Sample records for economically disadvantaged women

  1. 13 CFR 127.203 - What are the rules governing the requirement that economically disadvantaged women must own EDWOSBs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false What are the rules governing the...WOSB § 127.203 What are the rules governing the...owned by one or more women who are economically disadvantaged...WOSB share similar names, Web sites, equipment or...

  2. 13 CFR 127.203 - What are the rules governing the requirement that economically disadvantaged women must own EDWOSBs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false What are the rules governing the...WOSB § 127.203 What are the rules governing the...owned by one or more women who are economically disadvantaged...WOSB share similar names, Web sites, equipment or...

  3. 13 CFR 127.203 - What are the rules governing the requirement that economically disadvantaged women must own EDWOSBs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false What are the rules governing the...WOSB § 127.203 What are the rules governing the...owned by one or more women who are economically disadvantaged...WOSB share similar names, Web sites, equipment or...

  4. Engaging Women Who Are Depressed and Economically Disadvantaged in Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Nancy K.; Zuckoff, Allan; Swartz, Holly; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Geibel, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Women disadvantaged by poverty, as well as racial or ethnic minority status, are more likely to experience depression than the rest of the U.S. population. At the same time, they are less likely to seek or remain in treatment for depression in traditional mental health settings. This article explores a therapeutic, psychosocial engagement strategy developed to address the barriers to treatment engagement and the application of this strategy to a special population—women of color and white women who are depressed and living on low incomes. The conceptual foundations of this intervention—ethnographic and motivational interviewing—as well as its key techniques and structure are reviewed. Finally, a case example description and promising pilot data demonstrate the usefulness of this strategy. PMID:18232240

  5. Environmental perceptions as mediators of the relationship between the objective built environment and walking among socio-economically disadvantaged women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women living in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are at increased risk for physical inactivity and associated health outcomes and are difficult to reach through personally tailored interventions. Targeting the built environment may be an effective strategy in this population subgroup. The aim of this study was to examine the mediating role of environmental perceptions in the relationship between the objective environment and walking for transportation/recreation among women from socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Methods Baseline data of the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality (READI) study were used. In total, 4139 women (18–46 years) completed a postal survey assessing physical environmental perceptions (aesthetics, neighbourhood physical activity environment, personal safety, neighbourhood social cohesion), physical activity, and socio-demographics. Objectively-assessed data on street connectivity and density of destinations were collected using a Geographic Information System database and based on the objective z-scores, an objective destinations/connectivity score was calculated. This index was positively scored, with higher scores representing a more favourable environment. Two-level mixed models regression analyses were conducted and the MacKinnon product-of-coefficients test was used to examine the mediating effects. Results The destinations/connectivity score was positively associated with transport-related walking. The perceived physical activity environment mediated 6.1% of this positive association. The destinations/connectivity score was negatively associated with leisure-time walking. Negative perceptions of aesthetics, personal safety and social cohesion of the neighbourhood jointly mediated 24.1% of this negative association. Conclusion For women living in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods, environmental perceptions were important mediators of the relationship between the objective built environment and walking. To increase both transport-related and leisure-time walking, it is necessary to improve both objective walkability-related characteristics (street connectivity and proximity of destinations), and perceptions of personal safety, favourable aesthetics and neighbourhood social cohesion. PMID:24050686

  6. Human rights violations among economically disadvantaged women with mental illness: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Poreddi, Vijayalakshmi; Ramachandra; Thimmaiah, Rohini; Math, Suresh Bada

    2015-01-01

    Background: Globally women confront manifold violations of human rights and women with poverty and mental illness are doubly disadvantaged. Aim: The aim was to examine the influence of poverty in meeting human rights needs among recovered women with mental illness at family and community level. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study carried out among randomly selected (n = 100) recovered women with mental illness at a tertiary care center. Data were collected through face-to-face interview using structured needs assessment questionnaire. Results: Our findings revealed that below poverty line (BPL) participants were not satisfied in meeting their physical needs such as “access to safe drinking water” (?2 = 8.994, P < 0.02), “served in the same utensils” (?2 = 13.648, P < 0.00), had adequate food (?2 = 11.025, P < 0.02), and allowed to use toilet facilities (?2 = 13.565, P < 0.00). The human rights needs in emotional dimension, that is, afraid of family members (?2 = 8.233, P < 0.04) and hurt by bad words (?2 = 9.014, P < 0.02) were rated higher in above poverty line (APL) participants. Similarly, 88.9% of women from APL group expressed that they were discriminated and exploited by the community members (?2 = 17.490, P < 0.00). More than three-fourths of BPL participants (76.1%) believed that there were wondering homeless mentally ill in their community (?2 = 11.848, P < 0.01). Conclusion: There is an urgent need to implement social welfare programs to provide employment opportunities, disability allowance, housing and other social security for women with mental illness. Further, mental health professionals play an essential role in educating the family and public regarding human rights of people with mental illness.

  7. Mobile Technologies & Socio-Economic Opportunities for Disadvantaged Women: A Study of Information Behavior in a Developing Nation Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potnis, Devendra Dilip

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have been championed by the United Nations and others as one of the key media to open up socio-economic opportunities for disadvantaged populations. Studies lead us to believe that after being introduced to ICTs, users' information behavior changes, enabling them to benefit from socio-economic

  8. Raising awareness and providing free screening improves cervical cancer screening among economically disadvantaged Lebanese/Armenian women.

    PubMed

    Arevian, Mary; Noureddine, Samar; Kabakian-Khasholian, Tamar

    2006-10-01

    Women need to practice cervical screening regularly to reduce morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an intervention program on knowledge, attitude, and practice of cervical screening in the population of Lebanese/Armenian women. The design was a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental posttest survey following a year long intervention program. The sample included 176 women, who were members of the Armenian Relief Cross in Lebanon. Interventions consisted of educational classes, media messages, and free screening. The instrument was a self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge of women with intervention was higher (p > .05) and practice rate increased between intervention and comparison groups. No difference in attitude was noted. The study was successful in raising awareness and increasing screening in the sample. It is recommended to continue helping women to overcome barriers for cervical screening. PMID:16946118

  9. 49 CFR 26.67 - What rules determine social and economic disadvantage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? 26.67 Section 26...67 What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? (a) Presumption of...million, the individual's presumption of economic disadvantage is rebutted. You are...

  10. 49 CFR 26.67 - What rules determine social and economic disadvantage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? 26.67 Section 26...67 What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? (a) Presumption of...million, the individual's presumption of economic disadvantage is rebutted. You are...

  11. 49 CFR 26.67 - What rules determine social and economic disadvantage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? 26.67 Section 26...67 What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? (a) Presumption of...million, the individual's presumption of economic disadvantage is rebutted. You are...

  12. 49 CFR 26.67 - What rules determine social and economic disadvantage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? 26.67 Section 26...67 What rules determine social and economic disadvantage? (a) Presumption of...million, the individual's presumption of economic disadvantage is rebutted. You are...

  13. Globalisation, Women's Economic Rights and Forced Labour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Neumayer; Indra de Soysa

    2007-01-01

    Globalisation critics are concerned that increased trade openness and foreign direct investment exacerbate existing economic disadvantages of women and foster conditions for forced labour. Defenders of globalisation argue instead that as countries become more open and competition intensifies, discrimination against any group, including women, becomes more difficult to sustain and is therefore likely to recede. The same is argued with

  14. Employment and training solutions for the economically disadvantaged: An essay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard E. Anderson

    1998-01-01

    Conclusion  The persistence of urban poverty and the presence of economically disadvantaged families in our cities is a continuing challenge\\u000a to national aspirations for equal opportunity and economic justice. A continuing bifurcation of society between those who\\u000a enjoy an increasing share of economic prosperity and others who are stuck on the lowest rung of the economic ladder should\\u000a be unacceptable. The

  15. Cognitive aspects of young children's experience of economic disadvantage.

    PubMed

    Heberle, Amy E; Carter, Alice S

    2015-07-01

    Economic disadvantage is a well-studied risk factor for poorer behavioral and academic functioning in young children. Although the mechanisms by which disadvantage impacts children have long been of interest to researchers, studies to date have predominantly focused on mechanisms that are external to the child (e.g., parental depression, marital conflict). Very few studies have examined the internal, cognitive aspects of the experience of economic disadvantage, and almost none have considered how the effects of disadvantage on children's functioning might be mediated through cognitive processes. This article provides a framework for research into cognitive and social-cognitive mediators of economic disadvantage operating in early-to-middle childhood. The initial section of the article briefly reviews and summarizes the extant literature on childhood poverty and its effects. The second section reviews the evidence that preschool-aged children have the requisite cognitive abilities to recognize social inequality in their environments, to be aware of stereotypes related to social class, and to connect these social concepts to their own experience. The third section reviews and evaluates the small literature on children's appraisals, attributions, stereotypes, and perceptions of or about poverty and inequality. The fourth section defines and evaluates the literature on 2 social-cognitive processes-stereotype threat and status anxiety-that are hypothesized to mediate the effects of economic disadvantage on children's functioning. The article concludes with a series of proposed questions and hypotheses for future research, and elaborates on the potential implications of the proposed area of research. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25822131

  16. Economically Disadvantaged Urban Female Students Who Achieve in Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sally M. Reis; Eva Díaz

    1999-01-01

    Recently, researchers at the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented completed a three-year study of thirty-five economically disadvantaged, ethnically diverse, talented high school students who either achieved or underachieved in their urban high school. In this article, the results are discussed of the case study analysis of nine high-achieving female students who participated in the larger three-year study.

  17. Women Empowerment and Economic Development

    E-print Network

    Duflo, Esther

    Women empowerment and economic development are closely related: in one direction, development alone can play a major role in driving down inequality between men and women; in the other direction, empowering women may benefit ...

  18. Women, smoking, and social disadvantage over the life course: A longitudinal study of African American women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret E. Ensminger; Katherine Clegg Smith; Hee-Soon Juon; Jennifer L. Pearson; Judith A. Robertson

    2009-01-01

    We compare life course characteristics of a cohort of African American women (N=457) by their smoking status at age 42: never smoker (34.1%), former smoker (27.8%), or current smoker (38.1%). The Woodlawn population from which our sample is drawn has been followed from first grade (1966–67) to mid adulthood (2002–3) and is a cohort of children from a disadvantaged Chicago

  19. Economic Disadvantage in Complex Family Systems: Expansion of Family Stress Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Economic disadvantage is associated with multiple risks to early socioemotional development. This article reviews research regarding family stress frameworks to model the pathways from economic disadvantage to negative child outcomes via family processes. Future research in this area should expand definitions of family and household to incorporate…

  20. Organizational change and women managers’ careers: the restructuring of disadvantage?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Edwards; Jean Woodall; Rosemary Welchman

    1996-01-01

    Challenges the assumption implicit in much of the literature on women managers that their failure to progress can be explained solely in terms of the individual behaviour of women and their employers. Examines the characteristics of organizations in which women make their careers which are potent factors impeding female advancement. Draws attention to the effects of radical organizational change, and

  1. "Mindstorms" and "Mindtools" Aren't Happening: Digital Streaming of Students via Socio-Economic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Neil

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the possibility that school-based uses of new technologies might actually exacerbate the educational disadvantage of already disadvantaged social groups--particularly, learners from low socio-economic status populations. It draws on some recent international studies that indicate how minority, poor and urban students may be…

  2. Training the Socio-Economically Disadvantaged; A Selected, Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Beverly J.

    This annotated bibliography presents a collection of readings which should be of interest to persons charged with the responsibility of planning programs dealing with the education, counseling, and socialization of the socioeconomically disadvantaged. Taken from various sources, this collection contains: (1) current readings, (2) a listing of…

  3. Stress Exposure and Depression in Disadvantaged Women: The Protective Effects of Optimism and Perceived Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grote, Nancy K.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Larkin, Jill; Lemay, Edward P., Jr.; Brown, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, the authors predicted that the individual protective factors of optimism and perceived control over acute and chronic stressors would buffer the relations between acute and chronic stress exposure and severity of depression, controlling for household income, in a sample of financially disadvantaged women. Ninety-seven African…

  4. Male gender preference, female gender disadvantage as risk factors for psychological morbidity in Pakistani women of childbearing age - a life course perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Pakistan, preference for boys over girls is deeply culturally embedded. From birth, many women experience gendered disadvantages; less access to scarce resources, poorer health care, higher child mortality, limited education, less employment outside of the home and circumscribed autonomy. The prevalence of psychological morbidity is exceptionally high among women. We hypothesise that, among women of childbearing age, gender disadvantage is an independent risk factor for psychological morbidity Methods A cross-sectional catchment area survey of 525 women aged 18 to 35 years living in Islamabad and Rawalpindi. The effect of gender disadvantage was assessed as a latent variable using structural equation modelling. Indicators were parental gender preference, low parental care, parental overprotection, limited education, early age at marriage, marital dissatisfaction and low autonomy. Psychological morbidity was assessed using the 20 item Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ). Results Gender disadvantage was independently predictive of psychological morbidity. Among married women, socio-economic status did not predict psychological morbidity, and the effect of education was mediated through gender disadvantage rather than socioeconomic status (SES). The women's own preference for a male child was strongly predicted by their perceptions of having been disadvantaged by their gender in their families of origin. Conclusions The high prevalence of psychological morbidity among women in Pakistan is concerning given recently reported strong associations with low birth weight and infant stunting. Social action, public policies and legislation are indicated to reduce culturally embedded preferences. Neglect of these fundamentals will entrench consequent inequities including gender bias in access to education, a key millennium development goal. PMID:21958069

  5. Developmental outcomes of economically disadvantaged adolescents in Hong Kong: a replication.

    PubMed

    Shek, Daniel T L; Tsui, Pik-fong

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between economic disadvantage and adolescent and developmental outcomes as well as perceived family qualities in 3580 Secondary 2 students in Hong Kong. Developmental outcomes include positive youth development constructs, problem behavior and drug taking behavior, whereas perceived family qualities include perceived family interaction and parental parenting. Generally speaking, poor and non-poor adolescents differ in terms of overall positive youth development and family life quality. Although adolescents experiencing poverty do not display significant differences from non-poor adolescents in terms of risk behavior and psychosocial competencies, adolescents with economic disadvantage show lower levels of positive identity, family interaction, and perceived paternal parenting than do those without economic disadvantage. PMID:23446936

  6. Economic disadvantage in complex family systems: expansion of family stress models.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Melissa A

    2008-09-01

    Economic disadvantage is associated with multiple risks to early socioemotional development. This article reviews research regarding family stress frameworks to model the pathways from economic disadvantage to negative child outcomes via family processes. Future research in this area should expand definitions of family and household to incorporate diversity and instability. This expansion would be particularly relevant for research among low-income ethnic minority families and families with young children. This line of research would highlight specific pathways to target to prevent the onset of early parental and child dysfunction. PMID:18491229

  7. Economic Disadvantage in Complex Family Systems: Expansion of Family Stress Models

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Economic disadvantage is associated with multiple risks to early socioemotional development. This paper reviews research regarding family stress frameworks to model the pathways from economic disadvantage to negative child outcomes via family processes. Future research in this area should expand definitions of family and household to incorporate diversity and instability. This expansion would be particularly relevant for research among low-income ethnic minority families and families with young children. This line of research would highlight specific pathways to target to prevent the onset of early parental and child dysfunction. PMID:18491229

  8. Socio-economic differences in food group and nutrient intakes among young women in Ireland.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Daniel M A; Younger, Katherine M; Walsh, Joanne; O'Neill, Marie; Sheridan, Claire; Kearney, John M

    2013-12-14

    The present study aimed to investigate socio-economic disparities in food and nutrient intakes among young Irish women. A total of 221 disadvantaged and seventy-four non-disadvantaged women aged 18-35 years were recruited. Diet was assessed using a diet history protocol. Of the total population, 153 disadvantaged and sixty-three non-disadvantaged women were classified as plausible dietary reporters. Food group intakes, nutrient intakes and dietary vitamin and mineral concentrations per MJ of energy consumed were compared between the disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged populations, as was compliance with dietary fibre, macronutrient and micronutrient intake guidelines. The disadvantaged women had lower intakes than the non-disadvantaged women of fruit, vegetables, fish, breakfast cereals, low-fat milk and wholemeal bread (all P< 0·001), yogurt (P= 0·001), low-fat spread (P= 0·002) and fresh meat (P= 0·003). They also had higher intakes of butter, processed red meats, white bread, sugar-sweetened beverages, fried potatoes and potato-based snacks (all P< 0·001) and full-fat milk (P= 0·014). Nutritionally, the disadvantaged women had higher fat, saturated fat and refined sugar intakes; lower dietary fibre, vitamin and mineral intakes; and lower dietary vitamin and mineral densities per MJ than their more advantaged peers. Non-achievement of carbohydrate (P= 0·017), fat (P< 0·001), saturated fat (P< 0·001), refined sugar (P< 0·001), folate (P= 0·050), vitamin C (P< 0·001), vitamin D (P= 0·047) and Ca (P= 0·019) recommendations was more prevalent among the disadvantaged women. Both groups showed poor compliance with Fe and Na guidelines. We conclude that the nutritional deficits present among these socially disadvantaged women are significant, but may be potentially ameliorated by targeted food-based interventions. PMID:23721781

  9. Predictors of Quality of Life in Economically Disadvantaged Populations in Montreal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caron, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Most epidemiological studies agree that economically disadvantaged populations are the groups most vulnerable to mental health problems and report lower quality of life among these populations. However, it appears that access to social support plays a role in protecting against the chronic stress resulting from conditions such as poverty. This…

  10. Private Sector Training of the Economically Disadvantaged: Key Elements of Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keppler, Mark; Juelich, Mike

    This study analyzes private sector training programs that benefit economically disadvantaged (CETA-eligible) persons. Information on ten private sector training programs in seven states (Iowa, Florida, Maryland, California, Kansas, Mississippi, and New York) collected from a mailed eleven-page questionnaire, a follow-up telephone interview, and…

  11. Process of change for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among economically disadvantaged African American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to identify Transtheoretical Model processes of change associated with consumption of = 5 daily servings of FVs in a sample of economically disadvantaged African American adolescents (N = 549; mean (SD) age = 12.44 (.99) years; 61% female; 15% African American Hispanic). Participan...

  12. Processes of change for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among economically disadvantaged African American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to identify Transtheoretical model processes of change associated with consumption of >=5 daily servings of fruit and vegetables in a sample of economically disadvantaged African American adolescents (N=549; mean (SD) age=12.44 (.99) years; 61% female; 15% African American Hispanic...

  13. Predictors of Parenting among Economically Disadvantaged Latina Mothers: Mediating and Moderating Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prelow, Hazel M.; Weaver, Scott R.; Bowman, Marvella A.; Swenson, Rebecca R.

    2010-01-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to examine the role of ecological risk factors, maternal psychological distress, and social network support on the parenting behaviors of 535 economically disadvantaged Latina mothers, who were surveyed for the Welfare Children, & Families: A Three City Study. We predicted that ecological risk would influence…

  14. TV Characters at Work: Television's Role in the Occupational Aspirations of Economically Disadvantaged Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffner, Cynthia A.; Levine, Kenneth J.; Sullivan, Quintin E.; Crowell, Dennis; Pedrick, Laura; Berndt, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Television regularly depicts work-related activities of fictional characters and is one of several important sources of occupational information for young people. However, no research appears to have examined the influence of televised occupational portrayals on economically disadvantaged youths, although television may be an especially important…

  15. A Longitudinal Study of the Social and Academic Competence of Economically Disadvantaged Bilingual Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oades-Sese, Geraldine V.; Esquivel, Giselle B.; Kaliski, Pamela K.; Maniatis, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study was conducted to gain understanding of the social-emotional and academic development of economically disadvantaged bilingual preschool children. In Study 1, the authors combined cognitive, psychosocial, and cultural-linguistic factors to determine profiles of social competence as measured by peer play. A person-centered…

  16. The Achievement of Economically Disadvantaged Fifth Graders in Summer Enrichment Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulden, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    The achievement gap between economically disadvantaged students and their traditional counterparts has continued to be a problem in education. Based on cognitive constructivist theory and enrichment theory, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between scores on a high-stakes achievement test and participation in a summer…

  17. Persistence in the Face of Academic Challenge for Economically Disadvantaged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eleanor D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined persistence in the face of academic challenge for economically disadvantaged children. Participants included 103 children attending Head Start preschools, as well as their caregivers and teachers. Child tasks measured persistence in the face of academic challenge as well as emergent implicit theories of intelligence. Caregiver…

  18. Relation between Reading Problems and Internalizing Behavior in School for Preadolescent Children from Economically Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Brian P.; Izard, Carroll E.; Kobak, Roger; Brown, Eleanor D.; Smith, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study of 105 economically disadvantaged children examined the relation between reading problems and internalizing behavior in 3rd- and 5th-grade assessments (8- to 12-year olds). The variable-centered results showed that reading problems predicted change in internalizing behavior in the context of child and family predictors. The…

  19. The Impact of an Economically Disadvantaged Student Population on School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Curtis F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between student poverty levels, defined by the number of students identified as economically disadvantaged by qualifying for free and reduced lunch and school climate. The literature review examined school climate and culture, effects of student socioeconomic (SES) status on education,…

  20. Remedial self-fulfilling prophecy: two field experiments to prevent Golem effects among disadvantaged women.

    PubMed

    Davidson, O B; Eden, D

    2000-06-01

    The Pygmalion effect is a self-fulfilling prophecy (SFP) in which raising leader expectations boosts subordinate performance. Although attempts to produce Pygmalion effects have been successful repeatedly among men, attempts to produce Pygmalion effects with female leaders have yielded null results. Also, only 1 experiment has demonstrated the Golem effect (i.e., negative SFP in which low leader expectations impair subordinate performance). In 2 field experiments testing the SFP hypothesis among women leading disadvantaged women, experimental leaders were led to believe that their trainees had higher than usual potential. In reality, the trainees had been assigned randomly. Manipulation checks confirmed that the treatment raised leader expectations toward experimental trainees. Analysis of variance of performance detected the predicted SFP effects in both experiments. These were the first-ever experimental confirmations of SFP among women as leaders. PMID:10900813

  1. What Might Work? Exploring the Perceived Feasibility of Strategies to Promote Physical Activity among Women Living in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Verity; Ball, Kylie

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate preferences for, perceived feasibility of and barriers to uptake of hypothetical physical activity promotion strategies among women from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 purposively recruited women (18-45 years) living in socioeconomically…

  2. Economic crisis helps to "demarginalize" women.

    PubMed

    Forje, C L

    1998-05-01

    This article discusses processes that demarginalize women in developing countries. The case study pertained to women in the Santa coffee growing area of North West Province, Cameroon. Coffee is the main source of income for families. Women obtain land for growing subsistence crops with the permission of their husbands and with pleading. The sharp fall in coffee prices left families in economic difficulties. It forced families to reduce coffee production or abandon coffee production entirely. Women found an alternative in growing vegetables for retail sale. The women formed associations that provided instruction on how to farm, sell produce, and obtain credit. Men observed the increase in income from the women's sale of produce. Women included the men in discussions about their progress and difficulties. Men were thus encouraged to sell their land to women. Women gained power by becoming the sole source of family income. The women's groups helped women improve land use and the use of income. This experience proved that crises can have positive outcomes. Men's power was based on economic control over resources rather than culture or machismo. Women's cooperation with men in nation building resulted in economic independence. Marginalization of women was based on money. Women proved that participation, rather than power, was the appropriate means to social change and more equitable relations. The obstacles to women's power included cultural expectations about their roles and choices, sex discrimination, and lack of access to leadership networks. PMID:12293703

  3. Health, behavioral, cognitive, and social correlates of breakfast skipping among women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kylie J; McNaughton, Sarah A; Cleland, Verity J; Crawford, David; Ball, Kylie

    2013-11-01

    Breakfast skipping is a potentially modifiable behavior that has negative effects on health and is socioeconomically patterned. This study aimed to examine the intrapersonal (health, behavioral, and cognitive) and social factors associated with breakfast skipping. Nonpregnant women (n = 4123) aged 18-45 y from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods throughout Victoria, Australia, completed a postal questionnaire. Sociodemographic characteristics, diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and cognitive and social factors were assessed by self-report. Breakfast skipping was defined in 2 ways: 1) "rarely/never" eating breakfast (n = 498) and 2) eating breakfast ?2 d/wk (includes those who rarely/never ate breakfast; n = 865). Poisson regression was used to calculate prevalence ratios and linear trends, adjusting for covariates. The P values for linear trends are reported below. Compared with breakfast consumers, women who reported rarely/never eating breakfast tended to have poorer self-rated health (P-trend < 0.001), be current smokers (P-trend < 0.001), pay less attention to health (P-trend < 0.001), not prioritize their own healthy eating when busy looking after their family (P-trend < 0.001), have less nutrition knowledge (P-trend < 0.001), and a lower proportion were trying to control their weight (P-trend < 0.020). When breakfast skipping was defined as eating breakfast ?2 d/wk, additional associations were found for having lower leisure-time physical activity (P-trend = 0.012) and less self-efficacy for eating a healthy diet (P-trend < 0.043). In conclusion, a range of intrapersonal and social factors were significantly associated with breakfast skipping among women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. Acknowledging the cross-sectional design and need for causal confirmation, programs that aim to promote breakfast consumption in this population group should consider targeting family-related barriers to healthy eating and nutrition knowledge. PMID:23986365

  4. 34 CFR 403.114 - How does a State determine the number of economically disadvantaged students attending vocational...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false ...economically disadvantaged students attending vocational education programs under the Secondary School Vocational Education Program? 403.114 Section 403.114...

  5. 34 CFR 403.114 - How does a State determine the number of economically disadvantaged students attending vocational...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false ...economically disadvantaged students attending vocational education programs under the Secondary School Vocational Education Program? 403.114 Section 403.114...

  6. 34 CFR 403.114 - How does a State determine the number of economically disadvantaged students attending vocational...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false ...economically disadvantaged students attending vocational education programs under the Secondary School Vocational Education Program? 403.114 Section 403.114...

  7. Validity and reliability of a dietary stages of change measure among economically disadvantaged African-American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of theoretically prescribed behavior change strategies associated with adequate fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption are lacking. This study sought to identify Transtheoretical Model processes of change associated with consumption of five daily servings of FVs among economically disadvantage...

  8. Promoting Physical Activity and Reducing Sedentary Behavior in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods: A Qualitative Study of What Women Want

    PubMed Central

    Teychenne, Megan; Ball, Kylie; Salmon, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Since women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods are more likely to be physically inactive and engage in higher levels of sedentary behavior than women living in more advantaged neighborhoods, it is important to develop and test the feasibility of strategies aimed to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior amongst this high-risk target group. Thirty-seven women (aged 19–85) living in a disadvantaged neighborhood, and five key stakeholders, received a suite of potential intervention materials and completed a qualitative questionnaire assessing the perceived feasibility of strategies aimed to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. Thematic analyses were performed. Women perceived the use of a locally-relevant information booklet as a feasible strategy to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. Including weight-loss information was suggested to motivate women to be active. Half the women felt the best delivery method was mailed leaflets. Other suggestions included reference books and websites. Many women mentioned that an online activity calendar was motivational but too time-consuming to commit to. Most women preferred the information booklet as a strategy to increase physical activity/reduce sedentary behavior, yet several suggested that using the booklet together with the online calendar may be more effective. These findings make an important contribution to research informing the development of intervention strategies to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior amongst women living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. PMID:23166718

  9. Minimally supervised multimodal exercise to reduce falls risk in economically and educationally disadvantaged older adults.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Taís L; Alexander, Neil B; Nyquist, Linda V; Montagnini, Marcos L; Santos A, C S; Rodrigues G, H P; Negrão, Carlos E; Trombetta, Ivani C; Wajngarten, Mauricio

    2013-07-01

    Few studies have evaluated the benefit of providing exercise to underprivileged older adults at risk for falls. Economically and educationally disadvantaged older adults with previous falls (mean age 79.06, SD = 4.55) were randomized to 4 mo of multimodal exercise provided as fully supervised center-based (FS, n = 45), minimally supervised home-based (MS, n = 42), or to nonexercise controls (C, n = 32). Comparing groups on the mean change in fall-relevant mobility task performance between baseline and 4 mo and compared with the change in C, both FS and MS had significantly greater reduction in timed up-and-go, F(2,73) = 5.82, p = .004, ?2 p = .14, and increase in tandem-walk speed, F(2,73) = 7.71, p < .001 ?2 p = .17. Change in performance did not statistically differ between FS and MS. In community-dwelling economically and educationally disadvantaged older adults with a history of falls, minimally supervised home-based and fully supervised center-based exercise programs may be equally effective in improving fall-relevant functional mobility. PMID:22952201

  10. Is neighbourhood obesogenicity associated with body mass index in women? Application of an obesogenicity index in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Marilyn; Thornton, Lukar E; Lamb, Karen E; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David

    2014-11-01

    An aggregate index is potentially useful to represent neighbourhood obesogenicity. We created a conceptually-based obesogenicity index and examined its association with body mass index (BMI) among 3786 women (age 18-45y) in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Victoria, Australia. The index included 3 items from each of 3 domains: food resources (supermarkets, green grocers, fast food restaurants), recreational activity resources (gyms, pools, park space), and walkability (4+ leg intersections, neighbourhood walking environment, neighbourhood safety), with a possible range from 0 to 18 reflecting 0-2 for each of the 9 items. Using generalised estimating equations, neighbourhood obesogenicity was not associated with BMI in the overall sample. However, stratified analyses revealed generally positive associations with BMI in urban areas and inverse associations in rural areas (interaction p=0.02). These analyses are a first step towards combining neighbourhood characteristics into an aggregate obesogenicity index that is transparent enough to be adopted elsewhere and to allow examination of the relevance of its specific components in different settings. PMID:25155451

  11. Processes of Change for Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Economically Disadvantaged African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Debbe

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to identify Transtheoretical Model processes of change associated with consumption of ? 5 daily servings of FVs in a sample of economically disadvantaged African American adolescents (N = 549; mean (SD) age = 12.44 (.99) years; 61% female; 15% African American Hispanic). Participants completed measures of stages and processes of change, and were ranked according to intake level based on their reported stage. Spearman correlations and independent samples t tests were used in cross-sectional analyses of the relationship between processes of change and FV consumption. Consciousness raising, environmental reevaluation, helping relationships and stimulus control processes were significantly associated with FV consumption (? ? .12; p < .01), and were practiced more often by youths who consumed ? 5 daily servings of FVs relative to those who did not (p < .05). Findings highlight the potential of these processes for increasing FV consumption in this population. PMID:22177398

  12. Determinants of Childhood Immunization Uptake among Socio-Economically Disadvantaged Migrants in East China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Li, Qian; Chen, Enfu; Chen, Yaping; Qi, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the coverage of childhood immunization appropriate for age among socio-economically disadvantaged recent migrants living in East China and to identify the determinants of full immunization uptake among these migrant children. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey of 1,426 migrant mothers with a child aged ?24 months, who were interviewed with a pretested questionnaire. Various vaccines, migration history and some other social-demographic and income details were collected. Single-level logistic regression analyses were applied to identify the determinants of full immunization status. Results: Immunization coverage rates are lower among migrants and even lower among recent migrants. The likelihood of a child receiving full immunization rise with parents’ educational level and the frequency of mother’s utilization of health care. Higher household income also significantly increase the likelihood of full immunization, as dose post-natal visits by a health worker. Conclusions: Recent migrant status favours low immunization uptake, particularly in the vulnerability context of alienation and livelihood insecurity. Services must be delivered with a focus on recent migrants. Investments are needed in education, socio-economic development and secure livelihoods to improve and sustain equitable health care services. PMID:23839061

  13. The NASA Plan: To award eight percent of prime and subcontracts to socially and economically disadvantaged businesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    It is NASA's intent to provide small disadvantaged businesses, including women-owned, historically black colleges and universities and minority education institutions the maximum practicable opportunity to receive a fair proportion of NASA prime and subcontracted awards. Annually, NASA will establish socioeconomic procurement goals including small disadvantaged business goals, with a target of reaching the eight percent level by the end of FY 1994. The NASA Associate Administrators, who are responsible for the programs at the various NASA Centers, will be held accountable for full implementation of the socioeconomic procurement plans. Various aspects of this plan, including its history, are discussed.

  14. Delivery of primary health care to persons who are socio-economically disadvantaged: does the organizational delivery model matter?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As health systems evolve, it is essential to evaluate their impact on the delivery of health services to socially disadvantaged populations. We evaluated the delivery of primary health services for different socio-economic groups and assessed the performance of different organizational models in terms of equality of health care delivery in Ontario, Canada. Methods Cross sectional study of 5,361 patients receiving care from primary care practices using Capitation, Salaried or Fee-For-Service remuneration models. We assessed self-reported health status of patients, visit duration, number of visits per year, quality of health service delivery, and quality of health promotion. We used multi-level regressions to study service delivery across socio-economic groups and within each delivery model. Identified disparities were further analysed using a t-test to determine the impact of service delivery model on equity. Results Low income individuals were more likely to be women, unemployed, recent immigrants, and in poorer health. These individuals were overrepresented in the Salaried model, reported more visits/year across all models, and tended to report longer visits in the Salaried model. Measures of primary care services generally did not differ significantly between low and higher income/education individuals; when they did, the difference favoured better service delivery for at-risk groups. At-risk patients in the Salaried model were somewhat more likely to report health promotion activities than patients from Capitation and Fee-For-Service models. At-risk patients from Capitation models reported a smaller increase in the number of additional clinic visits/year than Fee-For-Service and Salaried models. At-risk patients reported better first contact accessibility than their non-at-risk counterparts in the Fee-For-Service model only. Conclusions Primary care service measures did not differ significantly across socio-economic status or primary care delivery models. In Ontario, capitation-based remuneration is age and sex adjusted only. Patients of low socio-economic status had fewer additional visits compared to those with high socio-economic status under the Capitation model. This raises the concern that Capitation may not support the provision of additional care for more vulnerable groups. Regions undertaking primary care model reforms need to consider the potential impact of the changes on the more vulnerable populations. PMID:24341530

  15. A Comprehensive Partnership Approach Increasing High School Graduation Rates and College Enrollment of Urban Economically Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Yvette; Sinatra, Richard; Eschenauer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Described is a 4-year model of a Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program (GEAR UP) offered to 294 academically and economically disadvantaged students and their parents during in- and out-of-school time activities through partnerships forged with school personnel and community-based agencies. In an urban high school where…

  16. The Relations between Contextual Risk, Earned Income, and the School Adjustment of Children from Economically Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Brian P.; Brown, Eleanor D.; Izard, Carroll E.

    2004-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relations between multiple risk indexes representing contextual adversity, income-to-needs ratios, and the elementary school adjustment of children from economically disadvantaged families. The results provide evidence for volatility in family circumstances over 2-year intervals from preschool to 5th grade, for…

  17. Growing up as "Man of the House": Adultification and Transition into Adulthood for Young Men in Economically Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Kevin; Messina, Lauren; Smith, Jocelyn; Waters, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Many children in economically disadvantaged communities assume adult roles in their families. Negotiating the responsibilities and expectations associated with becoming what some young men describe as "man of the house" has important implications for how adolescent boys move into adulthood. In this study, we share insights from field…

  18. Exposure to Interpersonal Violence and Socioemotional Adjustment in Economically Disadvantaged Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Hillary H.; Eisenhower, Abbey

    2014-01-01

    Focusing specifically on the experiences of economically disadvantaged preschoolers, the relations between interpersonal violence exposure, behavior problems, and social skills were examined in both the home and school settings. In this racially and ethnically diverse sample of preschoolers from poor, urban households (N = 64; 3-6 years old; 56% female), many children (33%) had been exposed to at least one type of interpersonal violence, and even more (70%) had been exposed to any type of potentially traumatic event (PTE). Although exposure to interpersonal violence was not directly associated with parent- or teacher-reported behavior problems or social skills, a significant interaction effect was observed between exposure to interpersonal violence and teacher-reported internalizing problems in predicting teacher-reported social skills; specifically, for children with the highest levels of internalizing problems, a positive relation between interpersonal violence exposure and social skills was observed. This indirect effect was observed only in the school setting, whereas children in this high-risk sample appeared to demonstrate resilience in the home setting. Given these high rates of exposure, additional, clinically-relevant research is needed to inform interventions for this vulnerable population. PMID:25175528

  19. Health care workers' knowledge, attitudes and practices on tobacco use in economically disadvantaged dominican republic communities.

