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1

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01

2

SRS ecology: Environmental information document  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

1993-09-01

3

Environmental Planning and Ecology Program Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2008-01-01

4

WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION - GENERAL INFORMATION SHEET  

EPA Science Inventory

abstract for flyer - general information The Western Ecology Division (WED), part of EPAs National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, provides information to EPA offices and regions nationwide to improve understanding of how human activities affect estuarine,...

5

QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA's goal is to provide access to information about environmental conditions and related health and ecological risks to help inform decisions and help the public assess the general environmental health of communities. Innovative tools that provide reliable, secure exchange of qu...

6

Environmental Attitude and Ecological Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper establishes environmental attitude, a construct in environmental psychology, as a powerful predictor of ecological behavior. Based on Ajzen's theory of planned behavior, this study uses a unified concept of attitude and a probabilistic measurement approach. Questionnaire data from members of two ideologically different Swiss…

Kaiser, Florian G.; And Others

7

Ecological effects of environmental change.  

PubMed

This Special Issue of Ecology Letters presents contributions from an international meeting organised by Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and Ecology Letters on the broad theme of ecological effects of global environmental change. The objectives of these articles are to synthesise, hypothesise and illustrate the ecological effects of environmental change drivers and their interactions, including habitat loss and fragmentation, pollution, invasive species and climate change. A range of disciplines is represented, including stoichiometry, cell biology, genetics, evolution and biodiversity conservation. The authors emphasise the need to account for several key ecological factors and different spatial and temporal scales in global change research. They also stress the importance of ecosystem complexity through approaches such as functional group and network analyses, and of mechanisms and predictive models with respect to environmental responses to global change across an ecological continuum: population, communities and ecosystems. Lastly, these articles provide important insights and recommendations for environmental conservation and management, as well as highlighting future research priorities. PMID:23679008

Luque, Gloria M; Hochberg, Michael E; Holyoak, Marcel; Hossaert, Martine; Gaill, Françoise; Courchamp, Franck

2013-05-01

8

Central Atlantic Regional Ecological Test Site (CARETS): A prototype regional environmental information system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Accomplishments have included: (1) completion of the research design for the USGS/CARETS demonstration project; (2) preparation of photomossics and land use maps at a scale of 1:100,000 for entire area; (3) demonstration of the feasibility of extracting several categories of land use information from ERTS-1 MSS data for a portion of the CARETS region; (4) demonstration of the feasibility of detecting some significant land use changes on ERTS-1 imagery; (5) demonstration of the feasibility of attaching environmental impact significance to the remote sensor-derived land use data; (6) delivery of land use information derived from high altitude aircraft data to the Maryland state planning agency for use in its statewide land use inventory; (7) demonstration of high interest by other use groups in the test region in products and services provided by investigation; and (8) determination of the viability of setting up a computerized geographic information system as part of the CARETS investigation, to facilitate handling of sensor-derived land use data in a variety of formats to suit user requirements.

Alexander, R. H. (principal investigator)

1973-01-01

9

ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University  

E-print Network

ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University strengths in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy. The primary mission of the Graduate Program in Ecology & Environmental Science is to offer a graduate program

Thomas, Andrew

10

ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES  

E-print Network

;· Range Sites are not Ecological Sites · Concept development is critical ­ Organizing initial tests (low intensity or "Tier 1") Testing of concepts/ concept refinement (medium intensity or "Tier 2ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES Society for Range Management Annual Meeting Ecological

11

Industrial ecology: Environmental chemistry and hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Industrial ecology may be a relatively new concept -- yet it`s already proven instrumental for solving a wide variety of problems involving pollution and hazardous waste, especially where available material resources have been limited. By treating industrial systems in a manner that parallels ecological systems in nature, industrial ecology provides a substantial addition to the technologies of environmental chemistry. Stanley E. Manahan, bestselling author of many environmental chemistry books for Lewis Publishers, now examines Industrial Ecology: Environmental Chemistry and Hazardous Waste. His study of this innovative technology uses an overall framework of industrial ecology to cover hazardous wastes from an environmental chemistry perspective. Chapters one to seven focus on how industrial ecology relates to environmental science and technology, with consideration of the anthrosphere as one of five major environmental spheres. Subsequent chapters deal specifically with hazardous substances and hazardous waste, as they relate to industrial ecology and environmental chemistry.

Manahan, S.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-01-01

12

Ecological Monitoring Information System (EMIS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A system for evaluating and monitoring child development projects, with possible computerization capabilities, was developed for the State of Pennsylvania in connection with 26 child development projects funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission. The Ecological Monitoring Information System (EMIS), provides a series of ecological measurement…

Fiene, Richard John; And Others

13

Southwest Environmental Information Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINet) is a series of linked databases and accompanying web software helpful in using those databases, which will be of interest to the environmental research community in Arizona, the Southwest, and elsewhere. SEINet allows users to locate, access, and work with a variety of data, including biological collections, ecological research data, GIS data, taxonomic information, bibliographies, and research protocols. Searchable databases include herbaria; pollen, fruit and seed collections; and mammal, bird, reptile, and amphibian collections. There is also a library of plant and lichen images; links to identification keys and species checklists from various research projects; information on NaviKey (a Java applet and application for accessing descriptive data); and Symbiota web tools (which integrate biological community knowledge and data in order to help identify plants).

14

Integrating Sustainable Agriculture, Ecology, and Environmental Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current agricultural practices are contributing to environmental degradation, which also threatens the sustainability of agricultural production. Ecology has the potential to contribute significantly to the development of a sustainable and environmentally sound agriculture. However, the results of a conference organized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency suggest that only a small part of this potential has been realized. Successful translation

Richard K. Olson

1992-01-01

15

Environmental science and ecology involve studies  

E-print Network

Environmental science and ecology involve studies of the biosphere, hydro- sphere, and lithosphere in environmental science is conducted on spatial scales varying from a single algal cell to the Earth as a whole facilitates unique investigation of environmental science from atomic to global levels. Recently funded by CFI

Christensen, Dan

16

The Certain Uncertainty: The Political Ecology of Environmental Security  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Aligning with the effort to establish warfare ecology as a disciplined bridge to advance ecological science to inform policy\\u000a decisions and implementation and offset negative environmental consequences, this chapter suggests linking two propositions.\\u000a The first is that the praxis of security should be understood as extreme efforts within a state’s larger management of uncertainty\\u000a about the future. By focusing on

Peter H. Liotta; Allan W. Shearer

17

Ecological risk assessment benefits environmental management  

SciTech Connect

The ecological risk assessment process in its ideal form is an unbiased approach for assessing the probability of harm to the environment as a consequence of a given action. This information can then be combined with other societal values and biases in the management of such risks. However, as the process currently is understood, decision makers often are accused of manipulating information in order to generate decisions or achieve buy in from the public in support of a particular political agenda. A clear understanding of the nature of the risk management process can help define areas where information should be free from social or personal bias, and areas where values and judgments are critical. The authors do not propose to discuss the individual`s decision-making process, but rather to address the social process of risk communication and environmentally-related decision-making, identifying which parts of that process require bias-free, scientifically generated information about the consequences of various actions and which parts need an understanding of the social values which underlie the informed choices among those possible actions.

Fairbrother, A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Williams, B.A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Glicken, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31

18

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology  

E-print Network

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

Maxwell, Bruce D.

19

Distinguishing ecological engineering from environmental engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses complex system thinking to identify key peculiarities of ecological engineering. In particular it focuses on the distinction between the purpose-driven design of structures in environmental engineering and the natural process of self-organization characteristic of life, which needs to be integrated into ecological engineering.Conventional engineering addresses the problem of fabrication of an organized structure, say a road, which

T. F. H Allen; M Giampietro; A. M Little

2003-01-01

20

Campus Ecology: Environmental Management Projects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website describes projects on college campuses that aim to improve environmental management systems of their university. The goals of these programs are to weave environmental responsibility into the very fabric of the institution. Strategies include setting goals, tracking progress, providing training and incentives, and planning for Earth Day. The site also includes student research projects, tips for creating an environmental coordinator position on your campus, and case studies from campuses that have succeeded in funding this position.

Federation, National W.

21

Campus Ecology: Environmental Literacy Projects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website from the National Wildlife Federation describes the many ways that campuses are working to ensure that students graduate with the skills and knowledge they need to make environmentally responsible choices in their lives. Environmental education can take place in or out of the classroom, whether by integrating environmental lessons into existing coursework, providing professional development for faculty, or starting student-led education campaigns around campus. This website includes examples of environmental literacy projects, course descriptions and class curricula, as well as links to related resources.

22

Why study Ecological and Environmental Sciences at  

E-print Network

Why study Ecological and Environmental Sciences at Edinburgh? At Edinburgh students have a wide a combination of fieldwork, laboratory work, computing and data analysis. Projects are selected from a list, business and arts can be taken in first and second year. Students can also transfer between many of the Geo

Schnaufer, Achim

23

Information analysis of a spatial database for ecological land classification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An ecological land classification was developed for a complex region in southern California using geographic information system techniques of map overlay and contingency table analysis. Land classes were identified by mutual information analysis of vegetation pattern in relation to other mapped environmental variables. The analysis was weakened by map errors, especially errors in the digital elevation data. Nevertheless, the resulting land classification was ecologically reasonable and performed well when tested with higher quality data from the region.

Davis, Frank W.; Dozier, Jeff

1990-01-01

24

Population. Environmental Ecological Education Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit on population, designed for senior high school students, is divided into six packets with the following major topics: general introduction to the effects of a growing population, urbanization, family structures, family planning, consumption, environmental decay, and controlling the environment. Each packet contains a list of the topical…

Parkway School District, Chesterfield, MO.

25

Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

1994-06-01

26

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

1995-03-01

27

SNL/CA Environmental Planning and Ecology Program Annual Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2007-02-01

28

SNL/CA Environmental Planning and Ecology Annual Program Report for Calendar Year 2005.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2005-05-01

29

Urban Environmental Education From a Social-Ecological Perspective: Conceptual Framework for Civic Ecology Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of environmental education practices are emerging to address the needs of an increasingly urban population. Drawing from social-ecological systems and social learning theory, we propose a conceptual framework to stimulate research questions in urban environmental education. More specifically, our conceptual framework focuses on environmental education programs that are nested within and linked to community-based stewardship or civic ecology

Keith G Tidball; Marianne E Krasny

2011-01-01

30

Ecology, Environmental Impact Statements, and Ecological Risk Assessment: A Brief Historical Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological risk assessment will continue to increase in importance as a conceptual and methodological basis for evaluating environmental impacts as required by the National Environmental Policy Act. Understanding the historical strengths and limitations of more traditional environmental assessments performed in support of the NEPA can facilitate the effective incorporation of ecological risk assessment into the NEPA process. Such integration will

S. M. Bartell

1998-01-01

31

Information and the Ecology of Scholars  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests a logical basis for the use of ecological concepts in modeling a special subculture; that of scholars (and in particular scientists), who produce, barter, and structure information as an ecosystem produces, exchanges, and structures biomass. (JR)

Blackburn, Thomas R.

1973-01-01

32

Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing  

E-print Network

Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing Karen S. Baker@scu.edu Abstract. An information ecology provides a conceptual framework to consider data, the creation Ecological Research (LTER) community, presents some manifestations of traditionally unreported `invisible

Bowker, Geoffrey C.

33

Environmental geographic information system.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

Peek, Dennis; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

2010-08-01

34

Public ecology: an environmental science and policy for global society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public ecology exists at the interface of science and policy. Public ecology is an approach to environmental inquiry and decision making that does not expect scientific knowledge to be perfect or complete. Rather, public ecology requires that science be produced in collaboration with a wide variety of stakeholders in order to construct a body of knowledge that will reflect the

David P. Robertson; R. Bruce Hull

2003-01-01

35

Ecological and life-history traits predict bee species responses to environmental disturbances  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to predict the responses of ecological communities and individual species to human-induced environmental change remains a key issue for ecologists and conservation managers alike. Responses are often variable among species within groups making general predictions difficult. One option is to include ecological trait information that might help to disentangle patterns of response and also provide greater understanding of

Neal M. Williams; Elizabeth E. Crone; T’ai H. Roulston; Robert L. Minckley; Laurence Packer; Simon G. Potts

2010-01-01

36

Integrating Sustainable Agriculture, Ecology, and Environmental Policy. Conference Proceedings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Current agricultural practices are contributing to environmental degradation, which also threatens the sustainability of agricultural production. Ecology has the potential to contribute significantly to the development of a sustainable and environmentally...

R. K. Olson

1992-01-01

37

Environmental Information Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Institute for the Environment is a joint public-private partnership between The George Washington University in Washington D.C. and the US Environmental Protection Agency. The Institute has implemented the Environmental Information Resources site providing information about the environment, including everything from ocean oil spills, to environmental college research world wide, to Access EPA (an on-line data base of environmental details), to the first model Green University along with its on-line Strategic Plan, to the U.S. Green Building Council's membership form. The site links to over two hundred other sites around the world and more are being added every day. The system is entirely free and has been cited by the President and Vice-President of the United States of America in a Environmental Technology report that was given in April of 1995.

1997-01-01

38

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Assessing Ecological Integrity of Ozark Rivers to  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Assessing Ecological Integrity of Ozark Rivers to Determine Suitability- disturbed streams and rivers. We applied two objective, quantitative methods to determine stream ecological integ- rity of headwater reaches of 10 Ozark rivers, 5 with Wild and Scenic River federal protective

Kwak, Thomas J.

39

Social–ecological resilience and environmental education: synopsis, application, implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The resilience approach is rooted in ecology and is being advanced as a means to understand change in social–ecological systems. How can resilience be applied to understanding change in social systems, including in environmental education? In probing this question the main resilience approaches are described, the manner in which they may be applied to social systems are explored, and the

Ryan Plummer

2010-01-01

40

ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA's Office of Research and Development initiated the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) to provide data for better assessments of the condition of the nation's ecological resources. ver the next five years, several integrated monitoring networks will be impl...

41

Environmental reports for the nuclear regulatory commission: Guidelines thwart sound ecological design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires a detailed description of the ecology associated with every proposed nuclear power station. This article examines the usefulness of much of this information. It evaluates the structure of logic and assumption underlying the requirement that certain information must be presented in applicants' environmental reports. It concludes that the regulation itself makes it impossible

Jon Ghiselin

1978-01-01

42

Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1994-06-01

43

Environmental Research Information Exchange  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Library for the Environment has launched its new Environmental Research Information Exchange (ERIE) service, to provide "a forum for researchers, educators, resource managers, agency decision-makers, foundation representatives, journalists and others in all environmental fields to share information and discuss issues." The site will include postings of research needs (identified by researchers and managers), research opportunities (for students and established researchers), funding opportunities, and a wealth of scientific information about the environment. In addition, a bulletin board will be available for posting messages, questions, and answers. This site aims to fill an important and much-needed role in facilitating communication between researchers, managers, journalists, and funding agencies; skeptics and interested participants should check out the examples of how ERIE might be useful ... and take it from there!

44

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31

45

The Environmental and Ecological Forum 1970-1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains the papers presented in the 1970-1971 Environmental and Ecological Forum series, planned to provide an overview of the significant environmental, social, and economic aspects of electric power generation, more specifically, the pros and cons of nuclear power production. The Forum was organized as a public service to foster…

Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC. Office of Information Services.

46

INTEGRATING SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE, ECOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY  

EPA Science Inventory

Current agricultural practices are contributing to environmental degradation, which also threatens the sustainability of agricultural production. cology has the potential to contribute significantly to the development of a sustainable and environmentally sound agriculture. owever...

47

Ecological Intelligence and Environmental Education: My Journey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many of us are intentional in considering the environment when performing our daily tasks. But how many of us really know the true impacts of our "green" behaviors on the environment? Indeed, is it possible that engaging in green efforts can actually be counterproductive or detrimental to the environment? In his book, "Ecological Intelligence: How…

Bouley, Theresa M.

2012-01-01

48

Putting the "Ecology" into Environmental Flows: Ecological Dynamics and Demographic Modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There have been significant diversions of water from rivers and streams around the world; natural flow regimes have been perturbed by dams, barriers and excessive extractions. Many aspects of the ecological `health' of riverine systems have declined due to changes in water flows, which has stimulated the development of thinking about the maintenance and restoration of these systems, which we refer to as environmental flow methodologies (EFMs). Most existing EFMs cannot deliver information on the population viability of species because they: (1) use habitat suitability as a proxy for population status; (2) use historical time series (usually of short duration) to forecast future conditions and flow sequences; (3) cannot, or do not, handle extreme flow events associated with climate variability; and (4) assume process stationarity for flow sequences, which means the past sequences are treated as good indicators of the future. These assumptions undermine the capacity of EFMs to properly represent risks associated with different flow management options; assumption (4) is untenable given most climate-change predictions. We discuss these concerns and advocate the use of demographic modelling as a more appropriate tool for linking population dynamics to flow regime change. A `meta-species' approach to demographic modelling is discussed as a useful step from habitat based models towards modelling strategies grounded in ecological theory when limited data are available on flow-demographic relationships. Data requirements of demographic models will undoubtedly expose gaps in existing knowledge, but, in so doing, will strengthen future efforts to link changes in river flows with their ecological consequences.

Shenton, Will; Bond, Nicholas R.; Yen, Jian D. L.; Mac Nally, Ralph

2012-07-01

49

Role of basic ecological knowledge in environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The role of basic ecological knowledge in environmental impact assessment was examined. The focus was primarily on the NEPA process. Experience in population biology and ecosystem studies is discussed, the successes and limits of applicability are highlighted, and implications for long-term research needs are identified. Current attempts to develop a national assessment of acid deposition impacts are reviewed. 48 refs. (ACR)

Hildebrand, S.G.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Suter, G.W.

1984-01-01

50

WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS: INTEGRATING SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE, ECOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY  

EPA Science Inventory

The role of ecological research in supporting development of one aspect of sustainable use, sustainable agriculture, was evaluated at a conference organized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Arlington, Virginia, July 22-23, 1991. griculture contributes to many ...

51

Reactor operation environmental information document  

SciTech Connect

This volume is a reactor operation environmental information document for the Savannah River Plant. Topics include meteorology, surface hydrology, transport, environmental impacts, and radiation effects. 48 figs., 56 tabs. (KD)

Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Hunter, C.H.; Marter, W.L.; Moyer, R.A.

1989-12-01

52

Environmental Attitudes and Information Sources among African American College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author examined the environmental attitudes of African American college students by using the 15-item New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) Scale. The author also attempted to determine their everyday environmental behaviors such as recycling and conservation and investigated major information sources for local, national, and international…

Lee, E. Bun

2008-01-01

53

Simulating evolutionary responses of an introgressed insect resistance trait for ecological effect assessment of transgene flow: a model for supporting informed decision-making in environmental risk assessment  

PubMed Central

Predicting outcomes of transgene flow from arable crops requires a system perspective that considers ecological and evolutionary processes within a landscape context. In Europe, the arable weed Raphanus raphanistrum is a potential hybridization partner of oilseed rape, and the two species are ecologically linked through the common herbivores Meligethes spp. Observations in Switzerland show that high densities of Meligethes beetles maintained by oilseed rape crops can lead to considerable damage on R. raphanistrum. We asked how increased insect resistance in R. raphanistrum – as might be acquired through introgression from transgenic oilseed rape – would affect seed production under natural herbivore pressure. In simulation experiments, plants protected against Meligethes beetles produced about twice as many seeds as unprotected plants. All stages in the development of reproductive structures from buds to pods were negatively affected by the herbivore, with the transition from buds to flowers being the most vulnerable. We conclude that resistance to Meligethes beetles could confer a considerable selective advantage upon R. raphanistrum in regions where oilseed rape is widely grown. PMID:23467842

Meier, Matthias S; Trtikova, Miluse; Suter, Matthias; Edwards, Peter J; Hilbeck, Angelika

2013-01-01

54

CERES: Environmental Information by Theme  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal, published by the California Environmental Resources Evaluation System (CERES), features links to environmental information arranged under three categories: natural environment, natural resources, and the human environment. Natural environmental topics include such items as weather, geology, and natural disturbances (earthquakes, El nino, and others). Natural resources topics include minerals, water, fisheries, and biodiversity. Human environmental topics include cultural resources, environmental law, hazardous waste, and land use.

55

mental planning; (5) environmental economics; (6) ecological anthropology; and (7) environmen-  

E-print Network

329 mental planning; (5) environmental economics; (6) ecological anthropology; and (7) environmen approved for environmental studies specializations are drawn from the offerings of anthropology, biological

Suzuki, Masatsugu

56

Information and its use by animals in evolutionary ecology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information is a crucial currency for animals from both a behavioural and evolutionary perspective. Adaptive behaviour relies upon accurate estimation of relevant ecological parameters; the better informed an indivi- dual, the better it can develop and adjust its behaviour to meet the demands of a variable world. Here, we focus on the burgeoning interest in the impact of ecological uncertainty

Sasha R. X. Dall; Luc-Alain Giraldeau; Ola Olsson; John M. McNamara; David W. Stephens

2005-01-01

57

7 CFR 799.13 - Environmental information.  

...2014-01-01 false Environmental information. 799...Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY...the Conservation and Environmental Protection Division, FSA,...

2014-01-01

58

ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM INFORMATION 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 3 -1  

E-print Network

or remediation programs; · Accurately communicate results of environmental monitoring and surveillance to DOEENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM INFORMATION 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 3 - 1 Chapter 3 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM INFORMATION 3.1 Environmental Program Elements Brookhaven National Laboratory is committed

59

Ecological niche shifts and environmental space anisotropy: a cautionary note  

E-print Network

stories about how Open Access to this article benefits you. 2011 Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad 82: 1348-1355, 2011 Recibido: 15 marzo 2011; aceptado: 11 junio 2011 Ecological niche shifts and environmental space anisotropy: a cautionary note... and the analytical potentials of its relationship to the habitat. American Naturalist 107:213-246. Medley, K. A. 2010. Niche shifts during the global invasion of the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus Skuse (Culicidae), revelaed by reciprocal distribution...

Soberó n, Jorge; Peterson, A. Townsend

2011-01-01

60

ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later)  

E-print Network

ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later course other than BIOL 54200 124 Total Credits BIOLOGY: 1. BIOL 12100 Biology I: Diversity, Ecology 28600 Intro. to Ecology and Evolution (2 cr.; spring) or BIOL 29500, Intro. to Evolution & Ecology (2 cr

Jiang, Wen

61

Model organisms retain an "ecological memory" of complex ecologically relevant environmental variation.  

PubMed

Although tractable model organisms are essential to characterize the molecular mechanisms of evolution and adaptation, the ecological relevance of their behavior is not always clear because certain traits are easily lost during long-term laboratory culturing. Here, we demonstrate that despite their long tenure in the laboratory, model organisms retain "ecological memory" of complex environmental changes. We have discovered that Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, a halophilic archaeon that dominates microbial communities in a dynamically changing hypersaline environment, simultaneously optimizes fitness to total salinity, NaCl concentration, and the [K]/[Mg] ratio. Despite being maintained under controlled conditions over the last 50 years, peaks in the three-dimensional fitness landscape occur in salinity and ionic compositions that are not replicated in laboratory culturing but are routinely observed in the natural hypersaline environment of this organism. Intriguingly, adaptation to variations in ion composition was associated with differential regulation of anaerobic metabolism genes, suggesting an intertwined relationship between responses to oxygen and salinity. Our results suggest that the ecological memory of complex environmental variations is imprinted in the networks for coordinating multiple cellular processes. These coordination networks are also essential for dealing with changes in other physicochemically linked factors present during routine laboratory culturing and, hence, retained in model organisms. PMID:24413600

Beer, Karlyn D; Wurtmann, Elisabeth J; Pinel, Nicolás; Baliga, Nitin S

2014-03-01

62

Environmental mutagenesis during the end-Permian ecological crisis  

PubMed Central

During the end-Permian ecological crisis, terrestrial ecosystems experienced preferential dieback of woody vegetation. Across the world, surviving herbaceous lycopsids played a pioneering role in repopulating deforested terrain. We document that the microspores of these lycopsids were regularly released in unseparated tetrads indicative of failure to complete the normal process of spore development. Although involvement of mutation has long been hinted at or proposed in theory, this finding provides concrete evidence for chronic environmental mutagenesis at the time of global ecological crisis. Prolonged exposure to enhanced UV radiation could account satisfactorily for a worldwide increase in land plant mutation. At the end of the Permian, a period of raised UV stress may have been the consequence of severe disruption of the stratospheric ozone balance by excessive emission of hydrothermal organohalogens in the vast area of Siberian Traps volcanism. PMID:15282373

Visscher, Henk; Looy, Cindy V.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Brinkhuis, Henk; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H. A.; Kürschner, Wolfram M.; Sephton, Mark A.

2004-01-01

63

Environmental, trophic, and ecological factors influencing bone collagen ?2H  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic deuterium/hydrogen stable isotope ratios (i.e., 2H/1H, expressed as ?2H value in ‰) in animal tissues are related to the 2H/1H in diet and ingested water. Bone collagen preserves the biochemical 2H/1H isotopic signal in the ?2H value of collagen's non-exchangeable hydrogen. Therefore, ?2H preserved in bone collagen has the potential to constrain environmental and trophic conditions, which is of interest to researchers studying of both living and fossil vertebrates. Our data examine the relationship of ?2H values of collagen with geographic variation in ?2H of meteoric waters, with local variations in the ecology and trophic level of species, and with the transition from mother's milk to adult diet. Based on 97 individuals from 22 marine and terrestrial vertebrates (predominately mammals), we found the relationships of collagen ?2H to both geographic variation in meteoric water ?2H (R2 = 0.55) and to ?15N in bone collagen (R2 = 0.17) statistically significant but weaker than previously reported. The second strongest control on collagen ?2H in our data is dietary, with nearly 50 percent of the variance in ?2H explained by trophic level (R2 = 0.47). Trophic level effects potentially confound the local meteoric signal if not held constant: herbivores tend to have the lowest ?2H values, omnivores have intermediate ones, and carnivores have the highest values. Body size (most likely related to mass-specific metabolic rates) has a strong influence on collagen ?2H (R2 = 0.30), by causing greater sensitivity in smaller animals to seasonal climate variations and/or high evapotranspiration leading to 2H-enrichment in tissues. In marine mammals weaning produces a dramatic effect on collagen ?2H with adult values being universally higher than pup values (R2 = 0.79). Interestingly, the shift in ?15N at weaning is downward, even though normally hydrogen and nitrogen isotope ratios are positively correlated with one another in respect to trophic level. Our findings suggest that in carnivores, which have an especially high variance in ?2H, large samples are needed to separate signals from precipitation, trophic level, body size, and age. For ?2H of fossil collagen to be useful as a proxy of environmental or dietary information, these confounding effects need to be understood, which means careful selection of a study species. Further, ?2H from a single fossil bone collagen is likely to be uninterpretable.

Topalov, Katarina; Schimmelmann, Arndt; David Polly, P.; Sauer, Peter E.; Lowry, Mark

2013-06-01

64

ECOLOGICAL TAX REFORM: Estimated Environmental and Employment Effects in British Columbia  

E-print Network

i ECOLOGICAL TAX REFORM: Estimated Environmental and Employment Effects in British Columbia by Amy in British Columbia. To do this, I simulated ecological taxes on water consumption, solid waste and carbon

65

REGIME CHANGES IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: AN INFORMATION THEORY APPROACH  

EPA Science Inventory

We present our efforts at developing an ecological system using Information Theory. We derive an expression for Fisher Information based on sampling of the system trajectory as it evolves in the state space. The Fisher Information index as we have derived it captures the characte...

66

Mining environmental toxicology information: web resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental toxicology is the study of the ecological effects of anthropogenic substances released into the environment. It is a relatively diverse field addressing impacts to aquatic and terrestrial organisms and communities. The determination of potential risk associated with toxic agents is of interest to government regulators, industry, researchers, private organizations and citizen groups. In assessing the ecological risk associated with

Christine L Russom

2002-01-01

67

A Module-Based Environmental Science Course for Teaching Ecology to Non-Majors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using module-based courses has been suggested to improve undergraduate science courses. A course based around a series of modules focused on major environmental issues might be an effective way to teach non-science majors about ecology and ecology's role in helping to solve environmental problems. I have used such a module-based environmental

Smith, Geoffrey R.

2010-01-01

68

Maximum information entropy: a foundation for ecological theory.  

PubMed

The maximum information entropy (MaxEnt) principle is a successful method of statistical inference that has recently been applied to ecology. Here, we show how MaxEnt can accurately predict patterns such as species-area relationships (SARs) and abundance distributions in macroecology and be a foundation for ecological theory. We discuss the conceptual foundation of the principle, why it often produces accurate predictions of probability distributions in science despite not incorporating explicit mechanisms, and how mismatches between predictions and data can shed light on driving mechanisms in ecology. We also review possible future extensions of the maximum entropy theory of ecology (METE), a potentially important foundation for future developments in ecological theory. PMID:24863182

Harte, John; Newman, Erica A

2014-07-01

69

Ecology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of teaching aids consists of nine Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing teachers and students with informational reading on various ecological topics. The bulletins have these titles: Schoolyard Laboratories, Owls and Predators, The Forest Community, Life in Freshwater Marshes, Camouflage in the Animal World, Life in the Desert, The…

National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

70

Geographic Information Systems in Epidemiology - Ecology of Common Vole and Distribution of Natural Foci of Tularaemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pikula J., F. Treml, M. Beklová, Z. Hole‰ovská, J. Pikulová: Geographic Information Systems in Epidemiology - Ecology of Common Vole and Distribution of Natural Foci of Tularaemia.Acta Vet. Brno 2002, 71: 379-387. KORMAP geographic information system (GIS) was used to analyse the distribution and selected environmental factors related to population levels of Microtus arvalis (a potential reservoir host of F.

J. PIKULA; F. TREML; M. BEKLOVÁ; Z. HOLE; J. PIKULOVÁ

2002-01-01

71

28 CFR 61.11 - Environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Environmental information. 61...Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES...IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing...Procedures § 61.11 Environmental information. ...regarding Department Justice compliance with...

2013-07-01

72

28 CFR 61.11 - Environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Environmental information. 61...Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES...IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing...Procedures § 61.11 Environmental information. ...regarding Department Justice compliance with...

2012-07-01

73

28 CFR 61.11 - Environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Environmental information. 61...Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES...IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing...Procedures § 61.11 Environmental information. ...regarding Department Justice compliance with...

2010-07-01

74

28 CFR 61.11 - Environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Environmental information. 61...Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES...IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing...Procedures § 61.11 Environmental information. ...regarding Department Justice compliance with...

2011-07-01

75

Ecological compensation and Environmental Impact Assessment in Spain  

SciTech Connect

To achieve meaningful sustainable development, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) should avoid the net losses in the environment resource base. But EIA practice does not always avoid the losses caused by the implementation of the projects under EIA regulation. Some environmental impacts are, simply, admitted, even without enforcing any form of compensation. When applied, compensation is sometimes just a monetary payment to offset the environmental loss. This paper looks for evidence on the role that compensation is given at present in EIA practice in Spain, and for some of its conceptual and regulatory roots. Specifically, it explores how compensation is addressed in 1302 records of decision (RODs) on those projects subject to the Spanish EIA regulation published during the years 2006 and 2007, to know how far Spain is from preserving the environmental resource base managed through this particular aspect of EIA practice. As a result, it is concluded that the practice of ecological compensation in EIA in Spain is much lower than it could be expected in a theoretical sustainability context committed to avoid net losses in the environment resource base, mainly due to an EIA practice focused on on-site mitigation that allows these net losses.

Villarroya, Ana, E-mail: avillarroya@alumni.unav.e [Department of Zoology and Ecology, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Navarra) (Spain); Puig, Jordi, E-mail: jpbaguer@unav.e [Department of Zoology and Ecology, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Navarra) (Spain)

2010-11-15

76

Remediation of ecosystems damaged by environmental contamination: Applications of ecological engineering and ecosystem restoration in Central and Eastern Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the applicability of ecological engineering to pollution problems prevalent in present-day Central and Eastern Europe, a SCOPE-UNEP sponsored workshop was held in Estonia in November 1995. The workshop was undertaken specifically to obtain information from and to train planners, managers and scientists in the region. These `countries in transition' face, in many respects, unique environmental problems as a

W. J Mitsch; Ü Mander

1997-01-01

77

Conflict between ecological sustainability and environmental aesthetics: Conundrum, canärd or curiosity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prominent theme in the relatively young field of landscape ecology is the development of an ecological aesthetic. Landscape ecologists and others are concerned with the planning and management of environments for both ecological sustainability and environmental aesthetics. Research and conceptual examples are used in the first part of this paper to illustrate the potential incompatibility of these goals in

Russ Parsons

1995-01-01

78

The Influence of Information Ecology on E-Commerce Initiatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the influence of an organization's information ecology, or internal information environment, on a firm's electronic commerce initiatives and plans. Reports results from a case study investigation on the adoption and use of an e-commerce initiative, a corporate portal, by participants at a large Canadian company. (Author/LRW)

Detlor, Brian

2001-01-01

79

From ecological test site to geographic information system: lessons for the 1980's  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic information systems were common elements in two kinds of interdisciplinary regional demonstration projects in the 1970's. Ecological test sits attempted to provide for more efficient remote-sensing data delivery for regional environmental management. Regional environmental systems analysis attempted to formally describe and model the interacting regional social and environmental processes, including the resource-use decision making process. Lessons for the 1980's are drawn from recent evaluations and assessments of these programs, focusing on cost, rates of system development and technology transfer, program coordination, integrative analysis capability, and the involvement of system users and decision makers.

Alexander, Robert H.

1981-01-01

80

Environmental variability and the ecological effects of spawning Pacific salmon on stream biofilm  

E-print Network

Environmental variability and the ecological effects of spawning Pacific salmon on stream biofilm by resource subsidies and disturbance by ecosystem engineering) on benthic biofilm. 2. We sampled seven, stream environmental characteristics and their influence on responses of benthic biofilm [mean

Tiegs, Scott

81

Experimental and environmental factors affect spurious detection of ecological thresholds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Threshold detection methods are increasingly popular for assessing nonlinear responses to environmental change, but their statistical performance remains poorly understood. We simulated linear change in stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities and evaluated the performance of commonly used threshold detection methods based on model fitting (piecewise quantile regression [PQR]), data partitioning (nonparametric change point analysis [NCPA]), and a hybrid approach (significant zero crossings [SiZer]). We demonstrated that false detection of ecological thresholds (type I errors) and inferences on threshold locations are influenced by sample size, rate of linear change, and frequency of observations across the environmental gradient (i.e., sample-environment distribution, SED). However, the relative importance of these factors varied among statistical methods and between inference types. False detection rates were influenced primarily by user-selected parameters for PQR (?) and SiZer (bandwidth) and secondarily by sample size (for PQR) and SED (for SiZer). In contrast, the location of reported thresholds was influenced primarily by SED. Bootstrapped confidence intervals for NCPA threshold locations revealed strong correspondence to SED. We conclude that the choice of statistical methods for threshold detection should be matched to experimental and environmental constraints to minimize false detection rates and avoid spurious inferences regarding threshold location.

Daily, Jonathan P.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David R.; Snyder, Craig D.

2012-01-01

82

Technology Characterizations. Environmental Information Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Handbook Series is designed to overcome the deficiency of information utility and transfer. Each of the works in this series brings together information in an area and format that is useful to both public and private sector needs. It is meant to serve as a basic reference document that will stand for a period of time and help to enrich decisionmaking and research in the interface of energy and the environment. This particular handbook deals with environmental characterization data for the energy technologies and presents the data in a format for use by DOE policy analysts. This treatment includes not only the actual information base, but also a preface which explains the present concept, the historical growth of the program, and the new direction for improved utility. The information base, itself, is constantly being enhanced and is republished periodically as necessary. The specific energy systems for which environmental/technology characterization information is provided are grouped as follows: nuclear energy; coal; petroleum; gas; synthetic fuels; solar energy; geothermal energy; and hydroelectricity.

