These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Treatment of Recurrent Eczema Herpeticum in Pregnancy With Acyclovir  

PubMed Central

Background: Eczema herpeticum is an uncommon manifestation of an infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). The disease is primarily seen in patients with histories of atopic eczema. Eczema herpeticum may be a life-threatening illness, but the mortality is felt to be <10% with modern antiviral and antibacterial agents. The use of acyclovir for other viral infections secondary to herpesvirus in pregnancy has been well documented. The authors now present a case report of eczema herpeticum treated with acyclovir during pregnancy. Case: A patient with a history of eczema herpeticum presented in pregnancy with a recurrence. She was successfully treated with intravenous (IV) acyclovir with good maternal and fetal outcome. Conclusion: Acyclovir may be utilized in pregnancy for several manifestations of HSV including eczema herpeticum. PMID:18476099

Baker, David A.

1996-01-01

2

A Case of Eczema Herpeticum with Hailey-Hailey Disease  

PubMed Central

Eczema herpeticum is the dissemination of herpes simplex virus in the setting of a preexisting skin disease. Hailey-Hailey disease [familial benign chronic pemphigus] is a blistering dermatosis that is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and it usually presents itself around the third or fourth decades. Coexistence of eczema herpeticum and Hailey-Hailey disease is an infrequent occurrence. Four such cases have been reported in the English and German medical literature. We report here on an unusual case of eczema herpeticum that coexisted with Hailey-Hailey disease in a 47 years old man and we review the relevant literatures. PMID:20523813

Lee, Gun Hong; Kim, Yun Mi; Lee, Jong Suk; Park, Young Lip; Whang, Kyu Uang

2009-01-01

3

Delayed Acyclovir and Outcomes of Children Hospitalized With Eczema Herpeticum  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology and outcomes of children hospitalized with eczema herpeticum and to determine the association with delayed acyclovir on outcomes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a multicenter retrospective cohort study conducted between January 1, 2001, and March 31, 2010, of 1331 children aged 2 months to 17 years with eczema herpeticum from 42 tertiary care children's hospitals in the Pediatric Health Information System database. Multivariable linear regression models determined the association between delayed acyclovir therapy and the main outcome measure: hospital length of stay (LOS). RESULTS: There were no deaths during the study period. Staphylococcus aureus infection was diagnosed in 30.3% of the patients; 3.9% of the patients had a bloodstream infection. Fifty-one patients (3.8%) required ICU admission. There were 893 patients (67.1%) who received acyclovir on the first day of admission. The median LOS increased with each day delay in acyclovir initiation. In multivariable analysis, delay of acyclovir initiation by 1 day was associated with an 11% increased LOS (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3%–20%; P = .008), and LOS increased by 41% when acyclovir was started on day 3 (95% CI: 19%–67%; P < .001) and by 98% when started on day 4 to 7 (95% CI: 60%–145%; P < .001). Use of topical corticosteroids on day 1 of hospitalization was not associated with LOS. CONCLUSIONS: Delay of acyclovir initiation is associated with increased LOS in hospitalized children with eczema herpeticum. Use of topical corticosteroids on admission is not associated with increased LOS. The mortality rate of hospitalized children with eczema herpeticum is low. PMID:22084327

Yan, Albert C.; Mittal, Manoj K.; Mohamad, Zeinab; Shah, Samir S.

2011-01-01

4

Eczema  

MedlinePLUS

Eczema is a term for several different types of skin swelling. Eczema is also called dermatitis. It is not dangerous, ... swollen and itchy skin. Factors that can cause eczema include other diseases, irritating substances, allergies and your ...

5

MRSA  

MedlinePLUS

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections . Accessed April 17, 2011. Que YA, ...

6

Eczema  

MedlinePLUS

... Allergy, Asthma & Immunology American Academy of Dermatology American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology National Eczema Association National ... Increasing in Pediatrics Home Strength Training for Young Athletes First Aid for Families (PedFACTs) Autism Spectrum Disorders: ...

7

Eczema  

PubMed Central

Introduction Eczema, as defined by the World Allergy Organization (WAO) revised nomenclature in 2003, affects 15% to 20% of school children and 2% to 5% of adults worldwide. About 50% of people with eczema demonstrate atopy, with specific immunoglobulin E responses to allergens. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of topical medical treatments, and dietary interventions in adults and children with established eczema? What are the effects of breastfeeding, reducing allergens, or dietary interventions for primary prevention of eczema in predisposed infants? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 54 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: breastfeeding, controlling house dust mites, corticosteroids, dietary exclusion of eggs or cow's milk, elementary diets, emollients, essential fatty oils, few-foods diet, multivitamins, pimecrolimus, probiotics, pyridoxine, reducing maternal dietary allergens, tacrolimus, vitamin E, and zinc supplements. PMID:21609512

2011-01-01

8

MRSA  

MedlinePLUS

... Share | MRSA A A A Understanding Staph Infections Staphylococcus aureus , commonly known as "staph," is a bacterium that ... longer killed by penicillin-type antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a strain of staph bacteria that ...

9

Psoriasis Herpeticum due to Varicella Zoster Virus: A Kaposi's Varicelliform Eruption in Erythrodermic Psoriasis  

PubMed Central

Kaposi's varicelliform eruption (KVE) or eczema herpeticum is characterized by disseminated papulovesicular eruption caused by a number of viruses like Herpes simplex virus I and II, Coxsackie virus, and Vaccinia and Small pox viruses in patients with pre-existing skin disease. The occurrence of KVE with psoriasis has been reported recently as a new entity psoriasis herpeticum. The rare causation of psoriasis herpeticum due to Varicella zoster virus in a patient with underlying psoriasis is being reported for the first time. PMID:22707775

Garg, Geeta; Thami, Gurvinder P

2012-01-01

10

MRSA  

MedlinePLUS

MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. It causes a staph infection (pronounced "staff infection") that is resistant to several common antibiotics. There are two types of infection. ...

11

Recurrent MRSA skin infections in atopic dermatitis.  

PubMed

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent cause of recurrent skin and soft tissue infections. For patients with atopic dermatitis, recurrent skin infections with MRSA often lead to eczema exacerbation. There currently is no standard practice in the prevention of recurrent MRSA soft tissue infections in the general and the atopic dermatitis populations. The current article reviews recent data on S aureus decolonization treatments for the prevention of recurrent MRSA soft tissue infections in the community setting. PMID:25017526

Ong, Peck Y

2014-01-01

12

Eczema: Diagnosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Field Search Button Advanced Search NIAID Home Health & Research Topics Labs & Scientific Resources Funding About NIAID News & Events NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Eczema > Understanding Eczema Understanding What is Atopic Dermatitis? ...

13

Eczema: Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Field Search Button Advanced Search NIAID Home Health & Research Topics Labs & Scientific Resources Funding About NIAID News & Events NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Eczema > Understanding Eczema Understanding What is Atopic Dermatitis? ...

14

Eczema: Cause  

MedlinePLUS

... Field Search Button Advanced Search NIAID Home Health & Research Topics Labs & Scientific Resources Funding About NIAID News & Events NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Eczema > Understanding Eczema Understanding What is Atopic Dermatitis? ...

15

Eczema: Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... more information on enabling JavaScript. Eczema Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Treatment Content on ... as petroleum jelly. Moisturizers should be free of alcohol, scents, dyes, fragrances, and other skin-irritating chemicals. ...

16

Treating Eczema in Children  

MedlinePLUS

... lower right-hand corner of the player. Treating Eczema in Children HealthDay November 24, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Children's Health Eczema Steroids Transcript Atopic dermatitis, often called eczema, affects ...

17

Hand Eczema  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Hand eczema is a common disease in the general population and one of the most frequent diagnoses in dermatology. It affects\\u000a occupational as well as private aspects of life, and the severity varies from mild and transient to severe and chronic disease.\\u000a Being a disease that affects mainly young people, often interfering with their professional career, the disease is a

Tove Agner

18

Localized psoriasis herpeticum: Case report and review of literature  

PubMed Central

Kaposi's varicelliform eruption (KVE) is a widespread cutaneous eruption caused by viruses, especially herpes simplex virus in patients with pre-existing dermatoses. “Psoriasis herpeticum” refers to the rare occurrence of KVE in patients with psoriasis. We report a case of KVE localized to the face in a patient with exfoliative dermatitis secondary to psoriasis. This case is being reported to make the treating clinician aware of the possibility of KVE in patients with psoriatic erythroderma. PMID:23130208

George, Mamatha; Pakran, Jaheersha; Rajan, Uma; George, Sandhya; Thomas, Sumi

2011-01-01

19

Frequently Asked Questions about Eczema  

MedlinePLUS

... Often Ask Dermatologists What is the difference between eczema and atopic dermatitis? The word “eczema” has a few meanings. It is a general ... itchy). One of the most common types of eczema is atopic dermatitis, also called “atopic eczema.” Sometimes ...

20

MRSA (treatment)  

PubMed Central

Introduction Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has a gene that makes it resistant to methicillin as well as to other beta lactam antibiotics including flucloxacillin, b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitor combinations, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. MRSA can be part of the normal body flora (colonisation), especially in the nose, but can cause infection, especially in people with prolonged hospital admissions, with underlying disease, or after antibiotic use. About 40% of S aureus in blood cultures in the UK is resistant to methicillin. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment for MRSA infections at any body site? What are the effects of treatment for MRSA nasal or extra-nasal colonisation? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to July 2005 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 16 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiseptic body washes, chlorhexidine-neomycin nasal cream, clindamycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, glycopeptides (teicoplanin, vancomycin), linezolid, macrolides (azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin), mupirocin nasal ointment, quinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin), quinupristin-dalfopristin, rifampicin, systemic antimicrobials, tea tree preparations, tetracyclines (doxycycline, minocycline, oxytetracycline), trimethoprim, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

2006-01-01

21

MRSA and Food Products  

MedlinePLUS

... MRSA), in a variety of food products including retail meats and raw milk. While more study is ... to measure MRSA in meat items purchased from retail establishments. CDC is actively working to reduce MRSA ...

22

MRSA and Cystic Fibrosis  

MedlinePLUS

... What is MRSA? MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus . It can cause an infection on the skin ... and cystic fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control & Germs Web Cast Lung Health: ...

23

Dyshidrotic Dermatitis (Hand Eczema)  

MedlinePLUS

... that the following weather conditions triggered flare-ups: heat (29.8% of patients), humidity (24% of patients), and cold (12.5% of patients). Pre-existing atopic condition (e.g., atopic eczema, hay ...

24

MRSA virulence and spread  

PubMed Central

Summary Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most frequent causes of hospital- and community-associated infections. Resistance to the entire class of ?-lactam antibiotics, such as methicillin and penicillin, makes MRSA infections difficult to treat. Hospital-associated MRSA strains are often multi-drug resistant, leaving only lower efficiency drugs such as vancomycin as treatments options. Like many other S. aureus strains, MRSA strains produce a series of virulence factors, such as toxins and adhesion proteins. Recent findings have shed some new light on the molecular events that underlie MRSA epidemic waves. Newly emerging MRSA clones appear to have acquired phenotypic traits that render them more virulent or able to colonize better, either via mobile genetic elements or adaptation of gene expression. Acquisition of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes and increased expression of core genome-encoded toxins are being discussed as potentially contributing to the success of the recently emerged community-associated MRSA strains. However, the molecular factors underlying the spread of hospital- and community-associated MRSA strains are still far from being completely understood, a situation calling for enhanced research efforts in that area. PMID:22747834

Otto, Michael

2012-01-01

25

Pet Care: MRSA FAQ  

MedlinePLUS

... should be treated by a healthcare provider. When animals are colonized with MRSA (usually by testing swabs taken of the nostrils), there are no recognized methods for decolonizing them. Based on clinical cases observed, ... companion animals are generally transient carriers of MRSA, meaning they ...

26

MRSA in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a form of Staphylococcus aureus, a common bacterium that has developed resistance to several forms of antibiotics. MRSA has been around for many years, mostly in health care settings but has moved into the community in recent years. Infections can be seen anywhere but are mostly seen in…

US Department of Education, 2007

2007-01-01

27

Primary neonatal MRSA pyonephrosis.  

PubMed

Pyonephrosis is uncommon in adult and paediatric population and very rare in neonates. Neonatal candidal and staphylococcal pyonephrosis has been reported earlier, and this is the first reported case of MRSA pyonephrosis. A case of potentially lethal fulminating primary MRSA pyonephrosis with septic shock in a neonate in whom investigations showed refluxing and obstructing left megaureter requiring successful surgical correction has been reported. PMID:22907630

Patel, Ramnik; Nwokoma, Ngozi; Ninan, George K

2013-08-01

28

MRSA nasal colonization burden and risk of MRSA infection  

PubMed Central

Background Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization burden has been identified as a risk factor for infection. This study evaluates methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) nasal burden, as defined by the cycle threshold (Ct) and risk of subsequent infection. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, United States veterans were classified into 3 MRSA nasal colonization groups: noncarriers, low burden (Ct > 24 cycles), and high burden (Ct ? 24 cycles). MRSA infections were identified prospectively, and clinical information was obtained by chart review. Multivariate logistic regression assessed the association of MRSA nasal burden and risk of MRSA infection. Results During 4-years of follow-up, 4.3% of noncarriers, 18.5% of low burden, and 17.2% of high burden developed a MRSA infection. In multivariate analysis, MRSA nasal colonization was a risk factor for MRSA infection (P = .008) with low burden (risk ratio [RR], 3.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.47–8.93) and high burden (RR, 2.71; 95% CI: 0.95–7.72) associated with subsequent MRSA infection when compared with noncarriers. When compared with low burden, high burden nasal carriers were not at increased risk of infection (RR, 0.75; 95% CI 0.36–1.55). Conclusion MRSA nasal colonization was a risk factor for MRSA infection. High nasal burden of MRSA did not increase the risk of infection. PMID:23261345

Stenehjem, Edward; Rimland, David

2013-01-01

29

Vitamin D Might Help Kids with Eczema  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vitamin D Might Help Kids With Eczema Researchers saw ... 17, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Children's Health Eczema Vitamin D FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Daily ...

30

General Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings  

MedlinePLUS

... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infections Share Compartir General Information About MRSA ... and surgical site infections. MRSA is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , a type of staph bacteria that is resistant ...

31

Chinese herbal medicine research in eczema treatment  

PubMed Central

Eczema is a chronic relapsing atopic dermatitis (AD) associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance and poor quality of life of the patient. Treatment of eczema includes use of emollient, topical and systemic antimicrobial agents, corticosteroid or immunomodulating agents. Many patients also seek alternative treatments such as dietary avoidance, supplementation or both. This article reviews the basic pathophysiology of eczema and clinical trials involving Chinese medicine in the treatment of eczema. Research reports on Chinese herbal medicine for eczema were retrieved from PubMed and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews for this review. Only a few RCTs demonstrated the efficacy (or lack of efficacy) of Chinese medicinal herbs in treating atopic eczema. Further larger scale trials are warranted. PMID:21527032

2011-01-01

32

Management of chronic hand eczema.  

PubMed

Hand eczema (HE) is one of the most frequent skin diseases and has often a chronically relapsing course with a poor prognosis resulting in a high social and economic impact for the individual and the society. In this article, we highlight the results of an expert workshop on the 'management of severe chronic hand eczema' with the focus on the epidemiology, the burden of severe HE, its classification and diagnostic procedures, and the current status of treatment options according to an evidence-based approach (randomized controlled clinical trials, RCTs). We conclude that despite the abundance of topical and systemic treatment options, disease management in patients with severe chronic HE is frequently inadequate. There is a strong need for RCTs of existing and new treatment options based on clearly diagnosed subtypes of HE and its severity. PMID:17868211

Diepgen, Thomas L; Agner, Tove; Aberer, Werner; Berth-Jones, John; Cambazard, Frédéric; Elsner, Peter; McFadden, John; Coenraads, Pieter Jan

2007-10-01

33

Eczema in north west of libya.  

PubMed

The life style and demographic structure of Libyan society is changing, and this could affect the epidemiology of certain diseases, including eczema. The aim of this study was to assess the burden of eczema among a selected patient population in the Zliten area in the northwest of Libya. We conducted a retrospective study by reviewing case notes and records in public and private dermatology practices in the Zliten area. The frequency of eczema among patients attending dermatology clinics in the Zliten area was 12.8%, and the male to female ratio was almost 1:1. The most affected age group among patients was 20-29 years. Eczema represented a larger proportion of dermatologic conditions during spring and summer. Of all cases of eczema, 72.6% were endogenous and 24.9% were exogenous (p<0.001). The most common type of eczema was contact dermatitis (22.7% of all cases), followed by atopic dermatitis (19.7%) and pityriasis alba (10.5%). In conclusion, eczema is a public health problem in Zliten-Libya, and this necessitates prospective studies to determine its incidence and prevalence. PMID:21499454

Arshah, Tm; Shambesh, Mk; Grera, Am; Albaccush, M

2008-01-01

34

Genetic basis for molecular epidemiology of MRSA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of genotyping in the epidemiology of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is reviewed, with special emphasis on a new method that enables us to track the evolutionary path of each MRSA isolate.\\u000a The MRSA genome is made up of 2 components: one,mec DNA; and the other, the methicillinsensitiveStaphylococcus aureus (MSSA) chromosome to which themec DNA has integrated. Therefore, the MRSA

Keiichi Hiramatsu; Noriko Kondo; Teruyo Ito

1996-01-01

35

Developing Scottish Priorities for MRSA Research  

E-print Network

Developing Scottish Priorities for MRSA Research: A Clinician's View Dr Malcolm G Booth Intensive Care Unit Royal infirmary Glasgow #12;MRSA deaths up by nearly quarter The number of deaths linked to the hospital superbug MRSA has risen by nearly a quarter, statistics show. The Office for National Statistics

Glasgow, University of

36

NARES CULTURE FOR MRSA SCREENING I. INTRODUCTION  

E-print Network

NARES CULTURE FOR MRSA SCREENING I. INTRODUCTION Active Surveillance Testing (AST) to detect newly admitted patients who are nasally colonized with MRSA is required in 2009 to comply with California Health an anterior nares specimen for MRSA screening. III. SUPPLIES 1. For children, adolescents and adults: BD BBL

Kay, Mark A.

37

JAMA Patient Page: MRSA Infections  

MedlinePLUS

... term care facility • Invasive procedures such as urinary catheters, intra-arterial lines, or central venous lines • Recent or long-term antibiotic use • Family members or close contacts who are health care workers • Chronic renal dialysis Risk factors for CA-MRSA include • Participation in ...

38

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detection: Comparison of Two Molecular Methods (IDI-MRSA PCR Assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR Assay) with Three Selective MRSA Agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA) for Use with Infection-Control Swabs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasing problem. Rapid detection of MRSA-colo- nized patients has the potential to limit spread of the organism. We evaluated the sensitivities and specificities of MRSA detection by two molecular methods (IDI-MRSA PCR assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR assay) and three selective MRSA agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA), using 205 (101 nasal,

S. J. van Hal; D. Stark; B. Lockwood; D. Marriott; J. Harkness

2007-01-01

39

Eczema Tied to Bone Fracture Risk in Study  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Eczema Tied to Bone Fracture Risk in Study Risk was small; distractions ... eczema may increase slightly the risk of broken bones and injured joints, a new study reports. In ...

40

Mouse Models of Atopic Eczema Critically Evaluated  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder with increasing prevalence in Western societies. Even though we have made considerable progress in understanding the cellular and molecular nature of cutaneous inflammation, the precise pathomechanisms of AE still remain elusive. Experimental animal models are indispensable tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms and to test novel therapeutic approaches in vivo.

Jan Gutermuth; Markus Ollert; Johannes Ring; Heidrun Behrendt; Thilo Jakob

2004-01-01

41

What is MRsa? The McGill Mature &  

E-print Network

What is MRsa? The McGill Mature & Re-entry Students' A s s o c i a t i o n (MRSA) facilitates from many different backgrounds and pursue various courses of study. All MRSA members are encouraged to use the office to meet others, study, or just decompress before the next class. Additionally, MRSA

Volesky, Bohumil

42

Characterisation of MRSA from Malta and the description of a Maltese epidemic MRSA strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Malta has one of the highest prevalence rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Europe. However, only limited typing data are currently available. In order to address this situation, 45 MRSA\\u000a isolates from the Mater Dei Hospital in Msida, Malta, were characterised using DNA microarrays. The most common strain was\\u000a ST22-MRSA-IV (UK-EMRSA-15, 30 isolates). Sporadic strains included ST36-MRSA-II (UK-EMRSA-16, two

E. A. Scicluna; A. C. Shore; A. Thürmer; R. Ehricht; P. Slickers; M. A. Borg; D. C. Coleman; S. Monecke

2010-01-01

43

General Information about MRSA in the Community  

MedlinePLUS

... or supplies. This might include athletes, daycare and school students, military personnel in barracks, and people who recently received inpatient medical care. Top How Common is MRSA? Studies show that about one in three people carry ...

44

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Drug) Resistance Examples of Antimicrobial Resistance Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Overview History Transmission Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Research Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gonorrhea) Gram- ...

45

The “hospital superbug”: Social representations of MRSA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The so-called ‘hospital superbug’ methcillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) became a topic of media and political concern in Britain from the middle of the 1990s. It was increasingly politicised in the period leading up to the British General Election of 2005. This study examines the meanings of MRSA that circulate in Britain by analysing newspaper coverage of the disease over the

Peter Washer; Helene Joffe

2006-01-01

46

Better environmental survival of outbreak vs. sporadic MRSA isolates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental sources have been associated with prolonged epidemics of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Our objective was to evaluate whether outbreak MRSA strains differ in their environmental survival from sporadic MRSA strains. The strains were detected in five adult patients unknowingly colonized by MRSA. The MRSA strains from patients No. 1 (phage pattern; III-29) and No. 2 (III-215) caused extensive outbreaks in

J. H. T. Wagenvoort; W. Sluijsmans; R. J. R. Penders

2000-01-01

47

The population impact of MRSA in a country: the national survey of MRSA in Wales, 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous data collection on all new isolates of MRSA via CoSurv has taken place in Wales since January 1996. In order to audit this data collection, and to address some of the issues that it does not include, a survey of MRSA was carried out. Questionnaires were completed by infection control teams. Rates were calculated using hospital throughput denominators. Results

M. Morgan; D. Evans-Williams; R. Salmon; I. Hosein; D. N. Looker; A. Howard

2000-01-01

48

Occurrence of self reported hand eczema in Swedish bakers  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of bakers developing hand eczema. The importance of atopy was studied as well as change of job due to hand eczema. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed among bakers trained in Swedish trade schools in 1961-89 (n = 2923). School referents followed other programmes (n = 1258); population controls were randomly selected from the

J. Brisman; B. Meding; B. Jarvholm

1998-01-01

49

Eczema Cases Rising Among U.S. Children  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Eczema Cases Rising Among U.S. Children: Report For most, ... November 24, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Children's Health Eczema MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A growing ...

50

Eczema increases susceptibility to PM10 in office indoor environments.  

PubMed

The objective was to compare impact of indoor office environment on employees with eczema with those without eczema. Exposure was measured at 56 sites and modelled for 173 work places. Tear film stability, lysozyme in nasal lavage, immunoglobulin E (IgE), and Phadiatop were assessed, and symptoms and perceptions collected by questionnaires. Multiple regression analyses were applied, adjusted for age, gender, strain, current smoking, and respiratory infections. Those with eczema perceived temperature too high but not associated with measured temperature. They had increased lysozyme in nasal lavage associated with increased air temperature difference between 6 and 10 AM, more general and mucosal symptoms, and "dry or flushed facial skin" associated with airborne particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter (PM(10)). Impact of PM(10) was most pronounced among those with eczema previous 30 days. Having eczema might be an important predictor for subjective and objective responses to indoor environment. PMID:22315931

Bakke, Jan Vilhelm; Wieslander, Gunilla; Norback, Dan; Moen, Bente E

2012-01-01

51

Community-acquired MRSA and pig-farming  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Sporadic cases of CA-MRSA in persons without risk-factors for MRSA carriage are increasing. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a MRSA cluster among family members of a pig-farmer, his co-workers and his pigs. Initially a young mother was seen with mastitis due to MRSA. Six months later her baby daughter was admitted to the hospital with pneumococcal otitis. After staying five

Xander W Huijsdens; Beatrix J van Dijke; Emile Spalburg; Marga G van Santen-Verheuvel; Max EOC Heck; Gerlinde N Pluister; Andreas Voss; Wim JB Wannet; Albert J de Neeling

2006-01-01

52

The Infection Control Management of MRSA in Acute Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many acute care facilities report endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), while others describe the occurrence of sporadic disease outbreaks. The timely implementation of effective infection control measures is essential to minimise the incidence of MRSA cases and the magnitude of disease outbreaks. Management strategies for the containment and control of MRSA currently vary between facilities and demonstrate varying levels

Elizabeth J Halcomb; Ritin Fernandez; Rhonda Griffiths; PJ Newton; Louise D Hickman

2008-01-01

53

MRSA colonization and the risk of MRSA bacteraemia in hospitalized patients with chronic ulcers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cohort study of patients with chronic ulcers was performed to estimate the risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia in a population colonized with MRSA. During a five-year period (January 1990–May 1995), 911 patients with chronic ulcers (CU), as determined by ICD9-CM code search, were admitted to an acute care hospital. Sixty percent (545\\/911) of these patients with CU

M.-C. Roghmann; A. Siddiqui; K. Plaisance; H. Standiford

2001-01-01

54

[Allergic contact eczema from epoxy resin].  

PubMed

Epoxy resins are plastics that are widely used as electrical insulation, in coatings, and as adhesives and paints. They have strong sensitizing power and are one of the main causes of allergic contact eczema, both in the workplace and elsewhere. We present the case of a worker at a plastics/chemical plant, who handled aeronautical components in the process of manufacturing fuselage parts. He consulted his physician because of eczematous lesions on his fingers, hands and forearms which had developed over a two-year period and were clearly related to his work. The standard battery of skin tests was performed, along with the plastics and adhesives series and tests using the products from his workplace. Positivity was shown to epoxy resins (standard battery) and to the products from his workplace, which included different fiberglass and carbon fiber sheets impregnated with epoxy resins and epoxy adhesives. PMID:16476309

Calzado, Leticia; Ortiz-de Frutos, Francisco J; del Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Galera, Carmen María; Valverde, Ricardo; Vanaclocha, Francisco

2005-11-01

55

The evolutionary history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections that are becoming increasingly difficult to combat because of emerging resistance to all current antibiotic classes. The evolutionary origins of MRSA are poorly understood, no rational nomenclature exists, and there is no consensus on the number of major MRSA clones or the relatedness of clones described from different countries. We resolve all of these issues and provide a more thorough and precise analysis of the evolution of MRSA clones than has previously been possible. Using multilocus sequence typing and an algorithm, burst, we analyzed an international collection of 912 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. We identified 11 major MRSA clones within five groups of related genotypes. The putative ancestral genotype of each group and the most parsimonious patterns of descent of isolates from each ancestor were inferred by using burst, which, together with analysis of the methicillin resistance genes, established the likely evolutionary origins of each major MRSA clone, the genotype of the original MRSA clone and its MSSA progenitor, and the extent of acquisition and horizontal movement of the methicillin resistance genes. Major MRSA clones have arisen repeatedly from successful epidemic MSSA strains, and isolates with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin, the antibiotic of last resort, are arising from some of these major MRSA clones, highlighting a depressing progression of increasing drug resistance within a small number of ecologically successful S. aureus genotypes. PMID:12032344

Enright, Mark C.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Randle, Gaynor; Feil, Edward J.; Grundmann, Hajo; Spratt, Brian G.

2002-01-01

56

Characterization of PVL-positive MRSA from Norway.  

PubMed

Norway is a country in which the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevalence has been low for the last decades. There are virtually no epidemic, hospital-acquired MRSA because of an emphasis on strict infection control rules and restrictive use of antibiotics. However, community-acquired and/or Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-positive MRSA need to be monitored as these strains are transmitted outside of healthcare facilities and cannot be contained by healthcare-centred strategies. All 179 non-repetitive isolates of PVL-positive MRSA that were received during 2011 at the regional infection control laboratory at Akershus University Hospital were preserved and spa typed. Seventy isolates were further characterized by DNA microarray hybridization. The most common PVL-MRSA lineages were ST8-MRSA-IV and CC30-MRSA-IV. Further common clones were CC80-MRSA-IV and CC5-MRSA-IV. Other clones were found sporadically. These included ST772-MRSA-V and ST834-MRSA-IV, the latter in patients with epidemiological connections to the Philippines. Small-scale family outbreaks affecting at least 49 individuals were noted, with numbers of known cases per outbreak ranging from two to seven. At least 24 cases were related to foreign travel to Eritrea, India, Iraq, Macedonia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Singapore, Turkey, the USA and Vietnam. These data show that community-acquired/PVL-positive MRSA are not yet a major public health problem in Southern Norway. Our study corroborates the current practice of mandatory screening of patients and staff with travel histories, admissions or employment in healthcare institutions outside the Scandinavian countries or with known MRSA contacts. PMID:24106794

Monecke, Stefan; Aamot, Hege Vangstein; Stieber, Bettina; Ruppelt, Antje; Ehricht, Ralf

2014-07-01

57

A Holistic Approach to MRSA Eradication in Critically Ill Patients with MRSA Pneumonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:  The number of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia cases is increasing in many European countries. In this observational study in one medical and three surgical\\u000a ICUs multiple interventions for the treatment and eradication of nosocomial MRSA-pneumonia were used.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and Methods:  Twenty-one critically ill patients (age: 59 14 years, 15 males\\/6 females, 18 ventilator-associated, 3 nosocomial, clinical\\u000a pulmonary infection score >

C. Wenisch; H. Laferl; M. Szell; K. H. Smolle; A. Grisold; G. Bertha; R. Krause

2006-01-01

58

Novel cephalosporins for the treatment of MRSA infections.  

PubMed

Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are among the most difficult to treat, Efforts toward the development of cephalosporin antimicrobial agents with activity against MRSA have been ongoing for the last decade. In spite of advancement of several potential drugs into clinical trials no such drugs are available for anti-MRSA therapy yet. The recent emergence of MRSA strains resistant to vancomycin, which is the treatment of choice for MRSA infection, has made the clinical need for new effective drugs even more pressing. In the present review structure-activity relationships are discussed with an emphasis on anti-MRSA activity, pharmacokinetics and efficacy in animal models. Clinical trial status of promising drug candidates is also provided where available. PMID:12020048

Glinka, Tomasz W

2002-02-01

59

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major nosocomial pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. MRSA strains are endemic in many American and European hospitals and account for 29%–35% of all clinical isolates. Recent studies have documented the increased costs associated with MRSA infection, as well as the importance of colonisation pressure. Surveillance strategies have been proposed especially in high risk areas such as the intensive care unit. Pneumonia and bacteraemia account for the majority of MRSA serious clinical infections, but intra-abdominal infections, osteomyelitis, toxic shock syndrome, food poisoning, and deep tissue infections are also important clinical diseases. The traditional antibiotic therapy for MRSA is a glycopeptide, vancomycin. New antibiotics have been recently released that add to the armamentarium for therapy against MRSA and include linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but cost, side effects, and resistance may limit their long term usefulness. PMID:12151652

Haddadin, A; Fappiano, S; Lipsett, P

2002-01-01

60

Eczema and early solid feeding in preterm infants  

PubMed Central

Aims: To establish whether development of eczema is influenced by feeding practices in preterm infants, while taking account of confounding factors. Methods: Data were assembled from 257 infants born prematurely and studied to 12 months post-term. Logistic regression analysis was performed to establish the association between feeding practices and eczema, allowing for potential confounding factors including the infants' gender, parental atopic status, social background, and parental smoking habits. Results: For the development of eczema (with or without other symptoms) by 12 months post-term, the introduction of four or more solid foods by or before 17 weeks post-term was a significant risk (odds ratio 3.49). Male infants were at significantly higher risk (odds ratio 1.84). In addition, having non-atopic parents who introduced solid foods before 10 weeks post-term or having at least one atopic parent represented a significant risk scenario (odds ratio 2.94). Conclusions: Early introduction of a diverse range of solid foods may predispose the preterm infant to eczema development by 12 months post-term. Furthermore, non-atopic parents who practice early as opposed to late introduction of solid foods may be exposing preterm infants to a greater risk of eczema by 12 months post-term. PMID:15033836

Morgan, J; Williams, P; Norris, F; Williams, C; Larkin, M; Hampton, S

2004-01-01

61

Probiotics in the prevention of eczema: a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate a multistrain, high-dose probiotic in the prevention of eczema. Design A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial. Settings Antenatal clinics, research clinic, children at home. Patients Pregnant women and their infants. Interventions Women from 36?weeks gestation and their infants to age 6?months received daily either the probiotic (Lactobacillus salivarius CUL61, Lactobacillus paracasei CUL08, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis CUL34 and Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20; total of 1010 organisms/day) or matching placebo. Main outcome measure Diagnosed eczema at age 2?years. Infants were followed up by questionnaire. Clinical examination and skin prick tests to common allergens were done at 6?months and 2?years. Results The cumulative frequency of diagnosed eczema at 2?years was similar in the probiotic (73/214, 34.1%) and placebo arms (72/222, 32.4%; OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.6). Among the secondary outcomes, the cumulative frequency of skin prick sensitivity at 2?years was reduced in the probiotic (18/171; 10.5%) compared with the placebo arm (32/173; 18.5%; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.98). The statistically significant differences between the arms were mainly in sensitisation to cow's milk and hen's egg proteins at 6?months. Atopic eczema occurred in 9/171 (5.3%) children in the probiotic arm and 21/173 (12.1%) in the placebo arm (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.91). Conclusions The study did not provide evidence that the probiotic either prevented eczema during the study or reduced its severity. However, the probiotic seemed to prevent atopic sensitisation to common food allergens and so reduce the incidence of atopic eczema in early childhood. Trial registration Number ISRCTN26287422. PMID:24947281

Allen, Stephen J; Jordan, Sue; Storey, Melanie; Thornton, Catherine A; Gravenor, Michael B; Garaiova, Iveta; Plummer, Susan F; Wang, Duolao; Morgan, Gareth

2014-01-01

62

Contact allergy and hand eczema in Swedish dentists.  

PubMed

Hand eczema and contact allergy in Swedish dentists were studied in a multidisciplinary project. The aims of the study were to establish diagnoses, to investigate the occurrence of contact allergy, in particular to (meth)acrylates, and to evaluate certain consequences of hand eczema. A postal questionnaire on skin symptoms, atopy and occupational experience was mailed to 3,500 dentists aged <65 years, and licensed 1965-1995. The response rate was 88%. Among dentists living in 3 major cities, 14.9% (n= 191) reported hand eczema during the previous year. They were invited to a clinical examination, including patch testing with a standard and a dental series. 158/191 (83%) dentists attended, and hand eczema diagnosis was confirmed in 149/158 (94%). Irritant contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 67% and allergic contact dermatitis in 28%. On patch testing, 50% presented at least 1 positive reaction. The most frequent allergens were nickel sulfate, fragrance mix, gold sodium thiosulfate and thiuram mix. 7 (5%) had positive reactions to (meth)acrylates, all to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 6 also to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. 38% had consulted a physician, 4% had been on sick-leave and 1% had changed occupational tasks due to hand eczema. No dentist with allergy to acrylates had been on sick-leave or changed occupation. It is concluded that dentistry is a high-risk occupation for hand eczema, and that irritant contact dermatitis is most common. The prevalence of contact allergy to acrylates was below 1% in the population of responding dentists, and in most cases did not have serious medical, social or occupational consequences. PMID:11011917

Wallenhammar, L M; Ortengren, U; Andreasson, H; Barregård, L; Björkner, B; Karlsson, S; Wrangsjö, K; Meding, B

2000-10-01

63

MRSA patients: proven methods to treat colonization and infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections continue to cause serious nosocomial infections in many hospitals. Measures used to control the spread of these infections include ongoing laboratory-based surveillance, placing colonized and infected patients in isolation, use of barrier precautions and handwashing and hand antisepsis. Culturing hospitalized patients at high risk of acquiring MRSA can facilitate detection and isolation of colonized patients.

J. M. Boyce

2001-01-01

64

Antimicrobial pharmacodynamics against MRSA in an in vitro infection model: comparing monotherapy to combinations under standard and altered conditions.  