    PubMed

    Prucha, Michael G; Fisher, Susan G; McIntosh, Scott; Grable, John C; Holderness, Heather; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; de Monegro, Zahíra Quiñones; Sánchez, José Javier; Bautista, Arisleyda; Díaz, Sergio; Ossip, Deborah J

    2015-04-01

    Tobacco use is increasing globally, particularly in low and middle-income countries like the Dominican Republic (DR) where data have been lacking. Health care worker (HCW) interventions improve quit rates; asking patients about tobacco use at each visit is an evidence-based first step. This study provides the first quantitative examination of knowledge, attitudes and practices of DR HCWs regarding tobacco use. All HCWs (N = 153) in 7 economically disadvantaged DR communities were targeted with anonymous surveys. Approximately 70% (N = 107) completed the primary outcome item, asking about tobacco use at each encounter. Despite >85% strongly agreeing that they should ask about tobacco use at each encounter, only 48.6% reported doing so. While most (94.39%) strongly agreed that smoking is harmful, knowledge of specific health consequences varied from 98.13% for lung cancer to 41.12% for otitis media. Few received training in tobacco intervention (38.32%). Exploratory analyses revealed that always asking even if patients are healthy, strongly agreeing that tobacco causes cardiac disease, and always advising smoke-free homes were associated with always asking. Overall, results demonstrate a disconnect between HCW belief and practice. Though most agreed that always asking about tobacco was important, fewer than half did so. Gaps in HCW knowledge and practices suggest a need for education and policy/infrastructure support. To our knowledge, this is the first reported survey of DR HCWs regarding tobacco, and provides a foundation for future tobacco control in the DR. PMID:25872018

  20. Health Care Workers’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices on Tobacco Use in Economically Disadvantaged Dominican Republic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Prucha, Michael G.; Fisher, Susan G.; McIntosh, Scott; Grable, John C.; Holderness, Heather; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Quiñones de Monegro, Zahíra; Sánchez, José Javier; Bautista, Arisleyda; Díaz, Sergio; Ossip, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco use is increasing globally, particularly in low and middle-income countries like the Dominican Republic (DR) where data have been lacking. Health care worker (HCW) interventions improve quit rates; asking patients about tobacco use at each visit is an evidence-based first step. This study provides the first quantitative examination of knowledge, attitudes and practices of DR HCWs regarding tobacco use. All HCWs (N = 153) in 7 economically disadvantaged DR communities were targeted with anonymous surveys. Approximately 70% (N = 107) completed the primary outcome item, asking about tobacco use at each encounter. Despite >85% strongly agreeing that they should ask about tobacco use at each encounter, only 48.6% reported doing so. While most (94.39%) strongly agreed that smoking is harmful, knowledge of specific health consequences varied from 98.13% for lung cancer to 41.12% for otitis media. Few received training in tobacco intervention (38.32%). Exploratory analyses revealed that always asking even if patients are healthy, strongly agreeing that tobacco causes cardiac disease, and always advising smoke-free homes were associated with always asking. Overall, results demonstrate a disconnect between HCW belief and practice. Though most agreed that always asking about tobacco was important, fewer than half did so. Gaps in HCW knowledge and practices suggest a need for education and policy/infrastructure support. To our knowledge, this is the first reported survey of DR HCWs regarding tobacco, and provides a foundation for future tobacco control in the DR. PMID:25872018

  1. Increasing Access for Economically Disadvantaged Students: The NSF/CSEM & S-STEM Programs at Louisiana State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Zakiya S.; Iyengar, Sitharama S.; Pang, Su-Seng; Warner, Isiah M.; Luces, Candace A.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing college degree attainment for students from disadvantaged backgrounds is a prominent component of numerous state and federal legislation focused on higher education. In 1999, the National Science Foundation (NSF) instituted the "Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships" (CSEMS) program; this initiative was designed to provide greater access and support to academically talented students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Originally intended to provide financial support to lower income students, this NSF program also advocated that additional professional development and advising would be strategies to increase undergraduate persistence to graduation. This innovative program for economically disadvantaged students was extended in 2004 to include students from other disciplines including the physical and life sciences as well as the technology fields, and the new name of the program was Scholarships for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM). The implementation of these two programs in Louisiana State University (LSU) has shown significant and measurable success since 2000, making LSU a Model University in providing support to economically disadvantaged students within the STEM disciplines. The achievement of these programs is evidenced by the graduation rates of its participants. This report provides details on the educational model employed through the CSEMS/S-STEM projects at LSU and provides a path to success for increasing student retention rates in STEM disciplines. While the LSU's experience is presented as a case study, the potential relevance of this innovative mentoring program in conjunction with the financial support system is discussed in detail.

  2. Cohort study of smoke-free homes in economically disadvantaged communities in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Ann M.; Diaz, Sergio; Guido, Joseph; de Monegro, Zahira Quiñones; McIntosh, Scott; Fisher, Susan G.; Ossip, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze household smoking bans over time and predictors of bans among communities in the Dominican Republic, historically a significant tobacco-growing country with few tobacco control regulations. Methods Baseline (2004) and follow-up surveillance surveys (2006, 2007) (each n > 1 000 randomly selected households) conducted in six economically disadvantaged communities (three tobacco-growing and two each urban, peri-urban, and rural) assessed household members’ demographics, health status, and household characteristics, including smoking restrictions. Results Between 2004 and 2007, household smoking-ban prevalence increased in all communities (24%–45%). Households with smokers (versus those without) adopted bans at lower rates (6%–17%; 35%–58%). Logistic regression models demonstrated that allowing smoking in nonsmoking households was more likely in tobacco-growing communities, Catholic households, and those with a member with a cardiovascular problem. Having a child under age 5 or a member with a respiratory condition was not significantly related to establishing smoking bans. Conclusions Prevalence of households banning smoking increased in all communities but remained well below rates in industrialized countries. For low- and middle-income countries or those early in tobacco control, small awareness-raising measures (including surveillance activities) may lead to significant increases in household-ban adoption, particularly among nonsmoking households. Increasing household-ban prevalence may affect community norms that can lead to greater adoption. Having household members who smoke and being in a tobacco-growing community may mitigate the establishment of household bans. Increasing individuals’ knowledge about the far-reaching health effects of secondhand smoke exposure on children and nonsmoking adults (healthy or unhealthy) may help overcome these obstacles. PMID:24626445

  3. Tobacco Use in Six Economically Disadvantaged Communities in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Ossip-Klein, Deborah J.; Fisher, Susan; Diaz, Sergio; Quiñones, Zahira; Sierra, Essie; Dozier, Ann; McIntosh, Scott; Guido, Joseph; Winters, Paul; Diaz, Omar; Armstrong, LaToya

    2008-01-01

    The Dominican Republic (DR) is a tobacco-growing country and tobacco control efforts have been virtually nonexistent. This study provides a first systematic surveillance of tobacco use in 6 economically disadvantaged DR communities (2 small urban, 2 peri-urban, 2 rural; half were tobacco-growing). Approximately 175 households were randomly selected in each (total N=1048) and an adult household member reported on household demographics and resources (e.g., electricity), tobacco use and health conditions of household members, and household policies on tobacco use. Poverty and unemployment were high in all communities, and significant gaps in access to basic resources such as electricity, running water, telephones/cell phones, and secondary education were present. Exposure to tobacco smoke was high, with 38.4% of households reporting ?1 tobacco user, and 75.5% allowing smoking in the home. Overall, 22.5% reported using tobacco, with commercial cigarettes (58.0%) or self-rolled cigarettes (20.1%) the most commonly used types. Considerable variability in prevalence and type of use was found across communities. Overall, tobacco use was higher in males, illiterate groups, ages 45+, rural dwellers, and tobacco-growing communities. Based on reported health conditions, tobacco attributable risks, and WHO mortality data, it is estimated that at least 2254 lives could potentially be saved each year in the DR with tobacco cessation. While it is expected that the reported prevalence of tobacco use and health conditions represent underestimates, these figures provide a starting point for understanding tobacco use and its prevalence in the Dominican Republic. PMID:18569759

  4. It Doesn't Happen Here: Eating Disorders in an Ethnically Diverse Sample of Economically Disadvantaged, Urban College Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katie Gentile; Chitra Raghavan; Valli Rajah; Katie Gates

    2007-01-01

    The bulk of eating disorder studies have focused on white, middle-upper class women, excluding ethnically and economically diverse women and men. Accordingly, our knowledge of prevalence rates and risk factors is reliant on this narrow literature. To expand upon the current literature, we examined eating disorders in ethnically diverse low-income, urban college students. We surveyed 884 incoming freshmen during an

  5. Growing up as "man of the house": adultification and transition into adulthood for young men in economically disadvantaged families.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kevin; Messina, Lauren; Smith, Jocelyn; Waters, Damian

    2014-03-01

    Many children in economically disadvantaged communities assume adult roles in their families. Negotiating the responsibilities and expectations associated with becoming what some young men describe as "man of the house" has important implications for how adolescent boys move into adulthood. In this study, we share insights from field work and life-history interviews with low-income, young African American men and Salvadoran men in the Washington, DC/Baltimore region to illustrate how adultification may deliver contradictory expectations for adolescents. The findings also show how the accelerated responsibilities that accompany the experience of adultification create difficulties in the young men's transition into adulthood. These findings indicate that the age period of emerging adulthood may begin earlier for economically disadvantaged young men. PMID:24677648

  6. Indigenous Women Facing Educational Disadvantages: The Case of the Ainu in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takayanagi, Taeko; Shimomura, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the life and educational experiences of Ainu women, using the framework of postcolonial feminist theory. It explores the extent to which two factors--gender and ethnic minority status--affect young Ainu women as they attempt to enter mainstream society. The authors analyse life history interviews from three Ainu women aged 25.…

  7. Beyond Reproductive Health: Listening to Women About Their Health in Disadvantaged Beirut Neighborhoods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huda Zurayk; Cynthia Myntti; Mylene T. Salem; Afamia Kaddour; Faysal el-Kak; Samer Jabbour

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we aim to contextualize gynecological problems within a broader health and social context, expanding the lens beyond reproductive health. Questionnaires were administered to 1,869 ever-married women aged 15 to 59 that included questions on living, general health, and gynecological problems. These questions were open-ended, allowing women to respond in their own words. Women reported a multitude of

  8. Gender and Small Business Success: An Inquiry into Women's Relative Disadvantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loscocco, Karyn A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Among 540 successful small businesses in New England, female-owned businesses had lower sales volumes and produced lower incomes than male-owned businesses. The smaller size of women's businesses was the major explanatory factor, followed by women's lack of experience and concentration in less profitable industries. Contains 66 references. (SV)

  9. Treatment Effects of a Relationship-Strengthening Intervention for Economically Disadvantaged New Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Pajarita; Jones, Anne; Guo, Shenyang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the treatment effects of a relationship skills and family strengthening intervention for n = 726 high-risk, disadvantaged new parents. Method: Hierarchical linear modeling and regression models were used to assess intervention treatment effects. These findings were subsequently verified…

  10. Women's Economic Empowerment: Realities and Challenges for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taborga, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    Despite an international consensus on the importance of women's economic empowerment, expressed through such agreements as the Beijing Platform for Action, a recent study by the World Economic Forum noted that no country has yet managed to eliminate the gap between the economic participation of women and men. Even countries with high empowerment…

  11. "Planned" Teenage Pregnancy: Perspectives of Young Women from Disadvantaged Backgrounds in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Lester; Cater, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of teenage pregnancy has attracted much interest in research, practice and social policy. Little is known about teenagers who report their pregnancies as "planned." Forty-one in-depth interviews were undertaken, in six different parts of England, among young women who reported their pregnancy as "planned". The mean age at conception…

  12. Association of socio-economic, gender and health factors with common mental disorders in women: a population-based study of 5703 married rural women in India

    PubMed Central

    Shidhaye, Rahul; Patel, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few population-based studies from low- and middle-income countries that have described the association of socio-economic, gender and health factors with common mental disorders (CMDs) in rural women. Methods Population-based study of currently married rural women in the age group of 15–39 years. The baseline data are from the National Family Health Survey-II conducted in 1998. A follow-up study was conducted 4 years later in 2002–03. The outcome of CMD was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Due to the hierarchical nature and complex survey design, data were analysed using mixed-effect logistic regression with random intercept model. Results A total of 5703 women (representing 83.5% of eligible women) completed follow-up. The outcome of CMD was observed in 609 women (10.7%, 95% confidence interval 9.8–11.6). The following factors were independently associated with the outcome of CMD in the final multivariable model: higher age, low education, low standard of living, recent intimate partner violence (IPV), husband’s unsatisfactory reaction to dowry, husband’s alcohol use and women’s own tobacco use. Conclusions Socio-economic and gender disadvantage factors are independently associated with CMDs in this population of women. Strategies that address structural determinants, for example to promote women’s education and reduce their exposure to IPV, may reduce the burden of CMDs in women. PMID:21037247

  13. Household type, economic disadvantage, and residential segregation: empirical patterns and findings from simulation analysis 

    E-print Network

    Howden, Lindsay Michelle

    2005-08-29

    In this thesis I focus on segregation between households giving attention to the roles that family type, economic inequality, and race can play in promoting and maintaining these patterns. I first consider three lines of ...

  14. Time trends in socio-economic inequalities for women and men with disabilities in Australia: evidence of persisting inequalities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The socio-economic circumstances and health of people with disabilities has been relatively ignored in public health research, policy and practice in Australia and internationally. This is despite emerging evidence that the socio-economic circumstances that people with disabilities live in contributes to their poorer health. Compared to other developed countries, Australians with disabilities are more likely to live in disadvantaged circumstances, despite being an economically prosperous country; it is therefore likely that the socio-economic disadvantage experienced by Australians with disabilities makes a significant contribution to their health. Despite the importance of this issue Australia does not routinely monitor the socio-economic inequalities for people with disabilities. This paper addresses this gap by describing time trends in socio-economic conditions for Australians with and without disabilities according to the severity of the disability and sex. Methods Cross-sectional analyses of the Australian Bureau of Statistics Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers were carried out at three time points (1998, 2003 and 2009) to estimate the proportions of women and men (aged between 25 and 64 years) who were living on low incomes, had not completed year 12, were not in paid work, living in private rental and experiencing multiple disadvantage (three or more of the indicators). Results People with disabilities are less likely to have completed year 12, be in paid work and are more likely to be living on low incomes and experiencing multiple disadvantage. These conditions worsened with increasing severity of disability and increased or persisted over time, with most of the increase between 1998 and 2003. While women with milder disabilities tended to fare worse than men, the proportions were similar for those with moderate and severe/profound disabilities. Conclusion People with disabilities experience high levels of socio-economic disadvantage which has increased or persisted over time and these are likely to translate into poorer health outcomes. A large proportion experience multiple forms of disadvantage, reinforcing the need to tackle disadvantage in a coordinated way across sectors. People with disabilities should be a priority population group for public health. Monitoring socio-economic conditions of people with disabilities is critical for informing policy and assessing the impact of disability reforms. PMID:23985044

  15. Influence of Schools on Economically Disadvantageous Attitudes: A Solomon Islands Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeth, Alastair M.

    1976-01-01

    This study examines the economically detrimental attitude of regionalism in a Solomon Islands secondary school and measures changes in regionalism with exposure to school experience that stressed regional integration. Significant decreases in regionalism were recorded. (Available from Plenum Publishing Corporation, 227 West 17 Street, New York, NY…

  16. Perceived Socio-Economic Status and Social Inclusion in School: Interactions of Disadvantages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veland, Jarmund; Midthassel, Unni Vere; Idsoe, Thormod

    2009-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of 7,372 students in grades 5-10 (aged 11-16) in a representative sample of Norwegian compulsory schools. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between students' reported socio-economic status (SES) and their perceived social inclusion (SI) in school in the whole sample. We also considered separately a…

  17. Building Lectures and Building Bridges with Socio-Economically Disadvantaged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Peter; Loch, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an empirical analysis of the first stage of an ongoing effort to introduce technology to enhance student learning in introductory corporate finance within a multi-campus and multi-mode regional Australian University. The engagement and performance of low socio-economic status (SES) students is of particular interest because…

  18. Net Impact Evaluation of Moving Men and Women to Economic Independence in Michigan, Within Reach Program: Year 1 and Year 2 Cohorts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall W. Eberts; Jason M. Preuss

    2010-01-01

    The authors completed a net impact evaluation of the “Within Reach” component of the Goodwill Industries of Greater Detroit program (Moving Men and Women to Economic Independence). This program provided employment-related support services to disadvantaged adults as coordinated by WorkFirst. The net impact evaluation estimated the contribution of the program to the employment outcomes of the participants. It constructed comparison

  19. Women's Education for Economic Development in Cross Section of Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    International organizations and researchers in the field of education and development have emphasized the importance of women's education for the social and economic development of Third World countries. However, women's educational levels are lower than men's in most countries throughout the world. This paper presents findings of a study that…

  20. Health Care for the Economically Disadvantaged. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Finance, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Finance.

    These hearings examine ways of ensuring access to quality health care, especially for low-income persons ineligible for Medicaid. The problems of determining who the economically disadvantaged are, what services they are provided with, and how those services are provided and financed are all addressed. An Urban Institute researcher testifies that…

  1. Attitudes Toward Changing Economic and Social Roles for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Margaret E.; And Others

    Attitudinal factors that hinder the economic and social advancement of women were investigated. Graduate students between the ages of 20 and 50 and enrolled in two southern institutions of higher learning were administered the Dolly-Bell Sex Discrimination Scale: Social and Economic Factors. Results indicate that sex discrimination is determined…

  2. A Program For Action In Disadvantaged Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavoie-Roux, Therese

    1971-01-01

    By drawing home and school closer, starting necessary community services and teaching teachers to work with the economically disadvantaged, the Montreal Catholic School Commission hopes to help the economically disadvantaged. (AF)

  3. Understanding the Disparities in Cervical Cancer Screening for Economically Disadvantaged Women

    E-print Network

    Gatchell, Melissa Sue

    2012-01-01

    smoking status, number of sexual partners, health status, BMI, family history of cancer, individual-level poverty, racial/ethnic discriminationsmoking status, number of sexual partners, health status, BMI, family history of cancer, individual-level poverty, racial/ethnic discrimination

  4. Increasing Access for Economically Disadvantaged Students: The NSF/CSEM & S-STEM Programs at Louisiana State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Zakiya S.; Iyengar, Sitharama S.; Pang, Su-Seng; Warner, Isiah M.; Luces, Candace A.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing college degree attainment for students from disadvantaged backgrounds is a prominent component of numerous state and federal legislation focused on higher education. In 1999, the National Science Foundation (NSF) instituted the "Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships" (CSEMS) program; this initiative was designed to…

  5. Schools and Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The three books reviewed in this essay all have a similar theme: the role that schools and other institutions can play in improving the life-chances of young people and breaking the cycle of socio-economic disadvantage and low educational attainment that is characteristic of school systems around the world. Through an evaluation of the Academies…

  6. Latinas and African American Women at Work: Race, Gender, and Economic Inequality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Irene, Ed.

    The 13 chapters of this book, written by various sociologists, document how race and gender intersect to put African American and Latina women at a disadvantage in the workplace. The articles encompass 30 years of change for women at all levels of the workforce, from those who spend time on the welfare rolls to middle class professionals, and look…

  7. Intimate partner violence and women's economic and non-economic activities in Minya, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Yount, Kathryn M; Zureick-Brown, Sarah; salem, Rania

    2014-06-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is widespread, but its implications for their economic and non-economic activities are understudied. Leveraging new data from 564 ever-married women aged 22–65 in rural Minya, Egypt, we estimated logistic regressions and zero-inflated negative binomial regressions to test spillover, compensation, and patriarchal bargaining theories about the influences of women's exposure to IPV on their engagement in and time spent on market, subsistence, domestic, and care work. Supporting compensation theory, exposures to lifetime, recent, and chronic physical or sexual IPV were associated with higher adjusted odds of performing market work in the prior month, and exposures to recent and chronic IPV were associated with higher adjusted odds of performing subsistence work in this period. Supporting compensation and patriarchal bargaining theories, exposures to recent and chronic IPV were associated with more time spent on domestic work in the prior day. Supporting spillover and patriarchal bargaining theories, exposures to lifetime IPV of all forms were associated with lower adjusted odds of performing mostly nonspousal care work in the prior day, and this association was partially mediated by women's generalized anxiety. Women in rural Minya who are exposed to IPV may escalate their housework to fulfill local norms of feminine domesticity while substituting economic activities for nonspousal care work to enhance their economic independence from violent partners. PMID:24659089

  8. The FEeding Support Team (FEST) randomised, controlled feasibility trial of proactive and reactive telephone support for breastfeeding women living in disadvantaged areas

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Leone; Maclennan, Graeme; Boyers, Dwayne; Vale, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of implementing a dedicated feeding support team on a postnatal ward and pilot the potential effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of team (proactive) and woman-initiated (reactive) telephone support after discharge. Design Randomised controlled trial embedded within a before-and-after study. Participatory approach and mixed-method process evaluation. Setting A postnatal ward in Scotland. Sample Women living in disadvantaged areas initiating breast feeding. Methods Eligible women were recruited to a before-and-after intervention study, a proportion of whom were independently randomised after hospital discharge to intervention: daily proactive and reactive telephone calls for ?14?days or control: reactive telephone calls ? day 14. Intention-to-treat analysis compared the randomised groups on cases with complete outcomes at follow-up. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: any breast feeding at 6–8?weeks assessed by a telephone call from a researcher blind to group allocation. Secondary outcomes: exclusive breast feeding, satisfaction with care, NHS costs and cost per additional woman breast feeding. Results There was no difference in feeding outcomes for women initiating breast feeding before the intervention (n=413) and after (n=388). 69 women were randomised to telephone support: 35 intervention (32 complete cases) and 34 control (26 complete cases). 22 intervention women compared with 12 control women were giving their baby some breast milk (RR 1.49, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.40) and 17 intervention women compared with eight control women were exclusively breast feeding (RR 1.73, 95% CI 0.88 to 3.37) at 6–8?weeks after birth. The incremental cost of providing proactive calls was £87 per additional woman breast feeding and £91 per additional woman exclusively breast feeding at 6–8?weeks; costs were sensitive to service organisation. Conclusions Proactive telephone care delivered by a dedicated feeding team shows promise as a cost-effective intervention for improving breastfeeding outcomes. Integrating the FEeding Support Team (FEST) intervention into routine postnatal care was feasible. Trial registration number ISRCTN27207603. The study protocol and final report are available on request. PMID:22535790

  9. Neighborhood socio-economic disadvantage and race/ethnicity as predictors of breast cancer stage at diagnosis

    E-print Network

    Flores, Yvonne N; Davidson, Pamela L; Nakazono, Terry T; Carreon, Daisy C; Mojica, Cynthia M; Bastani, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    breast cancer mortality: are we doing enough to address the root causes?breast cancer incidence among California women, 1988-1997. Canc Causesbreast cancer incidence: California and Massachusetts, 1978-2002 (United States). Canc Causes

  10. Neighborhood socio-economic disadvantage and race/ethnicity as predictors of breast cancer stage at diagnosis

    E-print Network

    Flores, Yvonne N; Davidson, Pamela L; Nakazono, Terry T; Carreon, Daisy C; Mojica, Cynthia M; Bastani, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    breast cancer incidence among California women, 1988-1997. Canc Causesbreast cancer mortality: are we doing enough to address the root causes?Causes Contr 2006, Snipes K: Chapter 7, Stage at diagnosis of female breast cancer,

  11. Women's changing economic roles with pastoral sedentarization: Varying strategies in alternate Rendille communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elliot Fratkin; Kevin Smith

    1995-01-01

    The trend of pastoral sedentarization in Africa presents new economic opportunities to women through the sale of dairy products, agricultural produce, and labor. This study of Rendille of northern Kenya shows a variety of economic strategies pursued by women in nomadic pastoral, settled agro-pastoral, and town communities. Results of household budgets and interviews with married women indicate that urban centers

  12. Frequency of consumption at fast-food restaurants is associated with dietary intake in overweight and obese women recruited from financially disadvantaged neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Sara; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Granner, Michelle; Baruth, Meghan

    2013-01-01

    Fast-food restaurants are more prevalent in lower income and predominately African American neighborhoods, where consumption of fast-food is also higher. In general populations, fast-food consumption is related to less healthy dietary intake. This cross-sectional study examined the hypotheses that greater fast-food consumption is associated with less healthy dietary intake and poorer diet quality in overweight and obese women (N=196, 25–51 years, 87% African American) recruited from financially disadvantaged Census tracts. Dietary intake and diet quality (Alternate Healthy Eating Index, AHEI) were assessed via three 24-hour dietary recalls. Linear regression models tested the association between fast-food consumption and each outcome (Model 1). Model 2 added sociodemographics and physical activity. Model 3 added total caloric intake. Fast-food consumption was significantly associated with total caloric intake; total intake of meat, grains, sweetened beverages, dairy, fiber, cholesterol, sodium, and added sugar; and percent of calories from total fat, saturated fat, and trans fatty acids. Statistically significant associations remained in Model 2 but most were not significant in Model 3. Fast-food consumption was not associated with diet quality (AHEI) in any model. In this at-risk sample, fast-food consumption was associated with more negative dietary practices. Significant associations generally disappeared when controlling for total caloric intake, suggesting that women who eat more fast-food have higher total caloric intakes as a result of increased consumption of unhealthy rather than healthy foods. PMID:23890353

  13. Frequency of consumption at fast-food restaurants is associated with dietary intake in overweight and obese women recruited from financially disadvantaged neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sara; Sharpe, Patricia A; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Granner, Michelle; Baruth, Meghan

    2013-08-01

    Fast-food restaurants are more prevalent in lower-income and predominately African American neighborhoods, where consumption of fast food is also higher. In general populations, fast-food consumption is related to less healthy dietary intake. This cross-sectional study examined the hypotheses that greater fast-food consumption is associated with less healthy dietary intake and poorer diet quality in overweight and obese women (n = 196, 25-51 years, 87% African American) recruited from financially disadvantaged Census tracts. Dietary intake and diet quality (Alternate Healthy Eating Index) were assessed via three 24-hour dietary recalls. Linear regression models tested the association between fast-food consumption and each outcome (model 1). Model 2 added sociodemographics and physical activity. Model 3 added total caloric intake. Fast-food consumption was significantly associated with total caloric intake; total intake of meat, grains, sweetened beverages, dairy, fiber, cholesterol, sodium, and added sugar; and percent of calories from total fat, saturated fat, and trans-fatty acids. Statistically significant associations remained in model 2, but most were not significant in model 3. Fast-food consumption was not associated with diet quality (Alternate Healthy Eating Index) in any model. In this at-risk sample, fast-food consumption was associated with more negative dietary practices. Significant associations generally disappeared when controlling for total caloric intake, suggesting that women who eat more fast food have higher total caloric intakes as a result of increased consumption of unhealthy rather than healthy foods. PMID:23890353

  14. Depressive symptoms are associated with dietary intake but not physical activity among overweight and obese women from disadvantaged neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Kara M; Sharpe, Patricia A; Wilcox, Sara; Hutto, Brent E

    2014-04-01

    Evidence suggests that depressive symptoms are associated with poorer dietary intake and inadequate physical activity; however, this association has not been examined in lower-income overweight and obese African American women. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the associations between depressive symptoms and diet and physical activity in 196 women (87% African American; age, 25-51 years). Higher depressive symptoms were hypothesized to predict poorer diet quality, greater emotional eating, lower physical activity levels, and greater sedentary time. Depressive symptoms were measured using the validated short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Dietary intake and quality were assessed using three 24-hour dietary recalls. Emotional eating was evaluated using 4 items from the emotional eating subscale of the Eating Behavior Patterns Questionnaire. Physical activity and sedentary time were objectively measured using the ActiGraph accelerometer. Linear regression models tested the associations between depressive symptoms and each dietary and physical activity outcome variable. Symptoms of depression were positively associated with total daily caloric intake from saturated fat and total sugars, as well as emotional eating scores (P < .05). Although not statistically significant, depressive symptoms were positively associated with sweetened beverage consumption (P = .06) and added sugars (P = .07). Depressive symptoms were not associated with total fat, sodium, fruit and vegetables, fast food consumption, the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, or sedentary time. Future studies should explore the mechanisms linking the identified associations between depressive symptoms and dietary intake, such as the role of emotional eating. PMID:24774065

  15. Neighborhood socio-economic disadvantage and race/ethnicity as predictors of breast cancer stage at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the role of key individual- and community-level determinants to explore persisting racial/ethnic disparities in breast cancer stage at diagnosis in California during 1990 and 2000. Methods We examined socio-demographic determinants and changes in breast cancer stage at diagnosis in California during 1990 and 2000. In situ, local, regional, and distant diagnoses were examined by individual (age, race/ethnicity, and marital status) and community (income and education by zip code) characteristics. Community variables were constructed using the California Cancer Registry 1990-2000 and the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census. Results From 1990 to 2000, there was an overall increase in the percent of in situ diagnoses and a significant decrease in regional and distant diagnoses. Among white and Asian/Pacific Islander women, a significant percent increase was observed for in situ diagnoses, and significant decreases in regional and distant diagnoses. Black women had a significant decrease in distant -stage diagnoses, and Hispanic women showed no significant changes in any diagnosis during this time period. The percent increase of in situ cases diagnosed between 1990 and 2000 was observed even among zip codes with low income and education levels. We also found a significant percent decrease in distant cases for the quartiles with the most poverty and least education. Conclusions Hispanic women showed the least improvement in breast cancer stage at diagnosis from 1990 to 2000. Breast cancer screening and education programs that target under-served communities, such as the rapidly growing Hispanic population, are needed in California. PMID:24209733

  16. The Relationship between Residential Land Use Patterns and the Educational Outcomes of Economically Disadvantaged Students in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zandt, Shannon; Wunneburger, Douglas F.

    2011-01-01

    Disparate outcomes resulting from economic segregation in public primary schools have been the subject of much debate and litigation. Little research, however, examines whether negative outcomes may be exacerbated by inequities in the distribution of housing across metropolitan areas. This article explores connections between residential land use…

  17. Women in economics: Moving up or falling off the academic career ladder?

    E-print Network

    Ginther, Donna K.; Kahn, S.

    2004-01-01

    Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Women in Economics: Moving Up or Falling Off the Academic Career Ladder? Donna K Ginther; Shulamit Kahn The Journal of Economic Perspectives...

  18. 77 FR 54951 - Disadvantaged Business Enterprise: Program Implementation Modifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ...her individual qualities. The social disadvantage must stem from...of the Black racial groups of Africa; (ii) ``Hispanic Americans...26.67 What rules determine social and economic disadvantage...individual's presumption of social and/or economic...

  19. The general and mental health of movers to more- and less-disadvantaged socio-economic and physical environments within the UK.

    PubMed

    Tunstall, Helena; Mitchell, Richard; Pearce, Jamie; Shortt, Niamh

    2014-10-01

    Residential mobility may play an important role in influencing both individual health, by determining individual exposures to environments, and area health, by shaping area population composition. This study is the first analysis of migration within the UK to compare general and mental health among adults by age group and consider moves between neighbourhoods with different levels of both socio-economic and physical environment disadvantage. The analysis assesses 122,570 cases from the annual British Household Panel Survey, 1996-2006, based upon pooled data describing moves between consecutive waves of the survey. It assesses the rates and binary logistic regression model odds of self-reported general health and mental health problems of movers and stayers by age group. It also compares movers between Census Area Statistics wards in the UK with different levels of Carstairs and Multiple Environmental Deprivation Index (MEDIx) scores. At all ages, movers had similar or higher odds of poor general and mental health relative to non-movers. Risk of mental health problems were particularly elevated among movers and remained significant after adjustment for socio-demographic variables in most age groups. In adjusted analysis of all adults odds of poor general and mental health were most elevated among movers to more socio-economically deprived areas, with the highest odds for mental health (1.54 95% CI 1.27-1.86). In contrast, risk of poor mental health among total adults was greatest among movers to better physical environments (1.40 95% CI 1.16-1.70). This study therefore finds little evidence of 'healthy migrant effects' among recent movers within the UK and suggests movers have particularly elevated risk of mental health problems. It also indicates that selective migration may not contribute to poor health found in UK neighbourhoods with multiple physical environment deprivation. Further analysis should explore why people with mental health problems are more likely to move to socio-economically deprived neighbourhoods. PMID:25112564

  20. Self-reported depression is increasing among socio-economically disadvantaged adolescents – repeated cross-sectional surveys from Finland from 2000 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescent depression is more common in lower socio-economic groups. Whether this pattern has changed over time, is not known. We examined the prevalence of self-reported depression and its changes in socio-economic groups from 2000 to 2011 among Finnish adolescents. Methods Data were based on classroom surveys every second year from 2000–2001 to 2010–2011 using nationwide samples of 14–16-year old Finns (n?=?618,084). Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires including questions on health, health behaviours, and school experiences. Depression was measured with a Finnish modification of the 13-item Beck Depression Inventory, and divided into no, mild, moderate and severe depression. The association between depression and the social background (parents’ education and employment) over time was studied using a multinomial regression analysis. Results The prevalence of self-reported severe depression slightly increased from 2000–2001 to 2010–2011 in girls. In boys a slight increase was observed when adjusting for background variables. The differences in the prevalence of depression between the social background groups persisted over the entire study period. In both sexes, severe depression nearly doubled among those adolescents whose parents were unemployed and had a low education level; among boys, the prevalence was 6.5% in 2000–2001 and 12.8% in 2010–2011, and among girls 6.4% and 11.4% respectively. Conclusion The largest increases in prevalence of severe depression are seen among socio-economically disadvantaged adolescents. This suggests that inequalities in mental health may become an increasing concern. PMID:24775269

  1. Development of Human Resources Through a Vocationally Oriented Educational Program for Disadvantaged Families in Depressed Rural Areas, Degree to which Families are Satisfied with Selected Aspects of Family Life in an Economically Depressed Rural Area. Interim Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Gerald R.; Phipps, Lloyd J.

    One aspect of Project REDY (Rural Education-Disadvantaged Youth) was to identify elements of family living which were satisfying to residents of an economically depressed rural area in Southern Illinois. McVoy's Wants and Satisfaction scale was administered to 115 family heads to determine the degree to which certain wishes and interests of…

  2. An Examination of the First/Second-Grade Form of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance: Factor Structure and Stability by Grade and Gender across Groups of Economically Disadvantaged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Brian F.; Mantzicopoulos, Panayota

    2007-01-01

    We tested the structure of the Pictorial Scale of Competence and Social Acceptance (PSPCSA) across groups of first and second grade children from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. We used confirmatory factor analysis, including latent mean structures analysis, to test the fit of competing PSPCSA factor models and examined invariance across…

  3. The economic costs of martial disruption for young women over the past two decades.

    PubMed

    Smock, P J

    1993-08-01

    This paper examines the economic costs of separation and divorce for young women in the United States from the late 1960s through the late 1980s. Broadened opportunities for women outside marriage may have alleviated some of the severe economic costs of marital disruption for women. This paper contrasts the experiences of two cohorts of young women: those who married and separated or divorced in the late 1960s through the mid-1970s and those who experienced these events in the 1980s. Based on panel data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979-1988. Young Women 1968-1978, and Young Men 1966-1978, the results show stability in the costs of disruption. A multivariate analysis shows that young women in the more recent cohort have more labor force experience before disruption than those in the earlier cohort, but prior work history does not protect women from the severe costs of marital disruption. PMID:8405603

  4. Women's relative immunity to the socio-economic health gradient: artifact or real?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Susan P.; Hamberg, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background Individual and area socio-economic status (SES) are significant predictors of morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. However, the span in health from poorest to richest, that is, the socio-economic gradient, appears steeper for men than women. Objective Our aim is to understand women's apparent immunity to the health harms of the SES gradient. Design Findings from a non-systematic search of Medline for population-based, SES gradient studies reporting results for both men and women and with health outcomes of morbidity, mortality or self-rated health (SRH) were reflectively analyzed. Results The 36 papers reviewed generally showed women to be relatively immune to the SES gradient for all but cardiovascular health outcomes. However, addressing the interconnected nature of socio-economic circumstances, exploring whether some measures of SES had ambiguous meanings for either women or men, including modifiers of SES such as household circumstances, social capital or area gender equity, or using indicators of area SES that were contextual rather than aggregates of individual, compositional measures increased the SES gradient for women. Outcome measures that combined mental and physical health, accounted for gender differences in SRH and adjusted for sex-specific differences in causes of mortality also explained some of the observed amelioration of the SES gradient among women. Conclusions Socio-economic circumstances have a real and sustained impact on individual health. The SES gradient appears stronger for men than for women for all health outcomes other than heart disease. However, some of the observed variability between men and women may be an artifact of biased methodology. Considering webs of causation rather than individual markers of SES along with other sources of gender bias can explain much of women's blunted socio-economic gradient and deepen understanding of the pathways from SES to morbidity and mortality overall. PMID:25947541

  5. Economic and political differentiation among Galole Orma women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean Ensminger

    1987-01-01

    The Orma are cattle?herders living close to Tana River in Kenya. This paper gives an outline of Orma propertyholding and of women's contributions to production in terms of labor. The relationship between control over resources (either outright ownership, rights over use, or indirect control through children's ownership) is discussed in relation to the influence women wield in issues considering sale

  6. Understanding the social and economic contexts surrounding women engaged in street-level prostitution.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz

    2010-12-01

    Prostitution involves the exchange of sexual services for economic compensation. Due to the sexual promiscuity surrounding prostitution, women involved in prostitution constitute a high-risk group for contracting and transmitting STDs, including HIV. Prostitution is not only a public health concern, but also an economic one. Cities throughout the United States spent an average of $7.5 to $16 million per year enforcing prostitution laws and addressing negative outcomes associated with prostitution. Thus, women involved in prostitution are a cause for concern from both public health and economic perspectives. However, little is known about why women remain in this type of behavior given the risks prostitution presents, and even less is known about how to intervene and interrupt the complex cycle of prostitution. Thus, the purpose of this study was to understand what factors contribute to a woman's decision to remain in prostitution. A series of interviews were conducted with 12 women engaged in street-level prostitution. Results of the study revealed that drug use not only spurs entry into prostitution, but also contributes to the tenure of prostitution. Further, social support and economic stability are plausible reasons for women remaining in prostitution. These findings lead us to recommendations for policy and program development. Women involved in prostitution are a highly marginalized population, rarely recognized as individuals with life histories. Understanding why women remain in prostitution is important, because until these determinants are known, intervention programs designed to interrupt the cycle, and ultimately prevent prostitution, cannot be formulated. PMID:21142598

  7. Women's labour and economic globalisation: a participatory workshop created by Alternative Women in Development (Alt-WID).