Not Available

1980-06-01

83

Consumption, Ecological Footprints and Global Inequality: A Lesson in Individual and Structural Components of Environmental Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As evidence of the growing ecological crisis mounts, it is imperative that sociologists speak to this social problem and incorporate a sociological perspective on environmental issues into the curriculum. Central to understanding how social issues relate to environmental problems is an examination of the ties between consumption and its ecological

Obach, Brian K.

2009-01-01

84

Biol 366 Course Information Autumn 2008 Freshwater Ecology  

E-print Network

Biol 366 Course Information Autumn 2008 Freshwater Ecology Biol 366 Autumn 2008 Instructor: WinsorGraw-Hill, NY. Additional Readings: On course website This course will focus on interactions among freshwater of freshwater habitats. Emphasis is placed on basic mechanisms controlling the distribution and abundance

Vonessen, Nikolaus

85

Elsa M. Ordway Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology  

E-print Network

to collect nesting ecology data on leatherback sea turtles Injecting and reading PIT tags in leatherbacks Protection Program (BBPP) 2009 - 2010 Sea Turtle Nesting Ecology Research Assistant Bioko Island, Equatorial Description: A nesting ecology project researching the impact of tidal pumping on gas exchange of leatherback

DeFries, Ruth S.

86

The Unknown Ecology of an Environmental Pathogen: Buruli ulcer Disease in West Africa  

E-print Network

Environmental Data 1 km Monthly MODIS Aqua NDVI data (July 2002 – December 2006) Minimum, maximum, median, range 1 km 8 Day MODIS Aqua LST Daytime data (July 2002 – December 2006) Minimum, maximum, median, range http://reverb.echo.nasa.gov/reverb/#utf8=%E2%9C...GIS DAY 2013 THE UNKNOWN ECOLOGY OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL PATHOGEN: BURULI ULCER DISEASE IN WEST AFRICA LINDSAY CAMPBELL ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Buruli Ulcer Disease (BU) ? Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) ? Environmental...

Campbell, Lindsay P.

2013-11-20

87

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE INFORMATION Dear colleague  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE INFORMATION Dear colleague Welcome to the Department of Environmental Science (ENVS) at Aarhus University (AU). With this information folder you will get a short presentation of the Department of Environmental Science and information about important practical stuff

88

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Generic Ecological Assessment Endpoints  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency determined that one of the major impediments to the advancement and application of ecological risk assessment is doubt concerning appropriate assessment endpoints. The Agency's Risk Assessment Forum determined that the best solution to this problem was to define a set of generic ecological assessment endpoints (GEAEs). They are assessment endpoints that are applicable to a

Glenn W. Suter; Donald J. Rodier; Scott Schwenk; Michael E. Troyer; Patricia L. Tyler; Douglas J. Urban; Marjorie C. Wellman; Steven Wharton

2004-01-01

89

Searching for Synergy: Integrating Traditional and Scientific Ecological Knowledge in Environmental Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scientific ecological knowledge (SEK) is a powerful discipline for diagnosing and analyzing environmental degradation, but has been far less successful in devising sustainable solutions which lie at the intersection of nature and culture. Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of indigenous and local peoples is rich in prescriptions for the…

Kimmerer, Robin Wall

2012-01-01

90

Ecological genomics in Daphnia: stress responses and environmental sex determination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological genomics is the study of adaptation of natural populations to their environment, and therefore seeks to link organism and population level processes through an under- standing of genome organization and function. The plank- tonic microcrustacean Daphnia, which has long been an important system for ecology, is now being used as a genomic model as well. Here we review recent

BD Eads; J Andrews; JK Colbourne

2007-01-01

91

Ecological genomics in Daphnia: stress responses and environmental sex determination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological genomics is the study of adaptation of natural populations to their environment, and therefore seeks to link organism and population level processes through an understanding of genome organization and function. The planktonic microcrustacean Daphnia, which has long been an important system for ecology, is now being used as a genomic model as well. Here we review recent progress in

B D Eads; J Andrews; J K Colbourne

2008-01-01

92

INTEGRATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY IN ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CHEMICALS (EDCS)  

EPA Science Inventory

Prospective and disgnostic assessments of the ecological risk of toxic chemicals require a thorough integration of aspects of environmental chemistry and toxicology. Failure to successfully achieve this can result in a lack of scientific credibility, as well as missed opportuniti...

93

Ecological systems approaches to sustainability and organizational development : Emerging trends in environmental and social accounting reporting systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The ecological framework focuses on ecosystems, natural resources, agricultural practices, geographical locations, conservation and environmental management. Recently, ecology has provided the underlying framework for sustainability development and reporting. This paper aims to relate the ecological approach to the environmental and conservation objectives embedded in sustainability development and reporting. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper argues that sustainability reporting is an

Seleshi Sisaye

2011-01-01

94

Using Formative Research to Develop Environmental and Ecological Interventions to Address Overweight and Obesity  

PubMed Central

Objective This paper presents the formative research phase of a large multi-site intervention study conducted to inform the feasibility of introducing environmental and ecological interventions. Methods Using mixed methods that included an environmental assessment, climate survey, leadership focus groups and interviews, and archival data, information was collected on employee health and job factors, the physical environment, social-organizational environment, and current health programs. Results Results show that 83% of employees at the study sites were overweight or obese. Leadership was very supportive of health initiatives and felt integrating the strategies into organizational operations would increase their likelihood of success. Environmental assessment scores ranged from 47 to 19 on a 100 point scale. Health services personnel tended to view the organizational climate for health more positively than site leadership (mean of 3.6 vs 3.0 respectively). Conclusions Intervention strategies chosen included increasing healthy food choices in vending, cafeterias, and company meetings, providing a walking path, targeting messages, developing site goals, training leaders, and establishing leaders at the work group level. PMID:18073340

Wilson, Mark G.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Ozminkowski, Ronald J.; DeJoy, Dave M.; Della, Lindsay; Roemer, Enid Chung; Schneider, Jennifer; Tully, Karen J.; White, John M.; Baase, Catherine M.

2010-01-01

95

RBIS - An Environmental Information System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The River Basin Information System (RBIS) developed at the Department of Geoinformatics at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena provides a modular structured and web-based platform for environmental data management and data sharing (http://www.rbis.uni-jena.de). The system is used in several multidisciplinary research projects and provides user-friendly functions for the management, analysis, visualization and presentation of different types of data. These types of data include time series data (e.g. hydrological, climatologically …), geodata, documents and more domain specific modules for example related to soil, vegetation, scenarios, simulation models or indicators. One main focus lies on the maintenance on meta-data to make sure information about data provenance and responsible parties are preserved. Furthermore the fine grained user and permission management of RBIS take care about the access and manipulation rights of all stored data. For an easy data exchange of time series data and other data types RBIS provides several interfaces. One example is a prototypical implementation using OGC standards (Sensor Observation Service (SOS) and WaterML2.0). Since RBIS is used for data in research regions located in different countries (e.g. Brazil, Vietnam, Angola, Chile, Germany) a Multilanguage support was added to address not only research project partners but also local stakeholder and public. We will present the structure, modules, main functions, permission management and interfaces for data exchange of RBIS together with selected examples of RBIS instances.

Zander, F.; Kralisch, S.

2012-04-01

96

Value Considerations in an Information Ecology: Printed Materials, Service Providers and Homeless Young People  

E-print Network

Value Considerations in an Information Ecology: Printed Materials, Service Providers and Homeless ecology that has emerged to help homeless young people. We studied the information ecology of service agencies that assist homeless young people, age 13 to 25. We focused on printed materials used

Anderson, Richard

97

The Effects of Ecology-Based Summer Nature Education Program on Primary School Students' Environmental Knowledge, Environmental Affect and Responsible Environmental Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to assess the effects of ecology-based nature education program on elementary school students' environmental knowledge, environmental affect, and responsible environmental behavior. A total number of 64 elementary school students including 26 females and 38 males who participated in summer natural education organized…

Erdogan, Mehmet

2011-01-01

98

CONVERGENCE OF ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND RISK ASSESSMENT: TOWARDS HOLISTIC ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION  

EPA Science Inventory

A major emphasis of environmental monitoring and assessment programs is to characterize the condition of natural resources. When repeated through time, ecological assessments (EA) can be used to track changes in environmental condition that reflect on the efficacy of regulatory a...

99

Educational Reflections on the "Ecological Crisis": EcoJustice, Environmentalism, and Sustainability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a tendency by scholars arguing for a more just and sustainable future to position the "ecological crisis" as a fundamental reason for major educational reforms. Relying on crisis-talk to fuel social and environmental justice and environmentalism reinforces the thinking of the past, which inadvertently perpetuates the acceptance of present…

Mueller, Michael P.

2009-01-01

100

Hip-Hop, Social Justice, and Environmental Education: Toward a Critical Ecological Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay describes an educational initiative that used environmentally themed (green) hip-hop to stimulate learning in an environmental science classroom. Students were then challenged to compose their own green hip-hop and their lyrics demonstrated skills that have thematic consistency around what is called a Critical Ecological Literacy (CEL).…

Cermak, Michael J.

2012-01-01

101

Integrating industrial ecology principles into a set of environmental sustainability indicators for technology assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the environmental component of sustainability of technology, taking into account the role of industrial ecology. Assessment of environmental sustainability of technology traditionally focuses on immediate impact of technology on the environment through quantifying resource extraction and generated emissions. However, technology does not only exchange materials with the environment but also with the industrial society as a

Jo Dewulf; Herman Van Langenhove

2005-01-01

102

Index of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and associated publications available in the Coordination and Information Center  

SciTech Connect

This publication was created by the Coordination and Information Center (CIC) to provide a readily available research tool for use by researchers interested in a specific area covered in the holdings of the CIC Archives. The Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) was formed and functioned in agreement with Planning Directive NVO-76 (July 29, 1970 and revised January 1, 1974, (CIC-165845 and CIC-16439) respectively) to coordinate the ecological and other environmental programs necessary to support the continued nuclear testing activities; and to provide a mechanism to effectively comply with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, Executive Order 11514, and AEC Manual Chapter 0510.'' The publication contains only citations to documents currently available at the CIC. It represents a significant portion of the principal research findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group.

Maza, B.G.

1991-02-01

103

Environmental Fluoride in Australasia: Ecological Effects, Regulation and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorine compounds (fluorides) are introduced into the Australian and New Zealand atmospheres principally as a result of coal- fired electric power generation, aluminium smelting and ceramics. Addition of fluorides to water supplies as a public health measure represent the largest single addition to waters. An ecologically important, but quantitatively small source of fluoride in soil is associated with superphosphate application

D. Doley; R. J. Hill; R. H. Riese

104

The Living Forest. Environmental Ecological Education Project. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit, designed for intermediate grades of elementary schools, focuses on the living forest by presenting such concepts as succession, forest communities, adaptation, ecological interrelationships, animal populations, the impact of man on forests, and job opportunities in the forest industry. The unit includes the behavioral objectives and the…

Parkway School District, Chesterfield, MO.

105

Environmental testing assessment using ecological variables in a successional framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many techniques are available for the detection of trend when the trend is of a simple form. However, for ecological data, the processes of interest often involve succession, in which case trend analysis becomes more difficult. This paper presents a dynamic framework for trend analysis when the system under study is also undergoing successional changes. The null model for change

C. Loehle; E. P. Smith

1989-01-01

106

Relationship between ecology fieldwork and student attitudes toward environmental protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is a summary of research carried out on Spanish secondary school students 14 - 16 years of age, with the intention of finding out what contributions fieldwork makes toward the under- standing of concepts and principles of ecology, and also to ascertain the effects of fieldwork on the de- fense of the studied ecosystem. Before further research was

R. Fernández Manzanal; L. M. Rodríguez Barreiro; M. Casal Jiménez

1999-01-01

107

Students' Perception of Environmental Problems and Sources of Environmental Information.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated were factors that potentially influence the environmental values of secondary school students in a western New York School district. The four variables studied were concern for the environment, locus of control, knowledge about the environment, and sources of environmental information. (WB)

Alaimo, Samuel J.; Doran, Rodney L.

1980-01-01

108

Learning and teaching for an ecological sense of place: Toward environmental/science education praxis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research presents a teaching model designed to enable learners to construct a highly developed ecological perspective and sense of place. The contextually-based research process draws upon scientific and indigenous knowledge from multiple data sources including: autobiographical experiences, environmental literature, science and environmental education research, historical approaches to environmental education, and phenomenological accounts from research participants. Data were analyzed using the theoretical frameworks of qualitative research, hermeneutic phenomenology, heuristics, and constructivism. The resulting model synthesizes and incorporates key educational philosophies and practices from: nature study, resident outdoor education, organized camping, conservation education, environmental education, earth education, outdoor recreation, sustainability, bio-regionalism, deep ecology, ecological and environmental literacy, science and technology in society, and adventure/challenge/experiential education. The model's four components--environmental knowledge, practicing responsible environmental behaviors, community-focused involvement, and direct experience in outdoor settings--contribute in a synergistic way to the development of ecological perspective and a sense of place. The model was honed through experiential use in an environmental science methods course for elementary and secondary prospective science teachers. The instructor/researcher employed individualized instruction, community-based learning, service learning, and the modeling of reflective teaching principles in pursuit of the model's goals. The resulting pedagogical knowledge extends the model's usefulness to such formal and non-formal educational contexts as: elementary/secondary classrooms, nature centers, museums, youth groups, and community organizations. This research has implications for the fields of education, geography, recreation/leisure studies, science teaching, and environmental education. Several aspects of this work make it novel. First, autobiographical and literature-based stories anchor the representations of ecological perspective and sense of place. Second, the dissertation text visually differentiates between story narrative, researcher narrative, and meta-narrative in order to convey the positionality of the researcher's distinct voices. Finally, icons are used throughout the text to visually link the model's multi-dimensional intersections. Oh, and by the way, I hope you read it.

Hug, J. William

1998-09-01

109

15 CFR 950.6 - Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC). 950...INFORMATION § 950.6 Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC...should be addressed to: Environmental Science Information Center, National...

2010-01-01

110

Expressions of ecological identity across the life span of eight environmental exemplars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While there is a substantial body of literature looking at various aspects of ecological identity and factors that influence it, there has been less work done on how an individual's ecological identity changes with time. Much of that work is limited to short segments of the life span (e.g. the impact of wilderness experiences). This dissertation attempts to address this perceived gap by investigating how the ecological identity of eight environmental exemplars changed during the course of his or her life. What has emerged from this qualitative grounded theory investigation of the lives and works of Charles Darwin, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Hazel Wolf, Rachel Carson, James Lovelock and E.O. Wilson are five sequential expressions of ecological identity. These 'stages' serve as a framework to explain ecological identity as a developmental process, both fluid and continuous, rather than at) end product. The development of an ecological identity is traced, through the development of five cognitive foundations and their alignment with five emotional foundations that reflect a progression from a sensory interaction and a kinship bond with nature into a deep understanding of the interconnectedness of all aspects of the planet. The findings reveal the evolution of an ecological identity and suggest the importance of looking beyond content knowledge in the nurturing of ecological attitudes, values, and lifestyles.

Seydel, Jennifer

111

Using Wetlands to Teach Ecology & Environmental Awareness in General Biology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents advantages of using wetlands educationally and their relevance to local, national, and global environmental issues. Discusses field trips to mangrove forests and freshwater marshes. (Author/MKR)

O'Neal, Lyman H.

1995-01-01

112

Community Ecology and Capacity: Keys to Progressing the Environmental Communication of Wicked Problems  

PubMed Central

Wicked problems are multifactorial in nature and possess no clear resolution due to numerous community stakeholder involvement. We demonstrate childhood lead poisoning as a wicked problem and illustrate how understanding a community’s ecology can build community capacity to affect local environmental management by (1) forming an academic–community partnership and (2) developing a place-specific strategy grounded in the cultural–experiential model of risk. We propose that practitioners need to consider a community’s ecology and social context of risk as it pertains to wicked problems. These factors will determine how a diverse community interprets and responds to environmental communication and capacity-building efforts. PMID:20686630

Caron, Rosemary M.; Serrell, Nancy

2010-01-01

113

Teaching Urban Ecology: Environmental Studies and the Pedagogy of Intersectionality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the recognition by early champions of the environmental movement in the United States that humans and the diverse ecosystems in which they live are indivisible, many environmental education policies and programs have tended to uphold the categorical distinction between "nature" and "culture" (e.g., Sessions; Soule and Press). In the late…

Di Chiro, Giovanna

2006-01-01

114

Urbanization and the ecological crisis: an analysis of environmental pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is aimed primarily at the United States, but as development in industry and urbanization proceeds in other countries, they will contribute to pollution on a global scale. It focuses primarily on the principal causes and effects of environmental pollution. Many of the pollution problems are related to urban centers, especially larger cities where environmental degradation is much more

1976-01-01

115

Social Desirability, Environmental Attitudes, and General Ecological Behaviour in Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Socially desirable responses have been widely discussed as potentially biasing self-reported measures of environmental attitude and behaviour assessment. The direct and moderating effect of social desirability on children has not been analysed before. By applying a Lie scale together with a two-factor environmental attitude set measure and a scale…

Oerke, Britta; Bogner, Franz X.

2013-01-01

116

Environmental testing assessment using ecological variables in a successional framework  

SciTech Connect

Many techniques are available for the detection of trend when the trend is of a simple form. However, for ecological data, the processes of interest often involve succession, in which case trend analysis becomes more difficult. This paper presents a dynamic framework for trend analysis when the system under study is also undergoing successional changes. The null model for change in state with time is characterized in terms of a stochastic envelope around a nominal trajectory. Specific tests for the detection of trends associated with succession are described and illustrated on example data. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Loehle, C.; Smith, E.P.

1989-01-01

117

Ecological & Environmental Acoustic Remote Sensor (EcoEARS) Application for Long-Term Monitoring and Assessment of Wildlife  

E-print Network

Ecological & Environmental Acoustic Remote Sensor (EcoEARS) Application for Long-Term Monitoring and Assessment of Wildlife Gonzalo Sanchez; President, Sanchez Industrial Design, Inc., 3510 Beltline Hwy. Signal analysis techniques to identify wildlife and simultaneous collection of environmental parameters

Maher, Robert C.

118

OVERVIEW OF CLIMATE INFORMATION NEEDS FOR ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Atmospheric scientists engaged in climate change research require a basic understanding of how ecological effects models incorporate climate. This report provides an overview of existing ecological models that might be used to model climate change effects on vegetation. ome agric...

119

Information Sharing and Environmental Policies  

PubMed Central

Based on the assumption that in a standard eco-dumping model governments are uncertain about future product demand and allowing governments to obtain information from firms, we examine governments’ and firms’ incentives to share information. We show that when governments regulate polluting firms through emission standards, then governments and firms will reach an agreement concerning information sharing. The opposite holds when governments regulate pollution through emission taxes. PMID:21139849

Antoniou, Fabio; Koundouri, Phoebe; Tsakiris, Nikos

2010-01-01

120

Ecology on Campus: Service Learning in Introductory Environmental Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a service learning project in the environmental sciences in which students learn about global sustainability through exploring issues such as energy and its effects on their everyday lives. (YDS)

Bixby, Julie A.; Carpenter, John R.; Jerman, Patricia L.; Coull, Bruce C.

2003-01-01

121

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INFORMATION SYSTEM - EQULS® - ITER  

EPA Science Inventory

This project consisted of an evaluation of the Environmental Quality Information System (EQuIS) software designed by Earthsoft, Inc. as an environmental data management and analysis platform for monitoring and remediation projects. In consultation with the EQuIS vendor, six pri...

122

15 CFR 950.6 - Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC... § 950.6 Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC...qualified users, including governments, universities, non-profit...addressed to: Environmental Science Information Center,...

2012-01-01

123

15 CFR 950.6 - Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC... § 950.6 Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC...qualified users, including governments, universities, non-profit...addressed to: Environmental Science Information Center,...

2011-01-01

124

15 CFR 950.6 - Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC... § 950.6 Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC...qualified users, including governments, universities, non-profit...addressed to: Environmental Science Information Center,...

2013-01-01

125

15 CFR 950.6 - Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC).  

...2014-01-01 false Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC... § 950.6 Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC...qualified users, including governments, universities, non-profit...addressed to: Environmental Science Information Center,...

2014-01-01

126

www.frontiersinecology.org The Ecological Society of America Global environmental change has moved our world  

E-print Network

456 www.frontiersinecology.org © The Ecological Society of America Global environmental change has change had documented impacts on species and ecosystems, and such impacts are expected to increase conduct an assessment of the impacts of climate change on the nation's resources no less than every 4

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

127

Urban Ecology for Secondary Schools, Unit I - Technology and Environmental Pollution, Parts 1 and 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Materials for a course on Urban Ecology are developed in these two documents which represent the first unit - Technology and Environmental Pollution. The entire course consists of seven units dealing with the many aspects of our way of life that produce an effect on, and in turn affected by, the quality of our physical environment. Unit I treats…

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

128

The Environmental and Ecological Awareness Potential in the Organized Camp Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine if an organized camp experience resulted in elementary school students having a higher level of environmental and ecological awareness than elementary students who had not had an organized camp experience. A letter of intent was circulated throughout all elementary schools in the Anchorage, Alaska school…

Platt, Bradley R.

129

Comparison of Journal Citation Reports and Scopus Impact Factors for Ecology and Environmental Sciences Journals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Impact factors for journals listed under the subject categories "ecology" and "environmental sciences" in the Journal Citation Reports database were calculated using citation data from the Scopus database. The journals were then ranked by their Scopus impact factor and compared to the ranked lists of the same journals derived from Journal…

Gray, Edward; Hodkinson, Sarah Z.

2008-01-01

130

Environmental and Ontogenetic Effects on Intraspecific Trait Variation of a Macrophyte Species across Five Ecological Scales  

PubMed Central

Although functional trait variability is increasingly used in community ecology, the scale- and size-dependent aspects of trait variation are usually disregarded. Here we quantified the spatial structure of shoot height, branch length, root/shoot ratio and leaf number in a macrophyte species Potamogeton maackianus, and then disentangled the environmental and ontogenetic effects on these traits. Using a hierarchical nested design, we measured the four traits from 681 individuals across five ecological scales: lake, transect, depth stratus, quadrat and individual. A notable high trait variation (coefficient variation: 48–112%) was observed within species. These traits differed in the spatial structure, depending on environmental factors of different scales. Shoot height and branch length were most responsive to lake, transect and depth stratus scales, while root/shoot ratio and leaf number to quadrat and individual scales. The trait variations caused by environment are nearly three times higher than that caused by ontogeny, with ontogenetic variance ranging from 21% (leaf number) to 33% (branch length) of total variance. Remarkably, these traits showed non-negligible ontogenetic variation (0–60%) in each ecological scale, and significant shifts in allometric trajectories at lake and depth stratus scales. Our results highlight that environmental filtering processes can sort individuals within species with traits values adaptive to environmental changes and ontogenetic variation of functional traits was non-negligible across the five ecological scales. PMID:23626856

Zhong, Jiayou; Cao, Te; Ni, Leyi; Xie, Ping

2013-01-01

131

EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT RESEARCH PROGRAM. OCTOBER 1985-MARCH 1988  

EPA Science Inventory

By Congressional mandate, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must determine whether individual chemicals, either new or existing, can be manufactured and sold in the United States. The evaluation process for each chemical includes an ecological risk assessment. To improve c...

132

POPULATION ECOLOGY Environmentally Based Maternal Effects on Development Time in the  

E-print Network

in response to food stress (e.g., Fox et al. 1996, Fox and Savalli 1998). Phenotypic plasticity in body sizePOPULATION ECOLOGY Environmentally Based Maternal Effects on Development Time in the Seed Beetle) reared at high density ( 20 eggs per seed) matured at a substantially smaller adult body size than

Savalli, Udo M.

133

Environmental education for social–ecological system resilience: a perspective from activity theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we attempt to integrate environmental education, with a focus on building capacity at the level of the individual, with frameworks for resilience, with a focus on adaptive capacity at the level of the social–ecological system. Whereas previous work has focused on enhancing system?level capacity through building adaptive capacity in individuals, we suggest a wider range of processes

Marianne E. Krasny

2010-01-01

134

Environmental Education for Social-Ecological System Resilience: A Perspective from Activity Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we attempt to integrate environmental education, with a focus on building capacity at the level of the individual, with frameworks for resilience, with a focus on adaptive capacity at the level of the social-ecological system. Whereas previous work has focused on enhancing system-level capacity through building adaptive capacity in…

Krasny, Marianne E.; Roth, Wolff-Michael

2010-01-01

135

Community Ecology and Capacity: Keys to Progressing the Environmental Communication of Wicked Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wicked problems are multifactorial in nature and possess no clear resolution due to numerous community stakeholder involvement. We demonstrate childhood lead poisoning as a wicked problem and illustrate how understanding a community's ecology can build community capacity to affect local environmental management by (1) forming an academic-community…

Caron, Rosemary M.; Serrell, Nancy

2009-01-01

136

Swallowed: Political Ecology and Environmentalism in the Spanish American "Novela de la Selva"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, I begin with the identification of a moment of intertextuality between "Un viejo que leia novelas de amor" (1989) by Chilean Luis Sepulveda and "La voragine" (1924) by Colombian Jose Eustasio Rivera as an analytical motif for a reevaluation of the environmentalism and political ecologies in the Spanish American "novela de la selva"…

DeVries, Scott

2010-01-01

137

Case Studies of Ecological Integrative Information Systems: The Luquillo and Sevilleta Information Management Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thirty-year-old United States Long Term Ecological Research Network has developed extensive metadata to document their scientific data. Standard and interoperable metadata is a core component of the data-driven analytical solutions developed by this research network Content management systems offer an affordable solution for rapid deployment of metadata centered information management systems. We developed a customized integrative metadata management system based on the Drupal content management system technology. Building on knowledge and experience with the Sevilleta and Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research sites, we successfully deployed the first two medium-scale customized prototypes. In this paper, we describe the vision behind our Drupal based information management instances, and list the features offered through these Drupal based systems. We also outline the plans to expand the information services offered through these metadata centered management systems. We will conclude with the growing list of participants deploying similar instances.

San Gil, Inigo; White, Marshall; Melendez, Eda; Vanderbilt, Kristin

138

Is traditional ecological knowledge relevant in environmental conservation in Nigeria?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-section survey of five states in Nigeria was derived through a stratified random sampling technique in 1999–2000 to assess the contribution of traditional knowledge in environmental conservation. Data were collected through a combination of questionnaire survey and discussions with stakeholders, with field assessment of herb gardens. Interviews were held with 1953 respondents composed of women, men and youths drawn

Gbadebo J. Osemeobo

2001-01-01

139

Analytic Hierarchy Process for Personalising Environmental Information  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents how a Geographical Information System (GIS) can be incorporated in an intelligent learning software system for environmental matters. The system is called ALGIS and incorporates the GIS in order to present effectively information about the physical and anthropogenic environment of Greece in a more interactive way. The system…

Kabassi, Katerina

2014-01-01

140

Foundry Technologies Focused on Environmental and Ecological Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solutions allowing fabrication of remote control systems with integrated sensors (motes) were introduced as a part of CMOS foundry production platform and verified on silicon. The integrated features include sensors employing principles previously verified in the development of ultra-low power consuming non-volatile memories (C-Flash, MRAM) and components allowing low-power energy harvesting (low voltage rectifiers, high -voltage solar cells). The developed systems are discussed with emphasis on their environmental and security applications.

Roizin, Ya.; Lisiansky, M.; Pikhay, E.

141

Reactor operation environmental information document  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

1989-12-01

142

Draft Environmental ImpactDraft Environmental Impact Statement to InformStatement to InformStatement to InformStatement to Inform  

E-print Network

Draft Environmental ImpactDraft Environmental Impact Statement to InformStatement to InformStatement to InformStatement to Inform Columbia River BasinColumbia River Basin Hatchery OperationsHatchery Operations

143

Environmental security as related to scale mismatches of disturbance patterns in a panarchy of social-ecological landscapes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental security, as the opposite of environmental fragility (vulnerability), is multilayered, multi-scale and complex,\\u000a existing in both the objective realm of biophysics and society, and the subjective realm of individual human perception. For\\u000a ecological risk assessments (ERAs), the relevant objects of environmental security are social-ecological landscapes (SELs).\\u000a ERAs, in this case, are less precise than traditional ERAs, but provide results

Giovanni Zurlini; Nicola Zaccarelli; Irene Petrosillo; Riitters H. Kurt

144

Homeward Bound: Ecological Design of Domestic Information Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information technology artefacts are steadily permeating everyday life, just as they have colonized the business domain. Although research in our field has largely addressed the workplace, researchers are beginning to take an interest in the home environment too. Here, we address the domestic realm, focusing on the design of complex, interactive information systems. As such, our work sits in the design science version rather than behavioral science paradigm of IS research. We argue that the home is in many ways a more challenging environment for the designer than the workplace, making good design of critical importance. Regrettably, the opposite would appear to be the norm. Two experiments are reported, both concerned with the design of the user interface for domestic heating systems. Of note is our use of a medium-fidelity laboratory simulation or "microworld" in this work. Two main substantive findings resulted. First, that ecologically designed feedback, embodying a strong mapping between task goals and system status, produced superior task performance. Second, that predictive decision aids provided clear benefits over other forms of user support, such as advisory systems. General implications for the design of domestic information systems are discussed, followed by reflections on the nature of design work in IS, and on the design science project itself. It is concluded that the microworld approach has considerable potential for developing IS design theory. The methodological challenges of design research are highlighted, especially the presence of additional validity threats posed by the need to construct artefacts in order to evaluate theory. It is argued that design theory is necessarily complex, modal, and uncertain, and that design science (like design itself) should be prosecuted in an open, heuristic spirit, drawing more on the proven methods of "good design" (e.g.,prototyping, user participation) in terms of its own praxis.

Wastell, David G.; Sauer, Juergen S.; Schmeink, Claudia

145

Integrating information for better environmental decisions.  

SciTech Connect

As more is learned about the complex nature and extent of environmental impacts from progressive human disturbance, scientists, policy analysts, decision makers, educators, and communicators are increasingly joining forces to develop strategies for preserving and protecting the environment. The Eco-Informa Foundation is an educational scientific organization dedicated to promoting the collaborative development and sharing of scientific information. The Foundation participated in a recent international conference on environmental informatics through a special symposium on integrating information for better environmental decisions. Presentations focused on four general themes: (1) remote sensing and data interpretation, including through new knowledge management tools; (2) risk assessment and communication, including for radioactively contaminated facilities, introduced biological hazards, and food safety; (3) community involvement in cleanup projects; and (4) environmental education. The general context for related issues, methods and applications, and results and recommendations from those discussions are highlighted here.

MacDonell, M.; Morgan, K.; Newland, L.; Environmental Assessment; Texas Christian Univ.

2002-01-01

146

Environmental Information Document: L-reactor reactivation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this Environmental Information Document is to provide background for assessing environmental impacts associated with the renovation, restartup, and operation of L Reactor at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). SRP is a major US Department of Energy installation for the production of nuclear materials for national defense. The purpose of the restart of L Reactor is to increase the production of nuclear weapons materials, such as plutonium and tritium, to meet projected needs in the nuclear weapons program.

Mackey, H.E. Jr. (comp.)

1982-04-01

147

Unequal exposure to ecological hazards: environmental injustices in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  

PubMed Central

This study analyzes the social and geographic distribution of ecological hazards across 368 communities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Combining census data with a variety of environmental data, we tested for and identified both income-based and racially based biases to the geographic distribution of 17 different types of environmentally hazardous sites and industrial facilities. We also developed a composite measure of cumulative exposure to compare the relative overall risks characteristic of each community. To the best of our knowledge, this point system makes this the first environmental justice study to develop a means for measuring and ranking cumulative exposure for communities. The study also controls for the intensity of hazards in each community by accounting for the area across which hazards are distributed. The findings indicate that ecologically hazardous sites and facilities are disproportionately located and concentrated in communities of color and working-class communities. The implication of this research for policymakers and citizen advocates is that cumulative exposure of residents to environmentally hazardous facilities and sites should receive greater consideration regarding community demographics and environmental health indicators. We conclude that the provision of additional resources for environmental monitoring and ranking, as well as yearly progress reports, is necessary for communities and state agencies to achieve equal access to clean and healthy environments for all residents. PMID:11929739

Faber, Daniel R; Krieg, Eric J

2002-01-01

148

Ecological genetics in the North Atlantic: environmental gradients and adaptation at specific loci.  

PubMed

The North Atlantic intertidal community provides a rich set of organismal and environmental material for the study of ecological genetics. Clearly defined environmental gradients exist at multiple spatial scales: there are broad latitudinal trends in temperature, meso-scale changes in salinity along estuaries, and smaller scale gradients in desiccation and temperature spanning the intertidal range. The geology and geography of the American and European coasts provide natural replication of these gradients, allowing for population genetic analyses of parallel adaptation to environmental stress and heterogeneity. Statistical methods have been developed that provide genomic neutrality tests of population differentiation and aid in the process of candidate gene identification. In this paper, we review studies of marine organisms that illustrate associations between an environmental gradient and specific genetic markers. Such highly differentiated markers become candidate genes for adaptation to the environmental factors in question, but the functional significance of genetic variants must be comprehensively evaluated. We present a set of predictions about locus-specific selection across latitudinal, estuarine, and intertidal gradients that are likely to exist in the North Atlantic. We further present new data and analyses that support and contradict these simple selection models. Some taxa show pronounced clinal variation at certain loci against a background of mild clinal variation at many loci. These cases illustrate the procedures necessary for distinguishing selection driven by internal genomic vs. external environmental factors. We suggest that the North Atlantic intertidal community provides a model system for identifying genes that matter in ecology due to the clarity of the environmental stresses and an extensive experimental literature on ecological function. While these organisms are typically poor genetic and genomic models, advances in comparative genomics have provided access to molecular tools that can now be applied to taxa with well-defined ecologies. As many of the organisms we discuss have tight physiological limits driven by climatic factors, this synthesis of molecular population genetics with marine ecology could provide a sensitive means of assessing evolutionary responses to climate change. PMID:19097487

Schmidt, Paul S; Serrão, Ester A; Pearson, Gareth A; Riginos, Cynthia; Rawson, Paul D; Hilbish, Thomas J; Brawley, Susan H; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Carrington, Emily; Wethey, David S; Grahame, John W; Bonhomme, François; Rand, David M

2008-11-01

149

Developing an integrated ecological resource management and monitoring plan as part of an environmental management system  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in defining the appropriate content of an Environmental Management System (EMS) as specified by ISO 14001 prompted a study to determine how ecological concerns should be integrated into an EMS and subsequently implemented. This paper describes an approach for developing objectives, targets, and processes for ecological resource management at those Department of Energy (DOE) facilities where an ecological resource management approach that goes beyond simple regulatory compliance is warranted. A major goal of this approach is to position DOE facilities so that they can proactively address ecological concerns, rather than being forced to respond retroactively to damage claims, restoration requirements, and/or bad publicity. Although DOE is not requiring ISO 14001 implementation at its facilities, it is recommending ISO 14001 as a voluntary approach to encourage good environmental practices, such as pollution prevention and sustainable development, by adopting an integrated systems approach. The DOE position is that existing DOE orders and policy statements are consistent with, and have elements of, the ISO 14001 EMS approach.

Michael, D.; Hooten, M. [Neptune and Co., Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Roy-Harrison, W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01

150

Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health.  

