemy fluid are determined by back analysis from observed events so that modelled events mimic their historical counterparts. Determined parameters characterizing individual debris flows show a large variability (related to fluid composition and surface roughness). However, there may be several sets of parameters that lead to a similar depositional pattern but cause large differences in flow velocity and momentum along the flow path. Fluid volumes of hazardous debris flows are estimated by analyzing historic events, precipitation time series, hydrographs or empirical relationships that correlate fluid volumes and drainage areas of torrential catchments. Beside uncertainties in the determination of the fluid volume the position and geometry of the initial masses of forthcoming debris flows are in general not well constrained but heavily influence the flow dynamics and the depositional pattern even in the run-out zones. In this study we present a new, freely available numerical description of rapid mass movements based on the GERRIS framework and early results of a Monte Carlo simulation exploring effects of the aforementioned parameters on run-out distance, inundated area and momentum. The novel numerical model describes rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates and appropriate correction terms to compensate large topographic gradients. The numerical model was successfully tested against an analytical solution for fluid flow on an inclined plane and by a comparison of results with another state of the art model (RAMMS) on synthetic and real world topographies. Numerical models describing rapid mass movements that initiate by a so called "block release" (entire fluid starts at the beginning) show the evolution of characteristic pattern in flow depth and velocity: on uniform slopes (inclined plane) the highest velocity and flow depth is observed at the front and the undeformed body of the fluid layer that approaches rapidly to a steady state velocity. The tail becomes increasingly stretched and thinned accompanied by reduced process celerity. The main body of the rapid mass movement is progressively "consumed" by the tail until the front itself decays and the moving mass decelerates over all. However, even for such a simple (synthetic) topography it is non-trivial to predict whether a given release volume initiated from a small or large initial release area (high versus low initial flow depth) will cause a higher momentum in the run-out zone and a larger run-out distance. The fluid layer of rapid mass movements on general topography featuring curved and twisted flow paths is also progressively stretched over time but the influence of the spatial position and the geometry of the release areas in combination with different sets of rheological parameters and topographic features along the flow path is unpredictable without a series of numerical experiments. Early results indicate that the spatial position and geometry of the release volume in combination with various parameter sets within a realistic range of parameters characterizing the Voellmy fluid heavily influence momentum, inundated areas and run-out distances. Even worse, different parameter sets lead to very similar depositional pattern but may differ in momentum along the flow path by more than one order of magnitude and beyond. We s

  18. Influences of Terrain Complexity on the Temporal Sensitivity of Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes to Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, W. M.; Emanuel, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Exchanges of carbon, water, and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere not only influence Earth's climate, but they are also sensitive to climate change. Terrain complexity (e.g. slope, aspect, upslope accumulated area and other variables) have the potential to mediate the sensitivity of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE), gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE) to climate variability by influencing soil water availability, which in turn mediates the sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem fluxes to temperature and precipitation. Here we use 178 site-years of data from 31 different sites across the Ameriflux network to investigate the following questions: (1) How sensitive are NEE, GPP and RE to temperature and precipitation across a wide range of temporal scales, climate, vegetation and terrain conditions? (2) Where and when does terrain complexity mediate the sensitivity of NEE, GPP and RE to climate variability? and (3) Does terrain complexity provide a basic template to help to predict the sensitivities of NEE, GPP and RE to climate despite biophysical differences across sites? Our results suggest that temperature sensitivity of NEE, GPP and RE across sites was strongest at the daily timescale whereas sensitivity to precipitation was greater at the annual timescale. The magnitude of such sensitivities varied greatly among sites, suggesting the existence of locally imposed controls, including terrain complexity. Overall, NEE, GPP and RE sensitivities to temperature and precipitation were found to be influenced by slope and aspect across sites; however, other terrain variables such as upslope accumulated area help explain the climate sensitivity observed at certain sites. Altogether, our results suggest that terrain complexity does contribute to the sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem fluxes to climate variability; therefore, our understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling may be improved by considering terrain complexity in addition to ecological characteristics as indicators of how terrestrial landscapes respond to climate variability and climate change.

  19. Triazine herbcides: Ecological risk assessment in North American surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, K.R. [Univ. of Guelph (Canada)

    1996-10-01

    The triazine herbicides are some of the most widely used pesticides in North America. Some are found in surface waters in North America and risks to aquatic ecosystems are a possible concern. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive aquatic ecological risk assessment conducted using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The assessment of exposure data concentrated on Midwestern us watersheds, the area of greatest triazine use in North America and showed that concentrations of some triazines rarely exceeded 20 {mu}g/L in rivers, streams, and reservoirs. The effects assessment showed that phytoplankton were the most sensitive organisms to triazines followed, in decreasing order of sensitivity, by macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton and fish. Distribution analysis of sensitivity to atrazine showed 10th percentile of 37 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 5.4 {mu}g/L for LC50s in algae and plants. Simazine showed 10th percentiles of 188 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 27 {mu}g/L for LC50s in aquatic plants. Comparisons of the exposure and effects distributions showed low probabilities of exceeding the 10th percentiles of the sensitivity distributions. These results will be discussed in relation to the mechanism of action of these substances and other stressors in the environment.

  20. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...characterizing areas designated as ecological preserves or as natural areas are contained in the following publications: Soil Taxonomy, a Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys, USDA-NRCS Agricultural Handbook...

  1. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...characterizing areas designated as ecological preserves or as natural areas are contained in the following publications: Soil Taxonomy, a Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys, USDA-NRCS Agricultural Handbook...

  2. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...characterizing areas designated as ecological preserves or as natural areas are contained in the following publications: Soil Taxonomy, a Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys, USDA-NRCS Agricultural Handbook...

  3. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...characterizing areas designated as ecological preserves or as natural areas are contained in the following publications: Soil Taxonomy, a Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys, USDA-NRCS Agricultural Handbook...

  4. Prospective ecological risk assessment of sediment resuspension in an estuary.

    PubMed

    Rial, Diego; Beiras, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    This study assesses potential ecological risk of resuspended sediment in the water column during the construction of a viaduct in the estuary of the Ulla river (Galicia, NW Iberian Peninsula), a shellfish production area. Chemical analyses and toxicity bioassays with elutriates were performed with sediments from the area where the three pillars of the viaduct will be located (CT1, CT2 and CT3) and a reference sediment (A2). Acute toxicity of the elutriate was evaluated in five species of three trophic levels (Isochrysis galbana, Paracentrotus lividus, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Venerupis pullastra and Siriella armata). The sediments of the pillars showed moderate levels of contamination by trace elements (Cu, Cr). Clam and sea urchin embryo-larval toxicity tests showed slightly higher sensitivity than mussel embryo tests, and toxicity was not detected for phytoplankton and mysid bioassays. The predicted no-effect environmental concentration (PNEC) was calculated from the arithmetic mean of the lowest calculated EC(50)s for each sampling site. The predicted environmental concentration (PEC) was estimated from a simple dilution model and the PEC/PNEC ratio was calculated according to different scenarios of resuspension. Negligible ecological risk in the water column is expected during construction of the pillars. PMID:22763505

  5. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology is based in Germany and their work encompasses a wide range of inquiry into the relationships between everything from bugs and symbiotic bacteria to odor activation in drosophila. Visitors can wander through the News area to get a sense of the ongoing research projects and overall mission. In the Institute area visitors can learn the basics of chemical ecology, the management of the Institute and their cooperative agreements with other like-minded organizations. The Departments area contains information about separate research groups, which are focused on entomology, bioorganic chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular ecology. Scientists and others will want to look over the Publications area, as it contains hundreds of research papers which can be searched by department, year, or citation number. Finally, visitors can also search available job openings.

  6. Reflections on Plant and Soil Nematode Ecology: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Howard; Griffiths, Bryan S.; Porazinska, Dorota L.; Powers, Thomas O.; Wang, Koon-Hui; Tenuta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight key developments in nematode ecology from its beginnings to where it stands today as a discipline within nematology. Emerging areas of research appear to be driven by crop production constraints, environmental health concerns, and advances in technology. In contrast to past ecological studies which mainly focused on management of plant-parasitic nematodes, current studies reflect differential sensitivity of nematode faunae. These differences, identified in both aquatic and terrestrial environments include response to stressors, environmental conditions, and management practices. Methodological advances will continue to influence the role nematodes have in addressing the nature of interactions between organisms, and of organisms with their environments. In particular, the C. elegans genetic model, nematode faunal analysis and nematode metagenetic analysis can be used by ecologists generally and not restricted to nematologists. PMID:23482864

  7. Review of the ecology of malaria vectors in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Zahar, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of published records and unpublished reports to WHO, the author reviews the information available on the ecology of 15 anopheline malaria vectors occurring in areas of the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region where attack measures are being applied. The information, which is still incomplete, relates chiefly to the period since 1956, the year when the malaria eradication programme in the Region was launched. An attempt is made to evaluate the control measures undertaken so far, and to provide data on the sensitivity to insecticides, behaviour, and mortality of vector populations. PMID:4549034

  8. Modeling sensitive elasmobranch habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennino, M. Grazia; Muñoz, Facundo; Conesa, David; López-Quílez, Antonio; Bellido, José Marí; a

    2013-10-01

    Basic information on the distribution and habitat preferences of ecologically important species is essential for their management and protection. In the Mediterranean Sea there is increasing concern over elasmobranch species because their biological (ecological) characteristics make them highly vulnerable to fishing pressure. Their removal could affect the structure and function of marine ecosystems, inducing changes in trophic interactions at the community level due to the selective elimination of predators or prey species, competitors and species replacement. In this study Bayesian hierarchical spatial models are used to map the sensitive habitats of the three most caught elasmobranch species (Galeus melastomus, Scyliorhinus canicula, Etmopterus spinax) in the western Mediterranean Sea, based on fishery-dependent bottom trawl data. Results show that habitats associated with hard substrata and sandy beds, mainly in deep waters and with a high seabed gradient, have a greater probability registering the presence of the studied species than those associated with muddy shallow waters. Temperature and chlorophyll-? concentration show a negative relationship with S. canicula occurrence. Our results identify some of the sensitive habitats for elasmobranchs in the western Mediterranean Sea (GSA06 South), providing essential and easy-to-use interpretation tools, such as predictive distribution maps, with the final aim of improving management and conservation of these vulnerable species.

  9. Ecology of Inland Saline Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pawan K. Kasera; Sher Mohammed

    \\u000a This chapter describes the ecology and adaptive strategies of inland halophytes growing in natural saline areas, with special\\u000a reference to classification, metabolic products, soil–water relationships, the role of proline in their survival, etc. Studies\\u000a on eight saline plants, viz. Aeluropus lagopoides (Poaceae), Cressa cretica (Convolvulaceae), Salsola baryosma (Chenopodiaceae), Sesuvium sesuvioides (Aizoaceae), Sporobolus helvolus (Poaceae), Suaeda fruticosa (Chenopodiaceae), Trianthema triquetra (Aizoaceae),

  10. Ecological response surfaces nested in a process-based vegetation-water blance model to investigate species-level sensitivity to projected climatic chanage in the North American Central Grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, J.M. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Neilson, R.P. [USDA Forest Service, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Empirical ecological response surfaces were nested in MAPSS, a process-based vegetation-water balance model, to increase the taxonomic resolution of simulations of vegetation change under altered climates in the Central Grasslands. Response surfaces developed for dominant grass species predict the probability of dominance as a function of both climatic variables and variables derived by MAPSS. The former include indices of warmth and moisture more directly related to the response of plants than annual or monthly measures of temperature or precipitation commonly used in ecological response surface modeling. The MAPSS-derived predictor variables include evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and lifeform LAI. Under current climatic conditions, the response surfaces provide estimates of grass species dominance with a high degree of success. Much of the variation in the simulated probability of dominance is related to the species` individualistic response to regional gradients of temperature and moisture. The equilibrium response under different doubled-CO2 climatic scenarios suggests the potential for significant change in the distribution of species dominance consistent with biome-level change simulated by MAPSS.

  11. Long Term Ecological Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scott Cooper

    Students analyze data on temperature and precipitation collected from 26 different Long Term Ecological Research sites and compare them with annual net primary productivity. The students then form an ecological rule to explain their results.