    PubMed

    Barton, C; Nazombei, E

    2000-03-01

    This article describes the aims, methods, materials and topics used in a participatory workshop created by Alternative Women in Development. The organization aims to bridge the gaps in analyzing human rights and economic justice in both North and South from a feminist perspective through a workshop. This workshop considers the varied roles that women play in the global economy and features a series of anecdotes to illustrate the diverse ways in which globalization affects women in all regions worldwide. The workshop runs for a minimum of 3 hours and is structured as follows: introduction; plenary: identifying the human rights of the women; small-group work, plenary: building a group analysis and discussion of alternatives to the existing policies; and individual and plenary evaluations. Furthermore, four anecdotes used at the workshop are presented. Among the outcomes of the workshop included the identification of the problem causes and development of strategies for action. PMID:12349637

  8. Population Density and Women's Business Ownership: a Case Study of Ohio Counties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sherry Robinson

    2002-01-01

    This study reviews the literature on rural small businesses and women business owners. While some literature suggests women business owners, particularly those in rural areas, are disadvantaged, other studies contend that rural business owners prefer to remain in their location and do not consider it a problem. Using data from the 1997 Economic Census, the number of women-owned businesses and

  9. Women, Fertility and Economics: Fifty Years of Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felipe Del Río; Nelson Alvis; Martha Yánez; Raúl Quejada; Karina Acevedo

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a systematic review of the scientific literature on fertility and its relationship with economics. We explore theoretical and empirical frameworks developed in the last fifty years, emphasizing on the classical (Becker, Easterling) and unorthodox approaches (Bongaarts, Iannaccone, Lehrer). This literature review focused on journals of economics, sociology and demography indexed in the Journal Storage database (JSTOR), Elsevier’s

  10. Reverse mortgages and the economic status of elderly women.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B A; Megbolugbe, I F; Rasmussen, D W

    1996-06-01

    Data from the 1990 Census of Population and Housing are used to estimate the potential demand for reverse mortgages among elderly women householders. A reverse mortgage product is simulated using parameters based on the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage insurance demonstration, and its effect on poverty and income distribution among this group is calculated. Approximately 1.8 million women with low incomes and home equity of $40,000 and above could see a significant increase in income under such a program. PMID:8682338

  11. Development of an economic skill building intervention to promote women's safety and child development in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Saima Shams; Karmaliani, Rozina; McFarlane, Judith; Asad, Nargis; Madhani, Farhana; Shehzad, Shireen; Ali, Nazbano Ahmed

    2010-02-01

    Violence against women is a global epidemic phenomenon that can result in major mental health problems. Not only are women affected but also the health and well-being of their children are in jeopardy. To prevent violence and promote women's safety, several strategies have been tested in various cultural contexts. This article describes the process of developing and validating an economic skill building intervention for women of an urban slum area of Karachi, Pakistan. The purpose of the intervention is to increase women's economic independence, promote women's safety, and improve the behavioral functioning of their children. PMID:20070221

  12. The importance of eating rice: changing food habits among pregnant Indonesian women during the economic crisis.

    PubMed

    Hartini, T Ninuk S; Padmawati, R Siwi; Lindholm, Lars; Surjono, Achmad; Winkvist, Anna

    2005-07-01

    This article presents qualitative and quantitative research findings on food habits of pregnant Indonesian women in relation to the economic crisis that arose in 1997. Between 1996 and 1998, dietary intakes were estimated for 450 pregnant women in Central Java. Between January and June 1999, four focus group discussions, 16 in-depth interviews and four non-participant observations were held with women, two in-depth interviews were held with traditional birth attendants, and four with midwives. Women were categorized as urban or rural, rich or poor, and according to rice field ownership. The women reported that before the crisis they bought more foods and cooked more meals and snacks. During the crisis, cooking methods became simpler and cooking tasty foods was more important than cooking nutritious foods. This involved using plenty of spices and cooking oil, but reducing the use of expensive nutritious foods. The herbal drink jamu was drunk by 15% of pregnant women; its consumption was lower during than before the economic crisis. Twenty-six percent of the women avoided certain foods due to food taboos, and most of these women avoided beneficial foods; this phenomenon decreased during the crisis among the rich and the rural, poor, landless women. In spite of increased prices for rice, women did not decrease their rice consumption during the crisis because rice was believed to have the highest value for survival, to provide strength during pregnancy and delivery, and to be easier to store and cook. Finally, children and husbands had highest priority in being served food, and women were the last to eat. PMID:15847972

  13. Gender, Work-Family Linkages, and Economic Success among Small Business Owners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loscocco, Karyn A.; Leicht, Kevin T.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated work-family connections and economic success among women and men small business owners. Analyses of data from 3-year panel survey of 99 women and 312 men showed considerable gender similarity in processes through which business and individual characteristics affect personal earnings, although women were disadvantaged in some…

  14. Beyond the simple economics of cesarean section birthing: women's resistance to social inequality.

    PubMed

    Béhague, Dominique P

    2002-12-01

    This research explored the reasons for women's preferences for cesarean section births in Pelotas, Brazil. It is argued that women strategize and appropriate both medical knowledge and the technology of cesarean sections as a creative form of responding to larger public debates (and the practices that produced them) on the need for and causes of (de)medicalization. Questioning the reasons why some women engage more actively in this process than others elucidates the ways local forms of power engage gender, economic and medical ideologies. The current debate on why some women prefer c-section deliveries, or indeed if they really do at all, has diverted attention from the utility of the technology itself. This paper argues that for some women, the effort to medicalize the birth process represents a practical solution to problems found within the medical system itself. I end by exploring the socio-biological conditions that have produced a need for the technology. PMID:12572770

  15. The Economic Future of Girls and Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitz, Joan

    Later marriage ages, longer life expectancy, higher divorce rates, and the feminization of poverty will all figure in the economic future of modern girls. Values about work, marriage, and motherhood are in flux during adolescence, and the messages they receive are often contradictory. Steps must be taken to educate girls to make clearheaded and…

  16. Economic Status of Women in the Labor Market and Prospects for Pay Equity Over the Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figart, Deborah M.

    Social and economic forces in the post-war era have lead to an increased commitment by women of all ages to the labor force. In contrast, the labor force participation rate for men has declined. With women's continued predominance in the service sector and jobs lost in the traditionally male manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy, men and women

  17. The Dilemma of the Contribution of African Women Toward and the Benefits They Derive from Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amuge, Immaculate Mary

    1986-01-01

    Africa and Third World countries do not include women in economic development projects. Women have benefited little from the minimum development done so far. These governments' lack of recognition and expansion of women's critical activities in producing and distributing food and cash crops will perpetuate underdevelopment and poverty. (PS)

  18. Social or Economic Concerns: How News and Women's Magazines Framed Breast Cancer in the 1990s

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie L. Andsager; Angela Powers

    1999-01-01

    Media framing of complex diseases is important because the way these are presented may affect individuals' choices regarding health. The authors analyzed 127 articles on breast cancer from three news magazines and four women's magazines to examine whether they focused on social or economic issues. Two content analysis methods were used to determine the issues, sources, and frames. Issues in

  19. The Current Attack on Women's Rights: A Political-Economic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, June

    The right-wing attack on women's rights in the United States manifests itself in the regulation of reproductive rights, the family, and the workplace and corresponds to the changing needs of capital in an era of social and economic crises. Against this background, anti-abortion legislation, the Family Protection Act, and discrimination in the…

  20. Economic comparison of diagnostic approaches for evaluating osteoporosis in older women.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Dale F; Nelson, Heidi D; Bauer, Douglas C; Helfand, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Of the technologies available, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the hip or femoral neck (DXA-FN) is the best predictor of hip fractures. Diagnostic approaches utilizing measures of peripheral sites with office-based technology, such as calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS), may reduce costs although clinical and economic outcomes have not been evaluated. The objective was to compare three approaches for diagnosing osteoporosis in older women. The design was a decision-analytic model using diagnostic measures and clinical and economic outcomes from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures, a prospective cohort of older white women that measured BMD and QUS and assessed fracture outcomes. The setting and patients were a hypothetical cohort of older white women presenting for diagnosis of osteoporosis. For the diagnostic and treatment alternatives, three diagnostic approaches-DXA-FN alone, QUS alone and a sequential approach (first QUS, then DXA-FN for those with low values for QUS)-were compared to no diagnosis. The outcome measures were the number of women identified for treatment, number of hip fractures prevented following diagnosis and subsequent treatment, number of women needed to treat to prevent one hip fracture and total direct medical costs. The sequential approach identified fewer women to treat, prevented more hip fractures and incurred lower total costs than using DXA alone. Diagnosis with QUS alone identified more women to treat and incurred higher total costs than DXA alone under most conditions. Compared to other approaches for diagnosing osteoporosis, sequential use of QUS followed by DXA resulted in fewer women treated and lower total costs. PMID:15889313

  1. The changing economic role of women in the urbanization process: a preliminary report from Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Drakakis-smith, D W

    1984-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey, conducted to collect information on the present economic situation of women and the constraints they face in the choice of work in Zimbabwe, which has recently witnessed a steady growth in its urbanization. Questionnaires were administered to women in 3 district areas of the city of Harare--a middle class suburb within easy commuting distance to the main white collar employment in the city, a low income area of site-and-service housing in the semiperiphery of the city, and a densely populated, lower income, inner city district. There are clear contrasts among the economic activities of women in the 3 areas studied, but the factors which influence the activities seem to vary between and within the social groups, relating somewhat uneasily to the generalized concepts on the female labor market. The occupational analysis of Harare reveals not only the inadequacy of conventional dualistic theories on the labor market, but the somewhat limited utility of westernized concepts on the domestic role of women. The survey also showed strong spatial and geographic influence on women's work and the different opportunities that arise from particular residential locations in Harare. However, this was clearly tempered by social contacts and migrational histories, especially in the inner city areas, where proximity to potential employment was not exploited by many recent migrants. Political factors too were found to play an important role, in the particular circumstance of Zimbabwe, in affecting the residential and economic opportunities for households. In the middle class suburb and low income area studied, the allocation of site and service plots or mortgages was strongly influenced by one's previous combatant status during the struggle for independence. For instance, families with such a status which could be earned by men as well as women), and who are also members of the ruling ZANU-PF party have been favored since 1980. PMID:12340239

  2. Risk factors and prevalence of osteoporosis in premenopausal women from poor economic backgrounds in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Londono, John; Valencia, Paula; Santos, Ana María; Gutiérrez, Luisa F; Baquero, Roberto; Valle-Oñate, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of osteoporosis in premenopausal women along with associated risk factors has not been well elucidated. Recent studies have shown that poverty is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Objective To determine the prevalence of osteoporosis and its risk factors in a group of premenopausal women of poor economic background in Colombia. Materials and methods The study comprised 1483 women between 35 and 53 years of age with at least one risk factor for osteoporosis. Demographic characteristics, reproductive factors, comorbidities, and risk factors for osteoporosis were evaluated. Lumbar vertebrae (L2–L4) and the femur neck were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Of the 1483 patients, 1443 (97.3%) had at least one risk factor for osteoporosis and 40 (2.7%) had no risk factors. Patients with one risk factor were referred to have a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan, which 795 women completed. Osteopenia was found in 30.5% and osteoporosis in 4.8% of these women. The majority of these women were homemakers, and 18.5% of the patients with osteoporosis were also illiterate (P < 0.001). The risk factors identified in this population were: hypothyroidism (odds ratio [OR] = 5.19, 95% confience interval [CI]:1.6–16), age over 45 years old (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.0–1.2), a history of malnutrition or low birth weight (OR = 2.35, 95% CI: 1.0–5.2), or early-onset menopause (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.6–7.2). Conclusion Premenopausal Colombian women from impoverished areas showed increased rates of osteopenia and osteoporosis compared with the data described in the current literature. Hypothyroidism was an outstanding risk factor in Colombian premenopausal women with osteoporosis. This shows the influence of poverty and other risk factors on the onset of osteoporosis in women aged 35–53 years. PMID:23901298

  3. The Effects of a School-Family-Community Partnership on the Academic Achievement, High School Graduation, and College Enrollment Rate of Economically Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Yvette

    2012-01-01

    A school-family-community partnership to improve student achievement was examined at a comprehensive high school located in a low income urban community in Long Island City, New York. In this causal comparative analyses study, the researcher examines the effect of a school-family-community partnership on the educational outcomes of economically

  4. PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POTTS, ALFRED M.; AND OTHERS

    THE TERM "DISADVANTAGED" IS USED TO REPRESENT ENVIRONMENTS THAT ARE INADEQUATE FOR A FULL LIFE. INCLUDED WOULD BE GROUPS IDENTIFIED AS MIGRANTS, LINGUALLY DISADVANTAGED, CULTURALLY DEPRIVED, AND EDUCATIONALLY DISADVANTAGED. A CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED CHILD IS UNABLE TO CONFORM TO PRESENT GROUP EXPECTANCIES. THIS WORKSHOP REPORT IS THE RESULT OF…

  5. Barriers to Employment and the Disadvantaged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, C. Dean; Oetting, Gene

    1977-01-01

    Barriers to employment for economically and vocationally disadvantaged persons are presented in this study. Four clusters of barriers are identified: job qualifications, social and interpersonal conflict, legal and financial problems, and emotional-personal problems. Counseling programs are also described to help individuals overcome these…

  6. STEREOTYPES REGARDING DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEVINE, DANIEL U.

    THE AUTHOR SUBMITTED THAT NEGATIVE PRECONCEPTIONS OFTEN HINDER THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS IN CULTURALLY DEPRESSED AREAS. MOST DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN ARE NOT SPECIAL DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS, NOR EXCEPTIONALLY HOSTILE OR UNRESPONSIVE. THEY AND THEIR PARENTS HAVE HIGH, EVEN UNREALISTIC, EDUCATIONAL ASPIRATIONS. TEACHERS SHOULD…

  7. ENGLISH AND THE DISADVANTAGED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FAGAN, EDWARD R., ED.

    PART 1 OF THIS COLLECTION OF ARTICLES BY THE STAFF AND PARTICIPANTS OF AN NDEA SUMMER INSTITUTE IN ENGLISH FOR DISADVANTAGED YOUTH DESCRIBES ATTITUDES AND VIEWPOINTS ON THE PLACE OF ENGLISH IN THE DAILY LIVES OF STUDENTS AND CONTAINS ARTICLES ON "ENGLISH FOR WHAT" BY CHARLES WEINGARTNER, "ENGLISH TEACHING AND DROP-OUTS" AND "ENGLISH AND THE…

  8. Relationship between dietary habits, age, lifestyle, and socio-economic status among adult Norwegian women. The Norwegian Women and Cancer Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Hjartåker; E Lund

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To examine how dietary intake varies with age in a nation-wide sample of adult Norwegian women, and to evaluate the impact of lifestyle and socio-economic status on important dietary aspects.Design: Cross-section study.Setting and subjects: A food frequency questionnaire was mailed to a random, nation-wide sample of 20 000 women aged 45–69 y, and 9885 questionnaires were accepted for nutritional

  9. Socio-Economic Variables and Nutrient Adequacy of Women in the Vaal Region of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Oldewage-Theron, Wilna H; Kruger, Rozanne; Egal, Abdulkadir A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional, observational baseline survey was to examine the association between nutrient intakes and selected socio-economic variables in 722 women, aged 19 to 90 years living in peri-urban settlements. Measurements included socio-demographic data and 24-hour recall dietary intake data. The results showed poor nutrient intakes with the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) not met for the mean intakes of all nutrients except carbohydrates, phosphorus, and vitamin B12. The inadequate energy intakes were significantly higher among the women who had lower education (p = .015), lower income (p = .028), and were unemployed (p = .015). The epidemiological value of the study findings is in the contribution to the rationale of appropriate interventions such as income-generating projects as well as household agricultural projects to improve food and nutrient intakes. PMID:25105862

  10. Beaten and Poor? A Study of the Long-Term Economic Situation of Women Victims of Severe Violence

    PubMed Central

    Trygged, Sven; Hedlund, Ebba; Kåreholt, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    This 10-year follow-up study based on Swedish national registers compares the economic situation of women victims of violence leading to hospitalization (n = 6,085) to nonexposed women (n = 55,016) in 1992 to 2005. Women exposed to severe violence had a poorer financial situation prior to the assault. Violence seems to heavily reinforce this pattern, indicating a continued need of support from the social work profession. Assaulted women had a worse income development, lower odds for being in employment, and higher odds for having low incomes and means tested social assistance during the 10-year follow-up, independent of having children or not. PMID:24405195

  11. Rationale, Design, and Baseline Characteristics of a Community-based Comparative Effectiveness Trial to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Economically Disadvantaged Adults: The RAPID Study

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Ronald T.; Finch, Emily A.; Schmidt, Karen K.; Hoen, Helena M.; Hays, Laura M.; Marrero, David G.; Saha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Reaching out And Preventing Increases in Diabetes (RAPID) is a community-based randomized trial evaluating the comparative costs and effectiveness of a group-based adaption of the DPP lifestyle intervention developed and implemented in partnership with the YMCA. RAPID enrolled adult primary care patients, with BMI 24 kg/m2 or higher and abnormal glucose metabolism (HbA1c 5.7-6.9% or fasting plasma glucose 100-125 mg/dL). 509 participants were enrolled and randomized to one of two groups: standard clinical advice plus free-of-charge access to a group-based adaption of the DPP offered by the Y, versus standard clinical advice alone. Key outcomes for future analysis will include differences in body weight and other cardiovascular risk factors over a 24-month intervention period. At baseline, RAPID participants had a mean (SD) age of 51 ± 12.1 years, weight of 225.1 ± 56.2 Ibs, and BMI of 36.9 ± 8.6 kg/m2. 70.7% were women, 57.2% were African American, 35.4% were non-Hispanic White, and 3.2% were Hispanic. Mean HbA1c was 6.05 ± 0.34%. Additionally, 55.4% of participants had a baseline systolic blood pressure of ?130 mmHg, 33.1% had a total blood cholesterol exceeding 200 mg/dl, and 74% reported a household income of <$25,000. The RAPID Study successfully randomized a large cohort of participants with a wide distribution of age, body weight, and race who are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. PMID:24177413

  12. Adolescent Fertility and the Educational Attainment of Young Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel H. Klepinger; Shelly Lundberg; Robert D. Plotnick

    1995-01-01

    then public policies that focus on reduc- ing teenage pregnancy and childbearing may do little to improve the life chances of many disadvantaged young women. Proving, or disproving, the theory that teenage childbearing undermines a wom- an's chances of social and economic suc- cess in adulthood is essential if policies to reduce poverty and welfare dependence are to be grounded

  13. HIV prevalence and risk behaviors among African American Women Who Trade Sex for Drugs Versus Economic Resources.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Eugene M; Dyer, Typhanye Penniman; Khan, Maria R; Cavanaugh, Courtenay E; Melnikov, Alex; Latimer, William W

    2014-07-01

    Trading sex for money, drugs, goods, services, or a place to stay is prevalent among women who use drugs and has been associated with women's risk of HIV acquisition. There is evidence that trading sex for drugs only may be associated with elevated risk of HIV compared with trading sex for money. The purpose of this study was to assess whether HIV risk behaviors and HIV prevalence differ among African American drug using women (N = 92) who traded sex for drugs only, traded sex for economic resources (defined as money, shelter, or other resources) only, or traded sex for both economic resources and drugs. In this study, lower rates of condom use and higher rates of HIV were found among women who traded sex for drugs only compared to women who traded sex for economic resources or for economic resources and drugs. These findings suggest that African American women who trade sex for drugs only represent an understudied yet highly vulnerable group. PMID:24496649

  14. Making a livelihood at the fish-landing site: exploring the pursuit of economic independence amongst Ugandan women

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Georgina; Barratt, Caroline; Seeley, Janet; Ssetaala, Ali; Nabbagala, Georgina; Asiki, Gershim

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative life history data were used to explore the experiences of women who live at five fish-landing sites on Lake Victoria, Uganda. We explored what economic and social opportunities women have in order to try to understand why some women are more vulnerable to violence and other risks than others and why some women are able to create successful enterprises while others struggle to make a living. The ability of women to create a viable livelihood at the landing sites was influenced by a wide variety of factors. Women who had or were able to access capital when they arrived at the landing site to set up their own enterprise had a significant advantage over those who did not, particularly in avoiding establishing sexual relationships in order to get support. Being able to establish their own business enabled women to avoid lower paid and more risky work such as fish processing and selling or working in bars. The development of landing sites and the leisure industry may be having an impact on how women earn money at the landing sites, with the most desirable economic opportunities not necessarily being connected directly to fishing. PMID:25400694

  15. Making a livelihood at the fish-landing site: exploring the pursuit of economic independence amongst Ugandan women.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Georgina; Barratt, Caroline; Seeley, Janet; Ssetaala, Ali; Nabbagala, Georgina; Asiki, Gershim

    2013-11-01

    Qualitative life history data were used to explore the experiences of women who live at five fish-landing sites on Lake Victoria, Uganda. We explored what economic and social opportunities women have in order to try to understand why some women are more vulnerable to violence and other risks than others and why some women are able to create successful enterprises while others struggle to make a living. The ability of women to create a viable livelihood at the landing sites was influenced by a wide variety of factors. Women who had or were able to access capital when they arrived at the landing site to set up their own enterprise had a significant advantage over those who did not, particularly in avoiding establishing sexual relationships in order to get support. Being able to establish their own business enabled women to avoid lower paid and more risky work such as fish processing and selling or working in bars. The development of landing sites and the leisure industry may be having an impact on how women earn money at the landing sites, with the most desirable economic opportunities not necessarily being connected directly to fishing. PMID:25400694

  16. The Long Term Economic Impact of Severe Obstetric Complications for Women and Their Children in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ilboudo, Patrick G. C.; Russell, Steve; D’Exelle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the long term economic impact of severe obstetric complications for women and their children in Burkina Faso, focusing on measures of food security, expenditures and related quality of life measures. It uses a hospital based cohort, first visited in 2004/2005 and followed up four years later. This cohort of 1014 women consisted of two main groups of comparison: 677 women who had an uncomplicated delivery and 337 women who experienced a severe obstetric complication which would have almost certainly caused death had they not received hospital care (labelled a “near miss” event). To analyze the impact of such near miss events as well as the possible interaction with the pregnancy outcome, we compared household and individual level indicators between women without a near miss event and women with a near miss event who either had a live birth, a perinatal death or an early pregnancy loss. We used propensity score matching to remove initial selection bias. Although we found limited effects for the whole group of near miss women, the results indicated negative impacts: a) for near miss women with a live birth, on child development and education, on relatively expensive food consumption and on women’s quality of life; b) for near miss women with perinatal death, on relatively expensive foods consumption and children’s education and c) for near miss women who had an early pregnancy loss, on overall food security. Our results showed that severe obstetric complications have long lasting consequences for different groups of women and their children and highlighted the need for carefully targeted interventions. PMID:24224028

  17. No time to worship the serpent deities: women, economic change, and religion in north-western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Saul, R

    1999-03-01

    This paper explores the changing relationships between lay women, and the spiritual realm, in two ethnic Tibetan communities, Kag and Dzong, in northwestern Nepal. The study tackles how economic and social change has affected women's spiritual roles within the household and the community, and how these roles, in turn, have influenced the course of such change. In Kag, the introduction of tourism changed women's way of life. They became income-generating members of the community as lodge-owners. With new responsibilities to manage, Kag women eventually neglected their traditional social and spiritual obligations, much to the dismay of the older generation. On the other hand, women in Dzong still consider full social and physical participation in village life important despite the added obligations. They maintain spiritual harmony within the village. Dzongba women do not seem to feel the same conflicts as Kagpa women. The negative impact of Kag women's neglect of traditional social and spiritual responsibilities should be weighed against the possible benefits to women, household, and economy. PMID:12295339

  18. Energy intake during economic crisis depends on initial wealth and access to rice fields: the case of pregnant Indonesian women.

    PubMed

    Hartini, T N S; Winkvist, A; Lindholm, L; Stenlund, H; Surjono, A; Hakimi, M

    2002-07-01

    Starting in August 1997, Indonesia experienced a radical and rapid deterioration in its economy. Between 1996 and 1998, dietary intake during the second trimester was measured in 450 pregnant women in Purworejo, Central Java, Indonesia. Using six 24 h recalls we describe the consequences of the economic crisis on the energy intake of pregnant Indonesian women. Depending on the date of data collection, women were grouped into 'before crisis', 'transition' and 'during crisis'. Mean energy intake among groups was compared using ANOVA and Student's t-test. All groups of pregnant women already had a mean energy intake before the emerging crisis that was lower than the Indonesian recommended dietary allowances (RDA). Nevertheless, energy intake differed significantly among women with different education levels (P = 0.00) and from different socio-economic groups (P = 0.00). 'During transition', a significant decrease in energy intake was experienced by urban poor women (P = 0.01). Poor women with access to rice fields had a higher rice consumption than other groups throughout the period. Our results most likely reflect the effect of higher rice price on income and welfare. 'During crisis', energy intake improved among vulnerable groups, perhaps reflecting government intervention. PMID:12173497

  19. Predicting breastfeeding in women living in areas of economic hardship: Explanatory role of the theory of planned behaviour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian McMillan; Mark Conner; Mike Woolridge; Lisa Dyson; Josephine Green; Mary Renfrew; Kuldip Bharj; Graham Clarke

    2008-01-01

    This study employed the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and additional variables (descriptive norm, moral norm, self-identity) to investigate the factors underlying breastfeeding intention and subsequent breastfeeding at four time points (during hospital stay, at hospital discharge, 10 days postpartum and 6 weeks postpartum) in a sample of women selected from defined areas of economic hardship (N = 248). A

  20. Women Empowerment and Participation in Economic Activities: Indispensable Tools for Self-Reliance and Development of Nigerian Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    E. N., Ekesionye; A. N., Okolo

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine women empowerment and participation in economic activities as tools for self-reliance and development of the Nigerian society. Research questions and hypothesis were used to guide the study. Structured questionnaire was used as the major instrument for data collection. Copies of questionnaires were…

  1. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Jha, V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  2. Sweeping out Home Economics: Curriculum Reform at Connecticut College for Women, 1952-1962

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marthers, Paul Philip

    2011-01-01

    At the moment of its founding in 1911, Connecticut College for Women exhibited a curricular tension between an emphasis on the liberal arts, which mirrored the elite men's and women's colleges of the day, and vocational aspects, which made it a different type of women's college, one designed to prepare women for the kind of lives they would lead…

  3. The Physiological Expression of Living in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods for Youth

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Allison B.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the consequences of chronic exposure to stressors extend beyond psychological effects, and that adolescents living in socio-economically disadvantaged neighborhoods may experience an accumulation of exposure to stressors that wears down the physical systems in the body, resulting in hyper-activation of the stress response. This research examines the relationship between exposure to neighborhood stressors and salivary cortisol reactivity in a sample of 163 at-risk African American adolescents (average age 21; 50% female) living in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods. More specifically, the relationship between neighborhood stressors and physiological stress, measured by baseline cortisol and cortisol reactivity is assessed. This research also examines several moderating pathways between exposure to neighborhood disadvantage and cortisol reactivity including substance use, high effort coping, psychological stress and social support. Results indicate that both individual and neighborhood-level factors influence adolescent cortisol. High effort coping and psychological stress were associated with cortisol in the sample, and exposure to neighborhood socio-economic disadvantage resulted in an atypical cortisol response. In addition, neighborhood disadvantage interacted with intra- and interpersonal factors to affect cortisol indirectly. Thus, living in disadvantaged neighborhoods may take a psychological and physiological toll on adolescents, and it also may exert synergistic effects through individual coping and vulnerabilities. PMID:23086016

  4. Relationship of Race/Ethnicity, Body Mass Index, and Economic Strain with Longitudinal Self-Report of Physical Functioning: The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation

    PubMed Central

    Ylitalo, Kelly R.; Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie A.; Fitzgerald, Nora; Zheng, Thomas (Huiyong); Sternfeld, Barbara; El Khoudary, Samar R.; Harlow, Siobán D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examined progression and improvement of physical functioning limitations during the mid-life, and whether race/ethnicity, economic strain, or body mass index were associated with these changes. Methods Women from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation with ?1 measure of self-reported physical functioning, categorized as no, some, or substantial limitations, between study visit 4 and 12 were included (n=2497). Results When women were aged 56–66, almost 50% reported limitations in functioning. African American women were more likely to report substantial (OR=1.63; 95% CI: 1.06,2.52) and Chinese women were more likely to report some limitations (OR=2.03; 95% CI: 1.22,3.36) compared to Caucasian women. Economic strain and obesity predicted limitations. The probability of worsening ranged from 6 to 22% and of improving ranged from 11% to 30%. Caucasian and Japanese women had the highest probability of remaining fully functional (80% and 84%, respectively) compared to 71% of African American women. Conclusions Race/ethnicity, obesity, and economic strain were associated with prevalence and onset of physical functioning limitations. Functional improvement is common, even among vulnerable subgroups of women. Future studies should characterize predictors of decline and improvement so that interventions can sustain functioning even in the context of many known immutable risk factors. PMID:23694761

  5. Women's worth.

    PubMed

    Bloch, N

    1992-01-01

    Jill Conway is a feminist historian, writer, teacher, and now-emerita 1st woman president of Smith College. She claims that women today still suffer from a great deal of oppression. Women around the world are currently in a disadvantage position. In 7 countries women do not have the right to vote. In the US less that .5% of top executives are women. The wage gap in the US between 1939 and 1989 has only shrunk $.10, from $.58-$.68. Conway points out that we are all constrained by our social mores, generational attitudes, political events, and economic circumstances. Few people are able to overcome these things in the way that they live their lives. Conway questions the validity of history written from a male dominated point of view. Around the world the value of women's work is almost always lower than that of men. India is just 1 example, there 75% of women are illiterate and 1/2 the population lives in poverty based on a caste system. Female literacy tripled in the 1st 30 years of independence and by 1981 it had reached 25%. The literacy gap is actually growing in India Today with 44% of girls aged 6 to 11, who are eligible to attend school, not doing so. Rural poverty keeps them at home because their domestic work is more valuable than their education. Other cultural tradition compound the problem: arranged marriages often result in motherhood for 14 year old girls. This is done for many reasons, 1 of which is crop failure insurance. When 2 families are combined through marriage, their total land share grows and they are thus more likely to have enough to eat. Education is just 1 necessary step. Developed nations must realize the realities that exist in the countries they provide aid for. In Africa for example, 70% of continent's food is produced by women. Yet the aid programs of the past have only been designed to offer assistant to men and create jobs for men. PMID:12317441

  6. NASA Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) within NASA promotes the utilization of small, disadvantaged, and women-owned small businesses in compliance with Federal laws, regulations, and policies. We assist such firms in obtaining contracts and subcontracts with NASA and its prime contractors. The OSDBU also facilitates the participation of small businesses in NASA's technology transfer and commercialization activities. Our driving philosophy is to consider small businesses as our products. Our customers are the NASA Enterprises, Field Centers, Functional Staff Offices, major prime contractors, and other large institutions. We hone the skills of our products to make them marketable to our customers in the performance of NASA missions.

  7. Jobs: women's double burden.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Whereas international conventions and national laws provide equal opportunities for women in employment, the reality of women's lives keeps a disproportionate number of women unemployed, underemployed, and living in poverty. The UN itself, which officially is working toward equity among its employees, has a staff composed of just 32.6% women, and women comprise only 10.5% of the top end of the hierarchy. In areas where women's labor force participation has increased dramatically, women typically earn 30-40% less than men doing the same job or else their employment is limited to "traditional female" service positions. The fact that women and girls have received an inadequate education makes it extremely difficult to break the barriers of discrimination in developing countries. The empowerment of women will break the education barrier, and, when that falls, many other barriers will follow suit. Efforts are already underway to break structural barriers caused by economic and social policies. For example, a more flexible pattern of work has been proposed which will include the voluntary assumption of flexible hours, job-sharing, and part-time work. The concept of work is also being broadened to include the important human services that women traditionally provide on a volunteer basis. This will lead to a valuation of women's contribution to society which can be added to calculations of gross domestic product. Women also need protection as they attempt to eke out a living in the informal sector which has been the traditional avenue for women to earn money. This sector is not protected by law and is subject to extortion by officials and by male competitors. A variety of measures is under consideration to increase the protection of informal sector workers. Women also need protection in the conventional work place, especially as they enter fields traditionally reserved for men. These questions are important even in the context of global unemployment because these issues must be addressed or their resolution to women's disadvantage will gain the mantle of tradition. PMID:12157784

  8. HOW DOES ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT AFFECT WOMEN'S RISK OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN LOW AND MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF PUBLISHED EVIDENCEy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SEEMA VYAS; CHARLOTTE WATTS

    Objectives: To identify whether individual and household economic empowerment is associated with lower intimate partner violence in low and middle income country settings. Methods: Systematic PubMed and internet searches. Results: Published data from 41 sites were reviewed. Household assets and women's higher education were generally protective. Evidence about women's involvement in income generation and experience of past year violence was

  9. Money, men and markets: Economic and sexual empowerment of market women in southwestern Uganda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Nyanzi; Stella Nyanzi; Brent Wolff; James Whitworth

    2005-01-01

    Market trading requires access to cash, independent decision?making, mobility and social interaction. This study sought to explore whether market work empowers women with respect to spending decisions and negotiation over sex and condom?use. A semi?structured questionnaire was administered to 212 market women; and 12 focus group discussions and 52 in?depths interviews were conducted among market women in southwestern Uganda. Market

  10. Influences on Employment Discrimination in the Caribbean: The Case of the Marginalized Men and Wasted Women of Dominica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    A study considered the global problem of employment discrimination as it is reenacted in the Caribbean. It takes Dominica as a micro-example of how factors of differential education and cultural expectation interact within the influences of changing global economic policies to disadvantage men and women across the spectrum of employment…

  11. Hopelessness as Mediator of the Link Between Reports of a History of Child Maltreatment and Suicidality in African American Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindi A. Meadows; Nadine J. Kaslow

    2002-01-01

    Findings from a study comparing reports of a history of child maltreatment and hopelessness in a sample of economically, socially, and educationally disadvantaged young urban African American women suicide attempters (n = 176) and demographically similar nonattempters (n = 185) revealed higher rates of child maltreatment and hopelessness among attempters than those among their nonsuicidal counterparts. Using a mediational model

  12. Capitalizing on Bourdieu: How Useful Are Concepts of "Social Capital" and "Social Field" for Researching "Marginalized" Young Women?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, Andrea C.

    2005-01-01

    This article considers Bourdieu's concepts of "social capital" and "social fields", comparing and contrasting his use of these concepts with that of James Coleman and Robert Putnam. It examines how Bourdieu's ideas offer a different way of understanding the lives of economically disadvantaged young women designated as "at risk" of leaving school…

  13. The Physiological Expression of Living in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Allison B.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the consequences of chronic exposure to stressors extend beyond psychological effects, and that adolescents living in socio-economically disadvantaged neighborhoods may experience an accumulation of exposure to stressors that wears down the physical systems in the body, resulting in hyper-activation of the stress response.…

  14. The Early Childhood Education of Disadvantaged Children in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Zhanmei; Zhu, Jiaxiong; Xia, Zhuyun; Wu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, the Chinese government has adopted a series of services and policies to provide early childhood education for disadvantaged children. The rapid economic development and urbanisation process since the mid-1980s have led to great changes in social structure and demographics in China. This creates new challenges for the education of…

  15. [Women, population and the environment].

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    Women still treated as 2nd class citizens in many developing countries despite international initiatives such as the UN convention on elimination of all forms of discrimination against women that was ratified by 105 countries. The disadvantages that confront women have social repercussions because women play a central role in the development process, especially in deciding the size of their families, and also in administering environmental resources. Efforts of women to improve their families' conditions involve then in management of such natural resources as soil, forests, and water, and also involve then in management of the household potable water supply and waste disposal. In some parts of sub-Saharan Africa, up to 70% of food production, processing, and marketing is in the hands of women. Women in many countries have the task of gathering firewood, which can require 5-10 hours of work several times a week in areas where firewood has become scarce. At the same time, women are often denied the opportunity of contributing to the economic support of their household because of their childcare responsibilities. A woman's prestige in some cultures is defined by her capacity to have many children. Lack of education and employment often prompt women to marry young and have many children, especially in countries where children contribute to family income. Local administration of natural resources improves when women become part of the development process. It is urgent that women's status be improved through social and political changes enabling them to make decisions affecting their own lives, such as postponing marriage and having the number of children they want. Family planning services should be available, and motivation for smaller families should be reinforced through better health care and educational and employment opportunities for women. PMID:12284752

  16. Training Women for Rural Employment in Fiji's Changing Economic and Cultural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Adele M. E.; Waqanivalu, Makario

    1996-01-01

    A young women's employment program in Fiji focused on personal development, self-reliance, and small business development. The responsibilities of women's traditional roles and lack of capital and credit were difficulties encountered, but the human development sessions were most valued by the participants. (SK)

  17. The Economic Legacy of Divorce and Separation for Women in Old Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Lynn; Robb, A. Leslie

    2004-01-01

    Although progress has been made over the last 20 years, the burden of a low income in old age is still carried by unattached women. Few researchers, however, have examined exactly where the burden of poverty falls within the category of unattached older women or what the nature of this poverty is. Like any other group of older Canadians,…

  18. PROGRAMS FOR THE EDUCATIONALLY DISADVANTAGED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA. Office of Urban Affairs.