E-print Network

??Methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA) is a highly virulent pathogen associated with serious healthcare-associated (HCA-MRSA) and community-associated (CA-MRSA) infections. MRSA is an increasingly important cause of skin… (more)

Alkurdi, Noha

2011-01-01

65

Immunomodulating effect of laser therapy in patients with microbial eczema  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While examining 90 patients suffering the microbial eczema (ME), we revealed disorders of the immune system in the majority of them (3/4). It was established that the inclusion of percutaneous laser irradiation of the blood in a course of multimodality treatment of patients with ME caused an immunomodulating action which resulted in an improved ME course in these patients.

Dudchenko, Mycola O.; Denisenko, Olga I.

1999-11-01

66

Atopic eczema: the current state of clinical research.  

PubMed

Atopic eczema (AE), also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic, inflammatory, itchy skin condition that usually develops in early childhood. There has been a steep rise in the burden of atopic eczema, with up to 20% of children in developed countries now suffering from the disease ( Flohr and Mann, 2014 ). Although atopic eczema is not always recognised as a serious medical condition by health professionals, it can have a significant negative impact on quality of life for children and their parents or carers ( National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), 2013 ). The application of eczema treatments often results in conflict between parents and their children, which affects family relationships further and drains the carers' physical and emotional resources ( Santer et al, 2013 ). It is typically an episodic disease of exacerbation with flares occurring two or three times per month, with periods of remission. For some children, however, it is continuous ( NICE, 2013 ). Although a common condition, there are uncertainties regarding treatments used both for health professionals and for patients and their carers. A recent priority setting partnership highlighted the top 14 uncertainties ( Box 1 ), which will provide guidance for future research and answer questions that are important to both clinicians and patients (Batchelor et al, 2013). This article cannot cover all aspects of AE, but will give an update on some of the current research projects and signpost the reader to further resources. PMID:25382078

Lawton, Sandra

2014-11-01

67

Community-associated MRSA: what makes them special?  

PubMed Central

Summary While infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were traditionally restricted to the hospital setting, novel MRSA strains emerged over the last two decades that have the capacity to infect otherwise healthy people outside of the hospital setting. These communityassociated (CA-) MRSA strains combine methicillin resistance with enhanced virulence and fitness. Interestingly, CA-MRSA strains emerged globally and from different backgrounds, indicating that the “trade-off” between maintaining sufficient levels of methicillin resistance and obtaining enhanced virulence at a low fitness cost was achieved on several occasions in convergent evolution. However, frequently this process comprised similar changes. First and foremost, all CA-MRSA strains typically carry a novel type of methicillin resistance locus that appears to cause less of a fitness burden. Additionally, acquisition of specific toxin genes, most notably that encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and adaptation of gene expression of genome-encoded toxins, such as alpha-toxin and phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), further contributed to the evolution of CA-MRSA. Finally, the exceptional epidemiological success of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in particular may have been due to yet another gene acquisition, namely that of the speG gene, which is located on the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) and involved in detoxifying harmful host-derived polyamines. PMID:23517691

Otto, Michael

2013-01-01

68

Outcome of MRSA carriers in neurological early rehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Background Colonization with MRSA is believed to have deteriorating effects on neurological rehabilitation patients because MRSA carriers need to be isolated. Methods Medical records of neurological early rehabilitation patients (most of them after stroke) admitted to a large rehabilitation facility in Northern Germany in 2010 have been carefully reviewed with respect to MRSA status, outcome variables (functional independence), morbidity, and length of stay (LOS). Results 74/569 (13.0%) patients were MRSA positive on admission. MRSA carriers had a significantly longer LOS in early neurological rehabilitation (63.7 (37.1) vs. 25.8 (24.5) days, p?MRSA positive patients (BI 25.5 (21.2) vs. 47.4 (31.0), p?MRSA positive group due to longer LOS. Conclusions Functional recovery of MRSA carriers in early neurological rehabilitation is worse than in MRSA negative patients. Poorer outcome is not resulting from isolation (less therapy) but from functional status and higher morbidity on admission. PMID:24555811

2014-01-01

69

MRSA as an occupational disease: a case series  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  Occupationally acquired infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an issue of increasing concern.\\u000a However, the number of cases of occupational disease (OD) due to MRSA in healthcare workers (HCWs) and the characteristics\\u000a of such cases have not been reported for Germany.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Cases of OD due to MRSA were identified from the database of a compensation board (BGW) for the

Frank Haamann; Madeleine Dulon; Albert Nienhaus

2011-01-01

70

First outbreak of community-acquired MRSA USA300 in France: failure to suppress prolonged MRSA carriage despite decontamination procedures.  

PubMed

The first French outbreak of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) USA300 clone was investigated. After outbreak investigation, hygiene measures were implemented in all family households and childminders' homes. Several decontamination procedures were performed, which used a combination of topical mupirocin, total body application of chlorhexidine, chlorhexidine gargle (if >6 years old) and a course of antibiotic therapy in cases of infection or decontamination failure. Patients were followed up for MRSA skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and carriage. Strains were characterised by antimicrobial drug resistance profile, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA microarrays. Between June 2011 and June 2012, six children and six adults among the ten corresponding relatives developed 28 SSTIs. None of the family members, including the index case, had any contact with foreigners or individuals known to have SSTIs. After infection control measures and prolonged decontamination have been implemented with a high adherence, six patients remained sustained CA-MRSA USA300 carriers, including one who developed mupirocin resistance and six who experienced minor CA-MRSA-related SSTIs. A baby was identified as an MRSA carrier 2 months after delivery. CA-MRSA decontamination using mupirocin and chlorhexidine in the community setting may also be a questionable strategy, associated with failure and resistance to both agents. Close monitoring of CA-MRSA SSTIs is required in France and in other European countries where MRSA USA300 has recently emerged. We showed that a closed management based on hygiene measures reinforcement, decolonisation and extended screening may fail to suppress CA-MRSA carriage and subsequent infections. PMID:24816900

Baud, O; Giron, S; Aumeran, C; Mouly, D; Bardon, G; Besson, M; Delmas, J; Coignard, B; Tristan, A; Vandenesch, F; Illes, G; Lesens, O

2014-10-01

71

Survival of epidemic strains of healthcare (HA-MRSA) and community-associated (CA-MRSA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in river-, sea- and swimming pool water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to examine the survival dynamics of several epidemic healthcare (HA) and community-associated (CA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in river, sea and swimming pool waters. Six different phage-types of HA-MRSA (Irish 1, Irish 2, EMRSA 15, EMRSA 16, distinct type and non-typable), as well as a community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA), were examined in this study. Two

Ola Tolba; Anne Loughrey; Colin E. Goldsmith; B. Cherie Millar; Paul J. Rooney; John E. Moore

2008-01-01

72

Mupirocin resistance and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mupirocin has become the topical agent of choice for the elimination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage. The increased use of this antibiotic has been followed by reports of outbreaks due to MRSA with both low- and high-level resistance. Whilst low-level resistance is becoming more widespread, it is unlikely to have a major impact upon current practice. High-level resistance is

I. Eltringham

1997-01-01

73

Quantitative assessment of human MRSA risks from Swine.  

PubMed

The public health community, news media, and members of the general public have expressed significant concern that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmitted from pigs to humans may harm human health. Studies of the prevalence and dynamics of swine-associated (ST398) MRSA have sampled MRSA at discrete points in the presumed causative chain leading from swine to human patients, including sampling bacteria from live pigs, retail meats, farm workers, and hospital patients. Nonzero prevalence is generally interpreted as indicating a potential human health hazard from MRSA infections, but quantitative assessments of resulting risks are not usually provided. This article integrates available data from several sources to construct a conservative (plausible upper bound) probability estimate for the actual human health harm (MRSA infections and fatalities) arising from ST398-MRSA from pigs. The model provides plausible upper bounds of approximately one excess human infection per year among all U.S. pig farm workers, and one human infection per 31 years among the remaining total population of the United States. These results assume the possibility of transmission events not yet observed, so additional data collection may reduce these estimates further. PMID:25100207

Cox, Louis Anthony Tony; Popken, Douglas A

2014-09-01

74

In vitro anti-MRSA activity of carvone with gentamicin  

PubMed Central

Carvone is one of the naturally occurring monoterpenes, the largest class of secondary metabolites in plants, and exists in two enantiomers, R-carvone (R-car) and S-car. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of R-car and S-car with gentamicin (GET) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major human pathogen that causes serious problems, including hospital-acquired pneumonia, abscesses and surgical wound infections. Nosocomial MRSA infections often exhibit multidrug resistance. In the present study, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed with R-car, S-car and GET using the broth microdilution method. Minimal inhibitory concentration values for R- and S-car against six different strains of S. aureus ranged between 500 and 1,000 ?g/ml. Anti-MRSA activity was evaluated using the checkerboard and time-kill assays to investigate the potential synergistic effects of different combinations of the carvone enantiomers and GET. R-car plus S-car, R-car plus GET and S-car plus GET exhibited significant synergistic activity against MRSA. These findings suggest that the single-agent anti-MRSA activities of R-car, S-car and GET are effectively increased through combination therapy. This study showed that carvone may be a potential adjuvant antimicrobial agent. PMID:24669246

MUN, SU-HYUN; KANG, OK-HWA; JOUNG, DAE-KI; KIM, SUNG-BAE; CHOI, JANG-GI; SHIN, DONG-WON; KWON, DONG-YEUL

2014-01-01

75

Evaluation of the LightCycler Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Advanced Test for Detection of MRSA Nasal Colonization  

PubMed Central

Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization is crucial for the prevention and control of MRSA infections in health care settings. The LightCycler MRSA Advanced Test (Roche Diagnostics) is a commercially available real-time PCR assay for direct detection of MRSA nasal colonization by targeting of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-orfX junction. The diagnostic performance of the assay was compared with that of ChromID MRSA agar (bioMérieux) culture and an in-house duplex real-time PCR assay. Among 1,246 nasal swab specimens collected from 2 general hospitals in Hong Kong, 174 (14%) were considered true positive for MRSA. Chromogenic culture and the in-house real-time PCR assay identified 147 (84.5%) and 133 (76.4%) true-positive cases with specificities of 100% and 98.6%, respectively. Based on the target melting temperature (Tm) values (57.0 to 62.0°C) defined by the manufacturer, the LightCycler MRSA Advanced Test identified only 85 (48.9%) true-positive specimens. Interestingly, an additional 60 (34.5%) true-positive specimens were detected despite atypical Tm values of 55°C, providing overall sensitivity and specificity values of 83.3% and 99%, respectively. Among isolates with Tm values of 55°C, most were typed as clonal complex 45 (CC45). By sequence analysis of the SCCmec-orfX junction, characteristic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified only in isolates with Tm values of 55°C and not in those with typical Tm values. It is conceivable that those SNPs were located inside the target region of the proprietary hybridization probes, which resulted in a Tm shift in the melting curve analysis. Our study highlights the importance of a global evaluation of commercial kits so that the interpretation algorithm covers different lineages of MRSA clones prevalent in various geographical regions. PMID:23784133

Siu, Gilman K. H.; Ho, P. L.; Ng, T. K.; Que, T. L.; Yip, K. T.; Fok, Cathie P. K.; Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Yuen, K. Y.

2013-01-01

76

Multicenter Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Test as a Rapid Screening Method for Detection of MRSA in Nares  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first U.S. multicenter clinical trial to assess the performance of the Cepheid Xpert MRSA assay (Xpert MRSA) was conducted. The assay is a qualitative test designed for the rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) directly from nares swabs. This novel test combines integrated nucleic acid extraction and automated real-time PCR for the detection of a MRSA-specific signature sequence.

D. M. Wolk; E. Picton; D. Johnson; T. Davis; P. Pancholi; C. C. Ginocchio; S. Finegold; D. F. Welch; M. de Boer; D. Fuller; M. C. Solomon; B. Rogers; M. S. Mehta; L. R. Peterson

2009-01-01

77

The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) statement to assess clinical signs of atopic eczema in trials.  

PubMed

The lack of core outcome sets for atopic eczema (AE) is a major obstacle for advancing evidence-based treatment. The global Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative has already defined clinical signs, symptoms, quality of life, and long-term control of flares as core outcome domains for AE trials. This article deals with the standardization of measurement instruments to assess clinical signs of AE. To resolve the current lack of standardization of the assessment of clinical signs of AE, we followed a structured process of systematic reviews and international consensus sessions to identify 1 core outcome measurement instrument for assessment of clinical signs in all future AE trials. Systematic reviews indicated that from 16 different instruments identified to assess clinical signs of AE, only the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) and the objective Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index were identified as extensively validated. The EASI has adequate validity, responsiveness, internal consistency, and intraobserver reliability. The objective SCORAD index has adequate validity, responsiveness, and interobserver reliability but unclear intraobserver reliability to measure clinical signs of AE. In an international consensus study, patients, physicians, nurses, methodologists, and pharmaceutical industry representatives agreed that the EASI is the preferred core instrument to measure clinical signs in all future AE trials. All stakeholders involved in designing, reporting, and using clinical trials on AE are asked to comply with this consensus to enable better evidence-based decision making, clearer scientific communication, and improved patient care. PMID:25282560

Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis I; Thomas, Kim S; Simpson, Eric; Furue, Masutaka; Deckert, Stefanie; Dohil, Magdalene; Apfelbacher, Christian; Singh, Jasvinder A; Chalmers, Joanne; Williams, Hywel C

2014-10-01

78

Risk factors for developing clinical infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) amongst hospital patients initially only colonized with MRSA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In hospital outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) many patients are initially colonized without infection. The reasons why some progress to infection while others do not are not known. A cohort of 479 hospital patients, initially only colonized with MRSA, was followed prospectively for the development of MRSA infection. Risk factors for progression to infection were assessed using Cox proportional

R. Coello; J. R. Glynn; C. Gaspar; J. J. Picazo; J. Fereres

1997-01-01

79

Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nococomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of two acute district general hospitals (A and B) was undertaken to investigate the extent of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals. Of 25 terminals examined, MRSA was identified in six (24%). Environmental contamination was of a low level. Five of the MRSA positive terminals were from hospital A which had a significantly higher rate

J. Devine; R. P. D. Cooke; E. P. Wright

2001-01-01

80

Epidemiology of Emerging Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Denmark: a Nationwide Study in a Country with Low Prevalence of MRSA Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Strict infection control measures introduced during the 1970s have kept the incidence of methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections extremely low in Denmark. Nevertheless, similarly to other countries, MRSA infections began to appear in the community in the late 1990s. A nationwide surveillance program has collected and stored all MRSA isolates since 1988 and, since 1999, clinical information has been

Nuno A. Faria; Duarte C. Oliveira; Henrik Westh; Dominique L. Monnet; Anders R. Larsen; Robert Skov; Hermõ ´ nia de Lencastre

2005-01-01

81

Developmental Profiles of Eczema, Wheeze, and Rhinitis: Two Population-Based Birth Cohort Studies  

PubMed Central

Background The term “atopic march” has been used to imply a natural progression of a cascade of symptoms from eczema to asthma and rhinitis through childhood. We hypothesize that this expression does not adequately describe the natural history of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis during childhood. We propose that this paradigm arose from cross-sectional analyses of longitudinal studies, and may reflect a population pattern that may not predominate at the individual level. Methods and Findings Data from 9,801 children in two population-based birth cohorts were used to determine individual profiles of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis and whether the manifestations of these symptoms followed an atopic march pattern. Children were assessed at ages 1, 3, 5, 8, and 11 y. We used Bayesian machine learning methods to identify distinct latent classes based on individual profiles of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis. This approach allowed us to identify groups of children with similar patterns of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis over time. Using a latent disease profile model, the data were best described by eight latent classes: no disease (51.3%), atopic march (3.1%), persistent eczema and wheeze (2.7%), persistent eczema with later-onset rhinitis (4.7%), persistent wheeze with later-onset rhinitis (5.7%), transient wheeze (7.7%), eczema only (15.3%), and rhinitis only (9.6%). When latent variable modelling was carried out separately for the two cohorts, similar results were obtained. Highly concordant patterns of sensitisation were associated with different profiles of eczema, rhinitis, and wheeze. The main limitation of this study was the difference in wording of the questions used to ascertain the presence of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis in the two cohorts. Conclusions The developmental profiles of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis are heterogeneous; only a small proportion of children (?7% of those with symptoms) follow trajectory profiles resembling the atopic march. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25335105

2014-01-01

82

Use of bleach baths for the treatment of infected atopic eczema.  

PubMed

Atopic eczema is one of the most common skin disorders in young children and also affects adults. Staphylococcus aureus infection is the most frequent complication of atopic eczema and is involved in the worsening of the disease. Antibiotic therapy against S.?aureus has been an important component of treatment for atopic eczema but there are concerns about antibiotic overuse and increasing bacterial resistance. This has led some clinicians to recommend the use of homemade remedies such as bleach baths as an adjunctive treatment for patients with infected atopic eczema, despite the fact that there have been few published studies in this area. Balancing safety concerns with efficacious treatment is of particular importance in the paediatric population. This review discusses the historical use of bleach in medicine as well as its recent use for atopic eczema. Further, the chemistry and safety of bleach as well as alternative therapies are examined. PMID:23330843

Barnes, Tanya M; Greive, Kerryn A

2013-11-01

83

Foot eczema: the role of patch test in determining the causative agent using standard series.  

PubMed

Foot dermatitis refers to the predominant involvement of feet in the eczematous process. This study is undertaken to determine the clinical pattern and causative agent in foot eczema and to evaluate the role of patch testing in determining the causative agent of foot eczema. Data was collected from 50 patients with foot eczema, who attended the out-patient department. The patch test was performed using Indian standard series. Patch test was positive in 88% of the patients. The most common site affected was the dorsal aspect of the foot (48%) and scaly plaque was the predominant morphological pattern. The highest number of patients (24%) showed positive reactions to mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and the lowest (4%) to neomycin sulfate. Rubber and rubber chemicals have been reported worldwide to be the most common sensitizer causing foot eczema. Thus, patch test has a major role in finding out the cause of foot eczema. PMID:19881990

Priya, K S; Kamath, Ganesh; Martis, Jacintha; D, Sukumar; Shetty, Narendra J; Bhat, Ramesh M; Kishore, B Nanda

2008-01-01

84

Contamination of public buses with MRSA in Lisbon, Portugal: a possible transmission route of major MRSA clones within the community.  

PubMed

In a previous study we have shown that public buses in Oporto, the second largest city in Portugal, were highly contaminated with MRSA. Here we describe the results of a similar study performed in another urban area of Portugal-Lisbon, the capital. Between May 2011 and May 2012, hand touched surfaces of 199 public buses in Lisbon were screened for MRSA contamination. Subsequently, the hands of 575 passengers who frequently use these bus lines were also screened. All hand carriers of MRSA were further screened for nasal carriage. The isolates were characterized by PFGE, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing, spa typing, MLST and were tested for the presence of mecA, Panton-Valentine leukocidin and arginine catabolic mobile element genes. MRSA contamination was shown in 72 buses (36.2%). The majority of the isolates belonged to three major clones: Clone A was identified as EMRSA-15 defined by pattern PFGE A, spa types t2357/t747/t025/t379/t910, ST22, and SCCmec IVh (n = 21; 29%). Clone B was the New York/Japan clone characterized by PFGE B-t002/t10682-ST5-II (n = 15; 21%). Clone C included isolates with characteristics of the international community-acquired USA300 or related clones, PFGE C-t008-ST8-IVa/IVc/IVg/IVnt/VI (n = 19; 26%). The first two clones are currently the two major lineages circulating in Portuguese hospitals. The hands of 15 individuals were contaminated with MRSA belonging to the nosocomial clones A or B. Eleven of these individuals were not nasal carriers of MRSA and all but one had travelled by public transportation, namely by bus, prior to sampling. In conclusion, public buses in two major cities in Portugal are often contaminated with MRSA representing clones dominant in hospitals in the particular geographic area. MRSA contamination of public transport and the transfer of the bacteria to the hands of passengers may represent a route through which hospital-acquired MRSA clones may spread to the community. PMID:24223124

Conceição, Teresa; Diamantino, Fernanda; Coelho, Céline; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

2013-01-01

85

Contamination of Public Buses with MRSA in Lisbon, Portugal: A Possible Transmission Route of Major MRSA Clones within the Community  

PubMed Central

In a previous study we have shown that public buses in Oporto, the second largest city in Portugal, were highly contaminated with MRSA. Here we describe the results of a similar study performed in another urban area of Portugal–Lisbon, the capital. Between May 2011 and May 2012, hand touched surfaces of 199 public buses in Lisbon were screened for MRSA contamination. Subsequently, the hands of 575 passengers who frequently use these bus lines were also screened. All hand carriers of MRSA were further screened for nasal carriage. The isolates were characterized by PFGE, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing, spa typing, MLST and were tested for the presence of mecA, Panton-Valentine leukocidin and arginine catabolic mobile element genes. MRSA contamination was shown in 72 buses (36.2%). The majority of the isolates belonged to three major clones: Clone A was identified as EMRSA-15 defined by pattern PFGE A, spa types t2357/t747/t025/t379/t910, ST22, and SCCmec IVh (n?=?21; 29%). Clone B was the New York/Japan clone characterized by PFGE B-t002/t10682-ST5-II (n?=?15; 21%). Clone C included isolates with characteristics of the international community-acquired USA300 or related clones, PFGE C-t008-ST8-IVa/IVc/IVg/IVnt/VI (n?=?19; 26%). The first two clones are currently the two major lineages circulating in Portuguese hospitals. The hands of 15 individuals were contaminated with MRSA belonging to the nosocomial clones A or B. Eleven of these individuals were not nasal carriers of MRSA and all but one had travelled by public transportation, namely by bus, prior to sampling. In conclusion, public buses in two major cities in Portugal are often contaminated with MRSA representing clones dominant in hospitals in the particular geographic area. MRSA contamination of public transport and the transfer of the bacteria to the hands of passengers may represent a route through which hospital-acquired MRSA clones may spread to the community. PMID:24223124

Conceicao, Teresa; Diamantino, Fernanda; Coelho, Celine; de Lencastre, Herminia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

2013-01-01

86

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in India: Prevalence & susceptibility pattern  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic in India and is a dangerous pathogen for hospital acquired infections. This study was conducted in 15 Indian tertiary care centres during a two year period from January 2008 to December 2009 to determine the prevalence of MRSA and susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates in India. Methods: All S. aureus isolates obtained during the study period in the participating centres were included in the study. Each centre compiled their data in a predefined template which included data of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, location of the patient and specimen type. The data in the submitted templates were collated and analysed. Results: A total of 26310 isolates were included in the study. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistance during the study period was 41 per cent. Isolation rates for MRSA from outpatients, ward inpatients and ICU were 28, 42 and 43 per cent, respectively in 2008 and 27, 49 and 47 per cent, respectively in 2009. The majority of S. aureus isolates was obtained from patients with skin and soft tissue infections followed by those suffering from blood stream infections and respiratory infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was low in both MSSA (53%) and MRSA (21%). MSSA isolates showed a higher susceptibility to gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin and clindamycin as compared to MRSA isolates. No isolate was found resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed a high level of MRSA in our country. There is a need to study epidemiology of such infections. Robust antimicrobial stewardship and strengthened infection control measures are required to prevent spread and reduce emergence of resistance. PMID:23563381

Joshi, Sangeeta; Ray, Pallab; Manchanda, Vikas; Bajaj, Jyoti; Chitnis, D.S.; Gautam, Vikas; Goswami, Parijath; Gupta, Varsha; Harish, B.N.; Kagal, Anju; Kapil, Arti; Rao, Ratna; Rodrigues, Camilla; Sardana, Raman; Devi, Kh Sulochana; Sharma, Anita; Balaji, Veeragaghavan

2013-01-01

87

MRSA in Conventional and Alternative Retail Pork Products  

PubMed Central

In order to examine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus on retail pork, three hundred ninety-five pork samples were collected from a total of 36 stores in Iowa, Minnesota, and New Jersey. S. aureus was isolated from 256 samples (64.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 59.9%–69.5%). S. aureus was isolated from 67.3% (202/300) of conventional pork samples and from 56.8% (54/95) of alternative pork samples (labeled “raised without antibiotics” or “raised without antibiotic growth promotants”). Two hundred and thirty samples (58.2%, 95% CI 53.2%–63.1%) were found to carry methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). MSSA was isolated from 61.0% (183/300) of conventional samples and from 49.5% (47/95) of alternative samples. Twenty-six pork samples (6.6%, 95% CI 4.3%–9.5%) carried methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). No statistically significant differences were observed for the prevalence of S. aureus in general, or MSSA or MRSA specifically, when comparing pork products from conventionally raised swine and swine raised without antibiotics, a finding that contrasts with a prior study from the Netherlands examining both conventional and “biologic” meat products. In our study spa types associated with “livestock-associated” ST398 (t034, t011) were found in 26.9% of the MRSA isolates, while 46.2% were spa types t002 and t008—common human types of MRSA that also have been found in live swine. The study represents the largest sampling of raw meat products for MRSA contamination to date in the U.S. MRSA prevalence on pork products was higher than in previous U.S.-conducted studies, although similar to that in Canadian studies. PMID:22276147

O'Brien, Ashley M.; Hanson, Blake M.; Farina, Sarah A.; Wu, James Y.; Simmering, Jacob E.; Wardyn, Shylo E.; Forshey, Brett M.; Kulick, Marie E.; Wallinga, David B.; Smith, Tara C.

2012-01-01

88

Nasal Screening for MRSA: Different Swabs - Different Results!  

PubMed Central

Objectives Swab-based nasal screening is commonly used to identify asymptomatic carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients. Bacterial detection depends on the uptake and release capacities of the swabs and on the swabbing technique itself. This study investigates the performance of different swab-types in nasal MRSA-screening by utilizing a unique artificial nose model to provide realistic and standardized screening conditions. Methods An anatomically correct artificial nose model was inoculated with a numerically defined mixture of MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria at quantities of 4×102 and 8×102 colony forming units (CFU), respectively. Five swab-types were tested following a strict protocol. Bacterial recovery was measured for direct plating and after elution into Amies medium by standard viable count techniques. Results Mean recovered bacteria quantities varied between 209 and 0 CFU for MRSA, and 365 and 0 CFU for S. epidermidis, resulting swab-type-dependent MRSA-screening-sensitivities ranged between 0 and 100%. Swabs with nylon flocked tips or cellular foam tips performed significantly better compared to conventional rayon swabs referring to the recovered bacterial yield (p<0.001). Best results were obtained by using a flocked swab in combination with Amies preservation medium. Within the range of the utilized bacterial concentrations, recovery ratios for the particular swab-types were independent of the bacterial species. Conclusions This study combines a realistic model of a human nose with standardized laboratory conditions to analyze swab-performance in MRSA-screening situations. Therefore, influences by inter-individual anatomical differences as well as diverse colonization densities in patients could be excluded. Recovery rates vary significantly between different swab-types. The choice of the swab has a great impact on the laboratory result. In fact, the swab-type contributes significantly to true positive or false negative detection of nasal MRSA carriage. These findings should be considered when screening a patient. PMID:25353631

Warnke, Philipp; Frickmann, Hagen; Ottl, Peter; Podbielski, Andreas

2014-01-01

89

Suicidal ideation, mental health problems, and social function in adolescents with eczema: a population-based study.  

PubMed

There are few studies on psychosocial problems in adolescents with eczema. We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study to explore the relationship of suicidal ideation, mental health problems, and social functioning with eczema. A total of 4,744 adolescents (18-19 years) were invited for the study, of whom 3,775 (80%) participated. The overall prevalence of current eczema was 9.7%. Among those with current eczema, 15.5% reported suicidal ideation compared with 9.1% among those without eczema, significantly associated in a multivariate model (odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.31-2.68). In a subgroup analyses, the prevalence of suicidal ideation in those with both eczema and itch was 23.8%, and was significantly associated, compared with those without eczema (3.57, 2.46-5.67). Eczema was associated with mental health problems assessed by the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (1.72, 1.21-2.45) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 10 (1.63, 1.23-2.16). Five questions assessed social function: feeling attached to family and friends; thriving at school; experiencing bullying; and romantic relationships. Boys with current eczema were less likely to have had romantic relationships (1.93, 1.21-3.08). Eczema in late adolescence is associated with suicidal ideation and mental health problems but rarely with social problems. Our findings point to the importance of addressing mental health issues in adolescents with eczema. PMID:24496238

Halvorsen, Jon A; Lien, Lars; Dalgard, Florence; Bjertness, Espen; Stern, Robert S

2014-07-01

90

A survey of occupational hand eczema in Denmark.  

PubMed

Occupational hand eczema (OHE) is the most frequently recognized work-related disease in Denmark and the annual cost to society is high. Understanding of the epidemiology of OHE is essential to be able to give appropriate recommendations for its prevention. The study comprised 758 persons, 490 females and 268 males with recognized OHE in the period October 2001 to November 2002. Data were obtained prospectively from the National Board of Industrial Industry Registry and from a self-administered questionnaire (response rate, 82%). The most frequently recognized diagnosis was irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), mainly caused by wet occupations. The proportion of occupational ICD was equal for males and females, 59.7% and 63.1%, respectively. The estimated rates of OHE were high for bakers, hairdressers and dental surgery assistants, and a high proportion of apprentices were found among hairdressers. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis was low (16.4%) compared to previous studies among hand eczema patients. The prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in the study population was substantially higher among males than females, and the most frequent causes among males were allergy to chromium (leather exposure), rubber additives (gloves) and nickel due to exposure from work tools and metalworking industry. PMID:15500664

Skoet, Rikke; Olsen, Jorn; Mathiesen, Bent; Iversen, Lars; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Agner, Tove

2004-10-01

91

[First case of pithomycotoxicosis (facial eczema) in the Netherlands].  

PubMed

Between mid September and the beginning of November 2005, the Animal Health Service (AHS) received thirteen reports offarms on which several animals showed severe symptoms of solar eczema. Blood chemistry showed very high levels of GOT/AST and GGT indicative of severe liver damage. Farm visits to eight farms showed that the animals--previous to the start of the symptoms--had been grazing 24 hours/day and received no additional feed. Ingestion of poisonous plants or medications was considered unlikely to have caused the liver damage, and liver fluke infections were present on only two farms. Microscopic examination of specimens of grass revealed the presence of spores of Pithomyces chartarum in samples taken from six of nine farms. This fungus produces the mycotoxin sporidesmin, which causes severe liver damage and pithomycotoxicosis (facial eczema). This article is the first to describe Pithomyces chartarum in cattle in mainland Europe. Further research on the distribution and re-occurrence of Pithomyces chartarum infection and sporidesmin survival in grass silage is recommended. PMID:17243449

van Wuijckhuise, L; Snoep, J; Cremers, G; Duvivier, A; Groeneveld, A; Ottens, W; van der Sar, S

2006-12-01

92

Genome and virulence determinants of high virulence community-acquired MRSA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Background A new type of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), designated community-acquired MRSA, is becoming increasingly noticeable in the community, some strains of which cause fatal infections in otherwise healthy individuals. By contrast with hospital-acquired MRSA, community-acquired MRSA is more susceptible to non ? -lactam antibiotics. We investigated the high virulence potential of certain strains of this bacterium. Methods We

Tadashi Baba; Fumihiko Takeuchi; Makoto Kuroda; Harumi Yuzawa; Ken-ichi Aoki; Akio Oguchi; Yoshimi Nagai; Natsuko Iwama; Kazuyuki Asano; Timothy Naimi; Hiroko Kuroda; Longzhu Cui; Kenji Yamamoto; Keiichi Hiramatsu

2002-01-01

93

Chronic Hand Eczema: Perception and Knowledge in Non-affected Individuals from General and Dermatological Practice.  

PubMed

Misunderstanding and stigmatisation are common problems encountered by patients with hand eczema. Various misconceptions about the disease circulate in the general population. Although hand eczema has gained more attention in dermatology during the past years, information on public perception of the disease is still lacking. The aim of our study was to investigate perception of and level of knowledge on the subject hand eczema. There were 624 patients included from 2 general medicine practices and 2 dermatological practices. A self-administered questionnaire was filled out by the participants, covering issues on history of hand eczema, level of knowledge and attitude towards a clinical photograph of hand eczema. We found that a larger proportion of individuals from dermatological practice were more familiar with hand eczema as a disease than those from general medical practice. Women knew significantly more about and had a more positive perception of the disease than men. Our results imply that the level of knowledge on hand eczema in the general public is rather low and influenced by prejudice. PMID:24531444

Letulé, Valerie; Herzinger, Thomas; Schirner, Astrid; Hertrich, Frank; Lange, Dirk; Ruzicka, Thomas; Molin, Sonja

2014-10-23

94

Clinical utility of the Xpert MRSA assay for early detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for many nosocomial and community-acquired infections, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. A practical way to limit the spread of MRSA is early detection and proper treatment. However, screening culture for MRSA typically requires 2–3 days. The Xpert MRSA assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) is a real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assay developed for screening an MRSA-specific DNA sequence within the staphylococcal cassette chromosome in 2 h. Lower respiratory tract specimens, such as transtracheal aspirates (TTAs) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), are commonly obtained from intubated patients. Therefore, using the lower respiratory tract specimens with the Xpert MRSA assay may be a practical tool for patient care. We performed the Xpert MRSA assay on 108 TTA and 21 BALF specimens from 92 patients and compared the results to those obtained by culture. The two assays showed concordant results in 120 (93.0%) cases and discordant results in 9 (7.0%) cases, which were culture-negative and Xpert MRSA-positive. Among the discordant cases, 5 patients developed culture-positive samples 2–15 days after the Xpert MRSA detected MRSA. We conclude that the Xpert MRSA assay is a rapid, sensitive and clinically useful test, particularly for the early detection of MRSA. PMID:23064681

OH, AE-CHIN; LEE, JIN KYUNG; LEE, HA NA; HONG, YOUNG JUN; CHANG, YOON HWAN; HONG, SEOK-IL; KIM, DONG HO

2013-01-01

95

First Outbreak with MRSA in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Risk Factors and Control Procedures  

PubMed Central

Introduction The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Denmark June 25th–August 8th 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA transmission. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and the Danish Neobase database. All MRSA isolates obtained from neonates, relatives and NICU health care workers (HCW) as well as environmental cultures were typed. Results During the 46 day outbreak period, 102 neonates were admitted to the two neonatal wards. Ninety-nine neonates were subsequently sampled, and 32 neonates (32%) from 25 families were colonized with MRSA (spa-type t127, SCCmec V, PVL negative). Thirteen family members from 11 of those families (44%) and two of 161 HCWs (1%) were colonized with the same MRSA. No one was infected. Five environmental cultures were MRSA positive. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (nCPAP) treatment (p?=?0.006) and Caesarean section (p?=?0.016) were independent risk factors for MRSA acquisition, whereas days of exposure to MRSA was a risk factors in the unadjusted analysis (p?=?0.04). Conclusions MRSA transmission occurs with high frequency in the NICU during hospitalization with unidentified MRSA neonates. Caesarean section and nCPAP treatment were identified as risk factors for MRSA colonization. The MRSA outbreak was controlled through infection control procedures. PMID:23825581

Ramsing, Benedicte Grenness Utke; Arpi, Magnus; Andersen, Erik Arthur; Knabe, Niels; Mogensen, Dorthe; Buhl, Dorte; Westh, Henrik; ?stergaard, Christian

2013-01-01

96

The structureactivity relationships of mansonone F, a potent anti-MRSA sesquiterpenoid quinone: SAR studies  

E-print Network

The structure�activity relationships of mansonone F, a potent anti-MRSA sesquiterpenoid quinone on mansonone F, a series of C6 and C9 analogs of mansonone F have been synthesized and their anti-MRSA activities were evaluated. Most of the analogs exhibited good or excellent anti-MRSA activities

Suh, Young-Ger

97

Glomerulonephritis associated with MRSA infection: A possible role of bacterial superantigen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glomerulonephritis associated with MRSA infection: A possible role of bacterial superantigen. We report 10 cases of glomerulonephritis following methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The clinical features of this syndrome were an abrupt or insidious onset of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) with nephrotic syndrome and occasionally purpura, following MRSA infection. The renal histologic findings showed a variety of types of proliferative

Akio Koyama; Masaki Kobayashi; Naoto Yamaguchi; Kunihiro Yamagata; Katsuhisa Takano; Masami Nakajima; Fujiko Irie; Michihiro Goto; Masaya Igarashi; Tadashi Iitsuka; Yasuko Aoki; Hideko Sakurai; Noriko Sakurayama; Katashi Fukao

1995-01-01

98

MRSA Information for Patients and Families What is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)?  