  12. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  13. Rattan: Ecological balance in a borneo rainforest swidden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph A. Weinstock

    1983-01-01

    Various agricultural strategies have been tried in swidden areas of tropical rainforest. Some have focused on food production,\\u000a others on cash crops. Certain strategies have disrupted the ecological balance of the rainforest, while others developed with\\u000a ecological stability in mind, but rarely have food production and cash cropping been coterminous and maintained ecological\\u000a stability. Rattan in tropical rainforest swidden of

  14. Ecological Footprint Calculator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson introduces students to the concept of ecological footprint, the overall impact of an individual on the environment. Topics include how ecological footprints are calculated, how individual footprints translate to entire nations or to the Earth, and the connection between ecological footprint and biodiversity. The students will consult some online resources on ecological footprint and use an online claculator to determine their individual fooprints, make some comparisons, and examine how making some changes in their consumption would reduce their footprints.

  15. Invertebrate Ecological Immunology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Rolff; M. T. Siva-Jothy

    2003-01-01

    Ecological immunology is a rapidly expanding field that examines the causes and consequences of variation in immune function in the context of evolution and of ecology. Millions of invertebrate species rely solely on innate immunity, compared with only 45,000 vertebrate species that rely additionally on an acquired immune system. Despite this difference in diversity, most studies of ecological immunology focus

  16. A New Urban Ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James P. Collins; Ann Kinzig; Nancy B. Grimm; William F. Fagan; Diane Hope; Jianguo Wu; Elizabeth Borer

    2000-01-01

    Ecology is the study of natural systems at the community level. So how do ecologists account for the role of people, who follow rules different from most other organisms and communities? Now that human activity has grown into a global ecological force, some ecologists are finding that traditional ecological theory does not provide good ways of understanding systems dominated by

  17. Ecological design applied

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Todd; Erica J. G Brown; Erik Wells

    2003-01-01

    Over the past three decades ecological design has been applied to an increasingly diverse range of technologies and innovative solutions for the management of resources. Ecological technologies have been created for the food sector, waste conversion industries, architecture and landscape design, and to the field of environmental protection and restoration. The five case studies presented here represent applications of ecological

  18. Wildfire History and Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Part of a great site on the land use history of the Colorado Plateau from Northern Arizona University, this site offers a brief overview of wildfire history and ecology on the Plateau with links to information about ponderosa pine fire ecology, reintroduction of fire to forest ecosystems, and fire ecology research studies.

  19. Ecology and speciation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew R. Orr; Thomas B. Smith

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies on diverse taxa suggest that natural selection caused by shifts in ecology or invasions of novel habitats plays an important role in adaptive divergence and speciation. Exciting new studies integrating approaches from both the field and the laboratory suggest that ecological shifts can result in extremely rapid rates of evolutionary divergence. Although experimental approaches that link rapid ecological

  20. Ecology 2005 19, 699706

    E-print Network

    Traveset, Anna

    vegetation, ornithocory, saurochory, seed emergence rate Functional Ecology (2005) 19, 699­706 doi: 10.1111/jFunctional Ecology 2005 19, 699­706 © 2005 British Ecological Society 699 -Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. Effect of seed passage through birds and lizards on emergence rate of mediterranean species

  1. Ecology 2006 94, 838845

    E-print Network

    Haddad, Nick

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Seed predation, not seed dispersal, explains the landscape, predator limitation, seed addition, seed dispersal, seed limitation Journal of Ecology (2006) 94, 838Journal of Ecology 2006 94, 838­845 © 2006 The Authors Journal compilation © 2006 British

  2. Ecology 2007 95, 13941403

    E-print Network

    Traveset, Anna

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Secondary seed dispersal systems, frugivorous lizards and hardness, seed distribution, seed viability and germination. Journal of Ecology (2007) 95, 1394­1403 doiJournal of Ecology 2007 95, 1394­1403 © 2007 The Authors Journal compilation © 2007 British

  3. Augmenting aquatic species sensitivity distributions with interspecies toxicity estimation models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) are cumulative distribution functions of species toxicity values. The SSD approach is increasingly being used in ecological risk assessment, but is often limited by available toxicity data necessary for diverse species representation. In ...

  4. Jones PJS, Qiu W & De Santo EM (2013) Governing marine protected areas: social-ecological resilience through institutional diversity. Marine Policy, 41, 5-13 -doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2012.12.026

    E-print Network

    Jones, Peter JS

    2013-01-01

    -ecological resilience through institutional diversity. Marine Policy, 41, 5-13 - doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2012, is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2012.12.026. This version is available here Abstract Marine.1016/j.marpol.2012.12.026 Marine conservation in the face of strong driving forces It is widely

  5. Detecting ecological change on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dustan, P.

    2011-12-01

    Remote sensing offers the potential to observe the response of coral reef ecosystems to environmental perturbations on a geographical scale not previously accessible. However, coral reef environments are optically, spatially, and temporally complex habitats which all present significant challenges for extracting meaningful information. Virtually every member of the reef community possesses some degree of photosynthetic capability. The community thus generates a matrix of fine scale features with bio-optical signatures that blend as the scale of observation increases. Furthermore, to have any validity, the remotely sensed signal must be "calibrated" to the bio-optics of the reef, a difficult and resource intensive process due to a convergence of photosynthetic light harvesting by green, red, and brown algal pigment systems. To make matters more complex, reefs are overlain by a seawater skin with its own set of hydrological optical challenges. Rather than concentrating on classification, my research has attempted to track change by following the variation in geo-referenced pixel brightness over time with a technique termed temporal texture. Environmental periodicities impart a phenology to the variation in brightness and departures from the norm are easily detected as statistical outliers. This opens the door to using current orbiting technology to efficiently examine large areas of sea for change. If hot spots are detected, higher resolution sensors and field studies can be focused as resources permit. While this technique does not identify the type of change, it is sensitive, simple to compute, easy to automate and grounded in ecological niche theory

  6. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  7. IMPRINT OF THE PAST: ECOLOGICAL HISTORY OF NEW BEDFORD HARBOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    To have an understanding of ecological conditions in a highly impacted area, it is important to look at how past events affected current conditions. Historical studies provide an understanding of how current ecological conditions arose, provide information to identify past pollut...

  8. Syllabus -Wetlands Ecology (7422) Dr. Weston H. Nowlin

    E-print Network

    Upchurch, Gary - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    for more advanced study of wetland ecology and/or management. Course Assignments and Grading Exams Material citations. The paper should be no more than 15 pages in length (excluding figures). Grade Distribution Exam the ecology these systems using numerous case studies as examples. Areas we will specifically discuss are

  9. Plant Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The unit is designed to be completed in six or more sessions. The comprehensive curriculum materials contain information for teachers, including activity tips and an overview of the many varied reasons that plant life flourishes in one plot but not another. Students speculate on why plants are more abundant in some areas of the site than others. They list factors that might account for the differences, such as temperature, humidity, light, soil, rainfall, wind, and human or animal activity, and figure out how they can collect more data on these factors. They discuss why it might be important to take a count of all the individual plants in each plot and develop a plan for conducting the field study. A reading selection describes how scientists count plants and gives students tips for conducting their own survey. Students then count plants and record their data. Several optional activities are provided.

  10. The Ecological Validity of Clinical Tests of Memory and Attention in Multiple Sclerosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher I. Higginson; Peter A. Arnett; William D. Voss

    2000-01-01

    Ecological validity—the degree to which clinical tests of cognitive functioning predict functional impairment—has recently become an area of interest in neuropsychology. The current study used a sample of 31 cognitively and functionally impaired multiple sclerosis (MS) patients to determine if tests commonly used to assess memory and attentional functioning in MS are ecologically valid. Two methods of improving the ecological

  11. Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.

    2007-12-01

    Discussion of climate sensitivity requires careful definition of forcings, feedbacks and response times, indeed, foggy definitions have produced flawed assessments of climate sensitivity. The best information available on climate sensitivity comes from insightful interpretation of the Earth's history aided by quantitative information from climate models and understanding of climate processes. Climate sensitivity is a strong function of time scale, in part because of the nature of climate feedbacks. Unfortunately for humanity, the preponderance of feedbacks on the century time scale appears to be positive. The chief implication is the need for a sharp reversal in the trend of human-made climate forcing, if we are to avoid creating a planet that is dramatically different than the one on which civilization developed.

  12. Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology (TIEE) is a peer-reviewed web-based collection of ecological educational materials. It is "a resource for busy ecology faculty who are looking for new ways to reach their students, or who perhaps want to learn more about teaching and learning." Each of the volumes here contains Experiments, Issues, and Teaching. In the Experiments area, visitors can find resources for laboratory settings, while the Issues section features classroom exercises and web-based materials. On the site's homepage, visitors will find the All Volumes link, which will allow them to look over all the resources dating back to 2004. The field experiments area includes resources such as "Using Steam Leaf Packs to Explore Community Assembly" and "Biodiversity Responses Across a Gradient of Human Influence."

  13. SEM probe of IC radiation sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Stanley, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) used to irradiate single integrated circuit (IC) subcomponent to test for radiation sensitivity can localize area of IC less than .03 by .03 mm for determination of exact location of radiation sensitive section.

  14. Recent developments in structural sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments are reviewed in two major areas of structural sensitivity analysis: sensitivity of static and transient response; and sensitivity of vibration and buckling eigenproblems. Recent developments from the standpoint of computational cost, accuracy, and ease of implementation are presented. In the area of static response, current interest is focused on sensitivity to shape variation and sensitivity of nonlinear response. Two general approaches are used for computing sensitivities: differentiation of the continuum equations followed by discretization, and the reverse approach of discretization followed by differentiation. It is shown that the choice of methods has important accuracy and implementation implications. In the area of eigenproblem sensitivity, there is a great deal of interest and significant progress in sensitivity of problems with repeated eigenvalues. In addition to reviewing recent contributions in this area, the paper raises the issue of differentiability and continuity associated with the occurrence of repeated eigenvalues.

  15. Areas, Volumes, Surface Areas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-07-28

    This printable sheet is an excellent reference tool for geometry students. It details the formulae for finding the area, volume, and surface area for a variety of two- and three-dimensional shapes and includes an illustration of each that shows which measurements are important to the calculation. Presented are: areas of polygons (square, rectangle, parallelogram, trapezoid, circle, ellipse, triangles); volumes of polyhedra (cube, rectangular prism, irregular prism, cylinder, pyramid, cone, sphere, ellipsoid); and surface area (cube, prism, sphere).

  16. HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS: A USEFUL EDUCATIONAL TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An historical analysis that presents the ecological consequences of development can be a valuable educational tool for citizens, students, and environmental managers. In highly impacted areas, the cumulative impacts of multiple stressors can result in complex environmental condit...

  17. ROLE OF PATHOBIOLOGY IN EXPERIMENTAL MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The editorial explores the role of the pathobiologist and problems encountered in estuarine/marine ecological investigations. Four areas are proposed for cooperative endeavor with scientists in other fields: (1) toxicological pathology in aquatic species; (2) pathophysiology of e...

  18. A Bicentennial City Involvement in Surveying an Ecological Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Albert C.

    1975-01-01

    Briefly relates activities undertaken by secondary school students in the Spokane, Washington, area relative to ecological activities which were surveyed via an interdisciplinary approach involving English, art, science, mathematics, history, and social studies classes. (PB)

  19. Application of Mechanistic Toxicology Data to Ecological Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ongoing evolution of knowledge and tools in the areas of molecular biology, bioinformatics, and systems biology holds significant promise for reducing uncertainties associated with ecological risk assessment. As our understanding of the mechanistic basis of responses of organ...