    THIS DOCUMENT LISTS PROGRAMS IN THE LOS ANGELES SCHOOLS FOR THE EDUCATIONALLY DISADVANTAGED. ON THE ELEMENTARY LEVEL, THERE ARE PROGRAMS FOR THE EDUCABLE MENTALLY RETARDED, COMPENSATORY EDUCATION, A DIVIDED PRIMARY SCHOOL DAY WHICH ALLOWS FOR MORE INDIVIDUALIZED READING INSTRUCTION, AND AN EXTENDED SCHOOL DAY. ALSO OFFERED ARE REMEDIAL READING…

  19. Demography of Disadvantage in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lewis W., Comp.; And Others

    In this report, demography conceptualizes significant characteristics to serve as a basis for more intensive study, planning, and procedures focusing on the target group. A compilation of the latest reports available and primarily tabular in form, identifies and locates Tennessee's disadvantaged people, ranking the 95 counties on each of 8…

  20. Functional Education for Disadvantaged Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurrin, Sterling M., Ed.

    This book is a collection of essays on the problems of vocational education for the disadvantaged. These papers were originally commissioned as part of a more general study of urban education. The essays concern the concept of functional education, the role of the public schools in preparing youth for employment, strategies for success in…

  1. Instructional Resources for Disadvantaged Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard W.

    Criteria and suggestions for the development and selection of instructional materials for culturally disadvantaged youth are discussed from the point of view of the textbook publisher. Materials should be educationally valid (any subject can be taught intellectually and honestly to a child), should teach fundamental concepts, and should suggest…

  2. Education and Training Strategies for Disadvantaged Groups in Thailand. Strategies of Education and Training for Disadvantaged Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piromruen, Smarnjit; Keoyote, Sen

    This book looks at the current spectrum of programs dealing with education for disadvantaged youth in Thailand. In spite of a lack of literature on the subject, it presents a diversity of information collected from various public and private organizations. The first chapter brings into focus the negative effects of the recent economic crisis,…

  3. The Scarring Effects of Bankruptcy: Cumulative Disadvantage across Credit and Labor Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroto, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    As the recent economic crisis has demonstrated, inequality often spans credit and labor markets, supporting a system of cumulative disadvantage. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this research draws on stigma, cumulative disadvantage and status characteristics theories to examine whether credit and labor markets intersect…

  4. Estimated economic impact of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system on unintended pregnancy in active duty women.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Mumford, Sunni L; Hill, Micah J; Armstrong, Alicia Y

    2014-10-01

    Unintended pregnancy is reportedly higher in active duty women; therefore, we sought to estimate the potential impact of the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) could have on unintended pregnancy in active duty women. A decision tree model with sensitivity analysis was used to estimate the number of unintentional pregnancies in active duty women which could be prevented. A secondary cost analysis was performed to analyze the direct cost savings to the U.S. Government. The total number of Armed Services members is estimated to be over 1.3 million, with an estimated 208,146 being women. Assuming an age-standardized unintended pregnancy rate of 78 per 1,000 women, 16,235 unintended pregnancies occur each year. Using a combined LNG-IUS failure and expulsion rate of 2.2%, a decrease of 794, 1588, and 3970 unintended pregnancies was estimated to occur with 5%, 10% and 25% usage, respectively. Annual cost savings from LNG-IUS use range from $3,387,107 to $47,352,295 with 5% to 25% intrauterine device usage. One-way sensitivity analysis demonstrated LNG-IUS to be cost-effective when the cost associated with pregnancy and delivery exceeded $11,000. Use of LNG-IUS could result in significant reductions in unintended pregnancy among active duty women, resulting in substantial cost savings to the government health care system. PMID:25269131

  5. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of CKD in disadavantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities, and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biologic predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expanding deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of WKD 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to ESRD, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25525919

  6. Work time. Leisure time. On women's temporal and economic well-being in Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracey Warren

    2010-01-01

    In the study of work time, a wealth of influential ideas has emerged about the potentially damaging impact of too many hours in the labour market on the rest of peoples' lives, as well as about the negative economic ramifications of short hours working. The paper focuses on the temporal and economic well-being of female employees in Europe, stimulated by

  7. 48 CFR 752.226-1 - Determination of status as disadvantaged enterprise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...in this provision, means United States citizens whose origins are in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, or Nepal. (c) Qualified groups. The offeror shall presume that socially and economically disadvantaged individuals...

  8. 48 CFR 752.226-1 - Determination of status as disadvantaged enterprise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...in this provision, means United States citizens whose origins are in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, or Nepal. (c) Qualified groups. The offeror shall presume that socially and economically disadvantaged individuals...

  9. 48 CFR 752.226-1 - Determination of status as disadvantaged enterprise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...in this provision, means United States citizens whose origins are in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, or Nepal. (c) Qualified groups. The offeror shall presume that socially and economically disadvantaged individuals...

  10. 48 CFR 752.226-1 - Determination of status as disadvantaged enterprise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...in this provision, means United States citizens whose origins are in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, or Nepal. (c) Qualified groups. The offeror shall presume that socially and economically disadvantaged individuals...

  11. 48 CFR 752.226-1 - Determination of status as disadvantaged enterprise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...in this provision, means United States citizens whose origins are in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, or Nepal. (c) Qualified groups. The offeror shall presume that socially and economically disadvantaged individuals...

  12. Coresidence with Parents, Women's Economic Resources, and the Transition to Marriage in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymo, James M.; Ono, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    Integrating three theoretical explanations for declining rates of marriage in Japan, the authors develop hypotheses in which linkages between benefits of coresidence with parents and marriage timing are moderated by women's own socioeconomic characteristics. To evaluate these hypothesized interactive relationships, data from a panel survey of…

  13. HIV risk behaviors among young drug using women who have sex with women (WSWs) in New York City.

    PubMed

    Ompad, Danielle C; Friedman, Samuel R; Hwahng, Sel J; Nandi, Vijay; Fuller, Crystal M; Vlahov, David

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that multiple stressors may work in tandem to affect the health of women who have sex with women (WSWs). WSWs have been a part of the HIV epidemic in New York City since the beginning, making it an ideal setting to further explore these women's risk. Among a sample of 375 heroin, crack and/or cocaine using women recruited from economically disadvantaged communities in New York City, we examined HIV seroprevalence and risk behaviors among WSWs as compared to women who have sex with men only (WSMOs). We also explore differences between WSWs and WSMOs with respect to potential stressors (i.e., decreased access to resources and health care utilization and violence victimization) that might contribute overall HIV risk. The study's limitations are noted. PMID:21303247

  14. Socio-economic correlates of contraceptive knowledge among women in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Salleh, N M; Peng, T N; Arshat, H

    1986-12-01

    Knowledge about contraception was examined in relation to selected socioeconomic variables. A total of 2567 currently married women aged 15-49 years residing in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya were interviewed. The majority of the women knew of at least 1 contraceptive method. An index termed Contraceptive Knowledge Score (CKS) was used to measure the level of knowledge about contraception. The CKS achieved differed significantly by age, area of residence and ethnic group. The other socioeconomic variables significantly associated with CKS are schooling, occupation, income, childhood residence and age at marriage. These relationships persisted even after adjusting for differences in age, ethnicity and area of residence. Overall the CKS attained have a wide range and there is no significant difference of the mean CKS attained, between users and non-users of contraceptives. PMID:12314886

  15. Women and Economic Security in Retirement:Implications for Social Security Reform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet Spratlin; Karen C. Holden

    2000-01-01

    Gender-related parenting roles lower incomes of women during the working-age years and in retirement years. National retirement income programs contribute to this gender-related difference in retirement income to the degree that they consider lifetime earnings in calculating benefits. This article examines two national pension systems: those of Australia and Sweden. The pension systems of these two countries often are considered

  16. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and gestational weight gain and loss

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Dara D.; Doebler, Donna Almario; Kim, Kevin H.; Amutah, Ndidi N.; Fabio, Anthony; Bodnar, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We explored the relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage (NSED) and gestational weight gain and loss and if the association differed by race. Methods A census tract level NSED index (categorized as low, mid-low, mid-high, and high) was generated from 12 measures from the 2000 US Census data. Gestational weight gain and other individual-level characteristics were derived from vital birth records for Allegheny County, PA for 2003–2010 (n=55,608). Crude and adjusted relative risks were estimated using modified multilevel Poisson regression models to estimate the association between NSED and excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) and weight loss (versus adequate GWG). Results Black women lived in neighborhoods that were more likely to be socioeconomically disadvantaged compared to white women. Almost 55% of women gained an excessive amount of weight during pregnancy, and 2% lost weight during pregnancy. Black women were more likely than white women to have inadequate weight gain or weight loss. Mid-high (aRR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.3) and high (aRR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.5, 1.6) NSED compared to low NSED was associated with inadequate weight gain while NSED was not associated with excessive weight gain. Among black women, high versus low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy (RR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.5). Among white women, each level of NSED compared to low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy. Conclusion This study demonstrates how neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics can contribute to our understanding of inadequate weight gain and weight loss during pregnancy, having implications for future research and interventions designed to advance pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24026397

  17. Women and Minorities in Economics Textbooks: Are They Being Adequately Represented?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Denise

    2001-01-01

    Examines 12 recent editions of principles of economics textbooks to determine the quantity of race- and gender-related material. Finds, in general, that there has been an increase in the quantitative coverage of race- and gender-related material as measured by the number of pages, names, and tables in the textbooks. (RLH)

  18. Employment and Health among Older Black Women: Implications for Their Economic Status. Working Paper No. 177.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Diane Robinson

    Recognizing that the economic well-being of older black females is associated with current employment as well as previous work history, this study attempts to determine the extent to which health status influences workforce participation or non-participation by older females, and to ascertain if there are significant differences by race. The study…

  19. Economic Risk Factors for HIV Infection Among Women in Rural Haiti: Implications for HIV Prevention Policies and Programs in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, W.; Boehm, F.; Finkelstein, J.L.; Singler, J.M.; Léandre, F.; Nevil, P.; Bertrand, D.; Claude, M.S.; Bertrand, J.; Louissaint, M.; Jeannis, L.; Farmer, P.E.; Yang, A.T.; Mukherjee, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aims The goals of this study were to (1) estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among women accessing services at a women's health center in rural Haiti and (2) to identify economic risk factors for HIV infection in this population. Methods Women who accessed healthcare services at this center between June 1999 and December 2002 were recruited to participate. The analysis was based on data from a case-control study of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in rural Haiti. HIV prevalence in the study population was 4%. Results In multivariate analyses, partner occupation was associated with HIV infection in women, with mechanic (OR 9.0, 95% CI 1.8-45) and market vendor (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.6-11) reflecting the strongest partner occupational risk factors. Partner's occupation as a farmer reduced the risk of infection in women by 60% (95% CI 0.14-1.1). Factors indicating low socioeconomic status (SES), such as food insecurity (OR 2.0, 95% CI 0.75-5.6) and using charcoal for cooking (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.72-3.8) suggested an association with HIV infection. Conclusions Given pervasive gender inequality in Haiti, women's economic security often relies on their partners' income earning activities. Our findings show that although factors reflecting poverty are associated with HIV-positive status, stronger associations are observed for women whose partners indicated a more secure occupation (e.g., mechanic or market vendor). Policies and programs that expand access to education and economic opportunities for women and girls may have long-term implications for HIV prevention in Haiti and other resource-poor settings. PMID:20380576

  20. Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of economics, and presents educational resources for teaching basics to children. Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources, as well as activities which focus on economics are described. Includes short features on related topics, and the subtopics of trade, money and banking, and…

  1. The relation between disadvantaged groups: a social psychological approach

    E-print Network

    Rothgerber, Hank

    1995-01-01

    This study examined how members of a disadvantaged group would relate to a disadvantaged outgroup as well as to an advantaged outgroup. An experiment was conducted in which disadvantaged subjects were exposed to a disadvantaged outgroup varying...

  2. Interpreting the Economic Growth and Development Policies of Post-Apartheid South Africa: Its Influence on Higher Education and Prospects for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eynon, Diane E.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is structured as a critical policy analysis employing historical methods. It examines how the post apartheid government's economic growth and development polices have informed the higher education system and how this has changed women's financial, occupational, political, social, and educational prospects in South Africa. Through…

  3. Women's work. Maintaining a healthy body weight.

    PubMed

    Welch, Nicky; Hunter, Wendy; Butera, Karina; Willis, Karen; Cleland, Verity; Crawford, David; Ball, Kylie

    2009-08-01

    This study describes women's perceptions of the supports and barriers to maintaining a healthy weight among currently healthy weight women from urban and rural socio-economically disadvantaged areas. Using focus groups and interviews, we asked women about their experiences of maintaining a healthy weight. Overwhelmingly, women described their healthy weight practices in terms of concepts related to work and management. The theme of 'managing health' comprised issues of managing multiple responsibilities, time, and emotions associated with healthy practices. Rural women faced particular difficulties in accessing supports at a practical level (for example, lack of childcare) and due to the gendered roles they enacted in caring for others. Family background (in particular, mothers' attitudes to food and weight) also appeared to influence perceptions about healthy weight maintenance. In the context of global increases in the prevalence of obesity, the value of initiatives aimed at supporting healthy weight women to maintain their weight should not be under-estimated. Such initiatives need to work within the social and personal constraints that women face in maintaining good health. PMID:19446587

  4. Working Women, Marriage, and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapkoff, Shelley; Fierst, Edith

    Women are at a disadvantage under both Social Security and private employee pension plans because the retirement systems were set up at a time when most women were non-working spouses of employed men, a condition that no longer exists. Today women workers, divorcees, and widows of retirees often find themselves with inadequate retirement benefits…

  5. Special Counseling for the Disadvantaged Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaple, Donald J.; Kaple, Marion Keeler

    This book is designed to aid teachers and administrators who have not had special training in counseling and who are working in educational programs for the disadvantaged adult. Subject areas discussed are: The Counselor and the Client (Duties of the Counselor; Areas of Assistance for the Client); Who Are the Disadvantaged (Characteristics of the…

  6. Women's Studies (undergraduate)

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    348 Women's Studies (undergraduate) The Women's Studies Program offers an interdisciplinary course of study in the historical, economic, political, social and cultural experi- ence of women. The program courses in women's studies. Each semester the Women's Studies Department publishes a list of courses

  7. A place of her own: women and land.

    PubMed

    Ogana, W; Seaforth, W

    1995-12-01

    This article discusses the gender issue of access to land and property by women. Women experience constraints to owning, inheriting, and using land. Laws, customs, and economics are factors that interfere with women's access to land and property. Women are forming groups and pooling their savings in order to buy land, or start an income generation project. In Kenya, women's groups have names that reflect women's situations. Under customary law, women frequently are unable to own land except through husbands or other male relatives. Widows without sons or unmarried women are denied access. In some legal systems, women are treated as minors and cannot make business transactions without a male relative's consent. Even in countries where women have the right to land ownership and property, women have little chance for ownership due to high costs and women's lack of business practices or knowledge of their rights. In a subsistence economy, land offers a place to live and to grow food. Pressure on the land in subsistence economies erodes women's ability to maintain shelters and feed their families. Women pushed onto marginal lands must struggle for survival and face eviction. Town planners ignore people's need to grow food for survival. Groups fight eviction based on protection of human rights. Community land trusts remove land from speculation. Gaining title to land may be a complicated process. Land delivery systems need to be more efficient. New ways of obtaining credit not tied to land ownership are needed. Governments need to remove constraints to land for all, particularly the disadvantaged. PMID:12293546

  8. The Impact of Maternal Cocaine Use on Neonates in Socioeconomic Disadvantaged Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Wei Yue; Chen, William

    1997-01-01

    Reviews literature on prevalence, mechanisms of fetal toxicity, effects of exposure, socioeconomic factors, and social-support programs to increase awareness of the effects of prenatal exposure to cocaine. Emphasizes the need for drug education and social-support programs for disadvantaged pregnant women to prevent and control cocaine use. (EMK)

  9. Sponge developer reacts to product's disadvantages; possible side effects.

    PubMed

    1984-07-01

    Users of the Today contraceptive sponge report some disadvantages and side effects of this method, including effectiveness rates lower than those for oral contraceptives (OCs) and the IUD, irritation related to chemicals in the sponge, removal problems, and possible risk of toxic shock syndrome. Sponge developer Burce W. Vorhauer explains why those problems may exist and what women can do to avoid them. Regarding effectiveness rates, Vorhauer said information has been "extremely difficult to communicate." The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved method effectiveness rates for the sponge as 89-91%, but Vorhauer stated that highly motivated women have experienced 99% effectiveness rates. Vorhauer claims that irritations are much more common in foams and suppositories because the sponge does not contain oils, waxing agents, or lubricants. Some women have also complained that water may not always be available to moisten the sponge. Moistening is necessary to activate the spermicide in the product. First time users of the sponge sometimes experience difficulty in removing it and may lose confidence in the sponge before giving it a fair chance. Regarding sponge cost, Vorhauer said the company is working to reduce the cost. He emphasized that the product is most often used by women who do not have frequent intercourse. Finally, Vorhauer believes the initial scare about toxic shock syndrome and the sponge have passed. Vorhauer maintains that complaints by sponge users will gradually decrease. PMID:12313207

  10. 13 CFR 124.1009 - Who decides disadvantaged status protests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Who decides disadvantaged status protests? 124.1009 Section 124...DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS Eligibility, Certification...124.1009 Who decides disadvantaged status protests? In response to a...

  11. 48 CFR 719.272 - Small disadvantaged business policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Small disadvantaged business policies. 719.272...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 719.272 Small disadvantaged business policies. In...

  12. 48 CFR 719.272 - Small disadvantaged business policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Small disadvantaged business policies. 719.272...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 719.272 Small disadvantaged business policies. In...

  13. Women’s experiences of factors that facilitate or inhibit gestational diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes rates have increased dramatically in the past two decades and this pattern of increase appears to relate primarily to the obesity epidemic, older maternal age and migration from world areas of high GDM risk. Women from disadvantaged and migrant backgrounds are most at risk of developing and of mismanaging this condition. The aim of the study was to explore the factors that facilitated or inhibited gestational diabetes self-management among women in a socially deprived area. Methods Fifteen pregnant women, with a diagnosis of gestational diabetes, were purposively recruited for this study. Qualitative semi structured interviews and 1 focus group were conducted when participants were approximately 28–38 weeks gestation. The study’s theoretical framework was based on interpretative phenomenology and data was analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Women in this study identified a number of factors that complicated their task of GDM self-management. Barriers included: (1) time pressures; (2) physical constraints; (3) social constraints; (4) limited comprehension of requirements, and (5) insulin as an easier option. Factors facilitating GDM self-management included: thinking about the baby and psychological support from partners and families. Conclusion Women from low socio economic and migrant backgrounds often struggle to comprehend GDM self-management requirements. To improve adherence to management plans, these women require educational and supportive services that are culturally appropriate and aimed at a low level of literacy. PMID:22988897

  14. Gender norms and economic empowerment intervention to reduce intimate partner violence against women in rural Côte d’Ivoire: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gender-based violence against women, including intimate partner violence (IPV), is a pervasive health and human rights concern. However, relatively little intervention research has been conducted on how to reduce IPV in settings impacted by conflict. The current study reports on the evaluation of the incremental impact of adding “gender dialogue groups” to an economic empowerment group savings program on levels of IPV. This study took place in north and northwestern rural Côte d’Ivoire. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, we conducted a two-armed, non-blinded randomized-controlled trial (RCT) comparing group savings only (control) to “gender dialogue groups” added to group savings (treatment). The gender dialogue group consisted of eight sessions that targeted women and their male partner. Eligible Ivorian women (18+ years, no prior experience with group savings) were invited to participate. 934 out of 981 (95.2%) partnered women completed baseline and endline data collection. The primary trial outcome measure was an overall measure of past-year physical and/or sexual IPV. Past year physical IPV, sexual IPV, and economic abuse were also separately assessed, as were attitudes towards justification of wife beating and a woman’s ability to refuse sex with her husband. Results Intent to treat analyses revealed that compared to groups savings alone, the addition of gender dialogue groups resulted in a slightly lower odds of reporting past year physical and/or sexual IPV (OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.58, 1.47; not statistically significant). Reductions in reporting of physical IPV and sexual IPV were also observed (not statistically significant). Women in the treatment group were significantly less likely to report economic abuse than control group counterparts (OR?=?0.39; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.60, p?women, treatment women attending more than 75% of intervention sessions with their male partner were less likely to report physical IPV (a OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.94; p?=?.04) and report fewer justifications for wife beating (adjusted ??=?-1.14; 95% CI: -2.01, -0.28, p?=?0.01) ; and both low and high adherent women reported significantly decreased economic abuse (a OR: 0.31; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.52, p?economic programming, because this type of combined intervention has potential to reduce levels of IPV. Additional large-scale intervention research is needed to replicate these findings. Trial registration Registration Number: NCT01629472. PMID:24176132

  15. 34 CFR 668.213 - Economically disadvantaged appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...all material respects. (2) The engagement that forms the basis of the independent...examination-level compliance attestation engagement performed in accordance with— ...Statement on Standards for Attestation Engagements, Compliance Attestation...

  16. 34 CFR 668.194 - Economically disadvantaged appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...all material respects. (2) The engagement that forms the basis of the independent...examination-level compliance attestation engagement performed in accordance with— ...Statement on Standards for Attestation Engagements, Compliance Attestation...

  17. 34 CFR 668.213 - Economically disadvantaged appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...all material respects. (2) The engagement that forms the basis of the independent...examination-level compliance attestation engagement performed in accordance with— ...Statement on Standards for Attestation Engagements, Compliance Attestation...

  18. 34 CFR 668.194 - Economically disadvantaged appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...all material respects. (2) The engagement that forms the basis of the independent...examination-level compliance attestation engagement performed in accordance with— ...Statement on Standards for Attestation Engagements, Compliance Attestation...

  19. 34 CFR 668.213 - Economically disadvantaged appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...the size of the student's family unit. (2) The students...material respects. (2) The engagement that forms the basis of the...examination-level compliance attestation engagement performed in accordance with...Standards for Attestation Engagements, Compliance...

  20. Efforts to recruit the economically disadvantaged to national clinical trials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, M S; Varricchio, C G; Padberg, R M

    1994-05-01

    Clinical trials are vital for the development of state-of-the-art cancer prevention and treatment. A goal for trial recruitment should be to have a representative sample of the total population by gender, race, culture, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status as appropriate. Increased sensitivity to the unique barriers and access to care issues required to achieve a representative sample are necessary. Knowledge and understanding of recruitment problems and strategies to resolve them are developing; however, much more is needed before we can fully address and resolve all of the relevant issues. Nurses have a key role in identification, education, and recruitment of special populations including the SED to clinical trials. PMID:8059110

  1. Guardians of Tradition and Handmaidens to Change: Women's Roles in Creek Economic and Social Life during the Eighteenth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braund, Kathryn E. Holland

    1990-01-01

    Argues that, during the eighteenth century, Creek women were central elements in both cultural preservation and adaptation to white ways. Discusses the deerskin trade, matrilineal customs, male and female roles, sexuality, marriage, intermarriage between Creek women and white traders, and the role of mixed bloods as cultural intermediaries. (SV)

  2. Private Economic Benefit/Cost Ratios of a College Investment for Men and Women, 1967 to 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue analyzed the income/cost ratios of a college investment decision for individuals. The analysis for men and women was done separately, because men and women have very different incomes at similar levels of educational attainment. Calculations were performed for each year from 1967 through 1999. Benefit (income) data were derived from the…

  3. Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and adult disorders Why do children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families suffer

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and adult disorders 1 Why do children from socioeconomically children who experienced socioeconomic (SES) disadvantage. Data come from 1,037 children born in Dunedin was associated with an increased risk of substance dependence and poor physical health in adulthood (sex

  4. What are We Learning from Current University Programs for Disadvantaged Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert L.

    Over 50% of American universities have special programs for high risk or disadvantaged students, most of whom come from different ethnic or cultural backgrounds and whose educational and economic background is considered markedly inferior to that of regular university students. Many of these programs, however, are token efforts, e.g., 100 high…

  5. Special Environmental Education Project for Disadvantaged Gifted Primary Grade Students: 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballagas, Linda D.

    The Outdoor Activity Center (Atlanta, Georgia) provides enriched experiences in a natural environment for economically disadvantaged gifted primary grade students and has developed materials incorporating creative activities used at the Center to expand the elementary science curriculum of the Atlanta Public Schools. Fifty-eight gifted students…

  6. Gaining Access or Losing Ground? Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Students in Undergraduate Engineering, 1994-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy-Wagner, Valerie C.; Veenstra, Cindy P.; Orr, Marisa K.; Ramirez, Nichole M.; Ohland, Matthew W.; Long, Russell A.

    2014-01-01

    Expanding access to engineering for underrepresented groups has by and large focused on ethnicity/race and gender, with little understanding of socioeconomic disadvantages. In this study, we use economic, human, and cultural capital theories to frame and then describe access to undergraduate engineering degree programs and bachelor's degrees.…

  7. Newer antiepileptic drugs: advantages and disadvantages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheila J. Wallace

    2001-01-01

    The choice of an antiepileptic drug depends firstly on its efficacy in specific seizure types and epilepsies. However, it is imperative to consider whether possible adverse events will outweigh any benefits. The advantages and disadvantages of vigabatrin, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine and felbamate are considered in some detail, and oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, remacemide, zonisamide and levetiracetam more briefly. Vigabatrin is effective

  8. Teacher Attitudes Toward Culturally Disadvantaged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faunce, R. W.

    In March, 1965, seven hundred and seventy seven (i.e. almost two-thirds of the total) Minneapolis elementary school teachers completed a questionnaire expressing agreement or disagreement with each of 186 statements about disadvantaged children. The modal respondent was white, female, married, from the Midwest, of middle-class origins, of average…

  9. Classroom Management and the Socially Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl

    Because of their deficits in academic attainments and different cultural styles, socially disadvantaged children create more potential than other children for classroom management problems. To improve classroom management, teachers should maintain a clean room and train their students to enter that room in an orderly fashion. In dealing with their…

  10. Collateral Consequences of Violence in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from Add Health, this study investigates the role of neighborhood violence in mediating the effects of neighborhood disadvantage on high school graduation and teenage pregnancy. Results show that neighborhood violence is a strong predictor of both outcomes, net of individual, family, community and school controls. Neighborhood violence…

  11. TEACHING A TEACHING LANGUAGE TO DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OSBORN, JEAN

    THE GOAL OF THE BEREITER-ENGELMANN PRESCHOOL PROGRAM IS TO GET DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN READY FOR THE LEARNING TASKS OF PUBLIC SCHOOL BY TEACHING A TEACHING LANGUAGE. THIS IS DONE BY MEANS OF A HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND STRUCTURED DIRECT LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION DESIGNED TO TEACH THAT A SENTENCE IS A SEQUENCE OF MEANINGFUL PARTS. THE CHILDREN BEGIN WITH…

  12. A Tutorial Language Program for Disadvantaged Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Genevieve

    This study attempted to ameliorate the educational deficits of infants using structured tutorial programs of language and concept training in the home. It was part of a larger project whose purpose was to determine the age at which intervention will produce maximum acceleration of cognitive development. Subjects were 20 disadvantaged 8- and…

  13. School Effectiveness and the Disadvantaged Schools Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Allan; Murphy, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    The Disadvantaged Schools Program (DSP) has been an important and integral part of education for many Australian students for over a decade. After reviewing eight school effectiveness variables, this paper argues that adding a new emphasis on academic success and cognitive skills will enhance the DSP program. Includes 3 tables and 20 references.…

  14. A GENERAL TECHNICIAN PROGRAM FOR DISADVANTAGED YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GILLIE, ANGELO C.

    A 2-YEAR GENERAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM HAS BEEN PLANNED BY RUTGERS UNIVERSITY AND THE NEWARK SCHOOL SYSTEM AS A MEANS OF PREPARING DISADVANTAGED YOUTH TO ENTER GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT AND ENHANCE THEIR OPPORTUNITY TO IMPROVE THEIR STATION IN LIFE. THE STUDENTS WILL BE DEPRIVED AREA YOUTH WHO ARE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES OR THE EQUIVALENT, GENERALLY FROM THE…

  15. Lightning protection systems: advantages and disadvantages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Zipse

    1993-01-01

    The mechanics and interaction of lightning producing thunder clouds and earth, are discussed. Compared to the Franklin Air Terminal (rod) and Faraday Cage, the debatable advantages and disadvantages of the Early Streamer Emission Enhanced Ionizing Air Terminal, and Multipoint Discharge Systems, are examined along with conceptual future methods of lightning protection

  16. The effect of neighborhood disadvantage on the racial disparity in ovarian cancer-specific survival in a large hospital-based study in cook county, illinois.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Caryn E; Rauscher, Garth H; Johnson, Timothy P; Kirschner, Carolyn V; Freels, Sally; Barrett, Richard E; Kim, Seijeoung; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Joslin, Charlotte E; Davis, Faith G

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of neighborhood disadvantage on racial disparities in ovarian cancer-specific survival. Despite treatment advances for ovarian cancer, survival remains shorter for African-American compared to White women. Neighborhood disadvantage is implicated in racial disparities across a variety of health outcomes and may contribute to racial disparities in ovarian cancer-specific survival. Data were obtained from 581 women (100 African-American and 481 White) diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between June 1, 1994, and December 31, 1998 in Cook County, IL, USA, which includes the city of Chicago. Neighborhood disadvantage score at the time of diagnosis was calculated for each woman based on Browning and Cagney's index of concentrated disadvantage. Cox proportional hazard models measured the association of self-identified African-American race with ovarian cancer-specific survival after adjusting for age, tumor characteristics, surgical debulking, and neighborhood disadvantage. There was a statistically significant negative association (-0.645) between ovarian cancer-specific survival and neighborhood disadvantage (p?=?0.008). After adjusting for age and tumor characteristics, African-American women were more likely than Whites to die of ovarian cancer (HR?=?1.59, p?=?0.003). After accounting for neighborhood disadvantage, this risk was attenuated (HR?=?1.32, p?=?0.10). These findings demonstrate that neighborhood disadvantage is associated with ovarian cancer-specific survival and may contribute to the racial disparity in survival. PMID:25657992

  17. The Effect of Neighborhood Disadvantage on the Racial Disparity in Ovarian Cancer-Specific Survival in a Large Hospital-Based Study in Cook County, Illinois

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Caryn E.; Rauscher, Garth H.; Johnson, Timothy P.; Kirschner, Carolyn V.; Freels, Sally; Barrett, Richard E.; Kim, Seijeoung; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Joslin, Charlotte E.; Davis, Faith G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of neighborhood disadvantage on racial disparities in ovarian cancer-specific survival. Despite treatment advances for ovarian cancer, survival remains shorter for African-American compared to White women. Neighborhood disadvantage is implicated in racial disparities across a variety of health outcomes and may contribute to racial disparities in ovarian cancer-specific survival. Data were obtained from 581 women (100 African-American and 481 White) diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between June 1, 1994, and December 31, 1998 in Cook County, IL, USA, which includes the city of Chicago. Neighborhood disadvantage score at the time of diagnosis was calculated for each woman based on Browning and Cagney’s index of concentrated disadvantage. Cox proportional hazard models measured the association of self-identified African-American race with ovarian cancer-specific survival after adjusting for age, tumor characteristics, surgical debulking, and neighborhood disadvantage. There was a statistically significant negative association (?0.645) between ovarian cancer-specific survival and neighborhood disadvantage (p?=?0.008). After adjusting for age and tumor characteristics, African-American women were more likely than Whites to die of ovarian cancer (HR?=?1.59, p?=?0.003). After accounting for neighborhood disadvantage, this risk was attenuated (HR?=?1.32, p?=?0.10). These findings demonstrate that neighborhood disadvantage is associated with ovarian cancer-specific survival and may contribute to the racial disparity in survival. PMID:25657992

  18. Women who sell sex in a Ugandan trading town: life histories, survival strategies and risk.

    PubMed

    Gysels, Marjolein; Pool, Robert; Nnalusiba, Betty

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about the background of commercial sex workers in Africa. This study investigated how women in a trading town on the trans-Africa highway in southwest Uganda become involved in commercial sex work, which factors contribute to their economic success or lack of success, and what effect life trajectories and economic success have on negotiating power and risk behaviour. Over the course of two years detailed life histories of 34 women were collected through recording open, in-depth interviews, the collection of sexual and income and expenditure diaries, visits to the women's native villages, and participant observation. The women share similar disadvantaged backgrounds and this has played a role in their move into commercial sex. They have divergent experiences, however, in their utilisation of opportunities and in the level of success they achieve. They have developed different life styles and a variety of ways of dealing with sexual relationships. Three groups of women were identified: (1) women who work in the back-street bars, have no capital of their own and are almost entirely dependent on selling sex for their livelihood; (2) waitresses in the bars along the main road who engage in a more institutionalised kind of commercial sex, often mediated by middlemen and (3) the more successful entrepreneurs who earn money from their own bars as well as from commercial sex. The three groups had different risk profiles. Due partly to their financial independence from men, women in the latter group have taken control of sexual relationships and can negotiate good sexual deals for themselves, both financially and in terms of safe sex. The poorer women were more vulnerable and less able to negotiate safer sex. A disadvantaged background and restricted access to economic resources are the major reasons for women gravitating to commercial sex work. Various aspects of personality play a role in utilising income from commercial sex to set up an economic basis that then makes the selling of sex unnecessary. This has implications for interventions, and part of the longer-term solution should lie in improving the economic position of women vis-à-vis men. PMID:11824924

  19. The Political Economy of Violence against Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacqui True

    Violence against women is a major problem in all countries, affecting women in every socio-economic group and at every life stage. Nowhere in the world do women share equal social and economic rights with men or the same access as men to productive resources. Economic globalization and development are creating new challenges for women's rights as well as some new

  20. Women’s identity-related participation and engagement in literacy courses in Turkey 

    E-print Network

    Yazlik, Ozlem

    2014-07-04

    This dissertation explores women’s participation and engagement in literacy courses from an identity perspective within the broader context of women’s life stories and the socio-cultural, economic and institutional ...

  1. Overweight and obesity prevalence among Indian women by place of residence and socio-economic status: Contrasting patterns from 'underweight states' and 'overweight states' of India.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Angan; Angeli, Federica; Syamala, Thelakkat S; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Schayck, C P van

    2015-08-01

    Evidence from developing countries demonstrates a mixed relationship of overweight/obesity with socioeconomic status (SES) and place of residence. Theory of nutrition transition suggests that over the course of development, overweight first emerges among rich and urban people before spreading among rural and poor people. India is currently experiencing a rapid rise in the proportion of overweight and obese population especially among adult women. Under the backdrop of huge socio-economic heterogeneity across the states of India, the inter-state scenario of overweight and obesity differs considerably. Hence, this paper investigates the evolution over time of overweight and obesity among ever-married Indian women (15-49 years) from selected 'underweight states' (Bihar, Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, where underweight proportion is predominant) and 'overweight states' (Kerala, Delhi and Punjab, where overweight is the prime concern), in relation to a few selected socio-economic and demographic indicators. This study analysed National Family Health Surveys- NFHS-2 (1998-99) and NFHS-3 (2005-06) following Asian population specific BMI cut-offs for overweight and obesity. The results confirm that within India itself the relationship of overweight and obesity with place of residence and SES cannot be generalized. Results from 'overweight states' show that the overweight problem has started expanding from urban and well-off women to the poor and rural people, while the rural-urban and rich-poor difference has disappeared. On the other hand in 'underweight states' overweight and obesity have remained socially segregated and increasing strongly among urban and richer section of the population. The rate of rise of overweight and obesity has been higher in rural areas of 'OW states' and in urban areas of 'UW states'. Indian policymakers thus need to design state-specific approaches to arrest the rapid growth of overweight and its penetration especially towards under-privileged section of the society. PMID:26094178

  2. Home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Loignon, Andrew; Gayton, William F; Brown, Melissa; Steinroeder, William; Johnson, Carrie

    2007-06-01

    Occurrence of the home field disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing data on penalty shots from 1983-2004. This datum was used as it does not involve physical contact for only the player taking the penalty shot is involved in the outcome. As a result, inhibition of anxiety associated with physical contact should not occur, and diffusion of responsibility would not occur since only the shooter is involved. Analysis indicated the player who took the penalty shot did not make significantly fewer shots at home than in away games. The result did not support hypotheses about roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey. PMID:17879659

  3. Higher mortality in deprived areas: community or personal disadvantage?

    PubMed Central

    Sloggett, A.; Joshi, H.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the association between level of social deprivation in electoral wards and premature mortality among residents, before and after allowing for levels of personal deprivation. DESIGN--Longitudinal study of the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys. SETTING--England. SUBJECTS--Random sample of nearly 300,000 people aged between 16 and 65 at the 1981 census and followed up for nearly nine years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death from all causes between ages of 16 and 70. RESULTS--Without allowance for personal disadvantage, both sexes showed a clear, significant, and roughly linear positive relation between degree of deprivation of the ward of residence in 1981 and premature death before 1990. For men, this association was effectively explained away once allowance was made for individual socioeconomic circumstances. For women living in wards of above average deprivation, the association was also effectively removed, but the situation for other women was less clear. CONCLUSION--The excess mortality associated with residence in areas designated as deprived by census based indicators is wholly explained by the concentration in those areas of people with adverse personal or household socioeconomic factors. Health policy needs to target people as well as places. PMID:7804047

  4. The advantages and disadvantages of being introduced

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Alpert

    2006-01-01

    Introduced species, those dispersed outside their natural ranges by humans, now cause almost all biological invasions, i.e.,\\u000a entry of organisms into habitats with negative effects on organisms already there. Knowing whether introduction tends to give\\u000a organisms specific ecological advantages or disadvantages in their new habitats could help understand and control invasions.\\u000a Even if no specific species traits are associated with

  5. Lightning protection systems: advantages and disadvantages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald W. Zipse

    1994-01-01

    The successful 200-year-old method of using a (Franklin) rod to collect, control, and convey to earth the awesome and destructive power of lightning has produced other controversial, potential alternate methods. The mechanics and interaction of lightning-producing thunderclouds and earth are discussed. Compared to the Franklin air terminal (rod) and Faraday cage method, the debatable advantages and disadvantages of the early

  6. Black Women in the New Services Economy: Help or Hinderance in Economic Self-Sufficiency? Working Paper No. 196.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Bette

    This report of a study based on research and analysis of U.S. Census data examines how the services economy and its component industrial sectors have spurred employment growth and with its gains and losses for black women. The report is divided into three parts. The first part looks at current theories related to work and workforce participation…

  7. Does Socio-Economic Status and Health Consciousness Influence How Women Respond to Health Related Messages in Media?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iversen, Anette Christine; Kraft, Pal

    2006-01-01

    During the past few decades, people have been increasingly exposed to health-related messages in the mass media, conveying recommendations for healthy lifestyles. The present study investigates whether these messages represent a stressor, and whether coping responses increase levels of motivation or levels of negative affect. A sample of 403 women

  8. Relationship between socio-economic and cultural status, psychological factors and body fat distribution in middle-aged women living in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cota, D; Vicennati, V; Ceroni, L; Morselli-Labate, A M; Pasquali, R

    2001-12-01

    This study analyses the relationships between body fat distribution and socioeconomic and psychological factors in a cohort of 426 healthy middle-aged women living in Virgilio, Mantua (Northern Italy). The information concerning their occupational, social and psychological conditions and smoking habits were obtained by means of questionnaires. Psychological factors were investigated using the Italian version of the Illness Behaviour Questionnaire and the Symptom Questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements, body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2), waist/hip ratio (WHR) and clinical/hormonal menopausal status were also collected for each subject. The women reported significantly higher or lower psychological factor scores (symptoms of conversion: p=0.005; perception of disease: p=-0.018; denial: p=0.021; hostility: p=0.57; and laxity: p=0.047) as their WHR increased, thus indicating some concern about their health. In a multiple regression model, their WHR and waist circumference (W) significantly correlated with symptoms of conversion (p=0.005 and p=0.029), and W was also significantly related to the perception of disease (p=0.043). There was a significant inverse correlation between the WHR and educational level (p<0.001). The prevalence of partners who were entrepreneurs or self-employed also decreased as WHR increased (p<0.001). Furthermore, the number of women living in the centre of town significantly diminished, whereas those living in the suburbs or in the country significantly increased (p=0.005). However, using age, BMI and menopausal status as covariates, only the partner's work significantly and negatively correlated with the WHR (p=0.029). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that psychological and socio-economic handicaps are associated with a higher prevalence of abdominal fatness in middle-aged women living in Northern Italy PMID:11808816

  9. Go WEST -Supporting Women in Engineering, Science and Technology

    E-print Network

    Loch, Birgit

    the participation of women in engineering, science and technology courses and careers. This chapter reports to be disadvantaged in career paths with fewer women applying for promotion than men, and proportionally more women1 Go WEST - Supporting Women in Engineering, Science and Technology: An Australian Higher Education

  10. 48 CFR 706.302-71 - Small disadvantaged businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Small disadvantaged businesses. 706.302-71 Section...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACQUISITION...302-71 Small disadvantaged businesses. (a) Authority...award contracts to small business concerns owned and...