E-print Network

MRSA Information for Patients and Families What is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)? S. aureus) or serious (such as blood infection or pneumonia). What is MRSA? MRSA (Methicillin Resistant S. aureus) is a kind of S. aureus germ that can not be treated by some antibiotics often used to treat staph infections

Kim, Duck O.

99

Transferable vancomycin resistance in a community-associated MRSA lineage.  

PubMed

We report the case of a patient from Brazil with a bloodstream infection caused by a strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that was susceptible to vancomycin (designated BR-VSSA) but that acquired the vanA gene cluster during antibiotic therapy and became resistant to vancomycin (designated BR-VRSA). Both strains belong to the sequence type (ST) 8 community-associated genetic lineage that carries the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) type IVa and the S. aureus protein A gene (spa) type t292 and are phylogenetically related to MRSA lineage USA300. A conjugative plasmid of 55,706 bp (pBRZ01) carrying the vanA cluster was identified and readily transferred to other staphylococci. The pBRZ01 plasmid harbors DNA sequences that are typical of the plasmid-associated replication genes rep24 or rep21 described in community-associated MRSA strains from Australia (pWBG745). The presence and dissemination of community-associated MRSA containing vanA could become a serious public health concern. PMID:24738669

Rossi, Flávia; Diaz, Lorena; Wollam, Aye; Panesso, Diana; Zhou, Yanjiao; Rincon, Sandra; Narechania, Apurva; Xing, Galen; Di Gioia, Thais S R; Doi, André; Tran, Truc T; Reyes, Jinnethe; Munita, Jose M; Carvajal, Lina P; Hernandez-Roldan, Alejandra; Brandão, Denise; van der Heijden, Inneke Marie; Murray, Barbara E; Planet, Paul J; Weinstock, George M; Arias, Cesar A

2014-04-17

100

Patients and Loved Ones: Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings  

MedlinePLUS

... MRSA infections, doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers: Clean their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub before and ... that all doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers clean their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub before and ...

101

Transferable Vancomycin Resistance in a Community-Associated MRSA Lineage  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY We report the case of a patient from Brazil with a bloodstream infection caused by a strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that was susceptible to vancomycin (designated BR-VSSA) but that acquired the vanA gene cluster during antibiotic therapy and became resistant to vancomycin (designated BR-VRSA). Both strains belong to the sequence type (ST) 8 community-associated genetic lineage that carries the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) type IVa and the S. aureus protein A gene (spa) type t292 and are phylogenetically related to MRSA lineage USA300. A conjugative plasmid of 55,706 bp (pBRZ01) carrying the vanA cluster was identified and readily transferred to other staphylococci. The pBRZ01 plasmid harbors DNA sequences that are typical of the plasmid-associated replication genes rep24 or rep21 described in community-associated MRSA strains from Australia (pWBG745). The presence and dissemination of community-associated MRSA containing vanA could become a serious public health concern. PMID:24738669

Rossi, Flavia; Diaz, Lorena; Wollam, Aye; Panesso, Diana; Zhou, Yanjiao; Rincon, Sandra; Narechania, Apurva; Xing, Galen; Di Gioia, Thais S.R.; Doi, Andre; Tran, Truc T.; Reyes, Jinnethe; Munita, Jose M.; Carvajal, Lina P.; Hernandez-Roldan, Alejandra; Brandao, Denise; van der Heijden, Inneke Marie; Murray, Barbara E.; Planet, Paul J.; Weinstock, George M.; Arias, Cesar A.

2014-01-01

102

Trying to control MRSA causes more problems than it solves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite occasional reports of local success, the steadily increasing prevalence of strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin (MRSA) shows that attempts to limit their spread do not work. In this commentary we suggest that efforts to control the spread of methicillinresistance are counterproductive, and that energies should instead be directed towards the control of outbreaks of disease and preventing

S. P. Barrett; R. V. Mummery; B. Chattopadhyay

1998-01-01

103

Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for Childhood Eczema Development and Allergic Sensitization in the CCAAPS Cohort  

PubMed Central

Eczema is very common and increasing in prevalence. Prospective studies investigating environmental and genetic risk factors for eczema in a birth cohort are lacking. We evaluated risk factors that may promote development of childhood eczema in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS) birth cohort (n = 762) of infants with at least one atopic parent. Objective environmental exposure data were available for each participant. At annual physical examinations, children underwent skin prick tests (SPTs), eczema was diagnosed by a clinician, and DNA was collected. Among Caucasian children, 39% developed eczema by age 3. Children with a pet dog were significantly less likely to have eczema at age one (odds ratio (OR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40–0.97) or at both ages 2 and 3 (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.30–0.97). This finding was most significant among children carrying the CD14–159C/T CC genotype. Carriers of the CD14–159C/T and IL4R? I75V single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had an increased risk of eczema at ages 2 and 3 (OR 3.44, 95% CI: 1.56–7.57), especially among children who were SPT+. These results provide new insights into the pathogenesis of eczema in high-risk children and support a protective role for early exposure to dog, especially among those carrying the CD14–159C/T SNP. The results also demonstrate a susceptible effect of the combination of CD14 and IL4R? SNPs with eczema. PMID:19759553

Myers, Jocelyn M. Biagini; Wang, Ning; LeMasters, Grace; Bernstein, David I.; Epstein, Tolly; Lindsey, Mark; Ericksen, Mark; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Ryan, Patrick; Villareal, Manuel; Burkle, Jeff; Lockey, James; Reponen, Tiina; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana

2009-01-01

104

Combined Use of Pastorex Staph-Plus and Either of Two New Chromogenic Agars, MRSA ID and CHROMagar MRSA, for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus?  

PubMed Central

We describe the search toward a fast and reliable strategy to detect and confirm the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in screening samples. First, we evaluated the sensitivities and specificities of oxacillin resistance screening agar (ORSA) with enrichment (tryptic soy broth [TSB] and ORSA [TSB-ORSA]) and without enrichment (ORSA), MRSA ID (MRSA_ID) plates, and CHROMagar MRSA (C_MRSA) plates, all of which were inoculated with equal volumes of a suspension made by emulsifying screening swabs. Whereas the sensitivities after 48 h were similar for all media tested (77% for MRSA_ID and ORSA; 73% for C_MRSA and ORSA after enrichment [TSB-ORSA]), the specificities of MRSA_ID (98% after 24 h and 94% after 48 h) and C_MRSA (98% after 24 h and 90% after 48 h) were superior to the specificities of ORSAs (92% after 24 h and 83% after 48 h) and TSB-ORSA (86% after 24 h and 81% after 48 h). Subsequently, the performance of the Pastorex Staph-Plus agglutination test with presumptive MRSA isolates taken directly from chromogenic agars (direct_Pastorex agglutination) was compared to that of the Pastorex Staph-Plus agglutination test with isolates from blood agar subcultures (conventional_Pastorex agglutination). When the direct_Pastorex agglutination test on MRSA_ID plates was combined with Gram staining, the direct_Pastorex agglutination test with samples from MRSA_ID plates was as reliable as the conventional_Pastorex agglutination test with samples from blood agar subcultures from MRSA_ID plates. In contrast, the direct_Pastorex agglutination test with samples from C_MRSA plates gave false-negative results. Finally, we calculated the processing times of the four different strategies, namely, (i) enrichment in TSB supplemented with NaCl, subsequent culture on ORSA, and the conventional_Pastorex agglutination test; (ii) direct inoculation of ORSA combined with conventional_Pastorex agglutination test; (iii) direct inoculation of MRSA_ID plates combined with Gram staining and the direct_Pastorex agglutination test; and (iv) direct inoculation of C_MRSA plates combined with Gram staining and the direct_Pastorex agglutination test. We concluded that the use of MRSA_ID in combination with Gram staining and the direct_Pastorex agglutination test is faster and more specific than the other strategies tested. PMID:17093032

Compernolle, Veerle; Verschraegen, Gerda; Claeys, Geert

2007-01-01

105

Low prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at hospital admission in the Netherlands: the value of search and destroy and restrictive antibiotic use  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Netherlands, less than 1% of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus are methicillin-resistant (MRSA). A national search and destroy policy prevents MRSA from becoming endemic. Some MRSA outbreaks cannot be related to patients at risk for MRSA carriage. This study was designed to measure the prevalence of MRSA among patients without risk factors for MRSA carriage at the time

H. F. L Wertheim; M. C Vos; H. A. M Boelens; A. Voss; C. M. J. E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; M. H. M Meester; J. A. J. W. Kluytmans; P. H. J van Keulen; H. A. Verbrugh

2004-01-01

106

Detection and genetic characterization of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA-IVa and exfoliative toxin D-positive European CA-MRSA-Like ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IVa strains in Bangladesh.  

PubMed

Severe skin lesions caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection are associated with production from bacterial cells of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a typical virulence factor of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), as well as other toxins represented by exfoliative toxins. Through a retrospective study of 26 S. aureus strains isolated from skin lesions of diabetic patients admitted to a hospital in Bangladesh, 2 PVL-gene-positive MRSA-IVa strains and 8 PVL-negative, exfoliative toxin D (ETD) gene (etd)-positive MRSA-IVa strains were isolated. A PVL-positive MRSA-IVa strain had a type I arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), belonged to ST8/agr-type I/spa-type t121 (a variant of t008), and harbored blaZ, tet(K), msrA, and aph(3')-IIIa, which are mostly typical characteristics found in USA300, a predominant CA-MRSA clone in the United States. Another PVL-positive MRSA strain, belonging to ST1929 (CC88)/agr-type III/spa-type t3341, was negative for ACME, but possessed blaZ and tet(K). The etd-positive MRSA-IVa strains possessed the epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor B (EDIN-B)-encoding gene (edinB) and belonged to ST1931 (CC80)/agr-type III/spa-type t11023 (a variant of t044), which was genetic trait similar to that of the European CA-MRSA ST80 clone. However, unlike the European ST80 strains, the etd-positive MRSA strains detected in the present study harbored seb, sek, and seq, while they were negative for tet(K), aph(3')-IIIa, and fusB, showing susceptibility to fusidic acid. These findings suggested that etd-positive ST1931 MRSA strains belong to the same lineage as the European ST80 MRSA clone, evolving from a common ancestral clone via acquisition of a different pathogenicity island. This is the first report of a USA300-like MRSA-IV strain, PVL-positive ST1929 (CC88) MRSA-IV, and European ST80 CA-MRSA-like etd-positive ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IV strains isolated in Bangladesh. PMID:24552553

Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Ghosh, Souvik; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Ahmed, Salma; Mahmud, Chand; Jilani, Md Shariful Alam; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful; Ahmed, Abdullah Akhtar; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

2014-08-01

107

Comparative evaluation of a rapid MRSA detection assay based on multiplex real-time PCR versus MRSA screening cultures containing egg yolk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been recommending the performance of active surveillance\\u000a culture (ASC) for the prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and their control since the guideline was issued in 2006, many variant types of MRSA with various characteristics\\u000a have been found recently. As this change in MRSA characteristics makes it harder to

Yuko Sumitani; Yoshio Kobayashi

2009-01-01

108

Clinical biochemistry of sporidesmin natural intoxication (facial eczema) of sheep.  

PubMed

The effects of facial eczema, i.e. intoxication by the mycotoxin sporidesmin, were investigated by extensive biochemical screening of serum in 100 controls (A), 31 clinically ill (B) and 219 apparently healthy (C) Manech ewes under field conditions. Dramatic increases of gamma-glutamyltransferase1), alkaline phosphatases, bilirubin, cholesterol, aspartate and alanine aminotransferases, and lactate dehydrogenase confirmed the severity of liver damage in group B, but they were also observed in slightly more than 50% of group C animals. This demonstrated the true extent of the disease, which could be best assessed by the measurement of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase; but since this enzyme was still elevated one year later, it cannot be used as a reliable prognostic parameter. PMID:2566642

Bonnefoi, M; Braun, J P; Bézille, P; LeBars, J; Sawadogo, G; Thouvenot, J P

1989-01-01

109

Staphylococcus aureus: Screening for Nasal Carriers in a Community Setting with Special Reference to MRSA  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Emergence of MRSA infections among previously healthy persons in community settings (without exposure to health care facilities) has been noted recently. MRSA infections are now classified as health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections. Its colonization is an important risk factor for subsequent MRSA infection. Aims and Objectives. The aim was to screen patients and health care workers for staphylococcal carriage, identify risk factors for MRSA colonization, and determine the sensitivity pattern. Materials and Methods. A total of 200 subjects were screened for nasal carriage after obtaining verbal consent. These were both healthy subjects attending various outpatient departments and health care workers. Specimens were collected from the anterior nares using premoistened sterile cotton swabs and inoculated onto blood agar and mannitol salt agar and incubated at 37°C for 24–48?h. Results. Staphylococcus aureus colonisation was found to be 12% (n = 24). MRSA was identified in 5% (n = 10) which represents 41.66% of SA. A total of 10 strains of MRSA were isolated from 200 subjects, giving an overall positivity rate of 5%. Discussion. Staphylococcal colonization was found to be 12% (MRSA 5%). Fluoroquinolone resistance was remarkable whereas all strains were sensitive to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin. PMID:25054078

Sharma, Yukti; Jain, Sanjay; Singh, Harshvardhan; Govil, Vasudha

2014-01-01

110

Occupational exposure to laboratory animals causing a severe exacerbation of atopic eczema.  

PubMed

A 24-year-old man with a long history of severe atopic eczema presented with a marked exacerbation requiring hospital admission. It emerged that his occupation as an animal house technician required him to work closely with laboratory animals, particularly mice and rats. Radioallergosorbent tests to mice allergens were markedly elevated. Avoidance of animal work, in conjunction with medical treatment, resulted in a marked improvement of his eczema. PMID:22571570

Bhabha, Friyana K; Nixon, Rosemary

2012-05-01

111

Experiences of carers managing childhood eczema and their views on its treatment: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Childhood eczema causes significant impact on quality of life for some families, yet non-concordance with treatment is common. Aim To explore parents' and carers' views of childhood eczema and its treatment. Design and setting Qualitative interview study in primary care in the south of England. Method Carers of children aged ?5 years with a recorded diagnosis of eczema, who reported that eczema was still a problem, were invited to participate. Thirty-one parents were interviewed from 28 families. Results Many parents expressed frustration with both medical care and prescribed treatments. They felt their child's suffering was not ‘taken seriously’, and experienced messages about a ‘trial and error’ prescribing approach and assurance that their child would ‘grow out of it’ as a further ‘fobbing off’, or dismissal. Many carers were ambivalent about eczema treatments, mainly topical corticosteroids but also emollients. Dietary exclusions as a potential cure were of interest to most families, although they perceived healthcare professionals as uninterested in this. Families varied in the extent to which they felt able to manage eczema and the length of time taken to gain control. In some instances, this was linked to not understanding advice or receiving conflicting advice from different healthcare providers. Conclusion Poor concordance with treatments seems unsurprising in the presence of such dissonance between carers' and healthcare providers' agendas. Acknowledging the impact of the condition, greater attention to how key messages are delivered and addressing carers' treatment beliefs are likely to improve engagement with effective self-care. PMID:22520913

Santer, Miriam; Burgess, Hana; Yardley, Lucy; Ersser, Steven; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Muller, Ingrid; Hugh, Catherine; Little, Paul

2012-01-01

112

Surveillance and epidemiology of MRSA bacteraemia in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveillance of bacteraemia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the UK has involved collection of data from hospital microbiology laboratories via several mechanisms, including a voluntary reporting scheme that has been operational in England and Wales since 1989 and mandatory reportingschemesthathavebeenrunningindependentlyinEngland,Wales,ScotlandandNorthernIreland since 2001. In addition, surveillance schemes involving panels of participating sentinel laboratories that submit isolates for centralized susceptibility

Alan P. Johnson; Andrew Pearson; Georgia Duckworth

2005-01-01

113

Why is community-associated MRSA spreading across the world and how will it change clinical practice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged in 1960 and over the following 40 years was a problem confined largely to the healthcare setting. In the late 1990s the first US reports of so-called community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections appeared. CA-MRSA infections were defined as MRSA infections occurring in patients who had no identifiable predisposing risk factors, such as healthy children and young

Matteo Bassetti; Elena Nicco; Malgorzata Mikulska

2009-01-01

114

In vitro exposure of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains to vancomycin: does vancomycin resistance occur?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vancomycin is the preferred parenteral antibiotic for the treatment of all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, including the newly emerging community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections. Vancomycin-intermediate nosocomial MRSA strains have developed in vitro and in vivo after exposure to vancomycin. The aim of this study was to determine whether daily serial passage of CA-MRSA strains onto vancomycin-supplemented agar selects for the

Sharon L. Kleinschmidt; Wendy J. Munckhof; Graeme R. Nimmo

2006-01-01

115

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (mrsa) in a Malaysian hospital.  

PubMed

Between August 1990 to November 1991, 905 of 2583 (35.4%) isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were found to be methicillin-resistant in a general hospital in Malaysia. A detailed study of 539 of these isolates showed a high prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the surgical/orthopaedic wards, paediatric wards and the special care unit. The yield of MRSA was highest from wounds/ulcers/skin swabs accounting for 64.2 per cent followed by 6.9 per cent in blood cultures. Vancomycin remains the drug of choice with no resistance detected. The resistance to ciprofloxacin was 6.7 per cent, rifampicin 4.5 per cent and fusidic acid 2.0 per cent. Most isolates were resistant to aminoglycosides. In view of the high prevalence of MRSA in this hospital, the authorities must introduce more effective measures to control its spread as a nosocomial pathogen. Otherwise it may seriously disrupt the efficient delivery of health care services in the country. PMID:8057986

Cheong, I; Tan, S C; Wong, Y H; Zainudin, B M; Rahman, M Z

1994-03-01

116

A hierarchical spatial modelling approach to investigate MRSA transmission in a tertiary hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Most hospitals have a hierarchical design with beds positioned within cubicles and cubicles positioned within wards. Transmission of MRSA may be facilitated by patient proximity and thus the spatial arrangements of beds, cubicles and wards could be important in understanding MRSA transmission risk. Identifying high-risk areas of transmission may be useful in the design of more effective, targeted MRSA interventions. Methods Retrospective data on numbers of multi-resistant and non-multiresistant MRSA acquisitions were collected for 52 weeks in 2007 in a tertiary hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A hierarchical Bayesian spatio-temporal modelling approach was used to investigate spatial correlation in the hierarchically arranged datasets. The spatial component of the model decomposes cubicle-level variation into a spatially structured component and a spatially unstructured component, thereby encapsulating the influence of unmeasured predictor variables that themselves are spatially clustered and/or random. A fixed effect for the presence of another patient with the same type of MRSA in the cubicles two weeks prior was included. Results The best-fitting model for non-multiresistant MRSA had an unstructured random effect but no spatially structured random effect. The best-fitting model for multiresistant MRSA incorporated both spatially structured and unstructured random effects. While between-cubicle variability in risk of MRSA acquisition within the hospital was significant, there was only weak evidence to suggest that MRSA is spatially clustered. Presence of another patient with the same type of MRSA in the cubicles two weeks prior was a significant predictor of both types of MRSA in all models. Conclusions We found weak evidence of clustering of MRSA acquisition within the hospital. The presence of an infected patient in the same cubicle two weeks prior may support the importance of environmental contamination as a source of MRSA transmission. PMID:24073821

2013-01-01

117

Prevalence of childhood eczema and food sensitization in the First Nations reserve of Natuashish, Labrador, Canada  

PubMed Central

Background The Mushua Innu of Natuashish, Labrador, Canada seem to have a high rate of childhood eczema. Anecdotally this problem seems to be more common now than 20 years ago. There has been speculation that this could be related to food sensitization that may have arisen coincident with a move away from a traditional Innu diet. We undertook to assess the prevalence and severity of pediatric eczema in Natuashish (population 792), and investigate the level of sensitization to common food antigens. Methods Over a three-month period we performed a population survey of all children in the community from the ages of 2–12 inclusive. The one-year prevalence of eczema was assessed using the United Kingdom Working Party’s diagnostic criteria, and graded on the Nottingham Severity Scale. All children with eczema and twice as many age/sex matched controls were offered complete blood counts, total IgE, and food specific IgE levels for egg white, cow’s milk protein and wheat. Results One hundred and eighty two (95% of the eligible children) were assessed. Of the 182 children examined eczema was diagnosed in 30 (16.5%) - 22 females and 8 males. The majority of children with eczema (20/30) were classified as being in the moderate and severe category. Of the 22 with eczema and 40 controls who consented to venipuncture all but 3 had IgE levels above the lab's reference range. Food specific antibody assays showed that 32, 23, and 5 percent of children with eczema were sensitized to egg, milk, and wheat respectively. None of the controls were sensitized. Conclusions The children of Natuashish, Labrador have a high rate of eczema, much of it graded as moderate or severe. IgE levels were markedly elevated in children with and without eczema, with average values at least ten-fold higher than other populations. There is no evidence of an unusual amount of sensitization to egg, milk or wheat. PMID:24649812

2014-01-01

118

Community-Based Intervention to Manage an Outbreak of MRSA Skin Infections in a County Jail  

PubMed Central

This article describes a community-based intervention to manage an outbreak of communityassociated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections in a midwestern county jail. A systematic investigation conducted by a family medicine residency program identified 64 total cases and 19 MRSA cases between January 1 and December 31, 2007. Factors contributing to MRSA transmission included inadequate surveillance, lack of antibacterial soap, and a defective laundry process. All 19 isolates were CA-MRSA and all seven tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were USA300. Four of the seven isolates showed variation of their PFGE patterns. A primary care approach using community-based resources effectively reduced the number of cases in this heterogeneous outbreak of CA-MRSA, with the last MRSA being isolated in October 2007. PMID:20466702

Elias, Abdallah F.; Chaussee, Michael S.; McDowell, Emily J.; Huntington, Mark K.

2012-01-01

119

Survival of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on naturally contaminated dry mops  

Microsoft Academic Search

The floors of single rooms being used by inpatients colonized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were cleaned using disposable dust-attracting dry mops. Each mop was divided into 12 sections and MRSA quantified serially. This experiment was repeated a total of 21 times for four patients. The MRSA survival rate on the dry mops compared with a control was 59·0–125% after

S. Oie; A. Kamiya

1996-01-01

120

Microbiota in Healthy Skin and in Atopic Eczema  

PubMed Central

The Italian interest group (IG) on atopic eczema and urticaria is member of the Italian Society of Allergology and Immunology. The aim of our IG is to provide a platform for scientists, clinicians, and experts. In this review we discuss the role of skin microbiota not only in healthy skin but also in skin suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD). A Medline and Embase search was conducted for studies evaluating the role of skin microbiota. We examine microbiota composition and its development within days after birth; we describe the role of specific groups of microorganisms that colonize distinct anatomical niches and the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin. Specific AD disease states are characterized by concurrent and anticorrelated shifts in microbial diversity and proportion of Staphylococcus. These organisms may protect the host, defining them not as simple symbiotic microbes but rather as mutualistic microbes. These findings reveal links between microbial communities and inflammatory diseases such as AD and provide novel insights into global shifts of bacteria relevant to disease progression and treatment. This review also highlights recent observations on the importance of innate immune systems and the relationship with normal skin microflora for the maintenance of healthy skin. PMID:25126558

Capra, Lucetta; Longo, Giorgio; Ricci, Giampaolo

2014-01-01

121

Pithomycotoxicosis (facial eczema) in ruminants in the Azores, Portugal.  

PubMed

Outbreaks of pithomycotoxicosis (facial eczema), a hepatogenous photosensitisation caused by the mycotoxin sporidesmin, have affected ruminants in the Azores Islands of Portugal after warm, humid periods during late summer and autumn. Twenty-two outbreaks were recorded in cattle between 1999 and 2001, affecting 11.4 per cent of the animals in the affected herds, and in 2000 there was an outbreak in one sheep flock in which more than 20 per cent of the sheep died. The clinical signs included decreases in milk production, weight loss, photosensitisation and its sequelae, including death. The animals had high activities of gamma glutamyltransferase in their serum, and icterus and severe liver disease, including biliary hyperplasia and fibrosis, were found postmortem. The characteristic spores of the toxigenic saprophytic fungus Pithomyces chartarum were found on grass; all 381 isolates of the fungus were toxigenic for sporidesmin by elisa, and the results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Cattle from farms at greatest risk of pithomycotoxicosis were protected by supplementing their concentrate feed with zinc oxide, or using a slow-release intraruminal zinc bolus. PMID:16361474

Pinto, C; Santos, V M; Dinis, J; Peleteiro, M C; Fitzgerald, J M; Hawkes, A D; Smith, B L

2005-12-17

122

CC8 MRSA Strains Harboring SCCmec Type IVc are Predominant in Colombian Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Recent reports highlight the incursion of community-associated MRSA within healthcare settings. However, knowledge of this phenomenon remains limited in Latin America. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of MRSA in three tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted from 2008–2010. MRSA infections were classified as either community-associated (CA-MRSA) or healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA), with HA-MRSA further classified as hospital-onset (HAHO-MRSA) or community-onset (HACO-MRSA) according to standard epidemiological definitions established by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Genotypic analysis included SCCmec typing, spa typing, PFGE and MLST. Results Out of 538 total MRSA isolates, 68 (12.6%) were defined as CA-MRSA, 243 (45.2%) as HACO-MRSA and 227 (42.2%) as HAHO-MRSA. The majority harbored SCCmec type IVc (306, 58.7%), followed by SCCmec type I (174, 33.4%). The prevalence of type IVc among CA-, HACO- and HAHO-MRSA isolates was 92.4%, 65.1% and 43.6%, respectively. From 2008 to 2010, the prevalence of type IVc-bearing strains increased significantly, from 50.0% to 68.2% (p?=?0.004). Strains harboring SCCmec IVc were mainly associated with spa types t1610, t008 and t024 (MLST clonal complex 8), while PFGE confirmed that the t008 and t1610 strains were closely related to the USA300-0114 CA-MRSA clone. Notably, strains belonging to these three spa types exhibited high levels of tetracycline resistance (45.9%). Conclusion CC8 MRSA strains harboring SCCmec type IVc are becoming predominant in Medellín hospitals, displacing previously reported CC5 HA-MRSA clones. Based on shared characteristics including SCCmec IVc, absence of the ACME element and tetracycline resistance, the USA300-related isolates in this study are most likely related to USA300-LV, the recently-described ‘Latin American variant’ of USA300. PMID:22745670

Jimenez, J. Natalia; Ocampo, Ana M.; Vanegas, Johanna M.; Rodriguez, Erika A.; Mediavilla, Jose R.; Chen, Liang; Muskus, Carlos E.; A. Velez, Lazaro; Rojas, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea V.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Garces, Carlos; Franco, Liliana; Bifani, Pablo; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Correa, Margarita M.

2012-01-01

123

MRSA distribution and epidemiological procedures evaluation at two hospitals in Northern Poland  

PubMed Central

In the present study we have analyzed the impact of modified MRSA screening of carriers and patients on epidemiological situation of MRSA during 2008–2010, comparing two regional hospitals with similar bed numbers and similar ward profiles in Northern Poland. In 2008 the proportion of MRSA to all S. aureus isolates was 14.4% resp. 6.0%, in 2009 8.3% resp. 4.7% and in 2010 6.5% in both hospitals. Independent of the different prevention and intervention strategy in both hospitals the different MRSA incidence seems to be due to regional epidemic settings PMID:22242100

Paszko, Krystyna; Michnowska, Ewa; Kurlenda, Julianna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Bielawski, Krzysztof Piotr

2011-01-01

124

Worldwide variations in the prevalence of symptoms of atopic eczema in the international study of asthma and allergies in childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Little is known about the prevalence of atopic eczema outside Northern Europe. Objectives: We sought to describe the magnitude and variation in the prevalence of atopic eczema symptoms throughout the world. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on random samples of schoolchildren aged 6 to 7 years and 13 to 14 years from centers in 56 countries throughout

Hywel Williams; Colin Robertson; Alistair Stewart; Nadia Aït-Khaled; Gabriel Anabwani; Ross Anderson; Innes Asher; Richard Beasley; Bengt Björkstén; Michael Burr; Tadd Clayton; Julian Crane; Philippa Ellwood; Ulrich Keil; Chris Lai; Javier Mallol; Fernando Martinez; Edwin Mitchell; Stephen Montefort; Neil Pearce; Jayant Shah; Bonnie Sibbald; David Strachan; Erika von Mutius; Stephan K. Weiland

1999-01-01

125

Patients presenting to the hospital with MRSA pneumonia: differentiating characteristics and outcomes with empiric treatment  

PubMed Central

Background Concern for MRSA in patients presented to the hospital with pneumonia may be overestimated leading to excessive prescribing of empiric anti-MRSA therapy. This study aims to identify at-risk patients and treatment outcomes. Methods Adults hospitalized during 2005–2011 with pneumonia diagnosed within 48 h of admission were included. Medical charts were retrospectively reviewed for relevant data. Patients with MRSA were matched 1:1 to those with non-MRSA pathogen or negative culture. A published risk scoring system for MRSA pneumonia was applied. Results 268 elderly patients were included, 134 patients in each group. Compared to non-MRSA group, MRSA patients presented more acutely ill (p?MRSA. A history of MRSA infection or pneumonia differentiated the latter group. Most MRSA patients (66%, 88/134) were treated empirically (primarily vancomycin) but outcome was not improved by receipt of empiric therapy. Conclusions Use of a published risk scoring scheme with additional variables from this study can potentially reduce overprescribing of anti-MRSA empiric therapy in patients presented to the hospital with pneumonia. Prospective studies evaluating the treatment benefit of non-vancomycin alternatives as empiric therapy are needed. PMID:24885158

2014-01-01

126

Update on the use of alitretinoin in treating chronic hand eczema  

PubMed Central

Chronic hand eczema is a debilitating dermatological condition with significant economic, social, and functional impacts. To date, conventional treatments such as topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, and systemic immunosuppressants have yielded disappointing results, owing to either a lack of efficacy or significant adverse events. Oral alitretinoin (9-cis-retinoic acid) is a unique panagonist retinoid with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activity that has emerged as a novel treatment for chronic hand eczema. Several large-scale clinical studies have demonstrated oral alitretinoin’s high efficacy rate of 28% to 89%, its safe tolerability profile, and its positive impact on quality of life, validating it as a therapeutic option for patients with severe chronic hand eczema refractory to standard treatment. PMID:21437060

Ghasri, Pedram; Scheinfeld, Noah

2010-01-01

127

Hailey-Hailey disease associated with herpetic eczema--the value of the Tzanck smear test  

PubMed Central

Background: Herpetic eczema is a herpetic superinfection of a preexisting skin disease. Hailey-Hailey disease is an autosomal dominant dermatosis that is clinically characterized by flaccid vesicles and rashes in intertriginous areas. The coexistence of those findings is a rare condition; only five cases have been published in literature. Purpose: To report the rare coexistence between Hailey-Hailey disease and herpetic eczema and to highlight the importance of cytology for a quick diagnosis. Case report: A 38-year-old man had been diagnosed with Hailey-Hailey disease for 13 years. His condition evolved into what could be herpetic eczema, which was later confirmed by skin cytology and histopathology. The man showed remission in the infection after 10 days under treatment with acyclovir. Conclusion: Research on the concomitance of infection by the herpes virus must be performed in the exacerbations of Hailey-Hailey disease, and, in those situations, the quick diagnosis through skin cytology makes the early treatment possible.

de Aquino Paulo Filho, Thomas; deFreitas, Yara Kelly Rodrigues; da Nobrega, Mylenne Torres Andrade; Lima, Carlos Bruno Fernandes; Carrico, Barbara Luiza Medeiros Francelino; Silva, Maria Aurora Pinto Leite e; Paulo, Filipe Lauria; Neto, Pedro Bezerra da Trindade

2014-01-01

128

Xerosis is associated with atopic dermatitis, hand eczema and contact sensitization independent of filaggrin gene mutations.  

PubMed

Atopic dermatitis, hand eczema and contact sensitization are prevalent disorders, and may, in many cases, be secondary to skin barrier abnormality. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between self-reported generalized xerosis, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema and contact sensitization, taking filaggrin gene mutations into account. Questionnaire data were collected from a cross-sectional study performed in a general population in Copenhagen. A total of 3,460 18-69-year-olds were patch-tested and 3,335 were genotyped for the 2282del4 and R501X mutations in the filaggrin gene. Atopic dermatitis and hand eczema were significantly associated with generalized xerosis, whereas contact sensitization (not nickel) showed only a borderline significant association. These results suggest that generalized xerosis may increase the risk of common skin disorders. PMID:23420336

Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus; Menné, Torkil; Linneberg, Allan

2013-07-01

129

Fusidic acid in skin infections and infected atopic eczema.  

PubMed

Skin infections represent an important public health issue and cost-driver. Additionally, chronic skin lesions are sometimes colonized by Gram-negative species. Topical therapies are a key component in the management of mild-to-moderate skin infections. In such cases, topical antibiotics may be preferable to systemic treatment, since they maximize the effective doses at the site of infection while minimizing the systemic side effects of the drugs. However, the prevalence of resistant strains is steadily increasing and cases of sensitization are not uncommon. As a consequence, the ideal topical antibiotic should be selective (thus, minimizing cross-resistance), have weak sensitization potential, penetrate the skin efficiently, reach adequate local doses at the site of infection, and finally be available in different formulations matching patients' preferences and needs. Fusidic acid (FA) is a selective antibiotic available in several topical formulations. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have shown that, contrary to other topical antibiotics such as gentamicin or mupirocin, FA reaches high antimicrobial concentration at deep skin layers after topical application either on intact or damaged epidermis. Several randomized controlled trials demonstrated that FA, in its various topical formulations, is very effective in treating skin infections, given its high bactericidal activity against S. aureus (including strains resistant to penicillin, methicillin, ampicillin, cloxacillin), S. epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Propionibacterium acnes, Corinebatteria, Clostridia. Additionally, FA presents a low risk of resistance even in methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains, a common pathogen implied in the etiology of skin infections and infected atopic eczema. Such feature makes FA particularly useful in the management of these medical conditions. Finally, possibly due to its large steric effect, FA has proved a very low risk of contact sensitization. Overall, data on FA efficacy, safety, sensitization potential, resistance profile and spectrum selectivity make it a first-choice option in the treatment of primary and secondary skin infection. PMID:25068235

Bonamonte, D; Belloni Fortina, A; Neri, L; Patrizi, A

2014-08-01

130

Prevalence and risk factors of atopic eczema in Turkish adolescents.  

PubMed

Atopic eczema (AE) is the most common childhood inflammatory skin condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of AE and its relation to various risk factors. In a cross-sectional study, 9,991 children ages 13 to 14 years in 61 primary schools in 32 districts of Istanbul were evaluated. The prevalence of AE and associated symptoms was assessed using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood protocol. The relationship between risk factors and AE was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Ten thousand nine hundred eighty-four questionnaires were distributed to 13- and 14-year-old children in 61 schools in 32 districts of Istanbul, 9,991 of which were suitable for analysis, for an overall response rate of 91.7%. There were 4,746 boys (47.9%) and 5,166 girls (52.1%) (M/F ratio 0.920). The rates of itchy rash ever, 12-month itchy rash, and doctor-diagnosed AE ever were 18.2%, 12.0%, and 2.8%, respectively. The difference between rates for itchy rash ever, 12-month itchy rash and doctor-diagnosed AE was high (12.8-31.3, 5.8-24.8, and 0-17.2, respectively) between the districts of Istanbul. Female sex, AE family history, watching television more than 5 hours a day, region of the district, and tonsillectomy history were found to be significantly associated with doctor-diagnosed AE at p < 0.05 in multivariate analysis. This study found a low prevalence of doctor-diagnosed AE and related symptoms in Istanbul. Several risk factors were found to be associated with doctor-diagnosed AE. PMID:24475933

Akcay, Ahmet; Tamay, Zeynep; Ergin, Ahmet; Guler, Nermin

2014-01-01

131

Towards an ontological representation of resistance: the case of MRSA.  