  20. Environmental Illness\\/Multiple Chemical Sensitivities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela Reed Gibson

    1994-01-01

    Recent attention has focused on a hidden disability usually referred to as Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), Environmental Illness (EI), or Ecologic Illness, and involving detrimental effects on multiple bodily systems in response to exposures to chemicals in levels that have been \\

  1. 6th European Conference on Ecological Restoration Ghent, Belgium, 8-12/09/2008 A GEOMORPHIC APPROACH FOR THE ECOLOGICAL

    E-print Network

    Protection Area for Birds and a Site of Community Importance). At the Outlying Protection Zone of the Park, as small ecologically functional wetlands). For their gauging, the methodology of the International Erosion

  2. Improving ecological inference using individual-level data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Jackson; Nicky Best; Sylvia Richardson

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY In typical small-area studies of health and environment we wish to make inference on the relationship between individual-level quantities using aggregate, or ecological, data. Such ecological inference is often subject to bias and imprecision, due to the lack of individual-level information in the data. Conversely, individual-level survey data often have insucient power to study small-area variations in health. Such

  3. POPULATION ECOLOGY Maaria Kankare Saskya van Nouhuys

    E-print Network

    van Nouhuys, Saskya

    POPULATION ECOLOGY Maaria Kankare Æ Saskya van Nouhuys Oscar Gaggiotti Æ Ilkka Hanski in a network of 4,000 small habitat patches within an area of 50 by 70 km . The two parasitoids are known 2000; Whitlock 2004), including the structure of the landscape (e.g. Manel et al. 2003), the dynamics

  4. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-print Network

    Zavaleta, Erika

    -View, a service that publishes fully edited and formatted manuscripts before they appear in print in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. Readers are strongly advised to check the final print version in case any subdivided and managed as smaller areas, reducing the likelihood that invasions will be controlled. We use

  5. Final Report Ecological Characterization of Aquatic Refugia

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    The American alligator is considered to be a keystone species in the Florida Everglades. Alligator holes characteristics of alligator holes in Water Conservation Area 3 (WCA3) (Mazzotti et al. 1999), further studies. Borkhataria1 Gayle Martin2 Karen Minkowski1 1 Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Ft. Lauderdale

  6. Algal Sensory Chemical Ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles D. Amsler

    Sensory chemical ecology is the branch of chemical ecology that focuses on chemical communications between organisms and chemical\\u000a sensing of the environment by organisms. Algae are well known to have numerous physiological responses to variations in their\\u000a chemical environment, particularly with respect to nutrients (Lobban and Harrison 1994). However, with respect to environmental\\u000a sensing it is typical for “chemical ecology”

  7. Fire Ecology Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website provides information gathered by the Western Ecological Research Center (WERC) about the importance of wildfires to ecosystem processes in the Pacific Southwest. Details are provided about fire history and ecology in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Nevada forests, California shrub lands, and Mojave and Sonoran deserts. Topics include the ecological impacts of fire suppression, livestock grazing, invasive species, timber harvests, and changes in climate.

  8. Ecology 2001 15, 772781

    E-print Network

    Janzen, Fredric

    -words: Chelydra serpentina, maternal behaviour, maternal effects, offspring survival Functional Ecology (2001) 15 in the Common Snapping Turtle, Chelydra serpen- tina. Using eight simultaneous experimental releases of neonates

  9. Ecology 2006 20, 174179

    E-print Network

    Husak, Jerry F.

    Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris), in addition to morphological measurements, in order to deter- mine, locomotion, natural selection, performance, predation, survival, territoriality Functional Ecology (2006) 20

  10. Ecology 2002 16, 766772

    E-print Network

    King, Richard B.

    ­body size allometry in two other natricine snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis, Storeria dekayi) suggest size, Nerodia sipedon, sexual dimorphism, Storeria dekayi, Thamnophis sirtalis Functional Ecology (2002

  11. Chemical ecology of fungi.

    PubMed

    Spiteller, Peter

    2015-06-26

    Covering: up to the end of 2014Fungi are widespread in nature and have conquered nearly every ecological niche. Fungi occur not only in terrestrial but also in freshwater and marine environments. Moreover, fungi are known as a rich source of secondary metabolites. Despite these facts, the ecological role of many of these metabolites is still unknown and the chemical ecology of fungi has not been investigated systematically so far. This review intends to present examples of the various chemical interactions of fungi with other fungi, plants, bacteria and animals and to give an overview of the current knowledge of fungal chemical ecology. PMID:26038303

  12. Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology (TIEE) is a "peer-reviewed web-based collection of ecological educational materials." The collection is under the direction of Professor Charlene D'Avanzo of Hampshire College and Professor Bruce W. Grant of Widener University. TIEE relies on high-quality submissions from college educators across the United States and Canada, and the materials offered here will not disappoint visitors to the site. First-time visitors can jump right in by clicking on the "All Volumes" area, which contains direct links to all of the current and past publications which have appeared so far. The materials here are divided into several sections, including "Research", "Issues to Teach Ecology", and "Experiments to Teach Ecology". These sections feature full-length articles like "Insect Predation Game: Evolving Prey Defenses and Predator Responses" and "The Ecology of Disturbance". The site is rounded out by a superb "Teaching" area. Here visitors can read essays on guiding class discussion and other related topics.

  13. Ecology of Root Colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Maya; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Background Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae), a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. Methodology/Principal Findings The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter) and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance) were positively related, and peaked (up to 85%) at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. Conclusions In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche. PMID:22808103

  14. Ecological Elements of Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X.; Fisher, S. G.; Grimm, N. B.

    2011-12-01

    In simplest terms, "water balance" can refer to the water budget in a bounded system within a specified time frame. While this mass-balance approach is important, a broader concept that includes ecological notions of balance, stability, and feedbacks is useful, especially when management goals extend to maintenance of ecological health and ecosystem integrity concomitant with water delivery. Here, we propose three ecological elements to enrich the concept of hydrologic balance. (1) A spatially explicit perspective of water and nutrient balance replaces the holistic view. For example, in fluvial landscapes, routing of water generates hydrologic connectivity via flowpaths and creates a hydrologic network. Important patches in the network include hillslopes, floodplains, riparian areas, surface channels, and hyporheic zones, each of which is characterized by unique biogeochemical processes. Different hydrologic network structures have different nutrient-removal capacities, which depend upon how their flowpaths intersect patch-specific processing. The connectivity among these patches is an important variable influencing nutrient-retention capacity of landscapes, and thereby the resulting water quality in receiving systems. (2) Temporal regime is an important component of balance. Organisms in a fluvial landscape reflect the inherent time schedule of the system, as a result of long-term interactions and adaptation to the environment. In aridland streams, the drying and flood cycle select flora whose life cycles and activities fit the hydrological regime. The existence of particular species relies on the temporal distribution of water-the input regime-more than the integral input and output balance. The match of organism life cycle and hydrologic regime is the basis for biodiversity and ecosystem functions. (3) Ecosystems are self-organized systems based on feedbacks among organisms and between organisms and the abiotic environment. They do not simply respond to hydrology passively and predictably. While both the amount and the spatial-temporal regime of water can be easily quantified, the consequences for ecosystems are harder to predict. Many ecological responses are nonlinear and state changes are observed in many systems. The return of a former hydrological regime may not take the system back to its previous state. In summary, while water is an important factor in ecosystems, a focus on hydrological balance or even ecological balance is insufficient. A new, broader perspective, which considers the self-organizing nature of ecosystems and nonlinear feedbacks between hydrogeomorphology and ecology, and a conceptual shift from water balance to spatiotemporal ecohydrologic dynamics, will enhance understanding.

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  16. Sensitive Electroscopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Lukens

    1932-01-01

    Three electroscopes are described whose electrodes are: (I) a single fiber repelled from a forked wire, (II) a Schonland electrode hollowed to increase the sensitivity, (III) a Schonland electrode, also hollowed, but with the mirror hung on a single gold leaf suspension and rotating on a nearly vertical axis. The deflections produced by the emission of an ? particle, as

  17. Residues, Distributions, Sources, and Ecological Risks of OCPs in the Water from Lake Chaohu, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Xiu; He, Wei; Qin, Ning; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; He, Qi-Shuang; Ouyang, Hui-Ling; Yang, Bin; Wang, Qing-Mei; Yang, Chen; Jiang, Yu-Jiao; Wu, Wen-Jing; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2012-01-01

    The levels of 18 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the water from Lake Chaohu were measured by a solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer detector. The spatial and temporal distribution, possible sources, and potential ecological risks of the OCPs were analyzed. The annual mean concentration for the OCPs in Lake Chaohu was 6.99?ng/L. Aldrin, HCHs, and DDTs accounted for large proportions of the OCPs. The spatial pollution followed the order of Central Lakes?>?Western Lakes?>?Eastern Lakes and water area. The sources of the HCHs were mainly from the historical usage of lindane. DDTs were degraded under aerobic conditions, and the main sources were from the use of technical DDTs. The ecological risks of 5 OCPs were assessed by the species sensitivity distribution (SSD) method in the order of heptachlor?>??-HCH?>?p,p?-DDT > aldrin?>?endrin. The combining risks of all sampling sites were MS?>?JC?>?ZM >?TX, and those of different species were crustaceans?>?fish?>?insects and spiders. Overall, the ecological risks of OCP contaminants on aquatic animals were very low. PMID:23251107

  18. Behavioral technology and behavioral ecology1

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Edwin P.

    1974-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis, as a special case of behavioral technology, is discussed from the standpoint of behavioral ecology. The ecological orientation and its emphasis upon system-like interdependencies among environment, organism, and behavior are presented. The widespread possibilities for unintended effects of simple interventions provide the context for evaluating effective behavioral technology and calling for cooperation between the technologist and ecologist. Such cooperation, in the form of mutual and cooperative research efforts, should come naturally for the technologist and ecologist, because they share some fundamental values and assumptions, and each has much to offer the other. Several areas of such cooperative effort are spelled out. PMID:4465371

  19. TENSAS ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ecological assessment in the Tensas River Basin, Louisiana, has been completed by the U.S. EPA in partnership with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality and other stakeholder groups. This assessment, conducted using landscape ecology and water quality methods, can...

  20. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  1. Ecology of prokaryotic viruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus G Weinbauer

    2004-01-01

    The finding that total viral abundance is higher than total prokaryotic abundance and that a significant fraction of the prokaryotic community is infected with phages in aquatic systems has stimulated research on the ecology of prokaryotic viruses and their role in ecosystems. This review treats the ecology of prokaryotic viruses (`phages') in marine, freshwater and soil systems from a `virus

  2. Developments in numerical ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Legendre; L. Legendre

    1987-01-01

    From earlier ecological studies it has become apparent that simple univariate or bivariate statistics are often inappropriate, and that multivariate statistical analyses must be applied. Despite several difficulties arising from the application of multivariate methods, community ecology has acquired a mathematical framework, with three consequences: it can develop as an exact science; it can be applied operationally as a computer-assisted

  3. Energy and ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gates

    1985-01-01

    The use of any renewable or nonrenewable energy form has ecological and environmental consequences. To comprehend these consequences, we must first understand the technology of each energy form: solar, biomass, coal, petroleum, nuclear, and such alternative energy sources as ocean thermal energy conversion, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, ocean tidal, and ocean wave. The author examines the ecological principles, the food chains,

  4. Ecological Structure Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Structure Activity Relationships, v1.00a, February 2009 ECOSAR (Ecological Structure Activity Relationships) is a personal computer software program that is used to estimate the toxicity of chemicals used in industry and discharged into water. The program predicts...

  5. Ecology 2003 91, 485488

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    Journal of Ecology 2003 91, 485­488 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd to local extinction, and (ii) that also inhabit discrete and recognizable habitat patches. The first the importance of fixed habitat patches in defining a metapopulation. It is of course true that many applications

  6. Sustainable ecological economies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. Cantlon; Herman E. Koenig

    1999-01-01

    A brief accounting is presented of the evolution of natural ecosystems and human cultures including industrialization and its ecologically-significant interactions with natural abiotic and biotic processes of the earth. These accounts show, among other things, that excess resource harvest rates and material releases into the natural environment have been ecological risks of growing scope and scale throughout the history of

  7. Ecology 2001 89, 464480

    E-print Network

    Ehleringer, Jim

    Journal of Ecology 2001 89, 464­480 © 2001 British Ecological Society 464 Blackwell Science, Ltd Water use trade-offs and optimal adaptations to pulse-driven arid ecosystems SUSANNE SCHWINNING­0840, USA Summary 1 We introduce a hydraulic soil-plant model with water uptake from two soil layers; one

  8. Applied Ecology 0888 British

    E-print Network

    Hopkin, Steve

    _cation scheme for quantifying the e}ects of pollutants on soil biodiversity[ However\\ sam! pling should emissions from a primary smelting works D[J[ SPURGEON and S[P[ HOPKIN$ Institute of Terrestrial Ecology monitoring\\ metal pollution\\ size classes\\ species richness\\ zinc[ Journal of Applied Ecology "0888# 25\\ 062Ð

  9. Marine Microbial Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Australian Antarctic Division

    This image-rich website from the Australian Antarctic Division's Biology program describes its research in marine microbial ecology. It includes an introduction of microbial ecology and microbial processes, followed by information about the research project. Field sampling, microscopy, flow cytometry, pigment analysis, flourometry, HPLC, culturing, feeding experiments, and the research staff are each discussed using vivid imagery. Links are provided to related websites.