  11. 48 CFR 706.302-71 - Small disadvantaged businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Small disadvantaged businesses. 706.302-71 Section...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACQUISITION...302-71 Small disadvantaged businesses. (a) Authority...award contracts to small business concerns owned and...

  12. 48 CFR 19.304 - Disadvantaged business status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Disadvantaged business status. 19.304 Section 19...FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS...Determination of Small Business Status for Small Business Programs...304 Disadvantaged business status. (a) To be...

  13. Helping Women into Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Jane

    2011-01-01

    With women bearing a disproportionate share of economic hardship, their poor representation on training designed to tackle barriers to work is a critical concern. The author asks what can be done to improve women's access to this sort of learning. As the underrecruitment of women to ESF pre-employment programmes demonstrates, the author suggests…

  14. The Disadvantaged Worker: Readings in Developing Minority Manpower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpel, Lloyd, Ed.

    This document examines the efforts made by American business to make employment opportunities available to the disadvantaged minority worker. Ten major areas are discussed, including the following: changing social attitudes, Negro work attitudes, patterns for disadvantaged programs, management views of hard-core hiring, testing the disadvantaged,…

  15. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and mortality after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li-Jung; Vassar, Stefanie D.; Merkin, Sharon Stein; Longstreth, W.T.; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Yan, Tingjian; Escarce, José J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Residence in a socioeconomically disadvantaged community is associated with mortality, but the mechanisms are not well understood. We examined whether socioeconomic features of the residential neighborhood contribute to poststroke mortality and whether neighborhood influences are mediated by traditional behavioral and biologic risk factors. Methods: We used data from the Cardiovascular Health Study, a multicenter, population-based, longitudinal study of adults ?65 years. Residential neighborhood disadvantage was measured using neighborhood socioeconomic status (NSES), a composite of 6 census tract variables representing income, education, employment, and wealth. Multilevel Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to determine the association of NSES to mortality after an incident stroke, adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, stroke type, and behavioral and biologic risk factors. Results: Among the 3,834 participants with no prior stroke at baseline, 806 had a stroke over a mean 11.5 years of follow-up, with 168 (20%) deaths 30 days after stroke and 276 (34%) deaths at 1 year. In models adjusted for demographic characteristics, stroke type, and behavioral and biologic risk factors, mortality hazard 1 year after stroke was significantly higher among residents of neighborhoods with the lowest NSES than those in the highest NSES neighborhoods (hazard ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.17–2.68). Conclusion: Living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with higher mortality hazard at 1 year following an incident stroke. Further work is needed to understand the structural and social characteristics of neighborhoods that may contribute to mortality in the year after a stroke and the pathways through which these characteristics operate. PMID:23284071

  16. Seeds of HOPE: a model for addressing social and economic determinants of health in a women's obesity prevention project in two rural communities.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Salli; Campbell, Marci; Doolen, Anne; Rivera, Imana; Negussie, Tezita; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

    2007-10-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) and income disparity are strong predictors of health, and health promotion interventions that address them are more likely to be meaningful to participants and to sustain positive effects. Seeds of HOPE is an innovative project that is the result of a long-standing collaboration between the University of North Carolina (UNC) Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Prevention Research Center, and communities in rural North Carolina. Initial formative work, including key informant interviews, community surveys, and focus groups, strengthened our understanding of the link between hope and health and the importance of addressing social and economic issues as part of our health promotion interventions. A Seeds of HOPE strategic plan was developed using a community-based participatory process and led to the idea to start Threads of HOPE, an enterprise that will serve as a business laboratory where women will produce and market a unique product and also learn business skills. Threads of HOPE will be a health-enhancing business and will serve as a training program for a new cadre of women entrepreneurs in two rural communities. PMID:17937563

  17. Gender Differences in Associations of Neighbourhood Disadvantage with Alcohol’s Harms to Others: A Cross-sectional Study from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.; Greenfield, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction & Aims To examine whether alcohol’s harms to others are more prevalent in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods and whether men or women are at differential risk in these neighbourhoods. Design & Methods Cross-sectional survey data from 2000 and 2005 National Alcohol Surveys were linked to geo-referenced indicators of neighbourhood disadvantage from the United States 2000 Decennial Census. The pooled sample included 10,121 adults (54% female; average age 44.4 years; 69% White; 13% African American; 13% Hispanic). A dichotomous indicator denoted neighbourhoods based on the top quartile on a 5-item measure of disadvantage (alpha=.90). We examined past-year family problems due to someone else’s drinking (marriage difficulties and/or financial trouble) and victimisation by someone who had been drinking (having property vandalised and/or being pushed, hit or assaulted). Results During the prior 12 months, 6% of women and 3% of men experienced family problems from someone else’s drinking, and 4% of women and 7% of men reported being victimised by drinkers. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for individual-level socioeconomic status and other demographic characteristics showed the relationship between neighbourhood disadvantage and harms from someone else’s drinking was moderated by gender, with significantly higher odds of family problems in disadvantaged neighbourhoods for men but not for women, as well as significantly higher odds of crime victimisation in disadvantaged neighbourhoods for women but not men. Discussion & Conclusions Experiences of harms from someone else’s drinking in disadvantaged neighbourhoods vary for men and women. Targeted intervention strategies are needed to reduce alcohol’s harm to others. PMID:24612367

  18. Communicating health information to disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Beacom, Amanda M; Newman, Sandra J

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the communication of health information among disadvantaged populations has increased in recent years with the shift from a model of patient-provider communication to one of a more empowered healthcare consumer; with the use of new communication technologies that increase the number of channels through which health information may be accessed; and with the steadily increasing number of people without health insurance. Three separate research literatures contribute to our current understanding of this issue. In the medicine and public health literature, disparities in health access and outcomes among socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups are now well documented. In the information sciences literature, scholars note that on a continuum of health information behaviors, ranging from information avoidance and nonseeking to active seeking, nonseeking behaviors are associated with disadvantaged populations. In the communication literature, enthusiasm over the technology-driven growth of online health information seeking is tempered by evidence supporting the knowledge gap hypothesis, which indicates that as potential access to health information increases, systematic gaps in health knowledge also increase as groups with higher socioeconomic status acquire this information at a faster rate than those with lower socioeconomic status. A number of diverse strategies show promise in reducing information and health disparities, including those that focus on technology, such as programs to increase computer and Internet access, skills, and comprehension; those that focus on interpersonal communication, such as the community health worker model; and those that focus on mass media channels, such as entertainment education. PMID:20216358

  19. 48 CFR 726.7006 - Determination of status as a disadvantaged enterprise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... false Determination of status as a disadvantaged enterprise...INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disadvantaged Enterprises...7006 Determination of status as a disadvantaged...

  20. Poverty, Delinquency, and Educational Attainment: Cumulative Disadvantage or Disadvantage Saturation? JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Lance

    Data from the NLSY (National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) were analyzed to test two competing hypotheses regarding how poverty affects the relationship between delinquency and educational attainment. The cumulative disadvantage perspective argues that poor youth suffer greater consequences for their involvement in delinquency than middle and…

  1. Women as agents of change: Female income and mobility in India

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nancy; Munshi, Kaivan

    2013-01-01

    Economic globalization will give many women in developing countries access to steady and relatively remunerative employment for the first time, potentially shifting bargaining power within their households and changing the choices that are made for their children. This paper exploits a unique setting — a group of tea plantations in South India where women are employed in permanent wage labor and where incomes do not vary by caste — to anticipate the impact of globalization on mobility across social groups in the future. The main result of the paper is that a relative increase in female income weakens the family's ties to the ancestral community and the traditional economy, but these mobility enhancing effects are obtained for certain historically disadvantaged castes alone. Although the paper provides a context-specific explanation for why the women from these castes emerge as agents of change, the first general implication of the analysis is that the incentive and the ability of women to use their earnings to influence household decisions depends importantly on their social background. The second implication is that historically disadvantaged groups may, in fact, be especially responsive to new opportunities precisely because they have fewer ties to the traditional economy to hold them back. PMID:24319310

  2. Women as agents of change: Female income and mobility in India.

    PubMed

    Luke, Nancy; Munshi, Kaivan

    2011-01-01

    Economic globalization will give many women in developing countries access to steady and relatively remunerative employment for the first time, potentially shifting bargaining power within their households and changing the choices that are made for their children. This paper exploits a unique setting - a group of tea plantations in South India where women are employed in permanent wage labor and where incomes do not vary by caste - to anticipate the impact of globalization on mobility across social groups in the future. The main result of the paper is that a relative increase in female income weakens the family's ties to the ancestral community and the traditional economy, but these mobility enhancing effects are obtained for certain historically disadvantaged castes alone. Although the paper provides a context-specific explanation for why the women from these castes emerge as agents of change, the first general implication of the analysis is that the incentive and the ability of women to use their earnings to influence household decisions depends importantly on their social background. The second implication is that historically disadvantaged groups may, in fact, be especially responsive to new opportunities precisely because they have fewer ties to the traditional economy to hold them back. PMID:24319310

  3. Economic evaluation of hormonal therapies for postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor–positive early breast cancer in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Djalalov, S.; Beca, J.; Amir, E.; Krahn, M.; Trudeau, M.E.; Hoch, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aromatase inhibitor (ai) therapy has been subjected to numerous cost-effectiveness analyses. However, with most ais having reached the end of patent protection and with maturation of the clinical trials data, a re-analysis of ai cost-effectiveness and a consideration of ai use as part of sequential therapy is desirable. Our objective was to assess the cost-effectiveness of the 5-year upfront and sequential tamoxifen (tam) and ai hormonal strategies currently used for treating patients with estrogen receptor (er)–positive early breast cancer. Methods The cost-effectiveness analysis used a Markov model that took a Canadian health system perspective with a lifetime time horizon. The base case involved 65-year-old women with er-positive early breast cancer. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to incorporate parameter uncertainties. An expected-value-of-perfect-information test was performed to identify future research directions. Outcomes were quality-adjusted life-years (qalys) and costs. Results The sequential tam–ai strategy was less costly than the other strategies, but less effective than upfront ai and more effective than upfront tam. Upfront ai was more effective and less costly than upfront tam because of less breast cancer recurrence and differences in adverse events. In an exploratory analysis that included a sequential ai–tam strategy, ai–tam dominated based on small numerical differences unlikely to be clinically significant; that strategy was thus not used in the base-case analysis. Conclusions In postmenopausal women with er-positive early breast cancer, strategies using ais appear to provide more benefit than strategies using tam alone. Among the ai-containing strategies, sequential strategies using tam and an ai appear to provide benefits similar to those provided by upfront ai, but at a lower cost. PMID:25908907

  4. Neural responses to advantageous and disadvantageous inequity

    PubMed Central

    Fliessbach, Klaus; Phillipps, Courtney B.; Trautner, Peter; Schnabel, Marieke; Elger, Christian E.; Falk, Armin; Weber, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study neural responses to inequitable distributions of rewards despite equal performance. We specifically focus on differences between advantageous inequity (AI) and disadvantageous inequity (DI). AI and DI were realized in a hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with pairs of subjects simultaneously performing a task in adjacent scanners and observing both subjects' rewards. Results showed (1) hypoactivation of the ventral striatum (VS) under DI but not under AI; (2) inequity induced activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) that was stronger under DI than under AI; (3) correlations between subjective evaluations of AI evaluation and bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal and left insular activity. Our study provides neurophysiological evidence for different cognitive processes that occur when exposed to DI and AI, respectively. One possible interpretation is that any form of inequity represents a norm violation, but that important differences between AI and DI emerge from an asymmetric involvement of status concerns. PMID:22701414

  5. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  6. The association of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with socioeconomic disadvantage: alternative explanations and evidence

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ginny; Ford, Tamsin; Rosenberg, Rachel; Kelly, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies throughout Northern Europe, the United States and Australia have found an association between childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and family socioeconomic disadvantage. We report further evidence for the association and review potential causal pathways that might explain the link. Method Secondary analysis of a UK birth cohort (the Millennium Cohort Study, N = 19,519) was used to model the association of ADHD with socioeconomic disadvantage and assess evidence for several potential explanatory pathways. The case definition of ADHD was a parent-report of whether ADHD had been identified by a medical doctor or health professional when children were 7 years old. Results ADHD was associated with a range of indicators of social and economic disadvantage including poverty, housing tenure, maternal education, income, lone parenthood and younger motherhood. There was no evidence to suggest childhood ADHD was a causal factor of socioeconomic disadvantage: income did not decrease for parents of children with ADHD compared to controls over the 7-year study period. No clinical bias towards labelling ADHD in low SES groups was detected. There was evidence to suggest that parent attachment/family conflict mediated the relationship between ADHD and SES. Conclusion Although genetic and neurological determinants may be the primary predictors of difficulties with activity level and attention, aetiology appears to be influenced by socioeconomic situation. PMID:24274762

  7. Making the Most of the Mosaic: Facilitating Post-School Transitions to Higher Education of Disadvantaged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott-Chapman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Research studies of post-school education and training conducted in Australia and internationally have revealed a mosaic of students' education and employment experiences, with a multiplicity of nonlinear pathways. These tend to be more fragmentary for disadvantaged students, especially those of low socio-economic background, rural students, and…

  8. How Community Development Programmes Can Foster Re-Engagement with Learning in Disadvantaged Communities: Leadership as Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Pat; Kilpatrick, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Family and community capacity building projects in Tasmania are attempting to address the disadvantage of communities marginalised by socio-economic and other influences. Collaborations between the projects, community members and groups, and education and training organisations, have resulted in a leadership process which has fostered reengagement…

  9. Parental Investment in Childhood and Later Adult Well-Being: Can More Involved Parents Offset the Effects of Socioeconomic Disadvantage?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darcy Hango

    2005-01-01

    Parental involvement in their children's lives can have a lasting impact on well-being. More involved parents convey to their children that they are interested in their development, and this in turn signals to the child that their future is valued. However, what happens in socio-economically disadvantaged homes? Can the social capital produced by greater parental involvement counteract some of the

  10. Subsidized Work Experience in the Private Sector and Occupational Accessing: Strategies for Employing Disadvantaged Youth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public/Private Ventures, Philadelphia, PA.

    Two approaches to private sector participation in employment and training programs for economically disadvantaged out-of-school youth (16-21 years old) are discussed in this report. The two approaches are: (1) subsidized work experience in the private sector, which tries to foster good work habits leading to employment; and (2) occupational…

  11. Subpopulational Profiling of the Psychoeducational Dimensions of Disadvantaged Preschool Children: A Conceptual Prospectus for an Interdisciplinary Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger, Robert P.; Ambron, Sueann R.

    Program planning for economically deprived children might be improved if behavioral information pertinent to specific subcultural groups were systematically obtained. This prospectus focuses on developing a three-part behavioral model which, when integrated, would identify and profile the nature of disadvantagement in terms idiosyncratic and…

  12. Factors associated with health-related quality of life among Indian women in mining and agriculture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women facing social and economic disadvantage in stressed communities of developing countries are at greater risk due to health problems. This paper investigates the relationships between structural, health and psychosocial predictors among women in mining and agricultural communities. This paper is a report of a study of the predictors of the health-related quality of life among Indian women in mining and agricultural communities. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional research design was used. The instruments used are SF-36 Health Survey and Coping Strategy Checklist. ANOVA, MANOVA and GLM were used in the analysis. The study was conducted between January-September 2008 with randomly selected women in a mining (145) and an agricultural community (133) in India. Results Women in the agricultural community had significantly increased Physical Health, Mental Health and SF36 scores compared with those in the mining community. Years of stay, education and employment were significant predictors among women in the agricultural community. 39% (33%) and 40% (26%) of the variance in Physical and Mental health respectively among women in agricultural and mining communities are predicted by the structural, health and psychosocial variables. Conclusion Perceived health status should be recognised as an important assessment of Physical and Mental Health among women in rural stressed communities. Cognitive, emotional and behavioural coping strategies are significant predictors of health related quality of life. Implications. Nurses should use the SF-36 as a diagnostic tool for assessing health related quality of life among women and discuss coping strategies, so that these can target women’s adaptive behaviour. This should be an essential part of the nursing process for facilitating adaptive process for improved health related quality of life. PMID:23336256

  13. Wider Opportunities for Women Nontraditional Work Programs: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wider Opportunities for Women, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Since 1970, Wider Opportunities for Women (WOW), in Washington, D.C., has conducted programs to train and place disadvantaged women in nontraditional jobs. The results have been record-breaking: high placement rates, high job retention rates, good starting salaries, and upward mobility for women who seemed doomed to a life of poverty and…

  14. Nuclear reactor operator training for disadvantaged Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, J.P.; Mulder, R.U.

    1992-12-01

    The Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Department of the University of Virginia was awarded a grant by the US Department of Energy in 1984 to establish and administer a reactor operator training program for disadvantaged Americans. Stipends were provided by the US DOE for five trainees with the anticipation that four other educational facilities would participate in the program. Sub-contracts were awarded to four other Universities: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The University of Missouri at Columbia, Oregon State University, and The State University of New York at Buffalo. The initial two year program was very successful and the grant was renewed in late 1986 for another two years. MIT declined to participate in the second program and was replaced by Ohio State University. U.VA. was notified in September, 1987 that new funding would no longer be provided for this program after December, 1987. U.VA. requested and was granted a no cost extention for the program through December, 1990, since sufficient funds remained in the initial grant to pursue the program further. DOE subsequently approved a no cost extension through November, 1992.

  15. Recruiting Disadvantaged Adults. Library Service Guide No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, George W.

    Designed as a guide for public library administrators and personnel, the document suggests ways to recruit new library users from the disadvantaged adult population. Libraries interested in recruitment are assumed to already have materials for the disadvantaged that include easy to read adult content materials, audio-visuals, out reach services,…

  16. Duration or Disadvantage? Exploring Nativity, Ethnicity, and Health in Midlife

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacqueline L. Angel; Cynthia J. Buckley; Art Sakamoto

    2001-01-01

    Objectives . This study examined nativity as a risk factor for poor physical and emotional health for an ethnically di- verse population making the transition into retirement. The authors addressed whether the health disadvantage observed for immigrants lessens with increased time spent in the country (supporting theories of assimilation) or increases with duration of residence (supporting theories of cumulative disadvantage).

  17. Measures of Disadvantage: Is Car Ownership a Good Indicator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Victoria; Currie, Graham; Stanley, Janet

    2010-01-01

    A need to better understand the multidimensional nature of disadvantage is leading to the adoption of a wider range of measurement variables. One variable now commonly adopted is zero car ownership. This paper challenges the logic of including "not having a car" as an indicator of disadvantage. It argues that this can distort the real picture of…

  18. Special Emergency Education for the Disadvantaged. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene; Mark M.; And Others

    This evaluation of Project Special Elementary Education for the Disadvantaged (SEED) sought to assess the impact of SEED instruction upon students enrolled in disadvantaged schools (grades three to six) in four major study areas: mathematics achievement, interest in math and other school subjects, motivation, and self concept. In addition, the…

  19. Loan for Disadvantaged University of Tennessee Health Science Center

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Loan for Disadvantaged Students (LDS-448-1570 UTHSC participates in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Loan for Disadvantaged Students of the loan for any academic year from LDS funds may not exceed a student's Cost of Attendance. To be eligible

  20. Characterizing the Bilingual Disadvantage in Noun Phrase Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadat, Jasmin; Martin, Clara D.; Alario, F. Xavier; Costa, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, evidence on bilingual disadvantages in language production comes from tasks requiring single word retrieval. The present study aimed to assess whether there is a bilingual disadvantage in multiword utterances, and to determine the extent to which such effect is present in onset latencies, articulatory durations, or both. To do so, we…

  1. INCREASING OPPORTUNITIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MARTYN, KENNETH A.

    THE DISADVANTAGED STUDENT IS DEFINED IN TERMS OF FAMILY INCOME AND THE LOCATION OF FAMILY RESIDENCE. THIS DEFINITION IS THE ONE GENERALLY USED AND ACCEPTED BY THE COLLEGES. ON-CAMPUS VISITS AND AN INVENTORY OF PROVISIONS FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS FROM ALL SEGMENTS OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN CALIFORNIA, AS WELL AS A SEARCH OF RELATED LITERATURE, WERE…

  2. The Elementary Teacher and the Disadvantaged: Bug in a Tub.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koester, Paul W.

    1965-01-01

    The national mandate to "teach the disadvantaged" child requires specific preservice and inservice teacher preparation. The classroom teacher in particular will need to make a firm, deliberate commitment to improve the instruction of the disadvantaged pupils already in his class. However, there are interwoven limitations imposed by the…

  3. 6 Tackling disadvantage: Place A persistent regional divide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Strelitz; David Darton

    Tackling UK poverty and disadvantage in the twenty-first century The considerable variation between areas in the depth and breadth of poverty and disadvantage has been a significant issue within recent policy discussions. Much of the focus has been directed at the urban level or lower, with considerable attention being paid to problems occurring at the neighbourhood and local level. In

  4. Practical Problems of Schoolbook Selection for Disadvantaged Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Gertrude

    Every year the purchase of unsuitable books for disadvantaged children wastes millions of dollars. The use of these unsuitable books results in extensive reading failure. In order to overcome this waste of money and human resources, book committees need to employ standards and methods of evaluation to identify books appropriate for disadvantaged

  5. The Business Case for Women?s Equality : Is the Carrot Better than the Stick?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda Dickens

    1994-01-01

    Outlines women?s continuing pay and employment disadvantage in Britain. Discusses limitations of the legal compliance approach to equal opportunity. Examines critically the business case for EO (that it serves organizational competitiveness). Argues there is not a business case but a series of business rationales which are contingent. Organizational and managerial receptiveness to them is uneven, and they lead to only

  6. Behavioral risk factors for noncommunicable diseases in working and nonworking women of urban slums

    PubMed Central

    Manjrekar, Shivani S.; Sherkhane, Mayur S.; Chowti, Jayaprakash V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are an emerging public health problem, accounting for 80% of deaths in low and middle-income countries leading to a global epidemic. The increasing burden of NCDs is affecting poor and disadvantaged women population disproportionately, contributing to widening health gaps between and within countries. Globalization and urbanization have led to lifestyle changes among urban poor, which need to be understood, as the urban areas are undergoing rapid transitions. Objectives: To know prevalence and pattern of behavioral risk factors for NCDs in working and nonworking women of urban slums to initiate steps for preventive interventions. Materials and Methods: This was community based cross-sectional study conducted among women of urban slums in the age-group of 30-45 years on a voluntary basis. Data were collected by the house-to-house survey using predesigned and pretested proforma World Health Organization-Stepwise Approach to Chronic Disease Risk Factor Surveillance (WHO-STEPS 1 and 2 questionnaires). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square test were used for analysis. Results: Majority, 49% women were in the age-group of 30-35 years, with 60.5% belonging to Class IV socio-economic status. Stress was present in 38% working women as compared to 17% nonworking women (?2 = 22.12, df = 1, P < 0.0001, HS). Nonworking women (25%) were less aware about common NCDs compared to (48%) working women (?2 = 22.82, df = 1, P < 0.0001, HS). It was also found that 11% women were newly diagnosed with hypertension. Conclusion: Most of the women were not aware of the risk factors leading to NCDs. Screening and IEC activities need to be strengthened and hence that diagnosis and preventive measures can be implemented at an early stage of life. PMID:25317001

  7. Why America's disadvantaged communities need twenty-first century learning.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Blenda J

    2006-01-01

    Current school reform efforts, emphasizing data and accountability, have shed additional light on racial and income-based inequities in education. To tackle this achievement gap, the discrepancies in the nation's educational system must be examined within the context of the increasing economic demand for higher skill levels. The author asserts that the education system is not educating all students to the levels necessary to fulfill America's quest for international excellence. Demonstrating the inadequacies of the current educational system, this chapter draws from Murnane and Levy's research emphasizing a need for new basic skills. The author cites Murnane and Levy's finding that up to half of all graduates leave high school without the skills necessary to compete in today's economy. Students are not getting enough out of school to succeed in the workforce. These data prompt the author's support for out-of-school-time programs. An opportunity gap exists when it comes to how children from various socioeconomic backgrounds spend their out-of-school time. Children from disadvantaged families experience much less enrichment, further contributing to the achievement gap. Quality after-school programs-not just "more school"-can fill this void, providing the enrichment and academic support needed to gain the skills required to succeed in the modern workforce. The Nellie Mae Education Foundation's Critical Hours: Afterschool Programs and Educational Success confirms the need for out-of-school-time programs by showing the relationship between an effective after-school program and academic success. Ultimately the after-school movement will reduce educational inequality, allowing today's youth to contribute to America's international competitiveness. PMID:17017256

  8. Do Jobs Work? Risk and Protective Behaviors Associated with Employment Among Disadvantaged Female Teens in Urban Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Janet; Zenilman, Jonathan; Rose, Eve; Wingood, Gina; DiClemente, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent employment predicts lower educational engagement and achievement and greater engagement with risk behaviors. Most research has studied middle class rather than disadvantaged adolescents. We identified risk and protective behaviors associated with employment using data from a 3-wave, 12-month study of 715 low-socio-economic status female African American adolescents who were ages 15–21 at baseline. Adolescents who were employed at wave 2 (n=214) were matched with adolescents who were not employed at wave 2 (n=422) using nearest-neighbor matching on baseline factors within propensity score calipers on factors including marijuana use, sex while high, pregnancy risk, and socioeconomic status. We compared employed and non-employed teens on risk behaviors including marijuana use, sex while high or drunk, and a biomarker for semen exposure in the past 14 days. Employed teens were 44% as likely to say that their boyfriend is their primary spending money source and 43% as likely to be emotionally abused, but these benefits did not persist after employment ended. Six months after employment, employed respondents reported using marijuana 57% more often and had sex while drunk or high 2.7 times as frequently. Women who were employed at both waves 2 and 3 were 17% as likely to have their boyfriend as a primary source of spending money and 13% more likely to graduate high school, but they used marijuana twice as often, alcohol 1.6 times as often, had 1.6 times as many sexual partners, and had sex while high or drunk 2.3 times as often. Female teens who work may avoid potentially coercive romantic relationships, but they may buy drugs or alcohol with their earnings. PMID:25221451

  9. Do Jobs Work? Risk and Protective Behaviors Associated with Employment Among Disadvantaged Female Teens in Urban Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Janet; Zenilman, Jonathan; Rose, Eve; Wingood, Gina; DiClemente, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent employment predicts lower educational engagement and achievement and greater engagement with risk behaviors. Most research has studied middle class rather than disadvantaged adolescents. We identified risk and protective behaviors associated with employment using data from a 3-wave, 12-month study of 715 low-socio-economic status female African American adolescents who were ages 15-21 at baseline. Adolescents who were employed at wave 2 (n=214) were matched with adolescents who were not employed at wave 2 (n=422) using nearest-neighbor matching on baseline factors within propensity score calipers on factors including marijuana use, sex while high, pregnancy risk, and socioeconomic status. We compared employed and non-employed teens on risk behaviors including marijuana use, sex while high or drunk, and a biomarker for semen exposure in the past 14 days. Employed teens were 44% as likely to say that their boyfriend is their primary spending money source and 43% as likely to be emotionally abused, but these benefits did not persist after employment ended. Six months after employment, employed respondents reported using marijuana 57% more often and had sex while drunk or high 2.7 times as frequently. Women who were employed at both waves 2 and 3 were 17% as likely to have their boyfriend as a primary source of spending money and 13% more likely to graduate high school, but they used marijuana twice as often, alcohol 1.6 times as often, had 1.6 times as many sexual partners, and had sex while high or drunk 2.3 times as often. Female teens who work may avoid potentially coercive romantic relationships, but they may buy drugs or alcohol with their earnings. PMID:25221451

  10. Why do some women know more? An exploration of the association of community socioeconomic characteristics, social capital, and HIV/AIDS knowledge.

    PubMed

    Jesmin, Syeda S; Chaudhuri, Sanjukta

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations of community-level socio-economic status (SES) characteristics and social capital with women's knowledge of HIV/AIDS. We used a representative national sample of 6,771 women ages 15-49 years from the Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey of 2007. We extended the findings of prior studies by providing new evidence that both community and social capital were related to having knowledge of AIDS. The significant community characteristics associated with women's greater knowledge of AIDS were: women's higher mean age at first marriage, higher mean years of education, the higher percentage of women in the community who work, and higher mean household living standard in the community. Regardless of individual-level SES, living in a community with higher community-level SES and having greater social capital were associated with having a greater likelihood of hearing about AIDS. However, we found that once women knew about AIDS, not all of the community-SES and social capital indicators explained their advanced knowledge of AIDS prevention and transmission. Our findings underscore the importance of HIV/AIDS education campaigns in the disadvantaged communities, specifically targeting women who are not members in any non-governmental organizations, as well as greater use of media in educating women about AIDS. PMID:24093449

  11. Women's Center Women's Center

    E-print Network

    Malls, Oct. 20-24, 8:00am-5:00pm Body Positive James River Room, Webb Center, 12:30pm-1:30 pm Love Your Activists James River Room, Webb Center, 12:30pm-1:30pm December Women's Climb Night - Winter HolidayWomen's Center Fall 2014 Women's Center Fall 2014 August Women's Equality Day Front Lobby, Webb

  12. The relation between disadvantaged groups: a social psychological approach 

    E-print Network

    Rothgerber, Hank

    1995-01-01

    in position and to an advantaged outgroup always high in position, and then subjects were given a chance to aggress against either the disadvantaged outgroup or the advantaged outgroup. Results supported hypotheses derived from social identity theory...

  13. Review of ADHD Pharmacotherapies: Advantages, Disadvantages, and Clinical Pearls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daughton, Joan M.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages, disadvantages, as well as helpful hints on when to use several drug therapies against attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are discussed. The drugs discussed are methylphenidate, atomoxetine, clonidine, and bupropion.

  14. Re-examining the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Gayton, William F; Perry, Scott M; Loignon, Andrew C; Ricker, Angela

    2011-04-01

    Occurrence of the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing shootout data from 2005 through 2008. Results indicated that teams involved in shootouts playing at their home arenas did not lose significantly more games at home than on the road. Results did not support the hypotheses that emphasize the roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey. PMID:21667767

  15. 75 FR 5535 - Participation by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in Department of Transportation Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ...by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in Department of Transportation...overall disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) goal for federally...significant change in the legal standards governing the DBE...BY DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISES IN DEPARTMENT OF...

  16. 13 CFR 124.1007 - Who may protest the disadvantaged status of a concern?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Who may protest the disadvantaged status of a concern? 124.1007 Section...DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS Eligibility, Certification...1007 Who may protest the disadvantaged status of a concern? (a) In...

  17. 13 CFR 124.1010 - What procedures apply to disadvantaged status protests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...What procedures apply to disadvantaged status protests? 124.1010 Section 124...DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS Eligibility, Certification...What procedures apply to disadvantaged status protests? (a) General....

  18. The impact of gendered organizational systems on women’s career advancement

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Deborah A.; Hopkins, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    In this Perspective article we propose that in order to pave the way for women’s career advancement into the senior ranks of organizations, attention must be directed at the systemic norms and structures that drive the gendered nature of the workplace. A focus on individual level issues, i.e., women lacking confidence and women opting out, detracts from the work that must be done at the organizational level in order to dismantle the system of pervasive, structural disadvantage facing women seeking to advance to senior leadership positions.

  19. The Road to Poverty: A Report on the Economic Status of Midlife and Older Women in America. Mother's Day Report 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Older Women's League, Washington, DC.

    Women of all ages continue to enter the work force in greater numbers while the work force participation rate for males is declining. Women are disproportionately concentrated in low-paying, dead-end jobs. Employment discrimination continues to be a significant problem. Job interruptions necessitated by family responsibilities are a major factor…

  20. Alaska Women's Commission Regional Conferences 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Christine

    This booklet describes the work of the Alaska Women's Commission, a state agency dedicated to the achievement of equal legal, economic, social, and political status for women in Alaska. Since its inception, the Alaska Women's Commission has provided funding for regional women's conferences in rural parts of the state. The document describes four…

  1. 48 CFR 719.271-2 - The USAID Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (SDB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (SDB...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies ...Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization...

  2. 48 CFR 719.271-2 - The USAID Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (SDB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (SDB...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies ...Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization...

  3. Advances in the prevention of heterosexual transmission of HIV/AIDS among women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nadine E.; Meyer, Jaimie P.; Springer, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in testing and treatment, the incidence of HIV/AIDS in the United States has remained stagnant with an estimated 56,300 new infections every year. Women account for an increasing proportion of the epidemic. The vulnerability of women to HIV stems from both increased biologic susceptibility to heterosexual transmission and also the social, economic, and structural disadvantages they often confront. This review describes the main reasons for the increased vulnerability of U.S. women to HIV transmission with particular emphasis on specific highrisk groups including: non-Hispanic blacks, women who use drugs, women with a history of incarceration, and victims of intimate partner violence. Although behavioral approaches to HIV prevention may be effective, pragmatic implementation is often difficult, especially for women who lack sociocultural capital to negotiate condoms with their male partners. Recent advances in HIV prevention show promise in terms of female-initiated interventions. These notably include female condoms, non-specific vaginal microbicides, and antiretroviral oral and vaginal pre-exposure prophylaxis. In this review, we will present evidence in support of these new female-initiated interventions while also emphasizing the importance of advocacy and the political support for these scientific advances to be successful. PMID:23745166

  4. Women's Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Women have unique health issues. And some of the health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. Unique issues ... and men also have many of the same health problems. But these problems can affect women differently. ...

  5. Women, Democracy and Participation in the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Louisa

    This paper discusses the disadvantaged state of women in South Africa, including statistics that illustrate effects of their lack of status on their health and well being. It then focuses on the role in South Africa of the community library and information services in empowering especially women. Barriers experienced in information delivery to…

  6. Economics Postgraduate MSc Economics

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Economics Postgraduate MSc Economics MSc Economics & Finance MSc International Money & Banking #12;www.bath.ac.uk/economics Welcome to the Department of Economics The Department offers a range. The Department has a strong international research reputation in mainstream economics. Our teaching and research

  7. 1 Women's Studies WOMEN'S STUDIES

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Women's Studies WOMEN'S STUDIES Students gain knowledge of contemporary feminist theories of the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences' arts and humanities programs, women's studies examines women's lives's programs · Bachelor of Arts with a major in women's studies (http:// bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/womens-studies

  8. Inequities Persist for Women and Non-Tenure-Track Faculty. The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession, 2004-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Many faculty members were optimistic about their economic prospects for 2004-05. They saw signs of--or at least hope for--economic recovery all around and were ending a year in which overall average faculty salaries had grown by the smallest percentage in decades. Following the pattern of recent years, this annual report first examines the…

  9. The unemployment of women with physical disabilities in Ghana: issues and recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Augustina Naami; Reiko Hayashi; Hank Liese

    2012-01-01

    Unemployment among persons with disabilities is high. The situation is worse for women with disabilities as they experience multiple disadvantages on account of gender and disability. The condition for women with disabilities in Ghana could be more complicated, given the intersection of disability, gender, poverty, cultural beliefs and practices. As employment provides not only income for women with disabilities but

  10. The Uses of Media to Improve the Status of Women on an International Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Linda J.