PubMed

This paper addresses a family of issues surrounding the biological phenomenon of resistance and its representation in realist ontologies. The treatments of resistance terms in various existing ontologies are examined and found to be either overly narrow, internally inconsistent, or otherwise problematic. We propose a more coherent characterization of resistance in terms of what we shall call blocking dispositions, which are collections of mutually coordinated dispositions which are of such a sort that they cannot undergo simultaneous realization within a single bearer. A definition of 'protective resistance' is proposed for use in the Infectious Disease Ontology (IDO) and we show how this definition can be used to characterize the antibiotic resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The ontological relations between entities in our MRSA case study are used alongside a series of logical inference rules to illustrate logical reasoning about resistance. A description logic representation of blocking dispositions is also provided. We demonstrate that our characterization of resistance is sufficiently general to cover two other cases of resistance in the infectious disease domain involving HIV and malaria. PMID:20206294

Goldfain, Albert; Smith, Barry; Cowell, Lindsay G

2011-02-01

132

Prevalence and acquisition of MRSA amongst patients admitted to a tertiary-care hospital in brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There are few studies in Brazil that address baseline prevalence of MRSA colonization and associated risk factors at hospital admission, or the incidence of nosocomial colonization. We report a prospective study in a tertiary-care, university-affiliated hospital to implement a new MRSA control policy at the institution. METHODS: A cohort of randomly selected patients admitted to emergency and clinical wards

Helena B Santos; Denise P Machado; Suzi A Camey; Ricardo S Kuchenbecker; Afonso L Barth; Mário B Wagner

2010-01-01

133

Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in patients with spinal cord injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization has been a problem in the Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center (RLAMC) since 1978. This study reviews the latest 2 years' use of a protocol to prevent the spread of MRSA while allowing spinal cord injured patients to continue to participate in the rehabilitation program. The protocol included management in a private room, bathing with

K Maeder; V J Ginunas; J Z Montgomerie; H N Canawati

1993-01-01

134

Transcriptional Events during the Recovery from MRSA Lung Infection: A Mouse Pneumonia Model  

PubMed Central

Community associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging threat to human health throughout the world. Rodent MRSA pneumonia models mainly focus on the early innate immune responses to MRSA lung infection. However, the molecular pattern and mechanisms of recovery from MRSA lung infection are largely unknown. In this study, a sublethal mouse MRSA pneumonia model was employed to investigate late events during the recovery from MRSA lung infection. We compared lung bacterial clearance, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) characterization, lung histology, lung cell proliferation, lung vascular permeability and lung gene expression profiling between days 1 and 3 post MRSA lung infection. Compared to day 1 post infection, bacterial colony counts, BALF total cell number and BALF protein concentration significantly decreased at day 3 post infection. Lung cDNA microarray analysis identified 47 significantly up-regulated and 35 down-regulated genes (p<0.01, 1.5 fold change [up and down]). The pattern of gene expression suggests that lung recovery is characterized by enhanced cell division, vascularization, wound healing and adjustment of host adaptive immune responses. Proliferation assay by PCNA staining further confirmed that at day 3 lungs have significantly higher cell proliferation than at day 1. Furthermore, at day 3 lungs displayed significantly lower levels of vascular permeability to albumin, compared to day 1. Collectively, this data helps us elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the recovery after MRSA lung infection. PMID:23936388

Chen, Jiwang; Feng, Gang; Guo, Qiang; Wardenburg, Juliane B.; Lin, Simon; Inoshima, Ichiro; Deaton, Ryan; Yuan, Jason X. J.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Machado, Roberto F.; Otto, Michael; Wunderink, Richard G.

2013-01-01

135

Guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis and susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

These evidence-based guidelines have been produced after a literature review of the laboratory diagnosis and susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We have considered the detection of MRSA in screening samples and the detection of reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides in S. aureus. Recommendations are given for the identification of S. aureus and for suitable methods of susceptibility testing and

Derek F. J. Brown; David I. Edwards; Peter M. Hawkey; Donald Morrison

2005-01-01

136

Limited effectiveness of chlorhexidine based hand disinfectants against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hand disinfectants containing chlorhexidine are thought to be less bactericidal against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) than methicilhn-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). We report an in vitro comparison between three distinct MRSA strains and three MSSA strains. The bactericidal efficacy of chlorhexidine digluconate, ‘Hibiscrub’ and ‘Hibisol’ against Staphylococcus aureus was determined in a quantitative suspension test. Logarithmic reduction factors (RF) were calculated

G. Kampf; R. Jarosch; H. Rüden

1998-01-01

137

STAPH AND MRSA RECOGNITION AND PREVENTION What is "Staph" (Staphylococcus aureus)?  

E-print Network

STAPH AND MRSA RECOGNITION AND PREVENTION What is "Staph" (Staphylococcus aureus)? Staphylococcus-resistant Staphylococcus aureus)? In the past, most serious staph bacterial infections were treated with a certain type. These bacteria are called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). According to the Centers

de Lijser, Peter

138

Prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among pigs on German farms and import of livestock-related MRSA into hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among pigs and estimate the impact of this animal reservoir on human healthcare. Nasal swabs were derived from 1,600\\u000a pigs at 40 German farms. The MRSA were characterized using S. aureus protein A (spa) typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and detection of

R. Köck; J. Harlizius; N. Bressan; R. Laerberg; L. H. Wieler; W. Witte; R. H. Deurenberg; A. Voss; K. Becker; A. W. Friedrich

2009-01-01

139

Evolution of Sporadic Isolates of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Hospitals and Their Similarities to Isolates of Community-Acquired MRSA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-one methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) hospital isolates that clearly differed from the six major pandemic clones of MRSA in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type, mecA and Tn554 polymorphism, and epidemic behavior were selected from an international strain collection for more detailed characterization. SpaA typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) typing dem- onstrated extensive diversity among these sporadic

M. Aires de Sousa; H. de Lencastre

2003-01-01

140

High-Density Livestock Production and Molecularly Characterized MRSA Infections in Pennsylvania  

PubMed Central

Background: European studies suggest that living near high-density livestock production increases the risk of sequence type (ST) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated associations between livestock production and human infection by other strain types. Objectives: We evaluated associations between MRSA molecular subgroups and high-density livestock production. Methods: We conducted a yearlong 2012 prospective study on a stratified random sample of patients with culture-confirmed MRSA infection; we oversampled patients from the Geisinger Health System with exposure to high-density livestock production in Pennsylvania. Isolates were characterized using S. aureus protein A (spa) typing and detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and scn genes. We compared patients with one of two specific MRSA strains with patients with all other strains of MRSA isolates, using logistic regression that accounted for the sampling design, for two different exposure models: one based on the location of the animals (livestock model) and the other on crop field application of manure (crop field model). Results: Of 196 MRSA isolates, we identified 30 spa types, 47 PVL-negative and 15 scn-negative isolates, and no ST398 MRSA. Compared with quartiles 1–3 combined, the highest quartiles of swine livestock and dairy/veal crop field exposures were positively associated with community-onset-PVL-negative MRSA (CO-PVL-negative MRSA vs. all other MRSA), with adjusted odds ratios of 4.24 (95% CI: 1.60, 11.25) and 4.88 (95% CI: 1.40, 17.00), respectively. The association with CO-PVL-negative MRSA infection increased across quartiles of dairy/veal livestock exposure (trend p = 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that other MRSA strains, beyond ST398, may be involved in livestock-associated MRSA infection in the United States. Citation: Casey JA, Shopsin B, Cosgrove SE, Nachman KE, Curriero FC, Rose HR, Schwartz BS. 2014. High-density livestock production and molecularly characterized MRSA infections in Pennsylvania. Environ Health Perspect 122:464–470;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307370 PMID:24509131

Casey, Joan A.; Shopsin, Bo; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Nachman, Keeve E.; Curriero, Frank C.; Rose, Hannah R.

2014-01-01

141

The High Diversity of MRSA Clones Detected in a University Hospital in Istanbul  

PubMed Central

Background: To characterize the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones present in Istanbul, 102 MRSA isolates collected during a 5-year period at the Istanbul Medical Faculty Hospital were characterized using microarray analysis and phenotypic resistance profiles. Methods: Resistance to methicillin was detected with a cefoxitin disk diffusion assay and confirmed with a MRSA-agar and MRSA detection kit. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by a disk diffusion assay and interpreted according to the 2012 guidelines of the Antibiogram Committee of the French Society for Microbiology. Decreased susceptibility to glycopeptides was confirmed using the population analysis profile-area under the curve (PAP-AUC) method. The presence of the mecA gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Bacterial DNA was extracted according to the manufacturer's recommended protocol using commercial extraction kits. Strains were extensively characterized using the DNA microarray. Results: Isolates were grouped into six clonal complexes. The most frequently detected clone was the Vienna/Hungarian/Brazilian clone (ST239-MRSA-III), which accounted for 53.9% of the isolates. These isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, particularly penicillin, tetracycline, rifampicin, kanamycin, tobramycin, gentamicin, levofloxacin, erythromycin, lincomycin and fosfomycin. Furthermore, three isolates were detected by population analysis profile as heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA). The UK-EMRSA-15 clone (ST22-MRSA-IV PVL negative) was detected in 9.8% of the isolates and was mainly susceptible to all anti-staphylococcal antibiotics. Seven isolates (6.9%) were positive for PVL genes and were assigned to the CC80-MRSA-IV clone (European CA-MRSA clone, three isolates), ST8-MRSA-IV clone (USA300 clone, two isolates, one ACME-positive) or ST22-MRSA-IV clone (“Regensburg EMRSA” clone, two isolates). All other clones were detected in one to six isolates and corresponded to well-known clones (e.g., Pediatric clone, Dublin EMRSA clone, WA MRSA-54/63, WA MRSA-1/57). Conclusions: This work highlighted both the high prevalence of ST239-MRSA-III clone and the large diversity of the other MRSA clones detected in a university hospital in Istanbul. PMID:24151444

Oksuz, Lutfiye; Dupieux, Celine; Tristan, Anne; Bes, Michele; Etienne, Jerome; Gurler, Nezahat

2013-01-01

142

Evaluation of the BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Assay as a Method for Detection of MRSA Isolates, Using a Large Collection of European and North African Isolates.  

PubMed

Using a large collection of European and North African methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with a variety of genetic backgrounds and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types, we evaluated the reliability of the BD GeneOhm MRSA assay. Results revealed high performance of this test for detecting MRSA strains provided from Europe and North Africa (98.3%). PMID:25274997

Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Bes, Michele; Meugnier, Helene; Tigaud, Sylvestre; Etienne, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric

2014-12-01

143

Dissemination of multiple MRSA clones among community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections from Japanese children with impetigo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The proportion of MRSA strains that cause skin and soft infections has recently increased. In 3 months we have characterized\\u000a 17 MRSA strains isolated from children with impetigo at a Japanese hospital. Seventeen MRSA strains belonged to 7 clones defined\\u000a by clonal complex (CC) in MLST genotype and type of SCCmec, which were rarely identified among healthcare-associated MRSA: CC 91-SCCmecIIb (4

Ken Hisata; Teruyo Ito; Nobuaki Matsunaga; Mitsutaka Komatsu; Jingxun Jin; Shanshuang Li; Shinya Watanabe; Toshiaki Shimizu; Keiichi Hiramatsu

144

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detected at Four U.S. Wastewater Treatment Plants  

PubMed Central

Background: The incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections is increasing in the United States, and it is possible that municipal wastewater could be a reservoir of this microorganism. To date, no U.S. studies have evaluated the occurrence of MRSA in wastewater. Objective: We examined the occurrence of MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) at U.S. wastewater treatment plants. Methods: We collected wastewater samples from two Mid-Atlantic and two Midwest wastewater treatment plants between October 2009 and October 2010. Samples were analyzed for MRSA and MSSA using membrane filtration. Isolates were confirmed using biochemical tests and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Sensititre® microbroth dilution. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) screening, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed to further characterize the strains. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion tests and analysis of variance. Results: We detected MRSA (n = 240) and MSSA (n = 119) in 22 of 44 (50%) and 24 of 44 (55%) wastewater samples, respectively. The odds of samples being MRSA-positive decreased as treatment progressed: 10 of 12 (83%) influent samples were MRSA-positive, while only one of 12 (8%) effluent samples was MRSA-positive. Ninety-three percent and 29% of unique MRSA and MSSA isolates, respectively, were multidrug resistant. SCCmec types II and IV, the pvl gene, and USA types 100, 300, and 700 (PFGE strain types commonly found in the United States) were identified among the MRSA isolates. Conclusions: Our findings raise potential public health concerns for wastewater treatment plant workers and individuals exposed to reclaimed wastewater. Because of increasing use of reclaimed wastewater, further study is needed to evaluate the risk of exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in treated wastewater. PMID:23124279

Goldstein, Rachel E. Rosenberg; Micallef, Shirley A.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Davis, Johnnie A.; He, Xin; George, Ashish; Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Schreiber, Nicole A.; Mukherjee, Sampa; Joseph, Sam W.

2012-01-01

145

Risk factors for acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by trauma patients in the intensive care unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a previous study in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, it was demonstrated that trauma patients were at particular risk of becoming colonized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We examined risk factors for MRSA acquisition in these patients using a cohort study comparing the 31 patients who acquired MRSA with 65 who did not.

C Marshall; R Wolfe; T Kossmann; S Wesselingh; G Harrington; D Spelman

2004-01-01

146

University of Minnesota study of exposure of animal manure applicators to bacteria (S. aureus, MRSA) of swine origin  

E-print Network

University of Minnesota study of exposure of animal manure applicators to bacteria (S. aureus, MRSA to certain antibiotics, and those resistant to the drug methicillin (known as MRSA � methicillin resistant S be a reservoir of MRSA. Furthermore, people with direct swine contact have an increased high likelihood

Netoff, Theoden

147

Risk factors associated with nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection including previous use of antimicrobials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major nosocomial pathogen world- wide. To investigate an association between antimicrobial use and MRSA, a case control study of 121 patients infected with MRSA compared with 123 patients infected with methicillin- susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was carried out. Antimicrobial use was analysed by three different logistic regression models: all ? ? ? ?-lactam antibiotics,

Eileen M. Graffunder; Richard A. Venezia

2002-01-01

148

Characterization of PVL/ACME-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (genotypes ST8-MRSA-IV and ST5-MRSA-II) isolated from a university hospital in Japan.  

PubMed

The ST8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa, known as USA300, is a prevalent community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) clone in the United States and has been spreading worldwide. The USA300 characteristically harbors Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) genes and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME, type I). Prevalence and molecular characteristics of PVL(+) and/or ACME(+) S. aureus were investigated in a university hospital located in northern Japan, for 1,366 S. aureus isolates, including 601 MRSA strains derived from clinical specimens collected from 2008 to 2010. The PVL gene was identified in three MRSA strains with SCCmec IV, which belonged to ST8, spa type t008, coagulase type III, and agr type I. Two PVL-positive MRSA strains had also type I ACME, and were isolated from skin abscess of outpatients who have not travelled abroad recently. One of these PVL(+)/ACME(+) strains carried tet(K), msrA, and aph(3')-IIIa, showing resistance to kanamycin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin, suggesting acquisition of more resistance than ST8 CA-MRSA reported in Japan previously. In contrast, another PVL(+)/ACME(+) strain and a PVL(+)/ACME(-) strain were susceptible to more antimicrobials and had less virulence factors than PVL(-)/ACME(+) MRSA strains. Besides the two PVL(+) MRSA strains, ACME (type-?II) was identified into seven MRSA strains with SCCmec II belonging to ST5, one of the three spa types (t002, t067, and t071), coagulase type II, and agr type II. These PVL(-)/ACME(+) MRSA strains showed multiple drug resistance and harbored various toxin genes as observed for ST5 PVL(-)/ACME(-) MRSA-II. The present study suggested the spread of ST8-MRSA-IV in northern Japan, and a potential significance of ACME-positive ST5-MRSA-II as an emerging MRSA clone in a hospital. PMID:23083127

Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Yamamoto, Dai; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Watanabe, Naoki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

2013-02-01

149

Pollen Grains Induce a Rapid and Biphasic Eczematous Immune Response in Atopic Eczema Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Eczematous reactions to type I allergy-inducing antigens are documented in a subgroup of patients with atopic eczema. Yet, the underlying immunological mechanisms are not well understood. Material and Methods: To delineate the effect of native pollen grains on human skin of healthy and atopic individuals we performed patch tests (atopy patch test with native pollen grains, PPT). Nickel patch

Kilian Eyerich; Johannes Huss-Marp; Ulf Darsow; Andreas Wollenberg; Stefanie Foerster; Johannes Ring; Heidrun Behrendt; Claudia Traidl-Hoffmann

2008-01-01

150

Sensitizing potential of triclosan and triclosan-based skin care products in patients with chronic eczema.  

PubMed

Triclosan is a lypophilic chlorophenol biocide with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antifungal activity. Triclosan-based topical products have been shown to be tolerated and beneficial in atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitizing potential of triclosan and triclosan-based creams in patients affected by eczematous dermatitis. Two hundred and seventy-five patients affected by chronic eczema (allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, atopic eczema, nummular eczema, stasis dermatitis) were patch tested with standard patch test series as well as triclosan and triclosan-based products. Standard patch test series resulted positive in 164 patients (61%), with nickel sulfate, house dust mites, fragrance mix, propolis, thimerosal, myroxylon pereira, potassium dichromate, wool alcohols, and p-phenylenediamine the most common sensitizing haptens. Only two patients developed positive reactions to triclosan (0.7%) and four (1.4%) to triclosan-based products. The present study's results confirm that triclosan is well tolerated and has a very low sensitizing potential even in high-risk patients affected by eczema. PMID:18837732

Schena, Donatella; Papagrigoraki, Anastasia; Girolomoni, Giampiero

2008-10-01

151

Influence of weather and climate on subjective symptom intensity in atopic eczema  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The frequent clinical observation that the course of atopic eczema, a skin disease involving a disturbed cutaneous barrier function, is influenced by climate and weather motivated us to analyse these relationships biometrically. In the Swiss high-mountain area of Davos the intensity of itching experienced by patients with atopic eczema was evaluated and compared to 15 single meteorological variables recorded daily during an entire 7-year observation period. By means of univariate analyses and multiple regressions, itch intensity was found to be correlated with some meteorological variables. A clear-cut inverse correlation exists with air temperature (coefficient of correlation: -0.235, P<0.001), but the effects of water vapour pressure, air pressure and hours of sunshine are less pronounced. The results show that itching in atopic eczema is significantly dependent on meteorological conditions. The data suggest that, in patients with atopic eczema, a certain range of thermo-hygric atmospheric conditions with a balance of heat and water loss on the skin surface is essential for the skin to feel comfortable.

Vocks, E.; Busch, R.; Fröhlich, C.; Borelli, S.; Mayer, H.; Ring, J.

152

Much Atopy about the Skin: Genome-Wide Molecular Analysis of Atopic Eczema  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder with an increasing prevalence in industrialized countries. Methods: Genox Research Incorporation was founded in 1996 to identify new genes involved in allergic diseases in collaboration with the National Children’s Hospital in Tokyo. In the AE project, they have discovered several hundred new genes and partial DNA sequences by mainly using

Hirohisa Saito

2005-01-01

153

Mapping Systematic Reviews on Atopic Eczema—An Essential Resource for Dermatology Professionals and Researchers  

PubMed Central

Background Many research studies have been published on atopic eczema and these are often summarised in systematic reviews (SRs). Identifying SRs can be time-consuming for health professionals, and researchers. In order to facilitate the identification of important research, we have compiled an on-line resource that includes all relevant eczema reviews published since 2000. Methods SRs were searched for in MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE and NHS Evidence. Selected SRs were assessed against the pre-defined eligibility criteria and relevant articles were grouped by treatment category for the included interventions. All identified systematic reviews are included in the Global Resource of EczemA Trials (GREAT) database (www.greatdatabase.org.uk) and key clinical messages are summarised here. Results A total of 128 SRs reviews were identified, including three clinical guidelines. Of these, 46 (36%) were found in the Cochrane Library. No single database contained all of the SRs found. The number of SRs published per year has increased substantially over the last thirteen years, and reviews were published in a variety of clinical journals. Of the 128 SRs, 1 (1%) was on mechanism, 37 (29%) were on epidemiology, 40 (31%) were on eczema prevention, 29 (23%) were on topical treatments, 31 (24%) were on systemic treatments, and 24 (19%) were on other treatments. All SRs included searches of MEDLINE in their search methods. One hundred six SRs (83%) searched more than one electronic database. There were no language restrictions reported in the search methods of 52 of the SRs (41%). Conclusions This mapping of atopic eczema reviews is a valuable resource. It will help healthcare practitioners, guideline writers, information specialists, and researchers to quickly identify relevant up-to-date evidence in the field for improving patient care. PMID:23505516

Futamura, Masaki; Thomas, Kim S.; Grindlay, Douglas J. C.; Doney, Elizabeth J.; Torley, Donna; Williams, Hywel C.

2013-01-01

154

A cosmeceutical formulation based on boswellic acids for the treatment of erythematous eczema and psoriasis  

PubMed Central

Background Boswellic acids (BAs) show anti-inflammatory properties in a variety of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and asthma. A topical administration route is currently used to deliver active compounds in psoriatic and eczematous patients. In this double-blind study we compare a novel BA formulation (containing Bosexil®, INCI [International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients]: lecithin, Boswellia serrata resin extract) with a placebo formulation. A third arm of the trial received a formulation of Vaccinium myrtillus seed oil, previously demonstrated as an effective local treatment for psoriatic lesions. Methods Patients with psoriasis or erythematous eczema were randomly assigned, in a 1:1:1 ratio, to Bosexil®, V. myrtillus seed oil, or placebo. In order to evaluate the effects of treatment, the changes of scales and erythema from diagnosis to the end of treatment were scored in psoriatic patients, while changes in itch and erythema were analyzed for erythematous eczema patients. Psoriasis Area Severity Index and Eczema Area and Severity Index scores were also calculated. Results In patients with psoriasis, scales and erythema improved both with Bosexil® and the V. myrtillus seed oil treatment in comparison with placebo. In particular, the treatment with Bosexil® formulation improved scales (70% of cases) and erythema (50% of cases) without any case of worsening. In patients with eczema, the administration of placebo did not result in any improvement in 90% of cases, and in the remaining 10% worsened both itch and erythema. Bosexil® formulation improved both itch (60% of cases) and erythema (60% of cases) without any case of worsening. V. myrtillus seed oil improved itch and erythema in 66.7% and 77.8% of patients, respectively. Conclusion A topical formulation of Bosexil® may be promising for the treatment of psoriasis and erythematous eczema. Long-term studies are recommended to evaluate the adherence to this topical treatment and its clinical benefits in real life.

Togni, Stefano; Maramaldi, Giada; Di Pierro, Francesco; Biondi, Massimo

2014-01-01

155

Characterisation of MRSA strains isolated from patients in a hospital in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is spreading worldwide and poses a serious public health problem, being present in hospital settings and communities. However, from the Middle East and the Arabian Peninsula few molecular typing data on MRSA strains are currently available. In order to obtain data on the population structure of MRSA in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 107 clinical and environmental MRSA isolates were genotyped using a microarray-based assay. Results Five major MRSA strains from four clonal complexes were identified CC8/ST239-III (20.75%), PVL-positive as well as -negative CC22-IV (18.87% and 9.43%, respectively), PVL-positive CC30-IV (12.26%) and PVL-positive CC80-IV (17.92%). Minor strains, which accounted for less than 3% each, included CC1-IV/SCCfus, PVL-positive CC1/ST772-V, PVL-positive as well as- negative CC5-IV, CC5-IV/SCCfus, CC5-V, CC6-IV, CC45-IV, PVL-negative CC80-IV, PVL-positive CC88-IV, CC97-V and a CC9/ST834-MRSA strain. Conclusions Typing of MRSA strains from Riyadh revealed a high diversity of clonal complexes. The prevalence of the genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin was surprisingly high (54.21%), and a significant rate of resistance markers was detected also in strains considered as community-associated. PMID:22823982

2012-01-01

156

Genome sequencing and molecular characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus ST772-MRSA-V, “Bengal Bay Clone”  

PubMed Central

Background The PVL-positive ST772-MRSA-V is an emerging community-associated (CA-) MRSA clone that has been named Bengal Bay Clone since most patients have epidemiological connections to the Indian subcontinent. It is found increasingly common in other areas of the world. Methods One isolate of ST772-MRSA-V was sequenced using the Illumina Genome Analyzer System. After initial assembling the multiple sequence contigs were analysed using different in-house annotation scripts. Results were compared to microarray hybridisation results of clinical isolates of ST772-MRSA-V, of related strains and to another ST772-MRSA-V genome sequence. Results According to MLST e-burst analysis, ST772-MRSA-V belongs to Clonal Complex (CC)1, differing from ST1 only in one MLST allele (pta-22). However, there are several additional differences including agr alleles (group II rather than III), capsule type (5 rather than 8), the presence of the egc enterotoxin gene cluster and of the enterotoxin homologue ORF CM14 as well as the absence of the enterotoxin H gene seh. Enterotoxin genes sec and sel are present. ST772-MRSA-V harbours the genes encoding enterotoxin A (sea) and PVL (lukS/F-PV). Both are located on the same prophage. Conclusions ST772-MRSA-V may have emerged from the same lineage as globally spread CC1 and CC5 strains. It has acquired a variety of virulence factors, and for a CA-MRSA strain it has an unusually high number of genes associated with antibiotic resistance. PMID:24359724

2013-01-01

157

[State of infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Extremadura: susceptibility, clonality and role of community-associated MRSA].  

PubMed

The correct surveillance and control of infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) needs of update knowledge of its specific properties in each place. Our study aims to describe the current characteristics of infection due to MRSA in Extremadura. During 2010, 309 MRSA were collected from clinical samples in our region. A susceptibility test that included 17 antibiotics tested by AST -588 card Vitek 2 ® and E -test method was performed on all isolates. A sample of 100 strains, selected by stratified random sampling, were genotyped by pulsed field electrophoresis (PFGE). The prevalence of MRSA in Extremadura was 20.2%. Don Benito-Villanueva area showed the most prevalence and a higher incidence. Merida reported the most favourable situation, with a relatively low ratios of prevalence and incidence. The community acquired reached 44 % in the region, showing predominantly in less populated areas (Navalmoral and Coria). The most common multiresistant pattern was tobramycin-levofloxacin-erythromycin (44%), followed tobramycin-erythromycin-clindamycin (20%). No linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline resistant strains were observed, but 42 % of the MRSA strains showed decreased susceptibility vancomycin (DSV). PFGE analysis reported 27 genotypes, with 3 major genotypes: E8a (25%), E7b (17%) and E7a (12%). The post-hoc statistical analysis did not reveal significant differences in the distribution of genotypes between different areas. However it revealed some trends that should be considered. PMID:25229373

Aguadero, V; González-Velasco, C; Vindel, A; González-Velasco, M; Moreno, J J

2014-09-01

158

Cecal ligation and puncture followed by MRSA pneumonia increases mortality in mice and blunts production of local and systemic cytokines  

PubMed Central

Mortality in the ICU frequently results from the synergistic effect of two temporally-distinct infections. This study examined the pathophysiology of a new model of intraabdominal sepsis followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy followed three days later by an intratracheal injection of MRSA or saline. Both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice had 100% survival while animals with CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia had 67% seven-day survival. Animals subjected to CLP/MRSA had increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) concentrations of MRSA compared to sham/MRSA animals. Animals subjected to sham/MRSA pneumonia had increased BAL levels of IL-6, TNF-?, and G-CSF compared to those given intratracheal saline while CLP/MRSA mice had a blunted local inflammatory response with markedly decreased cytokine levels. Similarly, animals subjected to CLP/saline had increased peritoneal lavage levels of IL-6 and IL-1? compared to those subjected to sham laparotomy while this response was blunted in CLP/MRSA mice. Systemic cytokines were upregulated in both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice, and this was blunted by the combination of CLP/MRSA. In contrast, no synergistic effect on pneumonia severity, white blood cell count or lymphocyte apoptosis was identified in CLP/MRSA mice compared to animals with either insult in isolation. These results indicate that a clinically relevant model of CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia causes higher mortality than could have been predicted from studying either infection in isolation, and this was associated with a blunted local (pulmonary and peritoneal) and systemic inflammatory response and decreased ability to clear infection. PMID:21937950

Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E.; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R.; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Clark, Andrew T.; Fox, Amy C.; Dunne, W. Michael; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

2011-01-01

159

Eradication of MRSA in chronic wounds of outpatients with leg ulcers is accelerated by antiseptic washes – Results of a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whereas several studies evaluate MRSA in inpatients, for outpatients there are merely expert recommendations, but no systematic studies. Mostly, MRSA in outpatients is tolerated but not eradicated. Particularly, for risk patients with chronic wounds some experts postulate that MRSA-eradication is even impossible. For the first time, this pilot study systematically searched for the results of an eradication of MRSA in

Stefanie Reich-Schupke; Katharina Warneke; Peter Altmeyer; Markus Stücker

2010-01-01

160

Tackling contamination of the hospital environment by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): a comparison between conventional terminal cleaning and hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hospital environment can sometimes harbour methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) but is not generally regarded as a major source of MRSA infection. We conducted a prospective study in surgical wards of a London teaching hospital affected by MRSA, and compared the effectiveness of standard cleaning with a new method of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination. MRSA contamination, measured by surface swabbing

G. L. French; J. A. Otter; K. P. Shannon; N. M. T Adams; D Watling; M. J Parks

2004-01-01

161

Linezolid eradicates MRSA better than vancomycin from surgical-site infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe purpose of this analysis was to compare the efficacy of linezolid versus vancomycin in patients with suspected or proven gram-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surgical-site infections.

John Weigelt; Haytham M. A. Kaafarani; Kamal M. F. Itani; Robert N. Swanson

2004-01-01

162

Clinical usefulness of multiplex PCR lateral flow in MRSA detection: a novel, rapid genetic testing method.  

PubMed

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with exogenous cassette DNA containing the methicillin-resistant gene mecA (SCCmec) poses a problem as a drug-resistant bacterium responsible for hospital- and community-acquired infections. The frequency of MRSA detection has recently been increasing rapidly in Japan, and SCCmec has also been classified more diversely into types I-V. A rapid test is essential for early diagnosis and treatment of MRSA infections, but detection by conventional methods requires at least two days. The newly developed multiplex PCR lateral flow method allows specific amplification of femA to detect S. aureus, mecA to detect SCCmec, and kdpC to detect SCCmec type II; moreover, PCR products can be evaluated visually in about 3 h. In the present study, we developed a PCR lateral flow method for MRSA using this method and investigated its clinical usefulness in the detection of MRSA. The results showed a diagnostic concordance rate of 91.7% for MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus between bacteriological examination and PCR lateral flow, and a high level of specificity in PCR lateral flow. In addition, a higher detection rate for S. aureus using the same sample was observed for PCR lateral flow (70.2%) than for bacteriological tests (48.6%). The above results show that PCR lateral flow for MRSA detection has high sensitivity, specificity, and speed, and its clinical application as a method for early diagnosis of MRSA infections appears to be feasible. PMID:21994180

Nihonyanagi, Shin; Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Okada, Kiyomi; Uozumi, Toshiki; Kazuyama, Yukumasa; Yamaguchi, Tokiko; Nakazaki, Nobuhiko; Sakurai, Keizou; Hirata, Yasuyoshi; Munekata, Shinichi; Ohtani, Shinichi; Takemoto, Tsuyoshi; Bandoh, Yuki; Akahoshi, Tohru

2012-06-01

163

Emergence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in Queensland, Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To investigate the incidence and epidemiology of non-multiresistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (nmMRSA) infection in south-east Queensland, Australia.Study design: A retrospective survey was done of hospital records of all patients who had non-multiresistant MRSA isolated at Ipswich Hospital (a 250-bed general hospital, 40 km south-west of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia) between March 2000 and June 2001. Laboratory typing of these isolates

Wendy J. Munckhof; Jacqueline Schooneveldt; Geoffrey W. Coombs; Jane Hoare; Graeme R. Nimmo

2003-01-01

164

Multiresistant-MRSA tricuspid valve infective endocarditis with ancient osteomyelitis locus  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) with low susceptibility to glycopeptides is uncommon. CASE PRESENTATION: The case of a 50-year-old non-drug addict patient presenting with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis (IE) by MRSA resistant to vancomycin and linezolid is presented. There was response only to quinupristin\\/dalfopristin. He had a motorcycling accident four years before undergoing right above-the-knee amputation and orthopaedic fixation of

Giuseppe Chesi; Andrea Colli; Carlos A Mestres; Gianpaolo Gambarati; Fabrizio Boni; Tiziano Gherli

2006-01-01

165

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among dental patients: a problem for infection control in dentistry?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed the frequency of carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among 500 dental patients of a university clinic. From each participant, two specimens were taken from the anterior\\u000a nares and the pharynx and analysed by culture. The participants completed a questionnaire on possible risk factors of MRSA\\u000a infection. Two hundred ten individuals carried S. aureus, 90 in the nares

Melanie Zimmerli; Andreas F. Widmer; Marc Dangel; Andreas Filippi; Reno Frei; Jürg Meyer

2009-01-01

166

The effect of increased bed numbers on MRSA transmission in acute medical wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

An 18-month prospective survey was performed to examine the effect of adding a fifth bed to four-bedded bays in three acute medical wards on colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Screening procedures were in accordance with the UK national guidelines. All patients newly colonized with MRSA were visited, and their bed location determined. Data from the five-bedded bays were compared

C. C. Kibbler; A. Quick; A.-M. O'Neill

1998-01-01

167

The Nottingham Staphylococcus aureus population study: prevalence of MRSA among the elderly in a university hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prevalence survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in elderly patients (65 years and older) three weeks after admission to a university hospital was performed. Risk factors associated with hospital MRSA carriage were determined. The design was a cross-sectional patient-based study and all adult wards at the University Hospital Nottingham (1600 beds) were included. Three hundred and forty-two elderly individuals

S. Hori; R. Sunley; A. Tami; H. Grundmann

2002-01-01

168

[Antibiotics for Treatment of Infections by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)].  

PubMed

Over the last 50 years methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) spread globally. Vancomycin is still the most recommended antibiotic for MRSA-infections. Teicoplanin is an alternative glycopeptide with longer elimination half-life. Telavancin is a more recently developed derivative of vancomycin with similar clinical efficacy as vancomycin. It is not recommended for treatment of patients with renal insufficiency. Nephrotoxicity limits the therapeutic use of glycopeptide antibiotics. The oxazolidinone linezolid exhibits similar to superior therapeutic efficacy. Hematologic controls are necessary during treatment with this antibacterial agent. Neurotoxic effects have been observed mainly in patients who received prolonged linezolid treatment. Attention must be paid to possible interactions with concomitantly given drugs acting on the serotonergic system. New therapeutic options arise with ceftaroline, the first ?-lactam antibiotic with activity against MRSA. However, controlled clinical trials with pulmonary MRSA infections have not been conducted with ceftaroline. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide, and tigecycline, a glycylcyclin are active in vitro against MRSA as well, but are also not indicated in pulmonary MRSA infections. These antibiotics show in an exemplary manner that antibacterial activity in vitro is an important prerequisite, but relevant data for a therapeutic decision should be derived from randomized controlled clinical double-blind trials. PMID:25290922

Stahlmann, R

2014-10-01

169

MRSA: why have we got it and can we do anything about it?  

PubMed Central

MRSA, first identified in 1960, became a major cause of healthcare-associated infection with the emergence of epidemic strains EMRSA 15 and 16 in the 1990s. MRSA bacteraemia surveillance in England showed a peak of 7700 in 2003–2004. A target was set to halve MRSA bacteraemias by 2008 backed by a central improvement programme for infection prevention and control. Healthcare-associated infection is a patient safety issue with joint responsibility between: clinicians responsible for patient care; managers responsible for the organisation of services; and the government/Department of Health responsible for national strategy, prioritisation and performance management, together with introducing a statutory Code of Practice. By 2011, the number of MRSA bacteraemias had reduced by 80% to 1481. The key drivers of improvement were management responsibility, enhanced surveillance, adherence to clinical protocols and care bundles for invasive procedures, hand hygiene and environmental cleaning, and improved isolation procedures and antibiotic stewardship. The target has been translated into an ongoing MRSA objective, and further control of MRSA is supported by a screening programme aimed at all relevant hospital admissions. Sustaining the reduction will depend upon joint responsibility between management maintaining compliance assurance with policies and individual clinicians keeping it as a priority in patient safety. PMID:22134591

Duerden, B I

2012-01-01

170

Role of Raktamokshana by Jalaukavacharana and Siravedhana in the management of Vicharchika (Eczema)  

PubMed Central

Eczema is most common skin disease which has social impact. The clinical picture of Eczema resembles with Vicharchika—a skin problem mentioned in Ayurvedic literature with Kapha and Pitta morbidly/pathology. In classical text of Ayurveda, Acharyas emphasize the Shodhana therapy as the line of treatment at various places. Among these various Shodhana therapy, Raktamokshan is indicated specially because Rakta is mainly involved as Dushya in Samprapti Ghataka. In the present comparative study, Raktamokshana with two different methods were selected to find out which method is more appropriate for Raktamokshana in Vicharchika. In A group, Jalaukavacharana Karma with Jalauka (Hirudinea medicinalis) and in B group, Siravedhana Karma with Syringe as method of Raktamokshana was selected. Better result was found in A group. So, it is better to manage Vicharchika using Jalaukavacharana as method of Raktamokshana in place of Siravedhana. PMID:23049187

Raval, Hiren N.; Thakar, A. B.