PubMed

The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security, waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental Impact Statements developed by NRC. We provide a template for the types of information needed for safe siting of nuclear facilities with buffers in three categories: ecological, fate and transport, and human health information that can be used for risk evaluations. Each item on the lists is an indicator for evaluation, and individual indicators can be selected for specific region. Ecological information needs include biodiversity (species, populations, communities) and structure and functioning of ecosystems, habitats, and landscapes, in addition to common, abundant, and unique species and endangered and rare ones. The key variables of fate and transport are sources of release for radionuclides and other chemicals, nature of releases (atmospheric vapors, subsurface liquids), features, and properties of environmental media (wind speed, direction and atmospheric stability, hydraulic gradient, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater chemistry). Human health aspects include receptor populations (demography, density, dispersion, and distance), potential pathways (drinking water sources, gardening, fishing), and exposure opportunities (lifestyle activities). For each of the three types of information needs, we expect that only a few of the indicators will be applicable to a particular site and that stakeholders should agree on a site-specific suite. PMID:20140506

Burger, Joanna; Clarke, James; Gochfeld, Michael

2011-01-01

151

Ecological effects and environmental fate of solid rocket exhaust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Specific target processes were classified as to the chemical, chemical-physical, and biological reactions and toxic effects of solid rocket emissions within selected ecosystems at Kennedy Space Center. Exposure of Citris seedlings, English peas, and bush beans to SRM exhaust under laboratory conditions demonstrated reduced growth rates, but at very high concentrations. Field studies of natural plant populations in three diverse ecosystems failed to reveal any structural damage at the concentration levels tested. Background information on elemental composition of selected woody plants from two terrestrial ecosystems is reported. LD sub 50 for a native mouse (peromysous gossypinus) exposed to SRM exhaust was determined to be 50 ppm/g body weight. Results strongly indicate that other components of the SRM exhaust act synergically to enhance the toxic effects of HCl gas when inhaled. A brief summary is given regarding the work on SRM exhaust and its possible impact on hatchability of incubating bird eggs.

Nimmo, B.; Stout, I. J.; Mickus, J.; Vickers, D.; Madsen, B.

1974-01-01

152

Environmental Scanning and the Information Manager.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses nine components of an environmental scanning model: selecting the scanning team; selecting resources to scan; choosing criteria for scanning; scanning the resources; identifying signals of new issues; selecting key events/issues; monitoring and analyzing events/issues; disseminating information; and deciding on appropriate organizational…

Newsome, James; McInerney, Claire

1990-01-01

153

Maine Department of Environmental Protection Washington State Department of Ecology California Environmental Protection Agency State House Station 17 Hazardous Waste & Toxics Reduction 1001 I Street  

E-print Network

Environmental Protection Agency State House Station 17 Hazardous Waste & Toxics Reduction 1001 I Street AugustaMaine Department of Environmental Protection Washington State Department of Ecology California of Environmental Protection. The effects of exposure to toxic chemicals on human health, the environment

154

PRESENTATION ON EPAS ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Information Management System (EIMS), which integrates descriptive information (metadata) and data, is a system to capture, store, manage, and distribute information about environmental resources collected, developed, and used by EPA and its state and regional p...

155

Maximum entropy production in environmental and ecological systems  

PubMed Central

The coupled biosphere–atmosphere system entails a vast range of processes at different scales, from ecosystem exchange fluxes of energy, water and carbon to the processes that drive global biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric composition and, ultimately, the planetary energy balance. These processes are generally complex with numerous interactions and feedbacks, and they are irreversible in their nature, thereby producing entropy. The proposed principle of maximum entropy production (MEP), based on statistical mechanics and information theory, states that thermodynamic processes far from thermodynamic equilibrium will adapt to steady states at which they dissipate energy and produce entropy at the maximum possible rate. This issue focuses on the latest development of applications of MEP to the biosphere–atmosphere system including aspects of the atmospheric circulation, the role of clouds, hydrology, vegetation effects, ecosystem exchange of energy and mass, biogeochemical interactions and the Gaia hypothesis. The examples shown in this special issue demonstrate the potential of MEP to contribute to improved understanding and modelling of the biosphere and the wider Earth system, and also explore limitations and constraints to the application of the MEP principle. PMID:20368247

Kleidon, Axel; Malhi, Yadvinder; Cox, Peter M.

2010-01-01

156

Ecology of cultivable yeasts in pristine forests in northern Patagonia (Argentina) influenced by different environmental factors.  

PubMed

Environmental factors influencing the occurrence and community structure of soil yeasts in forests are not well studied. There are few studies dedicated to Southern Hemisphere soil yeasts populations and even fewer focused on temperate forests influenced by volcanic activity. The present work aimed to study the ecology of soil yeast communities from pristine forests influenced by different environmental factors (precipitation, physicochemical properties of soil, tree species, soil region, and season). The survey was performed in 4 northern Patagonian forests: 2 dominated by Nothofagus pumilio and 2 by Nothofagus antarctica. Yeast communities were described with ecological indices and species accumulation curves, and their association with environmental characteristics was assessed using multivariate analysis. Each forest site showed a particular arrangement of species as a result of environmental characteristics, such as dominant plant species, nutrient availability, and climatic characteristics. Cryptococcus podzolicus was most frequently isolated in nutrient-rich soils, Trichosporon porosum dominated cold mountain forests with low nutrient and water availability in soil, and capsulated yeasts such as Cryptococcus phenolicus dominated forest sites with low precipitation. The present work suggests that environmental factors affecting yeast communities may not be the current soil characteristics but the result of complex interactions of factors including natural disturbances like volcanic activity. PMID:24849380

Mestre, María Cecilia; Fontenla, Sonia; Rosa, Carlos A

2014-06-01

157

Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) at the US National Library of Medicine has developed an Internet gopher offering free access to national and international information resources and convenient connection to NLM's MEDLARS online databases. Included in the TEHIP gopher are a variety of publications (e.g., the bibliographic publication produced by TEHIP: ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF LIVE VERTEBRATES IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND TESTING) and direct connections to many relevant information sources from national and international government groups and universities. Training modules and documentation for the MEDLARS toxicology databases, and a calendar of meetings and courses of interest to those working in the areas of toxicology, environmental health and medicine, and occupational health and medicine are also included.

1997-01-01

158

Educational Reflections on the ``Ecological Crisis'': EcoJustice, Environmentalism, and Sustainability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a tendency by scholars arguing for a more just and sustainable future to position the “ecological crisis” as a fundamental reason for major educational reforms. Relying on crisis-talk to fuel social and environmental justice and environmentalism reinforces the thinking of the past, which inadvertently perpetuates the acceptance of present cultural attitudes which frame our relationships with others and the natural world. To evaluate previous cultural thinking and associated traditions of Euro-West society, Chet Bowers asserts that we ought to analyze how assumptions are carried forward as metaphors, which are associated with attitudes towards science, technology, and nature. This pedagogy is called ecojustice education and serves to conserve and sustain cultural diversity and the biodiversity of Earth’s ecosystems, which are threatened and vulnerable. But, also carried forward in the language of ecojustice philosophy (and other ecological works) is a presumption that feeds into scientifically proving that a crisis exists, which is associated with organizing schools around an implicit shock doctrine of fear and urgency. This paper explores these assumptions and others associated with a supposition of ecological crisis. The ecological crisis has the potential to marginalize many diverse people who are needed during these times of increasing ecological awareness and uncertainties. Situating education (and the world) in the frenzy associated with crisis, versus the assertion that schools should increase awareness around the belief that a more sustainable lifestyle is beneficial for the individual, the community and the environment is a worthwhile debate and is rich with respect to research opportunities in education.

Mueller, Michael P.

2009-08-01

159

Do Interactions Between Gut Ecology and Environmental Chemicals Contribute to Obesity and Diabetes?  

PubMed Central

Background: Gut microbiota are important factors in obesity and diabetes, yet little is known about their role in the toxicodynamics of environmental chemicals, including those recently found to be obesogenic and diabetogenic. Objectives: We integrated evidence that independently links gut ecology and environmental chemicals to obesity and diabetes, providing a framework for suggesting how these environmental factors may interact with these diseases, and identified future research needs. Methods: We examined studies with germ-free or antibiotic-treated laboratory animals, and human studies that evaluated how dietary influences and microbial changes affected obesity and diabetes. Strengths and weaknesses of studies evaluating how environmental chemical exposures may affect obesity and diabetes were summarized, and research gaps on how gut ecology may affect the disposition of environmental chemicals were identified. Results: Mounting evidence indicates that gut microbiota composition affects obesity and diabetes, as does exposure to environmental chemicals. The toxicology and pharmacology literature also suggests that interindividual variations in gut microbiota may affect chemical metabolism via direct activation of chemicals, depletion of metabolites needed for biotransformation, alteration of host biotransformation enzyme activities, changes in enterohepatic circulation, altered bioavailability of environmental chemicals and/or antioxidants from food, and alterations in gut motility and barrier function. Conclusions: Variations in gut microbiota are likely to affect human toxicodynamics and increase individual exposure to obesogenic and diabetogenic chemicals. Combating the global obesity and diabetes epidemics requires a multifaceted approach that should include greater emphasis on understanding and controlling the impact of interindividual gut microbe variability on the disposition of environmental chemicals in humans. PMID:22042266

Snedeker, Suzanne M.

2011-01-01

160

Southeast Ecological Observatory Network (SEEON) Workshop on Ecological Sensors and Information Technology. Report on Second SEEON Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A fundamental goal of the new National Science Foundation (NSF) initiative National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is to provide timely and broad access to the ecological data collected at NEON sites. Information management and data collection will be critical components to achieving this goal and a successful NEON implementation. The Southeast Ecological Observatory Network (SEEON) working group recognized the importance of information management and sensor technology in its first planning workshop and recommended that interested parties in the region come together to discuss these subjects in the context of the needs and capabilities of a southeast regional ecological observatory network. In February 2004, 28 participants from 14 organizations including academic institutions, state and federal agencies, private and non-profit entities convened at the Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida for two days of presentations and discussions on ecological sensors and information management. Some of the participants were previously involved in the first SEEON workshop or other meetings concerned with NEON, but many were somewhat new to the NEON community. Each day focused on a different technical component, i.e. ecological sensors the first day and cyber-infrastructure the second day, and were structured in a similar manner. The mornings were devoted to presentations by experts to help stimulate discussions on aspects of the focal topic held in the afternoon. The formal and informal discussions held during the workshop succeeded in validating some concerns and needs identified in the first SEEON workshop, but also served to bring to light other questions or issues that will need to be addressed as the NEON planning and design stages move forward. While the expansion of the SEEON community meant that some of the presentation and discussion time was needed to help bring the newcomers up to speed on the goals, objectives and current status of the various NEON efforts, the additional perspectives and technical expertise included in this workshop helped fuel some valuable interdisciplinary discussions that will need to continue to bring SEEON and NEON to fruition. Participants agreed that continued discussions of SEEON are needed , to keep up the momentum and that the southeast region must continue to be represented at the national level. It is vital that the all'the regions continue to push things forward for NEON to succeed.

Jones, Lori N.; Binford, Michael; Hinkle, Ross C.

2004-01-01

161

Environmental Restoration Information Resource Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Information Resources Management (ER IRM) Program Plan defines program requirements, organizational structures and responsibilities, and work breakdown structure and to establish an approved baseline against which overall progress of the program as well as the effectiveness of its management will be measured. This plan will guide ER IRM Program execution and define the program`s essential elements. This plan will be routinely updated to incorporate key decisions and programmatic changes and will serve as the project baseline document. Environmental Restoration Waste Management Program intersite procedures and work instructions will be developed to facilitate the implementation of this plan.

Not Available

1994-09-01

162

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety, and health aspects of operating selected facilities at SNL/NM. The environmental baseline provides a record of the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic environment at SNL/NLM prior to being altered (beneficially or adversely) by proposed programs or projects. More specifically, the EID provides information on the following topics: Geology; Land Use; Hydrology and Water Resources; Air Quality and Meteorology; Ecology; Noise and Vibration; Cultural Resources; Visual Resources; Socioeconomic and Community Services; Transportation; Material Management; Waste Management; and Regulatory Requirements.

GUERRERO, JOSEPH V.; KUZIO, KENNETH A.; JOHNS, WILLIAM H.; BAYLISS, LINDA S.; BAILEY-WHITE, BRENDA E.

1999-09-01

163

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety, and health aspects of operating selected facilities at SNL/NM. The environmental baseline provides a record of the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic environment at SNL/NLM prior to being altered (beneficially or adversely) by proposed programs or projects. More specifically, the EID provides information on the following topics: Geology; Land Use; Hydrology and Water Resources; Air Quality and Meteorology; Ecology; Noise and Vibration; Cultural Resources; Visual Resources; Socioeconomic and Community Services; Transportation; Material Management; Waste Management; and Regulatory Requirements.

BAYLISS, LINDA S.; GUERRERO, JOSEPH V.; JOHNS, WILLIAM H.; KUZIO, KENNETH A.; BAILEY-WHITE, BRENDA E.

1999-09-01

164

Photosynthesis, environmental change, and plant adaptation: Research topics in plant molecular ecology. Summary report of a workshop  

SciTech Connect

As we approach the 21st Century, it is becoming increasingly clear that human activities, primarily related to energy extraction and use, will lead to marked environmental changes at the local, regional, and global levels. The realized and the potential photosynthetic performance of plants is determined by a combination of intrinsic genetic information and extrinsic environmental factors, especially climate. It is essential that the effects of environmental changes on the photosynthetic competence of individual species, communities, and ecosystems be accurately assessed. From October 24 to 26, 1993, a group of scientists specializing in various aspects of plant science met to discuss how our predictive capabilities could be improved by developing a more rational, mechanistic approach to relating photosynthetic processes to environmental factors. A consensus emerged that achieving this goal requires multidisciplinary research efforts that combine tools and techniques of genetics, molecular biology, biophysics, biochemistry, and physiology to understand the principles, mechanisms, and limitations of evolutional adaptation and physiological acclimation of photosynthetic processes. Many of these basic tools and techniques, often developed in other fields of science, already are available but have not been applied in a coherent, coordinated fashion to ecological research. The efforts of this research program are related to the broader efforts to develop more realistic prognostic models to forecast climate change that include photosynthetic responses and feedbacks at the regional and ecosystem levels.

NONE

1995-07-01

165

NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a deliberate approach to making sure that research data can be repurposed for operational purposes are the cornerstones of the NEON strategy: they facilitate the repurposing of credible, reliable data and information for multiple purposes. Often, the same data is useful in an undergraduate course on correlations as it is for public discourse on the effects of increased precipitation on stream water quality. This suggests a strategy for evolving an ecosystem of institutions whose primary responsibility is contributing to an open information commons that creates and curates credible sources of data and information products with clearly documented provenance, quality protocols, uncertainty estimates, and other qualitative descriptors. This information commons is deliberately designed to be tapped by another ecosystem of institutions whose individual missions revolve around some combination of discovery (e.g. research, forecasting, innovation), learning (e.g. public engagement, informal and formal learning, education research), and solutions (e.g. science and technology policy). This talk explores how the NEON information commons is envisioned to interact with this other community of institutions, and how the cornerstone principles enable that community to better focus their creative capabilities around their respective core missions.

Wee, B.

2010-12-01

166

Where the Wild Things Are: Informal Experience and Ecological Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Category-based induction requires selective use of different relations to guide inferences; this article examines the development of inferences based on ecological relations among living things. Three hundred and forty-six 6-, 8-, and 10-year-old children from rural, suburban, and urban communities projected novel "diseases" or "insides" from one…

Coley, John D.

2012-01-01

167

Ecological models supporting environmental decision making: a strategy for the future  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ecological models are important for environmental decision support because they allow the consequences of alternative policies and management scenarios to be explored. However, current modeling practice is unsatisfactory. A literature review shows that the elements of good modeling practice have long been identified but are widely ignored. The reasons for this might include lack of involvement of decision makers, lack of incentives for modelers to follow good practice, and the use of inconsistent terminologies. As a strategy for the future, we propose a standard format for documenting models and their analyses: transparent and comprehensive ecological modeling (TRACE) documentation. This standard format will disclose all parts of the modeling process to scrutiny and make modeling itself more efficient and coherent.

Schmolke, Amelie; Thorbek, Pernille; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Grimm, Volker

2010-01-01

168

ENVIRONMENTAL & RESOURCE STUDIES PROGRAM Environmental & Resource Science 3350H -Ecological Agriculture  

E-print Network

, rotational grazing, no-till agriculture and organic farming will also be considered. The challenges. It will examine the changes in farming practices since the time of the pioneers, as well as their environmental Agriculture 2010 Fall This course provides an introduction to agricultural practices in an environmental

Fox, Michael

169

31 CFR 26.5 - Upgrades and additional environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...decision that such project merits environmental analysis, but less than a full-fledged environmental impact assessment as defined by that MDB's own...Director of the concerned MDB, such environmental information from the MDB...

2010-07-01

170

TNX Burying Ground: Environmental information document  

SciTech Connect

The TNX Burying Ground, located within the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), was originally built to dispose of debris from an experimental evaporator explosion at TNX in 1953. This evaporator contained approximately 590 kg of uranyl nitrate. From 1980 to 1984, much of the waste material buried at TNX was excavated and sent to the SRP Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds for reburial. An estimated 27 kg of uranyl nitrate remains buried at TNX. The TNX Burying Ground consists of three sites known to contain waste and one site suspected of containing waste material. All four sites are located within the TNX security fenceline. Groundwater at the TNX Burying Ground was not evaluated because there are no groundwater monitoring wells installed in the immediate vicinity of this waste site. The closure options considered for the TNX Burying Ground are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated.

Dunaway, J.K.W.; Johnson, W.F.; Kingley, L.E.; Simmons, R.V.; Bledsoe, H.W.

1987-03-01

171

Translating Ecological Risk to Ecosystem Service Loss  

EPA Science Inventory

Hazardous site management in the US includes remediation of contaminated environmental media and restoration of injured natural resources. Site remediation decisions are informed by ecological risk assessment (ERA), while restoration and compensation decisions are informed by th...

172

Evaluating Course Impact on Student Environmental Values in Undergraduate Ecology with a Novel Survey Instrument  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The authors of this TIEE Research Paper investigated the effect their teaching had on the environmental attitudes and values of undergraduate students. Specifically, they wanted to know if student-active teaching approaches had an effect on attitude changes and whether or not those attitude changes were accompanied by a change in understanding of the underlying ecological principles. They used two survey instruments to assess student attitudes at the beginning and at the completion of a course. They coupled an established survey instrument (New Ecological Paradigm: NEP) with one they developed specifically for the study (Environmental Conflict Overview: ECO) to determine if attitude changes were consistent and to assess specific dimensions of attitude changes. The ECO survey asks students to respond to stakeholder perspectives in specific environmental issues. This study was done at two quite different institutions, which allowed the authors to examine responses of a wide range of students. Results showed consistent changes in attitude with both survey instruments at both schools. The ECO instrument also provided valuable insight into specific aspects of student attitudes that changed most. Results showed a significant reduction in studentsÃÂ anthropocentrism and a reduced emphasis on economic valuation in resolving stakeholder conflicts. Students also demonstrated increased understanding of underlying ecological principles. Quantitative results on the impact of specific student-active teaching methods were equivocal, though free-responses did reveal preference for course topics captured in such activities. The authors suggest that that the combined surveys provide an effective method for assessing changes in student attitudes and therefore can be used as a powerful teaching tool.

Humston, Robert

2010-02-16

173

Case Study: Calculating the Ecological Footprint of the 2004 Australian Association for Environmental Education (AAEE) Biennial Conference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Event tourism is accompanied by social, economic and environmental benefits and costs. The assessment of this form of tourism has however largely focused on the social and economic perspectives, while environmental assessments have been bound to a destination-based approach. The application of the Ecological Footprint methodology allows for these…

Rickard, Andrew

2006-01-01

174

Sustainability of nations by indices: Comparative study between environmental sustainability index, ecological footprint and the emergy performance indices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work makes a comparison between the two most used environmental sustainability indices of nations: “ecological footprint” and “environmental sustainability index”, with two emergy ratios (renewability and emergy sustainability index). All of them are gaining space within the scientific community and government officials. Despite the efforts for obtaining an index that adequately represents the sustainability of a region, according

J. R. Siche; F. Agostinho; E. Ortega; A. Romeiro

2008-01-01

175

Road Developments in the UK: An Analysis of Ecological Assessment in Environmental Impact Statements Produced between 1993 and 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been required for certain proposed road developmentsin the UK since EC Directive (85\\/337) was implemented in 1988. The extent to which the requirements of the EIA Directive are met with respect to ecological issues has been explored in earlier reviews of road statements (Treweek et al., 1993) and of UK environmental impact statements (EISs) in

Helen Byron; Joanna Treweek; William Sheate; Stewart Thompson

2000-01-01

176

Lechowicz, M.J., 2001. Phenology. In the Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change, Volume 2. The Earth System:biological and ecological dimensions of global environmental  

E-print Network

Lechowicz, M.J., 2001. Phenology. In the Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change, Volume 2. The Earth System:biological and ecological dimensions of global environmental change. Wiley, London of spring-warming is an expected and normal part of high-latitude climates, but no one expects the end

Lechowicz, Martin J.

177

Advancing an Information Model for Environmental Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observational data are fundamental to hydrology and water resources, and the way they are organized, described, and shared either enables or inhibits the analyses that can be performed using the data. The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project is developing cyberinfrastructure to support hydrologic science by enabling better access to hydrologic data. HIS is composed of three major components. HydroServer is a software stack for publishing time series of hydrologic observations on the Internet as well as geospatial data using standards-based web feature, map, and coverage services. HydroCatalog is a centralized facility that catalogs the data contents of individual HydroServers and enables search across them. HydroDesktop is a client application that interacts with both HydroServer and HydroCatalog to discover, download, visualize, and analyze hydrologic observations published on one or more HydroServers. All three components of HIS are founded upon an information model for hydrologic observations at stationary points that specifies the entities, relationships, constraints, rules, and semantics of the observational data and that supports its data services. Within this information model, observations are described with ancillary information (metadata) about the observations to allow them to be unambiguously interpreted and used, and to provide traceable heritage from raw measurements to useable information. Physical implementations of this information model include the Observations Data Model (ODM) for storing hydrologic observations, Water Markup Language (WaterML) for encoding observations for transmittal over the Internet, the HydroCatalog metadata catalog database, and the HydroDesktop data cache database. The CUAHSI HIS and this information model have now been in use for several years, and have been deployed across many different academic institutions as well as across several national agency data repositories. Additionally, components of the HIS have been modified to support data management for the Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs). This paper will present limitations of the existing information model used by the CUAHSI HIS that have been uncovered through its deployment and use, as well as new advances to the information model, including: better representation of both in situ observations from field sensors and observations derived from environmental samples, extensibility in attributes used to describe observations, and observation provenance. These advances have been developed by the HIS team and the broader scientific community and will enable the information model to accommodate and better describe wider classes of environmental observations and to better meet the needs of the hydrologic science and CZO communities.

Horsburgh, J. S.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Hooper, R. P.; Lehnert, K. A.; Schreuders, K.; Tarboton, D. G.; Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.

2011-12-01

178

Complex trait divergence contributes to environmental niche differentiation in ecological speciation of Boechera stricta  

PubMed Central

Ecological factors may contribute to reproductive isolation if differential local adaptation causes immigrant or hybrid fitness reduction. Since local adaptation results from the interaction between natural selection and adaptive traits, it is crucial to investigate both in order to understand ecological speciation. Previously, we used niche modeling to identify local water availability as an environmental correlate of incipient ecological speciation between two subspecies in Boechera stricta, a close relative of Arabidopsis. Here, we performed several large-scale greenhouse experiments to investigate the divergence of various physiological, phenological, and morphological traits. Although we found no significant difference in physiological traits, the Western subspecies has significantly faster growth rate, larger leaf area, less succulent leaves, delayed reproductive time, and longer flowering duration. These trait differences are concordant with previous results that habitats of the Western genotypes have more consistent water availability, while Eastern genotypes inhabit locations with more ephemeral water supplies. In addition, by comparing univariate and multivariate divergence of complex traits (QST) to the genome-wide distribution of SNP FST, we conclude that aspects of phenology and morphology (but not physiology) are under divergent selection. In addition, we also identified several highly diverged traits without obvious water-related functions. PMID:23432437

Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

2013-01-01

179

Complex trait divergence contributes to environmental niche differentiation in ecological speciation of Boechera stricta.  

PubMed

Ecological factors may contribute to reproductive isolation if differential local adaptation causes immigrant or hybrid fitness reduction. Because local adaptation results from the interaction between natural selection and adaptive traits, it is crucial to investigate both to understand ecological speciation. Previously, we used niche modelling to identify local water availability as an environmental correlate of incipient ecological speciation between two subspecies in Boechera stricta, a close relative of Arabidopsis. Here, we performed several large-scale glasshouse experiments to investigate the divergence of various physiological, phenological and morphological traits. Although we found no significant difference in physiological traits, the Western subspecies has significantly faster growth rate, larger leaf area, less succulent leaves, delayed reproductive time and longer flowering duration. These trait differences are concordant with previous results that habitats of the Western genotypes have more consistent water availability, while Eastern genotypes inhabit locations with more ephemeral water supplies. In addition, by comparing univariate and multivariate divergence of complex traits (Q(ST)) to the genomewide distribution of SNP FST , we conclude that the aspects of phenology and morphology (but not physiology) are under divergent selection. In addition, we also identified several highly diverged traits without obvious water-related functions. PMID:23432437

Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

2013-04-01

180

Geography of non-melanoma skin cancer and ecological associations with environmental risk factors in England  

PubMed Central

Background: This study investigates the geography of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in England, and ecological associations with three widespread environmental hazards: radon, arsenic and ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Methods: Age-/sex-standardised registration rates of NMSC were mapped for local authority (LA) areas (n=326), along with geographical data on bright sunshine, household radon and arsenic. Associations between NMSC and environmental variables, adjusted for socio-economic confounders, were investigated. Results: There was a substantial geographical variation in NMSC rates across English local authorities and between cancer registration regions. Forty percent of variance in rates was at registry region level and 60% at LA level. No association was observed between environmental arsenic and NMSC rates. Rates were associated with area-mean bright sunshine hours. An association with area-mean radon concentration was suggested, although the strength of statistical evidence was sensitive to model specification. Conclusion: The significant geographical variation across England in NMSC registration rate is likely to be partly, but not wholly, explained by registry differences. Findings tentatively support suggestions that environmental radon may be a risk factor for NMSC. Although NMSC is rarely fatal, it has significant implications for individuals and health services, and further research into NMSC geographical and environmental risk factors is warranted. PMID:23756856

Wheeler, B W; Kothencz, G; Pollard, A S

2013-01-01

181

Using remote sensing, ecological niche modeling, and Geographic Information Systems for Rift Valley fever risk assessment in the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary goal in this study was to explore remote sensing, ecological niche modeling, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as aids in predicting candidate Rift Valley fever (RVF) competent vector abundance and distribution in Virginia, and as means of estimating where risk of establishment in mosquitoes and risk of transmission to human populations would be greatest in Virginia. A second goal in this study was to determine whether the remotely-sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can be used as a proxy variable of local conditions for the development of mosquitoes to predict mosquito species distribution and abundance in Virginia. As part of this study, a mosquito surveillance database was compiled to archive the historical patterns of mosquito species abundance in Virginia. In addition, linkages between mosquito density and local environmental and climatic patterns were spatially and temporally examined. The present study affirms the potential role of remote sensing imagery for species distribution prediction, and it demonstrates that ecological niche modeling is a valuable predictive tool to analyze the distributions of populations. The MaxEnt ecological niche modeling program was used to model predicted ranges for potential RVF competent vectors in Virginia. The MaxEnt model was shown to be robust, and the candidate RVF competent vector predicted distribution map is presented. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was found to be the most useful environmental-climatic variable to predict mosquito species distribution and abundance in Virginia. However, these results indicate that a more robust prediction is obtained by including other environmental-climatic factors correlated to mosquito densities (e.g., temperature, precipitation, elevation) with NDVI. The present study demonstrates that remote sensing and GIS can be used with ecological niche and risk modeling methods to estimate risk of virus establishment in mosquitoes and transmission to humans. Maps delineating the geographic areas in Virginia with highest risk for RVF establishment in mosquito populations and RVF disease transmission to human populations were generated in a GIS using human, domestic animal, and white-tailed deer population estimates and the MaxEnt potential RVF competent vector species distribution prediction. The candidate RVF competent vector predicted distribution and RVF risk maps presented in this study can help vector control agencies and public health officials focus Rift Valley fever surveillance efforts in geographic areas with large co-located populations of potential RVF competent vectors and human, domestic animal, and wildlife hosts. Keywords. Rift Valley fever, risk assessment, Ecological Niche Modeling, MaxEnt, Geographic Information System, remote sensing, Pearson's Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient, vectors, mosquito distribution, mosquito density, mosquito surveillance, United States, Virginia, domestic animals, white-tailed deer, ArcGIS

Tedrow, Christine Atkins

182

Examining Decision-Making Regarding Environmental Information  

SciTech Connect

Eight participants were asked to view a computer-based multimedia presentation on an environmental phenomenon. Participants were asked to play a role as a senior aide to a national legislator. In this role, they were told that the legislator had asked them to review a multimedia presentation regarding the hypoxic zone phenomenon in the Gulf of Mexico. Their task in assuming the role of a senior aide was to decide how important a problem this issue was to the United States as a whole, and the proportion of the legislator’s research budget that should be devoted to study of the problem. The presentation was divided into 7 segments, each containing some new information not contained in the previous segments. After viewing each segment, participants were asked to indicate how close they were to making a decision and how certain they were that their current opinion would be their final decision. After indicating their current state of decision-making, participants were interviewed regarding the factors affecting their decision-making. Of interest was the process by which participants moved toward a decision. This experiment revealed a number of possible directions for future research. There appeared to be two approaches to decision-making: Some decision-makers moved steadily toward a decision, and occasionally reversed decisions after viewing information, while others abruptly reached a decision after a certain time period spent reviewing the information. Although the difference in estimates of distance to decisions did not differ statistically for these two groups, that difference was reflected in the participants’ estimates of confidence that their current opinion would be their final decision. The interviews revealed that the primary difference between these two groups was in their trade-offs between willingness to spend time in information search and the acquisition of new information. Participants who were less confident about their final decision, tended to be the same group of participants who moved slowly toward a decision. These participants also tended to indicate that acquisition of information was more critical than the amount of time spent on the information search. The second group tended to form a set of specific questions for which they desired specific answers. This group was more likely to demonstrate a significant reduction in their distance to a decision much earlier than the first group. In addition, this group tended to be very confident of their final decision and indicated that time spent in information search was more critical than obtaining new information. They indicated that the value of information obtained must remain high to justify the extensive time spent in information search.

Marble, Julie Lynne; Medema, Heather Dawne; Hill, Susan Gardiner

2001-10-01

183

A Critical Review of Environmental Impact Statements in Sri Lanka with Particular Reference to Ecological Impact Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article critically reviews environmental assessment (EA) practices in Sri Lanka, with a particular focus on ecology.\\u000a An overview is provided of the domestic and international influences which have shaped the administrative process which is\\u000a currently a two-tiered scheme. An Initial Environmental Examination (IEE) provides a preliminary screening tool, prior to\\u000a the requirement for a full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA).

Miriya Samarakoon; John S. Rowan

2008-01-01

184

Objective classification of ecological status in marine water bodies using ecotoxicological information and multivariate analysis.  

PubMed

Some relevant shortcomings have been identified in the current approach for the classification of ecological status in marine water bodies, leading to delays in the fulfillment of the Water Framework Directive objectives. Natural variability makes difficult to settle fixed reference values and boundary values for the Ecological Quality Ratios (EQR) for the biological quality elements. Biological responses to environmental degradation are frequently of nonmonotonic nature, hampering the EQR approach. Community structure traits respond only once ecological damage has already been done and do not provide early warning signals. An alternative methodology for the classification of ecological status integrating chemical measurements, ecotoxicological bioassays and community structure traits (species richness and diversity), and using multivariate analyses (multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis), is proposed. This approach does not depend on the arbitrary definition of fixed reference values and EQR boundary values, and it is suitable to integrate nonlinear, sensitive signals of ecological degradation. As a disadvantage, this approach demands the inclusion of sampling sites representing the full range of ecological status in each monitoring campaign. National or international agencies in charge of coastal pollution monitoring have comprehensive data sets available to overcome this limitation. PMID:24146320

Beiras, Ricardo; Durán, Iria

2014-12-01

185

Developing standards for environmental toxicants: the need to consider abiotic environmental factors and microbe-mediated ecologic processes.  

PubMed Central

This article suggests and discusses two novel aspects for the formulation of standards for environmental toxicants. First, uniform national standards for each pollutant will be underprotective for some ecosystems and overprotective for others, inasmuch as the toxicity of a pollutant to the indigenous biota is dependent on the physicochemical properties of the recipient environment. As the number of chemicals that need regulation is immense and as microbes appear to respond similarly to pollutant-abiotic factor interactions as do plants and animals, it is suggested that microbial assays be used initially to identify those abiotic factors that most influence the toxicity of specific pollutants. Thereafter, additional studies using plants and animals can focus on these pollutant-abiotic factor interactions, and more meaningful standards can then be formulated more rapidly and inexpensively. Second, it is suggested that the response to pollutants of microbe-mediated ecologic processes be used to quantitate the sensitivity of different ecosystems to various toxicants. Such a quantification, expressed in terms of an "ecological dose 50%" (EcD50), could be easily incorporated into the methodologies currently used to set water quality criteria and would also be applicable to setting criteria for terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:6339225

Babich, H; Stotzky, G

1983-01-01

186

GO FISH! and Aquatic Ecology Registration Form Contact Information  

E-print Network

Deposit Amount ________ Emergency Information and permission to attend Are there medical conditions, asthma, ADHD)? If yes, please explain_________________________________________________________ Emergency

Dyer, Rodney J.

187

A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Tradeoff on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part II: Ecological Networks  

PubMed Central

In ecological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations, as well as environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances, so that the phenotype stability of ecological networks can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. However, it is difficult to analyze the network robustness of ecological systems because they are complex nonlinear partial differential stochastic systems. This paper develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance sensitivity in ecological networks. We found that the phenotype robustness criterion for ecological networks is that if intrinsic robustness + environmental robustness ? network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations and environmental disturbances. These results in robust ecological networks are similar to that in robust gene regulatory networks and evolutionary networks even they have different spatial-time scales. PMID:23515112

Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

2013-01-01

188

Water Resources management and environmental flows under physicochemical and ecological considerations.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multidisciplinary models are useful for integrating different disciplines when addressing water planning and management problems. Coupling tools of water resources management, water quality and habitat analysis is important to propose water allocation solutions in different environmental flows scenarios. The Decision Support System AQUATOOL allows the construction of the three kinds of models: the SIMGES model solves the allocation problem through network flow optimisation and considers the environmental flows in selected river stretches; the GESCAL model performs the water quality in rivers and reservoirs; and the CAUDECO model assesses habitat suitability, providing Habitat Time Series for each available WUA-flow curve. Furthermore, the general methodological framework is improved by implementing a hydrological alteration assessment of the e-flow regime scenarios. This approach was applied in the Tormes River Water Resources System, where agricultural demands endanger the environmental needs of the river ecosystem. Moreover, the wastewater loading and the agricultural pollution result in water quality problems in some river stretches. Our methodological framework can be used to define water management rules that maintain water supply, aquatic ecosystem and water quality legal standards. The integration of ecological and water management criteria in a software platform allows the optimization and application of environmental flows, considering the real constrains in the legal and economical framework of a river basin.