    The mass media are valuable tools for influencing atttiudes toward women and for helping women to evaluate their roles in society. This paper discusses advantages and disadvantages of radio, printed materials, television, and film as socialization tools; the need for special attention to improving the status of women; new media products designed…

  11. Highline Public Schools Computer-Assisted Instruction Project: A Program to Meet Disadvantaged Students' Individual Needs for Basic Skill Development: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maser, Arthur L.; And Others

    This description of a computer-assisted instruction project, which provides an alternative approach to individual instruction in basic skills for economically and educationally disadvantaged students at the secondary level, includes the results of evaluations conducted at the end of each of three school years. Instruction in priority…

  12. "Bigger than Hip-Hop?" Impact of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program on Youth Living in a Disadvantaged Neighborhood in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulac, Julie; Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Calhoun, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This study explored whether a hip-hop dance program was associated with improved well-being for adolescents living in a multicultural, socio-economically disadvantaged urban community in Ottawa. Sixty-seven youths between 11 and 16 years of age participated in a 13-week program. A primarily qualitative approach was used to assess perceived impact…

  13. Getting Our Best Teachers into Disadvantaged Schools: Differences in the Professional and Personal Factors Attracting More Effective and Less Effective Teachers to a School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Of the school-level factors that have an impact on student learning, one of the most powerful appears to be the effectiveness of the individual teacher. The most effective teachers are, therefore, one of the most important tools schools and systems have at their disposal to lift the achievement of socio-economically disadvantaged students and…

  14. Women in Physics in Perú

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loayza, María Luisa Cerón; Vásquez, Yezeña Huaypar; Cabrejos, Jorge Aurelio Bravo

    2009-04-01

    The numbers of women receiving undergraduate and master's degrees in physics from San Marcos National University and undergraduate physics degrees from San Luis Gonzaga National University in Perú are reported. The number of undergraduate degrees in physics has increased for women in San Marcos University, but not for women earning master's degrees. Why don't women complete their post-degree studies? Economics and gender stereotypes are factors that women in Perú have to fight each day. Perú does not have a good scholar program in science, so few students are interested in beginning their university careers in science. Improvements in science education are needed for our country to reach its potential.

  15. An economical single to three phase converter for induction motors 

    E-print Network

    Di Zerega, Philp Van Uytandaele

    1994-01-01

    There are several different types of single to three phase converters for induction motors available today. However, many of the presently available phase converters suffer from disadvantages such as high cost or low performance. An economical...

  16. Language Arts Programs for Disadvantaged Children in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oettle, Sylvia

    To meet the sociological, psychological, and linguistic needs of disadvantaged children in teaching the language arts, both special teacher preparation--involving field experiences and mastery of the subject matter as well as teaching strategies--and effective language programs are necessary. Various teaching methods and materials have met with…

  17. Theorising Multiply Disadvantaged Young People's Challenges in Accessing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie; Mkwananzi, Faith

    2015-01-01

    This paper sketches an innovative conceptualisation of disadvantaged youth, shaped dialogically by the interactions of theorising and data from a case study at Orange Farm informal settlement in South Africa in 2013. The study focused on the challenges for the young people in this area in accessing higher education. Drawing on Sen's and Nussbaum's…

  18. Social Services: A New Program for Disadvantaged Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, John O.

    If the disadvantaged student is to have extended educational opportunities, programs of special relevance must be set up for him. His lack of skill is a cultural problem, not necessarily an intellectual one. Two programs leading to careers in social service, along with their attraction for students and the allocation of resources for their…

  19. Math Basic Skills Module for Disadvantaged Electronic Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodewald, Dave

    A project was undertaken to develop a remedial academic curriculum and materials that would help disadvantaged students gain the basic mathematics skills necessary to succeed in an electronics program. Major activities of the project included development of a bibliography of currently available math resource books with materials appropriate for…

  20. SOME PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF LEARNING IN THE DISADVANTAGED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DEUTSCH, MARTIN

    PARTICULAR FACTORS INFLUENCE THE LEARNING OF THE DISADVANTAGED CHILD. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS CAN INCREASE THE LIKELIHOOD OF LEARNING COGNITIVE STRATEGIES. VARIATIONS WITHIN THE ENVIRONMENT INFLUENCE VARIATIONS IN COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT. PARENTAL INFLUENCE MAY AFFECT THE LEARNING ABILITY OF THEIR CHILDREN. LOWER-CLASS PARENTS HAVE SELDOM SUBJECTED…

  1. Educational and Vocational Rehabilitation of Disadvantaged Handicapped Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshner, Saul S.; Snyderman, George S.

    Some 276 handicapped and socially disadvantaged youth aged 16 to 18, who were likely to drop out of high school, received rehabilitation services from the Philadelphia Jewish Employment and Vocational Service (JEVS) and the Board of Education. The services included intense vocational and personal evaluation, work adjustment training, individual…

  2. An afterschool intervention program for educationally disadvantaged young children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Bergin; Lynne M. Hudson; Carolyn F. Chryst; Mark Resetar

    1992-01-01

    The research investigated the premise that if educationally disadvantaged children experience increased instructional time combined with an educational setting that is sensitive to their culture and that provides perceptions of control, enhanced achievement and interest in learning will result. The research setting was the Hilltop Emergent Literacy Project (HELP), an afterschool educational program serving poor, mostly African American five- to

  3. Are new entrants to the residential property market informationally disadvantaged?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Watkins

    1998-01-01

    This paper sets out to test whether, as a consequence of being informationally disadvantaged, new entrants to residential property markets pay significantly higher prices for a hypothetical standardized property. The paper analyses data on house sales in Glasgow between April 1991 and March 1992. The transactions data are subdivided into mutually exclusive groups of households and the prices paid are

  4. A Study of Four Library Programs for Disadvantaged Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsor, Charlotte B.; Burrows, Lodema

    This is a study of four projects in New York City which were established with federal grants to offer library service to the disadvantaged in the area. The four programs studied are the Preschool Project of the Brooklyn Public Library, the Community Coordinator Project of the Brooklyn Public Library, the North Manhattan Project of the New York…

  5. MATERIALS THE DISADVANTAGED NEED--AND DON'T NEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HABERMAN, MARTIN

    THE ASSUMPTION THAT SOME CHILDREN ARE LOW ACHIEVERS BECAUSE OF CULTURAL, SENSORY, OR DEVELOPMENTAL DEPRIVATION IS CRITICIZED BECAUSE IT LEADS MAINLY TO A GRASPING FOR NEW AND DIFFERENT TEACHING TECHNOLOGIES. WHAT SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN A COHESIVE VIEW OF THE DISADVANTAGED ARE THEORETICAL UNDERPINNINGS FROM WHICH ACTION PROGRAMS CAN BE DERIVED. THE…

  6. Sources of migrant housing disadvantage in urban China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weiping Wu

    2004-01-01

    The increasing level of labor mobility in China challenges the current population-management structure. In particular, recent reforms in urban housing provision seem largely to overlook the needs of the migrant population. In this paper I examine the sources of migrant housing disadvantage in cities. Specifically, I analyze the institutional and socioeconomic factors underlying migrant housing choice and conditions, and how

  7. Advantages and Disadvantages of Student Loans Repayment Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Hua

    2010-01-01

    It is a difficulty problem to choice repayment patterns of student loan. "Conventional mortgage-type loan" and "Income contingent loan" has been performed in many countries. These loan repayment manners have their own characteristics. In this paper, we discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and would provide policy choice…

  8. Entrepreneurship as an integrating mechanism for disadvantaged persons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dirk De Clercq; Benson Honig

    2011-01-01

    This paper theorises about a specific facet of social entrepreneurship, namely, the integration of disadvantaged persons into the field of entrepreneurship. Drawing from Bourdieu's theory of practice, the authors conceive of this integration as a power-laden process that reflects normative expectations imposed by field incumbents on entrants to the field that require them to both comply with and challenge existing

  9. Advantages and Disadvantages of a "Joint Administrative Agreement."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, William H.

    Many rural school districts are contemplating joint administrative agreements at the superintendent and central staff level. An Illinois superintendent who participated as a joint administrator of two districts points out the advantages and disadvantages of such an arrangement. The potential budget savings often allow the hiring of a top…

  10. Reaching and Helping Unorganized and Disadvantaged People. Courier No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The articles in this issue are mainly concerned with how to reach the poorest and most disadvantaged sections of the population and how best to help once contact has been made. "Nijera Kori in Retrospect: In Search of an Organization of the Rural Poor" (Mohiuddin Ahmad) provides extracts from an evaluation of this grassroots, village-based,…

  11. To Admit or Not to Admit the Academically Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Robin H.

    1979-01-01

    If institutions of higher learning have admissions standards that admit the academically-disadvantaged student, then those same institutions should provide programs to assist the enrollee to be academically successful. The author cites an investigation made at Oklahoma State University, showing a significant relationship between provisional…

  12. From Here to Where?--"Disadvantaged Schools," Literacy and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the abolishment of the Disadvantaged Schools Program (DSP) in South Australia represented a shift away from a focus on the social to the individual, from curriculum to instruction, from school-based inquiry and teacher research to expert solutions, and from various contexted and contested outcomes to a singular and simplistic version…

  13. Processes of Curiosity and Exploration in Preschool Disadvantaged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuchin, Patricia

    This study was created primarily to explore new techniques and to generate fruitful new hypotheses and procedures for the (1) description of variations in expressed curiosity and constructive exploration among disadvantaged preschool children and (2) assessment of the relationship between such curiosity and exploration and other aspects of the…

  14. Developing Social Giftedness in Disadvantaged Girls at an Indian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Yukti

    2012-01-01

    This article describes developmental interactions with a group of female students at an Indian public school situated in a disadvantaged section of the community. Through a series of activities, the author makes an intensive effort to develop social giftedness in these students. The article describes various activities together with the author's…

  15. Urban disadvantage and delayed nephrology referral in Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Cass; Joan Cunningham; Paul Snelling; Zhiqiang Wang; Wendy Hoy

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between area level measures of social disadvantage and the late referral of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) to a nephrologist. Patients who were referred late were those who needed to commence dialysis within 3 months of referral to a nephrologist. Late referral has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We studied 3334 patients

  16. Using the Newspaper to Teach the Disadvantaged Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Newspaper Agency, Inc., Honolulu.

    One of a series prepared by the Hawaii Newspaper Agency, this teaching guide offers suggestions on using the newspaper to teach the disadvantaged child communication and reading skills. The objectives are to acquaint students with the format and contents of the newspaper; to improve vocabulary and comprehension; to encourage students to write…

  17. Teaching Low Achieving and Disadvantaged Students, 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Charles H.

    2006-01-01

    This new edition updates and expands the previous volume and continues to reflect the concepts and the reasons behind learning and behavior problems of low achieving and disadvantaged students. Through the chapters, the author describes instructional levels and independent levels, emphasizing that success is produced by finding the place on the…

  18. A Summer Academic Research Experience for Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience…

  19. Disrupting Patterns of Educational Inequality and Disadvantage in Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pridmore, Pat; Jere, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the gap in educational provision for vulnerable learners in Malawi who are at risk of falling behind and dropping out of school due to irregular attendance. It draws on a study in high HIV-prevalence areas that explores the patterns of inequality and disadvantage that disrupt learning and uses this knowledge to design…

  20. Using Preschool Materials to Modify the Language of Disadvantaged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Betty; Risley, Todd R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation of incidental teaching practices on the spontaneous speech of 12 disadvantaged preschool children during free-play periods which demonstrated that such periods can be powerful learning times by capitalizing on moments when children seek new plan materials. (Author/EH)

  1. Barriers to Healthier Eating in a Disadvantaged Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Martin; Rebane, Deanne; Lester, Carolyn

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The research objective was to identify how healthy eating was understood in a disadvantaged community and how barriers to healthy eating might be overcome. Design: Participatory action research. Setting: Communities in Gurnos, Merthyr Tydfil, one of the most deprived areas in the UK. Method: Trainees on a participative methods course…

  2. Nutritional Supplementation of Disadvantaged Elementary-School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, David M.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Examined with 177 disadvantaged elementary school students (5-9 years old, 99 percent Blacks) were the effects of the provision of a nutritionally fortified low-lactose food supplement on hematocrit values (volume percentage of erythrocytes in whole blood), growth, absenteeism, and lunch consumption. (IM)

  3. The Early College Challenge: Navigating Disadvantaged Students' Transition to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, James E.; Becker, Kelly Iwanaga

    2011-01-01

    Successful early college high schools (ECHSs) are formed through partnerships between high schools and colleges (usually community colleges). Think of it as preparation through acceleration. ECHSs enroll disadvantaged students who have not excelled with ordinary grade-level academic content and have them take college courses while still in high…

  4. Programming Mathematics: A New Approach in Teaching the Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-On, Ehud; Or-Bach, Rachel

    The development of an instructional model for teaching formal mathematical concepts (probability concepts) to disadvantaged high school students through computer programming and some results from a field test are described in this document. The instructional model takes into account both learner characteristics (cognitive, affective, and…

  5. Education and Training and the Avoidance of Financial Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Gary N.

    2011-01-01

    Making use of the longitudinal data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, this study examines the relationship between post-school qualifications and financial disadvantage among Australians during the period 2001 to 2008. Specifically, it is concerned with the extent that education and training, vis-a-vis…

  6. Women’s Labor Force Attachment and Childbearing in Finland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andres Vikat

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of women’s economic activity, earnings and take-up of child home care allowance on childbearing, using a ten percent sample from a longitudinal register data set that covers the entire female population of reproductive age in Finland in 1988-2000. Results show that a woman’s economic activity and income were positively correlated with entry into motherhood and

  7. Development of Kondh women.

    PubMed

    Baral, J K; Bakshi, S P

    1994-10-01

    This article presents a profile of the living conditions of the Kondh ethnic group, with particular attention to women's conditions. The Kondhs are the largest tribal community in Orissa state, India. Kondh tribes are concentrated in Phulbani, Koraput, and Kalahandi districts. The Kondh consist of three subgroups. In Phulbani district the Kondh are one of several tribal populations and together with scheduled castes and tribes are the dominant populations. Phulbani district has limited educational resources and low levels of literacy, particularly among women. Female literacy in 1991 was only 16.59%. Girl's educational institutions are few in number and poor in quality. Female literacy is low due to parental ignorance of the importance of female education, the need to use girl children as domestic helpers, the cultural practice of facial tattooing that causes injury and shame among parents and children, the inadequacy of district schools, and the reputation of better private boarding as "cages." Economic life is based on a sexual division of labor, and women and men work according to their capacity. Agricultural tasks are shared, but men perform ploughing and clearing of jungle. Women perform all domestic tasks in addition collection of daily firewood and additional forest products that are sold jointed with husbands in local markets. During the slack agricultural periods, men relax and women work. Both men and women work if construction work is available nearby. Although tubewells were installed in villages, women prefer distant pond or stream water for drinking. The loss of tribal land for women places them in more vulnerable sexual and economic positions. Many voluntary groups promote land ownership for women as a means of security and social status. Phulbani district has little urbanization and no major industries. Bride-price was replaced by dowry, which downgrades Kondh women's status. The Kondh suffer from malnutrition, malaria, and anemia. Health services are insufficient, and Kondh cultural practices interfere with acceptance of modern medicine and healthy lifestyles. PMID:12291436

  8. Women of the World: Women's Health in India

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Adlakha, Arjun, 1941-.

    The US Census Bureau offers this report that profiles the current state of women's health and education in India. The report was released as part of the bureau's Women of the World series, which focuses on socio-economic gender issues in various countries. The reports present data from a variety of sources and summarize germane findings to provide a snapshot of Indian literacy, education level, fertility, infant mortality, and maternal mortality, among other statistical factors related to women's health and education.

  9. Barriers and Facilitators to Health Behaviour Change and Economic Activity among Slum-Dwelling Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Nairobi, Kenya: The Role of Social, Health and Economic Assets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austrian, Karen; Anderson, Althea D.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent girls and young women in urban slum areas in developing countries face a myriad of challenges regarding education, sexual health, livelihoods and gender-based violence. One way of understanding how these challenges interact with each other is through the Asset Building Framework, which posits that girls need a combination of social,…

  10. State-level women’s status and psychiatric disorders among US women

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Ziming; Subramanian, S. V.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Although greater gender equality at the state-level is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in women after controlling for individual-level confounders, the extent to which state-level women’s status is related to psychiatric disorders in women and gender differences in psychopathology has never been examined. We examined these associations in the current report. Methods We used data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 34,653), a national probability sample of US adults. Respondents completed structured diagnostic assessments of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. We used generalized estimating equations to examine associations between four state-level indicators of women’s status (political participation, employment/earnings, social/economic autonomy, and reproductive rights) and odds of 12-month mood and anxiety disorders among women. We also tested whether women’s status predicted the magnitude of gender differences in psychiatric disorders. Results State-level political participation, employment/earnings, and social/economic autonomy were unrelated to odds of 12-month mood and anxiety disorders among women. However, the prevalence of major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder was lower in states where women have greater reproductive rights (OR 0.93–0.95), controlling for individual-level risk factors. None of the women’s status indicators predicted gender differences in mood and anxiety disorder prevalence. Conclusions State-level women’s status was largely unrelated to mood and anxiety disorders in women or to gender differences in these disorders. Investigation of social factors that play a role in shaping the distribution of individual-level risk factors that are associated with gender disparities in psychiatric disorders represents an important avenue for future research. PMID:20853099

  11. National Organization for Women (NOW)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    The National Organization of Women (NOW) Web page offers extensive information about issues NOW is involved in, such as economic equity, electoral politics, global feminism, racial and ethnic diversity, and violence against women. Also available is contact information for chapter and state organizations and the NOW Action Center. Links to other feminist resources on the Internet include the University of Maryland's Women's Studies Database and feminist activists resources on the Net.

  12. Obstacles to Women in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Deborah

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the underlying social, cultural and economic causes for the undemocratic treatment of the female sex within the fabric of the scientific establishment. Offers a few positive measures for women to use in opening the scientific-technical structure to women. (BR)

  13. Writing for Women: Civic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    Nearly 360 million women who live in the countries of Asia and the Pacific are illiterate. In this region, and in much of the world, women have restricted access to education, and are the victims of economic, social, and political marginalization. In recent years, governments have become increasingly aware that the inferior position assigned to…

  14. Incentives as connectors: insights into a breastfeeding incentive intervention in a disadvantaged area of North-West England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Incentive or reward schemes are becoming increasingly popular to motivate healthy lifestyle behaviours. In this paper, insights from a qualitative and descriptive study to investigate the uptake, impact and meanings of a breastfeeding incentive intervention integrated into an existing peer support programme (Star Buddies) are reported. The Star Buddies service employs breastfeeding peer supporters to support women across the ante-natal, intra-partum and post-partum period. Methods In a disadvantaged area of North West England, women initiating breastfeeding were recruited by peer supporters on the postnatal ward or soon after hospital discharge to participate in an 8 week incentive (gifts and vouchers) and breastfeeding peer supporter intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with 26 women participants who engaged with the incentive intervention, and a focus group was held with the 4 community peer supporters who delivered the intervention. Descriptive analysis of routinely collected data for peer supporter contacts and breastfeeding outcomes before and after the incentive intervention triangulated and retrospectively provided the context for the qualitative thematic analysis. Results A global theme emerged of 'incentives as connectors', with two sub-themes of 'facilitating connections' and 'facilitating relationships and wellbeing'. The incentives were linked to discussion themes and gift giving facilitated peer supporter access for proactive weekly home visits to support women. Regular face to face contacts enabled meaningful relationships and new connections within and between the women, families, peer supporters and care providers to be formed and sustained. Participants in the incentive scheme received more home visits and total contact time with peer supporters compared to women before the incentive intervention. Full participation levels and breastfeeding rates at 6-8 weeks were similar for women before and after the incentive intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that whilst the provision of incentives might not influence women's intentions or motivations to breastfeed, the connections forged provided psycho-social benefits for both programme users and peer supporters. PMID:22458841

  15. [Chorionic Villus Sampling in cytogenetic analysis--disadvantages and advantages].

    PubMed

    Gny?-Wiercioch, Agnieszka; Bloch, Renata; Grolik, Barbara; Hada?, Jolanta; Kania, Agnieszka; Szo?tysik-Szot, Mariola; Sodowska, Henryka

    2012-05-01

    Chorionic villus sampling is used in prenatal diagnosis, enabling to detect fetal genetic abnormalities. Its advantages include the possibility of performing the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy relatively fast result, risk of miscarriage comparable to that in case of amniocentesis. The disadvantages of this method are: difficult cytogenetic analysis, the possibility of contamination with maternal cells and the risk of mosaicism. There should always be a valid indication to perform the CVS procedure. PMID:22708335

  16. Essays in public finance and labor economics

    E-print Network

    Ananat, Elizabeth Oltmans

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines three questions of causality relevant to public finance and labor economics: the effect of racial segregation on city characteristics, the effect of divorce on women's economic outcomes, and the effect ...

  17. Women Migrant Workers: Embracing Empowerment Over Victimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jill Borak

    This paper focuses on women migrant workers - women who leave their countries, whether taking their families or leaving them behind, in search of employment and economic opportunity abroad. After a discussion of the recent globalization of migration, this paper continues with an examination of the feminization of migration. Part II then discusses how men and women workers experience migration

  18. Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Rose, Andresse; Hill, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges open the door to opportunity for millions of Americans who want to pursue higher education and secure their economic futures. As an organization founded on the basic principle of making college accessible to women, the American Association of University Women (AAUW) has been a leading voice for women in education and the…

  19. Hope in Hard Times: Women’s Empowerment and Human Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manisha Desai

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the conceptual and methodological issues related to women’s empowerment, the trends in women’s empowerment over the last 20 years in key areas such as education, health, economic and political participation, and finally the best practices of state and non-state actors in empowering women. Following a brief critique of human development, it begins with a discussion of the

  20. Forum on Economic Freedom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Forum on Economic Freedom web site was developed by the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) to build and strengthen democracy around the world through promoting private enterprise. The highlight of the site is Economic Reform Today, a journal published by CIPE to help educate policymakers on successful economic strategies. Recent issues have focused on challenges for policymakers in new democracies, globalization, reshaping government and market solutions to social issues. Other resources available include materials from CIPE "Central and Eastern Europe: Economic Policy Roundtables" and "Women in Business" programs.

  1. Women in science, engineering and technology (SET): a report on the Indonesian experience.

    PubMed

    Hermawati, W; Luhulima, A S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a study by the Gender Working Group, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, on women's contribution to, and benefits to women from, science, engineering and technology (SET), specifically the benefits accruing to disadvantaged women in urban and rural areas in Indonesia. Previous studies on the participation of women in SET have shown the under-representation of women in all SET activities, including decision-making and advisory positions. However, some studies have shown that if gender perspectives are included in the design and implementation of development activities, disadvantaged women in urban and rural areas could greatly benefit from SET in development projects. The two case studies in North Sulawesi and Central Lombok provinces show that the projects have enabled the expansion of employment opportunities for women and thus increased their technical skills and income. In addition, the projects have also contributed to enhancing women's self-confidence, self-reliance and communication skills. PMID:12179951

  2. Appalachian Women. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Mary Margo

    This bibliography compiles annotations of 178 books, journal articles, ERIC documents, and dissertations on Appalachian women and their social, cultural, and economic environment. Entries were published 1966-93 and are listed in the following categories: (1) authors and literary criticism; (2) bibliographies and resource guides; (3) economics,…

  3. THE WOMEN AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Scapini

    Women and environment are generally considered powerless elements in the complex global system, which is mainly based on economic laws, taking into account economically quantifiable elements. However, recent anthropogenic challenges to the environment, which threaten our existence, such as hydro-geological disasters, the overexploitation of primary resources, air and water pollution, show the need of new relationships with respect to the

  4. Creative productivity in women analysts.

    PubMed

    Schuker, E

    1985-01-01

    A pilot study of female analyst creative productivity finds that women authors are well represented in numbers in two leading analytic journals, The Journal of The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, for 1980-81. However, women analyst members of the journals' parent organizations are very poorly represented compared with male analyst members. This has led to an exploration of factors affecting female analyst productivity, encompassing a broad sweep from the sociological to the personal, dynamic level. Differential opportunities for women analysts may be inherent in the educational processes. There is evidence for an "accumulation of disadvantage" for women in the field of psychiatry, as well as the impression of gender bias and feelings of stigmatization in psychoanalysis. The question of whether academic research career paths for women are adequately encouraged is raised. Mentorship patterns are also discussed. Whether gender bias affects journal publications and the nature of psychoanalytic thinking is questioned. Women's lessened productivity is sometimes ascribed to practical aspects of feminine role. This myth is debunked for women in science, where married women with children are equally productive. The author suggests that women analysts, however, may be a select group and may be more subject to role conformity pressures. Feminine role conflicts and their effects are discussed. Dynamic issues related to creative productivity are explored in two major areas. The author suggests that female preoedipal object relations may play a part in females devaluing of their own creative efforts in a competitive arena. The oedipal situation is also discussed, especially with regard to very high-achieving women. It is suggested that though competition with the maternal-nurturant rival may be worked through, often there is incomplete resolution of the surpassing and separation from the protective, loving, but dominant oedipal father, thus limiting true professional autonomy. PMID:3988573

  5. Women Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Roberta M.; Sandler, Bernice Resnick

    Guidelines are presented to help institutions ensure women's full participation in campus-based and sponsored merit awards and prizes programs. Over 100 recommendations are designed to: explain why such awards and prizes can be particularly important for women students and women faculty; identify overt and inadvertent barriers to women's full…

  6. Women's Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James E., Ed.; Davis, Hazel K., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The 16 articles in this journal issue deal with women's studies within the English curriculum. Topics discussed in the articles include (1) the feminist challenge to the male-centered curriculum in higher education; (2) the women's movement and women's studies; (3) connotations of the word "girl"; (4) women in English education; (5) the new…

  7. Female Principals Leading at Disadvantaged Schools in Johannesburg, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Bhaigiavathie; Perumal, Juliet

    2014-01-01

    South African democracy precipitated many changes and excavated many dormant issues, one of which was equity in the workplace. This extended into the sphere of education - a sector in which women were rarely seen in leadership positions. Following the implementation of several redress policies, women have managed to penetrate the gender equity…

  8. The role of dietary protein and vitamin D in maintaining musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women: a consensus statement from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, René; Stevenson, John C; Bauer, Jürgen M; van Loon, Luc J C; Walrand, Stéphane; Kanis, John A; Cooper, Cyrus; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2014-09-01

    From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of falls and fractures. The risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be attenuated through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, calcium and vitamin D intakes, and regular physical activity/exercise, besides hormone replacement therapy when appropriate. Protein intake and physical activity are the main anabolic stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. Exercise training leads to increased muscle mass and strength, and the combination of optimal protein intake and exercise produces a greater degree of muscle protein accretion than either intervention alone. Similarly, adequate dietary protein intake and resistance exercise are important contributors to the maintenance of bone strength. Vitamin D helps to maintain muscle mass and strength as well as bone health. These findings suggest that healthy lifestyle measures in women aged >50 years are essential to allow healthy ageing. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) recommends optimal dietary protein intake of 1.0-1.2g/kgbodyweight/d with at least 20-25g of high-quality protein at each main meal, with adequate vitamin D intake at 800IU/d to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50nmol/L as well as calcium intake of 1000mg/d, alongside regular physical activity/exercise 3-5 times/week combined with protein intake in close proximity to exercise, in postmenopausal women for prevention of age-related deterioration of musculoskeletal health. PMID:25082206

  9. WORK LIFE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH: THE EXPERIENCES OF THAI WOMEN IN DEPRIVED COMMUNITIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darunee Jongudomkarn; Bernice West

    2004-01-01

    I discuss women's work life and the psychological health of women in low-income communities in Northeast Thailand. Previous research has shown that low-income women are part of a disadvantaged group who struggle against several problems in their everyday life, and who work hard to survive. These women worked as either manual laborers in agriculture or factories or as self-employed vendors,

  10. 41 CFR 105-53.130-4 - Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization. 105-53...Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization. (a) Creation...and authority. Public Law 95-507, October 14...amendment to the Small Business Act and the Small...

  11. 48 CFR 19.305 - Protesting a representation of disadvantaged business status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...representation of disadvantaged business status. 19.305 Section 19...FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS...Determination of Small Business Status for Small Business Programs...representation of disadvantaged business status. (a) This section...

  12. Socioeconomic disadvantage and changes in health risk behaviours in Australia: 1989-90 to 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Najman, Jake M.; Toloo, Ghasem; Siskind, Victor

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is associated in industrialized countries with unhealthy lifestyle characteristics, such as smoking, physical inactivity and being overweight or obese. This paper examines changes over time in the association between SES and smoking status, physical activity and being overweight or obese in Australia. METHODS: Data were taken from three successive national health surveys in Australia carried out in 1989-90 (n = 54,576), 1995 (n = 53,828) and 2001 (n = 26,863). Participants in these surveys were selected using a national probability sampling strategy, and aggregated data for geographical areas are used to determine the changing association between SES and lifestyle over time. FINDINGS: Overall, men had less healthy lifestyles. In 2001 inverse SES trends for both men and women showed that those living in lower SES areas were more likely to smoke and to be sedentary and obese. There were some important socioeconomic changes over the period 1989-90 to 2001. The least socioeconomically disadvantaged areas had the largest decrease in the percentage of people smoking tobacco (24% decrease for men and 12% for women) and the largest decrease in the percentage of people reporting sedentary activity levels (25% decrease for men and 22% for women). While there has been a general increase in the percentage over time of those who are overweight or obese, there is a modest trend for being overweight to have increased (by about 16% only among females) among those living in areas of higher SES. CONCLUSION: Socioeconomic inequalities have been increasing for several key risk behaviours related to health; this suggests that specific population-based prevention strategies intended to reduce health inequalities are needed. PMID:17242834

  13. Diabetes in Canadian Women

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Catherine; Booth, Gillian L

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic health condition affecting 4.8% of Canadian adults ? 20 years of age. The prevalence increases with age. According to the National Diabetes Surveillance System (NDSS) (1998–1999), approximately 12% of Canadians aged 60–74 years are affected. One-third of cases may remain undiagnosed. The projected increase in DM prevalence largely results from rising rates of obesity and inactivity. Key Findings DM in Canada appears to be more common among men than women. However, among Aboriginal Canadians, two-thirds of affected individuals are women. Although obesity is more prevalent among men than women (35% vs. 27%), the DM risk associated with obesity is greater for women. Socio-economic status is inversely related to DM prevalence but the income-related disparities are greater among women. Polycystic ovarian syndrome affects 5–7% of reproductive-aged women and doubles their risk for DM. Women with gestational diabetes frequently develop DM over the next 10 years. Data Gaps and Recommendations Studies of at risk ethnic/racial groups and women with gestational diabetes are needed. Age and culturally sensitive programs need to be developed and evaluated. Studies of low-income diabetic women are required before determining potential interventions. Lifestyle programs in schools and workplaces are needed to promote well-being and combat obesity/inactivity, together with lobbying of the food industry for needed changes. High depression rates among diabetic women influence self-care ability and health care expenditures. Health professionals need further training in the use of effective counseling skills that will assist people with DM to make and maintain difficult behavioural changes. PMID:15345079

  14. Digital Women

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Digital Women strives to be a full-service portal for working women in all varieties of business. The site offers a huge collection of resources, including informative articles, manuals, free software, Web tools, and advice, as well as ten free newsletters and mailing lists. Digital Women also provides a place for business women to network, including information about the Digital Women 2000 Annual International Net-Together, which will take place on Vancouver Island September 29-October 1, 2000.

  15. Self-Efficacy Buffers the Relationship between Educational Disadvantage and Executive Functioning.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Nowinski, Cindy J; Gershon, Richard C; Manly, Jennifer J

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed that control beliefs are more strongly related to global cognition and mortality among adults with low education, providing preliminary evidence that self-efficacy buffers against the negative impact of educational disadvantage on physical and cognitive health. The current study extends these findings to a nationally representative sample of men and women aged 30 to 85 and explores which cognitive domains are most strongly associated with self-efficacy, educational attainment, and their interaction. Data were obtained from 1032 adult (30-85) participants in the United States norming study for the NIH Toolbox. Self-efficacy, executive functioning, working memory, processing speed, episodic memory, and vocabulary were assessed with the NIH Toolbox. Multivariate analysis of covariance and follow-up regressions tested the hypothesis that self-efficacy would be more strongly related to cognitive performance among individuals with lower education, controlling for age, sex, race, ethnicity, education, reading level, testing language, and depressive symptoms. Higher education was associated with higher self-efficacy and better performance on all cognitive tests. Higher self-efficacy was associated with better set-switching and attention/inhibition. Significant self-efficacy by education interactions indicated that associations between self-efficacy and executive abilities were stronger for individuals with lower education. Specifically, individuals with low education but high self-efficacy performed similarly to individuals with high education. This study provides evidence that self-efficacy beliefs buffer against the negative effects of low educational attainment on executive functioning. These results have implications for future policy and/or intervention work aimed at reducing the deleterious effects of educational disadvantage on later cognitive health. (JINS, 2015, 21, 297-304). PMID:25877284

  16. Use of Computer Assisted Instruction for Teaching Mathematics to the Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipson, Joella

    The instructional needs of culturally disadvantaged students must be differentiated from the needs of slow learners and from the needs of mentally retarded children. The characteristics of a disadvantaged student's family structure, home environment, and neighborhood all affect his learning potential. The special needs of disadvantaged students…

  17. Education and the Many Faces of the Disadvantaged: Cultural and Historical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickman, William W., Ed.; Lehrer, Stanley, Ed.

    This book examines various types of the disadvantaged in the United States, uncovers reasons for the multifaceted problem of social deprivation, and indicates constructive ways, through education, of helping the disadvantaged. Attention is also focused on the poor and disadvantaged in foreign lands. There are ten parts to the volume: the…

  18. The spoken language of disadvantaged children in Israel ? a look at some pragmatic strategies of communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gloria Sheintuch

    1981-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether so?called “disadvantaged”; children are indeed, as has often been suggested, deficient both linguistically and in mental capacities. Two interviews with Israeli children from disadvantaged and privileged populations are carefully examined. It is shown that disadvantaged children practice the same types of pragmatic strategies of communication as privileged children, although their actual linguistic performance

  19. Teacher Preparation for the Minority and Disadvantaged. NCRIEEO Tipsheet, Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ether, John A.

    This tipsheet reports that the first series of books written especially to help prepare teachers of minorities and the disadvantaged were general books of readings. Among these is "The Disadvantaged Learner" by Staten Webster. Over 600 pages in length, it is loosely organized around three themes: knowing the disadvantaged, understanding the…

  20. Advantages and Disadvantages of Health Care Accreditation Mod­els

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Jafar S.; Gharibi, Farid; Wilson, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This systematic review seeks to define the general advantages and disadvan­tages of accreditation programs to assist in choosing the most appropriate approach. Method: Systematic search of SID, Ovid Medline & PubMed databases was conducted by the keywords of accreditation, hospital, medical practice, clinic, accreditation models, health care and Persian meanings. From 2379 initial articles, 83 articles met the full inclusion criteria. From initial analysis, 23 attributes were identified which appeared to define advantages and disadvantages of different accreditation approaches and the available systems were compared on these. Results: Six systems were identified in the international literature including the JCAHO from USA, the Canadian program of CCHSA, and the accreditation programs of UK, Australia, New Zealand and France. The main distinguishing attributes among them were: quality improve­ment, patient and staff safety, improving health services integration, public’s confi­dence, effectiveness and efficiency of health services, innovation, influence global standards, information management, breadth of activity, history, effective relationship with stakeholders, agreement with AGIL attributes and independence from government. Conclusion: Based on 23 attributes of comprehensive accreditation systems we have defined from a systematic review, the JCAHO accreditation program of USA and then CCHSA of Can­ada offered the most comprehensive systems with the least disadvantages. Other programs such as the ACHS of Australia, ANAES of France, QHNZ of New Zealand and UK accredita­tion programs were fairly comparable according to these criteria. However the decision for any country or health system should be based on an assessment weighing up their specific objec­tives and needs. PMID:24688896

  1. Divorce and Women's Risk of Health Insurance Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health…

  2. 76 FR 53165 - Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ...challenges in international economic policy. The meeting...Investment Subcommittee, the Economic Sanctions Subcommittee...Subcommittee on Women in International Economic Policy. This meeting...Office of Economic Policy Analysis and Public...

  3. 77 FR 33014 - Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ...meeting will focus on Economic Statecraft--Using Diplomacy to Meet Our Economic Goals. Subcommittee...Subcommittee on Women in International Economic Policy, and the Stakeholder...Office of Economic Policy Analysis and Public...

  4. 76 FR 4987 - Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ...challenges in international economic policy. The meeting...Investment Subcommittee, the Economic Sanctions Subcommittee...Subcommittee on Women in International Economic Policy. This meeting...Office of Economic Policy Analysis and Public...