2012-01-01

171

What's new in atopic eczema? An analysis of systematic reviews published in 2007 and 2008. Part 2. Disease prevention and treatment.  

PubMed

This review summarizes clinically important findings from systematic reviews indexed in bibliographical databases between August 2007 and August 2008 that dealt with disease prevention (six reviews) and treatment of atopic eczema (seven reviews). Regarding disease prevention, two independent systematic reviews found some clinical trial evidence that ingestion of probiotics by mothers during pregnancy might reduce the incidence of subsequent eczema. Another review failed to find any clear benefit of prebiotics in eczema prevention. Although furry pets are often cited as causing allergic disease, a systematic review of observational studies found no evidence that exposure to cats or dogs at birth increases eczema risk. One very large review of studies of breastfeeding found some evidence of a protective effect on eczema risk, although all the studies were limited by their observational nature. A German group has attempted an overview of eczema prevention studies with a view to informing national guidelines. In terms of eczema treatment, two systematic reviews have confirmed the efficacy of topical tacrolimus ointment. Another review of 31 trials confirms the efficacy of topical pimecrolimus, although many of those trials were vehicle controlled, which limits their clinical utility. A review of 23 studies of desensitization therapy for allergic diseases found some evidence of benefit for eczema, which needs to be explored further. Despite the popularity of antistaphylococcal therapies for eczema, a Cochrane Review of 21 trials failed to show any clear benefit for any of the therapies for infected or clinically noninfected eczema. Another Cochrane Review dealt with dietary exclusions for people with eczema and found little evidence to support any dietary exclusion, apart from avoidance of eggs in infants with suspected egg allergy supported by evidence of sensitization. A review of 13 studies of probiotics for treating established eczema did not show convincing evidence of a clinically worthwhile benefit, an observation that has been substantiated in a subsequent Cochrane Review. PMID:19874342

Williams, H C; Grindlay, D J C

2010-04-01

172

Some observations on the occurrence of Sporidesmium bakeri Syd. and facial Eczema disease in the field  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence in pastures of the spores of Sporidesmium bakeri, observed to grow saprophytically on dead pasture-plant material, has been studied with a simple spore-counting method.High spore counts were favoured by large amounts of dead and damaged plant materials and warm, moist conditions.A relationship has been established between relatively high counts of spores and facial eczema disease in lambs.A correlation

R. H. Thornton; D. P. Sinclair

1960-01-01

173

Liver enzyme changes in a guinea-pig model of facial eczema (sporidesmiotoxicosis).  

PubMed

Sporidesmin, a hepatotoxin from Pithomyces chartarum, is responsible for facial eczema in ruminants. In an attempt to clarify the biochemical processes supporting sporidesmin toxicity and response of the liver, haematology, plasma biochemistry and liver enzyme changes were monitored for 21 days in a model for facial eczema resulting from a single intraperitoneal injection of 2.8 mg/kg BW sporidesmin to guinea pigs. Most plasma disturbances were observed 8 days after administration and accounted for starvation, liver cytolysis, and cholestasis or liver enzyme induction. Alterations of hepatic enzyme activities were intense with a maximum increase on days 2 for alkaline phosphatases (ALP) and 8 for gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and a maximum decrease on day 21 for aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). Comparison of liver and plasma enzyme changes indicates that GGT was the most reliable and significant plasma indicator of sporidesmin-associated liver alterations. Moreover, this study points out the validity of the one-dose intoxicated guinea-pig model for research on sporidesmin biochemical toxicity and pathobiology of facial eczema. PMID:2570691

Bonnefoi, M; Hasim, M; Sauvagnac, P; Burgat, V; Braun, J P

1989-01-01

174

Evaluation of Three Techniques for Detection of Low-Level Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): a Disk Diffusion Method with Cefoxitin and Moxalactam, the Vitek 2 System, and the MRSA-Screen Latex Agglutination Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very-low-level methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), or class 1 MRSA, is often misdiagnosed as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). We evaluated the performances of three methods for detection of low-level methicillin resistance: the disk diffusion method using the cephamycin antibiotics cefoxitin and moxalactam, the Vitek 2 system (bioMerieux), and the MRSA-screen test (Denka). Detection of the mecA gene by PCR was considered

Annie Felten; Bernadette Grandry; Philippe Henri Lagrange; Isabelle Casin

2002-01-01

175

Skin care education and individual counselling versus treatment as usual in healthcare workers with hand eczema: randomised clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the effect of a secondary prevention programme with education on skin care and individual counselling versus treatment as usual in healthcare workers with hand eczema. Design Randomised, observer blinded parallel group superiority clinical trial. Setting Three hospitals in Denmark. Participants 255 healthcare workers with self reported hand eczema within the past year randomised centrally and stratified by profession, severity of eczema, and hospital. 123 were allocated to the intervention group and 132 to the control group. Interventions Education in skin care and individual counselling based on patch and prick testing and assessment of work and domestic related exposures. The control was treatment as usual. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was clinical severity of disease at five month follow-up measured by scores on the hand eczema severity index. The secondary outcomes were scores on the dermatology life quality index, self evaluated severity of hand eczema, skin protective behaviours, and knowledge of hand eczema from onset to follow-up. Results Follow-up data were available for 247 of 255 participants (97%). At follow-up, the mean score on the hand eczema severity index was significantly lower (improved) in the intervention group than control group: difference of means, unadjusted ?3.56 (95% confidence interval ?4.92 to ?2.14); adjusted ?3.47 (?4.80 to ?2.14), both P<0.001 for difference. The mean score on the dermatology life quality index was also significantly lower (improved) in the intervention group at follow-up: difference of means: unadjusted ?0.78, non-parametric test P=0.003; adjusted ?0.92, ?1.48 to ?0.37). Self evaluated severity and skin protective behaviour by hand washings and wearing of protective gloves were also statistically significantly better in the intervention group, whereas this was not the case for knowledge of hand eczema. Conclusion A secondary prevention programme for hand eczema improved severity and quality of life and had a positive effect on self evaluated severity and skin protective behaviour by hand washings and wearing of protective gloves. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01012453. PMID:23236031

2012-01-01

176

Combination Therapy of Sophoraflavanone B against MRSA: In Vitro Synergy Testing  

PubMed Central

Sophoraflavanone B (SPF-B), a known prenylated flavonoid, was isolated from the roots of Desmodium caudatum. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial synergism of SPF-B combined with antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA, a multidrug-resistant pathogen, causes both hospital- and community-acquired infections worldwide. The antimicrobial activity of SPF-B was assessed by the broth microdilution method, checkerboard dilution test, and time-kill curve assay. The MIC of SPF-B for 7 strains of S. aureus ranges from 15.6 to 31.25??g/mL determined. In the checkerboard method, the combinations of SPF-B with antibiotics had a synergistic effect; SPF-B markedly reduced the MICs of the ?-lactam antibiotics: ampicillin (AMP) and oxacillin (OXI); aminoglycosides gentamicin (GET); quinolones ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR) against MRSA. The time-kill curves assay showed that a combined SPF-B and selected antibiotics treatment reduced the bacterial counts below the lowest detectable limit after 24?h. These data suggest that the antibacterial activity of SPF-B against MRSA can be effectively increased through its combination with three groups of antibiotics (?-lactams, aminoglycosides, and quinolones). Our research can be a valuable and significant source for the development of a new antibacterial drug with low MRSA resistance. PMID:24319486

Mun, Su-Hyun; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Joung, Dae-Ki; Kim, Sung-Bae; Seo, Yun-Soo; Choi, Jang-Gi; Lee, Young-Seob; Cha, Seon-Woo; Ahn, Young-Sup; Han, Sin-Hee; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

2013-01-01

177

Influence of maternal diet during lactation and use of formula feeds on development of atopic eczema in high risk infants.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To examine the effects of maternal diet during lactation and the use of formula feeds on the development of atopic eczema in infants at risk. DESIGN--Mothers who planned to breast feed exclusively were randomly allocated to either a restricted diet (avoiding milk and other dairy products, eggs, fish, peanuts, and soybeans) or a diet without restrictions. Mothers who did not plan to breast feed were randomly allocated to using one of three formula feeds. SETTING--Child health centre in Canada. SUBJECTS--97 Mothers who chose to breast feed and 124 mothers who did not. INTERVENTIONS--Restricted diet for 49 mothers who breast fed. Casein hydrolysate formula, soy milk formula, or cows' milk formula for infants not breast fed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Development of eczema in babies. RESULTS--Infants were followed up over 18 months and examined for eczema. Eczema was less common and milder in babies who were breast fed and whose mothers were on a restricted diet (11/49 (22%) v 21/48 (48%)). In infants fed casein hydrolysate, soy milk, or cows' milk 9/43 (21%), 26/41 (63%), and 28/40 (70%), respectively, developed atopic eczema. CONCLUSIONS--In families with a history of atopic disease [corrected] mothers who breast feed should avoid common allergenic foods during lactation. If they choose not to breast feed a hydrolysate formula should be used. PMID:2504375

Chandra, R. K.; Puri, S.; Hamed, A.

1989-01-01

178

The importance of children's illness beliefs: The Children's Illness Perception Questionnaire (CIPQ) as a reliable assessment tool for eczema and asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lack of information about disease in children can lead to erroneous views such as children believing that hospital admittance or the presence of a disease is a punishment for a perceived wrong. There has thus far been no standard tool available to measure children's illness conceptualizations from a Leventhalian framework. Three groups of children with eczema, asthma and eczema

C. Walker; L. Papadopoulos; M. Lipton; M. Hussein

2006-01-01

179

Rapid Detection of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in Wound Specimens and Blood Cultures: Multicenter Preclinical Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert MRSA/SA Skin and Soft Tissue and Blood Culture Assays?  

PubMed Central

A multicenter preclinical evaluation was conducted to evaluate the performance of two Cepheid Xpert assays for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and S. aureus. Sensitivity was 97.1% and 98.3% for MRSA in wound and blood culture specimens, respectively. Sensitivity was 100% for S. aureus from both specimen types. PMID:19144803

Wolk, D. M.; Struelens, M. J.; Pancholi, P.; Davis, T.; Della-Latta, P.; Fuller, D.; Picton, E.; Dickenson, R.; Denis, O.; Johnson, D.; Chapin, K.

2009-01-01

180

A New Local Variant (ST764) of the Globally Disseminated ST5 Lineage of Hospital-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Carrying the Virulence Determinants of Community-Associated MRSA  

PubMed Central

The ST5 lineage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most globally disseminated hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) lineages. We isolated a new local variant (designated ST764) over at least 5 years that causes invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis, and is carried by medical students, as well as household members. Analysis of the genome sequence of one isolate compared to that of the reference ST5 strain revealed that ST764 had acquired virulence traits similar to those of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) through the acquisition of two new mobile genetic elements, ACMEII and SaPInn54, which carried ACME arcA and the staphylococcal enterotoxin B gene (seb), respectively, and through enhanced expression of cytolytic peptide genes, although ST764 was negative for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Other differences between ST764 and ST5 included the acquisition of an ACMEII-related cassette (cJR1), prophage ?2NN54, and streptococcal Tn5251 and decreased numbers of copies of Tn554. As for superantigen genes, although the two possessed seg, sei, sem, sen, and seo, ST764 lacked tst, sec, sel, and sep. The data suggest that ST764 MRSA is a novel hybrid variant of ST5 HA-MRSA with the characteristics of CA-MRSA and that the evolution of ST764 includes multiple steps, e.g., acquisition of novel or nonstaphylococcal mobile elements. PMID:23318800

Takano, Tomomi; Hung, Wei-Chun; Shibuya, Michiko; Higuchi, Wataru; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan; Khokhlova, Olga E.; Yabe, Shizuka; Ozaki, Kyoko; Takano, Misao

2013-01-01

181

Using Marker Pens on Patients: a Potential Source of Cross Infection with MRSA  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Marker pens are widely used in surgery but pre-operative marking of patients may be a cause of bacterial cross-infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS Two experiments were performed to assess whether marking pens can be cause of cross-infection: (i) 26 indelible marker pens were collected from surgical wards for analysis; and (ii) ‘fresh’ as well as ‘dry’ (artificially dried by removing cap and exposing tip for 2 h) new permanent marker pens, and whiteboard marker pens were inoculated by dipping the tips into various concentrations of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Each pen was inoculated onto 2 blood agar plates at 0 (immediately after inoculation) to 30 min at various intervals, 4 h and 24 h. The plates were incubated for 18 h at 35°C in an incubator. RESULTS Of 26 pens collected from the wards, 2 cultured Micrococci spp. (skin commensals). The constituents of new ‘fresh’ pen tips rapidly kill MRSA – in all cases by 4 h, but usually within minutes. At high inoculum concentrations, MRSA is not killed immediately. Dry marker pens harbour MRSA for at least 30 min and probably longer. CONCLUSIONS Marker pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infection. The ethanol-based ink in permanent marker pens has a bactericidal action against MRSA that starts within seconds, and they are likely to be safe to use with a gap of at least 2 min between patients. Usually, harmless skin commensals are not pathogenic except in immunocompromised patients. Old or dried-out marker pens can harbour pathogens and should be discarded before attempted use on patients. We recommend disposable markers for the immunocompromised and patients with a known positive MRSA status. PMID:17959001

Tadiparthi, S; Shokrollahi, K; Juma, A; Croall, J

2007-01-01

182

The Standard One Gram Dose of Vancomycin is not Adequate Prophylaxis for MRSA  

PubMed Central

Introduction The indications for vancomycin prophylaxis to prevent Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surgical site infections are increasing. The recommended dose of vancomycin has traditionally been 1 gram intravenous. However, the increasing prevalence of obesity in our population coupled with increasing resistance of MRSA to vancomycin has resulted in recent recommendations for weight-based dosing of vancomycin at 15mg/kg. We hypothesize that the standard one gram dose of vancomycin is inadequate to meet the recently recommended dosage of 15mg/kg. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review on 216 patients who were screened positive for MRSA prior to undergoing elective total joint or spine surgeries between January 2009 to January 2012. All patients were given 1 gram of vancomycin within an hour prior to surgical incision as prophylaxis. Using the revised dosing protocol of 15mg/kg of body weight for vancomycin, proper dosage was calculated for each patient. These values were then compared to the 1 gram dose given to the patients at time of surgery. Patients were assessed as either underdosed (a calculated weight-based dose >1 gram) or overdosed (a calculated weight-based dose <1 gram). Additionally, we used actual case times and pharmacokinetic equations to determine the vancomycin (VAN) levels at the end of the procedures. Results Out of 216 patients who tested positive for MRSA, 149 patients (69%) were determined to be underdosed and 22 patients (10%) patients were determined to be overdosed. The predicted VAN level at the end of procedure was <15 mg/L in 60% of patients with 1 gram dose compared to 12% (p=0.0005) with weight base dose. Six patients developed post-operative MRSA surgical site infections (SSI). Of these six patients; four had strains of MRSA with vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration of >1.0mg/L. Based on 1g dosing, 5/6 patients with MRSA positive SSIs had wound closure levels of <15 mg/L and all six were <20 mg/L. Conclusion In settings such as hospitals, where the risk for resistant bacteria, especially MRSA, is high, it is becoming increasingly important to accurately dose patients who require vancomycin. In order to avoid incorrect dosing of vancomycin health care providers must use weight-based dosing.

Catanzano, Anthony; Phillips, Michael; Dubrovskaya, Yanina; Hutzler, Lorraine; Bosco, Joseph

2014-01-01

183

Foetal Exposure to Maternal Passive Smoking Is Associated with Childhood Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Eczema  

PubMed Central

Objective. We examined the hypothesis that foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking is associated with childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema. Methods. The study was a population-based cross-sectional survey of Hong Kong Chinese children aged ?14 years carried out in 2005 to 2006. Results. Foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking was significantly associated with wheeze ever (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.58–2.67), current wheeze (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.48–2.86), allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.09–1.37), and eczema ever (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.38–1.87). Foetal exposure to maternal active smoking was significantly associated with asthma ever (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.14–3.84), wheeze ever (OR 2.46; 95% CI 1.27–4.78), and current wheeze (OR 2.74; 95% CI 1.24–6.01) but not with allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.70–1.46) or eczema ever (OR 1.38; 95% CI 0.87–2.18). The dose response relationship between wheeze ever and current wheeze with increasing exposure, from no exposure to maternal passive smoking and then to maternal active smoking, further supports causality. Conclusion. There is significant association between foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking and maternal active smoking with childhood asthma and related atopic illnesses. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential causal relationship. PMID:22927783

Lee, S. L.; Lam, T. H.; Leung, T. H.; Wong, W. H. S.; Schooling, M.; Leung, G. M.; Lau, Y. L.

2012-01-01

184

Chronic hand eczema - self-management and prognosis: a study protocol for a randomised clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background Hand eczema has a one-year prevalence of approximately 10 % in the general Danish population. Often the disease becomes chronic with numerous implications for the individual’s daily life, occupation and quality of life. However, no guidelines of self-management recommendations beyond the acute stage are given. Self-management of the disease is pivotal and involves self-monitoring of the condition, medication adherence, and preventive behaviour. Interventions best to support the individual in this ongoing process need to be developed. Methods/design This paper describes the design of a randomised clinical trial to test a newly developed intervention of individual counselling versus conventional information. 300 patients consecutively referred to dermatologic treatment at two different settings are individually randomised to either the intervention programme, named ‘The Healthy Skin Clinic’ or to the control group. Block-wise randomisation according to setting and gender is carried out. The intervention offers a tool for self-monitoring; basic and specific individual counselling; the possibility of asynchronous communication with the intervention team; and an electronic patient dialogue forum. Primary outcome variable is objective assessment of the hand eczema severity performed at baseline prior to randomisation, and repeated at six months follow-up. Secondary outcome variables are dermatology related life quality and perceived global burden of disease. Discussion The trial aims at evaluating a newly developed guidance programme which is expected to support self-management of patients referred to dermatology treatment due to chronic hand eczema. The design of the protocol is pragmatic with blinding of neither participants nor the investigator. Thus, in the interpretation of the results, the investigator takes into account effects that may be attributed to actors of the interventions rather than the intervention per se as well of potential observer bias. Inclusion criterions are wide in order to increase transferability of the results. Trial registration The trial is registered in ClinicalTrials.Gov with registration number NCT01482663. PMID:22691871

2012-01-01

185

Intestinal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nasal MRSA carriers hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

Background The current data regarding the correlation between the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones carried in the nasal cavity and digestive tract are inadequate. Methods MRSA strains were isolated from both the feces and nasal swabs of 21 nasal-MRSA carriers ranging from 10 to 104 days of age treated at the neonatal intensive care units of two hospitals. The molecular epidemiological characteristics of the isolates were determined: multilocus sequence types, spa-types, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types, carriage of four exotoxin genes, and genes contained in commercially available kit. Results The feces of all nasal carriers contained MRSA at levels ranging from 4.0 × 102 to 2.8 × 108 colony forming units/g feces. The MRSA clones isolated from the feces and the nasal swabs of each patient were the same. Four MRSA clones, clonal complex (CC) 8-SCCmec IVl, CC8-SCCmec IVb, CC1-SCCmec IVa and CC5-SCCmec IIa were identified from 21 patients. All CC8-SCCmec IVl strains and one of three CC5-SCCmec IIa strains carried the toxic shock syndrome toxin gene. Conclusions The feces of tested MRSA carriers contained the same MRSA clones as the nasal isolates in considerable amounts, suggesting that more careful attention should be paid for the handling of excrement in the case of newborn babies or infants than that of adults. PMID:24808943

2014-01-01

186

Nanocrystalline silver dressings as an efficient anti-MRSA barrier: a new solution to an increasing problem.  

PubMed

The emergence of multi-drug-resistant strains of bacteria represents a particular challenge in the field of wound management. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether nanocrystalline silver dressings possess the physical properties to act as a barrier to the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the laboratory setting and in a clinical setting. Initially, MRSA suspension and colony culture experiments were performed showing that nanocrystalline silver dressings act as potent and sustained antimicrobial agents, efficiently inhibiting MRSA penetration. Subsequently, a double-centre clinical trial was initiated using nanocrystalline silver dressings as a cover for 10 MRSA colonized wounds in a total of seven patients. By delineating the MRSA load on the upper side of the dressing and the wound bed each time the dressing was changed (i.e. after 1, 24, 48 and 72 h), nanocrystalline silver dressings were found to provide a complete, or almost complete, barrier to the penetration/spread of MRSA in 95% of readings. In addition, 67% of all wound observations showed a decrease in the MRSA load with an eradication rate of 11%. We believe that nanocrystalline silver dressings may become an important part of local MRSA management, with cost benefits to both patients and the healthcare system. PMID:15896880

Strohal, R; Schelling, M; Takacs, M; Jurecka, W; Gruber, U; Offner, F

2005-07-01

187

Isolation measures in the hospital management of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): systematic review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of isolation measures in reducing the incidence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation and infection in hospital inpatients. Design Systematic review of published articles. Data sources Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (SIGLE), and citation lists (1966-2000). Review methods Articles reporting MRSA related outcomes

B S Cooper; S P Stone; C C Kibbler; B D Cookson; J A Roberts; G F Medley; G Duckworth; R Lai; S Ebrahim

2004-01-01

188

Antimicrobial resistance profile of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from raw meat: A research for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a risk factor for patients in general population and particularly in immunocompromised patients. As a matter of fact, it can produce serious infections that may then evolve in septicaemia. However, transmission of MRSA from food to people can represent a serious problem only for immunocompromised people. Vancomycin is the elective antimicrobial commonly used

G. Pesavento; B. Ducci; N. Comodo; A. Lo Nostro

2007-01-01

189

Endotoxin in inner-city homes: Associations with wheeze and eczema in early childhood  

PubMed Central

Background An inverse association between domestic exposure to endotoxin and atopy in childhood has been observed. The relevance of this aspect of the “hygiene hypothesis” to U.S. inner-city communities that have disproportionately high asthma prevalence has not been determined. Objectives To measure endotoxin in the dust from inner-city homes, evaluate associations between endotoxin and housing/lifestyle characteristics, and determine whether endotoxin exposure predicted wheeze, allergic rhinitis and eczema over the first three years of life. Methods As part of an ongoing prospective birth cohort study, children of Dominican and African-American mothers living in New York City underwent repeated questionnaire measures. Dust samples collected from bedroom floors at age 12 or 36 months were assayed for endotoxin. Results Among the samples collected from 301 participant’s homes, the geometric mean endotoxin concentration [95% C.I.] was 75.9 EU/mg [66–87] and load was 3,892 EU/m2 [3,351–4,522]. Lower endotoxin concentrations were associated with wet mop cleaning and certain neighborhoods. Endotoxin concentration correlated weakly with cockroach (Bla g 2: r=0.22,p<0.001) and mouse (MUP: r=0.28,p<0.001) allergens in the dust. Children in homes with higher endotoxin concentration were less likely to have eczema at age 1 year (O.R. 0.70 [0.53–0.93]) and more likely to wheeze at age 2 years (O.R. 1.34 [1.01–1.78]). These associations were stronger among children with a maternal history of asthma. Conclusions Endotoxin levels in this inner-city community are similar to non-farm homes elsewhere. In this community, domestic endotoxin exposure was inversely associated with eczema at age 1, but positively associated with wheeze at age 2. Clinical Implications Endotoxin exposure in the inner-city community may be related to wheeze in the early life; however, given the inverse association seen with eczema, the long term development of allergic disease is still in question. PMID:16675336

Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Miller, Rachel L.; Thorne, Peter S.; Barr, R. Graham; Divjan, Adnan; Sheares, Beverley J.; Garfinkel, Robin S.; Perera, Frederica P.; Goldstein, Inge F.; Chew, Ginger L.

2007-01-01

190

Differences in parental? and self?report of asthma, rhinitis and eczema among Italian adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Epidemiological,and,clinical information,on respiratory,and,allergic disorders in adolescents has been collected from,the adolescents themselves,or from their parents, but little is known about the differences between these two sources of information. This study compared,the responses,to 10 identically worded,questions from,the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire,on asthma, rhinitis and eczema between written self- and parent-completed question- naires in a

E. Renzoni; F. Forastiere; A. Biggeri; G. Viegi; L. Bisanti; E. Chellini; G. Ciccone; G. Corbo; C. Galassi; F. Rusconi; P. Sestini

1999-01-01

191

The eczema risk variant on chromosome 11q13 (rs7927894) in the population-based ALSPAC cohort: a novel susceptibility factor for asthma and hay fever.  

PubMed

In a genome-wide association study, a common variant on chromosome 11q13.5 (rs7927894[T]) has been identified as a susceptibility locus for eczema. We aimed to analyze the effect of this risk variant on asthma and hay fever and to determine its impact on the general population level in over 9300 individuals of the prospectively evaluated Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children birth cohort. We demonstrate an association of rs7927894[T] with atopic asthma and with hay fever. The largest effect sizes were found in patients with the combined phenotype atopic asthma plus eczema [odds ratio (OR) = 1.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-1.88; P = 3.7 × 10(-4)] and hay fever plus eczema (OR = 1.37; 95% CI 1.15-1.62; P = 3.8 × 10(-4)). We replicated the effects of rs7927894[T] on eczema-associated asthma and hay fever independently in the German GENUFAD (GEnetic studies in NUclear Families with Atopic Dermatitis) study and show that they are significantly larger than the effect observed in eczema. The estimated population attributable risk fractions for eczema, eczema-associated atopic asthma or hay fever were 9.3, 24.9 and 23.5%, respectively. Finally in eczema, we found a synergistic interaction of rs7927894[T] with filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, which are a major cause of epidermal barrier dysfunction, and replicated the interaction in the German Multicenter Allergy Study birth cohort. The synergistic effect of rs7927894[T] and FLG mutations on eczema risk as well as the association of both variants with eczema-associated atopic asthma and hay fever point to an involvement of rs7927894[T] in a functional pathway that is linked to the barrier defect. PMID:21429916

Marenholz, Ingo; Bauerfeind, Anja; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Kerscher, Tamara; Granell, Raquel; Nickel, Renate; Lau, Susanne; Henderson, John; Lee, Young-Ae

2011-06-15

192

Alarming Proportions of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Wound Samples from Companion Animals, Germany 2010-2012  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is an important cause of wound infections in companion animals, and infections with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are of particular concern due to limited treatment options and their zoonotic potential. However, comparable epidemiological data on MRSA infections in dogs, cats and horses is scarce, also limiting the knowledge about possible links to MRSA isolates from human populations. To gain more knowledge about the occurrence and genotypic variation of MRSA among wound swabs of companion animal origin in Germany we performed a survey (2010–2012) including 5,229 samples from 1,170 veterinary practices. S. aureus was identified in 201 (5.8%) canine, 140 (12.2%) feline and 138 (22.8%) equine swabs from a total of 3,479 canine, 1,146 feline and 604 equine wounds, respectively. High MRSA rates were identified with 62.7%, 46.4% and 41.3% in S. aureus of canine, feline and equine origin, respectively. Further genotyping including spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed a comparable distribution of spa types among canine and feline MRSA with CC22 (47.6%; 49.2%) and CC5 (30.2%; 29.2%) as predominant lineages followed by CC398 (13.5%; 7.7%) and CC8 (4.0%; 9.2%). In contrast, the majority of equine MRSA belonged to CC398 (87.7%). Our data highlight the importance of S. aureus and MRSA as a cause of wound infections, particularly in cats and horses in Germany. While “human-associated” MRSA lineages were most common in dogs and cats, a remarkable number of CC398-MRSA was detected in horses, indicating a replacement of CC8-MRSA as the predominant lineage within horses in Germany. These data enforce further longitudinal epidemiological approaches to examine the diversity and temporal relatedness of MRSA populations in humans and animals to assess probable sources of MRSA infections. This would enable a sound risk assessment and establishment of intervention strategies to limit the additional spread of MRSA. PMID:24465637

Vincze, Szilvia; Stamm, Ivonne; Kopp, Peter A.; Hermes, Julia; Adlhoch, Cornelia; Semmler, Torsten; Wieler, Lothar H.; Lubke-Becker, Antina; Walther, Birgit

2014-01-01

193

Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as Causes of Human Infection and Colonization in Germany  

PubMed Central

Pigs, cattle and poultry are colonized with MRSA and the zoonotic transmission of such MRSA to humans via direct animal contact, environmental contaminations or meat are a matter of concern. Livestock-associated (LA) MRSA are mostly belonging to clonal complex (CC) 398 as defined by multilocus sequence typing. However, MRSA of other clonal lineages including CC5, CC9 and CC97 have also been detected in livestock animals in Germany. Within the framework of a Dutch-German network project (EUREGIO), 14,036 MRSA isolated from clinical and screening specimens (January 2008 - June 2012) derived from human patients in hospitals as well as general or specialized practices in a German region characterized by a high density of livestock production, were subjected to S. aureus protein A (spa) sequence typing. The prevalence of putative LA-MRSA among the human MRSA isolates was determined by analyzing the detection of livestock-indicator (LI) spa types which had already been reported in German livestock. Overall, 578 spa types were detected among the MRSA isolates. LI spa types t011, t034, t108, t1451, t2011, t571, t1456, t1250, t1255, t1580, t2970, t2346, t1344, t2576, t2330 and t2510 (all of which are indicative for LA-MRSA CC398) accounted for 18.6% of all human isolates. The LI spa types t1430 (CC9), t3992 (CC97), t002 (CC5) and t007 (CC30) were found in 0.14%, 0.01%, 1.01% and 0.04% of all human MRSA isolates, respectively. LI spa types associated with CC398 represented 23% of all MRSA from screening samples and a varying proportion among isolates from clinical specimens ranging between 0% in cerebrospinal fluid, 8% in blood cultures and 14% in deep respiratory fluids. Our findings indicate that LA-MRSA are a major cause for human infection and stress the need for close surveillance. Although LA-MRSA CC398 predominates, the occurrence of putative LA-MRSA from other clonal lineages should be monitored. PMID:23418434

Kock, Robin; Schaumburg, Frieder; Mellmann, Alexander; Koksal, Mahir; Jurke, Annette; Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W.

2013-01-01

194

Surgical treatment with spinal instrumentation for pyogenic spondylodiscitis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): a report of five cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: The treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) spondylodiscitis is reported to be far more difficult than that of non-MRSA spondylodiscitis. At present, there seems to be no standard protocol for the treatment of MRSA spondylodiscitis cases in which conservative management has failed. Materials and methods: Between 1998 and 2001, five patients (aged 48–73 years; average: 63.8 years; SD: 9.9) with MRSA

Takahiro Masuda; Kei Miyamoto; Hideo Hosoe; Hirofumi Sakaeda; Mizuo Tanaka; Katsuji Shimizu

2006-01-01

195

Evaluation of the IDI-MRSA Assay for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Nasal and Rectal Specimens Pooled in a Selective Broth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by PCR can be performed directly from nasal specimens with the IDI-MRSA assay. To improve the efficiency of screening, we evaluated the performance of the IDI-MRSA assay for the detection of MRSA from pooled and unpooled specimens cultured in a selective broth. Of the 287 specimens evaluated, 71 were culture and PCR positive,

M. Desjardins; Christiane Guibord; B. Lalonde; B. Toye; K. Ramotar

2006-01-01

196

Syntheses and anti-MRSA activities of the C3 analogs of mansonone F, a potent anti-bacterial sesquiterpenoid: insights into  

E-print Network

Syntheses and anti-MRSA activities of the C3 analogs of mansonone F, a potent anti-bacterial sesquiterpenoid: insights into its structural requirements for anti-MRSA activity Dong-Yun Shin,a Sun Nam Kim June 2004 Available online 3 July 2004 Abstract--Syntheses and excellent anti-MRSA activities

Suh, Young-Ger

197

MRSA colonisation (eradicating colonisation in people without active/invasive infection)  

PubMed Central

Introduction Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has a gene that makes it resistant to methicillin as well as to other beta-lactam antibiotics, including flucloxacillin, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. MRSA can be part of the normal body flora (colonisation), especially in the nose, but it can cause infection. Until recently, MRSA has primarily been a problem associated with exposure to the healthcare system, especially in people with prolonged hospital admissions, with underlying disease, or after antibiotic use. In many countries worldwide, a preponderance of S aureus bloodstream isolates are resistant to methicillin. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment for MRSA nasal or extra-nasal colonisation? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 9 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiseptic body washes, chlorhexidine–neomycin nasal cream, mupirocin nasal ointment, systemic antimicrobials, tea tree oil preparations, and other topical antimicrobials. PMID:21477403

2011-01-01

198

"Not Rocket Science" or "No Silver Bullet"? Media and Government Discourses about MRSA and Cleanliness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA), commonly called a superbug, has recently been a major political issue in the UK, playing a significant role in debates over health policy in the general election held in 2005. While science recognizes the lack of evidence with regards to the effectiveness of existing measures implemented to…

Koteyko, Nelya; Nerlich, Brigitte; Crawford, Paul; Wright, Nick

2008-01-01

199

Catalase gene is associated with facial eczema disease resistance in sheep.  