Paredes-Arquiola, Javier; Solera-Solera, Abel; Martínez-Capel, Francisco; Momblanch-Benavent, Andrea; Andreu-Álvarez, Joaquín

2013-04-01

189

Landscape Ecology and Design The Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary invites applications for a full-time  

E-print Network

Landscape Ecology and Design The Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary invites applications for a full-time tenure-track position in Landscape Ecology and Design to the integration of design, ecology and culture in the making and managing of meaningful and functional human

Habib, Ayman

190

The Role of Interest in Environmental Information: A New Agenda  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of environmental information is presented in factual, expository text format. Although this form of text may be sufficient when learner interest is already high or when incentives are strong, environmental communicators cannot always rely on traditional text to provide citizens or students with environmental information that is comprehensible and motivating. The literature suggests that the qualities of written

Martha C. Monroe; Raymond DeYoung

191

Environmental management: integrating ecological evaluation, remediation, restoration, natural resource damage assessment and long-term stewardship on contaminated lands.  

PubMed

Ecological evaluation is essential for remediation, restoration, and Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), and forms the basis for many management practices. These include determining status and trends of biological, physical, or chemical/radiological conditions, conducting environmental impact assessments, performing remedial actions should remediation fail, managing ecosystems and wildlife, and assessing the efficacy of remediation, restoration, and long-term stewardship. The objective of this paper is to explore the meanings of these assessments, examine the relationships among them, and suggest methods of integration that will move environmental management forward. While remediation, restoration, and NRDA, among others, are often conducted separately, it is important to integrate them for contaminated land where the risks to ecoreceptors (including humans) can be high, and the potential damage to functioning ecosystems great. Ecological evaluations can range from inventories of local plants and animals, determinations of reproductive success of particular species, levels of contaminants in organisms, kinds and levels of effects, and environmental impact assessments, to very formal ecological risk assessments for a chemical or other stressor. Such evaluations can range from the individual species to populations, communities, ecosystems or the landscape scale. Ecological evaluations serve as the basis for making decisions about the levels and kinds of remediation, the levels and kinds of restoration possible, and the degree and kinds of natural resource injuries that have occurred because of contamination. Many different disciplines are involved in ecological evaluation, including biologists, conservationists, foresters, restoration ecologists, ecological engineers, economists, hydrologist, and geologists. Since ecological evaluation forms the basis for so many different types of environmental management, it seems reasonable to integrate management options to achieve economies of time, energy, and costs. Integration and iteration among these disciplines is possible only with continued interactions among practitioners, regulators, policy-makers, Native American Tribes, and the general public. PMID:18687455

Burger, Joanna

2008-08-01

192

An Online Database for Informing Ecological Network Models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu  

PubMed Central

Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/databaseui). PMID:25343723

Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Tinker, Martin T.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison

2014-01-01

193

An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/data?baseui).

Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Tinker, M. Tim; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison C.

2014-01-01

194

45 CFR 673.4 - Environmental protection information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...EXPEDITIONS § 673.4 Environmental protection information. (a) Any person who organizes a non-governmental expedition to Antarctica and who does business in the United States shall notify expedition members of the environmental protection obligations...

2010-10-01

195

45 CFR 673.4 - Environmental protection information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...EXPEDITIONS § 673.4 Environmental protection information. (a) Any person who organizes a non-governmental expedition to Antarctica and who does business in the United States shall notify expedition members of the environmental protection obligations...

2012-10-01

196

45 CFR 673.4 - Environmental protection information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...EXPEDITIONS § 673.4 Environmental protection information. (a) Any person who organizes a non-governmental expedition to Antarctica and who does business in the United States shall notify expedition members of the environmental protection obligations...

2011-10-01

197

45 CFR 673.4 - Environmental protection information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...EXPEDITIONS § 673.4 Environmental protection information. (a) Any person who organizes a non-governmental expedition to Antarctica and who does business in the United States shall notify expedition members of the environmental protection obligations...

2013-10-01

198

Baboon feeding ecology informs the dietary niche of Paranthropus boisei.  

PubMed

Hominins are generally considered eclectic omnivores like baboons, but recent isotope studies call into question the generalist status of some hominins. Paranthropus boisei and Australopithecus bahrelghazali derived 75%-80% of their tissues' ?(13)C from C4 sources, i.e. mainly low-quality foods like grasses and sedges. Here I consider the energetics of P. boisei and the nutritional value of C4 foods, taking into account scaling issues between the volume of food consumed and body mass, and P. boisei's food preference as inferred from dento-cranial morphology. Underlying the models are empirical data for Papio cynocephalus dietary ecology. Paranthropus boisei only needed to spend some 37%-42% of its daily feeding time (conservative estimate) on C4 sources to meet 80% of its daily requirements of calories, and all its requirements for protein. The energetic requirements of 2-4 times the basal metabolic rate (BMR) common to mammals could therefore have been met within a 6-hour feeding/foraging day. The findings highlight the high nutritional yield of many C4 foods eaten by baboons (and presumably hominins), explain the evolutionary success of P. boisei, and indicate that P. boisei was probably a generalist like other hominins. The diet proposed is consistent with the species' derived morphology and unique microwear textures. Finally, the results highlight the importance of baboon/hominin hand in food acquisition and preparation. PMID:24416315

Macho, Gabriele A

2014-01-01

199

An approach for the application of the Ecological Footprint as environmental indicator in the textile sector.  

PubMed

The Ecological Footprint (EF) is a recent concept which has widely been used as an indicator of environmental sustainability applied to individual lifestyles, regions, nations or even the world. Recently, its application to enterprises has been proposed. In the present study, a textile tailoring plant has been analysed. The overall purpose of this study was to develop a tool useful for evaluating the environmental impact evolution due to the performance of the plant, as well as for comparing the environmental behaviour of different tailoring processes. Therefore, the selected data were those from the manufacturing work. Data were divided in three main categories: energy, resources and waste. The principal contribution to the final EF (expressed in hectares of land) was the resources category, mainly due to the high value associated to the cloth. The consumed energy was the second contributor, while the waste category remained in third place. The final outcomes were divided by the production rates to obtain a comparable relative index, easy to be interpreted by the different stakeholders. This is of special importance for a Company involved in Corporate Social Responsibility and thus meant to have a general communication strategy. PMID:18280032

Herva, M; Franco, A; Ferreiro, S; Alvarez, A; Roca, E

2008-08-15

200

Environmental Scanning: Acquisition and Use of Information by Managers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Defines environmental scanning as the acquisition and use of information about an organization's external environment to assist managers in planning. Highlights include a historical review; organizational theories; information needs and uses; managers as information users; and a review of research on environmental scanning. (Contains 124…

Choo, Chun Wei; Auster, Ethel

1993-01-01

201

Wisconsin's environmental public health tracking network: information systems design for childhood cancer surveillance.  

PubMed

In this article we describe the development of an information system for environmental childhood cancer surveillance. The Wisconsin Cancer Registry annually receives more than 25,000 incident case reports. Approximately 269 cases per year involve children. Over time, there has been considerable community interest in understanding the role the environment plays as a cause of these cancer cases. Wisconsin's Public Health Information Network (WI-PHIN) is a robust web portal integrating both Health Alert Network and National Electronic Disease Surveillance System components. WI-PHIN is the information technology platform for all public health surveillance programs. Functions include the secure, automated exchange of cancer case data between public health-based and hospital-based cancer registrars; web-based supplemental data entry for environmental exposure confirmation and hypothesis testing; automated data analysis, visualization, and exposure-outcome record linkage; directories of public health and clinical personnel for role-based access control of sensitive surveillance information; public health information dissemination and alerting; and information technology security and critical infrastructure protection. For hypothesis generation, cancer case data are sent electronically to WI-PHIN and populate the integrated data repository. Environmental data are linked and the exposure-disease relationships are explored using statistical tools for ecologic exposure risk assessment. For hypothesis testing, case-control interviews collect exposure histories, including parental employment and residential histories. This information technology approach can thus serve as the basis for building a comprehensive system to assess environmental cancer etiology. PMID:15471739

Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Anderson, Henry A; Busby, Brian; Bekkedal, Marni; Sieger, Thomas; Stephenson, Laura; Knobeloch, Lynda; Werner, Mark; Imm, Pamela; Olson, Joseph

2004-10-01

202

Wisconsin's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network: Information Systems Design for Childhood Cancer Surveillance  

PubMed Central

In this article we describe the development of an information system for environmental childhood cancer surveillance. The Wisconsin Cancer Registry annually receives more than 25,000 incident case reports. Approximately 269 cases per year involve children. Over time, there has been considerable community interest in understanding the role the environment plays as a cause of these cancer cases. Wisconsin’s Public Health Information Network (WI-PHIN) is a robust web portal integrating both Health Alert Network and National Electronic Disease Surveillance System components. WI-PHIN is the information technology platform for all public health surveillance programs. Functions include the secure, automated exchange of cancer case data between public health–based and hospital-based cancer registrars; web-based supplemental data entry for environmental exposure confirmation and hypothesis testing; automated data analysis, visualization, and exposure–outcome record linkage; directories of public health and clinical personnel for role-based access control of sensitive surveillance information; public health information dissemination and alerting; and information technology security and critical infrastructure protection. For hypothesis generation, cancer case data are sent electronically to WI-PHIN and populate the integrated data repository. Environmental data are linked and the exposure–disease relationships are explored using statistical tools for ecologic exposure risk assessment. For hypothesis testing, case–control interviews collect exposure histories, including parental employment and residential histories. This information technology approach can thus serve as the basis for building a comprehensive system to assess environmental cancer etiology. PMID:15471739

Hanrahan, Lawrence P.; Anderson, Henry A.; Busby, Brian; Bekkedal, Marni; Sieger, Thomas; Stephenson, Laura; Knobeloch, Lynda; Werner, Mark; Imm, Pamela; Olson, Joseph

2004-01-01

203

Integrating Ecology and Environmental Ethics: Earth Stewardship in the Southern End of the Author(s): Ricardo Rozzi, Juan J. Armesto, Julio R. Gutirrez, Francisca Massardo, Gene E.  

E-print Network

Integrating Ecology and Environmental Ethics: Earth Stewardship in the Southern End of the AmericasScience · March 2012 / Vol. 62 No. 3 www.biosciencemag.org Integrating Ecology and Environmental Ethics: Earth Stewardship in the Southern End of the Americas RicaRdo Rozzi, Juan J. aRmesto, Julio R. GutiéRRez, FRancisca

Berkowitz, Alan R.

204

General Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial explains how environmental conditions and organism interactions determine animal and tree distribution and abundance. There are definitions of important ecological terms such as ecology, interactions, and abundance; descriptions of the environmental conditions needed for rainforests and how they provide habitat for many species; and an explanation of the spawning process. The tutorial also introduces food chain concepts and the unique ecology of riparian habitats. A quiz is also available.

205

An ERP study on whether semantic integration exists in processing ecologically unrelated audio–visual information  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine whether semantic integration occurs for ecologically unrelated audio–visual information. Videos with synchronous audio–visual information were used as stimuli, where the auditory stimuli were sine wave sounds with different sound levels, and the visual stimuli were simple geometric figures with different areas. In the experiment, participants were shown an initial

Baolin Liu; Xianyao Meng; Zhongning Wang; Guangning Wu

2011-01-01

206

A matter of opinion—How ecological and neoclassical environmental economists and think about sustainability and economics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The differing paradigms of ecological and neoclassical environmental economics have been described in various articles and books and are also embedded in different professional associations. However, we cannot take for granted that the paradigm debates described in the literature are actually mirrored in exactly the same way in the perceptions and opinions of researchers looking at sustainability from an economic

Lydia Illge; Reimund Schwarze

2009-01-01

207

Comparison of Two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Species Sensitivity Distribution Methods for Calculating Ecological Risk Criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two major methods used by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to calculate ecological risk criteria using “species sensitivity distributions” (SSD) are compared using identical datasets. One method is the current USEPA Office of Water method for deriving acute numeric water quality criteria (EPA-FAV method). The 95% protection level generated by this method is the Final Acute Value (FAV).

Daniel J. Fisher; Dennis T. Burton

2003-01-01

208

DEVELOPMENT OF PROTEIN PROFILE TECHNOLOGY TO EVALUATE ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS USING A SMALL FISH MODEL  

EPA Science Inventory

Hemmer, Michael J., Robert T. Hudson and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Development of Protein Profile Technology to Evaluate Ecological Effects of Environmental Chemicals Using a Small Fish Model (Abstract). To be presented at the EPA Science Forum: Healthy Communities and Ecosyste...

209

Actualizing panarchy within environmental policy: mechanisms for tweaking institutional hierarchies to mimic the social-ecological systems they manage  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental law plays a key role in shaping approaches to sustainability. In particular, the role of legal instruments, institutions, and the relationship of law to the inherent variability in social-ecological systems is critical. Sustainability likely must occur via the insti...

210

Targeted grazing to reduce tillage in organic dryland systems: Environmental, ecological, and economic assessment of reintegrating animal and crop production  

E-print Network

of management system on lamb performance, health and quality. The successful candidate will evaluate the impact networks. As part of this project, the successful candidate will assess insect diversity and impactTargeted grazing to reduce tillage in organic dryland systems: Environmental, ecological

Lawrence, Rick L.

211

DIATOMS: POWERFUL INDICATORS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE  

EPA Science Inventory

Diatoms are being used increasingly to assess short- and long-term environmental change, because they are informative, versatile, flexible, and powerful ecological indicators. iatoms respond rapidly to changes in many ecological characteristics. ssemblages are usually diverse and...

212

Environmental databases and other computerized information tools  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Increasing environmental legislation has brought about the development of many new environmental databases and software application packages to aid in the quest for environmental compliance. These databases and software packages are useful tools and applicable to a wide range of environmental areas from atmospheric modeling to materials replacement technology. The great abundance of such products and services can be very overwhelming when trying to identify the tools which best meet specific needs. This paper will discuss the types of environmental databases and software packages available. This discussion will also encompass the affected environmental areas of concern, product capabilities, and hardware requirements for product utilization.

Clark-Ingram, Marceia

1995-01-01

213

New perspectives on the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in environmental health sciences.  

PubMed

At first glance, the domain of health is no typical area to applicate Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Nevertheless, the recent development clearly shows that also within the domains of environmental health, disease ecology and public health GIS have become an indispensable tool for processing, analysing and visualising spatial data. In the field of geographical epidemiology, GIS are used for drawing up disease maps and for ecological analysis. The striking advantages of GIS for the disease mapping process are the considerably simplified generation and variation of maps as well as a broader variety in terms of determining a real units. In the frame of ecological analysis, GIS can significantly assist with the assessment of the distribution of health-relevant environmental factors via interpolation and modelling. On the other hand, the GIS-supported methods for the detection of striking spatial patterns of disease distribution need to be much improved. An important topic in this respect is the integration of the time dimension. The increasing use of remote sensing as well as the integration into internet functionalities will stimulate the application of GIS in the field of Environmental Health Sciences (EHS). In future, the integration and analysis of health-relevant data in one single data system will open up many new research opportunities. PMID:12040915

Kistemann, Thomas; Dangendorf, Friederike; Schweikart, Jürgen

2002-04-01

214

Ecology Explorers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site from the Center for Environmental Studies at Arizona State University was developed as part of the Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-term Ecological Research Project (CAP LTER), but can be used by any classrooms interested in exploring urban ecosystems that surround them. Students and teachers learn about the scientific method and several data collection protocols that they can use right in their schoolyard. The site is attractive and easy to navigate; information is explained clearly and logically. A number of lesson plans for a variety of K-12 age groups will help teachers incorporate activities from this Web site into their classroom.

215

14 CFR 431.93 - Environmental information.  

...measurably outside the parameters of existing environmental impact statements covering that site; (d) A proposed payload that may have significant environmental impacts in the event of a reentry accident; and...

2014-01-01

216

Elder abuse and neglect in African American families: informing practice based on ecological and cultural frameworks.  

PubMed

Despite the rapid growth of the elderly African American population in the U.S., elder abuse and neglect in African American families continue to be underdeveloped areas of study. This article presents an ecological and culturally informed framework for the study of elder abuse in African American populations. The model was developed based on Bronfenbrenner's Human Ecological Theory. The model identifies risk factors associated with different systems that have an influence on the lives of African American families. Cultural protective factors also are identified in the model. The model is intended to provide an understanding of elder abuse and neglect in African American families by considering the influence of contextual factors such as the legacy of slavery, social exclusion, and structural segregation and racism. Specific suggestions for practice are proposed according to cultural strengths of African American communities as well as the ecological premises of the model. PMID:21253931

Horsford, Sheena R; Parra-Cardona, José Rubén; Schiamberg, Larry; Post, Lori A

2011-01-01

217

INEL Waste and Environmental Information Integration Project approach and concepts  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering, Laboratory (INEL) Waste and Environmental Information integration Project (IWEIIP) was established in December 1993 to address issues related to INEL waste and environmental information including: Data quality; Data redundancy; Data accessibility; Data integration. This effort includes existing information, new development, and acquisition activities. Existing information may not be a database record; it may be an entire document (electronic, scanned, or hard-copy), a video clip, or a file cabinet of information. The IWEIIP will implement an effective integrated information framework to manage INEL waste and environmental information as an asset. This will improve data quality, resolve data redundancy, and increase data accessibility; therefore, providing more effective utilization of the dollars spent on waste and environmental information.

Dean, L.A.; Fairbourn, P.J.; Randall, V.C.; Riedesel, A.M.

1994-06-01

218

Pollination ecology and the possible impacts of environmental change in the Southwest Australian Biodiversity Hotspot  

PubMed Central

The Southwest Australian Biodiversity Hotspot contains an exceptionally diverse flora on an ancient, low-relief but edaphically diverse landscape. Since European colonization, the primary threat to the flora has been habitat clearance, though climate change is an impending threat. Here, we review (i) the ecology of nectarivores and biotic pollination systems in the region, (ii) the evidence that trends in pollination strategies are a consequence of characteristics of the landscape, and (iii) based on these discussions, provide predictions to be tested on the impacts of environmental change on pollination systems. The flora of southwestern Australia has an exceptionally high level of vertebrate pollination, providing the advantage of highly mobile, generalist pollinators. Nectarivorous invertebrates are primarily generalist foragers, though an increasing number of colletid bees are being recognized as being specialized at the level of plant family or more rarely genus. While generalist pollination strategies dominate among insect-pollinated plants, there are some cases of extreme specialization, most notably the multiple evolutions of sexual deception in the Orchidaceae. Preliminary data suggest that bird pollination confers an advantage of greater pollen movement and may represent a mechanism for minimizing inbreeding in naturally fragmented populations. The effects of future environmental change are predicted to result from a combination of the resilience of pollination guilds and changes in their foraging and dispersal behaviour. PMID:20047877

Phillips, Ryan D.; Hopper, Stephen D.; Dixon, Kingsley W.

2010-01-01

219

78 FR 78998 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD Environmental Review Online System (HEROS)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection: HUD Environmental Review Online System...For telephone and email communication, contact Elizabeth Zepeda, Environmental Planning Division...Information Collection: HUD Environmental Review Online...

2013-12-27

220

November 1999 1189HISTORICAL VARIABILITY Ecological Applications, 9(4), 1999, pp. 11891206  

E-print Network

between natural and cultural causes of environmental change. We describe a montane grassland restoration to informed management. Key words: climate change; disturbance; fire history; historical ecology; packrat

221

Preliminary strategic environmental assessment of the Great Western Development Strategy: safeguarding ecological security for a new western China.  

PubMed

The Great Western Development Strategy (GWDS) is a long term national campaign aimed at boosting development of the western area of China and narrowing the economic gap between the western and the eastern parts of China. The Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) procedure was employed to assess the environmental challenges brought about by the western development plans. These plans include five key developmental domains (KDDs): water resource exploitation and use, land utilization, energy generation, tourism development, and ecological restoration and conservation. A combination of methods involving matrix assessment, incorporation of expert judgment and trend analysis was employed to analyze and predict the environmental impacts upon eight selected environmental indicators: water resource availability, soil erosion, soil salinization, forest destruction, land desertification, biological diversity, water quality and air quality. Based on the overall results of the assessment, countermeasures for environmental challenges that emerged were raised as key recommendations to ensure ecological security during the implementation of the GWDS. This paper is intended to introduce a consensus-based process for evaluating the complex, long term pressures on the ecological security of large areas, such as western China, that focuses on the use of combined methods applied at the strategic level. PMID:22190169

Li, Wei; Liu, Yan-ju; Yang, Zhifeng

2012-02-01

222

Preliminary Strategic Environmental Assessment of the Great Western Development Strategy: Safeguarding Ecological Security for a New Western China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Great Western Development Strategy (GWDS) is a long term national campaign aimed at boosting development of the western area of China and narrowing the economic gap between the western and the eastern parts of China. The Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) procedure was employed to assess the environmental challenges brought about by the western development plans. These plans include five key developmental domains (KDDs): water resource exploitation and use, land utilization, energy generation, tourism development, and ecological restoration and conservation. A combination of methods involving matrix assessment, incorporation of expert judgment and trend analysis was employed to analyze and predict the environmental impacts upon eight selected environmental indicators: water resource availability, soil erosion, soil salinization, forest destruction, land desertification, biological diversity, water quality and air quality. Based on the overall results of the assessment, countermeasures for environmental challenges that emerged were raised as key recommendations to ensure ecological security during the implementation of the GWDS. This paper is intended to introduce a consensus-based process for evaluating the complex, long term pressures on the ecological security of large areas, such as western China, that focuses on the use of combined methods applied at the strategic level.

Li, Wei; Liu, Yan-Ju; Yang, Zhifeng

2012-02-01

223

Development of a socio-ecological environmental justice model for watershed-based management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics and relationships between society and nature are complex and difficult to predict. Anthropogenic activities affect the ecological integrity of our natural resources, specifically our streams. Further, it is well-established that the costs of these activities are born unequally by different human communities. This study considered the utility of integrating stream health metrics, based on stream health indicators, with socio-economic measures of communities, to better characterize these effects. This study used a spatial multi-factor model and bivariate mapping to produce a novel assessment for watershed management, identification of vulnerable areas, and allocation of resources. The study area is the Saginaw River watershed located in Michigan. In-stream hydrological and water quality data were used to predict fish and macroinvertebrate measures of stream health. These measures include the Index of Biological Integrity (IBI), Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI), Family IBI, and total number of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa. Stream health indicators were then compared to spatially coincident socio-economic data, obtained from the United States Census Bureau (2010), including race, income, education, housing, and population size. Statistical analysis including spatial regression and cluster analysis were used to examine the correlation between vulnerable human populations and environmental conditions. Overall, limited correlation was observed between the socio-economic data and ecological measures of stream health, with the highest being a negative correlation of 0.18 between HBI and the social parameter household size. Clustering was observed in the datasets with urban areas representing a second order clustering effect over the watershed. Regions with the worst stream health and most vulnerable social populations were most commonly located nearby or down-stream to highly populated areas and agricultural lands.

Sanchez, Georgina M.; Nejadhashemi, A. Pouyan; Zhang, Zhen; Woznicki, Sean A.; Habron, Geoffrey; Marquart-Pyatt, Sandra; Shortridge, Ashton

2014-10-01

224

Professional food purchasers' practice in using environmental information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Food consumption impacts heavily on the environment. It is therefore highly relevant to study food-purchasing processes and needs for environmental information in the food supply chain. The objective of this article is to report findings from a study identifying practices in using environmental information when making decisions on what food to procure and purchase. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Using a

Kerstin Bergström; Cecilia Solér; Helena Shanahan

2005-01-01

225

Linking Science and Society With an Environmental Information Bridge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building learning communities to engage the public in identifying and solving local and regional environmental problems is the vision of the newly created Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment at the University of North Dakota. The Center serves as an Environmental Information Bridge between science and society for citizens of the region, providing information, data, and value-added

L. Welling; G. Seielstad; D. Jones; J. Peterson

2001-01-01

226

Building an Environmental Information System for Personalized Content Delivery  

E-print Network

Building an Environmental Information System for Personalized Content Delivery Leo Wanner1 , Luciano Serafini3 , Virpi Tarvainen6 1 Dept. of Information and Communication Technologies, Pompeu Fabra Institute 7 Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority leo.wanner@upf.edu, stefanos@iti.gr, satonelli

227

Mycobacterium ulcerans Ecological Dynamics and Its Association with Freshwater Ecosystems and Aquatic Communities: Results from a 12-Month Environmental Survey in Cameroon  

PubMed Central

Background Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) is the agent responsible for Buruli Ulcer (BU), an emerging skin disease with dramatic socioeconomic and health outcomes, especially in rural settings. BU emergence and distribution is linked to aquatic ecosystems in tropical and subtropical countries, especially to swampy and flooded areas. Aquatic animal organisms are likely to play a role either as host reservoirs or vectors of the bacilli. However, information on MU ecological dynamics, both in space and time, is dramatically lacking. As a result, the ecology of the disease agent, and consequently its mode of transmission, remains largely unknown, which jeopardizes public health attempts for its control. The objective of this study was to gain insight on MU environmental distribution and colonization of aquatic organisms through time. Methodology/Principal Findings Longitudinal sampling of 32 communities of aquatic macro-invertebrates and vertebrates was conducted from different environments in two BU endemic regions in Cameroon during 12 months. As a result, 238,496 individuals were classified and MU presence was assessed by qPCR in 3,084 sample-pools containing these aquatic organisms. Our study showed a broad distribution of MU in all ecosystems and taxonomic groups, with important regional differences in its occurrence. Colonization dynamics fluctuated along the year, with the highest peaks in August and October. The large variations observed in the colonization dynamics of different taxonomic groups and aquatic ecosystems suggest that the trends shown here are the result of complex ecological processes that need further investigation. Conclusion/Perspectives This is the largest field study on MU ecology to date, providing the first detailed description of its spatio-temporal dynamics in different aquatic ecosystems within BU endemic regions. We argue that coupling this data with fine-scale epidemiological data through statistical and mathematical models will provide a major step forward in the understanding of MU ecology and mode of transmission. PMID:24831924

Garchitorena, Andres; Roche, Benjamin; Kamgang, Roger; Ossomba, Joachim; Babonneau, Jeremie; Landier, Jordi; Fontanet, Arnaud; Flahault, Antoine

2014-01-01

228

Environmental Activities for Teaching Critical Thinking. [Environmental Education Information Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability to think critically is essential if individuals are to live, work, and function effectively in our current and changing society. The activities included in this publication were selected to identify a variety of effective strategies for teaching critical thinking skills through environmental education. Activities include library…

Howe, Robert W.; Disinger, John F.

229

Method and apparatus for environmental setting and information for environmental setting  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A space is set substantially in a tropical rain forest type environment to activate a human's essential brain region and realize an environment suitable for the human's brain by arranging a device for setting the tropical rain forest type environment based on characteristics of activating human's essential brain region responsive to tropical rain forest type environment information, in a space such as an urban space, a housing space or other living space. The tropical rain forest type environmental information has higher density and higher complexity than those of urban space type environmental information, and includes at least one of auditory information, visual information, and super perceptual information of aerial vibration. The tropical rain forest type environmental information is comfortable for the human with no excessive stress, and is environmental information for effecting prevention and treatment of diseases due to stress by realizing the environment comfortable for the human's brain.

2013-05-07

230

Geospatial Information Systems Analysis of Regional Environmental Change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia  

PubMed Central

This paper uses remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS); and descriptive statistics in the assessment of environmental change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia. Results of the study show that Savannah River basin side of Georgia has been experiencing environmental change due to several decades of relentless pressure induced by anthropocentric activities and host of other socio-economic factors. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analysis of the area also shows a decline in vegetation cover. The pace of ecological change showed some variations across time and space. Generally, the results point to a decline in water bodies, vegetation, and increase in population, loss of harvested cropland, farms and increasing threats to the environmental systems of the region. PMID:18441406

Twumasi, Yaw A.; Merem, Edmund C.

2008-01-01

231

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

GIS has become a common tool in environmental management and enforcement. Only in the last few years, however, has the technology come into use directly by litigators working on environmental cases. This presentation explores how GIS is being used in law firms to manage and sup...

232

Mapping the information landscape: Discerning peaks and valleys for ecological monitoring  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We investigate previously unreported phenomena that have a potentially significant impact on the design of surveillance monitoring programs for ecological systems. Ecological monitoring practitioners have long recognized that different species are differentially informative of a system?s dynamics, as codified in the well-known concepts of indicator or keystone species. Using a novel combination of analysis techniques from nonlinear dynamics, we describe marked variation among spatial sites in information content with respect to system dynamics in the entire region. We first observed these phenomena in a spatially extended predator?prey model, but we observed strikingly similar features in verified water-level data from a NOAA/NOS Great Lakes monitoring program. We suggest that these features may be widespread and the design of surveillance monitoring programs should reflect knowledge of their existence.

Moniz, L.J.; Nichols, J.D.; Nichols, J.M.

2007-01-01

233

40 CFR 2.310 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Comprehensive Environmental...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Comprehensive Environmental...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Confidentiality of Business Information § 2.310 Special rules governing...

2011-07-01

234

Nitrogen isotopic ecology in southern Africa: Implications for environmental and dietary tracing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to establish baseline nitrogen isotope data for certain African ecosystems, we have measured the 15N /14N of some 300 marine and terrestrial organisms. The majority of these specimens come from the southwestern Cape, and were chosen to represent a cross-section of the foods important in prehistoric diets in the region. ? 15N analyses of 78 Holocene human skeletons from the same area are interpreted in the light of these results. Additional terrestrial animal samples were collected from the northern and eastern Cape and from Botswana and Malawi. They represent a wide range of climatic and environmental zones, from semi-desert to sub-tropical swamps. The patterning in the values for marine organisms is consistent with previously published data; that for terrestrial organisms, however, is more complex than recent studies have indicated. Our data confirm the proposal that animal ? 15N values vary with rainfall: high ? 15N values for herbivores occur in areas receiving less than 400 mm of rain per annum. We critically examine a recently proposed model explaining this phenomenon, and suggest some additional mechanisms which should be considered. In such arid areas, nitrogen isotope ratios cannot be used as marine/terrestrial indicators, but may provide some indication of the trophic level of the food consumed. Dietary studies on human populations can only be undertaken with a thorough appreciation of the isotopic ecology of the relevant foodweb.

Sealy, Judith C.; van der Merwe, Nikolaas J.; Thorp, Julia A. Lee; Lanham, John L.

1987-10-01

235

Radiological and Environmental Research Division: ecology. Annual report, January-December 1982  

SciTech Connect

This is the annual report of the Radiological and Environmental Division of the Argonne National Laboratory for 1982. Studies of the effects of ozone on crop growth and yield have been carried out by the Terrestrial Ecology Group for winter wheat and for sorghum. The Microcosms for Acid Rain Studies (MARS) facility was completed in the early summer. Controlled investigations of plant and soil responses in acid rain were initiated with crop plants grown in two different midwestern soil types. The Transuranics Group has found that the solubility and adsorptive behavior of plutonium previously observed at fallout concentrations in natural waters (approx. 10/sup -16/ to 10/sup -18/ M) is applicable at plutonium concentrations as high as 10/sup -8/ M. The Lake Michigan eutrophication model has been adapted to operation in a Monte Carlo mode. Simulations based on yearly phosphorus loadings and winter conditions were selected at random from prescribed probability distributions and used to estimate some of the uncertainties associated with model forecasts of Lake Michigan water quality.

Not Available

1983-09-01

236

Nitrogen isotopic ecology in southern Africa: Implications for environmental and dietary tracing  

SciTech Connect

In order to establish baseline nitrogen isotope data for certain African ecosystems, they have measured the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N of some 300 marine and terrestrial organisms. The majority of these specimens come from the southwestern Cape, and were chosen to represent a cross-section of the foods important in prehistoric diets in the region. {delta}{sup 15}N analyses of 78 Holocene human skeletons from the same area are interpreted in the light of these results. Additional terrestrial animal samples were collected from the northern and eastern Cape and from Botswana and Malawi. They represent a wide range of climatic and environmental zones, from semi-desert to sub-tropical swamps. The patterning in the values for marine organisms is consistent with previously published data; that for terrestrial organisms, however, is more complex than recent studies have indicated. Their data confirm the proposal that animal {delta}{sup 15}N values vary with rainfall: high {delta}{sup 15}N values for herbivores occur in areas receiving less than 400 mm of rain per annum. They critically examine a recently proposed model explaining this phenomenon, and suggest some additional mechanisms which should be considered. In such arid areas, nitrogen isotope ratios cannot be used as marine/terrestrial indicators, but may provide some indication of the trophic level of the food consumed. Dietary studies on human populations can only be undertaken with a thorough appreciation of the isotopic ecology of the relevant foodweb.

Sealy, J.C.; Van Der Merwe, N.J.; Thorp, J.A.L.; Lanham, J.L. (Univ. of Cape Town (South Africa))

1987-10-01

237

Ecological information and water mass properties in the Mediterranean recorded by stable isotope ratios in Pinna nobilis shells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sclerochronologic and stable isotope records in Pinna nobilis shells potentially record ecological and oceanographic information. P. nobilis is a subtidal bivalve adapted to live in a variety of environments in the Mediterranean. We hypothesized that stable isotope ratios (?18O and ?13C) and growth increment patterns from individuals living in different environments serve as ecological indicators. Using a new methodology for calcite sampling, we (1) identified annual growth features (nacre tongues) and (2) compared monthly resolved variations in ?18O and ?13C values and calcification temperatures recorded in animals located above and below the thermocline (16 and 30 m depth). The specimens from 16 m showed more negative ?18O values than the specimen from 30 m, likely reflecting differences in salinity. The specimens from 30 m recorded ?13C values less positive than the specimens from 16 m, which we interpreted as an ontogenetic effect observed in previous studies. Estimated calcification temperatures were offset relative to measured water temperature by ˜6.1°C (˜1.4‰). This finding is evident in earlier proxy studies of P. nobilis, although it was not discussed in those studies. Using the seasonal pattern of ?18O and ?13C values, we demonstrated that nacre tongues are deposited annually and that their formation is independent of temperature. Food availability rather than temperature may control nacre tongue formation. An alternative explanation for nacre tongue formation is gonad maturation during spring. Our findings support the idea that sclerochronology in P. nobilis can be used to reconstruct environmental, ecological, and climate archives of the Mediterranean.

GarcíA-March, Jose Rafael; Surge, Donna; Lees, Jonathan M.; Kersting, Diego K.

2011-06-01

238

Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.

Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

2002-01-01

239

Introduction to Watershed Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Another informative Web site from the Environmental Protection Agency is the Online Training in Watershed Management page. Here, citizens have access to a wealth of information and tools to help them understand and protect their water resources. This module introduces watershed ecology by discussing five topics: "Physical Template," "Biological Setting," "Natural Systems Concept," "Watershed Structure," and "Watershed Function." Images and definitions are embedded throughout the module, and a self-test is presented at the end.

Elliott, Scott Robert, 1972-; Naiman, Robert J.; Norton, Douglas; O'Keefe, Thomas C.