  5. Women holding hands.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J

    1995-01-01

    It is estimated that 80% of the people involved in grassroots environmental protection advocacy in the US are women. One such self-described "average" woman became an activist upon learning that her drinking water was contaminated with uranium leaking from a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility. When DOE officials tried to brush off her concerns and those of her neighbors at a hearing, she presented them with a jar of water from her kitchen tap and challenged them to drink it. They refused. Thus began a long, but ultimately successful, struggle to shut down the offending facility. The efforts of these US women are mirrored all over the world as women have embraced environmental justice as one of their causes. At recent UN conferences, activists have challenged conventional strategies of economic development as being incompatible with equity and environmental sustainability. They have also established that "women's rights are human rights" and added domestic violence and rape to the human rights agenda. The recent International Conference on Population and Development revolved around women's health and rights issues. Throughout the world, women activists have challenged and changed the social dynamics of families, households, communities, and societies in general. One reason for the increased success of women's groups is that they have adopted the tactics of mass communication, including the use of computers, radio, and film. Although the various efforts are arising from diverse circumstances, they have some things in common such as finding personal experience to be a major impetus for action, realizing the self-reinforcing empowering nature of advocacy work, breaking the silence surrounding culturally taboo topics, and challenging the status quo. Such challenges often lead to political backlash or to counter measures taken by fundamentalist religious groups who link improvements in women's status with societal ills. Despite these challenges, the global women's movement continues to grow and to seek democracy and social justice. PMID:12290007

  6. Jobs for Women in Rural Industry and Services. Women in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Ruth B.

    Women's vulnerability to increased landlessness and other economic factors has created a need in most developing nations for year-round, rural, non-agricultural employment opportunities for women. Census data from 56 Third World countries reveal that women are generally underrepresented in the paid labor force and overrepresented in the "unpaid…

  7. Advantages and disadvantages of a municipal solid waste collection service for citizens of Hanoi City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kosuke; Osako, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Governments of municipalities in Vietnam experiencing dynamic economic growth and dramatic population increases have been struggling to manage increased amounts of municipal solid waste (MSW). This study aimed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of the current MSW collection service for citizens of the four central districts of Hanoi city, Vietnam, by conducting interviews with 200 households and 200 business entities regarding their satisfaction with the service. The survey results showed that Hanoi city provides an economical collection service with sufficient frequency and at appropriate times for citizens. However, a number of citizens complained about unsanitary conditions in the area surrounding their residence. Business entities had sufficient motivation to sell recyclable waste (RW) to the informal sector, not only to derive revenue from selling RW, but also to reduce the amount of MSW generated, thus reducing the MSW collection fee. Households were not motivated to reduce MSW by selling RW to the informal sector because they paid a fixed collection fee. As a result, an improvement in living standards in the near future is expected to contribute to increasing the amount of MSW generated from households. PMID:23315363

  8. Neural Correlates of Advantageous and Disadvantageous Inequity in Sharing Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Eveline A.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a strong preference for fair distributions of resources. Neuroimaging studies have shown that being treated unfairly coincides with activation in brain regions involved in signaling conflict and negative affect. Less is known about neural responses involved in violating a fairness norm ourselves. Here, we investigated the neural patterns associated with inequity, where participants were asked to choose between an equal split of money and an unequal split that could either maximize their own (advantageous inequity) or another person’s (disadvantageous inequity) earnings. Choosing to divide money unequally, irrespective who benefited from the unequal distribution, was associated with activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Inequity choices that maximized another person’s profits were further associated with activity in the ventral striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Taken together, our findings show evidence of a common neural pattern associated with both advantageous and disadvantageous inequity in sharing decisions and additional recruitment of neural circuitry previously linked to the computation of subjective value and reward when violating a fairness norm at the benefit of someone else. PMID:25238541

  9. A summer academic research experience for disadvantaged youth.

    PubMed

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) program that provides an enriching academic internship to underrepresented youth. Our program has shown that to have a successful internship for these disadvantaged youth, several issues need to be addressed in addition to scientific mentoring. We have found that it is necessary to remediate and/or fortify basic academic skills for students to be successful. In addition, students need to be actively coached in the development of professional skills, habits, and attitudes necessary for success in the workplace. With all these factors in place, these youths can become better students, compete on a more level playing field in their internships, and increase their potential of participating actively in the sciences in the future. PMID:24006390

  10. A Summer Academic Research Experience for Disadvantaged Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) program that provides an enriching academic internship to underrepresented youth. Our program has shown that to have a successful internship for these disadvantaged youth, several issues need to be addressed in addition to scientific mentoring. We have found that it is necessary to remediate and/or fortify basic academic skills for students to be successful. In addition, students need to be actively coached in the development of professional skills, habits, and attitudes necessary for success in the workplace. With all these factors in place, these youths can become better students, compete on a more level playing field in their internships, and increase their potential of participating actively in the sciences in the future. PMID:24006390

  11. English and Socio-Economic Disadvantage: Learner Voices from Rural Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamid, M. Obaidul; Baldauf, Richard B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    L2 education research has shown immense interest in learners and their views of L2 learning. Nevertheless, the different directions of learner-focused research have been inadequate in highlighting learners' learning experiences in relation to their social backgrounds, particularly in the developing world. Drawing on the first author's PhD…

  12. The Importance of Funds of Knowledge on Economically Disadvantaged Rural European American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Whitney Blair

    2012-01-01

    The identification and utilization of community funds of knowledge has been essential in understanding and assisting cultural groups to bridge the achievement gap. The purpose of this study was to examine the community funds of knowledge, the role of the parent, and the partnerships of a rural school in southeastern "Appalachia," United…

  13. Beliefs about the Causes of Poverty in Parents and Adolescents Experiencing Economic Disadvantage in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2004-01-01

    Over 2 consecutive years, parents and their adolescent children from 199 poor families in Hong Kong responded to the Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale, which assesses beliefs about the causes of poverty. The author abstracted 4 factors from the scale. Analyses showed that these factors (personal problems, exploitation, lack of opportunity,…

  14. An Afterschool Program for Economically Disadvantaged Youth: Perceptions of Parents, Staff, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Katrina W.; Williams, Lunetta M.; Daniel, Larry G.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated perceived effects of an afterschool program located in 6 Title 1 schools on students' achievement, self-esteem, and attitudes. Data sources comprised surveys (n = 257), 5 focus groups (n= 23), and an individual interview with the program director (n = 1). Survey data indicated overall satisfaction with the program.…

  15. Extending the purposes of science education: addressing violence within socio-economic disadvantaged communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Carolina

    2012-09-01

    Current discourses about science education show a wide concern towards humanisation and a more socio-cultural perspective of school science. They suggest that science education can serve diverse purposes and be responsive to social and environmental situations we currently face. However, these discourses and social approaches to science education tend to focus on global issues. They do not respond to the immediate needs and local context of some communities. I discuss in this paper why the purposes of science education need to be extended to respond to the local issue of violence. For this, I present a case study with a group of 38 students from a poor population in Bogotá, Colombia, located in one of the suburbs with highest levels of crime in the city. I examine the ways that science education contributes to and embodies its own forms of violence and explore how a new approach to science education could contribute to break the cycle of violence.

  16. Early Maternal Employment and Childhood Obesity among Economically Disadvantaged Families in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Rebekah Levine; Lombardi, Caitlin McPherran

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates a link between maternal employment and children's risk of obesity, but little prior work has addressed maternal employment during children's infancy. This study examined the timing and intensity of early maternal employment and associations with children's later overweight and obesity in a sample of low-income families in…

  17. Early Intervention for Childhood Anxiety in a School Setting: Outcomes for an Economically Disadvantaged Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mifsud, Cynthia; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a school-based early intervention program for the reduction of anxious symptoms in at-risk children from low socioeconomic status neighborhoods. Method: A total of 425 children (8-11 years old) from nine schools in low socioeconomic status areas were screened to identify children with high-level anxious symptoms. Ninety-one…

  18. Extending the Purposes of Science Education: Addressing Violence within Socio-Economic Disadvantaged Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castano, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Current discourses about science education show a wide concern towards humanisation and a more socio-cultural perspective of school science. They suggest that science education can serve diverse purposes and be responsive to social and environmental situations we currently face. However, these discourses and social approaches to science education…

  19. Women in Free Clinics: An Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life for Prevention and Health Education.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Myers, Kyl; Ashby, Jeanie; Trinh, Ha Ngoc; Nourian, Maziar M; Reel, Justine J

    2015-08-01

    Understanding gender influences on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is important to improve women's health when considering diseases that afflict women specifically. The target population of this study was uninsured female free clinic patients who are low socio-economic status and lack access to healthcare resources. Free clinics provide free or reduced fee healthcare to individuals who lack access to primary care and are socio-economically disadvantaged. While approximately half of free clinic patients are women, there is a paucity of comprehensive health-related data for female free clinic patients. US born English, non-US born English, and Spanish speaking female free clinic patients completed a self-administered survey using a standardized women's HRQoL measure in Fall 2014 (N = 389). Female free clinic patients reported lower HRQoL on all aspects of women's health compared to the US baseline scores, and were less likely to utilize preventive care including: mammograms, Pap smear, and HPV vaccination compared to the US general population. Spanish speakers reported a higher percentage of having had mammography and Pap smear, and heard about HPV compared to the other two groups. US born English speakers reported lower levels of HRQoL in vasomotor symptoms and sleep symptoms, and the lowest percentage of breast health and Pap smear screenings compared to non-US born English and Spanish speakers. Non-US born English speakers reported higher preference for female physician compared to US born English speakers and Spanish speakers. Free clinic female patients need preventative interventions and educational opportunities to improve their overall HRQoL. PMID:25708885

  20. Does social disadvantage over the life-course account for alcohol and tobacco use in Irish people? Birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Leavey, Gerard; Stansfeld, Stephen A.; Prince, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Few studies have examined how the settlement experiences of migrant parents might impact on the downstream adult health of second-generation minority ethnic children. We used prospective data to establish if childhood adversity relating to the settlement experiences of Irish-born parents might account for downstream adverse health-related behaviours in second-generation Irish respondents in adulthood. Design, setting and participants: Cohort data from the National Child Development Study, comprising 17 000 births from a single week in 1958, from Britain, were analysed. Respondents were followed to mid-life. Dependent variables were alcohol and tobacco use. The contribution of life-course experiences in accounting for health-related behaviours was examined. Findings: Relative to the rest of the cohort, the prevalence of harmful/hazardous alcohol use was elevated in early adulthood for second-generation men and women, although it reduced by age 42. Second-generation Irish men were more likely to report binge alcohol use (odds ratio 1.45; 95% confidence interval 0.99, 2.11; P = 0.05), and second-generation Irish women were more likely to smoke (odds ratio 1.67; 95% confidence interval 1.23, 2.23; P = 0.001), at mid-life. Childhood disadvantage partially mediated associations between second-generation Irish status and mid-life alcohol and tobacco use, although these were modest for associations with smoking in Irish women. Conclusions: The findings suggest mechanisms for the intergenerational ‘transmission’ of health disadvantage in migrant groups, across generations. More attention needs to focus on the public health legacy of inequalities transferring from one migrant generation to the next. PMID:24022216

  1. Married Women

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2008-03-26

    Broadcast Transcript: There's marital duplicity going on here in South Korea. Namely, secret bank accounts. Put together by women. Unbeknownst to their husbands. Apparently, more than 65% of married Korean women are salting away money that they save...

  2. Women's health

    MedlinePLUS

    Women's health refers to the branch of medicine that focuses on the treatment and diagnosis of diseases and ... Women's health includes a wide range of specialties and focus areas, such as: Birth control, sexually transmitted infections ( ...

  3. Effects of Gender and Ethnicity on Hispanic Women in the U.S. Navy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Rosenfeld

    1994-01-01

    Hispanic women in the U.S. Navy were surveyed to obtain data on demographics and attitudes. The results of the survey indicated that Hispanic women in the navy did not perceive themselves as “doubly disadvantaged,” as they have been portrayed in the civilian literature. There were few significant differences between Hispanics' and Whites' perceptions on equal opportunity and sexual harassment.

  4. Creative Business Ownership for Women. Final Report from July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Constance Q.; Poitier, Vera R.

    The Creative Business Ownership for Women Project was established at Valencia Community College (Florida) to provide displaced homemakers and single parents with the special help they need to achieve entrepreneurial success. During the course of the project, displaced homemakers, single parents, and rural disadvantaged women interested in owning a…

  5. Women and Academic Workloads: Career Slow Lane or Cul-de-Sac?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Lucinda; Barrett, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Career progression for women academics to higher levels is not in proportion to their representation within the profession. This paper looks at theories about this and relates them to current practices within universities for allocating work. The management of workloads can disadvantage women through a number of interactive factors. Interruptions…

  6. Low-income women in California may be at risk of inadequate folate intake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily R. Cena; Amy Block Joy; Karrie Heneman; Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr

    2007-01-01

    Folate plays a major role in prevent- ing neural tube defects in the devel- oping fetus, as well as in reducing the risks of cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer and some mental health problems. We assessed the folate intakes of socioeconomically disadvantaged women of childbear- ing age participating in California's Food Stamp Nutrition Education program. Of 195 women studied,

  7. Role of women in population.

    PubMed

    Srivasdava, T N

    Population control through voluntary adoption of family planning is emphasized in India's family planning policy. The 1981 census figures have not shown an arresting rate of population growth. The social and attitudinal barriers to promoting the concept of the small family are great where men and women are not exposed to new ideas. The target groups for family planning include the 75% of the population residing in rural areas. The literacy rate for women in rural areas in 1971 was 18.69. Motivation is difficult unless supported by systematic education. Women play an important role in the determination of family size. Participation in social and economic activities may help to promote small family size by meeting the necessary conditions of emotional and social fulfillment of women outside the family context. Adquate education for women in rural as well as urban areas can elucidate alternatives to childbearing and enable women to appreciate the need for and use of contraception. Employment opportunities enhance women's familial decision making power through the acquisition of an alternative social and economic role, which may help them to adopt birth control practices, space their children, and limit family size. Motivational schemes may change the attitudes of a small number of families, however, greater gains could be achieved through an investment in women's education and employment. PMID:12311983

  8. Emission constrained economic dispatch

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, R. (ESCA Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States))

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a methodology to include emission constraints in classical Economic Dispatch (ED), which contains an efficient weights estimation technique. Also, a partial closed form technique is presented to implement the Emission Constrained Economic Dispatch (ECED). A simple technique is proposed to identify the binding constraints. The methods proposed do not need any user-supplied tuning or conversion factors. Dispatch quality is not compromised, and any practical sized problem can be solved efficiently. The proposed methods have rapid and consistent convergence to the Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions. Different methods of including emissions as well as their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Sample test results are presented. The proposed two methodologies have potential for on-line implementation.

  9. Health Inequalities in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Lower Healthy Life Expectancy in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Areas

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa da Mota, Jurema; Damacena, Giseli Nogueira; Sardinha Pereira, Tatiana Guimarães

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated deprivation and inequalities in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy by location in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods. We conducted a health survey of 576 adults in 2006. Census tracts were stratified by income level and categorization as a slum. We determined health status by degree of functional limitation, according to the approach proposed by the World Health Organization. We calculated healthy life expectancies by Sullivan's method with abridged life table. Results. We found the worst indicators in the slum stratum. The life expectancy at birth of men living in the richest parts of the city was 12.8 years longer than that of men living in deprived areas. For both men and women older than age 65 years, healthy life expectancy was more than twice as high in the richest sector as in the slum sector. Conclusions. Our analysis detailed the excess burden of poor health experienced by disadvantaged populations of Rio de Janeiro. Policy efforts are needed to reduce social inequalities in health in this city, especially among the elderly. PMID:21233437

  10. Career Trajectories of Older Women: Implications for Career Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimrose, Jenny; McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    As work and employment transitions become more frequent and difficult, the demand for formal career guidance increases. Women are likely to experience structural labour market disadvantage and may benefit from formal support that is sympathetic to their particular needs. Yet the traditional psychological paradigms that dominate career guidance…

  11. Psychological Distress and Mortality: Are Women More Vulnerable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, Kenneth F.; Nuriddin, Tariqah A.

    2006-01-01

    Does psychological distress increase mortality risk? If it does, are women more vulnerable than men to the effect of distress on mortality? Drawing from cumulative disadvantage theory, these questions are addressed with data from a 20-year follow-up of a national sample of adults ages 25-74. Event history analyses were performed to examine…

  12. The Czech women in the labour market: a European comparison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie Valentova

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of the paper is to analyse the position of the Czech women in the labour market in a comparison to the EU-15 countries. The paper critically reviews three domains of female labour market participation: general characteristics of the female employment, work-life balance indicators, and disadvantages of the female labour force related to motherhood. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The

  13. Nibbled to Death by Ducks: The Accumulation of Disadvantage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Caroline E.

    2010-05-01

    One of the consequences of unconscious bias is the accumulation of advantage/disadvantage. Research has shown that over time, minor imbalances will accrue and eventually have major impacts regarding promotion, salary, prestige, and advancement to leadership positions. For example, an unconscious bias during an evaluation leading to an underestimate of performance will result in a lower success rate, which then feeds back into the next evaluation and the cycle repeats. How can we address this? We'll be discussing how to become informed and conscious of the problem, and we'll look at recommendations for developing and implementing departmental and institutional policies and practices aimed at increasing awareness and countering these accumulations of imbalances that impact us all.

  14. Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy in Spain: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, L; García-Gavín, J; Gilaberte, Y

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an option for the treatment of actinic keratosis, Bowen disease, and certain types of basal cell carcinoma. It is also used to treat various other types of skin condition, including inflammatory and infectious disorders. The main disadvantages of PDT are the time it takes to administer (both for the patient and for health professionals) and the pain associated with treatment. Daylight-mediated PDT has recently been reported to be an alternative to the conventional approach. Several studies have shown it to be similar in efficacy to and better tolerated than classic PDT for the treatment of mild to moderate actinic keratosis. Nevertheless, most of these studies are from northern Europe, and no data have been reported from southern Europe. The present article reviews the main studies published to date, presents the treatment protocol, and summarizes our experience with a group of treated patients. PMID:24726043

  15. Overlapping and distinct representations of advantageous and disadvantageous inequality.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjun; Calder, Andrew J; Mobbs, Dean

    2014-07-01

    Advantageous inequality (AI) aversion, or paying at a personal cost to achieve equal reward distribution, represents a unique feature of human behavior. Here, we show that individuals have strong preferences for fairness in both disadvantageous (DI) and advantageous inequality (AI) situations, such that they alter others' payoff at a personal financial cost. At the neural level, we found that both types of inequality activated the putamen, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula, regions implicated in motivation. Individual difference analyses found that those who spent more money to increase others' payoff had stronger activity in putamen when they encountered AI and less functional connectivity between putamen and both orbitofrontal cortex and anterior insula. Conversely, those who spent more money to reduce others' payoff had stronger activity in amygdala in response to DI and less functional connectivity between amygdala and ventral anterior cingulate cortex. These dissociations suggest that both types of inequality are processed by similar brain areas, yet modulated by different neural pathways. PMID:25050425

  16. Vacuum-assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass: advantages and disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Filho, Élio Barreto; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; da Costa, Loredana Nilkenes Gomes; Antunes, Nilson

    2014-01-01

    Systematic review of vacuum assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass, demonstrating its advantages and disadvantages, by case reports and evidence about its effects on microcirculation. We conducted a systematic search on the period 1997-2012, in the databases PubMed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO. Of the 70 selected articles, 26 were included in the review. Although the vacuum assisted drainage has significant potential for complications and requires appropriate technology and professionalism, prevailed in literature reviewed the concept that vacuum assisted drainage contributed in reducing the rate of transfusions, hemodilutions, better operative field, no significant increase in hemolysis, reduced complications surgical, use of lower prime and of smaller diameter cannulas. PMID:25140478

  17. Marine protected area improves yield without disadvantaging fishers.

    PubMed

    Kerwath, Sven E; Winker, Henning; Götz, Albrecht; Attwood, Colin G

    2013-01-01

    Potential fishery benefits of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are widely acknowledged, yet seldom demonstrated, as fishery data series that straddle MPA establishment are seldom available. Here we postulate, based on a 15-year time series of nation-wide, spatially referenced catch and effort data, that the establishment of the Goukamma MPA (18?km alongshore; 40?km²) benefited the adjacent fishery for roman (Chrysoblephus laticeps), a South African endemic seabream. Roman-directed catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) in the vicinity of the new MPA immediately increased, contradicting trends across this species' distribution. The increase continued after 5 years, the time lag expected for larval export, effectively doubling the pre-MPA CPUE after 10 years. We find no indication that establishing the MPA caused a systematic drop in total catch or increased travel distances for the fleet. Our results provide rare empirical evidence of rapidly increasing catch rates after MPA implementation without measurable disadvantages for fishers. PMID:23962973

  18. Resistance of Aedes aegypti to temephos and adaptive disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Morgana Michele Cavalcanti de Souza Leal; Henriques, Alleksandra Dias da Silva; Leandro, Renata da Silva; Aguiar, Dalvanice Leal; Beserra, Eduardo Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the resistance of Aedes aegypti to temephos Fersol 1G (temephos 1% w/w) associated with the adaptive disadvantage of insect populations in the absence of selection pressure. METHODS A diagnostic dose of 0.28 mg a.i./L and doses between 0.28 mg a.i./L and 1.40 mg a.i./L were used. Vector populations collected between 2007 and 2008 in the city of Campina Grande, state of Paraíba, were evaluated. To evaluate competition in the absence of selection pressure, insect populations with initial frequencies of 20.0%, 40.0%, 60.0%, and 80.0% resistant individuals were produced and subjected to the diagnostic dose for two months. Evaluation of the development of aquatic and adult stages allowed comparison of the life cycles in susceptible and resistant populations and construction of fertility life tables. RESULTS No mortality was observed in Ae. aegypti populations subjected to the diagnostic dose of 0.28 mg a.i./L. The decreased mortality observed in populations containing 20.0%, 40.0%, 60.0%, and 80.0% resistant insects indicates that temephos resistance is unstable in the absence of selection pressure. A comparison of the life cycles indicated differences in the duration and viability of the larval phase, but no differences were observed in embryo development, sex ratio, adult longevity, and number of eggs per female. CONCLUSIONS The fertility life table results indicated that some populations had reproductive disadvantages compared with the susceptible population in the absence of selection pressure, indicating the presence of a fitness cost in populations resistant to temephos. PMID:25372168

  19. Economics Undergraduate BSc Economics

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    ;Undergraduate Economics Economics helps us answer questions, such as how should the banking system be regulated assessment period. Our programmes of study are modular, consisting of self- contained units, taught (measured through the number of credits awarded) is proportional to the number of learning hours, which

  20. Women's rising status. Shandong province.

    PubMed

    Wang, X

    1994-03-01

    Improvements in the status of women are credited with the recent success of family planning promotion efforts in China's Xiji Village (Shanting District, Shandong Province). This small mountain village had a per capita annual income (US$27) below the national average ad a birth rate of 33/1000 population in 1984. When the District Family Planning Association targeted the village for programmatic intervention in 188, there was strong resistance to family planning. On the assumption that villagers would not accept family planning until they were convinced of its economic advantages, the Association combined poverty alleviation activities with contraceptives promotion. Small enterprises and workshops were set up, including processing mills to make noodles from beans and potato starch, and two-thirds of the village's unemployed women got jobs that paid an average of US$26/month at these mills. Income generating activities such as raising poultry or growing produce in backyard gardens were designed for women with too many children to work outside the home. In addition, the Women's Association at Feicheng City has selected more than 3500 economically active, family planning acceptors who serve as models to 15-16 women of childbearing age. As women experience the social, economic, and psychological advantages of income generation, they tend to voluntarily adopt family planning and to abandon their previous preference for sons. PMID:12287768

  1. Violence against women and suicide risk: The neglected impact of same-sex sexual behaviour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brigitte Lhomond; Marie-Josèphe Saurel-Cubizolles

    2006-01-01

    We used data from the National Survey on Violence against Women in France carried out in 2000 on a representative sample of 6970 women to compare the social characteristics of women who had sex with women (WSW) and women who had sex only with men (WSM). The WSW were more likely to be of a high socio-economic level and living

  2. Women Veterans Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Care » Women Veterans Health Care Women Veterans Health Care Menu Menu Womens Health Women Veterans Health Care ... more » MyHealtheVet LGBT Awareness Role Models Women Veterans Health Care Did you know that women are the fastest ...

  3. 75 FR 53559 - Women's Equality Day, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ...women around the world still lack access to basic education and economic opportunity, face gender-based violence...ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, or socioeconomic status. If we stay true to our founding ideals and...

  4. The impact of economic sanctions on health and human rights in Haiti, 1991-1994.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, E; Garfield, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This report examines the impact of an economic embargo from 1991 to 1994 on health, well-being, and human rights in Haiti. METHODS: Data from surveillance systems for nutrition, reportable diseases, and hospital diagnoses were combined with survey data and interviews with affected women, governmental representatives, diplomats, and staff of nongovernmental organizations. RESULTS: Changes included declining income, rising unemployment, poorer nutrition, declining infant mortality, rising mortality among 1- to 4-year-olds, decreased attention to children's well-being and education, and family breakdown. Survival strategies among poor Haitians included changed dietary habits, informal-sector economic activity, moving in with relatives, selling domestic goods, increased informal unions among couples, decreased school attendance, and indentured servitude among children. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of economic sanctions in Haiti resulted in extensive violations of rights; the impact was greatest on the most disadvantaged Haitians. Many Haitian and international supporters of democracy were unaware of the extensive negative impact that sanctions could have. The impact continues now, 5 years after sanctions ended. Modified policies reduced some of the burden of sanctions, and international assistance prevented what otherwise might have become a humanitarian disaster during sanctions. PMID:10511830

  5. The prevalence and correlates of single cigarette selling among urban disadvantaged drug users in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl; Murray, Laura; Smith, Katherine M Clegg; Cohen, Joanna; Knowlton, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Selling of single cigarettes, also known as loosies, is a public health concern. Loosies allow for those with fewer resources to buy cigarettes without having to purchase a pack. Selling of loosies may cue smoking behaviors. In the US, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations have high rates of smoking and illicit drug use and the selling of loosies appears to be linked to the urban informal economy. We examined the proportion and frequency of cigarette selling and roles in the informal economy associated with selling loosies among a sample of urban drug users. Methods There were 801 participants, recruited by community outreach, assessed at baseline, who were enrolled in an HIV prevention intervention for drug users. Results Most (89%) smoked cigarettes in the prior 30 days, of whom 92% smoked daily. Self-reported selling of cigarettes was common with 58% reporting that they had sold cigarettes within the last six months; 20.4% reported selling cigarettes a few times a week and 7.4% reported daily selling of cigarettes. In a stepwise regression model, four sources of income were associated with frequent cigarette selling: providing street security (OR=2.214, 95% CI 1.177–4.164), selling food stamps (OR=1.461, 95% CI 1.003–2.126), pawning items (OR=2.15, 95% CI 1.475–3.135), and selling drugs (OR=1.634, 95% CI 1.008–2.648). Conclusion There is a high rate of selling loosies among urban substance users. The wide availability of loosies may promote smoking. Smoking cessation programs with drug treatment and economic development programs may help to reduce economic pressures to sell loosies. PMID:23578589

  6. Community-based model for preventing tobacco use among disadvantaged adolescents in urban slums of India.

    PubMed

    Arora, Monika; Tewari, Abha; Tripathy, Vikal; Nazar, Gaurang P; Juneja, Neeru S; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Reddy, K Srinath

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco consumption in multiple forms presents an emerging, significant and growing threat to the health of Indian adolescents, especially those from low socio-economic communities. Research in two phases was undertaken among economically disadvantaged adolescents in two urban slums of Delhi. In phase I, qualitative research methods such as focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were used to explore and understand the determinants influencing tobacco use among these adolescents. Prevalence of tobacco use was higher among boys than girls. Adolescents reported using tobacco in multiple forms, chewing tobacco being the most popular. Peer pressure, easy availability and affordability were important reasons associated with tobacco initiation and continued use. Though they had some knowledge about the harmful effects of tobacco, this was not sufficient to motivate them to abstain or quit. The community-based intervention model developed on the basis of the results of phase I was evaluated in phase II in a demonstration study with two slum communities. One was treated as the intervention and the other as control. A significant difference in current use of tobacco was observed between the study groups (p = 0.048), with the intervention group showing a reduction in use, compared with an increase in use among the control group. Post-intervention, the intervention group reported significantly lower fresh uptake (0.3%) of tobacco use compared with the control group (1.7%). No significant change was found for quit rate (p = 0.282) in the two groups. Community-based interventions can be effective in preventing adolescents from initiating tobacco use in a low-resource setting such as India. PMID:20190265

  7. The Economics Department of Economics

    E-print Network

    The Economics Initiative Department of Economics #12;Economics at LSE The Department of Economics is the top ranked economics department in Europe and among the top 12 worldwide. It is one of the largest economics departments in the world, with over 60 faculty and 1,000 students and a department which makes

  8. Employment Gains and Wage Declines: The Erosion of Black Women’s Relative Wages Since 1980

    PubMed Central

    PETTIT, BECKY; EWERT, STEPHANIE

    2009-01-01

    Public policy initiatives in the 1950s and 1960s, including Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity law, helped mitigate explicit discrimination in pay, and the expansion of higher education and training programs have advanced the employment fortunes of many American women. By the early 1980s, some scholars proclaimed near equity in pay between black and white women, particularly among young and highly skilled workers. More recent policy initiatives and labor market conditions have been arguably less progressive for black women’s employment and earnings: through the 1980s, 1990s, and the first half of the 2000s, the wage gap between black and white women widened considerably. Using data from the Current Population Survey Merged Outgoing Rotation Group (CPS-MORG), this article documents the racial wage gap among women in the United States from 1979 to 2005. We investigate how demographic and labor market conditions influence employment and wage inequality among black and white women over the period. Although shifts in labor supply influence the magnitude of the black-white wage gap among women, structural disadvantages faced by black women help explain the growth in the racial wage gap. PMID:19771940

  9. Women and Rural Development in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Lin

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the important roles played by rural women in the development of China's local economy and provides an overview of the impact of the ongoing economic reform on their lives. The paper examines the active participation of women in the growing market economy, pinpoints the challenges that they confront, and discusses the function of non-formal education in rural

  10. Participation of Women: The Reality in 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe Forum, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of 10 articles presents perspectives on the issue of female political participation. "The Patriarchy Takes a Ribbing" (Benoite Groult) looks at women as the primary agents for economic and political change. "Women and Political Power in Europe" (Mariette Sineau) considers variations in female responsibility and status in…

  11. Puerto Rican Women as Workers and Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez, Blanca, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theme issue of the "Centro Bulletin" highlights recent studies by and about employed Puerto Rican and Latina women. "La mujer en el Puerto Rico del siglo XIX" (O. Jimenez de Wagenheim), in Spanish, reviews the contributions of women to Puerto Rican economic, political, and social life during the nineteenth century. "Notas sobre el desarrollo…

  12. [Women in the Labor Market. Remarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Collis N.

    From its position in the Office of the Secretary of Labor, the Women's Bureau participates in departmental policy making and program planning and serves as a coordinating body in the Department of Labor for programs affecting women. Among its activities are the following: initiating and supporting research in economic, social, and legislative…

  13. Popcorn Venus: Women, Movies & the American Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Marjorie

    The history of the film industry is in many ways a reflection of the thwarted emergence in society of feminism and full equal civil rights for women. Commercial films have traditionally relied upon the charm and sexual allure of actresses to assure economic success at the box office. Victorian mores heavily influenced the way women were treated in…

  14. Women's impetus in community and health development.

    PubMed

    Roestam, K S

    1994-01-01

    Women in Indonesia are playing an increasingly large part in economic activity and community development. Moreover, they are making a significant beneficial impact on the nation's health, most notably, perhaps, by helping to secure financial resources. The present article describes some of the ways in which women are working to improve the well-being of the Indonesian people. PMID:8141972

  15. African Women in the Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Explores recent studies in anthropology, art history, and archeology on African women's art from a feminist theoretical perspective. Relates women's arts to several sociological and economic factors and suggests new avenues of exploration, especially in the face of urbanization and modernization. (CJS)

  16. Deterrents to women taking computer science courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SYLVIA BEYER; KRISTINA RYNES; SUSAN HALLER

    2004-01-01

    The United States faces a shortage of computer scientists. Despite the current economic downturn, the most recent estimate indicates a labor force shortage of IT professionals. The shortage of IT professionals, and especially of computer scientists, provides impetus for increasing the representation of women in computer science (CS). We examine why so few students, and particularly few women, choose to

  17. Towards a Framework for Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, May

    1998-01-01

    The health of women involves their emotional, social, cultural, spiritual, and physical well-being, and is influenced by social, political, and economic factors, as well as by biology. This definition of women's health provides a framework for a relevant and effective approach to patient education, health promotion, and disease prevention.…

  18. [Advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing hospital microbiological testings].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Masaru

    2011-10-01

    In Japan, laws and ordinances were enforced to relax the regulation of the clinical laboratory setting in hospitals by revising the law of medical institutions in 2001. For this reason, outsourcing hospital microbiological testing, particularly by medium- or small-sized hospitals, was encouraged. The advantage of outsourcing microbiological testing is promotion of an efficient hospital management by cost saving. In contrast, the disadvantages are as follows: deterioration of specimen quality by extension of transportation time, delay in reporting by an independent laboratory compared with that by a hospital-based laboratory; this report is generally obtained within 1 or 2 days, difficulty and lack of communication between the laboratory staff and physician, and deterioration of the value of the microbiology report and the quality of the infection control system in a hospital. In addition to performing profit-related maintenance, independent laboratories should strive hard to maintain the same quality as that of a laboratory registered in a hospital. Furthermore, the new role of independent laboratories demands them to have a system allowing instant communication of information regarding the crisis control of infectious diseases to a hospital. PMID:22184876

  19. Stellar Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Maria

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1900s, researchers at the Harvard College Observatory conducted an astonishing amount of astronomical research. A handful of women were integral to this research. Describes the professional lives and scientific findings of five of these women scientists at Harvard to inspire students. Classroom activities are included. (PVD)

  20. AMERICAN WOMEN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Commission on the Status of Women, Washington, DC.

    FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COMMISSION AND SEVEN COMMITTEES WHO ASSESSED THE STATUS OF WOMEN ARE REPORTED. THE COMMITTEES MADE RECOMMENDATIONS IN THE AREAS--WOMEN'S EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, HOME AND COMMUNITY SERVICES, PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT (THAT UNDER FEDERAL CONTRACTS), EMPLOYMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, LABOR STANDARDS, FEDERAL SOCIAL…

  1. Empowering Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Aurelia

    2012-01-01

    Empowering Women is a traveling exhibition of folk art that focuses on ten cooperatives from four continents and ten countries. The exhibition is a window into the ways that cooperatives empower women to: (1) preserve and reinvigorate their country's traditional arts; (2) generate steady livelihoods for their families; (3) send their children to…

  2. Work Ethics of Students Who Are Disadvantaged Enrolled in Vocational Education. Analysis of Personal Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraska, Marie F.

    1990-01-01

    Results of the Meaning and Values of Work Scale administered to 100 vocational students uncovered differences in the perceptions of work and work value orientation of disadvantaged vocational students. Implications of the study are that vocational teachers should consider gender when planning for work ethics instruction for disadvantaged students.…

  3. Disadvantages of Minority Group Membership: The Perspective of a "Nondeprived" Minority Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Abraham D.

    1975-01-01

    Utilizing a sample of Jewish undergraduate students, evidence is presented to indicate that a minority group which is not deprived materially can nonetheless perceive itself as receiving disadvantages from its minority group status. The most frequently perceived disadvantages (as well as advantages) are enumerated and discussed. (EH)

  4. The Low-Frequency Encoding Disadvantage: Word Frequency Affects Processing Demands

    E-print Network

    Reder, Lynne

    The Low-Frequency Encoding Disadvantage: Word Frequency Affects Processing Demands Rachel A. Diana-frequency disadvantage during encoding. That is, low-frequency words require more processing resources to be encoded episodically than high-frequency words. Under encoding conditions in which processing resources are limited

  5. Problems and Issues in the Counseling of the Disabled Disadvantaged Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Harvey J.

    In the counseling phase which is imbedded in the global vocational rehabilitation process, the primary challenge, in dealing with the disabled disadvantaged client, is viewed as being the disadvantagement rather than the disability per se. A multitude of factors and interacting clusters of variables that influence the counseling process with these…

  6. Do Disadvantaged Students Have Equal Access to Effective Teaching? NCEE Study Snapshot. NCEE 2014-4001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study snapshot offers a summary of "Access to Effective Teaching for Disadvantaged Students. NCEE 2014-4001," the first report from a study initiated by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences to examine access to effective teaching for disadvantaged students in 29 diverse school districts. The study…

  7. Targeting Disadvantage among Young Children in the Republic of Ireland: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    It has been recognised for some time that the effects of disadvantage are in place early in a child's life, and early intervention has become an established element of efforts to alleviate such effects. This paper describes the range of interventions that exist to address disadvantage among children in the birth to six age range in Republic of…

  8. What Helps Children Eat Well? A Qualitative Exploration of Resilience among Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lauren K.; Veitch, Jenny; Ball, Kylie

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that persons of low socioeconomic position consume generally a less healthy diet. Key determinants of unhealthy eating among disadvantaged individuals include aspects of the family and external environment. Much less is known about family and environmental determinants of healthy eating among social disadvantaged children. The aim…

  9. Information Services to the Disadvantaged Person: A Challenge for Information Professionals in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butdisuwan, Sujin

    This paper considers the provision of library and information services to disadvantaged persons in Thailand and focuses on the need to provide appropriate staff training to library staff working with these groups. The results of a number of specific projects are used as illustrative examples. The paper begins with an overview of the disadvantaged

  10. Multiple Levels of Social Disadvantage and Links to Obesity in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hedwig; Harris, Kathleen M.; Lee, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Background: The rise in adolescent obesity has become a public health concern, especially because of its impact on disadvantaged youth. This article examines the role of disadvantage at the family-, peer-, school-, and neighborhood-level, to determine which contexts are related to obesity in adolescence and young adulthood. Methods: We analyzed…

  11. Neighborhood Disadvantage, Residential Stability, and Perceptions of Instrumental Support among New Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Kristin; Harknett, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing survey (N = 4,211), this study examines neighborhood disadvantage and perceptions of instrumental support among mothers with young children. The authors find that (a) living in a disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with less instrumental support, particularly financial…

  12. Hidden Educators and the Seduction of College Students: Higher Education's Competitive Disadvantage. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, James L.