PubMed

Facial eczema (FE) is a hepatogenous photosensitization disease of ruminant animals, particularly in sheep which vary widely in their susceptibility to the disease. The liver damage is caused by the mycotoxin, sporidesmin. There is evidence that the toxicity of sporidesmin is due to its ability to generate 'active oxygen' species. We evaluated the catalase gene, which encodes an enzyme with antioxidant functions, as a candidate for determining the susceptibility of sheep to the disease. Two microsatellite markers, OarSHP3 and OarSHP4, which flank the sheep catalase gene, were isolated from a Yeast Artificial Chromosome (YAC) clone. These markers mapped the catalase locus by linkage to ovine chromosome 15. Eleven informative markers spaced throughout chromosome 15, inclusive of the catalase marker OarSHP4, gave no significant linkage with the disease traits when analysed in four outcross resource pedigrees. However, OarSHP3 and OarSHP4 allele frequencies showed significant differences between FE resistant and susceptible selection-lines. Comparison of sequences of catalase cDNAs from sheep of resistant and susceptible lines showed only two silent mutations. A single nucleotide polymorphisms (KP1) in exon 6 of the catalase gene also showed significant differences in allele frequencies between the selection lines. The lack of evidence for linkage in outcross pedigrees, but the significant association in the genetic lines, implies that catalase is involved in determining the susceptibility of sheep to facial eczema, and that the candidate gene's effect is probably recessive or minor. PMID:10467703

Phua, S H; Dodds, K G; Morris, C A; Paterson, K A; McEwan, J C; Garmonsway, H G; Towers, N R; Crawford, A M

1999-08-01

200

Protocol for a randomised trial on the effect of group education on skin-protective behaviour versus treatment as usual among individuals with newly notified occupational hand eczema - the Prevention of Hand Eczema (PREVEX) Trial  

PubMed Central

Background The incidence of occupational hand eczema is approximately 0.32 per 1,000 person years. The burden of the disease is high, as almost 60% has eczema-related sick leave during the first year after notification, and 15% are excluded from the workforce 12 years after disease onset. New treatments and prevention strategies are needed. Methods/Design Trial design: The PREVEX trial is a randomised, parallel-group, superiority trial. Participants: All individuals from the Capital Region of Denmark and Region Zealand with a suspected occupational skin disorder notified to the National Board of Industrial Injuries between June 2012 and December 2013 are invited to participate in the trial. Inclusion criteria are: self-reported hand eczema and informed consent. Exclusion criteria are: age <18 years or >65 years; permanent exclusion from the workforce; inability to understand the Danish language; any serious medical condition; and lack of written informed consent. We plan to randomise 742 participants. Interventions: The experimental intervention is an educational course in skin-protective behaviour and written information about skin care related to the participants' specific occupation. Also, a telephone hotline is available and a subgroup will be offered a work-place visit. The experimental and the control group have access to usual care and treatment. All participants are contacted every eighth week with questions regarding number of days with sick leave or other absence from work. 12 months after randomisation follow-up is completed. Objective: To assesses the effect of an educational course versus treatment as usual in participants with newly notified occupational hand eczema. Randomisation: Participants are centrally randomised according to a computer-generated allocation sequence with a varying block size concealed to investigators. Blinding: It is not possible to blind the participants and investigators, however, data obtained from registers, data entry, statistical analyses, and drawing of conclusions will be blinded. Outcomes: The three co-primary outcomes, assessed at 12 months, are: total number of self-reported days with sick leave; health-related quality of life; and subjective assessment of hand eczema severity. Explorative outcomes are: self-reported eczema-related sick leave, absence from work registered by the DREAM-register and by self-report, risk behaviour, knowledge of skin protection and performance management (self-efficacy; and self-evaluated ability to self-care). Discussion The PREVEX trial will be the first individually randomised trial to investigate the benefits and harms of group-based education in patients with newly notified occupational hand eczema. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01899287 PMID:24245553

2013-01-01

201

Identification and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Austrian companion animals and horses.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance, resistance gene patterns and genetic relatedness of a collection of Austrian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from companion animals and horses. A total of 89 non-repetitive MRSA isolates collected during routine veterinary microbiological examinations from April 2004 to the end of 2012, and one isolate from 2013 were used for this study. The presence of mecA and other resistance genes was confirmed by PCR. Isolates were genotyped by spa typing, two multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analyses (MLVA) analyses, SCCmec typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PCR targeting Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE), toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST) was performed using PCR assays. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed. Five sequence types (STs-ST398, ST254, ST22, ST5 and ST1), SCCmec types II, IVa, V, and non-type-abele, 8 spa-types (t003, t011, t036, t127, t386, t1348, and t4450), and two isolates could not be assigned, 21 MLVA-14Orsay types Multiplex-PCR MLVA (mMLVA) displayed 17 different MLVA types. The present study is the most comprehensive dealing with MRSA from Austrian companion animals and horses. The results confirm that MRSA ST398 is present in a wide range of animal species and is predominant especially in horses. In other companion animals it is unclear whether the infections with the different MRSA isolates investigated in the present study truly represents a rare phenomenon or may be an emerging problem in companion animals. PMID:24332703

Loncaric, Igor; Künzel, Frank; Licka, Theresia; Simhofer, Hubert; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate

2014-01-31

202

Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing for Investigation of a Neonatal MRSA Outbreak  

PubMed Central

Background Isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to a single lineage are often indistinguishable by means of current typing techniques. Whole-genome sequencing may provide improved resolution to define transmission pathways and characterize outbreaks. Methods We investigated a putative MRSA outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. By using rapid high-throughput sequencing technology with a clinically relevant turnaround time, we retrospectively sequenced the DNA from seven isolates associated with the outbreak and another seven MRSA isolates associated with carriage of MRSA or bacteremia in the same hospital. Results We constructed a phylogenetic tree by comparing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the core genome to a reference genome (an epidemic MRSA clone, EMRSA-15 [sequence type 22]). This revealed a distinct cluster of outbreak isolates and clear separation between these and the nonoutbreak isolates. A previously missed transmission event was detected between two patients with bacteremia who were not part of the outbreak. We created an artificial “resistome” of antibiotic-resistance genes and demonstrated concordance between it and the results of phenotypic susceptibility testing; we also created a “toxome” consisting of toxin genes. One outbreak isolate had a hypermutator phenotype with a higher number of SNPs than the other outbreak isolates, highlighting the difficulty of imposing a simple threshold for the number of SNPs between isolates to decide whether they are part of a recent transmission chain. Conclusions Whole-genome sequencing can provide clinically relevant data within a time frame that can influence patient care. The need for automated data interpretation and the provision of clinically meaningful reports represent hurdles to clinical implementation. (Funded by the U.K. Clinical Research Collaboration Translational Infection Research Initiative and others.) PMID:22693998

Koser, Claudio U.; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Ellington, Matthew J.; Cartwright, Edward J.P.; Brown, Nicholas M.; Ogilvy-Stuart, Amanda L.; Hsu, Li Yang; Chewapreecha, Claire; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Harris, Simon R.; Sanders, Mandy; Enright, Mark C.; Dougan, Gordon; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Fraser, Louise J.; Betley, Jason R.; Schulz-Trieglaff, Ole B.; Smith, Geoffrey P.; Peacock, Sharon J.

2013-01-01

203

Molecular epidemiology of environmental MRSA at an equine teaching hospital: introduction, circulation and maintenance  

PubMed Central

The role that environmental contamination might play as a reservoir and a possible source of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for patients and personnel at equine veterinary hospitals remains undefined, as the environment has only been monitored during outbreaks or for short periods. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the monthly presence, distribution, and characteristics of environmental MRSA at an equine hospital, and to establish patterns of contamination over time using molecular epidemiological analyses. For this purpose, a yearlong active MRSA surveillance was performed targeting the environment and incoming patients. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, SCCmec typing, PFGE typing, and dendrographic analysis were used to characterize and analyze these isolates. Overall, 8.6% of the surfaces and 5.8% of the horses sampled were positive for MRSA. The most common contaminated surfaces were: computers, feed-water buckets, and surgery tables-mats. Ninety percent of the isolates carried SCCmec type IV, and 62.0% were classified as USA500. Molecular analysis showed that new pulsotypes were constantly introduced into the hospital throughout the year. However, maintenance of strains in the environment was also observed when unique clones were detected for 2 consecutive months on the same surfaces. Additionally, pulsotypes were circulating throughout several areas and different contact surfaces of the hospital. Based on these results, it is evident that MRSA is constantly introduced and frequently found in the equine hospital environment, and that some contact surfaces could act as “hot-spots”. These contaminated surfaces should be actively targeted for strict cleaning and disinfection as well as regular monitoring. PMID:24641543

2014-01-01

204

The isolation and cultivation of some fungi from soils and pastures associated with facial eczema disease of sheep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some fungi, isolated from soil and pasture grasses, have been examined in investigations relating to facial eczema disease of sheep.Cultures of fungi were submitted to Ruakura Animal Research Station for the “beaker test”, which had frequently been found to give positive results with toxic grass. A positive test was given by a high-sporing strain of Sporidesmium bakeri Syd., isolated from

R. H. Thornton; D. J. Ross

1959-01-01

205

Staphylococcal Enterotoxin-B-Mediated Stimulation of Interleukin13 Production as a Potential Aetiologic Factor in Eczema in Infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been found in 80–100% of lesional skin from patients with atopic eczema dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) and is thought to have a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Furthermore, up to 65% of S. aureus from lesional skin has been shown to produce toxigenic superantigens. Methods: Using a cohort of 11 children under 2 years

H. S. Lehmann; T. Heaton; D. Mallon; P. G. Holt

2004-01-01

206

Prevalence and risk factors for allergic rhinitis and atopic eczema among schoolchildren in Israel: results from a national study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There is growing evidence that the prevalence rates of asthma and allergic diseases are increasing, especially among children. Several risk factors are under investigation. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis (AR) and atopic eczema (AE), among 13- to 14-year-old schoolchildren in Israel. Methods: A modified version of the International Study of

Yael Graif; Ben-Zion Garty; Irit Livne; Manfred S. Green; Tamy Shohat

2004-01-01

207

Evidence for linkage of a new region (11p14) to eczema and Allergic Michel Guilloud-Bataille  

E-print Network

Evidence for linkage of a new region (11p14) to eczema and Allergic Diseases Michel Guilloud genome-wide linkage screen conducted for asthma and AR in a sample of 295 French EGEA families/absence of the three diseases were examined by linkage analyses using the Maximum Likelihood Binomial (MLB) method

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Evaluation of Three Techniques for Detection of Low-Level Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): a Disk Diffusion Method with Cefoxitin and Moxalactam, the Vitek 2 System, and the MRSA-Screen Latex Agglutination Test  

PubMed Central

Very-low-level methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), or class 1 MRSA, is often misdiagnosed as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). We evaluated the performances of three methods for detection of low-level methicillin resistance: the disk diffusion method using the cephamycin antibiotics cefoxitin and moxalactam, the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux), and the MRSA-screen test (Denka). Detection of the mecA gene by PCR was considered to be the “gold standard.” We also determined the sensitivity of the oxacillin disk diffusion method with 5- and 1-?g disks and that of the Oxascreen agar assay with 6 mg of oxacillin liter?1 for detection of MRSA. We compared the distributions of MICs of oxacillin and cefoxitin by the E-test (AB Biodisk), and those of moxalactam by dilutions in agar, for MRSA and MSSA isolates. The 152 clinical isolates of S. aureus studied were divided into 69 MSSA (mecA-negative) and 83 MRSA (mecA-positive) isolates, including 63 heterogeneous isolates and 26 class 1 isolates (low-level resistance). The cefoxitin and moxalactam disk diffusion tests detected 100% of all the MRSA classes: cefoxitin inhibition zone diameters were <27 mm, and moxalactam inhibition zone diameters were <24 mm. The Vitek 2 system and the MRSA-screen test detected 94 and 97.6% of all MRSA isolates, respectively. The sensitivities of the 5- and 1-?g oxacillin disks were 95.2 and 96.4%, respectively, whereas that of the Oxascreen agar screen assay was 94%. All of the tests except the 1-?g oxacillin disk test were 100% specific. For the class 1 MRSA isolates, the sensitivity of the Vitek 2 test was 92.3%, whereas those of the MRSA-screen test and the disk diffusion method with cefoxitin and moxalactam were 100%. Therefore, the cefoxitin and moxalactam disk diffusion methods were the best-performing tests for routine detection of all classes of MRSA. PMID:12149327

Felten, Annie; Grandry, Bernadette; Lagrange, Philippe Henri; Casin, Isabelle

2002-01-01

209

Use of Triplex PCR for Rapid Detection of PVL and Differentiation of MRSA from Methicillin Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major public health problem in both hospitals and communities. Panton – Valentine Leucocidin (PVL) has been reported to be an important marker for the highly pathogenic community acquired S. aureus infections. A rapid detection of these MRSA is very important for its treatment. The specific detection of MRSA is always a problem due to the prevalence of methicillin resistance among the coagulase negative Staphylococci. Hence, this study was done to develop a rapid triplex PCR for the detection of PVL positive MRSA and for the simultaneous differentiation of MRSA from Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS). Materials and Methods: We developed a triplex PCR for the specific detection of PVL positive Community Acquired (CA) – MRSA and for its simultaneous differentiation from the coagulase negative Staphylococci. We used PCR for targeting the fem A gene which is specific for S. aureus, mecA which is specific for methicillin-resistance and luk - PV which is specific for the PVL toxin. The method was evaluated with a total of 100 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus spp. Results: The triplex PCR was successfully standardized by using the reference strains and it was evaluated by using clinical strains. The method was found to be rapid, highly sensitive (100%), specific (99%) and cost effective. Conclusion: Triplex PCR can be used as a diagnostic tool for the detection of the highly pathogenic strains of CA-MRSA. PMID:23542876

Abimanyu, Nagarajan; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Murugesan, Saravanan; Subramanian G, Kaushik; Gurumurthy, Sivakumar; Krishnan, Padma

2013-01-01

210

Clinical effectiveness of rapid tests for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are often resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics. The research objectives of this systematic review were to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) versus chromogenic agar for MRSA screening, and PCR versus no screening for several clinical outcomes, including MRSA colonization and infection rates. Methods An electronic literature search was conducted on studies evaluating polymerase chain reaction techniques and methicillin (also spelled meticillin) resistant Staphylococcus aureus that were published from 1993 onwards using Medline, Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, BIOSIS Previews, and EMBASE. Due to the presence of heterogeneity in the selected studies, the clinical findings of individual studies were described. Results Nine studies that compared screening for MRSA using PCR versus screening using chromogenic agar in a hospital setting, and two studies that compared screening using PCR with no or targeted screening were identified. Some studies found lower MRSA colonization and acquisition, infection, and transmission rates in screening with PCR versus screening with chromogenic agar, and the turnaround time for screening test results was lower for PCR. One study reported a lower number of unnecessary isolation days with screening using PCR versus screening with chromogenic agar, but the proportion of patients isolated was similar between both groups. The turnaround time for test results and number of isolation days were lower for PCR versus chromogenic agar for MRSA screening. Conclusions The use of PCR for MRSA screening demonstrated a lower turnaround time and number of isolation days compared with chromogenic agar. Given the mixed quality and number of studies (11 studies), gaps remain in the published literature and the evidence remains insufficient. In addition to screening, factors such as the number of contacts between healthcare workers and patients, number of patients attended by one healthcare worker per day, probability of colonization among healthcare workers, and MRSA status of hospital shared equipment and hospital environment must be considered to control the transmission of MRSA in a hospital setting. PMID:22151575

2011-01-01

211

THE INCIDENCE OF AND RISK FACTORS FOR MRSA BACTEREMIA IN AN HIV-INFECTED COHORT IN THE HAART ERA  

PubMed Central

Objective(s) To define the incidence and risk factors for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia in an urban HIV-infected population. Design A retrospective cohort study and nested, case-control analyses set in an urban HIV outpatient clinic in Baltimore. Methods Over a four-year period (2000–2004) the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) was determined from an electronic database of blood culture results. Risk factors for MRSA bacteremia were assessed over a five-year period (2000–2005) using methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia and bacteremia-free controls. Results Of 4,607 patients followed for a total of 11,020 person-years (PY) of follow-up, 216 episodes of SAB occurred (incidence: 19.6 cases per 1000 PY.) Of these, 94 cases (43.5%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA bacteremia incidence: 8.5 per 1000 PY.) The incidence of MRSA bacteremia increased from 5.3 per 1000 PY in 2000–01 to 11.9 per 1000 PY in 2003–04 (p = 0.001). Significant risk factors for MRSA bacteremia included injection drug use (IDU) [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 4.61 (95% CI: 2.32–20.72)], end-stage renal disease (ESRD) [7.78 (2.92–20.72)], and CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 at the event. Patients with MRSA were more likely to have ESRD [AOR = 2.89 (1.12–7.49)] and greater immunosuppression than those with MSSA bacteremia. Conclusions The incidence of MRSA bacteremia increased from 2000 to 2004 in our HIV-infected cohort. Our data suggest that initial therapy for S. aureus bacteremia in HIV-infected patients, particularly in those with MRSA bacteremia risk factors, may require antimicrobial agents active against MRSA. PMID:18754806

Burkey, Matthew D.; Wilson, Lucy E.; Moore, Richard D.; Lucas, Gregory M.; Francis, John; Gebo, Kelly A.

2008-01-01

212

Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strains Suitable in Regions of High MRSA Endemicity  

PubMed Central

A multiplex real-time PCR assay that simultaneously detects the mecA, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec)-open reading frame X (orfX) junction, and staphylococcal 16S rRNA genes was developed and evaluated using 444 staphylococcal strains. We demonstrated that this assay resulted in fewer false-positive results than a single-locus real-time PCR assay that amplified the SCCmec-orfX junction. This assay would be useful in a clinical laboratory in a region of high endemicity for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. PMID:23269729

Cha, Choong-Hwan; An, Hae-Kyong; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Mi-Na

2013-01-01

213

MRSA Nasal Carriage Patterns and the Subsequent Risk of Conversion between Patterns, Infection, and Death  

PubMed Central

Background Patterns of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage over time and across the continuum of care settings are poorly characterized. Knowledge of prevalence rates and outcomes associated with MRSA nasal carriage patterns could help direct infection prevention strategies. The VA integrated health-care system and active surveillance program provides an opportunity to delineate nasal carriage patterns and associated outcomes of death, infection, and conversion in carriage. Methods/Findings We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all patients admitted to 5 acute care VA hospitals between 2008–2010 who had nasal MRSA PCR testing within 48 hours of admission and repeat testing within 30 days. The PCR results were used to define a baseline nasal carriage pattern of never, intermittently, or always colonized at 30 days from admission. Follow-up was up to two years and included acute, long-term, and outpatient care visits. Among 18,038 patients, 91.1%, 4.4%, and 4.6% were never, intermittently, or always colonized at the 30-day baseline. Compared to non-colonized patients, those who were persistently colonized had an increased risk of death (HR 2.58; 95% CI 2.18;3.05) and MRSA infection (HR 10.89; 95% CI 8.6;13.7). Being in the non-colonized group at 30 days had a predictive value of 87% for being non-colonized at 1 year. Conversion to MRSA colonized at 6 months occurred in 11.8% of initially non-colonized patients. Age >70 years, long-term care, antibiotic exposure, and diabetes identified >95% of converters. Conclusions The vast majority of patients are not nasally colonized with MRSA at 30 days from acute hospital admission. Conversion from non-carriage is infrequent and can be risk-stratified. A positive carriage pattern is strongly associated with infection and death. Active surveillance programs in the year following carriage pattern designation could be tailored to focus on non-colonized patients who are at high risk for conversion, reducing universal screening burden. PMID:23326483

Gupta, Kalpana; Martinello, Richard A.; Young, Melissa; Strymish, Judith; Cho, Kelly; Lawler, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

214

Dyshidrotic Eczema  

MedlinePLUS

... can be treated with a form of ultraviolet light therapy called PUVA (psoralen and ultraviolet A) or narrow-band UVB (ultraviolet B) phototherapy administered by a dermatologist. Trusted Links MedlinePlus: Rashes ...

215

Dyshidrotic eczema  

MedlinePLUS

... such as hayfever Their hands are often in water or moist They do cement work or other work that exposes their hands to chromium, cobalt, nickel The cause is unknown. The condition seems to appear during certain times of the year.

216

Comparative analysis of the virulence characteristics of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from Chinese children: ST59 MRSA highly expresses core gene-encoded toxin.  

PubMed

This study aims to investigate the prevalence of a novel cell wall-anchored protein gene, sasX, and to obtain information on the genetic basis for the pathogenic potential of the MRSA strains isolated from Chinese children. The molecular and virulence characteristics of the clinical strains were analyzed. Twenty-two sequence types (STs) were obtained, with six epidemic clones ST59, ST239, ST1, ST910, ST88, and ST338 accounting for 35.8, 22, 6.6, 6.6, 5.3, and 4.1% respectively. The expression levels of hla, psm?, and RNAIII were higher in ST59 than in other STs (p < 0.05). The sasX gene was detected in 26 (10.7%) MRSA isolates. ST239-MRSA-SCCmecIII-t037 (61.5%) was the predominant sasX-positive MRSA clone. The expressions of PSM? and RNAIII were higher in sasX-positive ST239 isolates than in sasX-negative ST239 ones (p < 0.01). Notably, the percentage of invasive infection in infections caused by sasX-positive ST239 MRSA was higher than that by sasX-negative ST239 MRSA (p = 0.008). This study indicated that ST59 was the predominant clone in the MRSA isolates obtained from Chinese children and might have stronger pathogenic potential. The prevalence of the sasX gene in the MRSA isolates from children was relatively low. Furthermore, the sasX gene might be related to the expressions of PSM? and RNAIII and infection invasiveness. PMID:23710711

Li, Shipeng; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Xiangmei; Tao, Xiaoxia; Wang, Lijuan; Sun, Mingjiao; Liu, Yingchao; Li, Juan; Qiao, Yanhong; Yu, Sangjie; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong; Shen, Xuzhuang

2014-02-01

217

Genomic Insights into the Atopic Eczema-Associated Skin Commensal Yeast Malassezia sympodialis  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Malassezia commensal yeasts are associated with a number of skin disorders, such as atopic eczema/dermatitis and dandruff, and they also can cause systemic infections. Here we describe the 7.67-Mbp genome of Malassezia sympodialis, a species associated with atopic eczema, and contrast its genome repertoire with that of Malassezia globosa, associated with dandruff, as well as those of other closely related fungi. Ninety percent of the predicted M. sympodialis protein coding genes were experimentally verified by mass spectrometry at the protein level. We identified a relatively limited number of genes related to lipid biosynthesis, and both species lack the fatty acid synthase gene, in line with the known requirement of these yeasts to assimilate lipids from the host. Malassezia species do not appear to have many cell wall-localized glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) proteins and lack other cell wall proteins previously identified in other fungi. This is surprising given that in other fungi these proteins have been shown to mediate interactions (e.g., adhesion and biofilm formation) with the host. The genome revealed a complex evolutionary history for an allergen of unknown function, Mala s 7, shown to be encoded by a member of an amplified gene family of secreted proteins. Based on genetic and biochemical studies with the basidiomycete human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, we characterized the allergen Mala s 6 as the cytoplasmic cyclophilin A. We further present evidence that M. sympodialis may have the capacity to undergo sexual reproduction and present a model for a pseudobipolar mating system that allows limited recombination between two linked MAT loci. PMID:23341551

Gioti, Anastasia; Nystedt, Bjorn; Li, Wenjun; Xu, Jun; Andersson, Anna; Averette, Anna F.; Munch, Karin; Wang, Xuying; Kappauf, Catharine; Kingsbury, Joanne M.; Kraak, Bart; Walker, Louise A.; Johansson, Henrik J.; Holm, Tina; Lehtio, Janne; Stajich, Jason E.; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Kahmann, Regine; Kennell, John C.; Cardenas, Maria E.; Lundeberg, Joakim; Saunders, Charles W.; Boekhout, Teun; Dawson, Thomas L.; Munro, Carol A.; de Groot, Piet W. J.; Butler, Geraldine; Heitman, Joseph; Scheynius, Annika

2013-01-01

218

Comparison of Xpert MRSA/SA Nasal and MRSA/SA ELITe MGB Assays for Detection of the mecA Gene with Susceptibility Testing Methods for Determination of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Isolates  

PubMed Central

In a series of 82 Staphylococcus strains isolated from culture, 100% were identified as Staphylococcus aureus by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS); 99.9% (77/82) of them were resistant to benzylpenicillin, oxacillin, and cefoxitin, and 6.1% (5/82) were susceptible to methicillin. Xpert MRSA/SA assay results were concordant with the phenotypic results in 76.8% (63/82) of cases and discordant in 23.2% (19/82) of cases. The MRSA/SA ELITe MGB kit results were concordant with phenotypic results in 100% of the cases. When comparing the Xpert MRSA/SA assay results with the MRSA/SA ELITe MGB kit results, 78% (64/82) of the cases were concordant, while 22% (18/82) of the cases were discordant. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two techniques. The PCR protocol that was used to validate the results of these two methods gave the following results: 49 were conventional methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates (mecA positive and mecALGA251 negative), and 25 were phenotypic MRSA isolates (mecA negative and mecALGA251 positive). PMID:23863569

Belmekki, Mohamed; Mammeri, Hedi; Hamdad, Farida; Rousseau, Florence; Canarelli, Brigitte

2013-01-01

219

Treatment and clinical management of recurrent knee empyema due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) after total knee replacement  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a patient with recurrent knee empyema and associated complications caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) after total knee replacement and the difficulties and limited options in its clinical management.

M. Kapella; Günter Kampf; Cornelia Holzheimer-Stock; Rüdiger Kreusch-Brinker

2001-01-01

220

Reducing MRSA infections in college student athletes: implementation of a prevention program.  

PubMed

An interventional prevention program, Training CAMP Program, was implemented with college football players (n = 98) in a Midwestern NCAA Division II college during the 2008 college football season. The program goal was a 50% reduction in community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) cases, as compared to the previous 3 seasons' average number of cases (12.6). Results showed a greater than 75% reduction in CA-MRSA in the target population, with only 3 cases recorded for the entire 2008 college football season. A 1-group pretest-posttest design paired t-test revealed increased knowledge and knowledge retention. Program description, implementation, evaluation, cost-effectiveness, and future recommendations are described. PMID:19866384

Sanders, J Chad

2009-10-01

221

Coagulase-negative staphylococci as reservoirs of genes facilitating MRSA infection  

PubMed Central

Recent research has suggested that Staphylococcus epidermidis is a reservoir of genes that, after horizontal transfer, facilitate the potential of Staphylococcus aureus to colonize, survive during infection, or resist antibiotic treatment, traits that are notably manifest in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). S. aureus is a dangerous human pathogen and notorious for acquiring antibiotic resistance. MRSA in particular is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and death in hospitalized patients. S. aureus is an extremely versatile pathogen with a multitude of mechanisms to cause disease and circumvent immune defenses. In contrast, most other staphylococci, such as S. epidermidis, are commonly benign commensals and only occasionally cause disease. Recent findings highlight the key importance of efforts to better understand how genes of staphylococci other than S. aureus contribute to survival in the human host, how they are transferred to S. aureus, and why this exchange appears to be uni-directional. PMID:23165978

Otto, Michael

2013-01-01

222

Successful Treatment of Persistent MRSA Bacteremia using High-dose Daptomycin Combined with Rifampicin.  

PubMed

We herein report a case of persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia that was successfully treated with combination therapy consisting of high-dose daptomycin (DAP, 10 mg/kg) and rifampicin. The patient's condition was complicated with multiple infectious foci, including an iliopsoas abscess and epidural abscess, as well as discitis and spondylitis at the cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels. Monotherapy treatments with vancomycin, linezolid and usual-dose DAP were all ineffective. It has been shown that usual-dose DAP administration may result in the emergence of a resistant strain and treatment failure. We would like to emphasize the importance of high-dose DAP therapy for MRSA bacteremia, a condition with a potentially high mortality rate. PMID:25224207

Hagiya, Hideharu; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kosuke; Satou, Asuka; Asano, Kikuko; Waseda, Koichi; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Otsuka, Fumio

2014-01-01

223

Reducing MRSA Infections in College Student Athletes: Implementation of a Prevention Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

An interventional prevention program, Training CAMP Program, was implemented with college football players (n = 98) in a Midwestern NCAA Division II college during the 2008 college football season. The program goal was a 50% reduction in community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) cases, as compared to the previous 3 seasons' average number of cases (12.6).Results showed a greater than 75%

J. Chad Sanders

2009-01-01

224

Antibiofilm Effect of Octenidine Hydrochloride on Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA and VRSA  

PubMed Central

Millions of indwelling devices are implanted in patients every year, and staphylococci (S. aureus, MRSA and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA)) are responsible for a majority of infections associated with these devices, thereby leading to treatment failures. Once established, staphylococcal biofilms become resistant to antimicrobial treatment and host response, thereby serving as the etiological agent for recurrent infections. This study investigated the efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH) for inhibiting biofilm synthesis and inactivating fully-formed staphylococcal biofilm on different matrices in the presence and absence of serum protein. Polystyrene plates and stainless steel coupons inoculated with S. aureus, MRSA or VRSA were treated with OH (zero, 0.5, one, 2 mM) at 37 °C for the prevention of biofilm formation. Additionally, the antibiofilm effect of OH (zero, 2.5, five, 10 mM) on fully-formed staphylococcal biofilms on polystyrene plates, stainless steel coupons and urinary catheters was investigated. OH was effective in rapidly inactivating planktonic and biofilm cells of S. aureus, MRSA and VRSA on polystyrene plates, stainless steel coupons and urinary catheters in the presence and absence of serum proteins. The use of two and 10 mM OH completely inactivated S. aureus planktonic cells and biofilm (>6.0 log reduction) on all matrices tested immediately upon exposure. Further, confocal imaging revealed the presence of dead cells and loss in biofilm architecture in the OH-treated samples when compared to intact live biofilm in the control. Results suggest that OH could be applied as an effective antimicrobial to control biofilms of S. aureus, MRSA and VRSA on appropriate hospital surfaces and indwelling devices.

Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

2014-01-01

225

Rapid healing of MRSA infection at the suprafascial radial donor site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract.Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection at the radial suprafascial donor site resulted in significant loss of the skin graft, but no tendon exposure, in two patients. The complication was successfully managed with wound debridement, appropriate antibiotics, a negative-pressure wound dressing and early partial-thickness skin grafting. The suprafascial dissection creates a donor site that resists both skin graft loss and tendon

C. M. E. Avery; C. Harrop

2002-01-01

226

Molecular characterisation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from keratitis patients: a microbiological analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIn order to diagnose and characterise a major corneal infection, ‘keratitis,’ which can lead to blindness, molecular studies were conducted to assess the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in patients suffering from keratitisMethodsThe selected culture positive for strains of S aureus were subjected to 18 antimicrobial drugs for their sensitivity behaviour, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of

Mohd A Khan; S. Ahmad; N. Banu

2010-01-01

227

Factors Contributing to Epidemic MRSA Clones Replacement in a Hospital Setting  

PubMed Central

The mechanisms governing the epidemiology dynamics and success determinants of a specific healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) clone in hospital settings are still unclear. Important epidemiological changes have occurred in Europe since 2000 that have been related to the appearance of the ST22-IV clone. Between 2006 and 2010, we observed the establishment of the ST22-IV clone displacing the predominant Italian clone, ST228-I, in a large Italian university hospital. To investigate the factors associated with a successful spread of epidemic MRSA clones we studied the biofilm production, the competitive behavior in co-culture, the capacity of invasion of the A549 cells, and the susceptibility to infection in a murine model of acute pneumonia of the two major HA-MRSA clones, ST22-IV and ST228-I. We showed that persistence of ST22-IV is associated with its increased biofilm production and capacity to inhibit the growth of ST228-I in co-culture. Compared to ST228-I, ST22-IV had a significantly higher capacity to invade the A549 cells and a higher virulence in a murine model of acute lung infection causing severe inflammation and determining death in all the mice within 60 hours. On the contrary, ST228-I was associated with mice survival and clearance of the infection. ST22-IV, compared with ST228-I, caused a higher number of persistent, long lasting bacteremia. These data suggest that ST22-IV could have exploited its capacity to i) increase its biofilm production over time, ii) maintain its growth kinetics in the presence of a competitor and iii) be particularly invasive and virulent both in vitro and in vivo, to replace other well-established MRSA clones, becoming the predominant European clone. PMID:22905220

Baldan, Rossella; Testa, Francesca; Lore, Nicola I.; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Cichero, Paola; Ossi, Cristina; Biancardi, Anna; Nizzero, Paola; Moro, Matteo; Cirillo, Daniela M.

2012-01-01

228

Molecular design of anti-MRSA agents based on the anacardic acid scaffold  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of anacardic acid analogues possessing different side chains viz. phenolic, branched, and alicyclic were synthesized and their antibacterial activity tested against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The maximum activity against this bacterium occurred with the branched side-chain analogue, 6-(4?,8?-dimethylnonyl)salicylic acid, and the alicyclic side-chain analogue, 6-cyclododecylmethyl salicylic acid, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.39?g\\/mL, respectively. This activity

Ivan R. Green; Felismino E. Tocoli; Sang Hwa Lee; Ken-ichi Nihei; Isao Kubo

2007-01-01

229

Antibacterial activity of Ulva lactuca against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thein vitro antimicrobial activity of the marine green algaeUlva lactuca was examined against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and a fungus. The ethyl-ether extract of algae exhibited\\u000a a broad-spectrum of antibacterial activity. but not antifungal activity againstCandida albicans. In particular, theU. lactuca extract showed strong activity aganst the bacterium methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This result confirms the potential use of seaweed extracts

Dong-Gun Lee; Sang Hyun Lee; Jong-Myung Ha; Bae-Jin Ha; Sung-Koo Kim; Jae-Hwa Lee

2007-01-01

230

Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Stilbenoid from Shorea gibbosa and Vancomycin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to determine the combined effects of stilbenoids from Shorea gibbosa and vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of nine pure compounds, five stilbenoid dimers ?-viniferin, ampelopsin A, balanocarpol, laevifonol and diptoindonesin G and four stilbenoid trimers a-viniferin, johorenol A, ampelopsin E and vaticanol G were evaluated for their antibacterial activities against ATCC 33591 and a HUKM clinical isolate. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for each active compound were determined using the serial microdilution and plate-streak techniques. The combined effect of stilbenoids with vancomycin against MRSA was evaluated using the checkerboard assay to determine their fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index values. The MIC value of a-viniferin on both MRSA strains was 100 ?g/mL, whereas those of johorenol A on ATCC 33591 and HUKM strain were 100 ?g/mL and 200 ?g/mL, respectively. The MIC values of ampelopsin E and vaticanol G were higher than 400 ?g/mL. Out of the five stilbenoid dimers, only ?-viniferin was capable of inhibiting the growth of both MRSA strains at MIC 400 ?g/mL. The MBC value of ?-viniferin, a-viniferin and johorenol A showed bacteriostatic action against MRSA. The FIC index value of ?-viniferin and a-viniferin in combination with vancomycin showed an additive effect (0.5 < FIC ? 2.0) against both MRSA strains. Johorenol A-vancomycin combination was also additive against HUKM strain, but it showed synergistic interaction with vancomycin against ATCC 33591 (FIC < 0.5). Stilbenoid compounds from Shorea gibbosa have anti-MRSA activity and huge potential as an alternative phytotherapy in combating MRSA infections. PMID:24280704

Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Luoi, Chan Kin; Azmi, Abdul Muin; Latip, Jalifah

2012-01-01

231

Practical Management: Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA): The Latest Sports Epidemic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococ- cus aureus (CA-MRSA) has gained international recognition as a superbug that causes serious infectious outbreaks in high-risk populations such as athletes. Clusters of cases in various athletic teams, particularly contact sports, have been reported since 1993 in the United States and more recently in Canada. CA-MRSA infections are not limited to North America, and all athletes are

Holly J. Benjamin; Vineet Nikore; Josh Takagishi

2007-01-01

232

Eczema vaccinatum resulting from the transmission of vaccinia virus from a smallpox vaccinee: An investigation of potential fomites in the home environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

On March 3, 2007, a 2-year-old boy was hospitalized with eczema vaccinatum. His two siblings, one with eczema, were subsequently removed from the home. Swabs of household items obtained on March 13th were analyzed for orthopoxvirus DNA signatures with real-time PCR. Virus culture was attempted on positive specimens. Eight of 25 household samples were positive by PCR for orthopoxvirus; of

Edith Lederman; Roque Miramontes; John Openshaw; Victoria A. Olson; Kevin L. Karem; John Marcinak; Rodrigo Panares; Wayne Staggs; Donna Allen; Stephen G. Weber; Surabhi Vora; Susan I. Gerber; Christine M. Hughes; Russell Regnery; Limone Collins; Pamela S. Diaz; Mary G. Reynolds; Inger Damon

2009-01-01

233

Successful management of an MRSA outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.  

PubMed

We report an MRSA outbreak in our 25-bed tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), which was successfully contained. Methods include a retrospective review of patient files, microbiology records and meeting protocols. During the seven months of outbreak, 27 patients and seven health care workers (HCWs) had positive cultures for MRSA. The outbreak was caused by the epidemic Rhine-Hessen strain; cultured isolates were monoclonal. After a sharp increase of the number of new MRSA-cases the installation of an outbreak management team (OMT) and implementation of comprehensive measures (extensive screening and decolonization strategy including orally applied vancomycin, isolation wards, intensive disinfection regimen) successfully terminated the outbreak within one month. Ten (53%) of 19 patients with completed follow-up and all of the HCWs were decolonized successfully. Gastrointestinal colonization was present in 15 of 27 (56%) neonates, and was associated with poor decolonization success (30% vs. 78% in absence of gastrointestinal colonization). A comprehensive outbreak management can terminate an outbreak in a NICU setting within a short time. Thorough screening of nares, throat and especially stool is necessary for correct cohorting. Gastrointestinal decolonization in neonates seems difficult. PMID:21298461

Heinrich, N; Mueller, A; Bartmann, P; Simon, A; Bierbaum, G; Engelhart, S

2011-07-01

234

MRSA: A Density-Equalizing Mapping Analysis of the Global Research Architecture.  

PubMed

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has evolved as an alarming public health thread due to its global spread as hospital and community pathogen. Despite this role, a scientometric analysis has not been performed yet. Therefore, the NewQIS platform was used to conduct a combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric study. As database, the Web of Science was used, and all entries between 1961 and 2007 were analyzed. In total, 7671 entries were identified. Density equalizing mapping demonstrated a distortion of the world map for the benefit of the USA as leading country with a total output of 2374 publications, followed by the UK (1030) and Japan (862). Citation rate analysis revealed Portugal as leading country with a rate of 35.47 citations per article, followed by New Zealand and Denmark. Country cooperation network analyses showed 743 collaborations with US-UK being most frequent. Network citation analyses indicated the publications that arose from the cooperation of USA and France as well as USA and Japan as the most cited (75.36 and 74.55 citations per collaboration article, respectively). The present study provides the first combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of MRSA research. It illustrates the global MRSA research architecture. It can be assumed that this highly relevant topic for public health will achieve even greater dimensions in the future. PMID:25272080

Addicks, Johann P; Uibel, Stefanie; Jensen, Anna-Maria; Bundschuh, Matthias; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

2014-01-01

235

MRSA: A Density-Equalizing Mapping Analysis of the Global Research Architecture  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has evolved as an alarming public health thread due to its global spread as hospital and community pathogen. Despite this role, a scientometric analysis has not been performed yet. Therefore, the NewQIS platform was used to conduct a combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric study. As database, the Web of Science was used, and all entries between 1961 and 2007 were analyzed. In total, 7671 entries were identified. Density equalizing mapping demonstrated a distortion of the world map for the benefit of the USA as leading country with a total output of 2374 publications, followed by the UK (1030) and Japan (862). Citation rate analysis revealed Portugal as leading country with a rate of 35.47 citations per article, followed by New Zealand and Denmark. Country cooperation network analyses showed 743 collaborations with US-UK being most frequent. Network citation analyses indicated the publications that arose from the cooperation of USA and France as well as USA and Japan as the most cited (75.36 and 74.55 citations per collaboration article, respectively). The present study provides the first combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of MRSA research. It illustrates the global MRSA research architecture. It can be assumed that this highly relevant topic for public health will achieve even greater dimensions in the future. PMID:25272080

Addicks, Johann P.; Uibel, Stefanie; Jensen, Anna-Maria; Bundschuh, Matthias; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Groneberg, David A.