2007-08-15

240

Estimating Environmental Drivers for Broad-Scale Ecological Models: Comparing Performance of Modeled Stream Flow and Meteorological Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fisheries ecologists are charged with assessing the impact of climate and land use changes on wild fish populations. Their ecological population models require estimates of environmental drivers, stream flow and stream temperature, across broad spatial scales. Observation data is frequently not available at that scale, especially for smaller streams and headwaters that are the habitat for target species. As estimates at a coarse temporal resolution are sufficient for many ecological population models, it is possible to develop regionalized models across the broad spatial scale required with the limited observations available. It may also be possible to use measures of air temperature and precipitation, for which meteorological observations are more readily available, as proxy metrics for stream flow and stream temperature. Since additional sources of model uncertainty are avoided by using the proxy measures, it is important to evaluate whether modeled stream flow provides enough improvement to the ecological models to justify this introduction of uncertainty. We employ wild brook trout occupancy models to evaluate these different environmental inputs. We present a regionalized model for estimating stream flow at the seasonal time-step, and a model of summary statistics. Performance of fish occupancy models using each of these estimates is then compared to the performance of a fish occupancy model using meteorological measures as the environmental driver.

Rosner, A.; Letcher, B. H.; Kanno, Y.

2013-12-01

241

Methods and general findings of a comparative ecological risk assessment: The State of Texas Environmental Priorities Project  

SciTech Connect

The State of Texas Environmental Priorities Project (STEPP) is a comparative risk project designed to analyze and rank anthropogenic environmental issues in Texas with respect to their impacts on human health, natural ecological systems, and socioeconomic welfare. The Ecological Workgroup, which was composed of members from several government agencies and academia, ranked nine environmental issues according to their relative risks to ecological systems. A report on each issue was generated. The reports consisted of risk assessments, though many were qualitative in nature. Using these reports the Workgroup ranked the risks of the issues relative to each other, e.g., low risk does not imply unimportance. The criteria used in ranking the issues, consisted of severity, population exposed, magnitude of effect, and uncertainty. A preliminary ranking of the issues, giving an equal weight to all four criteria, identified habitat alteration, loss of biodiversity, and air quality as the three issues with the greatest potential risks. A ranking of the criteria identified unequal importance values for the four criteria. A final issue ranking was performed using the two most important criteria (population exposed and magnitude of effect). The results of this ranking were (in order of greatest to least potential risks): habitat alteration, loss of biodiversity, global climate change, surface water quality, air quality, waste management, soil erosion, pesticide contamination, and water availability.

Kiesling, R.L.; Bond, J.A.; McCoy, J.T.; Wilder, J. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States); Bahktar, A. [Texas Dept. of Agriculture, Austin, TX (United States); Tinterra, J. [Railroad Commission of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Brock, D. [Texas Water Development Board, Austin, TX (United States)

1995-12-31

242

A Daphnia magna feeding bioassay as a cost effective and ecological relevant sublethal toxicity test for Environmental Risk Assessment of toxic effluents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental Risk Assessment of chemical products and effluents within EC countries require the use of cost effective standardized toxicity tests that in most cases are restricted to acute responses to high doses. Thus, subtle ecological effects are underestimated. Here we propose a short-term one day Daphnia magna feeding inhibition test as a cost effective and ecological relevant sublethal bioassay. The

C. Barata; P. Alañon; S. Gutierrez-Alonso; M. C. Riva; C. Fernández; J. V. Tarazona

2008-01-01

243

Co-benefits & Co-damages of environmental policies: using the principles of Industrial Ecology in Environmental Policy making. With the case of PVC  

E-print Network

Since environmental policy measures may have many impacts that are linked to each other in both physical and socio-economic respect, the need for tools for assess this variety of impacts is growing. In this paper the main aim is to describe the need for the development of a methodology to identify, categorize and quantify the environmental co-benefits and co-damage of environmental policies. The focus on such side effects is in this paper translated as using the systems perspective, a core concept in the field of Industrial Ecology. Using the Industrial Ecology framework will introduce or strengthen the focus on material flows in society as an addition to current Integrated Assessment tools like RAINS and IMAGE. To provide a practical framework in which the methodology will be developed a case is chosen from the realm of the chlorine industry: policy measures related to PVC. The PVC case is used to show the need for a systems perspective when evaluating the effects of environmental policy measures. If PVC is banned from certain applications alternative materials will be used with environmental effects of their own. Furthermore, the production of PVC is linked to other parts of the chlorine industry via the use of HCl in the oxychlorination process. A strong reduction in the production of PVC would have to result in either large solid waste flows or changes in production processes. Furthermore, PVC is linked to chemical waste treatment and, via the production of chlorine, to the production and use of caustic.

René Kleijn; Ester Van Der Voet

244

From Romanticism to Deep Ecology: The Continuing Evolution in American Environmental Thought.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the contributions to deep ecology of Henry Thoreau, who advocated acting upon strongly held convictions; John Muir, who adopted a biocentric view of nature; and Aldo Leopold, who formulated an egalitarian ecosystem ethic. While deep ecology is moving toward a new vision of humankind's relation to nature, it has yet to coalesce into a…

Ackerson, David

2000-01-01

245

Applying Ecological Principles On the Job: Engaging Students in Authentic Environmental Projects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a course that requires students to work in groups to address local ecological problems of interest to a client external to the university. Students learn the skills needed to apply their knowledge and gain satisfaction by assisting others. The ecological projects provide an important source of feedback to identify the strengths of the…

Abrahams, Mark V.; Gillis, Darren M.; Taylor, K. Lynn

2000-01-01

246

Adult Education in Local Environmental Initiatives for Ecological and Cultural Sustainability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation examines the phenomenon of how communities can effect change in policy and practice to support greater ecological and cultural sustainability. The general purpose of this research is to examine selected local initiatives for ecological and cultural sustainability to better understand the role of adult education in those efforts.…

Woodhouse, Janice Lynn

2011-01-01

247

INTEGRATING SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS TO IMPROVE WILDFIRE MANAGEMENT IN THE U.S.: TESTING A NEW ORGANIZING APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Conducting an integrated analysis to evaluate the societal and ecological consequences of environmental management actions requires decisions about data collection, theory development, modeling and valuation. Approaching these decisions in coordinated fashion necessitates a syste...

248

15 CFR 950.2 - Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS). 950.2 Section...COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.2 Environmental...

2013-01-01

249

15 CFR 950.2 - Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS). 950.2 Section...COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.2 Environmental...

2012-01-01

250

15 CFR 950.2 - Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS).  

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS). 950.2 Section...COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.2 Environmental...

2014-01-01

251

15 CFR 950.2 - Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS). 950.2 Section...COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.2 Environmental...

2010-01-01

252

15 CFR 950.2 - Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS). 950.2 Section...COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.2 Environmental...

2011-01-01

253

30 CFR 783.12 - General environmental resources information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General environmental resources information. 783.12 Section 783.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

2011-07-01

254

30 CFR 779.12 - General environmental resources information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General environmental resources information. 779.12 Section 779.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

2010-07-01

255

30 CFR 779.12 - General environmental resources information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General environmental resources information. 779.12 Section 779.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

2011-07-01

256

30 CFR 783.12 - General environmental resources information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General environmental resources information. 783.12 Section 783.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

2010-07-01

257

Ecological and resource management information transfer for Laguna de Terminos, Mexico: A computerized interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a bilingual, interactive, and user?friendly information system to expedite the organization and transfer findings about Laguna de Terminos, a coastal lagoon in the southern Gulf of Mexico. This system was designed to ease the transfer of research data and results to environmental managers and is built in a manner that simplifies the addition of information modules as

Enrique Reyes; John W. Day Jr; Mary L. White

1993-01-01

258

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM SOLVING WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS: A NATIONAL CONFERENCE  

EPA Science Inventory

This conference will provide a forum for the exchange of information on the use of GIS as a tool in environmental problem solving. Solving environmental problems has become more complex with consideration of cross-media pollutant transport and watershed-based decision-making. T...

259

The NASA John C. Stennis Environmental Geographic Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: 1. Introduction: Background information. Initial applications of the SSC EGIS. Ongoing projects. 2.Scope of SSC EGIS. 3. Data layers. 4. Onsite operations. 5. Landcover classifications. 6. Current activities. 7. GIS/Key. 8. Infrastructure base map - development. 9. Infrastructure base map - application. 10. Incorrected layer. 11. Corrected layer. 12. Emergency environmental response tool. 13. Future directions. 14. Bridging the gaps. 15. Environmental geographical information system.

Cohan, Tyrus

2002-01-01

260

Environmental audit: III. Improving the management of environmental information for toxic substances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental programs have been commonly driven by a preoccupation with the collection of data in the mistaken belief that data is synonymous with information. The distinction between data (that is, the quantified and qualitative attributes of a particular environment) and information (specifically, data processed so as to focus upon a particular environmental problem) will become far more important to environmental managers. They will increasingly manage their information through use of what has become known as information resource management (IRM) and the attendant use of critical success factors methodology. Environmental managers will thereby move away from concerns about data and specific EDP hardware and applications toward managing information as a valuable agency resource. In applying IRM, they will find it helpful to include a number of planning elements and to resolve early a number of issues critical to its successful use.

Sokolik, Stanley L.; Schaeffer, David J.

1986-05-01

261

An ERP study on whether semantic integration exists in processing ecologically unrelated audio-visual information.  

PubMed

In the present study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine whether semantic integration occurs for ecologically unrelated audio-visual information. Videos with synchronous audio-visual information were used as stimuli, where the auditory stimuli were sine wave sounds with different sound levels, and the visual stimuli were simple geometric figures with different areas. In the experiment, participants were shown an initial display containing a single shape (drawn from a set of 6 shapes) with a fixed size (14cm(2)) simultaneously with a 3500Hz tone of a fixed intensity (80dB). Following a short delay, another shape/tone pair was presented and the relationship between the size of the shape and the intensity of the tone varied across trials: in the V+A- condition, a large shape was paired with a soft tone; in the V+A+ condition, a large shape was paired with a loud tone, and so forth. The ERPs results revealed that N400 effect was elicited under the VA- condition (V+A- and V-A+) as compared to the VA+ condition (V+A+ and V-A-). It was shown that semantic integration would occur when simultaneous, ecologically unrelated auditory and visual stimuli enter the human brain. We considered that this semantic integration was based on semantic constraint of audio-visual information, which might come from the long-term learned association stored in the human brain and short-term experience of incoming information. PMID:22005579

Liu, Baolin; Meng, Xianyao; Wang, Zhongning; Wu, Guangning

2011-11-14

262

An Ecological View of Internet Health Information Seeking Behavior Predictors: Findings from the CHAIN Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of the study was to further elucidate proximal and distal demographic and social predictors of Internet Health Information Seeking Behavior (IHISB) among a cohort of HIV+ individuals through an ecological framework. Methods: The Community Health Advisory & Information Network (CHAIN) project is an ongoing prospective study of a representative sample of persons living with HIV/AIDS in New York City and the Tri-County region. The study sample was drawn from a two-stage randomized technique with the clients of 43 medical and social service organizations with 693 HIV+ participants. Bivariate correlations were computed between IHISB and independent demographic variables in ecological blocks. Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression was used to test association between blocks of variables and IHISB. Results: Among the surveyed respondents (n=645) 50.3% indicated that they used the Internet. Being above the poverty line, having less than a high school education, and having fewer neighbors were statistically significant predictors of IHISB related to HIV. Conclusions: The benefits of accessing the Internet may influence health behavior and may be considered a target for interventions that aim to increase access to health related information online. Coupled with increased access, is the need for increased patient education interventions, and creative managed care approaches to ensure that information gleaned from online sources is interpretable and accurate in order to benefit the lives of those living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:24222812

Calvert, Joshua K; Aidala, Angela A; West, Josh H

2013-01-01

263

15 CFR 950.9 - Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. 950.9 Section...Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. The Environmental...industry. A computerized, information retrieval service provides a...

2011-01-01

264

15 CFR 950.9 - Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. 950.9 Section...Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. The Environmental...industry. A computerized, information retrieval service provides a...

2013-01-01

265

15 CFR 950.9 - Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. 950.9 Section...Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. The Environmental...industry. A computerized, information retrieval service provides a...

2012-01-01

266

78 FR 76810 - Information Collection; Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta, GA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection; Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta...information collection, Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in...

2013-12-19

267

78 FR 49280 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Environmental Review Procedures for Entities...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection: Environmental Review Procedures for Entities Assuming HUD Environmental Review Responsibilities...For telephone and email communication, contact Elizabeth Zepeda, Environmental Planning Division,...

2013-08-13

268

Ecologically informed engineering reduces loss of intertidal biodiversity on artificial shorelines.  

PubMed

Worldwide responses to urbanization, expanding populations and climatic change mean biodiverse habitats are replaced with expensive, but necessary infrastructure. Coastal cities support vast expanses of buildings and roads along the coast or on "reclaimed" land, leading to "armouring" of shorelines with walls, revetments and offshore structures to reduce erosion and flooding. Currently infrastructure is designed to meet engineering and financial criteria, without considering its value as habitat, despite artificial shorelines causing loss of intertidal species and altering ecological natural processes that sustain natural biodiversity. Most research on ameliorating these impacts focus on soft-sediment habitats and larger flora (e.g., restoring marshes, encouraging plants to grow on walls). In response to needs for greater collaboration between ecologists and engineers to create infrastructure to better support biodiversity, we show how such collaborations lead to small-scale and inexpensive ecologically informed engineering which reduces loss of species of algae and animals from rocky shores replaced by walls. Adding experimental novel habitats to walls mimicking rock-pools (e.g., cavities, attaching flowerpots) increased numbers of species by 110% within months, in particular mobile animals most affected by replacing natural shores with walls. These advances provide new insights about melding engineering and ecological knowledge to sustain biodiversity in cities. PMID:21875080

Browne, Mark A; Chapman, M Gee

2011-10-01

269

Integrating Environmental and Information Systems Management: An Enterprise Architecture Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental responsibility is fast becoming an important aspect of strategic management as the reality of climate change settles in and relevant regulations are expected to tighten significantly in the near future. Many businesses react to this challenge by implementing environmental reporting and management systems. However, the environmental initiative is often not properly integrated in the overall business strategy and its information system (IS) and as a result the management does not have timely access to (appropriately aggregated) environmental information. This chapter argues for the benefit of integrating the environmental management (EM) project into the ongoing enterprise architecture (EA) initiative present in all successful companies. This is done by demonstrating how a reference architecture framework and a meta-methodology using EA artefacts can be used to co-design the EM system, the organisation and its IS in order to achieve a much needed synergy.

Noran, Ovidiu

270

Integration of environmental simulation models with satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies: case studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Environmental modelers are testing and evaluating a prototype land cover characteristics database for the conterminous United States developed by the EROS Data Center of the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Nebraska Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. This database was developed from multi temporal, 1-kilometer advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data for 1990 and various ancillary data sets such as elevation, ecological regions, and selected climatic normals. Several case studies using this database were analyzed to illustrate the integration of satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies with land-atmosphere interactions models at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The case studies are representative of contemporary environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management, and environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management and environmental risk assessment. The case studies feature land surface parameterizations for atmospheric mesoscale and global climate models; biogenic-hydrocarbons emissions models; distributed parameter watershed and other hydrological models; and various ecological models such as ecosystem, dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, ecotone variability, and equilibrium vegetation models. The case studies demonstrate the important of multi temporal AVHRR data to develop to develop and maintain a flexible, near-realtime land cover characteristics database. Moreover, such a flexible database is needed to derive various vegetation classification schemes, to aggregate data for nested models, to develop remote sensing algorithms, and to provide data on dynamic landscape characteristics. The case studies illustrate how such a database supports research on spatial heterogeneity, land use, sensitivity analysis, and scaling issues involving regional extrapolations and parameterizations of dynamic land processes within simulation models.

Steyaert, Louis T.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Reed, Bradley C.

1993-01-01

271

Research and Development for an Operational Information Ecology: The User-System Interface Agent Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The User System Interface Agent (USIA) is a special type of software agent which acts as the "middle man" between a human user and an information processing environment. USIA consists of a group of cooperating agents which are responsible for assisting users in obtaining information processing services intuitively and efficiently. Some of the main features of USIA include: (1) multiple interaction modes and (2) user-specific and stereotype modeling and adaptation. This prototype system provides us with a development platform towards the realization of an operational information ecology. In the first phase of this project we focus on the design and implementation of prototype system of the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). The second face of USIA allows user interaction via a restricted query language as well as through a taxonomy of windows. In third phase the USIA system architecture was revised.

Srivastava, Sadanand; deLamadrid, James

1998-01-01

272

Factors influencing acquisition of ecological and exposure information about hazards and risks from contaminated sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable research indicates that a wide range of socio-economic factors influence attitudes and perceptions about environmental\\u000a hazards and risks, and that social trust in those who manage a hazard is strongly correlated to judgements about risks and\\u000a benefits. We suggest that there are three steps that lead to environmental risk perceptions: acquisition of information, interpretation\\u000a and synthesis of different pieces

Joanna Burger; Michael Greenberg; Michael Gochfeld; Sheila Shukla; Karen Lowrie; Roger Keren

2008-01-01

273

Environmental Education in K-12 Curricula. ERIC/SMEAC Environmental Information Bulletin No. 2, 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During 1987 the ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education (ERIC/SMEAC) conducted a survey of the state education agencies, asking respondents to summarize their perceptions as to how schools include environmental topics in their curricula by responding to a questionnaire. Also requested was information concerning…

Disinger, John F.

274

Post-auditing of environmental impact statements using data held in public registers of environmental information  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is feasible to monitor some environmental impact statement (EIS) predictions using existing data held in public registers of environmental information, but only a limited number. An analysis of six case studies showed that, of 166 EIS predictions, 138 were auditable, monitoring data were available for 16 of these, and 12 of the 16 predictions were correct. One reason for

Ashley Bird; Riki Therivel

1996-01-01

275

40 CFR 2.310 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Comprehensive Environmental...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...information obtained under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability...amended. 2.310 Section 2.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION...

2012-07-01

276

40 CFR 2.310 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Comprehensive Environmental...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...information obtained under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability...amended. 2.310 Section 2.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION...

2013-07-01

277

PROFILE OF THE GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION, UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

EPA Science Inventory

A history of the man-made island on which the Gulf Ecology Division is located,from its origin in 1876 to the present day (2007). Contains a synopsis of current research and future plans of the division....

278

Toxicology information resources at the Environmental Protection Agency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Article presents toxicology information resources available to the public from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This includes digital information directly usable or downloadable from their web site, or referrals as to where the resource can be obtained. Contents include advice on effective search strategies, a ‘guided tour’ of the web site and its main categories, and concludes with

Linda Miller Poore; Geffry King; Karen Stefanik

2001-01-01

279

Managerial incentives for compliance with environmental information disclosure programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of factors have the potential to alter the effectiveness of environmental information disclosure programs in encouraging firms to adopt desirable behaviors. These factors include features related to program design such as the timing of information release, firm characteristics such as size, and the existence of complementary policies such as liability rules. These factors may affect the quantity of

Mary F. Evans; Scott M. Gilpatric; Michael McKee; Christian A. Vossler

280

Seeking reassuring or threatening information about environmental cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined information seeking as a potentially adaptive response to a new environmental health threat. College students in a state with a particularly high cancer rate were offered an opportunity to obtain either a reassuring or a threatening informational message concerning the cancer rate. Interviews were later conducted with students who had and had not requested a message (N=502).

Neil D. Weinstein

1979-01-01

281

Accommodating the Informal Sector: A Strategy for Urban Environmental Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Livelihoods of the urban poor, particularly the informal economic activities operating on streets and other public places, are usually seen as undesirable for environmental management by urban authorities which are preoccupied with keeping their cities clean. Hence, informal sector activities are often seen as ««eye-sores»» and are evicted from city centers in the name of ««public cleanliness and orderliness»». However,

L. A. S. R. Perera; A. T. M. N. Amin

1996-01-01

282

Strategic plan for Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Information Management  

SciTech Connect

This strategic plan addresses information management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Hanford Site. This Program leads the cleanup of the Hanford Site`s soil, groundwater, buried waste, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. The vision that drives this strategic plan is to ensure that quality information is available to the people who need it, when they need it, at a convenient location, in a usable form, and at an acceptable cost. Although investments are being made in managing the vast amounts of information, which include data, records and documents associated with the Hanford Site`s production history and new cleanup mission, it is widely recognized that efforts to date have not accomplished the vision. Effective information management involves more than the compilation of massive amounts of electronic and non-electronic information. It also involves integrating information management into business processes that support user`s needs and decisionmaking. Only then can information management complement and enable environmental restoration priorities and practices, help identify environmental restoration requirements, and enable communication within the Environmental Restoration Program and between the Program and its stakeholders. Successfully accomplishing the Hanford Site mission requires an integrated approach to information management that crosses organizational boundaries, streamlines existing systems, and builds new systems that support the needs of the future. This plan outlines that approach.

Cowley, P.J.; Beck, J.E.; Gephart, R.E. [and others

1994-06-01

283

The Geographic Information System component of the Hanford Environmental Information System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) has been developed to manage the data from the characterization and environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site. HEISGIS is the Geographic Information Systems component of HEIS. This report analyzes the HEISGIS functional requirements as articulated by the members of a GIS subcommittee established by the HEIS Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) in a series of

S. Tzemos; E. S. Overton

1992-01-01

284

The Geographic Information System component of the Hanford Environmental Information System. Requirements analysis for HEISGIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) has been developed to manage the data from the characterization and environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site. HEISGIS is the Geographic Information Systems component of HEIS. This report analyzes the HEISGIS functional requirements as articulated by the members of a GIS subcommittee established by the HEIS Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) in a series of

S. Tzemos; E. S. Overton

1992-01-01

285

Ecological momentary assessment of obesogenic eating behavior: combining person-specific and environmental predictors.  

PubMed

Obesity has been promoted by a food environment that encourages excessive caloric intake. An understanding of how the food environment contributes to obesogenic eating behavior in different types of individuals may facilitate healthy weight control efforts. In this study, Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) via palmtop computers was used to collect real-time information about participants' environment and eating patterns to predict overeating (i.e., greater than usual intake during routine meals/snacks, and eating outside of a participant's normal routine) that could lead to weight gain. Thirty-nine women (BMI = 21.6 ± 1.8; age = 20.1 ± 2.0 years; 61% white) of normal weight (BMI 18.5-25) completed the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire and the Power of Food Scale (PFS), and carried a palmtop computer for 7-10 days, which prompted them to answer questions about eating events, including a count of the types of good tasting high-calorie foods that were available. None of the self-report measures predicted overeating, but BMI interacted with the number of palatable foods available to predict overeating (P = 0.035). Compared to leaner individuals who reported a relatively low frequency of overeating regardless of the availability of palatable food, the probability of overeating among heavier individuals was very low in the absence of palatable food, but quickly increased in proportion to the number of palatable foods available. Our findings suggest that the eating behavior of those with higher relative weights is susceptible to the presence of palatable foods in the environment. Individuals practicing weight control may benefit from limiting their exposure to good tasting high-calorie food in their immediate environment. PMID:21273995

Thomas, J Graham; Doshi, Sapna; Crosby, Ross D; Lowe, Michael R

2011-08-01

286

Modelling the Ecological Vulnerability to Forest Fires in Mediterranean Ecosystems Using Geographic Information Technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Forest fires represent a major driver of change at the ecosystem and landscape levels in the Mediterranean region. Environmental features and vegetation are key factors to estimate the ecological vulnerability to fire; defined as the degree to which an ecosystem is susceptible to, and unable to cope with, adverse effects of fire (provided a fire occurs). Given the predicted climatic changes for the region, it is urgent to validate spatially explicit tools for assessing this vulnerability in order to support the design of new fire prevention and restoration strategies. This work presents an innovative GIS-based modelling approach to evaluate the ecological vulnerability to fire of an ecosystem, considering its main components (soil and vegetation) and different time scales. The evaluation was structured in three stages: short-term (focussed on soil degradation risk), medium-term (focussed on changes in vegetation), and coupling of the short- and medium-term vulnerabilities. The model was implemented in two regions: Aragón (inland North-eastern Spain) and Valencia (eastern Spain). Maps of the ecological vulnerability to fire were produced at a regional scale. We partially validated the model in a study site combining two complementary approaches that focused on testing the adequacy of model's predictions in three ecosystems, all very common in fire-prone landscapes of eastern Spain: two shrublands and a pine forest. Both approaches were based on the comparison of model's predictions with values of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), which is considered a good proxy for green biomass. Both methods showed that the model's performance is satisfactory when applied to the three selected vegetation types.

Duguy, Beatriz; Alloza, José Antonio; Baeza, M. Jaime; De la Riva, Juan; Echeverría, Maite; Ibarra, Paloma; Llovet, Juan; Cabello, Fernando Pérez; Rovira, Pere; Vallejo, Ramon V.

2012-12-01

287

Ecological approaches to informing public health policy and risk assessments on emerging vector-borne zoonoses  

PubMed Central

Pathogens associated with vector-borne zoonoses occur in enzootic cycles within nature. They are driven by a combination of vertebrate host and invertebrate vector population dynamics, which in turn respond to changes in environmental stimuli. Human involvement in these cycles, and hence the occurrence of human disease, is often to act as incidental host. From a public health perspective our ability to better predict human outbreaks of these diseases and prepare intervention and mitigation strategies relies on understanding the natural cycle of pathogen transmission. This requires consideration of, for example, invertebrate and vertebrate ecology and biology, climatology, land use and habitat change. Collectively, these can be referred to as medical entomology and medical ecology. This article reviews the importance for inclusion of such disciplines when assessing the public health risk from vector-borne zoonoses and summarizes the possible future challenges and driving forces for changes in vector status and vector-borne zoonoses emergence, with a particular focus on a UK and European context. PMID:22460391

Medlock, JM; Jameson, LJ

2010-01-01

288

The Nexus between ecological risk assessment and natural resource damage assessment under CERCLA: introduction to a Society of Environmental Toxicology and ChemistryTechnical Workshop.  

PubMed

A SETAC Technical Workshop titled "The Nexus Between Ecological Risk Assessment and Natural Resource Damage Assessment Under CERCLA: Understanding and Improving the Common Scientific Underpinnings," was held 18-22 August 2008 in Gregson, Montana, USA, to examine the linkage, nexus, and overlap between ecological risk assessment (ERA) and natural resource damage assessment (NRDA) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Experts from a broad range of relevant scientific, legal, and policy disciplines convened to 1) ascertain the potential for improved scientific harmonization of the processes of ERA and NRDA; 2) identify where statutory, regulatory, or scientific constraints might exist that would constrain or preclude the harmonization of the 2 processes; 3) determine approaches that might overcome these constraints; and 4) recommend research or potential changes in regulatory policies that might serve to improve both processes. This is the introduction to a series of 3 papers that describe the findings and conclusions of this workshop. Although unanimity was not achieved on all technical, legal, or policy questions posed to the participants, some consensus areas did arise. First, there appear to be few if any legal constraints to using the environmental data collected for ERA or NRDA for both processes. Second, although it is important to recognize and preserve the distinctions between ERA and NRDA, opportunities for data sharing exist, particularly for the characterization of environmental exposures and derivation of ecotoxicological information. Thus, effective coordination is not precluded by the underlying science. Where a cooperative, interactive process is involved among the response agencies, the natural resource trustees, and the responsible party(s), technical, legal or regulatory constraints can be minimized. Finally, one approach that might enhance the potential applicability of data collected for the ERA is to consider ecosystem services in the development of assessment endpoints. These points are explained in greater detail in the series of papers published herein. PMID:19545185

Stahl, Ralph G; Gouguet, Ron; Charters, David; Clements, Will; Gala, Will; Haddad, Robert; Helm, Roger; Landis, Wayne; Maki, Al; Munns, Wayne R; Young, Dale

2009-10-01

289

Molecular ecology meets remote sensing: environmental drivers to population structure of humpback dolphins in the Western Indian Ocean  

PubMed Central

Genetic analyses of population structure can be placed in explicit environmental contexts if appropriate environmental data are available. Here, we use high-coverage and high-resolution oceanographic and genetic sequence data to assess population structure patterns and their potential environmental influences for humpback dolphins in the Western Indian Ocean. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA data from 94 dolphins from the coasts of South Africa, Mozambique, Tanzania and Oman, employing frequency-based and maximum-likelihood algorithms to assess population structure and migration patterns. The genetic data were combined with 13 years of remote sensing oceanographic data of variables known to influence cetacean dispersal and population structure. Our analyses show strong and highly significant genetic structure between all putative populations, except for those in South Africa and Mozambique. Interestingly, the oceanographic data display marked environmental heterogeneity between all sampling areas and a degree of overlap between South Africa and Mozambique. Our combined analyses therefore suggest the occurrence of genetically isolated populations of humpback dolphins in areas that are environmentally distinct. This study highlights the utility of molecular tools in combination with high-resolution and high-coverage environmental data to address questions not only pertaining to genetic population structure, but also to relevant ecological processes in marine species. PMID:21427750

Mendez, M; Subramaniam, A; Collins, T; Minton, G; Baldwin, R; Berggren, P; Sarnblad, A; Amir, O A; Peddemors, V M; Karczmarski, L; Guissamulo, A; Rosenbaum, H C

2011-01-01

290

Northwestern Florida ecological characterization: An ecological atlas: Map narratives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study provides an atlas of ecological resources along the Big Bend and Panhandle coastline of Florida. The study area comprises 18 coastal counties, an area of 30,460 square kilometers (11,764 square miles). This atlas is designed to provide information and assist government and industry decisionmakers in coastal resource and environmental planning. In particular, results of this study will be

T. F. Palik; J. T. Kunneke

1984-01-01

291

Research Program in Environmental Planning and Geographic Information Systems (REGIS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of California at Berkeley provides this site on Environmental Planning and Geographic Information Systems (REGIS) research. Based at the University's Center for Environmental Design Research, REGIS aims "to develop GIS tools and apply them in environmental planning, management, research, and teaching." Four sections form the heart of the homepage: GRASSLinks (an interactive Web GIS program that enables real-time display and analysis of data), GIS Analysis and Modeling (includes photos and GIS coverages of San Francisco Bay/ Delta region), Research Projects and Collaborative Partnerships (lists collaborators), and GIS Data and Information Sources at REGIS (includes publications, instructional resources, and GRASS-related software). For academics and professionals interested in GIS and Environmental Planning, this is a solid and useful resource.

292

Ecology of Weddell seals during winter: Influence of environmental parameters on their foraging behaviour  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studying the foraging strategies of top predators can provide information on both how animals interact with their environment and the distribution of their prey. We studied the winter foraging behaviour of Weddell seals in Adélie Land, East Antarctica, and the influence of abiotic parameters (bathymetry, hydrology, sea ice, light intensity) on their foraging behaviour. A total of six seals were fitted with Conductivity Temperature Depth Satellite Relayed Data Loggers (CTD-SRDL) at Dumont D'Urville (˜67°S, 140°E) during the austral winters in 2007 and 2008. The tags transmitted positions and dive information over 169±31 day, providing a total of 20,400 dive profiles and 2350 CTD profiles. Significant environmental influences on seal diving behaviour and habitat use were detected. Seals dived deeper, longer and increased their foraging effort during the day than at night with intermediate values for twilight. During the winter season the maximum dive depth decreased in association with an increase in dive duration, but foraging effort was unchanged. Seals spent more time at the bottom of their dives in shallow waters associated with relatively smooth bathymetry and dominated by Antarctic Surface Water. Considering the whole winter, Weddell seals tended to favour enriched, warmer and less dense water masses following their seasonal appearance on the shelf (Antarctic Surface Water and Modified Circumpolar Deep Water). Our results are consistent with seals feeding primarily on Pleuragramma antarcticum during winter, tracking their vertical diel migrations and foraging in areas associated with bathymetric and hydrographic features likely to concentrate prey patches.

Heerah, Karine; Andrews-Goff, Virginia; Williams, Guy; Sultan, Emanuelle; Hindell, Mark; Patterson, Toby; Charrassin, Jean-Benoît

2013-04-01

293

Knowledge and Values in Science Textbooks Concerning Complexity in Ecological Systems and Environmental Problems: A Cross-cultural Study on Secondary School Manuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was carried out within the European research project "Biology, Health and Environmental Education for Better Citizenship" that joined 18 European and North-African countries. We report here the methodology and some of the conclusions drawn from an analysis of science textbooks that considered the topics ecology and environmental

Boujemaa, Agorram; Silvia, Caravita; Adriana, Valente; Daniela, Luzi; Nicola, Margnelli

2009-01-01

294

Understanding subarctic wildlife in Eastern James Bay under changing climatic and socio-environmental conditions: bringing together Cree hunters' ecological knowledge and scientific observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian Subarctic is undergoing climatic and environmental changes which are leading to wide-ranging implications for wildlife, ecosystems and aboriginal communities. Through their long-term experience and observations, Cree hunters of the Eastern James Bay are aware of the local manifestations of changes to animal ecology. This article presents and analyses Cree observations of the effects of altering climatic and environmental

Thora Martina Herrmann; Marie-Jeanne S. Royer; Rick Cuciurean

2012-01-01

295

Geographic information system applied to measuring benthic environmental impact with chemical measures on mariculture at Penghu Islet in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Cobia, Rachycentron canadum, is currently grown by marine aquaculture in Taiwan, particularly on Penghu Islet. Although the effect of marine aquaculture on the environment has been the subject of many studies, an understanding of its environmental impact has yet to be attained, and the continuing expansion of cage farming has caused noticeable ecological declines. Nevertheless, useful tools to measure this environmental degradation are scant. The results of this study suggest that the combination of a geographic information system (GIS) with redox potential and sulfide measurements can be used to definitively assess the condition of the benthic environment near cobia aquaculture sites and to help develop environmental monitoring programs. These applications could easily be adopted to assess multiple marine environmental conditions. PMID:19144393

Shih, Yi-Che; Chou, Chiu L; Chiau, Wen-Yan

2009-03-01

296

15 CFR 950.9 - Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service.  

...2014-01-01 false Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. 950.9 Section...COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.9 Computerized...

2014-01-01

297

["'Vazanteiros' in motion": the process of "environmentalization" of their territorial fights in the context of ecological modernization policies].  

PubMed

This text presents the process of environmentalization of the social campaigns of Pau Preto, Pau de Légua and Quilombo da Lapinha in the north of the State of Minas Gerais that culminated in their being re-named as "'Vazanteiros' in Motion." The analysis of the territorial environmental conflict examines it from the perspective of Political Ecology and Critical Sociology. Documents from public environmental and judicial institutions were analyzed as well as meeting and research reports referring to the process of social mobilization and political formation of the "Vazanteiros in Motion." Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted from 2006 to 2012 and the different actors involved in the conflict were interviewed. The "extended-case method" or "situational analyses" were also used in order to demonstrate the ethnographic social events from a procedural and historical perspective. The results revealed the contradictions in sustainable development ideology, which made it possible to consolidate the agribusiness in that region through the creation of parks for irrigated fruit production projects as an environmental compensation strategy and the emergence of an important social movement of territorial claims in the environmental field. PMID:25272113

Anaya, Felisa Cançado

2014-10-01

298

U.S. EPA'S ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM - AN ECOLOGICAL STATUS AND TRENDS PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is initiating an Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) to monitor the status and trends of the Nation's near-coastal waters, forests, freshwater wetlands, surface waters, agroecosystems, deserts, and rangelands. his ...

299

Response to environmental flows in the Lower Tarim River, Xinjiang, China: an ecological interpretation of water-table dynamics.  