  10. Curriculum in Ecological Restoration

    E-print Network

    Curriculum in Ecological Restoration Catalog 12-13 University Core Curriculum Required Courses...................................................................(3-0) 3 ESSM 320 Ecosystem Restoration and Management...............................................................................................................(3-2) 4 40 #12;Ecological Restoration Core Courses Plant Taxonomy - Choose one of the following: ESSM

  11. Perspectives in Plant Ecology,

    E-print Network

    Traveset, Anna

    been many studies of ecological and evolutionary as- pects of frugivory and seed dispersal by ani- malsPerspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics Vol. 1/2, pp. 151­190 © Gustav Fischer Verlag, 1998 Effect of seed passage through vertebrate frugivores' guts on germination: a review Anna

  12. Evoking the ecological self

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bron R. Taylor

    1993-01-01

    “Deep ecology” is a term coined in 1973 by the Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess. It has become the central label for an increasingly militant branch of the international environmental movement. Deep ecology rejects mechanistic assumptions about the natural world, supplanting them with the premise that at a metaphysical level, the natural world is a sacred, interrelated whole, characterized by a

  13. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecological Soil Screening Level (Eco-SSL) Work Group, composed of scientists and risk assessors from EPA, Environment Canada, DOE, Army, Navy, Air Force, states, industry, academia, and consulting companies, has been working on the development of scientifically sound, ecologi...

  14. CAREERS IN ECOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many non-scientists treat "ecology" and "environmentalism" as roughly interchangeable words, thus the word "ecologist" commonly has come to signify a particular part of the political spectrum. As used in the scientific community and in this presentation, however, ecology is loos...

  15. Terrestrial Ecology Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James W., Ed.; Hall, James A., Ed.

    This collection of study units focuses on the study of the ecology of land habitats. Considered are such topics as map reading, field techniques, forest ecosystem, birds, insects, small mammals, soils, plant ecology, preparation of terrariums, air pollution, photography, and essentials of an environmental studies program. Each unit contains…

  16. Ecology and conservation: contributions to One Health.

    PubMed

    Cleaveland, S; Borner, M; Gislason, M

    2014-08-01

    Although One Health is widely promoted as a more effective approach towards human, animal and ecosystem health, the momentum is still driven largely by health professionals, predominantly from the veterinary sector. While few can doubt the merits of interdisciplinary One Health approaches to tackle complex health problems, operating across the disciplines still presents many challenges. This paper focuses on the contributions of partners from ecology and conservation to One Health approaches, and identifies four broad areas which could act as a focus for practical engagement and bring ecological and conservation objectives more to the forefront of the One Health agenda: i) developing initiatives with shared conservation and health objectives, particularly in and around protected areas and including programmes addressing human reproductive health and mental health; ii) broadening concepts of health to extend beyond indicators of disease to include the assessment of ecological impacts; iii) the integration of ecological and epidemiological monitoring systems within protected areas to support conservation management and wildlife disease surveillance; iv) building partnerships to bring conservation, health, development and animal welfare agencies together to combat threats to global biodiversity and health from the international trade in wildlife and wildlife products. PMID:25707188

  17. Biodiversity in tropical areas, from molecules to ecosystems Place: Do Son, Hai Phong city, VIETNAM.

    E-print Network

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Biodiversity in tropical areas, from molecules to ecosystems Place: Do Son, Hai Phong city, VIETNAM) Organizational unit : Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources (IEBR) Tropical biodiversity: ecological and evolutionary approaches Tropical regions harbor a disproportionate share of Earth's biodiversity. Understanding

  18. Conservation Models and Ecological Concerns of the Community: A Case-Based Biology Lesson Plan

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fouch, C.

    In this activity, students will design a conservation model that will address the ecological concerns of a community. Students will obtain topographical map of an area and related data; research and analyze appropriate data as to deforestation; survey and select area for removal of trees and landscape according to water flow; and build and produce an ecologically balanced model that will address the concerns of the community. This case will involves the use of botany, environmental science, animal biology, ecology, forestry and mathematics.

  19. Predictive systems ecology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew R.; Bithell, Mike; Cornell, Stephen J.; Dall, Sasha R. X.; Díaz, Sandra; Emmott, Stephen; Ernande, Bruno; Grimm, Volker; Hodgson, David J.; Lewis, Simon L.; Mace, Georgina M.; Morecroft, Michael; Moustakas, Aristides; Murphy, Eugene; Newbold, Tim; Norris, K. J.; Petchey, Owen; Smith, Matthew; Travis, Justin M. J.; Benton, Tim G.

    2013-01-01

    Human societies, and their well-being, depend to a significant extent on the state of the ecosystems that surround them. These ecosystems are changing rapidly usually in response to anthropogenic changes in the environment. To determine the likely impact of environmental change on ecosystems and the best ways to manage them, it would be desirable to be able to predict their future states. We present a proposal to develop the paradigm of predictive systems ecology, explicitly to understand and predict the properties and behaviour of ecological systems. We discuss the necessary and desirable features of predictive systems ecology models. There are places where predictive systems ecology is already being practised and we summarize a range of terrestrial and marine examples. Significant challenges remain but we suggest that ecology would benefit both as a scientific discipline and increase its impact in society if it were to embrace the need to become more predictive. PMID:24089332

  20. Spatial assessment of landscape ecological connectivity in different urban gradient.

    PubMed

    Park, Sohyun

    2015-07-01

    Urbanization has resulted in remnant natural patches within cities that often have no connectivity among themselves and to natural reserves outside the urban area. Protecting ecological connectivity in fragmented urban areas is becoming crucial in maintaining urban biodiversity and securing critical habitat levels and configurations under continual development pressures. Nevertheless, few studies have been undertaken for urban landscapes. This study aims to assess ecological connectivity for a group of species that represent the urban desert landscape in the Phoenix metropolitan area and to compare the connectivity values along the different urban gradient. A GIS-based landscape connectivity model which relies upon ecological connectivity index (ECI) was developed and applied to this region. A GIS-based concentric buffering technique was employed to delineate conceptual boundaries for urban, suburban, and rural zones. The research findings demonstrated that urban habitats and potential habitat patches would be significantly influenced by future urban development. Particularly, the largest loss of higher connectivity would likely to be anticipated in the "in-between areas" where urban, suburban, and rural zones overlap one another. The connectivity maps would be useful to provide spatial identification regarding connectivity patterns and vulnerability for urban and suburban activities in this area. This study provides planners and landscape architects with a spatial guidance to minimize ecological fragmentation, which ultimately leads to urban landscape sustainability. This study suggests that conventional planning practices which disregard the ecological processes in urban landscapes need to integrate landscape ecology into planning and design strategies. PMID:26065890

  1. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, E; Farage, M; Maibach, H

    2013-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a condition of subjective cutaneous hyper-reactivity to environmental factors. Subjects experiencing this condition report exaggerated reactions when their skin is in contact with cosmetics, soaps and sun screens, and they often report worsening after exposure to dry and cold climate. Although no sign of irritation is commonly detected, itching, burning, stinging and a tight sensation are constantly present. Generally substances that are not commonly considered irritants are involved in this abnormal response.Sensitive skin and subjective irritation are widespread but still far from being completely defined and understood. A correlation between sensitive skin and constitutional anomalies and/or other triggering factors such as occupational skin diseases or chronic exposure to irritants has been hypothesized. Recent findings suggest that higher sensitivity can be due to different mechanisms. Hyper-reactors may have a thinner stratum corneum with a reduced corneocyte area causing a higher transcutaneous penetration of water-soluble chemicals. Alterations in vanilloid receptors and changes in neuronal transmission have been described. Monitoring skin parameters such as barrier function, proclivity to irritation, corneocyte size and sensorial transmission can also be useful to identify regional differences in skin sensitivity. PMID:22928591

  2. Physiological Ecology Section 2014 Ecological Society of America Meeting Awards

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Physiological Ecology Section 2014 Ecological Society of America Meeting Awards Student Travel Awards The ESA Physiological Ecology Section offers five travel grants for students presenting papers or posters in the field of physiological ecology at the 2014 ESA Annual Meeting. The winner of each grant

  3. Sensitivity, block sensitivity, and `block sensitivity of boolean functions

    E-print Network

    Kenyon, Claire

    Sensitivity, block sensitivity, and `­block sensitivity of boolean functions Claire Kenyon LRI, bat for Communications Research, 805 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540. E­mail: kutin@idaccr.org Sensitivity is one of the simplest, and block sensitivity one of the most useful, invariants of a boolean function. Nisan [8

  4. Ecology of artificial reefs in the subtropics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Paul K S; Cheung, Siu Gin; Tsang, Tsui Yun; Wai, Ho Yin

    2014-01-01

    The application of artificial reefs (ARs) has a long history, and there is a wealth of information related to the design and performance of ARs in coastal and ocean waters worldwide. However, relatively fewer studies in the literature are focused on the response of benthic communities within the reef areas than those on fish attraction and fish production and on the settlement and colonization of epibiota on the AR structures, especially in the subtropics where seasonal differences and environmental conditions can be large. Recent advances in the understanding of the ecology of ARs in the subtropics are highlighted, with a focus on fish attraction versus fish production, development of epibiota on AR systems and responses of in situ benthic communities in the reef areas. Data are also presented on studies of trophic relationships in subtropical AR systems, and further research areas using analyses of biological traits, stable isotope signatures and fatty acid profiles in investigating the ecology of ARs are proposed. PMID:24981732

  5. [Ecological footprint and available ecological capacity in Chongqing region].

    PubMed

    Sun, Fan; Mong, Linbing

    2005-07-01

    Based on the statistical data of Chongqing, the ecological footprint of Chongqing was calculated in this paper. The results showed that the per capita ecological footprint was 1.653566 hm2, per capita ecological capacity was 0.280393 hm2, and ecological surplus of deficit was 1.373173 hm2. The per capita ecological footprint was 0.5335 hm2 (47.64%) higher but the per capita ecological capacity was 0.5196 hm2 (64.95%) lower, and the ecological surplus of deficit was about 3.43 times of the average national level. These results showed that the ecological footprint of Chongqing was beyond the available ecological capacity, and its social and economic development was not sustainable. The strategies on reducing ecological deficit in this region, such as reducing ecosystem population, increasing public finance income, and controlling environmental pollution, were also put forward. PMID:16252886

  6. Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    JOHN PORTER, PETER ARZBERGER, HANS-WERNER BRAUN, PABLO BRYANT, STUART GAGE, TODD HANSEN, PAUL HANSON, CHAU-CHIN LIN, FANG-PANG LIN, TIMOTHY KRATZ, WILLIAM MICHENER, SEDRA SHAPIRO, and THOMAS WILLIAMS (; )

    2005-07-01

    This peer-reviewed resource from BioScience is using wireless sensor networks in ecology. Field biologists and ecologists are starting to open new avenues of inquiry at greater spatial and temporal resolution, allowing them to "observe the unobservable" through the use of wireless sensor networks. Sensor networks facilitate the collection of diverse types of data (from temperature to imagery and sound) at frequent intervals--even multiple times per second--over large areas, allowing ecologists and field biologists to engage in intensive and expansive sampling and to unobtrusively collect new types of data. Moreover, real-time data flows allow researchers to react rapidly to events, thus extending the laboratory to the field. We review some existing uses of wireless sensor networks, identify possible areas of application, and review the underlying technologies in the hope of stimulating additional use of this promising technology to address the grand challenges of environmental science

  7. Master programme in Ecology & Evolution

    E-print Network

    Richner, Heinz

    Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly organized by the Institute of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Bern Selected specialisation within the MSc programme in Ecology & Evolution Programme start and conservation Plant ecology Behaviour Evolution autumn semester spring semester year: 20.. 3 semester 4 semester

  8. Media Ecology and Symbolic Interactionism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan B. Barnes

    This paper examines Mead's role in media ecological studies and will explore his relationship to media ecology from an interpersonal communication perspective. Included in this discussion are Mead's concepts of self, symbolic interactionism, and the relationship between symbolic interactionism and media ecology. Examples from Internet research are used to illustrate how media ecology can be applied to interpersonal mediated communication