2014-01-01

236

Determination of the antibiofilm, antiadhesive, and anti-MRSA activities of seven Salvia species  

PubMed Central

Background: Several Salvia species are indigenous to Jordan and are widely used as beverages and spices and for their medicinal properties. The objective of the study was to establish the antimicrobial activities, including the antiadhesive and antibiofilm effects of seven different Salvia species. Materials and Methods: Methods used for planktonic culture included agar diffusion, broth microdilution, and minimal biocidal concentration determination while viable count was used for the determination of the antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities. Overnight cultures of reference strains of Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus and clinical strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were used as test microorganisms. Results: An antimicrobial activity toward planktonic cultures demonstrated a significant bacteriocidal activity (?4 log cycle reduction) for the S. triloba extract against S. aureus including MRSA. Its volatile oil exhibited an antimicrobial activity covering all tested microorganisms with the exception of P. aeruginosa. S. triloba extract and volatile oil were successful in preventing and controlling the biofilm, demonstrating antiadhesion and antibiofilm activities, respectively. Conclusion: These reported activities for S. triloba extract and volatile oil allows their listing as potential antibiofilm and anti-MRSA natural agents. This might suggest their use as an antiseptic in the prophylaxis and treatment of S. aureus-associated skin infections. The antimicrobial activity of the other tested Salvia species was negligible. PMID:21120026

Al-Bakri, Amal G.; Othman, Ghadeer; Afifi, Fatma U.

2010-01-01

237

Exploration of the activity of 7-pyrrolidino-8-methoxyisothiazoloquinolones against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  

PubMed

A series of 7-(3'-substituted)pyrrolidino-8-methoxyisothiazoloquinolone (ITQ) analogues were prepared, and their antibacterial potency against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Escherichia coli were compared. Many of these analogues had MIC ? 0.25 ?g/mL against quinolone-resistant MRSA strains. The stereochemical preference was explored for a series of 1''-methyl-3'-aminomethylpyrrolidine analogues. Antibacterial activity was generally more favorable with 3'-R, 1''-S configuration. Substitution on the 3'-aminomethyl nitrogen tended to decrease activity, while potency was maintained with disubstitution or aryl substitution at the 1''-carbon. The 7-[(R)-3-((S)-1-aminoethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl] analogue (6a(R,S)) and the (R)-7-[3-(2-aminopropan-2-yl)pyrrolidin-1-yl] analogue (7a(R)) were found to be the ITQs with the most promising antibacterial profiles. The MICs of these select ITQs versus a panel of clinical MRSA strains were determined, and the ITQs were found to have 8- to 16-fold greater potency than linezolid. These analogues were also evaluated for inhibition of the target enzymes, topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase, from both wild-type and multidrug resistant strains. The ITQs were up to >30 times more inhibitory against these targets than the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. PMID:21425851

Kim, Ha Young; Wiles, Jason A; Wang, Qiuping; Pais, Godwin C G; Lucien, Edlaine; Hashimoto, Akihiro; Nelson, David M; Thanassi, Jane A; Podos, Steven D; Deshpande, Milind; Pucci, Michael J; Bradbury, Barton J

2011-05-12

238

Rapid bactericidal action of alpha-mangostin against MRSA as an outcome of membrane targeting.  

PubMed

The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has created the need for better therapeutic options. In this study, five natural xanthones were extracted and purified from the fruit hull of Garcinia mangostana and their antimicrobial properties were investigated. ?-Mangostin was identified as the most potent among them against Gram-positive pathogens (MIC=0.78-1.56 ?g/mL) which included two MRSA isolates. ?-Mangostin also exhibited rapid in vitro bactericidal activity (3-log reduction within 5 min). In a multistep (20 passage) resistance selection study using a MRSA isolated from the eye, no resistance against ?-mangostin in the strains tested was observed. Biophysical studies using fluorescence probes for membrane potential and permeability, calcein encapsulated large unilamellar vesicles and scanning electron microscopy showed that ?-mangostin rapidly disrupted the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane leading to loss of intracellular components in a concentration-dependent manner. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that isoprenyl groups were important to reduce the free energy for the burial of the hydrophobic phenyl ring of ?-mangostin into the lipid bilayer of the membrane resulting in membrane breakdown and increased permeability. Thus, we suggest that direct interactions of ?-mangostin with the bacterial membrane are responsible for the rapid concentration-dependent membrane disruption and bactericidal action. PMID:22982495

Koh, Jun-Jie; Qiu, Shengxiang; Zou, Hanxun; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Li, Jianguo; Zhou, Xiaojun; Tang, Charles; Saraswathi, Padmanabhan; Verma, Chandra; Tan, Donald T H; Tan, Ai Ling; Liu, Shouping; Beuerman, Roger W

2013-02-01

239

Bacteriophage as effective decolonising agent for elimination of MRSA from anterior nares of BALB/c mice  

PubMed Central

Background Nasal carriers not only pose serious threat to themselves but also to the community by playing an active role in the dissemination of serious and life threatening S. aureus especially MRSA strains. The present study focuses on the use of broad spectrum lytic phage as decolonising agent. In addition, the combined use of lytic phage with mupirocin has also been investigated as an effective decolonising regimen. The effect of phage on the adherence, invasion and cytotoxic effect of MRSA strains on nasal epithelial cells was studied in an ex-vivo model of cultured murine nasal epithelial cells. This was followed by demonstration of therapeutic potential of phage along with mupirocin in decolonising the nares of BALB/c mice using a nasal model of MRSA colonisation. Results Phage was able to significantly reduce the in vitro adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity of MRSA 43300 as well as other clinical MRSA strains on murine nasal epithelial cells as compared to untreated control. Also, the frequency of emergence of spontaneous mutants decreased to negligible levels when both the agents (phage and mupirocin) were used together. Conclusion Phage MR-10, given along with mupirocin showed an additive effect and the combination was able to effectively eradicate the colonising MRSA population from the nares of mice by day 5. PMID:25112504

2014-01-01

240

No high level evidence to support the use of oral H1 antihistamines as monotherapy for eczema: a summary of a Cochrane systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background The most important symptom as well as one of the major diagnostic criteria for eczema is itch. Although oral antihistamines continue to be prescribed for people with eczema, it is unclear if they are effective and safe in relieving itch and skin lesions. We sought to evaluate the available evidence on effectiveness of oral antihistamines (H1 antagonists) as monotherapy in children and adults with eczema. Methods Searches included 10 databases and trial registers as well as conference proceedings (January 2014). Randomised controlled trials that assessed the effects of oral H1 antihistamines as monotherapy in children and adults with eczema were included. Results Our searches retrieved 757 references, but no randomised controlled trial met our inclusion criteria. Most studies allowed concomitant treatments, making the assessment of the individual effects of oral H1 antihistamines impossible. Conclusions There is currently no high-level evidence to support or refute the efficacy or safety of oral H1 antihistamines used as monotherapy for eczema. A further review of studies that assesses the effects of oral H1 antihistamines as ‘add-on’ therapy together with concomitant treatments is warranted to determine the beneficial effects of this group of medications in the treatment of eczema. PMID:24625301

2014-01-01

241

Analysis of Virulence Genes Among Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strains  

PubMed Central

Background: Staphylococcus aureus is amongst major human pathogens both in hospitals and the community. This bacterium is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for a large number of self-limiting and even life-threatening diseases in humans. Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains are common causes of emerging nosocomial infections and are considered as a major problem for public health. Objectives: We aimed to study the profile of some virulence genes including: sea, seb, sed, tst, eta, etb, LuKS/F-PV, hla and hld in methicillin-resistant S. aureus by the PCR technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 345 isolates of S. aureus were collected from clinical specimens of patients referred to teaching hospitals of Shiraz; identification was done by biochemical (catalase, coagulase and DNase) and molecular tests. One hundred and forty six isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were obtained and the presence of some toxin genes in these isolates was investigated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Results: The results showed that among the 345 isolates of S. aureus, 148 were confirmed as MRSA by screening with the cefoxitin disc diffusion (30 µg) method. Also among the 148 MRSA isolates, 146 isolates were confirmed as methicillin-resistant by molecular methods. The results showed that the frequency of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates during 2012 to 2013 in Namazi and Faghihi hospitals were 146 (42.3%) and 199 (57.7%), respectively. Besides, among the 146 confirmed MRSA isolates, 36.98% (54 isolates) and 63.02% (92 isolates) were related to female and male, respectively. The largest number of cases belonged to sputum samples (58 out of 146). The frequency of the eta, etb, sed, LuKS/F-PV, seb, tst, sea, hld and hla genes were 0.68%, 2.05%, 2.05%, 5.47%, 10.95%, 11.64%, 27.39%, 84.24% and 93.15%, respectively. In addition, amongst all examined genes, hla (93.15%) and eta (0.68%) genes had the highest and lowest frequencies, respectively. The greatest coexistence of genes was observed for the hla + hld gene combination (48.83%). The results of our study indicate that 98.63% of the isolates were positive for at least one of the virulence genes. Conclusions: The relative higher frequency of some virulence genes in this study may reflect the emergence of isolates containing these genes in Shiraz medical centers. PMID:25371805

Hoseini Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Hadi, Nahal; Sedigh Ebrahim Saraie, Hadi

2014-01-01

242

Unusual Clinical Presentation of Cutaneous Angiosarcoma Masquerading as Eczema: A Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

An unusual case of cutaneous angiosarcoma clinically mimicking eczema is described. A 98-year-old Caucasian male presented with a 6-month history of a flesh-colored, subcutaneous nodule on his left forehead with contralateral facial erythema and scaling that had been previously diagnosed as eczema. Despite treatments with topical steroids and moisturizers, the condition did not resolve. At our clinic, excisional biopsy of the forehead lesion and scouting biopsies from the contralateral cheek were performed which revealed cutaneous angiosarcoma. The described case illustrates that dermatitis-like features should be considered as a rare clinical manifestation of cutaneous angiosarcoma. It also demonstrates that these lesions may respond well to radiotherapy as a single modality. PMID:24222869

Trinh, Nhat Q.; Rashed, Issra; Hutchens, Kelli A.; Melian, Edward; Tung, Rebecca

2013-01-01

243

Production of a compound against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Streptomyces rubrolavendulae ICN3 & its evaluation in zebrafish embryos  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Antibiotic resistance in pathogens has become a serious problem worldwide. Therefore, the search for new antibiotics for drug resistanct pathogens is an important endeavor. The present study deals with the production of anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) potential of Streptomyces rubrolavendulae ICN3 and evaluation of anti-MRSA compound in zebrafish embryos. Methods: The antibiotic production from S. rubrolavendulae ICN3 was optimized in solid state fermentation and extracted. The antagonistic activity was confirmed against MRSA and purified in silica gel column and reverse phase - HPLC with an absorption maximum at 215 nm. Minimal inhibitory concentration of the compound was determined by broth microdilution method. Zebrafish embryos were used to evaluate the extract/compound for its minimal inhibition studies, influences on heart beat rates, haematopoietic blood cell count and lethal dose values. Results: Streptomyces rubrolavendulae ICN3 showed potent antagonistic activity against MRSA with a zone of 42 mm. The minimum inhibitory concentration was calculated as 500 ?g/ml of the crude extract and the purified C23 exhibited 2.5 ?g/ml in in vitro assay. The LC50 value of the anti MRSA compound C23 was calculated as 60.49 ?g/ml and the MRSA treated embryos survived in the presence of purified compound C23 at a dose of 10 ?g/ml. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggested that the compound was potent with less toxic effects in zebrafish embryonic model system for MRSA infection. Further structural evaluation and analysis in higher mammalian model system may lead to a novel drug candidate for drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25109726

Kannan, Rajaretinam Rajesh; Iniyan, Appadurai Muthamil; Vincent, Samuel Gnana Prakash

2014-01-01

244

Epidemiological features, resistance genes, and clones among community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CO-MRSA) isolates detected in northern Spain.  

PubMed

Twenty-nine community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CO-MRSA) isolates were prospectively selected according to epidemiological criteria among 374 MRSA isolates collected in our laboratory during 2009-2010 in order to determine which community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) and healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) clones are circulating in the community in northern Spain. PVL genes were detected in 5 strains (17.2%) that belonged to SCCmec type IV or V and to the agr group I (ST8 and ST2050), agr group II (ST121), and agr group III (ST30 and ST852). These strains were isolated from patients with different clinical manifestations such as urinary tract infection, abscess, or pneumonia, and most of them belonged to emergency department patients with no history of visits to General Practitioners (GPs) in the year before the isolation. We considered that the prevalence of CA-MRSA in community-onset isolates was low (17.2%). A high proportion of the CO-MRSA strains (58.6%) were ST125-MRSA-IVc (CC5), responsible for most of the infections caused by HA-MRSA strains in Spain. This endemic clone is also circulating in the community of northern Spain as we could demonstrate in this study. Antimicrobial resistance was found in spa type t067 isolates linked to the presence of ant(4')-Ia and msr(A). Most of the CO-MRSA isolates in this study corresponded to spa types more associated to the hospital environment, suggesting the interchange of genetic lineages of MRSA among community and hospital niches. PMID:23177275

González-Domínguez, María; Seral, Cristina; Sáenz, Yolanda; Salvo, Soledad; Gude, María José; Porres-Osante, Nerea; Torres, Carmen; Castillo, Francisco Javier

2012-12-01

245

First reporting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in an industrial rabbit holding and in farm-related people.  

PubMed

Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has been described in food-producing animals and farm or slaughterhouse workers involved in the primary industrial production of swine, bovine and poultry. This communication describes the first case of LA-MRSA (ST398, spa types t034 and t5210) occurring in rabbits raised intensively for meat production and involving farm workers or their family members. In 2012-2013, in a study involving 40 rabbit industrial holdings in Italy, one farm was found to have rabbits colonized or infected with MRSA. Four farm workers and one of their relatives were found to be carrying MRSA. In this case holding, rabbits, people and the holding environment were further investigated and followed up by a second sampling five months later. MRSA was found in 48% (11/23) and 25% (15/59) of the rabbits carrying S. aureus at first and second samplings, respectively. Five months after first detection, some farm workers or family members were still MRSA carriers. Surface samples (2/10) and air samples (2/3) were contaminated with MRSA. Air samples yielded MRSA counts of 5 and 15CFU/m(3). MRSA from rabbits and people collected at first sampling were spa types t034 and t5210 belonging to ST398. The MRSA isolates from rabbits and persons tested at second sampling were t034 and t5210, but spa types t1190 and t2970 were also detected in MRSA isolates from rabbits. Tracing the epidemiological pattern earlier may prevent further spread of LA-MRSA in these food producing animals. PMID:24602406

Agnoletti, Fabrizio; Mazzolini, Elena; Bacchin, Cosetta; Bano, Luca; Berto, Giacomo; Rigoli, Roberto; Muffato, Giovanna; Coato, Paola; Tonon, Elena; Drigo, Ilenia

2014-05-14

246

Natural history of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE): a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background No published systematic reviews have assessed the natural history of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). Time to clearance of colonization has important implications for patient care and infection control policy. Methods We performed parallel searches in OVID Medline for studies that reported the time to documented clearance of MRSA and VRE colonization in the absence of treatment, published between January 1990 and July 2012. Results For MRSA, we screened 982 articles, identified 16 eligible studies (13 observational studies and 3 randomized controlled trials), for a total of 1,804 non-duplicated subjects. For VRE, we screened 284 articles, identified 13 eligible studies (12 observational studies and 1 randomized controlled trial), for a total of 1,936 non-duplicated subjects. Studies reported varying definitions of clearance of colonization; no study reported time of initial colonization. Studies varied in the frequency of sampling, assays used for sampling, and follow-up period. The median duration of total follow-up was 38 weeks for MRSA and 25 weeks for VRE. Based on pooled analyses, the model-estimated median time to clearance was 88 weeks after documented colonization for MRSA-colonized patients and 26 weeks for VRE-colonized patients. In a secondary analysis, clearance rates for MRSA and VRE were compared by restricting the duration of follow-up for the MRSA studies to the maximum observed time point for VRE studies (43 weeks). With this restriction, the model-fitted median time to documented clearance for MRSA would occur at 41 weeks after documented colonization, demonstrating the sensitivity of the pooled estimate to length of study follow-up. Conclusions Few available studies report the natural history of MRSA and VRE colonization. Lack of a consistent definition of clearance, uncertainty regarding the time of initial colonization, variation in frequency of sampling for persistent colonization, assays employed and variation in duration of follow-up are limitations of the existing published literature. The heterogeneity of study characteristics limits interpretation of pooled estimates of time to clearance, however, studies included in this review suggest an increase in documented clearance over time, a result which is sensitive to duration of follow-up. PMID:24678646

2014-01-01

247

Effects of tetracycline and zinc on selection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sequence type 398 in pigs ().  

PubMed

Although this paper was published some time ago, its importance is only recently coming to light as zinc oxide's use as a therapeutic substance for the treatment and control of post-weaning diarrhoea caused primarily by Escherichia coli, is being called into question in Europe. One of the main negative aspects of this paper was the conclusion that that feed supplemented with tetracycline or zinc increases the numbers of MRSA ST398 in the nasal cavity of pigs and that they significantly select for such higher counts. It is the purpose of this critique to demonstrate that by using a poor trial method with only a single replicate and small treatment group numbers of only four pigs (two infected with MRSA and two not), by ignoring the MRSA counts on day 0 before treatment started and manipulating the statistics, to increase the low power of the original analysis, has led to the drawing of misleading conclusions regarding the co-selection effect on MRSA by zinc oxide and underestimating the major numerical impact of tetracycline. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship analysis supports the finding that zinc oxide is unlikely to have any direct co-selector effect on MRSA in the nasal cavity. PMID:25236984

Burch, David G S

2014-10-10

248

Videothoracoscopy in pleural empyema following methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lung infection.  

PubMed

Our study shows the different therapeutic procedures in 64 patients with pleural effusion due to MRSA pneumonia. The thoracostomy tube associated with pleural washing was decisive in 10 simple effusion patients. Video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a complete resolution of the disease in 22 complex parapneumonic effusion patients. In 20 of 32 patients with frank pus in the pleural cavity, the videothoracoscopic insufflation of carbon dioxide (CO2) before thoracotomy facilitated the dissection of the lung tissue. In 12 patients, this approach was not applied because of cardiac insufficiency. Videothoracoscopy and decortication after thoracotomy ensured the recovery of functions. PMID:19649511

Divisi, Duilio; Imbriglio, Giovanna; Crisci, Roberto

2009-01-01

249

Clinicopathological studies on facial eczema outbreak in sheep in Southwest Turkey.  

PubMed

After very hot summer, 22 sheep from 5 different flocks consisting of approximately 150-200 animals each were diagnosed with facial eczema in September 2005, in southwest Turkey. Photophobia, corneal opacity, severe ulcers of the facial skin, especially localized around the eyes and mouth, and 3% mortality were the most prominent clinical symptoms. GGT levels of the animals were very high and varying between 261- 328 U/l. While the activities of ALT and total bilirubin were elevated and AST was normal in affected sheep. Total bilirubin level was higher than normal. Seven of the 22 sheep were euthanatized and necropsy was performed on all of these animals. Severe icterus, hepatomegaly, enlarged gallbladder, congestion of mesenteric vessels were the common necropsy findings. Histopathological changes of the liver included necrosis of the hepatocytes, cholangiohepatitis characterized by mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate in the portal area and mild to severe fibrosis around bile ducts. A diagnosis of sporidesmin toxicosis was made based on the histopathology of the livers, the elevation in liver enzymes, and the development of cutaneous lesions consistent with photosensitization and high spore counts in the ruminal contents. Surviving sheep were treated with procaine penicillin + dihidrostreptomycin sulfate, multivitamin complexes and flunixin meglumine. Additionally, zinc sulphate was also given at a dose of 6 gr per 100 lt drinking water for 28 days. All treated sheep recovered. Pasture spore counts were between 96,300- 267,500 spores/g grass. PMID:18716912

Ozmen, Ozlem; Sahinduran, Sima; Haligur, Mehmet; Albay, Metin Koray

2008-10-01

250

Facial eczema in goats: the toxicity of sporidesmin in goats and its pathology.  

PubMed

Groups of six goats were orally dosed with sporidesmin at rates of 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4 mg of sporidesmin per kg body weight and their responses up to 6 weeks later compared with those of sheep dosed at the same time. Clinical facial eczema and pathological lesions similar to those found in sheep were found in all the goat breeds, but at higher dose rates of sporidesmin than those which caused equivalent lesions in sheep. Saanens were the most susceptible goat breed, requiring 2-4 times as much sporidesmin as sheep to achieve similar effects. G4 and feral goats required 4-8 times the sheep dose of sporidesmin to obtain similar responses. Gamma-glutamyltransferase reached its highest serum levels after 20 days while glutamate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase reached their highest levels between 10 and 20 days. Alkaline phosphatase did not rise consistently to high levels in affected goats. The elevation in aspartate aminotransferase levels tended to be early and transient; glutamate dehydrogenase early and prolonged; gamma-glutamyltransferase late and prolonged, and'alkaline phosphatase late and minor. There was considerable individual variation in the time at which elevations occurred and the levels which enzymes reached. Cholesterol and bilirubin levels were high if liver injury was severe. PMID:16031610

Smith, B L; Embling, P P

1991-03-01

251

Wheezing, asthma, hay fever, and atopic eczema in relation to maternal occupations in pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine whether prenatal occupational exposures, especially to organic solvents, are associated with atopic diseases in childhood. Methods The study comprised children born in Odense or Aalborg, Denmark between 1984 and 1987. Occupational job titles were derived from questionnaires filled out by the mothers when attending midwife centres. Assessment of organic solvent exposures was based on job titles selected by occupational specialists. A follow up questionnaire to the parents provided data on medical diagnoses as well as wheezing symptoms for 7844 children aged 14–18. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the cumulative risk for wheezing (early wheezing not diagnosed as asthma), asthma, hay fever, and atopic eczema during childhood by means of odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Explorative analyses by maternal job titles in pregnancy showed elevated odds ratios concerning different atopic diseases for occupational groups such as “bakers, pastry cooks, and confectionary makers”, “dental assistants”, “electrical and electronic assemblers”, “sewers and embroiders”, and “bookbinders and related workers”. An excess risk ratio for hay fever (OR 2.8, CI 1.1 to 7.5) was found following maternal gestational exposure to organic solvents. Furthermore, a slightly raised odds ratio for asthma was observed in children of shift workers (OR 1.2, CI 1.0 to 1.5). Conclusion The data suggest links between certain maternal occupations during pregnancy and atopic diseases, which merits further scrutiny. However, no consistent pattern was seen across the different atopic diseases. PMID:16757508

Magnusson, L L; Wennborg, H; Bonde, J P; Olsen, J

2006-01-01

252

MRSA Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... decolonized with a nasal antibiotic ointment and daily cleansing with special antimicrobial wipes. A study comparing prevention ... administering a course of a nasal antibiotic and cleansing patients with special antimicrobial wipes for all patients ...

253

Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among primary school children and prisoners in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Staphylococcus aureus infections are increasingly reported from both health institutions and communities around the world. In particular, infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have been detected worldwide. If MRSA becomes the most common form of S. aureus in a community, it makes the treatment of common infections much more difficult. But, report on the current status of community acquired MRSA in the study area is scanty. Methods Community-based cross sectional study was conducted to evaluate the current prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of MRSA among primary school children and prisoners in Jimma town. MRSA was detected using Cefoxitin (30?g) disc; and epidemiologic risk factors were assessed using pre-designed questionnaires distributed to the children’s parents and prisoners. A total of 354 nasal swabs were collected from primary school children and prisoners from December 2010 to March 2011 following standards microbiological methods. Results A total of 169 S. aureus isolates were recovered. The overall prevalence of MRSA among the study population was 23.08 % (39/169). Specifically, the prevalence of MRSA among primary school children and prisoners were 18.8% (27/144) and 48% (12/25), respectively. The isolated S. aureus and MRSA displayed multiple drug resistance (MDR) to 2 to 10 antibiotics. The most frequent MDR was Amp/Bac/Ery/Pen/Fox (resistance to Ampicillin, Bacitracin, Erythromycin, Penicillin, and Cefoxitin). Conclusion The present study revealed that MRSA could be prevalent in the healthy community, transmitted from hospital to the community. The high distribution of MRSA could be favored by potential risk factors. Thus, for comprehensive evaluation of the current prevalence of MRSA and design control measures, consideration need to be given to the healthy community besides data coming from health institutions. PMID:23731679

2013-01-01

254

Isolation of a potent antibiotic producer bacterium, especially against MRSA, from northern region of the Persian Gulf.  

PubMed

Nowadays, emergence and prevalence of MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) strain have become a great global concern in 21st century, so, it is necessary to discover new antibiotics against this pathogen. The aim of this study was isolation and evaluation marine bacteria from the Persian Gulf in order to finding antibiotic compounds against some pathogenic bacteria. For this purpose, water and sediment samples were collected from the Persian Gulf during March to October 2009. The antibacterial activity of the isolated bacteria was assessed using disc diffusion method. The Growth Curve Interference (GCI) parameter against MRSA was determined for the high potential antibiotic producing strain. The most important factors affecting fermentation conditions in antibiotic production were also optimized. Definite identification of intended isolate was confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing. Altogether, 51 bacterial colony was isolated and among them only 3 bacterium showed antibacterial activity. Pseudoalteromonas piscicida PG-01 isolated from a sediment sample was chosen as the best antibiotic producing strain. This strain was effective against all tested Gram-positive bacteria, had good anti-MRSA activity and also GCI value against MRSA was two times lower than MIC value. Among the optimized fermentation parameters, carbon and nitrogen sources play major role in efficacy of optimized antibiotic production. Ultrastructural study on the effect of intended antibiotic compounds on MRSA using TEM revealed that the target site for this compound is cell wall. Considering the antibacterial effect of PG-01 strain especially against MRSA, intended antibiotic compounds can gives hope for treatment of diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria. PMID:22642595

Darabpour, Esmaeil; Roayaei Ardakani, Mohammad; Motamedi, Hossein; Taghi Ronagh, Mohammad

2012-05-01

255

Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using the NanoLantern Biosensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human illness, and has developed the remarkable ability to resist the bactericidal capabilities of many of the world's leading antibiotics (i.e. MRSA). In an effort to enable rapid detection and treatment of MRSA infections, we have developed a DNA detection technology termed the NanoLantern(TM). The NanoLantern(TM) biosensor technology is based on the simple immobilization of a fluorophore-terminated DNA hairpin onto a gold chip. This produces a label-free sensor that allows for a positive response to be obtained without extensive processing of the sample, saving cost and increasing accuracy. We will also discuss a newly developed method of partial gene analysis, used to develop a DNA hairpin probe that is capable of detecting the presence of the mecR gene, a gene necessary for methicillin resistance to be present in S. aureus, with 100% sequence specificity. The successful incorporation of this probe into the NanoLantern(TM) platform, along with the concomitant development of the paired PCR assay has allowed for the successful detection of methicillin-resistance directly from a culture of S. aureus. These results represent an important step forward in terms of developing the ability to rapidly and effectively detect the presence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections.

Strohsahl, Christopher M.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Krauss, Todd D.

2009-02-01

256

A Natural Plasmid Uniquely Encodes Two Biosynthetic Pathways Creating a Potent Anti-MRSA Antibiotic  

PubMed Central

Background Understanding how complex antibiotics are synthesised by their producer bacteria is essential for creation of new families of bioactive compounds. Thiomarinols, produced by marine bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudoalteromonas, are hybrids of two independently active species: the pseudomonic acid mixture, mupirocin, which is used clinically against MRSA, and the pyrrothine core of holomycin. Methodology/Principal Findings High throughput DNA sequencing of the complete genome of the producer bacterium revealed a novel 97 kb plasmid, pTML1, consisting almost entirely of two distinct gene clusters. Targeted gene knockouts confirmed the role of these clusters in biosynthesis of the two separate components, pseudomonic acid and the pyrrothine, and identified a putative amide synthetase that joins them together. Feeding mupirocin to a mutant unable to make the endogenous pseudomonic acid created a novel hybrid with the pyrrothine via “mutasynthesis” that allows inhibition of mupirocin-resistant isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, the mupirocin target. A mutant defective in pyrrothine biosynthesis was also able to incorporate alternative amine substrates. Conclusions/Significance Plasmid pTML1 provides a paradigm for combining independent antibiotic biosynthetic pathways or using mutasynthesis to develop a new family of hybrid derivatives that may extend the effective use of mupirocin against MRSA. PMID:21483852

Song, Zhongshu; Murphy, Annabel C.; Hothersall, Joanne; Stephens, Elton R.; Gurney, Rachel; Cox, Russell J.; Crosby, John; Willis, Christine L.; Simpson, Thomas J.; Thomas, Christopher M.

2011-01-01

257

Inhibition of Transcription Factor Specificity Protein 1 Alters the Gene Expression Profile of Keratinocytes Leading to Upregulation of Kallikrein-Related Peptidases and Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) is involved in diverse cellular functions. We recently found that Sp1 was significantly decreased in skin biopsy samples obtained from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and had an even greater reduction in AD patients with a history of eczema herpeticum. In the current study, we sought to better understand the role of Sp1 in

Lianghua Bin; Byung E Kim; Clifton F Hall; Sonia M Leach; Donald Y M Leung

2011-01-01

258

Direct Detection of Staphylococcus Osteoarticular Infections by Use of Xpert MRSA/SA SSTI Real-Time PCR ?  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the Xpert MRSA/SA SSTI real-time PCR assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) directly on perioperative bone and joint samples. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were, respectively, 100% and 98.3%, 100% and 100%, and 100% and 95.3%. The median total test turnaround time was 72 min for PCR versus 79 h for culture. Using these rapid results, appropriate antibiotic treatment could be rapidly initiated. PMID:21998420

Dubouix-Bourandy, Anne; de Ladoucette, Aymard; Pietri, Valerie; Mehdi, Nazim; Benzaquen, David; Guinand, Regis; Gandois, Jean-Marc

2011-01-01

259

Preoperative Biliary MRSA Infection in Patients Undergoing Hepatobiliary Resection with Cholangiojejunostomy: Incidence, Antibiotic Treatment, and Surgical Outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  There have been no reports on the impact of preoperative biliary MRSA infection on the outcome of major hepatectomy. The aim\\u000a of this study was to review the surgical outcome of patients who underwent hepatobiliary resection after biliary drainage\\u000a and to evaluate the impact of preoperative biliary MRSA infection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Medical records from 350 patients who underwent hepatobiliary resection with cholangiojejunostomy

Daisuke Takara; Gen Sugawara; Tomoki Ebata; Yukihiro Yokoyama; Tsuyoshi Igami; Masato Nagino

2011-01-01

260

An economic model for the prevention of MRSA infections after surgery: non-glycopeptide or glycopeptide antibiotic prophylaxis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim  Surgical site infection is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The multiresistant strains (MRSA) are resistant to most antibiotic prophylaxis regimens. Our aim was to explore whether\\u000a there is a threshold of MRSA prevalence at which switching to routine glycopeptide-based antibiotic prophylaxis becomes cost-effective.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  An indicative model was designed to explore the cost-effectiveness of vancomycin, cephalosporin or a combination, in patients

Rachel A. Elliott; Helen L. A. Weatherly; Neil S. Hawkins; Gillian Cranny; Duncan Chambers; Lindsey Myers; Alison Eastwood; Mark J. Sculpher

2010-01-01

261

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT DISINFECTANTS USED IN RIYADH HOSPITALS AND THEIR EFFICACY AGAINST METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the means of controlling it, continue to be of major interest to the healthcare community. The bactericidal activity of some disinfectants which are in common use in seven major tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh was tested against two control strains of S. aureus, namely MRSA ATCC 33591 and Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) ATCC

Manal M. Baddour

262

Masclaux, F.G.; Sakwinska, O.; Charrire, N.; Swmaani, E.; Oppliger, A. Concentration of airborne Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA), total  

E-print Network

Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA), total bacteria, and endotoxins in pig farms. Annals of Occupational of airborne Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA), total bacteria and endotoxins in pig farms. FREDERIC G: Anne.Oppliger@hospvd.ch #12;3 ABSTRACT Pigs are very often colonized with Staphylococcus aureus

Alvarez, Nadir

263

Quantifying Type-Specific Reproduction Numbers for Nosocomial Pathogens: Evidence for Heightened Transmission of an Asian Sequence Type 239 MRSA Clone  

Microsoft Academic Search

An important determinant of a pathogen's success is the rate at which it is transmitted from infected to susceptible hosts. Although there are anecdotal reports that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones vary in their transmissibility in hospital settings, attempts to quantify such variation are lacking for common subtypes, as are methods for addressing this question using routinely-collected MRSA screening data

Ben S. Cooper; Theodore Kypraios; Rahul Batra; Duncan Wyncoll; Olga Tosas; Jonathan D. Edgeworth

2012-01-01

264

Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Swiss veterinary health care providers: detection of livestock- and healthcare-associated clones.  

PubMed

We screened a total of 340 veterinarians (including general practitioners, small animal practitioners, large animal practitioners, veterinarians working in different veterinary services or industry), and 29 veterinary assistants for nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) at the 2012 Swiss veterinary annual meeting. MRSA isolates (n = 14) were detected in 3.8 % (95 % CI 2.1 - 6.3 %) of the participants whereas MRSP was not detected. Large animal practitioners were carriers of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398-t011-V (n = 2), ST398-t011-IV (n = 4), and ST398-t034-V (n = 1). On the other hand, participants working with small animals harbored human healthcare-associated MRSA (HCA-MRSA) which belonged to epidemic lineages ST225-t003-II (n = 2), ST225-t014-II (n = 1), ST5-t002-II (n = 2), ST5-t283-IV (n = 1), and ST88-t186-IV (n = 1). HCA-MRSA harbored virulence factors such as enterotoxins, ?-hemolysin converting phage and leukocidins. None of the MRSA isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In addition to the methicillin resistance gene mecA, LA-MRSA ST398 isolates generally contained additional antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance to tetracycline [tet(M) and tet(K)], trimethoprim [dfrK, dfrG], and the aminoglycosides gentamicin and kanamycin [aac(6')-Ie - aph(2')-Ia]. On the other hand, HCA-MRSA ST5 and ST225 mainly contained genes conferring resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics [erm(A)], to spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia], amikacin and tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia], and to fluoroquinolones [amino acid substitutions in GrlA (S84L) and GyrA (S80F and S81P)]. MRSA carriage may represent an occupational risk and veterinarians should be aware of possible MRSA colonization and potential for developing infection or for transmitting these strains. Professional exposure to animals should be reported upon hospitalization and before medical intervention to allow for preventive measures. Infection prevention measures are also indicated in veterinary medicine to avoid MRSA transmission between humans and animals, and to limit the spread of MRSA both in the community, and to animal and human hospitals. PMID:24973319

Wettstein Rosenkranz; Rothenanger; Brodard; Collaud; Overesch; Bigler; Marschall; Perreten

2014-07-01

265

What's new in atopic eczema? An analysis of systematic reviews published in 2010-11.  