PubMed

Increased water-dependent development and utilization have led to significant environmental and hydrological degradation of the Tarim River in western China and its dependent ecosystems. Between the 1950s and 1970s, 350 km of the lower reaches were drained and between 1960 and 1980 the water-table fell from between -2 and -3 m to between -8 and -10 m. Subsequently, riparian ecosystems were seriously degraded. In 2000, the Chinese government launched a program to restore the lower reaches of the river. Four environmental flows of 1034 x 10(6) m(3) were released from 2000 to 2002. This paper interprets and discusses the ecological significance of changes following the releases and identifies the relationship between water-table dynamics and vegetation responses. Short-term objectives for river restoration are proposed with possible monitoring parameters suggested. PMID:17010503

Hou, P; Beeton, R J S; Carter, R W; Dong, X G; Li, X

2007-06-01

300

Energy Policy and Environmental Possibilities: Biofuels and Key Protagonists of Ecological Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While a growing body of research indicates the severe ecological and social costs of biofuel production worldwide, the U.S. government continues to promote the expansion of this fuel sector. Recent congressional testimony regarding the promotion of biofuels via the renewable fuel standard (RFS) offers a strategic research site for sociological…

Holleman, Hannah

2012-01-01

301

The maturity index: an ecological measure of environmental disturbance based on nematode species composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nematode assemblages constitute a potential instrument for assessing the quality of submersed, temporarily submersed, and terrestrial soils and for the development of an ecological typology and biomonitoring system. Interpretation of physical or pollution-induced disturbances has hitherto mainly been based on changes in diversity, dominance patterns or percentage of dorylaimids (Adenophorea). The maturity index, based on the nematode fauna, is proposed

Tom Bongers

1990-01-01

302

Ecology of the City: Urban Environmental Awareness Teacher's Guide, Intermediate Level.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide was developed for teachers to use in helping students understand components of the urban ecosystem. The guide is based on sequentially arranged performance objectives for each concept. Organization of the guide includes activities designed to link the urban units with the forest ecology unit which overlap in concepts and philosophy. A…

Courreges, Eugenie; Scudder, Elizabeth

303

Dept. of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology (E3B) 10th Floor Schermerhorn Ext.  

E-print Network

-grass prairies. Ecology and Evolution. 10. Jain, M, E. Lim, J. Arce, M. Uriarte (Submitted). Socio. Remote Sensing of Environment. 134: 210-223. 5. Balvanera, P., M. Uriarte, L. Almeida-Lenero, A. Altesor. Adame, R.S. DeFries, M. Uriarte (2011). Biophysical and Socioeconomic Factors Associated with Forest

DeFries, Ruth S.

304

Human Ecology: A Means of Environmental and Demographic Analysis in Educational Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to provide an ecological-demographic analysis of a suburban elementary school attendance area by examining the sociocultural elements within the spatially delimited boundaries. The area, though beyond the limits of the incorporated city, was part of the urban school district which transcended the political boundaries…

Olson, John Alden

305

Strategies for enhancing the learning of ecological research methods and statistics by tertiary environmental science students  

Microsoft Academic Search

To undertake rigorous research in biology and ecology, students must be able to pose testable hypotheses, design decisive studies, and analyse results using suitable statistics. Yet, few biology students excel in topics involving statistics and most attempt to evade optional courses in research methods. Over the last few years, we have developed a tertiary-level unit to create a positive, inquiry-based,

D L Panizzon; A J Boulton

2004-01-01

306

The Ecological and Environmental Characteristics and Conservation of the Wetlands in the Changjiang Estuary, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The natural wetlands in the Changjiang Estuary, China are important ecologically. The total area of the wetlands in the Changjiang Estuary amounts to 215000 ha. The wetlands consist of littoral and sandy estuarine island areas, and are rich in biological resources. There are 136 species of vascular plant, 150 species of bird, and 68 species of benthic macro-invertebrate in the

X. Z. Yuan; H. Liu; J. J. Lu

2002-01-01

307

Campus Ecology: A Guide to Assessing Environmental Quality and Creating Strategies for Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is designed to take the environmental issues and principles currently being studied in the classroom and move them outside the classroom doors into the campus community and the larger world. By making environmental knowledge part and parcel of campus environmental practice, students, faculty, and administrators have an extraordinary…

Smith, April A.; And Others

308

Environmental cognitions, land change, and social–ecological feedbacks: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding land use transitions requires analyzing how, when facing qualitative environmental change, human agents may modify their beliefs, values, and decision rules. This article first reviews some of the useful theories analyzing how environmental change can have a feedback effect on behaviors, via the environmental cognitions. Then, it discusses three propositions for more cognitively realistic agents in land change science:

Patrick Meyfroidt

2012-01-01

309

A Conceptual Framework for Evaluating the Domains of Applicability of Ecological Models and its Implementation in the Ecological Production Function Library - International Society for Ecological Modelling Conference  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of computational ecological models to inform environmental management and policy has proliferated in the past 25 years. These models have become essential tools as linkages and feedbacks between human actions and ecological responses can be complex, and as funds for sampl...

310

Mapping environmental injustices: pitfalls and potential of geographic information systems in assessing environmental health and equity.  

PubMed Central

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been used increasingly to map instances of environmental injustice, the disproportionate exposure of certain populations to environmental hazards. Some of the technical and analytic difficulties of mapping environmental injustice are outlined in this article, along with suggestions for using GIS to better assess and predict environmental health and equity. I examine 13 GIS-based environmental equity studies conducted within the past decade and use a study of noxious land use locations in the Bronx, New York, to illustrate and evaluate the differences in two common methods of determining exposure extent and the characteristics of proximate populations. Unresolved issues in mapping environmental equity and health include lack of comprehensive hazards databases; the inadequacy of current exposure indices; the need to develop realistic methodologies for determining the geographic extent of exposure and the characteristics of the affected populations; and the paucity and insufficiency of health assessment data. GIS have great potential to help us understand the spatial relationship between pollution and health. Refinements in exposure indices; the use of dispersion modeling and advanced proximity analysis; the application of neighborhood-scale analysis; and the consideration of other factors such as zoning and planning policies will enable more conclusive findings. The environmental equity studies reviewed in this article found a disproportionate environmental burden based on race and/or income. It is critical now to demonstrate correspondence between environmental burdens and adverse health impacts--to show the disproportionate effects of pollution rather than just the disproportionate distribution of pollution sources. PMID:11929725

Maantay, Juliana

2002-01-01

311

Spatiotemporal information systems in soil and environmental sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work is concerned with spatiotemporal information systems and their application in soil and environmental sciences. Issues investigated in this work include developments in the space\\/time modelling of natural variations, composite spatiotemporal mapping, and the incorporation of various sources of information into space\\/time analysis. Theoretical models, simulation examples, as well as real-world case studies are discussed. The models can process

George Christakos

1998-01-01

312

THE POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF THE COLONIAS ON THE U.S.- MEXICO BORDER: HUMAN-ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES AND COMMUNITY RESPONSES IN SOUTHERN NEW MEXICO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Economic development and population growth along the U.S.-Mexico border have been determined by the natural resources available for the physical and social transformations in this region. A critical political ecology of the U.S.-Mexico border links environmental hazards with the socioeconomic and political aspects that have generated colonia population settlements as locales within the border region's spatialized hierarchies. The political ecological

GUILLERMINA G. NÚÑEZ-MCHIRI

313

Geographic information systems: their use in environmental epidemiologic research.  

PubMed Central

Advances in geographic information system (GIS) technology, developed by geographers, provide new opportunities for environmental epidemiologists to study associations between environmental exposures and the spatial distribution of disease. A GIS is a powerful computer mapping and analysis technology capable of integrating large quantities of geographic (spatial) data as well as linking geographic with nongeographic data (e.g., demographic information, environmental exposure levels). In this paper we provide an overview of some of the capabilities and limitations of GIS technology; we illustrate, through practical examples, the use of several functions of a GIS including automated address matching, distance functions, buffer analysis, spatial query, and polygon overlay; we discuss methods and limitations of address geocoding, often central to the use of a GIS in environmental epidemiologic research; and we suggest ways to facilitate its use in future studies. Collaborative efforts between epidemiologists, biostatisticians, environmental scientists, GIS specialists, and medical geographers are needed to realize the full potential of GIS technology in environmental health research and may lead to innovative solutions to complex questions. Images p598-a Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 3. D Figure 3. E PMID:9288494

Vine, M F; Degnan, D; Hanchette, C

1997-01-01

314

Using Text Messaging to Assess Adolescents' Health Information Needs: An Ecological Momentary Assessment  

PubMed Central

Background Use of mobile technology has made a huge impact on communication, access, and information/resource delivery to adolescents. Mobile technology is frequently used by adolescents. Objective The purpose of this study was to understand the health information needs of adolescents in the context of their everyday lives and to assess how they meet their information needs. Methods We gave 60 adolescents smartphones with unlimited text messaging and data for 30 days. Each smartphone had applications related to asthma, obesity, human immunodeficiency virus, and diet preinstalled on the phone. We sent text messages 3 times per week and asked the following questions: (1) What questions did you have about your health today? (2) Where did you look for an answer (mobile device, mobile application, online, friend, book, or parent)? (3) Was your question answered and how? (4) Anything else? Results Our participants ranged from 13-18 years of age, 37 (62%) participants were male and 22 (37%) were female. Of the 60 participants, 71% (42/60) participants identified themselves as Hispanic and 77% (46/60) were frequent users of mobile devices. We had a 90% (1935/2150) response rate to our text messages. Participants sent a total of 1935 text messages in response to the ecological momentary assessment questions. Adolescents sent a total of 421 text messages related to a health information needs, and 516 text messages related to the source of information to the answers of their questions, which were related to parents, friends, online, mobile apps, teachers, or coaches. Conclusions Text messaging technology is a useful tool for assessing adolescents’ health behavior in real-time. Adolescents are willing to use text messaging to report their health information. Findings from this study contribute to the evidence base on addressing the health information needs of adolescents. In particular, attention should be paid to issues related to diet and exercise. These findings may be the harbinger for future obesity prevention programs for adolescents. PMID:23467200

Okoniewski, Anastasia; Tiase, Victoria; Low, Alexander; Rodriguez, Martha; Kaplan, Steven

2013-01-01

315

Global ecology  

SciTech Connect

A general description of the earth as a biosphere is presented. Divergent views of near-future world scenarios are presented; the Global 2000 report, and the analysis of Simon and Kahn. The basic principles and trends in global ecology are outlined, and the basic pollution and environmental degradation problems are discussed. Humanistic considerations which affect global ecology (population control, the effects of largescale nuclear war, and third-world socio-economics) are discussed.

Southwick, C.H. (ed.)

1985-01-01

316

Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) Enhancements - 13109  

SciTech Connect

Significant cleanup has been accomplished on the Oak Ridge (OR) site since it was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989, and a final evaluation of Zone 1 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1988 (CERCLA) has been initiated. The Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) is the database for storing OR site environmental characterization and monitoring data. Consideration of a final decision under CERCLA prompted several enhancements to OREIS that were designed to provide future users a clear picture of remediation progression across the OR site. The enhancements to OREIS are ongoing and fall into four categories: Geographic Information System Interface; Document Association; Remediation Status; Geo-spatial Data (authors)

Halsey, Patricia J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Salpas, Peter A. [Salpas Consulting, Inc., 106 Claymore Ln, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Salpas Consulting, Inc., 106 Claymore Ln, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Clark, Phillip A.; Lewis, Larry [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 5177, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 5177, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Tharpe, Deidre

2013-07-01

317

Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) operating procedures handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Operating Procedures Handbook of the Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) is intended to be kept current as EQIAC develops and evolves. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive guide to the mission, infrastructure, functions, and operational procedures of EQIAC. The handbook is a training tool for new personnel and a reference manual for existing personnel. The handbook will be distributed throughout EQIAC and maintained in binders containing current dated editions of the individual sections. The handbook will be revised at least annually to reflect the current structure and operational procedures of EQIAC. The EQIAC provides information on environmental issues such as compliance, restoration, and environmental monitoring do the Air Force and DOD contractors.

Walsh, T.E. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)); Das, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-08-01

318

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF TELEMATICS: TELECOMMUNICATION, COMPUTATION, AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Current important research needs whose results will be critical to Environmental Protection Agency's mission in the next two to three decades with regard to a major expansion in the use of telematics, i.e. telecommunications, computer, and information technology, are identified. ...

319

INFORMATION INTEGRATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY  

EPA Science Inventory

Annual federal and state investments in the collection, storage, and maintenance of resource and environmental data are enormous (estimated in the range of a few to tens of billions of dollars). espite these investments, the use of information from these databases for societal en...

320

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-print Network

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490 and efficient decision making, planning, and management of military training lands. GIS provides a spatial be customized for an installation to incorporate its military mission objectives, address operational scheduling

321

Comments on selecting a geographic information system for environmental management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many organizations in environmental fields stand to benefit from the use of a geographic information system (GIS). Selecting a GIS to implement within an organization can be a difficult task that is often required of people with little experience using a GIS. A framework for evaluating competing GIS considers cost, functionality, ease of use, future stability, development potential, support availability,

Curtis E. Woodcock; Chi Ho Sham; Barbara Shaw

1990-01-01

322

The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification  

SciTech Connect

We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

2010-10-15

323

Taoism and Deep Ecology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

1988-01-01

324

Information Fusion Issues in the UK Environmental Science Community  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Earth is a complex, interacting system which cannot be neatly divided by discipline boundaries. To gain an holistic understanding of even a component of an Earth System requires researchers to draw information from multiple disciplines and integrate these to develop a broader understanding. But the barriers to achieving this are formidable. Research funders attempting to encourage the integration of information across disciplines need to take into account culture issues, the impact of intrusion of projects on existing information systems, ontologies and semantics, scale issues, heterogeneity and the uncertainties associated with combining information from diverse sources. Culture - There is a cultural dualism in the environmental sciences were information sharing is both rewarded and discouraged. Researchers who share information both gain new opportunities and risk reducing their chances of being first author in an high-impact journal. The culture of the environmental science community has to be managed to ensure that information fusion activities are encouraged. Intrusion - Existing information systems have an inertia of there own because of the intellectual and financial capital invested within them. Information fusion activities must recognise and seek to minimise the potential impact of their projects on existing systems. Low intrusion information fusions systems such as OGC web-service and the OpenMI Standard are to be preferred to whole-sale replacement of existing systems. Ontology and Semantics - Linking information across disciplines requires a clear understanding of the concepts deployed in the vocabulary used to describe them. Such work is a critical first step to creating routine information fusion. It is essential that national bodies, such as geological surveys organisations, document and publish their ontologies, semantics, etc. Scale - Environmental processes operate at scales ranging from microns to the scale of the Solar System and potentially beyond. The many different scales involved provide serious challenges to information fusion which need to be researched. Heterogeneity - Natural systems are heterogeneous, that is a system consisting of multiple components each of which may have considerable internal variation. Modelling Earth Systems requires recognition of the inherent complexity. Uncertainty - Understanding the uncertainties within a single information source can be difficult. Understanding the uncertainties across a system of linked models, each drawn from multiple information resources, represents a considerable challenge that must be addressed. The challenges to overcome appear insurmountable to individual research groups; but the potential rewards, in terms of a fuller scientific understanding of Earth Systems, are significant. A major international effort must be mounted to tackle these barriers and enable routine information fusion.

Giles, J. R.

2010-12-01

325

Tracking groundwater monitoring information using an environmental database management system  

SciTech Connect

Growing, all encompassing environmental regulations and information management guidelines create the need for effective data management. Groundwater monitoring is an example of a task that requires detailed standard procedures, accurate and accessible sample result information, and reproduction of several standard reports. A relational database helps manage this information, resulting in time savings and ultimately cost savings. Quick retrieval and consistent reproduction of field sampling procedures, sample bottle labels, well development forms, well purging and sampling forms and instrument calibration forms ensure timely and accurate data collection as well as sound information management. A relational database also provides quick retrieval of sample and results information in a form that can be customized by the user for reporting purposes. The efficient operation of a groundwater monitoring program that results from a sound information management system indicates that a relational database is the safest and most effective way to create historical records and produce standard or customized reports.

Butler, S.M. [EnviroMetrics Software, Inc., New Castle, DE (United States)

1997-12-31

326

Soil Ecology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil Ecology is designed to meet the increasing challenge faced by today's environmental scientists, ecologists, agriculturalists, and biotechnologists for an integrated approach to soil ecology. It emphasizes the interrelations among plants, animals, and microbes, by first establishing the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the soil habitat and then functionally characterizing the major components of the soil biota and some of their most important interactions. The fundamental principles underpinning soil ecology are established and this then enables an integrated approach to explore and understand the processes of soil nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) cycling and the ecology of extreme soil conditions such as soil-water stress. Two of the most topical aspects of applied soil ecology are then selected. First, the ecology of soil pollution is examined, focusing on acid deposition and radionuclide pollution. Second, manipulation of soil ecology through biotechnology is discussed, illustrating the use of pesticides and microbial inocula in soils and pointing toward the future by considering the impact of genetically modified inocula on soil ecology.

Killham, Ken

1994-04-01

327

Environmental monitoring and ecological risk assessment for pesticide contamination and effects in Lake Pamvotis, northwestern Greece.  

PubMed

Monitoring of pesticide residues in water and sediments was conducted as a basis for subsequent ecotoxicological risk assessment for the shallow eutrophic Lake Pamvotis, northwestern Greece. During a one-year study period, atrazine, desethylatrazine (DEA), simazine, diazinon, malathion, oxamyl, carbofuran, and ethion were detected in water and atrazine, desethylatrazine, diazinon, and s-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC) in sediments, all at ppb concentration level. Temporal variation in pesticide concentrations was observed. Highest residue levels for most pesticides in both water and sediment matrices occurred in the May to July period with the exception of atrazine and DEA, which show highest levels in water during the September to November period. The ecological risk associated with pesticide contamination was assessed using two different methods: The toxic unit method, which provides a first indication of the relative contribution of detected pesticides to the total toxicity and a probabilistic approach, and the inverse method of Van Straalen and Denneman, which is used to quantify the ecological risk. The maximum percentage of the ecological risk was 10.3 and 51.8% for water and 17.2 and 70.6% for sediment, based on acute and chronic level, respectively. These results show that pesticides exert a significant pressure on the aquatic system of Lake Pamvotis, especially for the chronic-effect level. Simple quotient methods should be coupled with higher-tier risk assessment, especially if restoration activities on lake ecosystems are to be undertaken for sustainable development. PMID:16117136

Hela, Dimitra G; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A; Konstantinou, Ioannis K; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

2005-06-01

328

Linking Science and Society With an Environmental Information Bridge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Building learning communities to engage the public in identifying and solving local and regional environmental problems is the vision of the newly created Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment at the University of North Dakota. The Center serves as an Environmental Information Bridge between science and society for citizens of the region, providing information, data, and value-added remote sensing products to precision agriculture, sustainable forestry, Native American land managers, and K-lifetime educators. Guided by the needs of end users, the new Center is a prototype for a national infrastructure that meets ESE's objective to "expand and accelerate the realization of economic and societal benefits from Earth science, information, and technology". The scientific community has been good at converting raw data into useful information. However, a serious communications gap exists between the communities of scientists and non-scientists. The new Center bridges this gap, creating a many-to-many exchange of information among those who learn first about the environment and those who will put those lessons to work for their economic welfare, the betterment of the quality of their lives, and the benefit of their descendants. A major outreach component of the Center, written and produced at UND, is Our Changing Planet, a public television series aimed at increasing viewers' awareness of environmental and climate change issues. Now carried by approximately 30 public television stations the series is distributed nationwide by the National Education Television Association. The Center has also recently established a partnership with StormCenter.com, LLC, a multimedia company and fellow partner in NASA's Federation of Earth Science Information Partners that uses leading-edge technology to deliver information about the environment to regional television stations. Service to the media provides a vital link between science and the public, as local weather broadcasts are often the public's primary source of environmental news and information. Through our partnership with StormCenter.com, the Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment will deliver up-to-date satellite imagery and accurate environmental information to regional media outlets.

Welling, L.; Seielstad, G.; Jones, D.; Peterson, J.

2001-12-01

329

Governance through information: environmental monitoring from a citizen-consumer perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The function of environmental monitoring and information in governing the environment has changed considerably in recent times. Traditionally, environmental monitoring was geared towards governments and producers; it provided them with the information required to formulate environmental policies and environmental management strategies. More recently, environmental monitoring has come to serve an additional and different function. In line with the increasing popularity

Burg van den S. W. K

2006-01-01

330

Interdisciplinarity, landscape ecology and the `Transformation of Agricultural Landscapes'  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theme, the `Transformation of Agricultural Landscapes' is used as a context for examining the current status of landscape ecology and its ability to provide a critical set of responses to a defined range of environmental issues. The links between academic structures and the public demand for landscape-based information raises the potential for landscape ecology to provide solutions. Current approaches

Michael R. Moss

2000-01-01

331

GIS and Time-Series Integration in the Kennedy Space Center Environmental Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA started the Ecological Program 14 years ago to collect environmental data which can be used in making environmental management decisions. The EP team created the Mapping Analysis and Planning System (MAPS) to store all the data, including the appropriate tools for data analysis and exploration.

Hinkle, Ross; Costa, Joao Ribeiro da; Engel, Bernard

1996-01-01

332

The role of web-based environmental information in urban planning--the environmental information system for planners.  

PubMed

The Environmental Information System for Planners (EISP) is a proof of concept web-based system designed to support decision making within the UK planning framework by making information on environmental issues more widely accessible. It incorporates relevant outputs from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Urban Regeneration and the Environment (URGENT) research programme and from research directly commissioned by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM). It supports three principal planning functions carried out by local authorities: pre-planning enquiries, development control decisions and strategic planning. Eleven environmental science themes are incorporated: Air quality, Shallow undermining, Landslide susceptibility, Groundwater protection, Flood risk, Drainage, Land contamination, Proximity to landfill, Biodiversity, Natural and Man-made heritage. Decision flow diagrams represent detailed analysis of workflow in each theme, taking account of best practice, regulatory responsibilities and planning guidance. Industry-standard web technologies integrate the flows and provide access to the system via secure web pages. Underpinning the system is an environmental geographical information system (GIS) containing up-to-date data, information and models relevant to each theme. The modular system design allows new legislation and local priorities and datasets to be easily incorporated. Web technology delivers information and research data that have hitherto been difficult for the non-specialist to access and have therefore been under-exploited. The study has demonstrated a successful application of the principles of e-Governance in an area where informed decisions commonly require specialist information. The system, if rolled out nationally, offers potential economic benefits and efficiency savings for both planners and developers. PMID:16242758

Culshaw, M G; Nathanail, C P; Leeks, G J L; Alker, S; Bridge, D; Duffy, T; Fowler, D; Packman, J C; Swetnam, R; Wadsworth, R; Wyatt, B

2006-05-01

333

Martin J Lechowicz Volume 2, The Earth system: biological and ecological dimensions of global environmental  

E-print Network

of global environmental change, pp 461­465 Edited by Professor Harold A Mooney and Dr Josep G Canadell in Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change (ISBN 0-471-97796-9) Editor-in-Chief Ted Munn John Wiley & Sons. The advance of spring warming is an expected and normal part of high- latitude climates, but no one expects

Lechowicz, Martin J.

334

Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (ORIES) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1.2. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.

Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.

1993-02-01

335

45 CFR 641.20 - Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA § 641.20 Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information. The...

2011-10-01

336

45 CFR 641.20 - Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA § 641.20 Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information. The...

2012-10-01

337

45 CFR 641.20 - Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA § 641.20 Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information. The...

2013-10-01

338

45 CFR 641.20 - Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR PROPOSED NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACTIONS IN ANTARCTICA § 641.20 Notification of the availability of environmental documents and other information. The...

2010-10-01

339

Storytelling and environmental information: connecting schoolchildren and herpetofauna in Morocco.  

PubMed

Northwestern Morocco is undergoing a sudden change in the level of infrastructure growth and pressure on the environment from increased tourism. The ongoing changes are raising questions about how the ecosystem will react, and the relevant drivers of these changes. The Oued Laou valley in north-west Morocco hosts high landscape, species and human cultural diversity. The Talassemtane National Park has been established to preserve the environment in this region; however, what information tools are available to children regarding this environment? The ecosystem is illustrated here using three components: herpetofauna (representing ecosystem components), problems related to water quantity and quality (representing interactions within ecosystem components) and Talassemtane National Park (representing a case of ecosystem management). A children's book was written on this topic, and when the book was delivered to pupils, a questionnaire was included, aimed at determining their sources of environmental information. The results identified major changes in the sources of information utilized by children in this part of Morocco, a clear role of schools in explaining ecosystem components, and an increasing role of TV in environmental information supply. The role of the family was found to be less important than TV or school. Another major source of pupils' environmental knowledge is personal observation and hands-on experience, both for rural and urban children. Children are willing to discover and understand complex systems, and researchers should be encouraged to supply children with correct and up-to-date information on environmental systems, focusing at first on the local environment, as a background for sustainable development. PMID:21392289

Fanini, Lucia; Fahd, Soumia

2009-06-01

340

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA, AND INFORMATION SERVICE Library and Information Services Divison  

E-print Network

in China. Pp. -342-344. In: New developments in marine science and technology... , proceedings of the 22ndNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA, AND INFORMATION SERVICE Library and Information Services The management of oceanographic data in China and China's participation in international atmospheric and marine

341

Invasion Ecology (Teacher's Guide)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Strange intruders are invading our part of the world, threatening our environment and our economy. These newcomers and their impact on our ecological balance are the focus of Invasion Ecology, a new book that teaches students to investigate the behaviors of nonnative and native species. Studying real-life invaders such as purple loosestrife and Phragmites, students will learn about the links between biology and ecology -- and explore how scientists are fighting these aggressors with biological controls. The Teacher's Edition explains how to guide highly sophisticated inquiry and conduct interactive research. Materials are classroom-ready and include detailed background information as well as sample assessment tasks and rubrics.The companion Student Edition has three sections: � Background on the science of ecology and its place in the control of invasive species � Protocols for practicing methods that scientists use in monitoring invasive species, such as early detection surveys, plot sampling, transect surveys, and decomposition studies � A series of helpful worksheets to guide students through their own interactive research Invasion Ecology is the second volume in the four-part Environmental Inquiry curriculum series, designed to show students how to apply scientific knowledge to solving real-life problems.

Krasny, Marianne E.; Team, The E.

2003-01-01

342

The Ecological Response of Carex lasiocarpa Community in the Riparian Wetlands to the Environmental Gradient of Water Depth in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China  

PubMed Central

The response of Carex lasiocarpa in riparian wetlands in Sanjiang Plain to the environmental gradient of water depth was analyzed by using the Gaussian Model based on the biomass and average height data, and the ecological water-depth amplitude of Carex lasiocarpa was derived. The results indicated that the optimum ecological water-depth amplitude of Carex lasiocarpa based on biomass was [13.45?cm, 29.78?cm], while the optimum ecological water-depth amplitude of Carex lasiocarpa based on average height was [2.31?cm, 40.11?cm]. The intersection of the ecological water-depth amplitudes based on biomass and height confirmed that the optimum ecological water-depth amplitude of Carex lasiocarpa was [13.45?cm, 29.78?cm] and the optimist growing water-depth of Carex lasiocarpa was 21.4?cm. The TWINSPAN, a polythetic and divisive classification tool, was used to classify the wetland ecological series into 6 associations. Result of TWINSPAN matrix classification reflected an obvious environmental gradient in these associations: water-depth gradient. The relation of biodiversity of Carex lasiocarpa community and water depth was determined by calculating the diversity index of each association. PMID:24065874

Luan, Zhaoqing; Wang, Zhongxin; Yan, Dandan; Liu, Guihua; Xu, Yingying

2013-01-01

343

Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings.  

PubMed

Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how differences in atmospheric delta13C values were transferred across three trophic levels. Second, we compared contemporary delta13C trends (1961-2004) in atmospheric CO2 to delta13C patterns in a tree species (jack pine, Pinus banksiana), large herbivore (moose, Alces alces) and large carnivore (grey wolf, Canis lupus) from North America. Third, we compared palaeontological (approx. 30000 to 12000 14C years before present) atmospheric CO2 trends to delta13C patterns in a tree species (Pinus flexilis, Juniperus sp.), a megaherbivore (bison, Bison antiquus) and a large carnivore (dire wolf, Canis dirus) from the La Brea tar pits (southern California, USA) and Great Basin (western USA). Contrary to previous expectations, we found that the environmental isotope pattern is better represented with increasing trophic level. Our results indicate that museum specimens of large carnivores would best reflect large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of carbon isotopes in the palaeontological record because top predators can act as ecological integrators of environmental change. PMID:17686730

Bump, Joseph K; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Bada, Jeffrey L; Koch, Paul L; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

2007-10-01

344

Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings  

PubMed Central

Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (?13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how differences in atmospheric ?13C values were transferred across three trophic levels. Second, we compared contemporary ?13C trends (1961–2004) in atmospheric CO2 to ?13C patterns in a tree species (jack pine, Pinus banksiana), large herbivore (moose, Alces alces) and large carnivore (grey wolf, Canis lupus) from North America. Third, we compared palaeontological (approx. 30?000 to 12?000 14C years before present) atmospheric CO2 trends to ?13C patterns in a tree species (Pinus flexilis, Juniperus sp.), a megaherbivore (bison, Bison antiquus) and a large carnivore (dire wolf, Canis dirus) from the La Brea tar pits (southern California, USA) and Great Basin (western USA). Contrary to previous expectations, we found that the environmental isotope pattern is better represented with increasing trophic level. Our results indicate that museum specimens of large carnivores would best reflect large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of carbon isotopes in the palaeontological record because top predators can act as ecological integrators of environmental change. PMID:17686730

Bump, Joseph K; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Bada, Jeffrey L; Koch, Paul L; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

2007-01-01

345

AN ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CORRELATES OF CHILDHOOD ACCIDENT, ASSAULT AND CHILD ABUSE INJURIES  

PubMed Central

Introduction This study examines the relationships of population and environmental characteristics to hospital discharges for childhood accident, assault, and child abuse injuries among youth from 0 to 17 years of age. Methods The analysis uses aggregate data on populations and environments in 1646 California zip code areas that were collected for the year 2000. Zero inflated negative binomial models were used to assess ecological relationships between these characteristics and numbers of hospital discharges for childhood injuries from accidents and assaults; negative binomial models were used to assess these relationships for injuries related to child abuse. Results A number of different characteristics were related to the different injury outcomes. Childhood accident injuries were related to measures female headed households, adult to child ratio and non-alcohol retail establishments (e.g., numbers of gas stations). Assault injuries were related to measures of poverty and vacant housing. All three outcomes were directly related to percent of female-headed households, percent African American residents, and density of off-premise alcohol outlets. Conclusion The results demonstrate that both population and environmental characteristics are significantly correlated with rates of childhood injuries. These results suggest that some environmental characteristics, in particular the presence of many off-premise alcohol outlets in neighborhoods, may reduce the overall level of guardianship of children’s activities in zip code areas, resulting in harm to their children. PMID:18782339

Freisthler, Bridget; Gruenewald, Paul J.; Ring, Lori; LaScala, Elizabeth A

2008-01-01

346

EnGenIUS -- Environmental Genome Informational Utility System.  

PubMed

Short-insert shotgun sequencing approaches have been applied in recent years to environmental genomic libraries. In the case of complex multispecies microbial communities, there can be many sequence reads that are not incorporated into assemblies, and thus need to be annotated and accessible as single reads. Most existing annotation systems and genome databases accommodate assembled genomes containing contiguous gene-encoding sequences. Thus, a solution is required that can work effectively with environmental genomic annotation information to facilitate data analysis. The Environmental Genome Informational Utility System (EnGenIUS) is a comprehensive environmental genome (metagenome) research toolset that was specifically designed to accommodate the needs of large (> 250 K sequence reads) environmental genome sequencing efforts. The core EnGenIUS modules consist of a set of UNIX scripts and PHP programs used for data preprocessing, an annotation pipeline with accompanying analysis tools, two entity relational databases, and a graphical user interface. The annotation pipeline has a modular structure and can be customized to best fit input data set properties. The integrated entity relational databases store raw data and annotation analysis results. Access to the underlying databases and services is facilitated through a web-based graphical user interface. Users have the ability to browse, upload, download, and analyze preprocessed data, based on diverse search criteria. The EnGenIUS toolset was successfully tested using the Alvinella pompejana epibiont environmental genome data set, which comprises more than 300 K sequence reads. A fully browsable EnGenIUS portal is available at (http://ocean.dbi.udel.edu/) (access code: "guest"). The scope of this paper covers the implementation details and technical aspects of the EnGenIUS toolset. PMID:19090024

Kaplarevic, Mihailo; Murray, Alison E; Cary, Stephen C; Gao, Guang R

2008-12-01

347

Teaching Environmental and Ecological Sciences to Business Students. Exploring Approaches through Student Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In two environmental sciences courses for business students, observations were made of student reactions to concept presentation and instructional organization. Most trainees successfully learned to apply two of three knowledge types (theoretical, procedural, practical) to primary concepts. (SK)

Maubrey, Regis

2003-01-01

348

Hazard identification of environmental pollutants by combining results from ecological and biomarker studies: an example  

EPA Science Inventory

Objective: Linking exposures from environmental pollutants with adverse health effects is difficult because these exposures are usually low-dose and ill-defined. According to several investigators, a series of multidisciplinary, multilevel studies is needed to address this prob...

349

An Outline of Project Work in Ecology/Environmental Biology for Expedition Participants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article aims to encourage the development of safe, valuable and scientifically sound field investigations, and offers suggestions or guidelines for your people participating in environmental work on expeditions to areas in the northern United Kingdom. (Author/MDH)

Pyatt, F. Brian

1993-01-01

350

Integrating Omic Technologies into Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessment and Environmental Monitoring: Hurdles, Achievements and Future Outlook  

EPA Science Inventory

In this commentary we present the findings from an international consortium on fish toxicogenomics sponsored by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) with an objective of moving omic technologies into chemical risk assessment and environmental monitoring. Objectiv...

351

Integrating Omic Technologies into Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessment and Environmental Monitoring: Hurdles, Achievements and Future Outlook  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: In this commentary we present the findings from an international consortium on fish toxicogenomics sponsored by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) with a remit of moving omic technologies into chemical risk assessment and environmental monitoring. Obj...

352

[Long-term ecological and genetic consequences of use of dioxin-containing environmental agents].  

PubMed

The long-term consequences of the use of dioxine-containing ecotoxic agents in the USA in 1961-1972 are ecologically and genetically characterized. There were increases in the incidence of pathological reproductive events in the contaminated region. It is concluded that there will be higher probability of abnormalities in the families of individuals born at war or just thereof. An association of impaired reproduction with functional disorders and women's poorer health, with higher incidence of somatic and gynecological diseases (chronic ones in particular) is shown. Cytogenetic changes in the lymphocytes were found in individuals from exposure risk groups. The contribution of chromosomal alterations observed in the contaminated area to immunodeficiency is appreciated. The systemic pattern of the action of biologically active properties of dioxine was demonstrated from the morphofunctional changes of different cell types. Cluster analysis revealed associations of cytogenetic parameters with the integrated index of health status in individuals from different contaminated areas. The ecological and genetic consequences may be regarded as part of homeostatic changes at many levels, as suggested by a correlation between the genetic instability and the changes occurring in other tissues, organs, and systems. PMID:9511442

Golikov, S N; Rumak, V S; Sofronov, G A; Umnova, N V

1998-01-01

353

Developing an Ecological Risk Framework to Assess Environmental Safety of Nanoscale Products  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nanotechnology industry is developing rapidly and promises to spawn many exciting products in the field of medicine, manufacturing,\\u000a and various environmental fields, such as bio-control agents, and remediation catalysts. However, as legitimate questions\\u000a of environmental safety go unanswered, opposition to the industry is accelerating just as rapidly. Unique physico-chemical\\u000a properties of compounds within the nano-range present unknown toxicities relative

L. Kapustka; S. Chan-Remillard; S. Goudey

2009-01-01

354

Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center multi-year plan  

SciTech Connect

An information analysis center (IAC) is a federal resource that provides technical information for a specific technology field. An IAC links an expert technical staff with an experienced information specialist group, supported by in-house or external data bases to provide technical information and maintain a corporate knowledge in a technical area. An IAC promotes the rapid transfer of technology among its users and provides assistance in adopting new technology and predicting and assessing emerging technology. This document outlines the concept, requirements, and proposed development of an Environmental Quality IAC (EQIAC). An EQIAC network is composed of several nodes, each of which has specific technology capabilities. This document outlines strategic and operational objectives for the phased development of one such node of an EQIAC network.