  9. Ecological Resilience, Biodiversity, and Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Garry Peterson; Craig R. Allen; C. S. Holling

    1998-01-01

    We describe existing models of the relationship between species diversity and ecological function, and propose a conceptual model that relates species richness, ecological resilience, and scale. We suggest that species interact with scale-dependent sets of ecological structures and processes that determine functional opportunities. We propose that ecologi- cal resilience is generated by diverse, but overlap- ping, function within a scale

  10. Status assessment in acid-sensitive and non-acid-sensitive Maryland coastal planin streams using an integrated biological, chemical, physical, and land-use approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lenwood W. Hall; Steven A. Fischer; William D. Killen; Mark C. Scott; Michael C. Ziegenfuss; Ronald D. Anderson

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to: (1) evaluate the ecological status of acid-sensitive and non acid-sensitive Maryland coastal plain streams using biological (Index of biotic Integrity [IBI] for fish), chemical and physical habitat conditions; (2) determine if a low IBI for coastal plain stream fish can be related to stream sensitivity from acidic inputs and (3) correlate land use activities and

  11. Evolutionary and ecological response of pocket gophers ( Thomomys talpoides ) to late-Holocene climatic change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ELIZABETH A. HADLY

    1997-01-01

    Late-Holocene evolutionary and ecological response of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) and other species to climatic change is documented by mammalian fossils from Lamar Cave, a palaeontological site in northern Yellowstone National Park. Pocket gophers illustrate ecological sensitivity to a series of mesic to xeric climatic excursions in the sagebrush-grassland ecotone during the last 3200 years, increasing in abundance during mesic

  12. A Multicultural-Ecological Assessment Tool: Conceptualization and Practice with an Asian Indian Immigrant Woman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roysircar, Gargi; Pignatiello, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    A multicultural-ecological (M-Eco) method assesses multiple levels of a client's presentation, such as individual, micro-, meso-, exo-, macro-, and chronosystems. An M-Eco method is a culturally sensitive practice of Bronfenbrenner's (1995) ecological perspective that focuses on behavior's contextual and interactional nature and an individual's…

  13. Cosmic emergy based ecological systems modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Chen, G. Q.; Ji, X.

    2010-09-01

    Ecological systems modelling based on the unified biophysical measure of cosmic emergy in terms of embodied cosmic exergy is illustrated in this paper with ecological accounting, simulation and scenario analysis, by a case study for the regional socio-economic ecosystem associated with the municipality of Beijing. An urbanized regional ecosystem model with eight subsystems of natural support, agriculture, urban production, population, finance, land area, potential environmental impact, and culture is representatively presented in exergy circuit language with 12 state variables governing by corresponding ecodynamic equations, and 60 flows and auxiliary variables. To characterize the regional socio-economy as an ecosystem, a series of ecological indicators based on cosmic emergy are devised. For a systematic ecological account, cosmic exergy transformities are provided for various dimensions including climate flows, natural resources, industrial products, cultural products, population with educational hierarchy, and environmental emissions. For the urban ecosystem of Beijing in the period from 1990 to 2005, ecological accounting is carried out and characterized in full details. Taking 2000 as the starting point, systems modelling is realized to predict the urban evolution in a one hundred time horizon. For systems regulation, scenario analyses with essential policy-making implications are made to illustrate the long term systems effects of the expected water diversion and rise in energy price.

  14. Space Radar Image of Raco, Michigan, ecological test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band image of seasonal changes at the ecological test site of Raco, Michigan, located south of Whitefish Bay on Lake Superior. The image is centered at about 46 degrees north latitude and 85 degrees west longitude. This image was acquired by the X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 10th, 1994, and on October 1, 1994. The areas shown in red correspond to the April 10th data; the areas in blue correspond to data acquired on October 1, 1994; green indicates the ratio of data acquired on April 10 and October 1, 1994. The area shown is 22.7 kilometers by 53 kilometers (14 miles by 33 miles). Lake Superior in the upper right was frozen in April and had small waves (ripples) on its surface in October. The land area contains mostly forests and, to a lesser extent, agricultural regions. In April the area was covered in wet snow. By October, there agricultural areas were covered with grass. Vegetation and soils were moist due to rainfalls three days before the data was acquired on October 1, 1994. The bright light green/yellow tones in the lower half of the image show the stronger reflections of the snow-covered agricultural fields. The pinkish color corresponds to the coniferous and deciduous forests. The green area represents red pines. These trees are smaller than the surrounding forest cover and allow more radar penetration. The area is green because the radar is sensing the surface, which undergoes great change from snow to grass and fern undergrowth between April and October. The bright green triangle in the upper half of the image is an old airstrip, while the modern airport can be seen on the bottom right side of the image. The Raco site is an important location for monitoring seasonal changes and future global change because it is situated at the ecological transition zone between the boreal forests and the northern temperate forests. This transitional zone is expected to be ecologically sensitive to anticipated global changes resulting from climatic warming. Baseline studies of vegetation are essential in monitoring these expected changes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  15. Maximum information entropy: a foundation for ecological theory.

    PubMed

    Harte, John; Newman, Erica A

    2014-07-01

    The maximum information entropy (MaxEnt) principle is a successful method of statistical inference that has recently been applied to ecology. Here, we show how MaxEnt can accurately predict patterns such as species-area relationships (SARs) and abundance distributions in macroecology and be a foundation for ecological theory. We discuss the conceptual foundation of the principle, why it often produces accurate predictions of probability distributions in science despite not incorporating explicit mechanisms, and how mismatches between predictions and data can shed light on driving mechanisms in ecology. We also review possible future extensions of the maximum entropy theory of ecology (METE), a potentially important foundation for future developments in ecological theory. PMID:24863182

  16. Recent developments in structural sensitivity analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. T. Haftka; H. M. Adelman

    1989-01-01

    The present paper reviews recent developments in two major areas of structural sensitivity analysis: sensitivity of static and transient response; and sensitivity of vibration and buckling eigenproblems. Recent developments from the standpoint of computational cost, accuracy, and ease of implementation are presented.

  17. [Parasitism and ecological parasitology].

    PubMed

    Balashov, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    Parasitism as one of the life modes is a general biological phenomenon and is a characteristic of all viruses, many taxa of bacteria, fungi, protists, metaphytes, and metazoans. Zooparasitology is focused on studies of parasitic animals, particularly, on their taxonomy, anatomy, life cycles, host-parasite relations, biocoenotic connections, and evolution. Ecological parasitology is a component of ecology, as the scientific study of the relation of living organisms with each other and their surroundings. In the present paper, critical analysis of the problems, main postulates, and terminology of the modern ecological parasitology is given. PMID:21874841

  18. Society for Vector Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Formed in 1968, the Society for Vector Ecology (SOVE) is dedicated to studying "all aspects of the biology, ecology, and control of arthropod vectors and the interrelationships between the vectors and the disease agents they transmit." Comprised of researchers and operational and extension personnel around the globe, SOVE tracks and studies the biological organisms that transmit diseases. The SOVE Website contains information related to the Society (e.g., mission, history), its publications (journal, newsletter -- both .pdf format), and professional opportunities (conferences, employment). Several dozen links to additional vector ecology resources are provided.

  19. Ecological Niche Modeling of Bacillus anthracis on Three Continents: Evidence for Genetic-Ecological Divergence?

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Jocelyn C.; Garofolo, Giuliano; Van Ert, Matthew; Fasanella, Antonio; Lukhnova, Larisa; Hugh-Jones, Martin E.; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    We modeled the ecological niche of a globally successful Bacillus anthracis sublineage in the United States, Italy and Kazakhstan to better understand the geographic distribution of anthrax and potential associations between regional populations and ecology. Country-specific ecological-niche models were developed and reciprocally transferred to the other countries to determine if pathogen presence could be accurately predicted on novel landscapes. Native models accurately predicted endemic areas within each country, but transferred models failed to predict known occurrences in the outside countries. While the effects of variable selection and limitations of the genetic data should be considered, results suggest differing ecological associations for the B. anthracis populations within each country and may reflect niche specialization within the sublineage. Our findings provide guidance for developing accurate ecological niche models for this pathogen; models should be developed regionally, on the native landscape, and with consideration to population genetics. Further genomic analysis will improve our understanding of the genetic-ecological dynamics of B. anthracis across these countries and may lead to more refined predictive models for surveillance and proactive vaccination programs. Further studies should evaluate the impact of variable selection of native and transferred models. PMID:23977300

  20. Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) conceptual design option study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Melvin; Olson, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Results are given of a study to explore options for the development of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for a future Space Station. In addition, study results will benefit the design of other facilities such as the Life Sciences Research Facility, a ground-based CELSS demonstrator, and will be useful in planning longer range missions such as a lunar base or manned Mars mission. The objectives were to develop weight and cost estimates for one CELSS module selected from a set of preliminary plant growth unit (PGU) design options. Eleven Space Station CELSS module conceptual PGU designs were reviewed, components and subsystems identified and a sensitivity analysis performed. Areas where insufficient data is available were identified and divided into the categories of biological research, engineering research, and technology development. Topics which receive significant attention are lighting systems for the PGU, the use of automation within the CELSS system, and electric power requirements. Other areas examined include plant harvesting and processing, crop mix analysis, air circulation and atmosphere contaminant flow subsystems, thermal control considerations, utility routing including accessibility and maintenance, and nutrient subsystem design.

  1. SENSAT-a practical tool for estimation of the IC layout sensitivity to spot defects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Witold Pleskacz; Wieslaw Kuzmicz

    1995-01-01

    A practical interactive tool, SENSAT, is presented for IC layout optimization based on the concept of sensitive area. Since reduction of the layout sensitivity to shorts may increase its sensitivity to opens and vice versa, a practical tool must determine sensitive areas for both. The main function of SENSAT is to extract and display the sensitive areas in the IC

  2. Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 535541 2006 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    that the relationships among these variables can best be explained by assuming (1) a necessary trade-off between al leaf photosynthetic rates, construction costs, and leaf longevity. Key words: comparative ecology; leaf life span; leaf longevity; leaf mass per area, LMA; leaf nitrogen content; net photosynthetic rate

  3. Ecological Applications, 17(4), 2007, pp. 10311038 2007 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-print Network

    and DeFries 2007), the trade-offs between human uses and longer term conservation of ecosystem services LAND USE CHANGE AROUND PROTECTED AREAS: MANAGEMENT TO BALANCE HUMAN NEEDS AND ECOLOGICAL FUNCTION RUTH biodiversity, and land use is key for providing food, fiber, and other ecosystem services essential for human

  4. An urban metabolism and ecological footprint assessment of Metro Vancouver Jennie Moore a,*, Meidad Kissinger a,b

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Tom

    An urban metabolism and ecological footprint assessment of Metro Vancouver Jennie Moore a,*, Meidad through Metro Vancouver (424,860,000 m3 ), it has the smallest ecological footprint (23,100 gha). Food (2 of the EF (1,414,440 gha). Metro Vancouver's total Ecological Footprint in 2006 was 10,071,670 gha, an area

  5. [Research on the sensitivity of geochemical of underground river in Chongqing Xueyu Cave].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shang-Quan; Yang, Ping-Heng; Yin, Jian-Jun; Mao, Hai-Hong; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Xiao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Quoted geochemical susceptivity index and isosensitive line on geochemical susceptivity, analyzed the data of underground rivers of Xueyu Cave in Chongqing from September 2010 to August 2011, we found that the chemical composition of the underground river was controlled by the bedrock, due to the composition of high concentration of Ca2+ and low concentration of Mg2+. Owing to the effects of the monsoon, water chemistry was different between drought season and rainy season: the value of [Mg2+]/[Ca2+] was 0.018-0.051 in the rainy season, but in dry season the value was 0.038-0.064. The value of [HCO3(-)]/[SO4(2-)] was 4.86-36.62 in the rainy season, and 6.23-46.67 in the dry season. The seasonal change of Karstification made Ca2+ and HCO3(-) become the most sensitive ion. As a result of the special hydrogeological structure in Karat area, rain, surface water and groundwater transformed rapidly, which caused the underground river was sensitive to agricultural activities, especially for Cl- and NO3(-), and their sensitive indices were 0.286 and 0.022 respectively. The influence of tourism activities on the underground river was less than the management. The management work of ecological system should be strengthen in the recharge area, thus the largest economic and environmental benefits in the Karst area could be achieved. PMID:23487921

  6. Species distributions and area relationships.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C J; Lee, T E; McCarthy, M A

    2014-12-21

    The well-known species-area relationship is one of many scaling laws, or allometries, in ecology and biology that have received much attention over the years. We present a new derivation of this relationship based on Yule?s theory of evolution of species. Using definitions of mutation rates, our analysis yields species-area exponents that are in close agreement with previously observed values. PMID:25150460

  7. Ecology 2003 91, 664676

    E-print Network

    the above-ground and below-ground biomass allocation and root morphology of non-acidic tussock tundra near, competition, nutrients, tundra Journal of Ecology (2003) 91, 664­676 Introduction Carbon allocation in plants

  8. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    As ecological risk assessment evolves, it is moving beyond focus on single species toward addressing multiple species and their interactions, and from assessing effects of simple chemical toxicity to the cumulative impacts of multiple interacting chemical, physical, and biologica...