    This paper suggests that undergraduate higher education is at a severe competitive disadvantage vis-a-vis other socializing and educating agencies in society and proposes some strategies to compensate for this disadvantage. First, the paper notes difficulties with mandated assessment as a major means of educational improvement. It then identifies…

  13. Why is the Socially Disadvantaged Child Retarded? A Rationale and New Concept of Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    Volumes have been written on the socially disadvantaged. Two theories related to the disadvantaged have evolved: the first is the "deprivation theory" which stresses the importance of an enriched environment, during the early years, on the cognitive and emotional development of the child; the second is "the cumulative intellectual deficit theory,"…

  14. An experimental demonstration that early-life competitive disadvantage accelerates telomere loss

    PubMed Central

    Nettle, Daniel; Monaghan, Pat; Gillespie, Robert; Brilot, Ben; Bedford, Thomas; Bateson, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Adverse experiences in early life can exert powerful delayed effects on adult survival and health. Telomere attrition is a potentially important mechanism in such effects. One source of early-life adversity is the stress caused by competitive disadvantage. Although previous avian experiments suggest that competitive disadvantage may accelerate telomere attrition, they do not clearly isolate the effects of competitive disadvantage from other sources of variation. Here, we present data from an experiment in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) that used cross-fostering to expose siblings to divergent early experience. Birds were assigned either to competitive advantage (being larger than their brood competitors) or competitive disadvantage (being smaller than their brood competitors) between days 3 and 12 post-hatching. Disadvantage did not affect weight gain, but it increased telomere attrition, leading to shorter telomere length in disadvantaged birds by day 12. There were no effects of disadvantage on oxidative damage as measured by plasma lipid peroxidation. We thus found strong evidence that early-life competitive disadvantage can accelerate telomere loss. This could lead to faster age-related deterioration and poorer health in later life. PMID:25411450

  15. Physical Fitness and Academic Performance in Primary School Children with and without a Social Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Greeff, J. W.; Hartman, E.; Mullender-Wijnsma, M. J.; Bosker, R. J.; Doolaard, S.; Visscher, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the differences between children with a low socioeconomic status [socially disadvantaged children (SDC)] and children without this disadvantage (non-SDC) on physical fitness and academic performance. In addition, this study determined the association between physical fitness and academic performance, and investigated the…

  16. Expanding Services to Young Disadvantaged Adults. Public Library Training Institutes Library Service Guide No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Barbara

    After descriptions of some problems encountered by disadvantaged youths and some general services libraries can provide, specific guidelines for library services to young disadvantaged adults are given. These include services both inside and outside the library: the selection of staff to work with the young adults, cooperation between the library…

  17. The Tax (Dis)Advantage Of A Firm Issuing Options On Its Own Stock

    E-print Network

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    The Tax (Dis)Advantage Of A Firm Issuing Options On Its Own Stock Robert L. McDonald First draft with implicit borrowing--such as put sales and call purchases--are tax-disadvantaged relative to the equivalent--such as compensation calls--are tax-advantaged. We also show that firms are better off from a tax perspective issuing

  18. 7 CFR 761.208 - Target participation rates for socially disadvantaged groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...disadvantaged groups. (b) FO loans based on ethnicity or race. The FO loan target participation rate based on ethnicity or race in each: (1) State is...disadvantaged groups. (c) OL loans based on ethnicity or race. The OL loan target...

  19. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  20. Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa C.; Krontiras, Helen; Pisu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Racial disparities in breast cancer treatment among Medicare beneficiaries have been documented. This study aimed to determine whether racial disparities exist among white and black female Medicare beneficiaries in Alabama, an economically disadvantaged U.S. state. Methods: From a linked dataset of breast cancer cases from the Alabama Statewide Cancer Registry and fee-for-service claims from Medicare, we identified 2,097 white and black females, aged 66 years and older, who were diagnosed with stages 1–3 breast cancer from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2002. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to determine whether there were racial differences in initiating and completing National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice guideline-specific treatment. Results: Sixty-two percent of whites and 64.7% of blacks had mastectomy (p=0.27); 34.6% of whites and 30.2% of blacks had breast conserving surgery (BCS) (p=0.12). Among those who had BCS, 76.8% of whites and 83.3% of blacks started adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.33) and they equally completed adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.29). For women with tumors over 1 centimeter, whites and blacks were equally likely to start (16.1% of whites and 18.3% of black; p=0.34) and complete (50.6% of whites and 46.3% of black; p=0.87) adjuvant chemotherapy. There were still no differences after adjusting for confounders using GEE. However, differences were observed by area-level socioeconomic status (SES), with lower SES residents more likely to receive a mastectomy (odds ratio [OR]=1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.57) and initiate radiation after BCS (OR=2.24; 95% CI: 1.28–3.93). Conclusions: No racial differences were found in guideline-specific breast cancer treatment or treatment completion, but there were differences by SES. Future studies should explore reasons for SES differences and whether similar results hold in other economically disadvantaged U.S. states. PMID:24350590

  1. The Effects of School Curriculum on Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasso, John T.

    The two largest programs of federally-funded vocational education for women are home economics and office programs, which suggests both sex-role stereotyping and occupational segregation. Investigated are correlates and consequences of high school curriculum on young women in curricular choice or assignment, persistence in schooling, and economic,…

  2. Socioeconomic Disadvantage as a Social Determinant of Teen Childbearing in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Carter, Marion; Snead, M. Christine; Kourtis, Athena P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We reviewed the literature focused on socioeconomic influences on teen childbearing and suggested directions for future research and practice related to this important indicator of teen sexual health. Methods We conducted an electronic search of Medline, ERIC, PsychLit, and Sociological Abstracts databases for articles published from January 1995 to November 2011. Selected articles from peer-reviewed journals included original quantitative analyses addressing socioeconomic influences on first birth among teen women in the U.S. Articles were abstracted for key information, ranked for quality according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines, assessed for bias, and synthesized. Results We selected articles with a range of observational study designs. Risk for bias varied across studies. All 12 studies that considered socioeconomic factors as influences on teen childbearing (vs. moderators or mediators of other effects) reported at least one statistically significant association relating low socioeconomic status, underemployment, low income, low education levels, neighborhood disadvantage, neighborhood physical disorder, or neighborhood-level income inequality to teen birth. Few reports included any associations contradicting this pattern. Conclusions This review suggests that unfavorable socioeconomic conditions experienced at the community and family levels contribute to the high teen birth rate in the U.S. Future research into social determinants of sexual health should include multiple levels of measurement whenever possible. Root causes of teen childbearing should be evaluated in various populations and contexts. Interventions that address socioeconomic influences at multiple levels could positively affect large numbers of teens and help eliminate disparities in teen childbearing. PMID:23450881

  3. Family and school socioeconomic disadvantage: interactive influences on adolescent dating violence victimization.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Aubrey L; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Herring, Amy H; Schoenbach, Victor J

    2009-06-01

    Although low socioeconomic status has been positively associated with adult partner violence, its relationship to adolescent dating violence remains unclear. Further, few studies have examined the relationship between contextual disadvantage and adolescent dating violence, or the interactive influences of family and contextual disadvantage. Guided by social disorganization theory, relative deprivation theory, and gendered resource theory, we analyzed data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1994-1996) to explore how family and school disadvantage relate to dating violence victimization. Psychological and minor physical victimization were self-reported by adolescents in up to six heterosexual romantic or sexual relationships. Family and school disadvantage were based on a principal component analysis of socioeconomic indicators reported by adolescents and parents. In weighted multilevel random effects models, between-school variability in dating violence victimization was proportionately small but substantive: 10% for male victimization and 5% for female victimization. In bivariate analyses, family disadvantage was positively related to victimization for both males and females; however, school disadvantage was only related to males' physical victimization. In models adjusted for race/ethnicity, relative age within the school, and mean school age, neither family nor school disadvantage remained related to males' victimization. For females, family disadvantage remained significantly positively associated with victimization, but was modified by school disadvantage: family disadvantage was more strongly associated with dating violence victimization in more advantaged schools. Findings support gendered resource theory, and suggest that status differentials between females and their school context may increase their vulnerability to dating violence victimization. PMID:19375207

  4. Grad*Star (A Women's Educational Equity Act Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Michael

    This report discusses the proposed Grad*Star Program (a Women's Educational Equity Act Program) to deal with the extremely serious dropout program in Northern Kentucky. Housed at the University of Kentucky, it examines such factors as poor economic conditions, large numbers of women and households headed by women that exist below the poverty…

  5. Women's Studies Sourcebook: A Comprehensive, Classified Bibliography of Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Judith D., Comp.

    Over 1,000 entries are presented in this bibliography of resources about women. Subject categories include the following: abortion; academia; art; biography; black women; business, banking, and economics; crime; day care; education; employment; health; history; Jewish women; lesbianism; literary works; medicine; music; national studies; police…

  6. Using the Women's Community Education Approach to Deliver Community Employment Training: A Case Study from Longford Women's Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lorne; Dowd, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The recent economic downturn and surge in unemployment has focused attention on education and training as a strategic response to Ireland's socio-economic crisis. However, that attention has been concentrated on training through statutory institutions, particularly FAS and the VECs. Longford Women's Link, a Women's Community Education centre in Co…

  7. 77 FR 57180 - Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ...The Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy (ACIEP...issues and challenges in international economic policy. The meeting will examine U.S.-Egypt relations. Subcommittee reports will...Subcommittee on Women in International Economic Policy, and...

  8. 78 FR 2709 - Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ...concerning issues and challenges in international economic policy. The meeting will...the Subcommittee on Women in International Economic Policy, and the Stakeholder...Office of Economic Policy Analysis and Public Diplomacy,...

  9. 78 FR 24784 - Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ...concerning issues and challenges in international economic policy. The meeting will...the Subcommittee on Women in International Economic Policy, and the Stakeholder...Office of Economic Policy Analysis and Public Diplomacy,...

  10. Stress and distress in migration: problems and resources of Turkish women in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Mirdal, G M

    1984-01-01

    Data collected through interviews with 72 Turkish female immigrants to Denmark show that migration and the inevitable confrontation with an unfamiliar cultural mileu, create several stress producing situations, which they are unable to cope due to their multiple disadvantage of being poor, uneducated, alien and female. Turkish women began arriving in Denmark after 1973, in order to join male members of their families, when Denmark began experiencing economic recession and rising unemployment. This was responsible for the lukewarm reception they faced in their host country, even from their own relatives. A feeling of uprootedness is common in these women, who, leaving behind the security of their their own society, are constantly exposed to behavior patterns that appear to be in sharp contrast to their own. An unfamiliarity with the implicit structure of the society and rules of conduct can be threatening. Having a job outside the home creates the double burden of working to earn a living and having to take full responsibility for children and the household. On the other hand, not having a job creates an excess of leisure time, due to the availability of time saving gadgets, which is spent indoors with no meanigful activities. Lack of mobility compounds the situation. While proximity to other Turks inbitits freedom for fear of criticism, staying away brings loneliness. Changing concepts of sex roles can be disruptive, especially when roles they are brought up to believe are theirs, are no longer needed. As accompanying wives, they are excessively dependent on their husbands, and are more isolated and overwoked than they would have been in their homeland. All these factors help render the women extremely powerless. The women interviewed attributed their complaints, physical or emotional, to their state as immigrants. Women's complaints, especially if they are psychological in nature, lead to the danger of the women being labelled mentally ill. Despite their general low status, these women seemed determined to solve their problems, and thus had strength and resources as well, arising out of, among other factors, the knowledge of Turkish girls that, because of their sex, they have to be prepared to make adjustments. PMID:12340241

  11. Sex Trafficking of Women and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Neha A; Nour, Nawal M

    2013-01-01

    Sex trafficking involves some form of forced or coerced sexual exploitation that is not limited to prostitution, and has become a significant and growing problem in both the United States and the larger global community. The costs to society include the degradation of human and women’s rights, poor public health, disrupted communities, and diminished social development. Victims of sex trafficking acquire adverse physical and psychological health conditions and social disadvantages. Thus, sex trafficking is a critical health issue with broader social implications that requires both medical and legal attention. Healthcare professionals can work to improve the screening, identification, and assistance of victims of sex trafficking in a clinical setting and help these women and girls access legal and social services. PMID:23687554

  12. Vulnerable women and neo-liberal globalization: debt burdens undermine women's health in the global South.

    PubMed

    Jaggar, Alison M

    2002-01-01

    Contemporary processes of globalization have been accompanied by a serious deterioration in the health of many women across the world. Particularly disturbing is the drastic decline in the health status of many women in the global South, as well as some women in the global North. This paper argues that the health vulnerability of women in the global South is inseparable from their political and economic vulnerability. More specifically, it links the deteriorating health of many Southern women with the neo-liberal economic policies that characterize contemporary economic globalization and argues that this structure is sustained by the heavy burden of debt repayments imposed on many Southern countries. In conclusion, it argues that many Southern debt obligations are not morally binding because they are not democratically legitimate. PMID:12546163

  13. Does possession of assets increase women's participation in reproductive decision-making? Perceptions of Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Omeje, Joachim C; Oshi, Sarah N; Oshi, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    This study is based on a population-based, descriptive questionnaire survey, the objective of which was to elicit the perceptions of women in south-eastern Nigeria on whether possession of economic/household assets by women enhanced their capacity to negotiate reproductive issues with their husbands. The findings show that the respondents believed that possession of economic/household assets by women in their communities might not necessarily increase their negotiation power in their reproductive decision-making. Other factors tend to attenuate the effects of women's possession of economic/household assets on their reproductive bargaining power. Notable among these may be social norms that implicitly arrogate control of the assets owned by the conjugal couple to the man, even when they are bought by the women. Planners of reproductive health intervention projects, policy-makers and researchers need to be aware of such sociocultural specific phenomena, which do not fit with widely held international beliefs. PMID:20846467

  14. Poverty, Inequality, and Discrimination as Sources of Depression among U.S. Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle, Deborah; Doucet, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Poverty, inequality, and discrimination endanger women's well-being. Poverty is a consistent predictor of depression in women. Economic inequalities relate to reduced life expectancy and various negative physical health consequences. Discrimination maintains inequalities, lessens economic security, and exposes women to unmerited contempt.…

  15. Divorce and women's risk of health insurance loss.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health insurance changes after divorce. Our estimates suggest that roughly 115,000 American women lose private health insurance annually in the months following divorce and that roughly 65,000 of these women become uninsured. The loss of insurance coverage we observe is not just a short-term disruption. Women's rates of insurance coverage remain depressed for more than two years after divorce. Insurance loss may compound the economic losses women experience after divorce and contribute to as well as compound previously documented health declines following divorce. PMID:23147653

  16. DIVORCE AND WOMEN'S RISK OF HEALTH INSURANCE LOSS*

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health insurance changes after divorce. Our estimates suggest that roughly 115,000 American women lose private health insurance annually in the months following divorce and that roughly 65,000 of these women become uninsured. The loss of insurance coverage we observe is not just a short-term disruption. Women's rates of insurance coverage remain depressed for more than two years after divorce. Insurance loss may compound the economic losses women experience after divorce, and contribute to as well as compound previously documented health declines following divorce. PMID:23147653

  17. Social change and women's health.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Peggy; Worts, Diana; McMunn, Anne; Sacker, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Over the past five decades, the organization of women's lives has changed dramatically. Throughout the industrialized world, paid work and family biographies have been altered as the once-dominant role of homemaker has given way to the role of secondary, dual, or even primary wage-earner. The attendant changes represent a mix of gains and losses for women, in which not all women have benefited (or suffered) equally. But little is known about the health consequences. This article addresses that gap. It develops a "situated biographies" model to conceptualize how life course change may influence women's health. The model stresses the role of time, both as individual aging and as the anchoring of lives in particular historical periods. "Situating" biographies in this way highlights two key features of social change in women's lives: the ambiguous implications for the health of women as a group, and the probable connections to growing social and economic disparities in health among them. This approach lays the groundwork for more integrated and productive population-based research about how historical transformations may affect women's health. PMID:24066418

  18. A fifty-year production and economic assessment of common property-based management of marine living common resources: A case study for the women divers communities in Jeju, South Korea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jae-Young Ko; Glenn A. Jones; Moon-Soo Heo; Young-Su Kang; Sang-Hyuck Kang

    2010-01-01

    We examined the conditions of successful common property-based management for coastal marine living resources, using a case of historically and anthropologically well established women divers communities on Jeju Island, South Korea, focusing on their decentralized work rules and production records. Due to their tight social network and work rule, the women divers have harvested coastal marine living resources with limited

  19. Behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Camerer, Colin F

    2014-09-22

    Behavioral economics uses evidence from psychology and other social sciences to create a precise and fruitful alternative to traditional economic theories, which are based on optimization. Behavioral economics may interest some biologists, as it shifts the basis for theories of economic choice away from logical calculation and maximization and toward biologically plausible mechanisms. PMID:25247364

  20. The Fourth World Conference on Women.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The Fourth World Conference on Women held in Beijing during September 4-15, 1995, was a major success. The platform for action adopted by consensus at the conference is comprised of the mission statement, a global framework, critical areas of concern, strategic objectives and actions, and institutional and financial arrangements. The conference was an extension of other large international conferences organized under UN initiative over the past 15 years. The Beijing platform of action aims to remove all obstacles to women's active participation in all spheres of public and private life through a full and equal share in economic, social, cultural, and political decision-making. The following concerns were defined by the conference: eradicating poverty, increasing school enrollment and eliminating gender inequalities in access to education, improving access to health care and eliminating gender inequalities in access to services, eliminating violence against women, mitigating the consequences of armed conflicts against women, securing equal access of men and women to economic resources and employment, providing equal participation of men and women in power structures and decision making, enhancing national mechanisms to promote the advancement of women, protecting the rights of girls and women, eradicating stereotypes about women, participating in the management of natural resources and environmental protection, and improving the status of girls. PMID:12320155

  1. Pathways of Women Prisoners to Jail in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Adeela; Khan, Nashi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to examine pathways to imprisonment for women in Pakistan. It was hypothesized that early life victimization in women, problematic family relationship and economical deprivation would be significantly associated with criminal activities of women prisoners. Method: To identify the pathways to prison, structured interview was devised by the researchers. Sample comprised of 114 women prisoners enlisted from KotLakhpat jail, Lahore, Pakistan. Results: Poverty, revenge, anger and lack of empowerment were significantly associated with criminal activities of women of fender. Conclusion: The umbrella of rehabilitation should also cover social and legal matters of women offenders along with tackling their psychological issues. PMID:24688950

  2. The Human Dimension of Economic Competitiveness with Evidence from the

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafael Capellán; Consuelo Cruz Almánzar; Cristina Manfre

    2008-01-01

    This report was produced by the Greater Access to Trade Expansion Project (GATE), which is financed by USAID's Office of Women in Development. The purpose of the report is to stimulate reflection on the human dimension of competitiveness, particularly gender aspects. It emphasizes the economic role that women play in competitive situations and the economic benefits of policies and programs

  3. Women’s education levels and its impact on their attitudes towards children’s health development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathrine Bjørgen

    2011-01-01

    Relations between socio?economic differences and health have previously been well documented, but women’s education level and relative attitudes towards children’s health development has been seldom found in studies. This paper examines the relation between women’s education level and their attitudes in understanding kindergarten children’s health and its positive development in practice. Kindergartens in Norway offer preschool children of ages one

  4. "Starting from Ground Zero:" Constraints and Experiences of Adult Women Returning to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutsch, Nancy L.; Schmertz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Women adult students face particular constraints when pursuing degrees. This paper uses focus group data to explore the educational pathways, barriers, and supports of women students. Women's educations are shaped by personal and structural gendered forces, including family, economic, and workplace issues. Women report conflict over short-term…

  5. Beyond Pregnancy Gingivitis: Bringing a New Focus to Women's Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redford, Maryann

    1993-01-01

    Research on women's dental health and on differences between men's and women's dental health issues is reviewed. Factors specifically influencing women's health, including medical, economic, social, psychological, and behavioral factors, are also examined. It is argued that the clustering of risk factors for women indicates a need for more…

  6. CULTURE, SOCIAL CLASS, AND INCOME CONTROL IN THE LIVES OF WOMEN GARMENT WORKERS IN BANGLADESH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NAZLI KIBRIA

    1995-01-01

    This article looks at the income-related experiences of women workers in Bangladesh in the export garment industry, the first modern industry in the country to employ large numbers of women. The analysis draws on in-depth interviews with 34 female sewing machine operators at five factories. Despite the traditionally low economic autonomy of Bangladeshi women, the women's ability to control their

  7. Women Who Have Sex with Other Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy Joan Shotsky

    1996-01-01

    This report provides HIV seroprevalence data for women who are sexually active with women (WSW) choosing to access services in four of New York State's counseling and testing programs from January 1993 to June 1994. During that period, these programs tested 27,370 women. When questioned about sexual activity since 1978, 3.7% of these women reported sexual activity exclusivelv with women.

  8. Facilitating the Transition of Disadvantaged Students into Postsecondary Occupational Education Programs: A Suggested Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayser, Terrence F.; Brown, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the problem of transition for disadvantaged students from secondary vocational programs to postsecondary programs, and recommends several components for a proposed system which may facilitate better transition. (CT)

  9. 78 FR 69336 - Title I-Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ...Title I--Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged AGENCY...rulemaking regarding modified academic achievement standards and alternate assessments based on those modified academic achievement standards. This notice...

  10. Neighborhood Disadvantage, Residential Stability, and Perceptions of Instrumental Support among New Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Turney, Kristin; Harknett, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study (N = 4,211), we examine neighborhood disadvantage and perceptions of instrumental support among mothers with young children. We find that: (a) living in a disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with less instrumental support, particularly financial assistance, from family and friends; (b) residential stability is associated with stronger personal safety nets irrespective of neighborhood quality; and (c) mothers who move to a more disadvantaged neighborhood experience a small but significant decline in perceived instrumental support compared to those who do not move. In interpreting these results, we suggest instrumental support may be either a cause or consequence of living in an advantaged neighborhood, but, in either case, neighborhood and social network disadvantages go hand in hand. PMID:22102766

  11. 48 CFR 752.219-8 - Utilization of small business concerns and small disadvantaged business concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Utilization of small business concerns and small disadvantaged business concerns. 752.219-8...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAUSES AND...219-8 Utilization of small business concerns and small...

  12. 48 CFR 752.219-8 - Utilization of small business concerns and small disadvantaged business concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Utilization of small business concerns and small disadvantaged business concerns. 752.219-8...Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAUSES AND...219-8 Utilization of small business concerns and small...

  13. Area Disadvantage and Intimate Partner Homicide: An Ecological Analysis of North Carolina Counties, 2004–2006

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Martin, Sandra L.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Schoenbach, Victor J.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System and other sources, we examined ecologic relationships between county (n=100) disadvantage and intimate partner homicide (IPH), variability by victim gender and county urbanicity, and potential mediators. County disadvantage was related to female-victim homicide only in metropolitan counties (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.25); however, disadvantage was associated with male-victim IPH regardless of county urbanicity (IRR 1.17). None of the potential intervening variables examined (shelter availability, intimate partner violence services’ funding), was supported as a mediator. Results suggest disparities across North Carolina counties in IPH according to county disadvantage. Future research should explore other potential mediators (i.e., service accessibility and law enforcement responses), as well as test the robustness of findings using additional years of data. PMID:20565007

  14. 75 FR 77737 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Small Disadvantaged Business Self-Certification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ...Federal Acquisition Regulation; Small Disadvantaged Business Self-Certification AGENCIES...revision to SBA's regulation removed any uncertainty...subcontractors' ability to self-represent themselves...consistency between the SBA regulations and the FAR,...

  15. 76 FR 68026 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Small Disadvantaged Business Self-Certification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ...2, 2011)] [Rules and Regulations] [Pages 68026-68027...9000-AL77 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Small Disadvantaged Business Self-Certification AGENCY...amending the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to incorporate...

  16. 48 CFR 53.302-312 - Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Participation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...302-312 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.302-312 Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Participation Report. ER26JY00.003...

  17. 48 CFR 53.302-312 - Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Participation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...302-312 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.302-312 Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Participation Report. ER26JY00.003...

  18. Differences Between Self-Concepts of Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged High School Students Within Certain Types of Rural and Urban Communities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Keith E.

    Responses were sought to the following questions: (1) Are there differences between self concepts of disadvantaged and nondisadvantaged students? (2) Do these differences, if any, occur within and/or among different types of communities? A total of 373 students were selected from Maine communities designated "rural depressed,""rural…

  19. Theorizing alternative pathways through adulthood: unequal social arrangements in the lives of young disadvantaged men.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kevin; Jones, Nikki

    2014-03-01

    This chapter introduces the innovative field-based studies on disadvantaged men that are featured in this volume. Together, these studies of disadvantaged men from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and both urban and nonurban settings complement and extend recent discussions of emerging adulthood, which typically conceptualizes the transition to adulthood as a normative and linear process. The authors offer that the research presented here provides a more accurate rendering of the transition to adulthood for young disadvantaged men. For disadvantaged young men, the transition to adulthood is often complex and nonlinear, and features a diversity of pathways that are often overlooked in contemporary research on transitions to adulthood. The chapter ends with a call for research and theory that better reflects the precarious nature of pathways to adulthood for disadvantaged men in urban and nonurban settings. Researchers are encouraged to draw on findings from field-based studies to inform policies and practices directed at minimizing the marginalization of disadvantaged men from mainstream society. PMID:24677645

  20. Women and post-conflict development : a case study on Liberia

    E-print Network

    Massaquoi, William N

    2007-01-01

    Liberia seems an ostensible 'poster child' in light of the call by women's rights advocates to insert women in all aspects of the political, social, and economic transition in post-conflict countries. Liberia has elected ...

  1. INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: AN ECONOMIC EXPLANATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James V. KOCH

    Despite the NCAA's public statements about its concern for amateurism and physical fitness, its fundamental actions are readily explainable by means of conventional economic models of cartelization . This has been especially evident in the NCAA's recent activities in the area of football television and in its recent foray into the domain of women's Intercollegiate athletics. While it is likely

  2. Contemplating abortion: HIV-positive women’s decision to terminate pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rasanathan, Jennifer J. K.; Crawford-Roberts, Ann; Dourado, Ines; Gruskin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Research on pregnancy termination (PT) largely assumes HIV status is the only reason why HIV-positive women contemplate abortion. As antiretroviral treatment (ART) becomes increasingly available and women are living longer, healthier lives, the time has come to consider the influence of other factors on HIV-positive women’s reproductive decision-making. Because ART has been free and universally available to Brazilians for more than two decades, Brazil provides a unique context in which to explore these issues. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews exploring women’s PT decision-making were conducted with women receiving care at the Reference Centre for HIV/AIDS in Salvador, Brazil. Interviews were transcribed, translated into English, and coded for analysis. HIV played different roles in women’s decision-making. 13 HIV-positive women did not consider PT. Influential factors described by those who did consider PT included fear of HIV transmission, fear of HIV-related stigma, family size, economic constraints, partner and provider influence, as well as lack of access to such services as PT and abortifacients. For some HIV-positive women in Brazil, HIV can be the only reason to consider PT, but other factors are significant. A thorough understanding of all variables affecting reproductive decision-making is necessary for enhancing services and policies and better meeting the needs and rights of HIV-positive women. PMID:24387297

  3. Women as Mendelians and Geneticists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Marsha L.

    2015-01-01

    After the rediscovery of Mendel's laws of heredity in 1900, the biologists who began studying heredity, variation, and evolution using the new Mendelian methodology—performing controlled hybrid crosses and statistically analyzing progeny to note the factorial basis of characters—made great progress. By 1910, the validity of Mendelism was widely recognized and the field William Bateson christened `genetics' was complemented by the chromosome theory of heredity of T. H. Morgan and his group in the United States. Historians, however, have largely overlooked an important factor in the early establishment of Mendelism and genetics: the large number of women who contributed to the various research groups. This article examines the social, economic, and disciplinary context behind this new wave of women's participation in science and describes the work of women Mendelians and geneticists employed at three leading experimental research institutes, 1900-1940. It argues that the key to more women working in science was the access to higher education and the receptivity of emerging interdisciplinary fields such as genetics to utilize the expertise of women workers, which not only advanced the discipline but also provided new opportunities for women's employment in science.

  4. Women's Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Swasthya Abhiyan

    2007-01-01

    The double burden carried by women explains their chronic state of malnutrition, overwork and fatigue. Added to these are the stresses and strains of modern life, environmental degradation and increasing insecurity and violence. Here are examined the limitations of the health system and the consequent demands to recognize women’s right to health and healthcare as a fundamental right,and the state

  5. Minority Women's Health: Latinas

    MedlinePLUS

    ... address Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > Latinas Minority Women's Health Latinas Health conditions common in Latinas Latinos are ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for ...

  6. Women's Health USA 2013

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Services Utilization HRSA Programs Related to Women's Health Women's Health USA 2013 Home This Web site has been ... women, their families, and their communities. Data in Women's Health USA: Reflects the everchanging, increasingly diverse population and ...

  7. Women and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and men differently — some ... mail.nih.gov Share Science News About Women’s Mental Health Soldiers at High Suicide Risk after Hospitalization NIMH ...

  8. The Stages of Economic Evolution and the Russian\\/USSR\\/Russian Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L. Brinkman; Georgy Bovt

    1994-01-01

    Demonstrates the relevance of a stages methodology as a basis for understanding and analysing the evolutionary metamorphosis leading to the current Russian malaise. Addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the methodology, such as the unilinear fallacy, and analyses economic stagnation and decline in the context of the dynamics of culture evolution in the stage of modern economic growth. Given the

  9. Titre : HTA et prcarit perue en population prcaire guadeloupenne : l'enqute PHAPPG English Title: Hypertension and perceived material insecurity in a disadvantaged Caribbean

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Title: Hypertension and perceived material insecurity in a disadvantaged Caribbean population Auteurs insecurity in a disadvantaged Caribbean population. Patients and methods: We used data from a cross

  10. Women's experience of telehealth cancer genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Zilliacus, Elvira M; Meiser, Bettina; Lobb, Elizabeth A; Kirk, Judy; Warwick, Linda; Tucker, Katherine

    2010-10-01

    Telegenetics offers an alternative model of delivering genetic counseling to rural and outreach areas; however there is a dearth of qualitative research into the patient's experience. Twelve women who had received telemedicine genetic counseling for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) within the previous 12 months participated in a semi-structured telephone interview. The interview explored women's experience with telegenetics, satisfaction, perceived advantages and disadvantages and quality of the interaction with their genetic professionals. Overall women were highly satisfied with telegenetics. Telegenetics offered them convenience and reduced travel and associated costs. The majority of women described feeling a high degree of social presence, or rapport, with the off-site genetic clinician. One woman with a recent cancer diagnosis, reported that telemedicine was unable to meet her needs for psychosocial support. This finding highlights the need to be mindful of the psychosocial support needs of women with a recent diagnosis being seen via telegenetics. Patients attending for HBOC genetic counseling are generally highly satisfied with the technology and the interaction. Care should be taken, however, with patients with more complex psychosocial needs. PMID:20411313

  11. African-American Women in the Professoriate: Addressing Social Exclusion and Scholarly Marginalization through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Jones, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    African-American women and other underrepresented faculty members often report experiences of social exclusion and scholarly marginalization in mainstream institutions of higher education. This lack of inclusion challenges their retention and hinders them from becoming productive members of the professoriate, positioning them at a disadvantage for…

  12. The Short-Term Effects of Marital Disruption on the Labor Supply Behavior of Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sylvia F.

    A research study was conducted to measure (1) the extent to which a young woman is financially disadvantaged by the loss of her husband's income, (2) the ways in which she seeks to alleviate this loss, and (3) how successful she is in doing so. Data were collected from 519 young women, both white and black, who experienced a first disruption of…

  13. The Effectiveness of a Female Condom Intervention on Women's Use of Condoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated a female condom promotion intervention for socioeconomically disadvantaged women at high risk for sexually transmitted diseases and HIV who had never used female condoms. Pre- and postintervention surveys indicated that providing education and counseling, along with unlimited quantities of male condoms, female condoms, and water-based…

  14. Thresholds and Glass Ceilings: Career Pattern of Women Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnert, Gerhard

    2004-05-01

    The Project Access study examined the careers of men and women who had received prestigious postdoctoral fellowships and thus were presumably of about equal promise at the start of their professional careers. Had the women scientists in this elite group overcome a threshold beyond which they proceeded on equal footing with their male counterparts; or did a glass ceiling impede their careers? We found gender differences in career outcomes in the group we studied (699 questionnaires, 200 interviews), but these differences varied considerably by scientific discipline. Moreover, the career disparities for women, as a group, appear now to result chiefly from a series of subtle but identifiable and sometimes counterintuitive impediments as well as from slight gender differences in socialization. Each disadvantage by itself may be small, but in their accumulation they significantly influence women's careers.

  15. Gender: shaping personality, lives and health of women in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gender norms determine the status of Pakistani women that influence their life including health. In Pakistan, the relationship between gender norms and health of women is crucial yet complex demanding further analysis. This paper: determines the reasons for reiteration of gender roles; describes the societal processes and mechanisms that reproduce and reinforce them; and identifies their repercussions on women’s personality, lives and health especially reproductive health. Methods As part of a six-country study titled ‘Women’s Empowerment in Muslim Contexts’, semi-structured group discussions (n?=?30) were conducted with women (n?=?250) who were selected through snowballing from different age, ethnic and socio-economic categories. Discussion guidelines were used to collect participant’s perceptions about Pakistani women’s: characteristics, powers, aspirations, needs and responsibilities; circumstances these women live in such as opportunities, constraints and risks; and influence of these circumstances on their personality, lifestyle and health. Results The society studied has constructed a ‘Model’ for women that consider them ‘Objects’ without rights and autonomy. Women’s subordination, a prerequisite to ensure compliance to the constructed model, is maintained through allocation of lesser resources, restrictions on mobility, seclusion norms and even violence in cases of resistance. The model determines women’s traits and responsibilities, and establishes parameters for what is legitimate for women, and these have implications for their personality, lifestyle and health, including their reproductive behaviours. Conclusion There is a strong link between women’s autonomy, rights, and health. This demands a gender sensitive and a, right-based approach towards health. In addition to service delivery interventions, strategies are required to counter factors influencing health status and restricting access to and utilization of services. Improvement in women’s health is bound to have positive influences on their children and wider family’s health, education and livelihood; and in turn on a society’s health and economy. PMID:24690271

  16. PASSHE Women's Consortium Undergraduate Women's Leadership Institute

    E-print Network

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    PASSHE Women's Consortium 24th Annual Undergraduate Women's Leadership Institute "Fostering the Leadership of Women" Sunday, June 24, through Friday, June 29, 2012 McKeever Environmental Learning Center Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania #12;ABOUT THE INSTITUTE The Leadership Institute for Undergraduate Women

  17. Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known acknowledges the wisdom of conducting research and expanding knowledge about women's health and sex differences

  18. WOMEN-S HEALTH USA 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Women's Health USA 2002, the first annual report on the health status of America's women is presented by the HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and the Office of Women's Health. This first edition of the Women's Health USA data book brings together key facts and figur...

  19. Changing roles of women: reproduction to production.

    PubMed

    Rachapaetayakom, J

    1988-12-01

    The status of women in the countries included in the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) varies widely from home labor and childbearing to social and political participation. In countries where the total fertility rate is high (over 6), such as Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal, the status of women is low. Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal, along with India, Sri Lanka, and China, also have the lowest levels of per capita income. The education of women is one of the earmarks of social development. Education enables women to delay marriage, reduce fertility, and participate in the economy. Between 1970 and 1980, the female literacy rate increased 10% in Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and the Philippines; and 5% in Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal. Women's participation in the labor force is determined both by the stage of development of the country and by cultural factors. In Muslim countries the level of women's participation in the labor force is low. In Thailand and China it is very high. Women with the most education are likeliest to work in professional and administrative jobs. Self-employed women tend to have as little status and as many children as unpaid family workers, and women working in agriculture are almost as badly off. In Asia and the Pacific, except for Muslim countries, women have participated actively in family planning programs. In several countries in the region, women have been active in politics, but mostly at the local level. If women are to be integrated into the development process in the countries of Asia and the Pacific, attention must be given to their education and employment, to increasing the role of men in household and child rearing duties, and to research in the interrelations of population processes, women's status, and socioeconomic development. PMID:12282180

  20. Women's vital voices. The costs of exclusion in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Hunt, S

    1997-01-01

    In the newly independent states of Eastern Europe, the low status of women is hindering economic development and the transition to democracy. The transition from communism to capitalism has caused women to suffer from diminished labor market access, increased vulnerability to crime (including trafficking in women), loss of family-oriented social benefits, and exceedingly low representation in parliaments. These factors have combined to produce the striking feminization of poverty evident in many countries. Many countries also have not yet established laws and mechanisms to protect women from sexual harassment in employment, rape, or domestic violence. All of this ignores the fact that women create the essential social elements of political stability and fuel economies because they are reliable employees and innovative entrepreneurs. In response, women have formed new alliances, (including some that reached across enemy lines in Bosnia) and scores of nongovernmental organizations. The US has responded by taking actions that focus on women's economic enterprises, such as directing management training to women farmers in Albania and Russia and advocating the creation of microcredit schemes for women. The US is also supporting efforts to harmonize national and international policies and legislation to stop trafficking in women and is taking steps to support and develop women leaders in the region. It is in the best interest of the US to magnify the voices of women who are echoing US values in postcommunist Europe. PMID:12348980