Rivera, R.G. [RDG, Inc. (United States); Das, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Walsh, T.E. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

1992-09-01

355

The NASA John C. Stennis Environmental Geographic Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) at Stennis Space Center (SSC) covers four counties in Mississippi and four parishes in Louisiana. The EGIS includes 410 data layers including vector and raster data from various public and private sources. These data layers provide information on natural and cultural features. SSC initially used the EGIS to: 1) Monitor on and off-site impacts of propulsion testing; 2) Classify land cover at SSC to predict the impacts of future programs. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of ongoing projects and future applications for the EGIS.

Cohan, Tyrus

2002-01-01

356

Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology and Environmental Teratology Information Center Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology and Environmental Teratology Information Center (DART/ ETIC) Database is made available by the National Library of Medicine's Toxicology Data Network. The database contains over 100,000 current and earlier literature citations covering teratology and other aspects of developmental and reproductive toxicology. Users may search the database by subject, title words, chemical name, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number, and author. The Web site also includes a useful help page and sample record for familiarizing oneself with the database.

357

Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 6, Soil subject area  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Soil subject area of the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is to manage the data acquired from soil samples, both geologic and surface, and sediment samples. Stored in the Soil subject area are data relevant to the soil samples, laboratory analytical results, and field measurements. The two major types of data make up the Soil subject area are data concerning the samples and data about the chemical and/or radiologic analyses of soil samples.

Not Available

1994-01-14

358

Comments on selecting a geographic information system for environmental management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many organizations in environmental fields stand to benefit from the use of a geographic information system (GIS). Selecting\\u000a a GIS to implement within an organization can be a difficult task that is often required of people with little experience\\u000a using a GIS. A framework for evaluating competing GIS considers cost, functionality, ease of use, future stability, development\\u000a potential, support availability,

Curtis E. Woodcock; Chi Ho Sham; Barbara Shaw

1990-01-01

359

Cardille, J. A., Ventura, S. J., and M. G. Turner. 2001. Environmental and social factors influencing wildfires in the Upper Midwest, USA. Ecological Applications 11(1):111-127.  

E-print Network

influencing wildfires in the Upper Midwest, USA. Ecological Applications 11(1):111-127. 1 Environmental and Social Factors Influencing Wildfires in the Upper Midwest, USA Running head: Factors and Fires. 2001. Environmental and social factors influencing wildfires in the Upper Midwest, USA. Ecological

Turner, Monica G.

360

Ecological Footprints  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ever wondered what sort of impact your everyday existence has on the planet? The University of Texas at Austin offers this information as part of their training in Natural Resource Management. An ecological footprint is defined here as "the area on the surface of Earth that each person appropriates in order to live," including many kinds of ecological services -- from food, air, water, and living space, to the recycling of wastes. This site offers an introduction to the concept of Ecological Footprints, including links to spreadsheets for calculation, national footprints, and related scientific articles.

361

The 2-MEV Scale in the United States: A Measure of Children's Environmental Attitudes Based on the Theory of Ecological Attitude  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Environmental (2-MEV) Scale questionnaire was developed in Europe to measure adolescents' attitudes and gauge the effectiveness of educational programs. It also formed the basis for the Theory of Ecological Attitudes. In the present four-year study, the 2-MEV Scale was modified for use with 9-12-year-old children in the United States. Initial…

Johnson, Bruce; Manoli, Constantinos C.

2011-01-01

362

The Death and Life of a School-Based Environmental Education and Communication Program in Brazil: Rethinking Educational Leadership and Ecological Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an exploratory case study of the sustainability of an environmental education and communication (EEC) project at an elementary public school in Brazil. Our analysis shows that a narrow view of institutional educational leadership and ecological learning negatively affected the resilience of that particular EEC development. We…

Reis, Giuliano; Guimaraes-Iosif, Ranilce

2012-01-01

363

A Catalog of Educational Resources in Communication Arts, Cultural Ecology, and Environmental Studies for the Small High School Teacher. Curriculum Resources for the Alaskan Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A catalog of semi-annotated topical listings of curriculum resources, published between 1960 and 1980, for use by educators in small Alaska high schools, contains sections on communication arts (108 items), cultural ecology (269 items), and environmental studies (363 items). Listings are presented on pages ruled into grids; for each item the…

Madsen, Eric; And Others

364

Subconscious Environmental Information Perceiving Behavior and its Attenuation in Information-Based Evacuation Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An evacuation was studied from a classroom by means of experiment and simulation. In the experiments, evacuation with and without visibility was mimicked by requiring the evacuees to wear eye masks or not. The distribution of evacuees' egress times against initial positions and the flow rate at exits were studied. It was found that when masks were used, evacuees' egress strategies were highly dependent on their pre-perceived environmental information in subconsciousness which might affect the egress process. Thus we call this phenomenon the "subconscious environmental information perceiving behavior." In the simulation, a cellular automata model considering the influence of sound information and the subconscious behavior was used to simulate the experiments. Both the experimental and the simulation results show that the sound information plays a more important role in evacuation without visibility than in normal condition, and the pre-perceived environmental information is also very important when people have poor visibility because of the subconscious environmental information perceiving behavior. The simulation results consist with the experimental results well. This study is useful for understanding the human behaviors during emergency evacuation with poor visibility under the guide of sound signal.

Yang, Lizhong; Liu, Shaobo; Rao, Ping; Zhu, Kongjin

2012-07-01

365

Ecological comparison of cellular stress responses among populations – normalizing RT-qPCR values to investigate differential environmental adaptations  

PubMed Central

Background Rising temperatures and other environmental factors influenced by global climate change can cause increased physiological stress for many species and lead to range shifts or regional population extinctions. To advance the understanding of species’ response to change and establish links between individual and ecosystem adaptations, physiological reactions have to be compared between populations living in different environments. Although changes in expression of stress genes are relatively easy to quantify, methods for reliable comparison of the data remain a contentious issue. Using normalization algorithms and further methodological considerations, we compare cellular stress response gene expression levels measured by RT-qPCR after air exposure experiments among different subpopulations of three species of the intertidal limpet Nacella. Results Reference gene assessment algorithms reveal that stable reference genes can differ among investigated populations and / or treatment groups. Normalized expression values point to differential defense strategies to air exposure in the investigated populations, which either employ a pronounced cellular stress response in the inducible Hsp70 forms, or exhibit a comparatively high constitutive expression of Hsps (heat shock proteins) while showing only little response in terms of Hsp induction. Conclusions This study serves as a case study to explore the methodological prerequisites of physiological stress response comparisons among ecologically and phylogenetically different organisms. To improve the reliability of gene expression data and compare the stress responses of subpopulations under potential genetic divergence, reference gene stability algorithms are valuable and necessary tools. As the Hsp70 isoforms have been shown to play different roles in the acute stress responses and increased constitutive defenses of populations in their different habitats, these comparative studies can yield insight into physiological strategies of adaptation to environmental stress and provide hints for the prudent use of the cellular stress response as a biomarker to study environmental stress and stress adaptation of populations under changing environmental conditions. PMID:23680017

2013-01-01

366

Exploring ecology in Alaska: Reflective storytelling as a model for environmental education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This professional project is formatted as a book that was written as a part of a qualitativeparticipatory action research study exploring best practices for diverse communities in Alaska to access reflective storytelling method as environmental education. Non-invasive assessment was utilized with participants in the form of talking circles, where program leaders and educators met in small groups with youth to practice sharing and reflecting on their experiential education activity. Youth voice and educator opinions were gathered in structured and unstructured interviews. Along with interviews, standard practice methods for a qualitative research project were utilized, including: participant observation, non-participant observation, field notes, reflexive journals, and analysis of documents and materials. The current book project was designed as a tool to assist with the implementation of the Alaska Natural Resource and Environmental Literacy Plan. Through place-based curriculum and experiential learning techniques, it shares examples of a unique method of teaching outdoor environmental education through storytelling.

Shoemaker, Kay Warren

367

Information technologies for global resources management and environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in computer and communications technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to develop sophisticated information resources management systems for global resources management and environment assessment in an efficient, effective, and systematic manner. In this paper, the emerging global energy and environmental issues are identified. Since satellite-based remote sensing systems are becoming increasingly available and produce massive data collections, the utilization of imaging processing techniques and their applications for regional and global resources management and environmental studies are described. Interoperability and interconnectivity among heterogeneous computer systems are major issues in designing a totally integrated, multimedia-based, information resources management system that operates in a networking environment. Discussions of the future technology trends are focused on a number of emerging information management technologies and communications standards which will aid in achieving seamless system integration and offer user-friendly operations. It can be foreseen that advances in computer and communications technologies, increasingly sophisticated image processing techniques and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and the development of globally comprehensive data bases will bring ``global visualization`` onto multimedia desktop computers before the end of this decade.

Campbell, A.P.; Wang, Hua

1992-09-01

368

Information technologies for global resources management and environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in computer and communications technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to develop sophisticated information resources management systems for global resources management and environment assessment in an efficient, effective, and systematic manner. In this paper, the emerging global energy and environmental issues are identified. Since satellite-based remote sensing systems are becoming increasingly available and produce massive data collections, the utilization of imaging processing techniques and their applications for regional and global resources management and environmental studies are described. Interoperability and interconnectivity among heterogeneous computer systems are major issues in designing a totally integrated, multimedia-based, information resources management system that operates in a networking environment. Discussions of the future technology trends are focused on a number of emerging information management technologies and communications standards which will aid in achieving seamless system integration and offer user-friendly operations. It can be foreseen that advances in computer and communications technologies, increasingly sophisticated image processing techniques and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and the development of globally comprehensive data bases will bring global visualization'' onto multimedia desktop computers before the end of this decade.

Campbell, A.P.; Wang, Hua.

1992-01-01

369

The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Agrawal Supplementary information  

E-print Network

relationships, diet breadth, and trophic structure are important areas of conceptual and empirical development in landscape ecology and conservation biology. Merging paleo- and neoecological perspectives. Although in community ecology, a synthesis of paleo- and neoecological perspectives is needed to bet- ter understand how

Arnold, A. Elizabeth

370

10 CFR 54.23 - Contents of application-environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...application-environmental information. 54.23 Section 54.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions...application—environmental information. Each...

2013-01-01

371

10 CFR 54.23 - Contents of application-environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...application-environmental information. 54.23 Section 54.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions...application—environmental information. Each...

2011-01-01

372

10 CFR 54.23 - Contents of application-environmental information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...application-environmental information. 54.23 Section 54.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions...application—environmental information. Each...

2012-01-01

373

10 CFR 54.23 - Contents of application-environmental information.  

...application-environmental information. 54.23 Section 54.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions...application—environmental information. Each...

2014-01-01

374

Environmental Education Resource Catalog.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prepared for the use of elementary and secondary school teachers, this catalog is designed to provide information about environmental education materials which will aid in classroom presentations and in curriculum development. Subject areas cover conservation and natural resources, ecology and ecosystems, environmental action and survival,…

Phoenix Union High School District, AZ.

375

The environmental consequences of nuclear war (SCOPE 28), Vol. 2: Ecological, agricultural, and human effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Offerred in this book is an appraisal of the possible environmental consequences of nuclear war. It presents a consensus among leading scientists of the effects on climate, ecosystems, and food supply. Volume 2 reviews ecosystems structure and function relevant to nuclear war effects, plant and animal responses and recovery, agricultural productivity, vulnerability of world food production and storage, estimated population

M. A. Harwell; T. C. Hutchinson

1986-01-01

376

Innate Immunity, Environmental Drivers, and Disease Ecology of Marine and Freshwater Invertebrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite progress in the past decade, researchers struggle to evaluate the hypothesis that environmental conditions compromise immu- nity and facilitate new disease outbreaks. In this chapter, we review known immunological mechanisms for selected phyla and find that there are critical response pathways common to all invertebrates. These include the prophenoloxidase pathway, wandering phagocytic cells, cytotoxic effector responses, and antimicrobial compounds.

Laura D. Mydlarz; Laura E. Jones; C. Drew Harvell

2006-01-01

377

The Global Ecology Handbook: What You Can Do about the Environmental Crisis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is ample evidence of the seriousness of the world's population, resource, and environmental problems--poverty and hunger, deforestation and species loss, soil erosion and desertification, air and water pollution, acid precipitation and ozone layer depletion, as well as the greenhouse effect and climate change. This handbook was prepared as a…

Corson, Walter H., Ed.

378

Environmental biodosimetry: a biologically relevant tool for ecological risk assessment and biomonitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biodosimetry, the estimation of received doses by determining the frequency of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, is widely applied in humans acutely exposed as a result of accidents or for clinical purposes, but biodosimetric techniques have not been utilized in organisms chronically exposed to radionuclides in contaminated environments. The application of biodosimetry to environmental exposure scenarios could greatly improve the accuracy, and

B Ulsh; T. G Hinton; J. D Congdon; L. C Dugan; F. W Whicker; J. S Bedford

2003-01-01

379

Ecology of Burkholderia pseudomallei and the interactions between environmental Burkholderia spp. and human–animal hosts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early workers thought that melioidosis was a zoonosis with a reservoir in rodents, but we now know that Burkholderia pseudomallei is a widely distributed environmental saprophyte. In northeast Thailand, two thirds of paddy fields yield the organism, and 80% of children have antibodies by the time they are 4 years old. However, interpretation of these results has been complicated by

David A. B Dance

2000-01-01

380

On ecological reflections: the tensions of cultivating ecojustice and youth environmentalism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I respond to Zeyer and Roth's (2009) "A Mirror of Society" by elaborating on how the idea of interpretive repertoires is grounded by education philosophy and sociology. Vernacular languages are carried forward collectively from individuals who lived during a particular period of time, inculcated as root metaphors, which frame our relationships with others. It follows that metaphors (or interpretive repertoires) frame Swiss relationships with others, and what serves as Swiss goals for the environment and environmental protection are deeply embedded in some past conceptualizations of how a society should develop in the world. Indeed these youth's repertoires are "a mirror of society." But how do we know whether Swiss ideals are cultivating good, right, or just relationships, and embody a morally defensible environmentalism? Zeyer and Roth emphasize that teaching is a cultural process, which I agree with, but there is a contradiction in the idea that curriculum should be designed in a way that allows students to expand their existing repertoires without culturally mediated changes. Clearly students in Zeyer and Roth's study feel limited as to what they can do about the environment and environmental protection, in relation to outside influences such as US consumerism. Ecojustice, environmentalism, and sustainability should begin to dissolve this feeling of powerlessness. The purpose of this response is to show why cultural mediation is needed for defensible youth action.

Mueller, Michael P.

2009-12-01

381

An Ecological System Curriculum: An Integrated MST Approach to Environmental Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an inquiry-based, student-centered mathematics, science, and technology curriculum guide. It features activities addressing such environmental science topics as groundwater modeling, water filtration, soil permeability and porosity, water temperature and salinity, and quadrant studies. Activities are organized so that the…

Leonhardt, Nina A.

382

Ecology and Pedagogy: On the Educational Implications of Postwar Environmental Philosophy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Environmentalism, an ethical imperative to preserve and protect nature, has become in the last decade a central ethical, political and pedagogic theme. Against this background, this article focuses on the postwar philosophy of the German-Jewish scholar Hans Jonas (1903-93). It points to Jonas's radical theory of pedagogic responsibility, and to…

Hotam, Yotam

2010-01-01

383

The Geographic Information System component of the Hanford Environmental Information System. Requirements analysis for HEISGIS  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) has been developed to manage the data from the characterization and environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site. HEISGIS is the Geographic Information Systems component of HEIS. This report analyzes the HEISGIS functional requirements as articulated by the members of a GIS subcommittee established by the HEIS Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) in a series of meetings. These functionalities are identified throughout this report, but no implementation commitment is made. This requirements analysis document will be followed by a brief list of the functionalities that will be implemented in FY91 and a description of the requisite acceptance test criteria.

Tzemos, S.; Overton, E.S.

1992-01-01

384

Predictable Variation of Range-Sizes across an Extreme Environmental Gradient in a Lizard Adaptive Radiation: Evolutionary and Ecological Inferences  

PubMed Central

Large-scale patterns of current species geographic range-size variation reflect historical dynamics of dispersal and provide insights into future consequences under changing environments. Evidence suggests that climate warming exerts major damage on high latitude and elevation organisms, where changes are more severe and available space to disperse tracking historical niches is more limited. Species with longer generations (slower adaptive responses), such as vertebrates, and with restricted distributions (lower genetic diversity, higher inbreeding) in these environments are expected to be particularly threatened by warming crises. However, a well-known macroecological generalization (Rapoport's rule) predicts that species range-sizes increase with increasing latitude-elevation, thus counterbalancing the impact of climate change. Here, I investigate geographic range-size variation across an extreme environmental gradient and as a function of body size, in the prominent Liolaemus lizard adaptive radiation. Conventional and phylogenetic analyses revealed that latitudinal (but not elevational) ranges significantly decrease with increasing latitude-elevation, while body size was unrelated to range-size. Evolutionarily, these results are insightful as they suggest a link between spatial environmental gradients and range-size evolution. However, ecologically, these results suggest that Liolaemus might be increasingly threatened if, as predicted by theory, ranges retract and contract continuously under persisting climate warming, potentially increasing extinction risks at high latitudes and elevations. PMID:22194953

Pincheira-Donoso, Daniel

2011-01-01

385

Ecology and Environmental Quality, A Selected and Annotated Bibliography for Biologists and Earth Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a selected and annotated bibliography compiled and published by the Syracuse University Libraries and specifically designed for those seeking information regarding the biological aspects of air, land, and water pollution, as well as information concerning geographic and geologic facets of the biosphere. No attempt has been made to compile…

Watkins, Jessie B.

386

USER-CUSTOMIZED ENVIRONMENTAL MAPPING AND DECISION SUPPORT USING NASA WORLD WIND AND DOE GENIE PRO SOFTWARE  

EPA Science Inventory

Effective environmental stewardship requires timely geospatial information about ecology and environment for informed environmental decision support. Unprecedented public access to high resolution imagery from earth-looking sensors via online virtual earth browsers ...

387

MetaPathways: a modular pipeline for constructing pathway/genome databases from environmental sequence information  

PubMed Central

Background A central challenge to understanding the ecological and biogeochemical roles of microorganisms in natural and human engineered ecosystems is the reconstruction of metabolic interaction networks from environmental sequence information. The dominant paradigm in metabolic reconstruction is to assign functional annotations using BLAST. Functional annotations are then projected onto symbolic representations of metabolism in the form of KEGG pathways or SEED subsystems. Results Here we present MetaPathways, an open source pipeline for pathway inference that uses the PathoLogic algorithm to map functional annotations onto the MetaCyc collection of reactions and pathways, and construct environmental Pathway/Genome Databases (ePGDBs) compatible with the editing and navigation features of Pathway Tools. The pipeline accepts assembled or unassembled nucleotide sequences, performs quality assessment and control, predicts and annotates noncoding genes and open reading frames, and produces inputs to PathoLogic. In addition to constructing ePGDBs, MetaPathways uses MLTreeMap to build phylogenetic trees for selected taxonomic anchor and functional gene markers, converts General Feature Format (GFF) files into concatenated GenBank files for ePGDB construction based on third-party annotations, and generates useful file formats including Sequin files for direct GenBank submission and gene feature tables summarizing annotations, MLTreeMap trees, and ePGDB pathway coverage summaries for statistical comparisons. Conclusions MetaPathways provides users with a modular annotation and analysis pipeline for predicting metabolic interaction networks from environmental sequence information using an alternative to KEGG pathways and SEED subsystems mapping. It is extensible to genomic and transcriptomic datasets from a wide range of sequencing platforms, and generates useful data products for microbial community structure and function analysis. The MetaPathways software package, installation instructions, and example data can be obtained from http://hallam.microbiology.ubc.ca/MetaPathways. PMID:23800136

2013-01-01

388

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology  

E-print Network

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology and Environmental Sciences This cross of ecology and environmental sciences, within the unparalleled natural laboratory that is the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Particular program strengths include terrestrial and aquatic ecology, environmental

Lawrence, Rick L.

389

Ecological site-based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing accelerated soil erosion management in rangelands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Accelerated soil erosion occurs when anthropogenic processes modify soil, vegetation or climatic conditions causing erosion rates at a location to exceed their natural variability. Identifying where and when accelerated erosion occurs is a critical first step toward its effective management. Here we explore how erosion assessments structured in the context of ecological sites (a land classification based on soils, landscape setting and ecological potential) and their vegetation states (plant assemblages that may change due to management) can inform systems for reducing accelerated soil erosion in rangelands. We evaluated aeolian horizontal sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Across the ecological sites, plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated vegetation states were consistently susceptible to aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion. Both processes were found to be highly variable for grassland and grass-succulent states across the ecological sites at the plot scale (0.25 Ha). We identify vegetation thresholds that define cover levels below which rapid (exponential) increases in aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion occur across the ecological sites and vegetation states. Aeolian sediment flux and fluvial erosion in the study area can be effectively controlled when bare ground cover is 100 cm in length is less than ~35%. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of areas to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the range of natural variability should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds identified here will enable identification of areas susceptible to accelerated soil erosion and the development of practical management solutions.

Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Duniway, Michael C.

2014-01-01

390

Information to help reduce environmental impacts from freshwater oil spills  

SciTech Connect

The American Petroleum Institute (API) has been working since 1990 to provide information to help the response community minimize the impact of spills to pared jointly with the US inland freshwater. Projects have included a manual, pre National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to give guidance on the cleanup techniques that will minimize environmental impacts on spills in freshwater habitats. Nearing completion are a literature review and annotated bibliography of the environmental and human health effects of oil spilled in freshwater habitats. The use of chemical treating agents for freshwater spill applications is being studied with input from other industry and government groups. A project has begun, with funding from API, the Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research and Development Program, NOAA, the Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC), and the US Department of Energy, to evaluate in situ burning of oil spilled in marshes.

Fritz, D.E. [Amoco Corp., Naperville, IL (United States); Steen, A.E. [American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31

391

The effects of exposure to environmental factors on Heart Rate Variability: an ecological perspective.  

PubMed

The impact of human exposure to environmental factors on Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was examined in the urban space of Tel-Aviv-Jaffa. Four environmental factors were investigated: thermal and social loads; CO concentrations and noise. Levels of HRV are explained mainly by subjective social stresses, noise and CO. The most interesting result is the fact that while subjective social stress and noise increase HRV, low levels of CO are reducing HRV to some extent moderating the impact of subjective social stress and noise. Beyond the poisoning effect of CO and the fact that extremely low levels of HRV associated with high dozes of CO increase risk for life, low levels of CO may have a narcotic effect, as it is measured by HRV. The effects of thermal loads on HRV are negligible probably due to the use of behavioral means in order to neutralize heat and cold effects. PMID:23477780

Schnell, Izhak; Potchter, Oded; Epstein, Yoram; Yaakov, Yaron; Hermesh, Hagai; Brenner, Shmuel; Tirosh, Emanuel

2013-12-01

392

Ecological theatre and the evolutionary game: how environmental and demographic factors determine payoffs in evolutionary games.  

PubMed

In the standard approach to evolutionary games and replicator dynamics, differences in fitness can be interpreted as an excess from the mean Malthusian growth rate in the population. In the underlying reasoning, related to an analysis of "costs" and "benefits", there is a silent assumption that fitness can be described in some type of units. However, in most cases these units of measure are not explicitly specified. Then the question arises: are these theories testable? How can we measure "benefit" or "cost"? A natural language, useful for describing and justifying comparisons of strategic "cost" versus "benefits", is the terminology of demography, because the basic events that shape the outcome of natural selection are births and deaths. In this paper, we present the consequences of an explicit analysis of births and deaths in an evolutionary game theoretic framework. We will investigate different types of mortality pressures, their combinations and the possibility of trade-offs between mortality and fertility. We will show that within this new approach it is possible to model how strictly ecological factors such as density dependence and additive background fitness, which seem neutral in classical theory, can affect the outcomes of the game. We consider the example of the Hawk-Dove game, and show that when reformulated in terms of our new approach new details and new biological predictions are produced. PMID:22936541

Argasinski, K; Broom, M

2013-10-01

393

Construction of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action of granting a site use permit to construct and operate a conference center on an approximately 70-acre tract of land on the Savannah River Site (SRS). While the proposed action requires an administrative decision by DOE, this EA reviews the linked action of physically constructing and operating a conference center. The SRS is a DOE-owned nuclear production facility encompassing approximately 200,000 acres in southwestern South Carolina. The proposed conference center would have an area of approximately 4,000 square feet, and would infrequently accommodate as many as 150 people, with the average being about 20 people per day. In addition to the No-Action alternative, under which the Research Foundation would not require the 70-acre tract of SRS land for a conference center, this EA considers site preservation. Under Site Preservation only minimal activities necessary to the SRS mission would occur, thereby establishing the lower limits of environmental consequences. A review conducted under the SRS permitting process identified no other forms of possible site development. Similarly, SRS areas identified in the Nuclear Complex Reconfiguration Site Proposal (DOE, 199la) do not include the conference center site area in proposed weapons complex reconfiguration activities. As a consequence, this EA does not consider other forms of possible site development as alternatives. The potential environmental consequences associated with the action of constructing and operating a conference center include impacts to cultural resources and impacts from construction activities, primarily related to land clearing (5 to 10 acres) and providing access to the site.

Not Available

1993-07-01

394

A social-ecological approach to voluntary environmental initiatives: the case of nature-based tourism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the role of voluntary environmental initiatives by the tourism industry to alleviate social dilemmas\\u000a for the management of natural resources. The objective is to explore whether previous findings on the determinants of voluntary\\u000a action in the management of common-pool resources (CPR) also apply to a sector, such as tourism, where non-extractive uses\\u000a are dominant. The paper applies

Esther Blanco

2011-01-01

395

Technical procedures for ecology: Environmental field program, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Final draft  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains Technical Procedures pursuant to the Land Use Site Study Plan including walkover surveys for threatened, endangered, or candidate species; vegetation classification and mapping; reclamation planning; wetland and floodplain determination and characterization of playas; wildlife habitat mapping methods; mammal sampling; bird survey methods; reptile and amphibian survey methods; preexisting environmental; stress and disturbance studies methods; voucher specimens for plants; and voucher specimens to wildlife. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1987-08-01

396

Environmental geochemistry and ecological risk of vanadium pollution in Panzhihua mining and smelting area, Sichuan, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vanadium is a trace element widely distributed in the Earth’s crust. Naturally high levels of vanadium are recognized mainly\\u000a in basic rocks and minerals, particularly in titaniferous magnetite. And the anthropogenic sources of vanadium include fossil\\u000a fuel combustion and wastes including steel-industry slags. In the last few years, the authors have made investigations and\\u000a assessments on the environmental geochemistry and

Yanguo Teng; Shijun Ni; Chengjiang Zhang; Jinsheng Wang; Xueyu Lin; Yi Huang

2006-01-01

397

Connecting Urban Youth with their Environment: The Impact of an Urban Ecology Course on Student Content Knowledge, Environmental Attitudes and Responsible Behaviors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study explores the impact of an urban ecology program on participating middle school students' understanding of science and pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors. We gathered pre and post survey data from four classes and found significant gains in scientific knowledge, but no significant changes in student beliefs regarding the environment. We interviewed 12 students to better understand their beliefs. Although student responses showed they had learned discrete content knowledge, they lacked any ecological understanding of the environment and had mixed perceptions of the course's relevance in their lives. Students reported doing pro-environmental behaviors, but overwhelmingly contributed such actions to influences other than the urban ecology course. Analyses indicated a disconnect between the course, the environment, and the impact on the students' lives. Consequently, this suggests the importance of recognizing the implications of context, culture, and identity development of urban youth. Perhaps by providing explicit connections and skills in urban environmental programs through engaging students in environmental scientific investigations that stem from their own issues and questions can increase student engagement, motivation, and self-efficacy of environmental issues.

Hashimoto-Martell, Erin A.; McNeill, Katherine L.; Hoffman, Emily M.

2012-10-01

398

Aquatic & Riparian Ecology (see Environmental Natural Resources Institute)........................................ 786-4963  

E-print Network

", Professor Art History 786-4704 McPeck, B. Hugh, Associate Professor/Sculpture 786-1003 Mealor, Garry Information Director 786-4625 Blair, Campbell, Associate Men's Ice Hockey Coach 786-1292 Calvert, Robin

Pantaleone, Jim

399

Managing environmental information in the age of outsourcing.  

SciTech Connect

As more data gathering, analysis, and tracking tasks are outsourced the need for multiple contractors and military personnel to input, update, access, store, and track Mormation is becoming critical to efficient functioning and managing of environmental projects and programs at military installations. This paper presents two case studies detailing the way two organizations--the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in Colorado, and the 611th Air Support Group (611 ASG) in Alaska--are managing complex data using web-based technology. RMA is involved in one of the largest environmental cleanup programs in the Department of Defense. As such, large volumes of environmental data and documents must be generates stored, and tracked. Often these documents are prepared by multiple contractors and are reviewed by several parties or groups. To manage environmental information and to ensure that it meets compliance requirements more efficiently, RMA has developed an electronic document tracking and distribution system. This system allows access to up-to-date information, including a detailed review of all pertinent regulatory and other requirements at RMA. The dynamic system includes milestones, review deadlines, submission deadlines, and other requirements for managing the environmental program. The 611 ASG manages more than 30 remote installations in Alaska, many of which are operated by contractor personnel. These installations contain hundreds of buildings that are constantly being modified because of exposure to harsh arctic climates; some of them have been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. To meet regulatory requirements for cultural resources management as well as engineering requirements for upkeep of buildings, a database was developed to store and analyze building data. The database has a web-based interface that allows anyone with the correct access codes to input new data, modify existing data, or query the database using a number of standard reports. This system allows the 611 ASG to centrally manage its building information while also permitting installation contractors to update and use data through the Internet from their remote locations.

Perkins, S.; Smith, K.; Whorton, M.; Williams, G.

1999-03-08

400

GENESIS: GPS Environmental and Earth Science Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation reviews the GPS ENvironmental and Earth Science Information System (GENESIS). The objectives of GENESIS are outlined (1) Data Archiving, searching and distribution for science data products derived from Space borne TurboRogue Space Receivers for GPS science and other ground based GPS receivers, (2) Data browsing using integrated visualization tools, (3) Interactive web/java-based data search and retrieval, (4) Data subscription service, (5) Data migration from existing GPS archived data, (6) On-line help and documentation, and (7) participation in the WP-ESIP federation. The presentation reviews the products and services of Genesis, and the technology behind the system.

Hajj, George

1999-01-01

401

Phytoplankton Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site describes phytoplankton ecology research by marine ecologists at Mote Marine Laboratory (MML), an independent, nonprofit research organization based in Sarasota, Florida. The emphasis of MML's phytoplankton ecology research is the photophysiology of marine algae -- with recent emphasis on the ability to predict and possibly mitigate blooms of the toxic marine dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium breve. The no-frills phytoplankton ecology homepage describes research and offers data (maps, figures, tables) from 1998 and 1999 projects on Red Tide transects, Nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations, and Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) transect data, among several others. The site also offers general information on Red Tides, Red Tide conditions in Southwest Florida, a chronology of historic Red Tide events, and links to related resources.

402

Four opportunities for studies of ecological succession.  

PubMed

Lessons learned from the study of ecological succession have much to offer contemporary environmental problem solving but these lessons are being underutilized. As anthropogenic disturbances increase, succession is more relevant than ever. In this review, we suggest that succession is particularly suitable to address concerns about biodiversity loss, climate change, invasive species, and ecological restoration. By incorporating modern experimental techniques and linking results across environmental gradients with meta-analyses, studies of succession can substantially improve our understanding of other ecological phenomena. Succession can help predict changes in biodiversity and ecosystem services impacted by invasive species and climate change and guide manipulative responses to these disruptions by informing restoration efforts. Succession is still a critical, integrative concept that is central to ecology. PMID:21295370

Prach, Karel; Walker, Lawrence R

2011-03-01

403

Multivariate analyses in microbial ecology  

PubMed Central

Environmental microbiology is undergoing a dramatic revolution due to the increasing accumulation of biological information and contextual environmental parameters. This will not only enable a better identification of diversity patterns, but will also shed more light on the associated environmental conditions, spatial locations, and seasonal fluctuations, which could explain such patterns. Complex ecological questions may now be addressed using multivariate statistical analyses, which represent a vast potential of techniques that are still underexploited. Here, well-established exploratory and hypothesis-driven approaches are reviewed, so as to foster their addition to the microbial ecologist toolbox. Because such tools aim at reducing data set complexity, at identifying major patterns and putative causal factors, they will certainly find many applications in microbial ecology. PMID:17892477

Ramette, Alban

2007-01-01

404

Lead: Aspects of its ecology and environmental toxicity. [physiological effects of lead compound contamination of environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis of lead toxicity in the Hawaiian environment was conducted. It was determined that lead enters the environment as an industrial contaminant resulting from the combustion of leaded gasoline. The amount of lead absorbed by the plants in various parts of the Hawaiian Islands is reported. The disposition of lead in the sediments of canals and yacht basins was investigated. The methods for conducting the surveys of lead content are described. Possible consequences of continued environmental pollution by burning leaded gasoline are discussed.

Siegel, S. M.

1973-01-01

405

The EMAP: Ecological indicators of condition  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, the Science Advisory Board to the EPA recommended a program to monitor ecological status and trends, as well as the development of innovative methods, for anticipating emerging environmental problems before a crisis. The multi-agency Environmental Monitoring And Assessment Program (EMAP) evolved with the following program elements: (1) a focus on environmental values and policy-relevant questions; (2) an activity that monitors indicators of ecological condition rather than individual stressors or pollutants; (3) an assessment-driven approach that provides probability-based, scientific results with known certainty; and (4) an activity that translates results into information useful to environmental policy makers and managers. Establishing baseline environmental conditions has received increasing attention with the growing awareness of impacts on human health and environmental integrity from global atmospheric change, acidic deposition, the loss of wetland habitats, and decreasing biodiversity. Monitoring programs can provide critical, quantitative results for scientific assessments of the complex effects of pollutants and natural changes on ecosystems. The goal of the EPA component of EMAP is to conduct research to develop place-based (e.g., large and small geographic scales) ecological monitoring and assessment. EPA/EMAP conducts research to develop and evaluate indicators of ecological condition and to detect in the long-term changes and trends in indicators and associated stresses and develops monitoring strategies to identify conditions of ecological resources in larger, high priority regions or in smaller, regional studies, such as watersheds. With its focus on long-term monitoring and assessment research and research on indicators of ecological condition, the EPA/EMAP can better determine where environmental programs are working to protect, improve, and maintain the quality of our nation`s ecological resources.

Austin, H.K.