  9. Advances in ecological research

    SciTech Connect

    Macfadyen, A.

    1988-01-01

    A Theory of Gradient Analysis. Sunflecks and Their Importance to Forest Understorey Plants. Geochemical Monitoring of Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution - Theory and Applications. Population Cycles in Forest Lepidoptera. Mycorrhizal Links Between Plants: Their Functioning and Ecological Significance.

  10. Ecology 2003 17, 289304

    E-print Network

    -tolerant clones. Implica- tions of this finding for carbon sequestration, plantations to reduce excess CO2, carbon budgets, carbon sequestration, interacting pollutants Functional Ecology (2003) 17, 289­304 Author

  11. SOIL BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "Soil Biology", the study of organism groups living in soil, (plants, lichens, algae, moss, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, and arthropods), predates "Soil Ecology", the study of interactions between soil organisms as mediated by the soil physical environment. oil ...

  12. ECOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EMAP has traditionally relied on indicators of ecological condition to report on the extent to which coastal waters are impaired. Correlations between biological indicators and physical or chemical indicators may generate hypotheses about potential causes of impairment but are n...

  13. Ecology 2006 20, 678688

    E-print Network

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Carotenoid accumulation strategies for becoming a colourful House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) colour their sexually selected plumage with carotenoid pigments yellow. 2. There is good support for the notions that health, nutritional condition and total carotenoid

  14. Ecology: Spying on nature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Hopkin

    2006-01-01

    The biggest project in the history of ecology is nearing its dawn. Can its organizers pull off the seemingly impossible and unite a disparate field behind its vision to observe the ecosystems of the United States? Michael Hopkin reports.

  15. Ecology 2005 19, 315322

    E-print Network

    Bortolotti, Gary R.

    The endocrine system orchestrates appropriate changes in the morphology, physiology and behaviour of organisms framework has been developed to explore the ecological bases of stress as well as under- lying endocrine

  16. Are taxonomic distinctness measures compliant to other ecological indicators in assessing ecological status?

    PubMed

    Salas, F; Patrício, J; Marcos, C; Pardal, M A; Pérez-Ruzafa, A; Marques, J C

    2006-02-01

    Assessing the ecological status, a concept implemented in the European Water Framework Directive [Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council 2000/60/EC establishing a framework for community action in the field of water policy PE-CONS 3639/1/00, 72 p.], requires the application of methods capable of distinguishing different levels of ecological quality. Somerfield and Clarke [Marine Environmental Research 43 (2003) 145-156] proposed Average Taxonomic Distinctness to be used as tool in this context. We tested the robustness of Taxonomic Distinctness measures applying it in different scenarios (estuarine eutrophication, organic pollution, and re-colonisation after physical disturbance), analysing simultaneously its compliance to other types of ecological indicators. Results show that, in most of the case studies, only Total Taxonomic Distinctness was relatively satisfactory in discriminating between disturbed situations. Other Taxonomic Distinctness measures have not proved to be more sensitive than other ecological indicators (Shannon-Wiener, Margalef, and Eco-Exergy indices). Therefore, this approach does not seem to be particularly helpful in assessing systems' ecological status with regard to the WFD implementation. PMID:16216282

  17. Are taxonomic distinctness measures compliant to other ecological indicators in assessing ecological status?

    PubMed

    Salas, F; Patrício, J; Marcos, C; Pardal, M A; Pérez-Ruzafa, A; Marques, J C

    2006-07-01

    Assessing the ecological status, a concept implemented in the European Water Framework Directive [EC, 2000. Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council 2000/60/EC establishing a framework for community action in the field of water policy PE-CONS 3639/1/00, p. 72], requires the application of methods capable of distinguishing different levels of ecological quality. The Average Taxonomic Distinctness has been used as tool in this context, and we tested the robustness of Taxonomic Distinctness measures applying it in different scenarios (estuarine eutrophication, organic pollution, and re-colonisation after physical disturbance), analysing simultaneously its compliance to other types of ecological indicators. Results show that, in most of the case studies, only Total Taxonomic Distinctness was relatively satisfactory in discriminating between disturbed situations. Other Taxonomic Distinctness measures have not proved to be more sensitive than other ecological indicators (Shannon-Wiener, Margalef, and Eco-Exergy indices). Therefore, this approach does not seem to be particularly helpful in assessing systems' ecological status with regard to the WFD implementation. PMID:17165196

  18. MAB Secretariat Division of Ecological Sciences, UNESCO

    E-print Network

    Hui, Bowen

    MAB Secretariat Division of Ecological Sciences, UNESCO POPULATION DYNAMICS OF THE ENDANGERED Ecology, Faculty of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Zvolen Technical University, Banská Stiavnica.......................................................................... 12 Seed Predation Study

  19. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a summary of information available on estuarine ecology, that reviews concepts and problems of estuaries and assesses the value of these coastal systems. It investigates such topics as water circulation and mixing, trace elements, nutrients, organic matter, and sedimentary processes, with reviews on more than two decades of intense study. Chapters reflect contributions from a variety of interdisciplinary sciences including botany, chemistry, ecology, geology, physics, and zoology.

  20. Quantifying the sensitivity of ephemeral streams to land disturbance activities in arid ecosystems at the watershed scale.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ben L; Hamada, Yuki; Bowen, Esther E; Grippo, Mark A; Hartmann, Heidi M; Patton, Terri L; Van Lonkhuyzen, Robert A; Carr, Adrianne E

    2014-11-01

    Large areas of public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management and located in arid regions of the southwestern United States are being considered for the development of utility-scale solar energy facilities. Land-disturbing activities in these desert, alluvium-filled valleys have the potential to adversely affect the hydrologic and ecologic functions of ephemeral streams. Regulation and management of ephemeral streams typically falls under a spectrum of federal, state, and local programs, but scientifically based guidelines for protecting ephemeral streams with respect to land-development activities are largely nonexistent. This study developed an assessment approach for quantifying the sensitivity to land disturbance of ephemeral stream reaches located in proposed solar energy zones (SEZs). The ephemeral stream assessment approach used publicly-available geospatial data on hydrology, topography, surficial geology, and soil characteristics, as well as high-resolution aerial imagery. These datasets were used to inform a professional judgment-based score index of potential land disturbance impacts on selected critical functions of ephemeral streams, including flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitat value, and groundwater recharge. The total sensitivity scores (sum of scores for the critical stream functions of flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitats, and groundwater recharge) were used to identify highly sensitive stream reaches to inform decisions on developable areas in SEZs. Total sensitivity scores typically reflected the scores of the individual stream functions; some exceptions pertain to groundwater recharge and ecological habitats. The primary limitations of this assessment approach were the lack of high-resolution identification of ephemeral stream channels in the existing National Hydrography Dataset, and the lack of mechanistic processes describing potential impacts on ephemeral stream functions at the watershed scale. The primary strength of this assessment approach is that it allows watershed-scale planning for low-impact development in arid ecosystems; the qualitative scoring of potential impacts can also be adjusted to accommodate new geospatial data, and to allow for expert and stakeholder input into decisions regarding the identification and potential avoidance of highly sensitive stream reaches. PMID:25129382

  1. Predictive ecology: systems approaches

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew R.; Norris, Ken J.; Benton, Tim G.

    2012-01-01

    The world is experiencing significant, largely anthropogenically induced, environmental change. This will impact on the biological world and we need to be able to forecast its effects. In order to produce such forecasts, ecology needs to become more predictive—to develop the ability to understand how ecological systems will behave in future, changed, conditions. Further development of process-based models is required to allow such predictions to be made. Critical to the development of such models will be achieving a balance between the brute-force approach that naively attempts to include everything, and over simplification that throws out important heterogeneities at various levels. Central to this will be the recognition that individuals are the elementary particles of all ecological systems. As such it will be necessary to understand the effect of evolution on ecological systems, particularly when exposed to environmental change. However, insights from evolutionary biology will help the development of models even when data may be sparse. Process-based models are more common, and are used for forecasting, in other disciplines, e.g. climatology and molecular systems biology. Tools and techniques developed in these endeavours can be appropriated into ecological modelling, but it will also be necessary to develop the science of ecoinformatics along with approaches specific to ecological problems. The impetus for this effort should come from the demand coming from society to understand the effects of environmental change on the world and what might be performed to mitigate or adapt to them. PMID:22144379

  2. [Ecological compensation standard in Dongting Lake region of returning cropland to lake based on emergy analysis].

    PubMed

    Mao, De-Hua; Hu, Guang-Wei; Liu, Hui-Jie; Li, Zheng-Zui; Li, Zhi-Long; Tan, Zi-Fang

    2014-02-01

    The annual emergy and currency value of the main ecological service value of returning cropland to lake in Dongting Lake region from 1999 to 2010 was calculated based on emergy analysis. The calculation method of ecological compensation standard was established by calculating annual total emergy of ecological service function increment since the starting year of returning cropland to lake, and the annual ecological compensation standard and compensation area were analyzed from 1999 to 2010. The results indicated that ecological compensation standard from 1999 to 2010 was 40.31-86.48 yuan x m(-2) with the mean of 57.33 yuan x m(-2). The ecological compensation standard presented an increase trend year by year due to the effect of eco-recovery of returning cropland to lake. The ecological compensation standard in the research area presented a swift and steady growth trend after 2005 mainly due to the intensive economy development of Hunan Province, suggesting the value of natural ecological resources would increase along with the development of society and economy. Appling the emergy analysis to research the ecological compensation standard could reveal the dynamics of annual ecological compensation standard, solve the abutment problem of matter flow, energy flow and economic flow, and overcome the subjective and arbitrary of environment economic methods. The empirical research of ecological compensation standard in Dongting Lake region showed that the emergy analysis was feasible and advanced. PMID:24830254

  3. The Protected Areas Visitor Impact Management (PAVIM) framework: A simplified process for making management decisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ecotourism and protected area visitation in Central and South America have resulted in ecological impacts, which some protected areas managers have addressed by employing visitor impact management frameworks. In this paper, we propose the Protected Area Visitor Impact Management (PAVIM) framework as an alternative to carrying capacity and other frameworks such as Limits of Acceptable Change. We use a set of evaluation criteria to compare the relative positive and negative attributes of carrying capacity, other decision-making frameworks and the new framework, within the context of their actual and potential use in Central and South America. Positive attributes of PAVIM include simplicity, flexibility, cost effectiveness, timeliness, and incorporating input from stakeholders and local residents. Negative attributes include diminished objectivity and cultural sensitivity issues. Further research and application of PAVIM are recommended.

  4. The Leiden Infant Simulator Sensitivity Assessment (LISSA): Parenting an Infant Simulator as Your Own Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Biro, Szilvia; Voorthuis, Alexandra; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2015-01-01

    Observation of parental sensitivity in a standard procedure, in which caregivers are faced with the same level of infant demand, enables the comparison of sensitivity "between" caregivers. We developed an ecologically valid standardized setting using an infant simulator with interactive features, the Leiden Infant Simulator Sensitivity…

  5. Indices, Graphs and Null Models: Analyzing Bipartite Ecological Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carsten F. Dormann; Jochen Frund; Nico Bluthgen; Bernd Gruber

    2009-01-01

    Many analyses of ecological networks in recent years have introduced new indices to describe network properties. As a consequence, tens of indices are available to address similar questions, differing in specific detail, sensitivity in detecting the property in question, and robustness with respect to network size and sampling intensity. Furthermore, some indices merely reflect the number of species participating in

  6. The Behavioral Ecology of Insect Vibrational Communication

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    REGINALD B. COCROFT and RAFAEL L. RODR�GUEZ (; )

    2005-04-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience is about vibrational communication in insects. Vibrational communication is widespread in insect social and ecological interactions. Of the insect species that communicate using sound, water surface ripples, or substrate vibrations, we estimate that 92% use substrate vibrations alone or with other forms of mechanical signaling. Vibrational signals differ dramatically from airborne insect sounds, often having low frequencies, pure tones, and combinations of contrasting acoustic elements. Plants are the most widely used substrate for transmitting vibrational signals. Plant species can vary in their signal transmission properties, and thus host plant use may influence signal divergence. Vibrational communication occurs in a complex environment containing noise from wind and rain, the signals of multiple individuals and species, and vibration-sensitive predators and parasitoids. We anticipate that many new examples and functions of vibrational communication will be discovered, and that study of this modality will continue to provide important insights into insect social behavior, ecology, and evolution.

  7. Cascading ecological effects of eliminating fishery discards.

    PubMed

    Heath, Michael R; Cook, Robin M; Cameron, Angus I; Morris, David J; Speirs, Douglas C

    2014-01-01

    Discarding by fisheries is perceived as contrary to responsible harvesting. Legislation seeking to end the practice is being introduced in many jurisdictions. However, discarded fish are food for a range of scavenging species; so, ending discarding may have ecological consequences. Here we investigate the sensitivity of ecological effects to discarding policies using an ecosystem model of the North Sea--a region where 30-40% of trawled fish catch is currently discarded. We show that landing the entire catch while fishing as usual has conservation penalties for seabirds, marine mammals and seabed fauna, and no benefit to fish stocks. However, combining landing obligations with changes in fishing practices to limit the capture of unwanted fish results in trophic cascades that can benefit birds, mammals and most fish stocks. Our results highlight the importance of considering the broader ecosystem consequences of fishery management policy, since species interactions may dissipate or negate intended benefits. PMID:24820200

  8. Land ecological security evaluation of Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linyu; Yin, Hao; Li, Zhaoxue; Li, Shun

    2014-01-01

    As the land ecosystem provides the necessary basic material resources for human development, land ecological security (LES) plays an increasingly important role in sustainable development. Given the degradation of land ecological security under rapid urbanization and the urgent LES requirements of urban populations, a comprehensive evaluation method, named Double Land Ecological Security (DLES), has been introduced with the city of Guangzhou, China, as a case study, which evaluates the LES in regional and unit scales for reasonable and specific urban planning. In the evaluation process with this method, we have combined the material security with the spiritual security that is inevitably associated with LES. Some new coefficients of land-security supply/demand distribution and technology contribution for LES evaluation have also been introduced for different spatial scales, including the regional and the unit scales. The results for Guangzhou indicated that, temporally, the LES supply indices were 0.77, 0.84 and 0.77 in 2000, 2006 and 2009 respectively, while LES demand indices for the city increased in 2000, 2006 and 2009 from 0.57 to 0.95, which made the LES level decreased slowly in this period. Spatially, at the regional scale, the urban land ecological security (ULES) level decreased from 0.2 (marginal security) to -0.18 (marginal insecurity) as a whole; in unit scale, areas in the north and in parts of the east were relatively secure and the security area was shrinking with time, but the central and southern areas turned to be marginal insecurity, especially in 2006 and 2009. This study proposes that DLES evaluation should be conducted for targeted and efficient urban planning and management, which can reflect the LES level of study area in general and in detail. PMID:25321873

  9. VIMS Molluscan Ecology Oyster Reef Community Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site describes the Molluscan Ecology research program at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS). Research projects investigate cephalopods, coastal habitats, hard clams, oysters, and rapa whelks. Background information is given regarding the history of the research, including management efforts and associated publications. Maps of restoration areas are available in addition to information about molluscan educational materials (including instructional publications and cds). Fees apply for cds.

  10. Land Ecological Security Evaluation of Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linyu; Yin, Hao; Li, Zhaoxue; Li, Shun

    2014-01-01

    As the land ecosystem provides the necessary basic material resources for human development, land ecological security (LES) plays an increasingly important role in sustainable development. Given the degradation of land ecological security under rapid urbanization and the urgent LES requirements of urban populations, a comprehensive evaluation method, named Double Land Ecological Security (DLES), has been introduced with the city of Guangzhou, China, as a case study, which evaluates the LES in regional and unit scales for reasonable and specific urban planning. In the evaluation process with this method, we have combined the material security with the spiritual security that is inevitably associated with LES. Some new coefficients of land-security supply/demand distribution and technology contribution for LES evaluation have also been introduced for different spatial scales, including the regional and the unit scales. The results for Guangzhou indicated that, temporally, the LES supply indices were 0.77, 0.84 and 0.77 in 2000, 2006 and 2009 respectively, while LES demand indices for the city increased in 2000, 2006 and 2009 from 0.57 to 0.95, which made the LES level decreased slowly in this period. Spatially, at the regional scale, the urban land ecological security (ULES) level decreased from 0.2 (marginal security) to ?0.18 (marginal insecurity) as a whole; in unit scale, areas in the north and in parts of the east were relatively secure and the security area was shrinking with time, but the central and southern areas turned to be marginal insecurity, especially in 2006 and 2009. This study proposes that DLES evaluation should be conducted for targeted and efficient urban planning and management, which can reflect the LES level of study area in general and in detail. PMID:25321873

  11. Molecular ecological network analyses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the interaction among different species within a community and their responses to environmental changes is a central goal in ecology. However, defining the network structure in a microbial community is very challenging due to their extremely high diversity and as-yet uncultivated status. Although recent advance of metagenomic technologies, such as high throughout sequencing and functional gene arrays, provide revolutionary tools for analyzing microbial community structure, it is still difficult to examine network interactions in a microbial community based on high-throughput metagenomics data. Results Here, we describe a novel mathematical and bioinformatics framework to construct ecological association networks named molecular ecological networks (MENs) through Random Matrix Theory (RMT)-based methods. Compared to other network construction methods, this approach is remarkable in that the network is automatically defined and robust to noise, thus providing excellent solutions to several common issues associated with high-throughput metagenomics data. We applied it to determine the network structure of microbial communities subjected to long-term experimental warming based on pyrosequencing data of 16?S rRNA genes. We showed that the constructed MENs under both warming and unwarming conditions exhibited topological features of scale free, small world and modularity, which were consistent with previously described molecular ecological networks. Eigengene analysis indicated that the eigengenes represented the module profiles relatively well. In consistency with many other studies, several major environmental traits including temperature and soil pH were found to be important in determining network interactions in the microbial communities examined. To facilitate its application by the scientific community, all these methods and statistical tools have been integrated into a comprehensive Molecular Ecological Network Analysis Pipeline (MENAP), which is open-accessible now (http://ieg2.ou.edu/MENA). Conclusions The RMT-based molecular ecological network analysis provides powerful tools to elucidate network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes, which are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology and environmental microbiology. PMID:22646978

  12. [Land layout for lake tourism based on ecological restraint].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Ying; Li, Jiang-Feng; Zou, Li-Lin; Liu, Shi-Bin

    2012-10-01

    To avoid the decrease and deterioration of lake wetlands and the other ecological issues such as lake water pollution that were caused by the unreasonable exploration of lake tourism, a land layout for the tourism development of Liangzi Lake with the priority of ecological security pattern was proposed, based on the minimal cumulative resistance model and by using GIS technology. The study area was divided into four ecological function zones, i. e., core protection zone, ecological buffer zone, ecotone zone, and human activity zone. The core protection zone was the landscape region of ecological source. In the protection zone, new tourism land was forbidden to be increased, and some of the existing fundamental tourism facilities should be removed while some of them should be upgraded. The ecological buffer zone was the landscape region with resistance value ranged from 0 to 4562. In the buffer zone, expansion of tourism land should be forbidden, the existing tourism land should be downsized, and human activities should be isolated from ecological source by converting the human environment to the natural environment as far as possible. The ecotone zone was the landscape region with resistance value ranged from 4562 to 30797. In this zone, the existing tourism land was distributed in patches, tourism land could be expanded properly, and the lake forestry ecological tourism should be developed widely. The human activity zone was the landscape region with resistance value ranged from 30797 to 97334, which would be the key area for the land layout of lake tourism. It was suggested that the land layout for tourism with the priority of landscape ecological security pattern would be the best choice for the lake sustainable development. PMID:23359952

  13. Chapter I: Ecological Acoustics 1.1 Ecological Perception

    E-print Network

    Cummins, Fred

    23 Chapter I: Ecological Acoustics 1.1 Ecological Perception The ecological approach to perception of an organism's perceptual apparatus and, furthermore, this perception may be unmediated by higher of cognitive psychology, there are subtleties in the notion of direct perception that are often over- looked

  14. 44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 4453.

    E-print Network

    Rey Benayas, José María

    44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 44­53. Accepted 13 May 2009 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 agricultural landscape on local bird communities. ­ Web Ecol. 9: 44­53. This study assesses whether Alcalá de Henares, Spain. #12;45WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 multifunctional systems are common in southern Europe

  15. 120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120131.

    E-print Network

    Rey Benayas, José María

    120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120­131. Accepted 27 December 2007 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 improves early performance of planted seedlings of the Mediterranean shrub Quer- cus coccifera. ­ Web, Spain. #12;121WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 have important economic consequences because large amounts of public

  16. Journal of Applied Ecology 2001

    E-print Network

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    *NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH Dorset, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset DT2 8 213600; e-mail jmbul@ceh.ac.uk). #12;254 J.M. Bullock et al. © 2001 British Ecological Society, Journal

  17. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  18. Understanding Invasion Ecology: Introduction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Marianne E. Krasny

    2003-01-01

    How can a single species of insect pose a threat to millions of acres of forests, orchards, and street trees? What can we do about the Asian longhorned beetle and other plants and animals that invade our farms, cities, and forests? The study of ecology helps us to find answers to these questions. Through applying ecological principles and conducting research, scientists are learning to manage invasive species. Students can learn alongside the scientists and, in some cases, help them. This chapter defines the term invasive species using a variety of examples--such as the Asian longhorned beetle and Chestnut Blight--and discusses their ecological implications. This free selection includes the Table of Contents and Preface.

  19. Strontium-90 at the Hanford Site and its ecological implications

    SciTech Connect

    RE Peterson; TM Poston

    2000-05-22

    Strontium-90, a radioactive contaminant from historical operations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, enters the Columbia River at several locations associated with former plutonium production reactors at the Site. Strontium-90 is of concern to humans and the environment because of its moderately long half-life (29.1 years), its potential for concentrating in bone tissue, and its relatively high energy of beta decay. Although strontium-90 in the environment is not a new issue for the Hanford Site, recent studies of near-river vegetation along the shoreline near the 100 Areas raised public concern about the possibility of strontium-90-contaminated groundwater reaching the riverbed and fall chinook salmon redds. To address these concerns, DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to prepare this report on strontium-90, its distribution in groundwater, how and where it enters the river, and its potential ecological impacts, particularly with respect to fall chinook salmon. The purpose of the report is to characterize groundwater contaminants in the near-shore environment and to assess the potential for ecological impact using salmon embryos, one of the most sensitive ecological indicators for aquatic organisms. Section 2.0 of the report provides background information on strontium-90 at the Hanford Site related to historical operations. Public access to information on strontium-90 also is described. Section 3.0 focuses on key issues associated with strontium-90 contamination in groundwater that discharges in the Hanford Reach. The occurrence and distribution of fall chinook salmon redds in the Hanford Reach and characteristics of salmon spawning are described in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 describes the regulatory standards and criteria used to set action levels for strontium-90. Recommendations for initiating additional monitoring and remedial action associated with strontium-90 contamination at the Hanford Site are presented in Section 6.0. Appendix A describes monitoring methods. Appendix B discusses uncertainties associated with plume characterizations, and Appendix C provides an overview of studies on fish immuno-suppression and exposure to tritium.