1995-12-01

406

Fire Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forest fires have become a regular summertime occurrence in North America, sparking debate about the proper role of fire on the land. The following websites examine fires and fire ecology in different ecosystems, regions, and time periods. The first site (1), from the USGS-Western Ecological Research Center shares information about fire ecology research in the California shrublands, Sierra Nevada forests, and Mohave and Sonoran deserts. The second site (2) features the Fire Ecology Center at Texas Tech University. The Fire Ecology Center focuses on the role of fire in grassland ecosystems and their website contains information on current research, publications, managing pastures, managing problem plants, and more. The third site (3), from the USGS-Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center contains "an annotated bibliography on fire in North American wetland ecosystems and a subject index of all fire-related literature that has appeared in Wildlife Review." Hosted by Yellowstone National Park, the fourth site (4) addresses wildland fires in Yellowstone. The Park website presents brief sections on Fire Ecology, Fire Monitoring, Prescribed Fire, and Fire Effects -- to name a few. The fifth (5) site, from the Canadian Forest Service, provides information about forest fires in Canada including weekly fire statistics, fire research, daily fire maps, a fire database, and more. Part of a great site on the land use history of the Colorado Plateau from Northern Arizona University, the sixth site (6) offers a brief overview of wildfire history and ecology on the Plateau with links to information about ponderosa pine fire ecology, reintroduction of fire to forest ecosystems, and fire ecology research studies. The seventh site (7), from DiscoverySchool.com, contains a lesson plan on forest fire ecology for grade levels 9-12. The lesson spans two class periods and the site provides objectives, materials needed, discussion questions, academic standards, and more. The final (8) website, from the Why Files, "examines the role of fire in natural systems, and the role of science in understanding wildfires." The eleven-page website follows a kid-friendly narrative format and includes a bibliography and glossary.

407

Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (ORIES) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1. 2  

SciTech Connect

The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.

Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.

1993-02-01

408

School of Biological and Chemical Sciences University Marine Biological Station MSc Marine Ecology and Environmental Management  

E-print Network

and other facilities, and to enjoy the experience of being based in a National Facility for Marine Biology;3 Programme Modules Modules comprise a variety of lectures, seminars, and practical and written exercises additional information at a relevant time relating to how these are submitted electronically (for plagiarism

Chittka, Lars

409

The distributional ecology of the maned sloth: environmental influences on its distribution and gaps in knowledge.  

PubMed

The maned sloth Bradypus torquatus (Pilosa, Bradypodidae) is endemic to a small area in the Atlantic Forest of coastal Brazil. It has been listed as a threatened species because of its restricted geographic range, habitat loss and fragmentation, and declining populations. The major objectives of this study were to estimate its potential geographic distribution, the climatic conditions across its distributional range, and to identify suitable areas and potential species strongholds. We developed a model of habitat suitability for the maned sloth using two methods, Maxent and Mahalanobis Distance, based on 42 occurrence points. We evaluated environmental variable importance and the predictive ability of the generated distribution models. Our results suggest that the species distribution could be strongly influenced by environmental factors, mainly temperature seasonality. The modeled distribution of the maned sloth included known areas of occurrence in the Atlantic Forest (Sergipe, Bahia, Espírito Santo, and Rio de Janeiro), but did not match the observed distributional gaps in northern Rio de Janeiro, northern Espírito Santo or southern Bahia. Rather, the model showed that these areas are climatically suitable for the maned sloth, and thus suggests that factors other than climate might be responsible for the absence of species. Suitable areas for maned sloth were located mainly in the mountainous region of central Rio de Janeiro throughout Espírito Santo and to the coastal region of southern Bahia. We indicate 17 stronghold areas and recommended survey areas for the maned sloth. In addition, we highlight specific areas for conservation, including the current network protected areas. Our results can be applied for novel surveys and discovery of unknown populations, and help the selection of priority areas for management and conservation planning, especially of rare and relatively cryptic species directed associated with forested habitats. PMID:25338139

Moreira, Danielle de Oliveira; Leite, Gustavo Rocha; Siqueira, Marinez Ferreira de; Coutinho, Bruno Rocha; Zanon, Mariana Santos; Mendes, Sérgio Lucena

2014-01-01

410

The Distributional Ecology of the Maned Sloth: Environmental Influences on Its Distribution and Gaps in Knowledge  

PubMed Central

The maned sloth Bradypus torquatus (Pilosa, Bradypodidae) is endemic to a small area in the Atlantic Forest of coastal Brazil. It has been listed as a threatened species because of its restricted geographic range, habitat loss and fragmentation, and declining populations. The major objectives of this study were to estimate its potential geographic distribution, the climatic conditions across its distributional range, and to identify suitable areas and potential species strongholds. We developed a model of habitat suitability for the maned sloth using two methods, Maxent and Mahalanobis Distance, based on 42 occurrence points. We evaluated environmental variable importance and the predictive ability of the generated distribution models. Our results suggest that the species distribution could be strongly influenced by environmental factors, mainly temperature seasonality. The modeled distribution of the maned sloth included known areas of occurrence in the Atlantic Forest (Sergipe, Bahia, Espírito Santo, and Rio de Janeiro), but did not match the observed distributional gaps in northern Rio de Janeiro, northern Espírito Santo or southern Bahia. Rather, the model showed that these areas are climatically suitable for the maned sloth, and thus suggests that factors other than climate might be responsible for the absence of species. Suitable areas for maned sloth were located mainly in the mountainous region of central Rio de Janeiro throughout Espírito Santo and to the coastal region of southern Bahia. We indicate 17 stronghold areas and recommended survey areas for the maned sloth. In addition, we highlight specific areas for conservation, including the current network protected areas. Our results can be applied for novel surveys and discovery of unknown populations, and help the selection of priority areas for management and conservation planning, especially of rare and relatively cryptic species directed associated with forested habitats. PMID:25338139

Coutinho, Bruno Rocha; Zanon, Mariana Santos; Mendes, Sergio Lucena

2014-01-01

411

Ecologically based municipal land use planning  

SciTech Connect

The book presents compelling evidence and sound arguments that make the case for sound land use policies that will reduce sprawl. The book provides easily understood solutions for municipal land planners dealing with urban sprawl; discusses ecological resources; emphasizes the use of new environmental indicators; and includes the use of the Geographic Information System (GIS) to problem solving.

Honachefsky, W.B.

2000-07-01

412

Ecological-site based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing management of accelerated soil erosion in rangelands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work explores how soil erosion assessments can be structured in the context of ecological sites and site dynamics to inform systems for managing accelerated soil erosion. We evaluated wind and water erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Our results show that wind and water erosion can be highly variable within and among ecological sites. Plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated states were consistently susceptible to both wind and water erosion. However, grassland plots and plots with a grass-succulent mix had a high indicated susceptibility to wind and water erosion respectively. Vegetation thresholds for controlling erosion are identified that transcend the ecological sites and their respective states. The thresholds define vegetation cover levels at which rapid (exponential) increases in erosion rates begin to occur, suggesting that erosion in the study ecosystem can be effectively controlled when bare ground cover is <20% of a site or total ground cover is >50%. Similarly, our results show that erosion can be controlled when the cover of canopy interspaces >50 cm in length reaches ~50%, the cover of canopy interspaces >100 cm in length reaches ~35% or the cover of canopy interspaces >150 cm in length reaches ~20%. This process-based understanding can be applied, along with knowledge of the differential sensitivity of vegetation states, to improve erosion management systems. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of sites to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the natural variability of sites should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds and natural variability of ecological sites will enable improved identification of where and when accelerated soil erosion occurs and the development of practical management solutions.

Webb, N.; Herrick, J.; Duniway, M.

2013-12-01

413

The Charles River, Eastern Massachusetts: Scientific Information in Support of Environmental Restoration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Human activity has profoundly altered the Charles River and its watershed over the past 375 years. Restoration of environmental quality in the watershed has become a high priority for private- and public-sector organizations across the region. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs worked together to coordinate the efforts of the various organizations. One result of this initiative has been a series of scientific studies that provide critical information concerning some of the major hydrologic and ecological concerns in the watershed. These studies have focused upon: * Streamflows - Limited aquifer storage, growing water demands, and the spread of impervious surfaces are some of the factors exacerbating low summer streamflows in headwater areas of the watershed. Coordinated management of withdrawals, wastewater returns, and stormwater runoff could substantially increase low streamflows in the summer. Innovative approaches to flood control, including preservation of upstream wetland storage capacity and construction of a specially designed dam at the river mouth, have greatly reduced flooding in the lower part of the watershed in recent decades. * Water quality - Since the mid-1990s, the bacterial quality of the Charles River has improved markedly, because discharges from combined sewer overflows and the number of illicit sewer connections to municipal storm drains have been reduced. Improved management of stormwater runoff will likely be required, however, for full attainment of State and Federal water-quality standards. Phosphorus inputs from a variety of sources remain an important water-quality problem. * Fish communities and habitat quality - The Charles River watershed supports a varied fish community of about 20 resident and migratory species. Habitat conditions for fish and other aquatic species have improved in many parts of the river system in recent years. However, serious challenges remain, including the control of nutrients, algae, and invasive plants, mitigation of dam impacts, addressing remaining sources of bacteria to the river, and remediation of contaminated bottom habitat and the nontidal salt wedge in the lower river.

Weiskel, Peter K.

2007-01-01

414

Prediction of the environmental fate and aquatic ecological impact of nitrobenzene in the Songhua River using the modified AQUATOX model.  

PubMed

An accidental discharge of nitrobenzene happened in November 2005 in the Songhua River, China. The AQUATOX model was modified and adapted to simulate the time-dependent nitrobenzene distribution in this multimedia aquatic system and its potential ecological impacts. Nitrobenzene concentrations in flowing water, sediment, and biota were predicted. Based on the initial concentrations of nitrobenzene observed in the field during the accidental discharge, that is, 0.167-1.47 mg/L at different river segments, the predicted water concentrations of nitrobenzene would be lower than 0.02 and 0.002 mg/L after twenty days and one month, respectively. Both model prediction and field observation were in good agreement. The predicted nitrobenzene concentrations in sediments and aquatic organisms would be lower than 0.025 and 0.002 mg/kg, respectively, after two months. Among the environmental factors affecting nitrobenzene concentrations in water, inflow water dilution, water temperature, and initial concentration were the most important, by sensitivity analysis. Comparing the perturbed simulation and control simulation, the biomass changes for diatoms and mussel were significantly affected, whereas, no influence on other organisms could be predicted. Therefore the results indicated that nitrobenzene pollution in the Songhua River should have a limited impact on the benthos community. PMID:18814570

Lei, Bingli; Huang, Shengbiao; Qiao, Min; Li, Tianyun; Wang, Zijian

2008-01-01

415

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information Processing and Communications Systems  

E-print Network

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information Processing and Communications Systems Abstract: Creating a Sustainable Information and Communication Infrastructure Modern society's dependence on information and communication infrastructure (ICI) is so deeply

416

A GIS APPLICATION AND RESOURCE TOOL FOR USE ON STUDIES OF THE LAKE TEXOMA ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

Investigations are underway at Lake Texoma to develop tools and information needed to evaluate the transport and attenuation of contaminants and stressors in a lake ecosystem, and link them to observable ecological effects. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), ...

417

Molecular ecological responses of dinoflagellate, Karenia mikimotoi to environmental nitrate stress.  

PubMed

Karenia mikimotoi is one of the most important harmful algal species in the Chinese coastal waters, and which produce hemolytic toxins and ichthyotoxins, resulting in devastating economic losses. Previous studies demonstrated that the increase of nitrate concentration could promote the growth and reproduction of K. mikimotoi. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regarding the effects of nitrate on the K. mikimotoi photosynthesis, nucleic acid replication and differential protein expression remain to be elucidated. Our study demonstrated that nitrate stress inhibited growth of K. mikimotoi (p<0.01). Algal chlorophyll fluorescence intensity varied slightly while algal cell cycle succession was significantly retarded by nitrate stress (p<0.05). Sixteen proteins were detected only in nitrate-limited cultures which related to nitrate transport, signal transduction, amino acid metabolism, DNA repair and hemolysin manufacture. Eleven proteins were detected only in nitrate-replete sample and were related to photorespiration, reproduction and growth, assistance of protein modification, cytoskeleton stability and signal transduction. Based on analysis of differential proteomic functional annotations, we hypothesized a proteomic response mechanism of K. mikimotoi to environmental nitrate stress. PMID:22019194

Lei, Qiang-Yong; Lü, Song-Hui

2011-12-01

418

Environmental Influences on the Spatial Ecology of Juvenile Smalltooth Sawfish (Pristis pectinata): Results from Acoustic Monitoring  

PubMed Central

To aid recovery efforts of smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) populations in U.S. waters a research project was developed to assess how changes in environmental conditions within estuarine areas affected the presence, movements, and activity space of this endangered species. Forty juvenile P. pectinata were fitted with acoustic tags and monitored within the lower 27 km of the Caloosahatchee River estuary, Florida, between 2005 and 2007. Sawfish were monitored within the study site from 1 to 473 days, and the number of consecutive days present ranged from 1 to 125. Residency index values for individuals varied considerably, with annual means highest in 2005 (0.95) and lowest in 2007 (0.73) when several P. pectinata moved upriver beyond detection range during drier conditions. Mean daily activity space was 1.42 km of river distance. The distance between 30-minute centers of activity was typically <0.1 km, suggesting limited movement over short time scales. Salinity electivity analysis demonstrated an affinity for salinities between 18 and at least 24 psu, suggesting movements are likely made in part, to remain within this range. Thus, freshwater flow from Lake Okeechobee (and its effect on salinity) affects the location of individuals within the estuary, although it remains unclear whether or not these movements are threatening recovery. PMID:21347294

Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; Yeiser, Beau G.; Wiley, Tonya R.; Poulakis, Gregg R.; Stevens, Philip W.; Heupel, Michelle R.

2011-01-01

419

Historical Analysis, a Valuable Tool in Community-Based Environmental Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

A historical analysis of the ecological consequences of development can be a valuable tool in community-based environmental protection. These studies can engage the public in environmental issues and lead to informed decision making. Historical studies provide an understanding of how current ecological conditions arose, provide information to identify past pollutant inputs, identify modification or loss of habitat, help identify changes

Carol E Pesch; Jonathan Garber

2001-01-01

420

A Conceptual Framework for Evaluating the Domains of Applicability of Ecological Models and its Implementation in the Ecological Production Function Library  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of computational ecological models to inform environmental management and policy has proliferated in the past 25 years. These models have become essential tools as linkages and feedbacks between human actions and ecological responses can be complex, and as funds for sampl...

421

INFORMATION SHARING AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE DANISH ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AND THE CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

-based chemicals to chemicals based on renewable resources; · promoting research on environmental toxicology, greenINFORMATION SHARING AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE DANISH ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AND THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ON GREEN CHEMISTRY The Danish Environmental Protection Agency and the California

422

Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS): Phase I, System Definition Document. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Phase 1--System Definition Document documents the basis for establishing a consolidated environmental data base and information system for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office (OR) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). The Automated Data Processing System Development Methodology (ADPSDM), an Energy Systems procedure to assist in developing scientific and technical systems, was used to guide the preparation of the feasibility study and the system requirements definition, both of which are contained in this document. The Feasibility Study (Part 1) documents the existing system and data management practices and establishes and analyzes preliminary alternatives to be considered for the development of a consolidated system, i.e., the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS). Alternatives were analyzed for technical and operational feasibility, benefits, and risks. Performance criteria used to rank alternatives included standardization, documentation, robustness, integration, reliability, and predictability. Of the three alternatives studied--request/referral, distributed, and centralized--the centralized system was selected to be most feasible because of its conformance to the performance criteria.

Not Available

1992-06-01

423

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document  

SciTech Connect

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-11-01

424

Wildfire History and Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of a great site on the land use history of the Colorado Plateau from Northern Arizona University, this site offers a brief overview of wildfire history and ecology on the Plateau with links to information about ponderosa pine fire ecology, reintroduction of fire to forest ecosystems, and fire ecology research studies.

2008-09-17

425

Characterizing Variability and Uncertainty in Exposure Assessments Improves links to Environmental Decision-Making  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Decisions often rely upon observational data or model estimates. For instance, the evaluation of human health or ecological risks often includes information on pollutant emission rates, environmental concentrations, exposures, and exposure/dose-response data. Whet...

426

Rev. col. (Terre Vie), suppt. 10, 2008. THE FRENCH INFORMATION SYSTEM ON SAPROXYLIC BEETLE ECOLOGY  

E-print Network

patrimoniale, (iii) une table écologique, incluant 11 descripteurs du bois ou traits écologiques caractérisant table, including 11 wood parameters or ecological traits that categorize the association of a species are dominant in saproxylic assemblages (20% of the saproxylic organisms; Stok- land & Meyke, 2008). Furthermore

Boyer, Edmond

427

Locomotor morphometry of the Pachydactylus radiation of lizards (Gekkota: Gekkonidae): a phylogenetically and ecologically informed analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pachydactylus radiation comprises a diverse group of African gekkonids that exploit a variety of microhabitats and exhibit both climbing and terrestrial locomotion. The phylogeny of this radiation is well supported, making it a promising candidate for the investigation of relationships between limb proportions, ecology, and behav- iour. Skeletal and external measurements were recorded for an array of taxa and

Megan K. Johnson; Anthony P. Russell; Aaron M. Bauer

2005-01-01

428

Modelling bryophyte distribution based on ecological information for extent of occurrence assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

For some groups such as bryophytes, the IUCN distribution criteria are of critical importance to evaluate threat status, since other parameters cannot be determined readily. In this study, we propose the use of ecological niche modelling methods to estimate the extent of occurrence (EOO) of species. Herbarium (LISU) collection data are used to estimate the potential distribution of bryophytes based

Cecília Sérgio; Rui Figueira; David Draper; Rui Menezes; António Jorge Sousa

2007-01-01

429

Industrial ecology.  

PubMed

Industrial ecology addresses issues that will impact future production, use, and disposal technologies; proper use of the concept should reduce significantly the resources devoted to potential remediation in the future. This cradle-to-reincarnation production philosophy includes industrial processes that are environmentally sound and products that are environmentally safe during use and economically recyclable after use without adverse impact on the environment or on the net cost to society. This will require an industry-university-government round table to set the strategy and agenda for progress. PMID:11607254

Patel, C K

1992-02-01

430

FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

2011-01-01

431

Hierarchy Theory in Sociology, Ecology, and Resource Management: A Conceptual Model for Natural Resource or Environmental Sociology and Socioecological Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article argues that hierarchy theory can be used as a conceptual bridge to facilitate analysis of socioecological systems (SES). An SES model is proposed based on a synthesis of structuration theory in sociology and hierarchy theory in ecology. The model is process rather than component based by relating institutional processes with ecological processes at multiple scales. The model also

WILLIAM A. WARREN

2005-01-01

432

Applications of Geographic Information Systems technology for environmental planning and management in North Carolina  

Microsoft Academic Search

The State of North Carolina is developing a multipurpose geographic information systems (GIS) database for widespread use. The database currently consists of more than fifty categories of information state wide. In addition to basic planimetric information, the data include many categories of environmental significance. Much of the database has proven useful to planners, managers, and consultants involved with environmental policy-making

Z. Nagy; C. Van Der Wiele-Evans

1993-01-01

433

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: EXAMPLE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REPORT FOR ESTUARIES  

EPA Science Inventory

EMAP is a comprehensive, multiagency program designed to assess the condition of the nation's ecological resources at national, regional, and subregional scales. ata and information collected by EMAP will be integrated with data from other monitoring programs and environmental in...

434

NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment: A large-scale study of environmental change in Western North America and its implications for ecological systems and society  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate change in high northern latitudes is unfolding faster than anywhere else on Earth, resulting in widespread changes in landscape structure and ecosystem function in the Arctic-Boreal Region (ABR). Recognizing its sensitivity, vulnerability and global importance, national- and international-level scientific efforts are now advancing our ability to observe, understand and model the complex, multi-scale processes that drive the ABR's natural and social systems. Long at the edge of our mental map of the world, environmental change in the ABR is increasingly becoming the focus of numerous policy discussions at the highest levels of decision-making. To improve our understanding of environmental change and its impacts in the ABR, the Terrestrial Ecology Program of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning its next major field campaign for Western Canada and Alaska. The field campaign will be based on the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) concept as described in the Revised Executive Summary from the ABoVE Scoping Study Report. The original Scoping Study Report provided the proof-of-concept demonstration of scientific importance and feasibility for this large-scale study. In early 2013, NASA announced the selection of the ABoVE Science Definition Team, which is charged with developing the Concise Experiment Plan for the campaign. Here, we outline the conceptual basis for ABoVE and present the compelling rationale explaining the scientific and societal importance of the study. We present the current status of the planning process, which includes development of the science questions to drive ABoVE research; the study design for the field campaign to address them; and the interagency and international collaborations necessary for implementation. The ABoVE study will focus on 1) developing a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability to climate change in the ABR, and 2) providing the scientific information required to develop options for societal responses to the impacts of these changes. The field campaign will emphasize research that integrates data collected by airborne and spaceborne sensors with information obtained from field studies and ground-based observations. Other key components of ABoVE research include the process-level analyses, scientific syntheses, and modeling needed for understanding ecosystem responses and societal implications.

Kasischke, E. S.; Hayes, D. J.; Griffith, P. C.; Larson, E. K.; Wickland, D. E.

2013-12-01

435

Internet Use and Child Development: Validation of the Ecological Techno-Subsystem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Johnson and Puplampu recently proposed the "ecological techno-subsystem", a refinement to Bronfenbrenner's theoretical organization of environmental influences on child development. The ecological techno-subsystem includes child interaction with both living (e.g., peers) and nonliving (e.g., hardware) elements of communication, information, and…

Johnson, Genevieve Marie

2010-01-01

436

Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

1992-09-01

437

An evaluation of ecological information on Australia’s northern tropical rivers and wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The northern tropical river and wetland systems of Australia cover a vast and mostly remote area. Comparably little is known\\u000a of wetland type, species diversity, ecological processes and ecosystem services. Systematic inventory and classification is\\u000a lacking and research remains disparate in purpose and coverage. An integrated framework is used to evaluate results from three\\u000a multidisciplinary studies across various scales to

G. P. Lukacs; C. M. Finlayson

2010-01-01

438

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration.

NONE

1995-09-01

439

Restoration Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While not a panacea, the emerging field of restoration ecology provides an important tool for environmental conservation and contributes greatly to our understanding of ecology.The first Web site is the home page of the Society for Ecological Restoration, offering a good starting point for exploring this relatively new discipline (1). The next site (2) provides an overview of the University of Wisconsin's Center for Restoration Ecology, "the first comprehensive, interdisciplinary research team assembled to advance the science and technology of ecosystem restoration." The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration outlines its plans for coastal and estuarine restoration in this Web site (3). The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois has implemented one of the largest tallgrass prairie restorations to date (4). The Kissimmee River Restoration Web site (5) provides a detailed look at this incredibly ambitious dam removal and wetland restoration project in Florida. The next Web site (6) offers a visually-attractive introduction to the restoration efforts of the nonprofit organization RESTORE, focusing on the forests of Maine. The Wildlands Project, another restoration-oriented nonprofit organization, describes its vision of ecosystem conservation in this Web site, which includes a personal brief from distinguished biologist E. O. Wilson. (7). The Wildwood project of the Scottish organization Carrifran offers an interesting contrast to restoration efforts in the US, as much of Scotland has been denuded of its original forests for thousands of years (8).

Sohmer, Rachel.

2002-01-01

440

The Landscape Architecture field of study --both the two-year and three-year programs --offers the ideal context for producing tomorrow's leaders in ecological  

E-print Network

theory, cultural engagement, ecological function and environmental justice all figure prominently engineering, environmental justice, environmental psychology, environmental policy and environmental economics specializing in conservation biology, aquatic and terrestrial ecology, industrial ecology, environmental

Edwards, Paul N.

441

Environmental Geographic Information Systems (EGIS) at Stennis Space Center (SSC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation includes: 1) Background of SSC Environmental GIS (EGIS); 2) Principal Center Activities; 3) SSC's GIS Applications: a) Environmental Emergency Response Tool, b) CERCLA, c) Facilities Master Planning, d) Natural Resource Management and Site Assessment.

Carr, Hugh; Smoot, James; Parikh, Joy

2004-01-01

442

CONSULTANCY ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE  

E-print Network

RESEARCH CONSULTANCY KNOW LEDGE EXCHANGE ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ANIMAL HEALTH & W ELFARE scientific application areas: plant science; animal health and welfare; ecology and environmental science & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Process & Systems Modelling Statistical Methodology RESEARCH Plant Science CONSULTANCY

Edinburgh, University of

443

A study of the environmental information acquisition system based on smart phones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, it proposed a new environmental information acquisition system based on smart phones (Smartphone / Pocket PC) which combined with Geographic Information System (GIS), Global Positioning System (GPS), wireless communication technology in allusion to the current actual situation of environmental protection information acquisition in city environmental protection department. System architecture and working principle is analyzed, and it designs the main modules of the software and hardware. In addition, transport protocols and application of the implementation method have been discussed. Experiments show that the environmental information acquisition system has high precision, easy to use, information transfer with high efficiency and reliability. Not only have that, the paper also discusses the effective strategies of network transmission of data encryption and the image transmission rate improvement. In brief, it can effectively enhance the work efficiency of the city environmental protection department when they collect relevant information.

Xu, Lingyan; Chen, Feixiang; Ni, Shaoliang; Wang, Ling; Wei, Chao; Gong, Bowen

2010-08-01

444

Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Combustion sources  

SciTech Connect

This environmental information handbook was prepared to assist both the non-technical reader (i.e., homeowner) and technical persons (such as researchers, policy analysts, and builders/designers) in understanding the current state of knowledge regarding combustion sources of indoor air pollution. Quantitative and descriptive data addressing the emissions, indoor concentrations, factors influencing indoor concentrations, and health effects of combustion-generated pollutants are provided. In addition, a review of the models, controls, and standards applicable to indoor air pollution from combustion sources is presented. The emphasis is on the residential environment. The data presented here have been compiled from government and privately-funded research results, conference proceedings, technical journals, and recent publications. It is intended to provide the technical reader with a comprehensive overview and reference source on the major indoor air quality aspects relating to indoor combustion activities, including tobacco smoking. In addition, techniques for determining potential concentrations of pollutants in residential settings are presented. This is an update of a 1985 study documenting the state of knowledge of combustion-generated pollutants in the indoor environment. 191 refs., 51 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01

445

Comments on selecting a geographic information system for environmental management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many organizations in environmental fields stand to benefit from the use of a geographic information system (GIS). Selecting a GIS to implement within an organization can be a difficult task that is often required of people with little experience using a GIS. A framework for evaluating competing GIS considers cost, functionality, ease of use, future stability, development potential, support availability, and maintenance costs. Initial cost involves more than the actual purchase price of hardware and software; it includes the cost of building the data base and training users within the organization. Functionality refers to the depth and breadth of capabilities of a GIS. Issues involved in evaluating functionality include the appropriateness of raster vs vector processing and the ability to add your own software. Ease of use is important, but there is generally a trade-off with functionality. The degree of centralization of use of the GIS within the organization affects requirements for ease of use. GIS are rapidly evolving, and as a result it is important to select a system with high potential for future development. With the proliferation of companies offering GIS it is important to select one that is likely to survive and prosper. Similarly, the ability to find support in the forms of technical help, advice, and possibly even skilled employees can be significant.

Woodcock, Curtis E.; Sham, Chi Ho; Shaw, Barbara

1990-05-01

446

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume II  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL\\/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety,

JOSEPH V. GUERRERO; KENNETH A. KUZIO; WILLIAM H. JOHNS; LINDA S. BAYLISS; BRENDA E. BAILEY-WHITE

1999-01-01

447

Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL\\/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories\\/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety,

LINDA S. BAYLISS; JOSEPH V. GUERRERO; WILLIAM H. JOHNS; KENNETH A. KUZIO; BRENDA E. BAILEY-WHITE

1999-01-01

448

Environmental and ecological conditions surrounding the production of large year classes of walleye (Sander vitreus) in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Saginaw Bay walleye population (Sander vitreus) has not fully recovered from a collapse that began in the 1940s and has been dependent on stocking with only limited natural reproduction. Beginning in 2003, and through at least 2005, reproductive success of walleye surged to unprecedented levels. The increase was concurrent with ecological changes in Lake Huron and we sought to quantitatively model which factors most influenced this new dynamic. We developed Ricker stock-recruitment models for both wild and stock fish and evaluated them with second-order Akaike's information criterion to find the best model. Independent variables included adult alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) abundance, spring water temperatures, chlorophyll a levels and total phosphorus levels. In all, 14 models were evaluated for production of wild age-0 walleyes and eight models for stocked age-0 walleyes. For wild walleyes, adult alewife abundance was the dominant factor, accounting for 58% of the variability in age-0 abundance. Production of wild age-0 fish increased when adult alewives were scarce. The only other plausible factor was spring water temperature. Predictably, alewife abundance was not important to stocked fish; instead temperature and adult walleye abundance were more significant variables. The surge in reproductive success for walleyes during 2003-2005 was most likely due to large declines in adult alewives in Lake Huron. While relatively strong year classes (age-1 and up) have been produced as a result of increased age-0 production during 2003-2005, the overall magnitude has not been as great as the initial age-0 abundance originally suggested. It appears that over-winter mortality is higher than in the past and may stem from higher predation or slower growth (lower condition for enduring winter thermal stress). From this it appears that low alewife abundance does not assure strong walleye year classes in Saginaw Bay but may be a prerequisite for them.

Fielder, D.G.; Schaeffer, J.S.; Thomas, M.V.

2007-01-01

449

[Ecological footprint and available ecological capacity in Chongqing region].  

PubMed

Based on the statistical data of Chongqing, the ecological footprint of Chongqing was calculated in this paper. The results showed that the per capita ecological footprint was 1.653566 hm2, per capita ecological capacity was 0.280393 hm2, and ecological surplus of deficit was 1.373173 hm2. The per capita ecological footprint was 0.5335 hm2 (47.64%) higher but the per capita ecological capacity was 0.5196 hm2 (64.95%) lower, and the ecological surplus of deficit was about 3.43 times of the average national level. These results showed that the ecological footprint of Chongqing was beyond the available ecological capacity, and its social and economic development was not sustainable. The strategies on reducing ecological deficit in this region, such as reducing ecosystem population, increasing public finance income, and controlling environmental pollution, were also put forward. PMID:16252886

Sun, Fan; Mong, Linbing

2005-07-01

450

Ecology of the Predatory Bdellovibrio and Like Organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work explores what is known about the ecology of the Bdellovibrio\\u000a and like-organisms (BALO). Recent studies of these incredibly unique predatory bacteria have revealed new\\u000a information on some of their genomic features, distribution in the environment, environmental determinants\\u000a that may select for the predators and their interactions with other bacteria. However, little remains known\\u000a about the ecology of BALOs

Henry N. Williams; Silvia Piñeiro

451

Characterizing a scientific elite: the social characteristics of the most highly cited scientists in environmental science and ecology.  

PubMed

In science, a relatively small pool of researchers garners a disproportionally large number of citations. Still, very little is known about the social characteristics of highly cited scientists. This is unfortunate as these researchers wield a disproportional impact on their fields, and the study of highly cited scientists can enhance our understanding of the conditions which foster highly cited work, the systematic social inequalities which exist in science, and scientific careers more generally. This study provides information on this understudied subject by examining the social characteristics and opinions of the 0.1% most cited environmental scientists and ecologists. Overall, the social characteristics of these researchers tend to reflect broader patterns of inequality in the global scientific community. However, while the social characteristics of these researchers mirror those of other scientific elites in important ways, they differ in others, revealing findings which are both novel and surprising, perhaps indicating multiple pathways to becoming highly cited. PMID:20927183

Parker, John N; Lortie, Christopher; Allesina, Stefano

2010-10-01

452

TENSAS ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT PROJECT  

EPA Science Inventory

An ecological assessment in the Tensas River Basin, Louisiana, has been completed by the U.S. EPA in partnership with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality and other stakeholder groups. This assessment, conducted using landscape ecology and water quality methods, can...

453

Translational ecology for hydrogeology.  

PubMed

Translational ecology--a special discipline aimed to improve the accessibility of science to policy makers--will help hydrogeologists contribute to the solution of pressing environmental problems. Patterned after translational medicine, translational ecology is a partnership to ensure that the right science gets done in a timely fashion, so that it can be communicated to those who need it. PMID:23837514

Schlesinger, William H

2013-01-01

454

Service-Based Infrastructure for User-Oriented Environmental Information Delivery  

E-print Network

Service-Based Infrastructure for User-Oriented Environmental Information Delivery Leo Wanner1 and Advanced Studies, 2 Dept. of Information and Communication Technologies, Pompeu Fabra University, 3 for Research and Technology Hellas, 7 Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority, 8 Fondazione Bruno

455

USING INFORMATION THEORY TO DEFINE A SUSTAINABILITY INDEX  

EPA Science Inventory

Information theory has many applications in Ecology and Environmental science, such as a biodiversity indicator, as a measure of evolution, a measure of distance from thermodynamic equilibrium, and as a measure of system organization. Fisher Information, in particular, provides a...

456

Professor Alastair Grant Professor of Ecology  

E-print Network

to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: 72, 1-13. httpProfessor Alastair Grant Professor of Ecology School of Environmental Sciences University of East of Environmental Sciences 2007- Professor of Ecology 2003-2007 Director, Centre for Ecology, Evolution

Watson, Andrew

457

NOAA's Honua: Visualizations of Complex Environmental Information in Formal and Informal Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Services Center supports a data visualization program, called NOAA's Honua, for the presentation of geophysical processes and environmental data in both formal and informal education settings using 3-D technology. Many display systems are available for the virtual representation of global environmental data, including Google Earth, NASA World Wind, and ESRI's ArcGIS Explorer. All present global data on virtual 3-D platforms using industry standard vector and raster data sources. Other products project earth system data on 3-D spherical platforms: NOAA's Science on a Sphere, Global Imagination's Magic Planet, and the OmniGlobe spherical display system. The NOAA Pacific Services Center provides resources for formal education in the form of lesson plans that cover ocean, climate, and hazards science. Components of NOAA's Honua also utilize spherical display systems for public outreach in a variety of venues, including conferences, community events, and science learning centers. In these settings, NOAA's Honua combines written narratives and accompanying audio in an interactive kiosk. Web-based 3-D interactive components are available and complement both the formal and informal education components. The strength of this program is that complex geophysical processes are presented in intuitive and compelling formats that are readily accessible via the Internet and can be viewed at science centers and museums.

McBride, M. A.; Stovall, W. K.; Lewinski, S.; Bennett, S.

2010-12-01

458

Curriculum in Ecological Restoration  

E-print Network

......................................................................................(0-2) 1 43 Ecosystem Science and Management Core Courses AGEC 350 Environmental and Natural Resource Science and Management............................................(1-0) 1 ESSM 301 Wildland Watershed ESSM 306 Plant Functional Ecology and Adaptation

459

Ecology 2007 21, 162170  

E-print Network

Trachemys scripta elegans of all body sizes to environmental conditions and potential predators for four and fitness. Key-words: performance, predation, survivorship, Trachemys scripta. Functional Ecology (2007) 21

Janzen, Fredric

460

INFORMATION TOOLS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL AND SOCIOECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE FOR CORAL REEF MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Coral reefs are complex, nonlinear systems in which the interplay of spatial heterogeneity and stochastic events with environmental factors results in highly variable patterns of resource availability and use. Given the myriad interacting effects of climate and other stressors o...

461

Environmental perceptions and objective walking trail audits inform a community-based participatory research walking intervention  

PubMed Central

Background Given the documented physical activity disparities that exist among low-income minority communities and the increased focused on socio-ecological approaches to address physical inactivity, efforts aimed at understanding the built environment to support physical activity are needed. This community-based participatory research (CBPR) project investigates walking trails perceptions in a high minority southern community and objectively examines walking trails. The primary aim is to explore if perceived and objective audit variables predict meeting recommendations for walking and physical activity, MET/minutes/week of physical activity, and frequency of trail use. Methods A proportional sampling plan was used to survey community residents in this cross-sectional study. Previously validated instruments were pilot tested and appropriately adapted and included the short version of the validated International Phy