  20. Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

    1995-06-01

    This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

  1. Interference and Sensitivity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; Halloran, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Causal inference with interference is a rapidly growing area. The literature has begun to relax the “no-interference” assumption that the treatment received by one individual does not affect the outcomes of other individuals. In this paper we briefly review the literature on causal inference in the presence of interference when treatments have been randomized. We then consider settings in which causal effects in the presence of interference are not identified, either because randomization alone does not suffice for identification, or because treatment is not randomized and there may be unmeasured confounders of the treatment-outcome relationship. We develop sensitivity analysis techniques for these settings. We describe several sensitivity analysis techniques for the infectiousness effect which, in a vaccine trial, captures the effect of the vaccine of one person on protecting a second person from infection even if the first is infected. We also develop two sensitivity analysis techniques for causal effects in the presence of unmeasured confounding which generalize analogous techniques when interference is absent. These two techniques for unmeasured confounding are compared and contrasted. PMID:25620841

  2. ESA: Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity and Sustainability

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Ecological Society of America created the Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity and Sustainability (SEEDS) program in order "to diversify and advance the ecology profession through opportunities that stimulate and nurture the interest of underrepresented students." As such, the site is a fine resource for science educators and others, and it contains seven basic sections, which include "Research", "Newsletter", and "Opportunities". In the "Opportunities" area, interested parties can find listings of student opportunities (such as funding), lists of relevant partnerships, and their career fair. The "Research" area includes material on the students who work with SEEDS, along with materials about how to get involved with one of their research experiences. Finally, the site is rounded out by the "Programs" area, which includes materials on local SEEDS chapters and field trips.

  3. A general theory of ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel M. Scheiner; Michael R. Willig

    2008-01-01

    Ecologists bemoan the dearth of theory in ecology, in particular, the lack of an overarching, general theory. These complaints\\u000a largely are unjustified. The components of a general theory of ecology have existed for the past half century; ecologists\\u000a simply have failed to explicitly recognize them. We present a general theory of ecology and show how it relates to ecology’s\\u000a numerous

  4. Climate Change Has Cascading Ecological Effects on Mountain Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagre, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Evidence that ecosystems of the Northern Rocky Mountains are responding to climate change abounds. Alpine glaciers, as iconic landscape features, are disappearing rapidly with some glaciers losing one half of their area in five years. A model developed in the 1990s to predict future rates of melt has proved too conservative when compared to recent measurements. The largest glaciers in Glacier National Park are almost 10 years ahead of schedule in their retreat. The cascading ecological effects of losing glaciers in high-elevation watersheds includes shifts in distribution and dominance of temperature-sensitive stream macroinvertebrates as stream volume dwindles (or disappears) in later summer months and water temperatures increase. Critical spawning areas for threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) will be lost without the consistent supply of cold water that melting snow and ice provide and raise management questions regarding the efficacy of recovery efforts. Snowpacks are documented as becoming smaller and melting earlier in the spring, facilitating the invasion of subalpine meadows by trees and reducing habitat for current alpine wildlife. Even vital ecosystem disturbances, such as periodic snow avalanches that clear mountain slope forests, have been shown by tree-ring studies to be responsive to climatic trends and are likely to become less prevalent. Monitoring of high-elevation mountain environments is difficult and has largely been opportunistic despite the fact that these areas have experienced three times the temperature increases over the past century when compared to lowland environments. A system of alpine observatories is sorely needed. Tighter integration of mountains studies, and comparisons among diverse mountain systems of the western U.S. has been initiated by the USGS-sponsored Western Mountain Initiative and the Consortium for Integrated Climate Research in Western Mountains to begin addressing this need.

  5. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Joel E.

    , numerical abundance. Journal of Animal Ecology (2004) 73, 852­866 Introduction The combinationJournal of Animal Ecology 2004 73, 852­866 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing and numerical abundance DANIEL C. REUMAN* and JOEL E. COHEN* *Laboratory of Populations, The Rockefeller

  6. Dolphin sympatric ecology MADDALENA BEARZI

    E-print Network

    REVIEW Dolphin sympatric ecology MADDALENA BEARZI Department of Organismic Biology, Ecology, but the sympatric ecology of such dolphin associations has not been studied in great detail. A few field dolphins (Tursiops spp.), short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis), and killer whales (Orcinus orca

  7. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-print Network

    Elkinton, Joseph

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2005 74, 1005­1019 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. Predation of beech seed by mice: effects of numerical and functional responses WENDY A. RUSCOE Zealand; Department of Entomology, and Graduate Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University

  8. The speed of ecological speciation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDREW P. HENDRY; PATRIK NOSIL; LOREN H. RIESEBERG

    2007-01-01

    Summary 1. Adaptation can occur on ecological time-scales (contemporary evolution) and adaptive divergence can cause reproductive isolation (ecological speciation). From the intersection of these two premises follows the prediction that reproductive isolation can evolve on ecological time-scales. We explore this possibility in theory and in nature. Finding few relevant studies, we examine each in some detail. 2. Theory : Several

  9. Wetland Wildlife Ecology Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    1 WIS 4443C 4 credits Wetland Wildlife Ecology Spring 2012 Course Objectives Lecture and Laboratory to identify representatives of wetland wildlife groups (birds, amphibians, mammals) Course Description, and ecological concepts associated with wetland ecology and the wildlife species that are dependant on wetlands

  10. Ecology and evolution of plant–pollinator interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Randall J.; Irwin, Rebecca E.; Flanagan, Rebecca J.; Karron, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Some of the most exciting advances in pollination biology have resulted from interdisciplinary research combining ecological and evolutionary perspectives. For example, these two approaches have been essential for understanding the functional ecology of floral traits, the dynamics of pollen transport, competition for pollinator services, and patterns of specialization and generalization in plant–pollinator interactions. However, as research in these and other areas has progressed, many pollination biologists have become more specialized in their research interests, focusing their attention on either evolutionary or ecological questions. We believe that the continuing vigour of a synthetic and interdisciplinary field like pollination biology depends on renewed connections between ecological and evolutionary approaches. Scope In this Viewpoint paper we highlight the application of ecological and evolutionary approaches to two themes in pollination biology: (1) links between pollinator behaviour and plant mating systems, and (2) generalization and specialization in pollination systems. We also describe how mathematical models and synthetic analyses have broadened our understanding of pollination biology, especially in human-modified landscapes. We conclude with several suggestions that we hope will stimulate future research. This Viewpoint also serves as the introduction to this Special Issue on the Ecology and Evolution of Plant–Pollinator Interactions. These papers provide inspiring examples of the synergy between evolutionary and ecological approaches, and offer glimpses of great accomplishments yet to come. PMID:19482881

  11. Antibiotic contamination in a typical developing city in south China: occurrence and ecological risks in the Yongjiang River impacted by tributary discharge and anthropogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baoming; Zhang, Ruijie; Wang, Yinghui; Liu, Xiang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence and distribution of ten selected antibiotics from three groups (sulfonamides, macrolides, and trimethoprim) were investigated in the Yongjiang River, which flows through Nanning City, a typical developing city in China. The study also assessed the ecological risks and the potential effects caused by discharge from tributaries and anthropogenic activities. Concentrations of most of the antibiotics were elevated along the section of the river in the urban area, highlighting the significant impact of high population density and human activities on the presence of antibiotics in the environment. The concentrations in the tributaries (ranged from not detected to 1336ngL(-1)) were generally higher than those in the main stream (ranged from not detected to 78.8ngL(-1)), but both areas contained the same predominant antibiotics, revealing the importance of tributary discharge as a source of antibiotic pollution. A risk assessment for the surface water contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin posed high ecological risks to the most sensitive aquatic organisms (Synechococcus leopoliensis and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, respectively) in the midstream and some tributaries. Most of the selected antibiotics presented high ecological risks (risk quotients up to 95) in the sediments. PMID:23478166

  12. Ecological analysis of the US Forest Service's RARE-II sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Klopatek; J. T. Kitchings; R. J. Olson; K. D. Kumar; L. K. Mann

    1980-01-01

    A methodology has been developed and applied to measure the ecological quality of land areas being evaluated as potential wilderness areas under the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service's Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE-II) Program. Four major parameters were chosen to quantify land areas located anywhere in the conterminous United States. These are: (1) vegetation - the principal

  13. ESTIMATION OF THE IC LAYOUT SENSITIVITY TO SPOT DEFECTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Witold A. Pleskacz; Wieslaw Kuzmicz

    SUMMARY Interactive method for optimization of an IC layout with respect to sensitivity to spot defects is presented. The relationship between occurrence of a spot defect and a circuit failure is discussed. A new concept of sensitive area is introduced. A new algorithm which allows determination of sensitive areas for opens is proposed. A practical example of the application of

  14. [Dynamics of regional ecological frangibility under natural hazard stress: a case study in Qingping Town of Sichuan Province, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin-Tao; Tao, He-Ping; Liu, Shao-Quan; Yu, Hui; Kong, Bo

    2012-01-01

    By using the aerial remote sensing images after May 12, 2008 (the date of catastrophic Wenchuan Earthquake) and the unmanned aircraft vehicle remote sensing images after August 13, 2010 (the date of extraordinary debris flow), and in combining with the land use map (1:10000), topographic map (1:50000), and collected field investigation data of Qingping Town, Mianzhu City of Sichuan Province in 2006, this paper analyzed and evaluated the ecological frangibility of the Town. In the Town, the slightly, lightly, moderately, heavily, and extremely fragile ecological zones after the extraordinary debris flow occupied 1.9%, 7.9%, 18.7%, 23.0%, and 48.5%, respectively, with the area of heavily and extremely fragile ecological zones accounting for 71.5% of the total, being 238.45 km2, i. e., the ecological environment was overall very fragile. Under the impact of the two natural hazards, the ecological frangibility degree of the Town increased obviously. As compared with that before the Earthquake, the area of heavily and extremely fragile ecological zones after the Earthquake increased by 12.4%, and the area of extremely fragile ecological zone was 1.67 times larger. The dynamic evolution of the ecological frangibility of the Town was mainly manifested in the conversion of heavily fragile ecological zone into extremely fragile ecological zone. Complex terrain was the key factor of the ecological frangibility of the Town. PMID:22489499

  15. Ecology of Dracophyllum subulatum-dominant heathland on frost flats at Rangitaiki and north Pureora, central North Island, New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Smale

    1990-01-01

    The structure, composition, and dynamics of heathland dominated by Dracophyllum subulatum (monoao) on “frost flats” (plateaus and shallow basins supporting low vegetation and subject to year-round frosts) at proposed Te Papa Ecological Area, Rangitaiki and Waipapa Ecological Area, Pureora, were investigated. Systematic sampling and subsequent classification identified five frost flat and related communities at Rangitaiki, the three minor ones apparently

  16. Area Designers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deana Davis

    2012-06-07

    This is the first of two hands-on lessons that make a real-world connection for students in measuring area in square units. Students become area designers during an activity that illustrates area, and then make a real world connection with area when they are shown a residential blueprint. Students gain practice calculating area and recording the area of rooms (quadrilaterals) in square units.

  17. System issues for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J N; Pawlowski, C W; Maszle, D R; Auslander, D M

    1995-01-01

    There are several characteristics of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System that are distinct from commonly engineered systems. These are: 1) the uncertainty, due to limited data availability, and variability due to the heterogeneity of biological subsystems; 2) the closed, ecological nature of the system; and 3) the primary criterion of maximizing the probability of survival. Consequences of these features include: complex dynamics characterized by time scales ranging from milliseconds to months, posing difficult problems with respect to mathematical modeling and predictability; and the necessity for a unique controller design that can translate the high level requirement of survivability to low-level actuator tasks. Future research in the systems and control area should include an ecological perspective focusing on the unique dynamical characteristics of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System. PMID:11538586

  18. Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007

    SciTech Connect

    T. Haney

    2007-07-31

    This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

  19. EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY Conservation Biology

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    1 EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY 1 Conservation Biology Spring 2009 Evolutionary ecologists attempt of evolution on the different topics we have already discussed from a functional standpoint, namely, population competition in such an environment would favor those individuals who channel all their energy into producing

  20. Human Ecology: Curriculum Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine commercially available programs which represent one aspect or a portion of the human ecology theme. Other information supplied for each program includes: program objectives; methods of instruction; specific subjects, grade, and ability levels; materials produced and purchasable; program implementation; teacher preparation; program…