PubMed

This review provides a summary of key findings from 24 systematic reviews of atopic eczema (AE) published or indexed between 1 August 2010 and 31 December 2011, updating published summaries from previous years. Epidemiological evidence points to the protective effects of early daycare, endotoxin exposure, consumption of unpasteurized milk, and early exposure to dogs, but antibiotic use in early life may increase the risk for AE. With regard to prevention of AE, there is currently no strong evidence of benefit for exclusive breastfeeding, hydrolysed protein formulas, soy formulas, maternal antigen avoidance, omega-3 or omega-6 fatty-acid supplementation, or use of prebiotics or probiotics. With respect to AE treatments, the most compelling new systematic review evidence was for proactive treatment with topical anti-inflammatory agents (topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors) for the prevention of AE flares in patients with moderate to severe AE. A meta-analysis of 4 trials confirmed the superiority of tacrolimus 0.1% over pimecrolimus for the treatment of AE, and a review of 17 trials found that tacrolimus (0.1% or 0.03%) was broadly similar in efficacy to mild/moderate topical corticosteroids. Evidence for the role of education in the management of AE was less conclusive, with evidence from randomized controlled trials showing mixed results. Further work is needed in this area to conduct high-quality trials of educational interventions that are clearly described and reproducible. There is no clear evidence for the efficacy of homeopathy, botanical extracts or Chinese herbal medicine in the treatment of AE, as large well-designed trials are lacking in these areas. PMID:23750610

Torley, D; Futamura, M; Williams, H C; Thomas, K S

2013-07-01

266

Inheritance of resistance to facial eczema: a review of research findings from sheep and cattle in New Zealand.  

PubMed

Facial eczema (FE) is a costly problem to New Zealand pastoral agriculture, and has a detrimental impact on animal wellbeing. Incidence and severity of the disease can be reduced by grazing management and zinc prophylaxis. An additional strategy is to breed animals that are genetically resistant to intoxication with sporidesmin, the causative mycotoxin. This review summarises research findings on the inheritance of resistance of animals to FE, including evidence of among- and within-breed genetic variation, direct and correlated responses to selection, and identification of genetic markers and candidate genes for FE resistance. PMID:15768115

Morris, C A; Towers, N R; Hohenboken, W D; Maqbool, N; Smith, B L; Phua, S H

2004-10-01

267

Interactive effect of STAT6 and IL13 gene polymorphisms on eczema status: results from a longitudinal and a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Eczema is a prevalent skin disease that is mainly characterized by systemic deviation of immune response and defective epidermal barrier. Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13 and transcription factor STAT6 are key elements in the inflammatory response that characterize allergic disorders, including eczema. Previous genetic association studies showed inconsistent results for the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with eczema. Our aim was to investigate whether SNPs in IL13 and STAT6 genes, which share a biological pathway, have an interactive effect on eczema risk. Methods Data from two independent population-based studies were analyzed, namely the Isle of Wight birth cohort study (IOW; n?=?1,456) and for the purpose of replication the Swansea PAPA (Poblogaeth Asthma Prifysgol Abertawe; n?=?1,445) cross-sectional study. Log-binomial regressions were applied to (i) account for the interaction between IL13 (rs20541) and STAT6 (rs1059513) polymorphisms and (ii) estimate the combined effect, in terms of risk ratios (RRs), of both risk factors on the risk of eczema. Results Under a dominant genetic model, the interaction term [IL13 (rs20541)?×?STAT6 (rs1059513)] was statistically significant in both studies (IOW: adjusted Pinteraction?=?0.046; PAPA: Pinteraction?=?0.037). The assessment of the combined effect associated with having risk genotypes in both SNPs yielded a 1.52-fold increased risk of eczema in the IOW study (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05 – 2.20; P?=?0.028) and a 2.01-fold higher risk of eczema (95% CI: 1.29 – 3.12; P?=?0.002) in the PAPA study population. Conclusions Our study adds to the current knowledge of genetic susceptibility by demonstrating for the first time an interactive effect between SNPs in IL13 (rs20541) and STAT6 (rs1059513) on the occurrence of eczema in two independent samples. Findings of this report further support the emerging evidence that points toward the existence of genetic effects that occur via complex networks involving gene-gene interactions (epistasis). PMID:23815671

2013-01-01

268

Quantifying The Impact of Extra-Nasal Testing Body Sites for MRSA Colonization at the Time of Hospital or Intensive Care Unit Admission  

PubMed Central

Objective Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections. Recent legislative mandates require nares screening for MRSA at hospital and ICU admission in many states. However, MRSA colonization at extra-nasal sites is increasingly recognized. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify the yield of extra-nasal testing for MRSA. Design We searched MEDLINE from January 1966 through January 2012 for articles comparing nasal and extra-nasal screening for MRSA colonization. Studies were categorized by population tested, specifically those admitted to ICUs, and those admitted to hospitals with a high prevalence (?6%) or low prevalence (<6%) of MRSA carriers. Data were extracted using a standardized instrument. Results We reviewed 4,381 abstracts and 735 manuscripts. Twenty-three manuscripts met criteria for analysis (n=39,479 patients). Extra-nasal MRSA screening increased yield by approximately one-third over nares alone. The yield was similar upon ICU admission (weighted average 33%, range 9%–69%), and hospital admission in high (weighted average 37%, range 9–86%) and low prevalence (weighted average 50%, range 0–150%) populations. Comparing individual extra nasal sites, testing the oropharynx increased MRSA detection by 21% over nares alone; rectum by 20%; wounds by 17%; and axilla by 7%. Conclusions Extra-nasal MRSA screening at hospital or ICU admission in adults will increase MRSA detection by one-third compared to nares screening alone. Findings were consistent among subpopulations examined. Extra-nasal testing may be a valuable strategy for outbreak control or in settings of persistent disease, particularly when combined with decolonization or enhanced infection prevention protocols. PMID:23295562

McKinnell, James A.; Huang, Susan S.; Eells, Samantha J.; Cui, Eric; Miller, Loren G.

2013-01-01

269

Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in dogs and cats: a case-control study  

PubMed Central

Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in dogs and cats were investigated in an unmatched case-control study. A total of 197 animals from 150 veterinary practices across the United Kingdom was enrolled, including 105 MRSA cases and 92 controls with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infection. The association of owners and veterinarian staff with the human healthcare sector (HCS) and animal-related characteristics such as signalment, antimicrobial and immunosuppressive therapy, and surgery were evaluated as putative risk factors using logistic regression. We found that significant risk factors for MRSA infection were the number of antimicrobial courses (p = 0.005), number of days admitted to veterinary clinics (p = 0.003) and having received surgical implants (p = 0.001). In addition, the odds of contact with humans which had been ill and admitted to hospital (p = 0.062) were higher in MRSA infected pets than in MSSA controls. The risk factors identified in this study highlight the need to increase vigilance towards identification of companion animal groups at risk and to advocate responsible and judicious use of antimicrobials in small animal practice. PMID:20423695

Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo Jorge; Loeffler, Anette; Lindsay, Jodi; Rich, Mick; Roberts, Larry; Smith, Heather; Lloyd, David Hugh; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo

2010-01-01

270

A Prospective Audit of Complex Wound and Graft Infections in Great Britain and Ireland: the Emergence of MRSA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background a number of studies have examined the outcome of complex wound and graft infections, but most include small numbers of patients collected over a prolonged period of time. To date, there is little information on the clinical outcome of infections involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Methods between February 1998 and January 1999, two prospective multi-centre audits were performed in

A. R. Naylor; P. D. Hayes; S. Darke

2001-01-01

271

A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis of Factors Associated with MRSA Colonization at Time of Hospital or ICU Admission  

PubMed Central

Objective Screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in high-risk patients is a legislative mandate in nine U.S. states and has been adopted by many hospitals. Definitions of “high-risk” differ among hospitals and state laws. A systematic evaluation of factors associated with colonization is lacking. We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess factors associated with MRSA colonization at hospital admission. Design We searched MEDLINE from 1966–2012 for articles comparing MRSA colonized and non-colonized patients on hospital or ICU admission. Data were extracted using a standardized instrument. Meta-analyses were performed to identify factors associated with MRSA colonization. Results We reviewed 4,381 abstracts; twenty-nine manuscripts met inclusion criteria (n=76,913 patients). MRSA colonization at hospital admission was associated with recent prior hospitalization (OR=2.4 95%-CI=1.3–4.7;p<0.01), nursing home exposure (OR=3.8 95%-CI=2.3–6.3;p<0.01) and history of exposure to healthcare-associated pathogens (MRSA carriage OR=8.0 95%-CI =4.2–15.1, C. difficile infection OR=3.4 95%-CI=2.2–5.3, vancomycin-resistant Enterococci carriage OR=3.1 95%-CI=2.5–4.0;p<0.01 for all). Select comorbidities were associated with MRSA colonization (congestive heart failure, diabetes, pulmonary disease, immunosuppression and renal failure; p<0.01 for all), while others were not (HIV, cirrhosis, and malignancy). ICU admission was not associated with an increased risk of MRSA colonization (OR=1.1 95%-CI =0.6–1.8;p=0.87). Conclusions MRSA colonization on hospital admission was associated with healthcare contact, previous healthcare-associated pathogens, and select comorbid conditions. ICU admission was not associated with MRSA colonization although this is commonly used in state mandates for MRSA screening. Infection prevention programs utilizing targeted MRSA screening may consider our results to define patients likely to have MRSA colonization. PMID:24018925

McKinnell, James A.; Miller, Loren G.; Eells, Samantha J.; Cui, Eric; Huang, Susan S.

2013-01-01

272

[Pharmaceutical investigation of vancomycin hydrochloride eye drops and their topical application to MRSA eye infection].  

PubMed

Two formulations of 0.5% vancomycin hydrochloride (VM) eye drops (VM-B and VM-C eye drops) were prepared by dissolving commercial VM powder for injection with preserved water B (PWB) containing phosphate buffer and preserved water C (PWC) containing only antimicrobial preservative, respectively. The VM-B eye drops have neutral pH (about 6.3), and the VM-C eye drops acidic pH of about 3.5. The pharmaceutical examination of these eye drops was performed regarding its clinical application to MRSA eye infection. In an irritability test using a rabbit's eye, the average number of winks after instillation of one drop of VM-B eye drops was 0.8 times/min and significantly smaller than that of VM-C eye drops (2.0 times/min). In dark storage at 4 degrees C, no change of VM concentration in both eye drops was observed for 25 weeks after preparation and the mean residual concentrations as determined by the HPLC-UV (240 nm) method were constant over 90% for 8 weeks, of the initial concentration. However, the residual VM concentration of VM-B eye drops under a room condition declined to 58% after 4 weeks and 20% after 8 weeks, and VM in light storage at 40 degrees C was not detectable after 8 weeks. The drug concentration of VM-C eye drops declined to 83% after 4 weeks and 74% after 8 weeks under a room condition, and to 46% after 4 weeks and 20% after 8 weeks under light storage at 40 degrees C. Under these storage conditions, the precipitation of VM related crystals was observed in both the eye drops when the residual percentage of VM was lower than 80%. Judging from HPLC chromatograms of a solution of the precipitated crystals, it was suggested that this crystal was degradation products of VM. The VM-B eye drops was applied to a patient with MRSA eye infection, because other medication was not effective. After continuous instillation of a drop per times every hour to both eyes, MRSA in corneal culture turned out negative after one week, and the clinical condition was remarkably improved. On the basis of the result of eye-irritability, VM-B eye drops with neutral pH was suggested to be superior to acidic VM-C eye drops from a safety point of view. It was also indicated that VM-B eye drops can be effectively used for 8 weeks under dark storage at 4 degrees C for MRSA eye infection, which is a useful piece information for the proper usage of the VM eye drops. PMID:11433777

Itoh, M; Aoyama, T; Iemoto, A; Nakajima, K; Amano, S; Nakamura, H; Sato, H; Iga, T

2001-06-01

273

MRSA-Infected External Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysm Treated with Endovascular Stenting  

SciTech Connect

A 48-year-old woman with severe juvenile-onset rheumatoid arthritis presented with a bleeding cutaneous sinus distal to her right total hip replacement scar. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated on culture. She had previously undergone bilateral total hip and knee replacements at aged 23 and six years later had the right knee prosthesis removed for infection, with subsequent osteomyelitis of the femoral shaft and right total hip prosthesis disruption. Peripheral arteriography was performed in view of persistent bleeding from the sinus, which revealed a 6 cm false aneurysm filling from and compressing the right external iliac artery (EIA). A PTFE-covered, balloon expandable JOSTENT was deployed in the right EIA, successfully excluding the false aneurysm and preventing further bleeding from the sinus. No graft infection was reported at 12 months. This case illustrates the potential use of endovascular stent-grafting in the treatment of an infected pseudoaneurysm.

Clarke, M.G. [Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Thomas, H.G. [Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Hywel.Thomas@tst.nhs.uk; Chester, J.F. [Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom)

2005-04-15

274

Evaluation of the BD Max MRSA XT Assay for Use with Different Swab Types.  

PubMed

We evaluated the performance of the BD Max MRSA XT assay for use with different swab types. The 90% detection rates (95% confidence intervals) were 387 (97 to 1,551), 877 (238 to 3,230), 986 (183 to 5,287), 1,292 (328 to 5,078), 2,400 (426 to 13,518), and 5,848 (622 to 55,021) CFU/swab for Liquid Stuart, Liquid Amies, dry, Amies Gel without charcoal, ESwab collection, and Amies gel with charcoal swabs (Becton Dickinson), respectively. Amies Gel without charcoal, ESwab collection, and Amies gel with charcoal swabs had a tendency to be less sensitive, but none of the differences was statistically significant. PMID:25232162

Dalpke, Alexander H; Hofko, Marjeta; Stock, Christian; Zimmermann, Stefan

2014-12-01

275

Implementation of recommendations for hand eczema through a multifaceted strategy. A process evaluation among health care workers.  

PubMed

Process data give important insights into how an intervention is implemented. The aim of the present study is to conduct a process evaluation, alongside a randomised controlled trail, on the implementation of recommendations for the prevention of hand eczema. The intervention was carried out in healthcare workers' departments and consisted of working groups and role models. The role models were selected based on their representativeness, their influence on colleagues, and their motivation. The focus of the working group was to implement recommendations for hand eczema at the department by choosing solutions to overcome barriers for implementation. Out of the 104 solutions, 87 were realised. Solutions regarding moisturisers and use of cotton under gloves, were used by 90.9% and 30.8% of the employees, respectively. Of all participants, 58.2% actively engaged with the role models. This process evaluation showed that the intervention was executed according to protocol and that the solutions were implemented well. However, the role model component in the intervention should be improved. PMID:24572935

van der Meer, Esther W C; Boot, Cécile R L; Jungbauer, Frank H W; Coenraads, Pieter Jan; van der Gulden, Joost W J; Anema, Johannes R

2014-10-23

276

Comparative Evaluation of Three Chromogenic Media Combined with Broth Enrichment and the Real-Time PCR-Based Xpert MRSA Assay for Screening of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Nasal Swabs  

PubMed Central

Background We evaluated the performance of three chromogenic media (Brilliance agar I [Oxoid, UK], Brilliance agar II [Oxoid], and ChromID MRSA [Biomérieux, France]) combined with broth enrichment and the Xpert MRSA assay for screening of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Methods We obtained 401 pairs of duplicate nasal swabs from 321 patients. One swab was suspended overnight in tryptic soy broth; 50-µL aliquots of suspension were inoculated on the three chromogenic media. Brilliance agar I and II were examined after 24 hr, and ChromID MRSA, after 24 and 48 hr. The paired swab was processed directly using real-time PCR-based Xpert MRSA assay. Results True positives, designated as MRSA growth in any of the culture media, were detected with the prevalence of 17% in our institution. We report the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of MRSA growth as follows: 92.3%, 94.0%, 75.9%, and 98.4% in Brilliance agar I (24 hr); 92.7%, 97.9%, 90.0%, and 98.5% in Brilliance agar II (24 hr); 95.6%, 95.8%, 82.3%, and 99.1% in ChromID MRSA (24 hr); 100%, 92.5%, 73.1%, and 100% in ChromID MRSA (48 hr); 92.6%, 96.7%, 85.1%, and 98.5% in Xpert MRSA assay. The agreement between the enriched culture and Xpert MRSA assay was 96.0%. Conclusions Three chromogenic culture media combined with enrichment and Xpert MRSA assay demonstrated similar capabilities in MRSA detection. The Xpert MRSA assay yielded results comparable to those of culture methods, saving 48-72 hr, thus facilitating earlier detection of MRSA in healthcare settings. PMID:23826561

Lee, Seungok; Park, Kang-Gyun; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Chae, Hyojin; Yoo, Jin-Kyung; Seo, Sin Won; Choi, Jung Eun; Lim, Jung Hye; Heo, Seon Mi; Seo, Ju Hee

2013-01-01

277

Emergence of Hospital- and Community-Associated Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Genotype ST772-MRSA-V in Ireland and Detailed Investigation of an ST772-MRSA-V Cluster in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

Sequence type 22 (ST22) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) harboring staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) IV (ST22-MRSA-IV) has predominated in Irish hospitals since the late 1990s. Six distinct clones of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) have also been identified in Ireland. A new strain of CA-MRSA, ST772-MRSA-V, has recently emerged and become widespread in India and has spread into hospitals. In the present study, highly similar MRSA isolates were recovered from seven colonized neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a maternity hospital in Ireland during 2010 and 2011, two colonized NICU staff, one of their colonized children, and a NICU environmental site. The isolates exhibited multiantibiotic resistance, spa type t657, and were assigned to ST772-MRSA-V by DNA microarray profiling. All isolates encoded resistance to macrolides [msr(A) and mpb(BM)] and aminoglycosides (aacA-aphD and aphA3) and harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin genes (lukF-PV and lukS-PV), enterotoxin genes (sea, sec, sel, and egc), and one of the immune evasion complex genes (scn). One of the NICU staff colonized by ST772-MRSA-V was identified as the probable index case, based on recent travel to India. Seven additional hospital and CA-ST772-MRSA-V isolates recovered from skin and soft tissue infections in Ireland between 2009 and 2011 exhibiting highly similar phenotypic and genotypic characteristics to the NICU isolates were also identified. The clinical details of four of these patients revealed connections with India through ethnic background or travel. Our study indicates that hospital-acquired and CA-ST772-MRSA-V is currently emerging in Ireland and may have been imported from India on several occasions. PMID:22189119

Shore, Anna C.; Corcoran, Suzanne; Tecklenborg, Sarah; Coleman, David C.; O'Connell, Brian

2012-01-01

278

Evaluation of the atopy patch test and the cutaneous late-phase reaction as relevant models for the study of allergic inflammation in patients with atopic eczema  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to evaluate the atopy patch test (APT) and the late-phase reaction (LPR) after intracutaneous allergen injection as models for the study of allergic inflammation in atopic eczema. METHODS: Immunocytochemistry was used to analyze skin biopsy specimens from sites of APTs and LPRs at 2 and 24 hours and to compare these with lesional and nonlesional

Elisabeth G. Langeveld-Wildschut; Theo Thepen; Ilse C. Bihari; Frank C. van Reijsen; I. Jolanda M. de Vries; Piet L. B. Bruijnzeel; Carla A. F. M. Bruijnzeel-Koomen

1996-01-01

279

Assessing Health-related Quality of Life in Hand Eczema Patients: How to Overcome Psychometric Faults when Using the Dermatology Life Quality Index.  

PubMed

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important patient reported outcome in health service research. The dermatology life quality index (DLQI) is the most commonly used instrument in dermatology. In recent years, the psychometric properties of the DLQI have been a subject of debate as requirements of modern test theory seem not to be fulfilled. The aim of this study was to test whether those violations also occur in patients with hand eczema. We collected data of 602 hand eczema patients who participated in an inpatient dermatology rehabilitation program in Germany. In order to report meaningful scores of the DLQI, data were analysed according to the principles of modern test theory. We calibrated the DLQI using the Rasch model, resulting in a 6 item version with a range between 0-15 points. This version showed no significant misfit to the Rasch model (p>0.14). By using a Rasch analysis the results were evaluated in a second sample of hand eczema patients (n=511). Even if all demographic characteristic of this sample were different, we were able to replicate the results found in this study (p>0.21). In conclusion, we recommend to use an alternative scoring procedure as presented in this article if the DLQI is used in hand eczema patients. PMID:24604210

Ofenloch, Robert F; Diepgen, Thomas L; Weisshaar, Elke; Elsner, Peter; Apfelbacher, Christian J

2014-10-23

280

Cost-effectiveness of oral alitretinoin in patients with severe chronic hand eczema - a long-term analysis from a Swiss perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The impact on patients suffering from chronic hand eczema (CHE) is enormous, as no licensed systemic treatment option with proven efficacy for CHE is available. Alitretinoin is a novel agent which showed high clinical efficacy in patients with severe, refractory CHE. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of alitretinoin for CHE patient treatment from a Swiss third party payer perspective. A

Patricia R Blank; Armin A Blank; Thomas D Szucs

2010-01-01

281

Evidence for linkage of a new region (11p14) to eczema and allergic diseases Guilloud-Bataille Michel 1 2  

E-print Network

Evidence for linkage of a new region (11p14) to eczema and allergic diseases Guilloud genetic effects as well as on specific genetic factors. After a previous genome-wide linkage screen by` ' linkage analyses using the Maximum Likelihood Binomial (MLB) method. A fine mapping was carried

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

282

Incidence and characterisation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from nasal colonisation in participants attending a cattle veterinary conference in the UK.  

PubMed

We sought to determine the prevalence of nasal colonisation with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among cattle veterinarians in the UK. There was particular interest in examining the frequency of colonisation with MRSA harbouring mecC, as strains with this mecA homologue were originally identified in bovine milk and may represent a zoonotic risk to those in contact with dairy livestock. Three hundred and seven delegates at the British Cattle Veterinarian Association (BCVA) Congress 2011 in Southport, UK were screening for nasal colonisation with MRSA. Isolates were characterised by whole genome sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Eight out of three hundred and seven delegates (2.6%) were positive for nasal colonisation with MRSA. All strains were positive for mecA and none possessed mecC. The time since a delegate's last visit to a farm was significantly shorter in the MRSA-positive group than in MRSA-negative counterparts. BCVA delegates have an increased risk of MRSA colonisation compared to the general population but their frequency of colonisation is lower than that reported from other types of veterinarian conference, and from that seen in human healthcare workers. The results indicate that recent visitation to a farm is a risk factor for MRSA colonisation and that mecC-MRSA are rare among BCVA delegates (<1% based on sample size). Contact with livestock, including dairy cattle, may still be a risk factor for human colonisation with mecC-MRSA but occurs at a rate below the lower limit of detection available in this study. PMID:23869220

Paterson, Gavin K; Harrison, Ewan M; Craven, Emily F; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders Rhod; Ellington, Matthew J; Török, M Estée; Peacock, Sharon J; Parkhill, Julian; Zadoks, Ruth N; Holmes, Mark A

2013-01-01

283

Incidence and Characterisation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Nasal Colonisation in Participants Attending a Cattle Veterinary Conference in the UK  

PubMed Central

We sought to determine the prevalence of nasal colonisation with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among cattle veterinarians in the UK. There was particular interest in examining the frequency of colonisation with MRSA harbouring mecC, as strains with this mecA homologue were originally identified in bovine milk and may represent a zoonotic risk to those in contact with dairy livestock. Three hundred and seven delegates at the British Cattle Veterinarian Association (BCVA) Congress 2011 in Southport, UK were screening for nasal colonisation with MRSA. Isolates were characterised by whole genome sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Eight out of three hundred and seven delegates (2.6%) were positive for nasal colonisation with MRSA. All strains were positive for mecA and none possessed mecC. The time since a delegate’s last visit to a farm was significantly shorter in the MRSA-positive group than in MRSA-negative counterparts. BCVA delegates have an increased risk of MRSA colonisation compared to the general population but their frequency of colonisation is lower than that reported from other types of veterinarian conference, and from that seen in human healthcare workers. The results indicate that recent visitation to a farm is a risk factor for MRSA colonisation and that mecC-MRSA are rare among BCVA delegates (<1% based on sample size). Contact with livestock, including dairy cattle, may still be a risk factor for human colonisation with mecC-MRSA but occurs at a rate below the lower limit of detection available in this study. PMID:23869220

Paterson, Gavin K.; Harrison, Ewan M.; Craven, Emily F.; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders Rhod; Ellington, Matthew J.; Torok, M. Estee; Peacock, Sharon J.; Parkhill, Julian; Zadoks, Ruth N.; Holmes, Mark A.

2013-01-01

284

Investigating International Time Trends in the Incidence and Prevalence of Atopic Eczema 1990-2010: A Systematic Review of Epidemiological Studies  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of atopic eczema has been found to have increased greatly in some parts of the world. Building on a systematic review of global disease trends in asthma, our objective was to study trends in incidence and prevalence of atopic eczema. Disease trends are important for health service planning and for generating hypotheses regarding the aetiology of chronic disorders. We conducted a systematic search for high quality reports of cohort, repeated cross-sectional and routine healthcare database-based studies in seven electronic databases. Studies were required to report on at least two measures of the incidence and/or prevalence of atopic eczema between 1990 and 2010 and needed to use comparable methods at all assessment points. We retrieved 2,464 citations, from which we included 69 reports. Assessing global trends was complicated by the use of a range of outcome measures across studies and possible changes in diagnostic criteria over time. Notwithstanding these difficulties, there was evidence suggesting that the prevalence of atopic eczema was increasing in Africa, eastern Asia, western Europe and parts of northern Europe (i.e. the UK). No clear trends were identified in other regions. There was inadequate study coverage worldwide, particularly for repeated measures of atopic eczema incidence. Further epidemiological work is needed to investigate trends in what is now one of the most common long-term disorders globally. A range of relevant measures of incidence and prevalence, careful use of definitions and description of diagnostic criteria, improved study design, more comprehensive reporting and appropriate interpretation of these data are all essential to ensure that this important field of epidemiological enquiry progresses in a scientifically robust manner. PMID:22808063

Deckers, Ivette A. G.; McLean, Susannah; Linssen, Sanne; Mommers, Monique; van Schayck, C. P.; Sheikh, Aziz

2012-01-01

285

Impact of Anthelminthic Treatment in Pregnancy and Childhood on Immunisations, Infections and Eczema in Childhood: A Randomised Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Helminth infections may modulate immune responses to unrelated pathogens and allergens; these effects may commence prenatally. We addressed the hypothesis that anthelminthic treatment in pregnancy and early childhood would improve responses to immunisation and modulate disease incidence in early childhood with both beneficial and detrimental effects. Methods and Findings A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Entebbe, Uganda [ISRCTN32849447]. In three independent randomisations, 2507 pregnant women were allocated to receive single-dose albendazole or placebo, and praziquantel or placebo; 2016 of their offspring were randomised to receive quarterly single-dose albendazole or placebo from age 15 months to 5 years. Primary outcomes were post-immunisation recall responses to BCG and tetanus antigens, and incidence of malaria, diarrhoea, and pneumonia; incidence of eczema was an important secondary outcome. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Of 2345 live births, 1622 (69%) children remained in follow-up at age 5 years. 68% of mothers at enrolment, and 11% of five-year-olds, had helminth infections. Maternal hookworm and Schistosoma mansoni were effectively treated by albendazole and praziquantel, respectively; and childhood hookworm and Ascaris by quarterly albendazole. Incidence rates of malaria, diarrhoea, pneumonia, and eczema were 34, 65, 10 and 5 per 100 py, respectively. Albendazole during pregnancy caused an increased rate of eczema in the children (HR 1.58 (95% CI 1.15–2.17), p?=?0.005). Quarterly albendazole during childhood was associated with reduced incidence of clinical malaria (HR 0.85 (95% CI 0.73–0.98), p?=?0.03). There were no consistent effects of the interventions on any other outcome. Conclusions Routine use of albendazole in pregnancy may not always be beneficial, even in tropical developing countries. By contrast, regular albendazole treatment in preschool children may have an additional benefit for malaria control where helminths and malaria are co-endemic. Given the low helminth prevalence in our children, the effect of albendazole on malaria is likely to be direct. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN32849447 PMID:23236367

Mawa, Patrice A.; Nampijja, Margaret; Muhangi, Lawrence; Kihembo, Macklyn; Lule, Swaib A.; Rutebarika, Diana; Apule, Barbara; Akello, Florence; Akurut, Hellen; Oduru, Gloria; Naniima, Peter; Kizito, Dennison; Kizza, Moses; Kizindo, Robert; Tweyongere, Robert; Alcock, Katherine J.; Muwanga, Moses; Elliott, Alison M.

2012-01-01

286

Fusidic acid-betamethasone combination in infected eczema: an open, randomized comparison with gentamicin-betamethasone combination.  

PubMed

Ninety-nine patients with secondarily infected eczema were allocated at random to receive 10-days' treatment with either 2% fusidic acid plus 0.1% betamethasone cream or 0.1% gentamicin plus 0.1% betamethasone cream. Both preparations were applied to the lesions twice daily and assessment of the signs and symptoms was carried out before, after 2 to 4 days, and after 7 to 12 days of treatment, severity being rated on a 4-point scale. Bacteriological tests were carried out before and after treatment. The results showed that the combination with fusidic acid was marginally superior in clinical effect. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated pathogen from eczematous lesions (86%) and fusidic acid showed the lowest resistance rate (9%), followed by gentamicin (21%). Chloramphenicol, neomycin and tetracycline showed resistance rates from 48% to 59%. PMID:3763654

Strategos, J

1986-01-01

287

Isojacareubin from the Chinese Herb Hypericum japonicum: Potent Antibacterial and Synergistic Effects on Clinical Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

PubMed Central

Through bioassay-guided fractionation of the extracts from the aerial parts of the Chinese herb Hypericum japonicum Thunb. Murray, Isojacareubin (ISJ) was characterized as a potent antibacterial compound against the clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The broth microdilution assay was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of ISJ alone. The results showed that its MICs/MBCs ranged from 4/16 to 16/64 ?g/mL, with the concentrations required to inhibit or kill 50% of the strains (MIC50/MBC50) at 8/16 ?g/mL. Synergistic evaluations of this compound with four conventional antibacterial agents representing different types were performed by the chequerboard and time-kill tests. The chequerboard method showed significant synergy effects when ISJ was combined with Ceftazidime (CAZ), Levofloxacin (LEV) and Ampicillin (AMP), with the values of 50% of the fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI50) at 0.25, 0.37 and 0.37, respectively. Combined bactericidal activities were also observed in the time-kill dynamic assay. The results showed the ability of ISJ to reduce MRSA viable counts by log10CFU/mL at 24 h of incubation at a concentration of 1 × MIC were 1.5 (LEV, additivity), 0.92 (CAZ, indifference) and 0.82 (AMP, indifference), respectively. These in vitro anti-MRSA activities of ISJ alone and its synergy with conventional antibacterial agents demonstrated that ISJ enhanced their efficacy, which is of potential use for single and combinatory therapy of patients infected with MRSA. PMID:22942699

Zuo, Guo-Ying; An, Jing; Han, Jun; Zhang, Yun-Ling; Wang, Gen-Chun; Hao, Xiao-Yan; Bian, Zhong-Qi

2012-01-01

288

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated at Fukuoka University Hospital and hospitals and clinics in the Fukuoka city area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacteriological and epidemiological studies were carried out on 106 isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated at our hospital (56 isolates) and from 15 other hospitals and clinics (50 isolates) in the Fukuoka city area. Strains were studied regarding coagulase-type, ?-lactamase production, and antimicrobial susceptibility; genotype studies used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with cluster analysis. The majority of isolates produced

Seiji Takeda; Kakuko Yasunaka; Kenji Kono; Kikuo Arakawa

2000-01-01

289

Large screening of CA-MRSA among Staphylococcus aureus colonizing healthy young children living in two areas (urban and rural) of Portugal  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The incidence of pediatric infections due to community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), including children with no identifiable risk factors, has increased worldwide in the last decade. This suggests that healthy children may constitute a reservoir of MRSA in the community. In this study, nested within a larger one on nasopharyngeal ecology, we aimed to: (i) evaluate the prevalence of

Débora A Tavares; Raquel Sá-Leão; Maria Miragaia; Hermínia de Lencastre

2010-01-01

290

Pumilicin 4, A Novel Bacteriocin with Anti-MRSA and Anti-VRE Activity Produced by Newly Isolated Bacteria Bacillus pumilus Strain WAPB4  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 34 bacterial strains with anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) activity were isolated from 69 soil and water samples collected from four areas of Thailand. One strain, WAPB4 identified\\u000a as Bacillus pumilus, showed remarkable antibacterial activity against MRSA, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), and several Gram-positive test bacteria. Bacteriocin produced by WAPB4 was designated as pumilicin 4. It was heat

Ratchaneewan Aunpad; Keasara Na-Bangchang

2007-01-01

291

Prevalence and clonality of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the Atlantic Azores islands: predominance of SCC mec types IV, V and VI  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to obtain insights into the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) population structure in the Azores archipelago, 106 MRSA isolates were collected from patients attending an Azorean\\u000a central hospital between January 2007 and February 2008. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for all isolates. Molecular\\u000a typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal chromosome cassette

T. Conceição; A. Tavares; M. Miragaia; K. Hyde; M. Aires-de-Sousa; H. de Lencastre

2010-01-01

292

Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among veterinary students and personnel at a veterinary hospital in Malaysia.  

PubMed

In this study, we report the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among veterinary students and personnel in Malaysia. Nasal and oral swabs were collected from 103 veterinary medicine students and 28 personnel from a veterinary hospital. Antibiotic sensitivity test (AST), minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test, and PCR amplifications of nucA and mecA gene were performed. Molecular characterization of the isolates was conducted using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results from MLST show the presence of the pandemic and widespread MRSA clones, ST5 and ST59. Spa gene typing revealed spa type t267 which has a wide geographical distribution. A new spa type, t5697 was found in this study. Fingerprint analysis by using PFGE show heterogeneity of the isolates. These findings affirm the importance of MRSA in veterinary settings and underscore the need for further extensive research to devise contextual control and prevention strategies. PMID:23523336

Aklilu, E; Zunita, Z; Hassan, L; Cheng, Chen Hui

2013-06-28

293

Student Self-Screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Nasal Colonization in Hand Hygiene Education  

PubMed Central

Objective. To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of adding a hand hygiene exercise in self-screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization to a health care delivery course for first-year pharmacy (P1) students. Design. About one month after students were trained in hand hygiene technique and indications, faculty members demonstrated how to self-screen for MRSA nasal colonization. Students were then asked to screen themselves during the required class time. Aggregated class results were shared and compared to prevalence estimates for the general population and health care providers. Assessment. The 71 students present in class on the day of the self-screening exercise chose to participate. A survey comparing presecreening and postscreening responses indicated incremental improvements in student knowledge and awareness of health care associated infections and motivation to perform hand hygiene. On the written exam, student performance demonstrated improved knowledge compared to previous class years. Conclusion. Self-screening for MRSA nasal colonization in a health care delivery course for P1 students increased students’ motivation to perform hand hygiene techniques and follow indications promulgated by the World Health Organization.

Lum, Tia; Picardo, Kristin; Westbay, Theresa; Barnello, Amber; Fine, Lynn

2014-01-01

294

Student self-screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization in hand hygiene education.  

PubMed

Objective. To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of adding a hand hygiene exercise in self-screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization to a health care delivery course for first-year pharmacy (P1) students. Design. About one month after students were trained in hand hygiene technique and indications, faculty members demonstrated how to self-screen for MRSA nasal colonization. Students were then asked to screen themselves during the required class time. Aggregated class results were shared and compared to prevalence estimates for the general population and health care providers. Assessment. The 71 students present in class on the day of the self-screening exercise chose to participate. A survey comparing presecreening and postscreening responses indicated incremental improvements in student knowledge and awareness of health care associated infections and motivation to perform hand hygiene. On the written exam, student performance demonstrated improved knowledge compared to previous class years. Conclusion. Self-screening for MRSA nasal colonization in a health care delivery course for P1 students increased students' motivation to perform hand hygiene techniques and follow indications promulgated by the World Health Organization. PMID:25258443

Lum, Tia; Picardo, Kristin; Westbay, Theresa; Barnello, Amber; Fine, Lynn; Lavigne, Jill

2014-09-15

295

Noninvasive In Vivo Imaging to Evaluate Immune Responses and Antimicrobial Therapy against Staphylococcus aureus and USA300 MRSA Skin Infections  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus aureus skin infections represent a significant public health threat because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As greater understanding of protective immune responses and more effective antimicrobial therapies are needed, a S. aureus skin wound infection model was developed in which full-thickness scalpel cuts on the backs of mice were infected with a bioluminescent S. aureus (methicillin sensitive) or USA300 community-acquired MRSA strain and in vivo imaging was used to noninvasively monitor the bacterial burden. In addition, the infection-induced inflammatory response was quantified using in vivo fluorescence imaging of LysEGFP mice. Using this model, we found that both IL-1? and IL-1? contributed to host defense during a wound infection, whereas IL-1? was more critical during an intradermal S. aureus infection. Furthermore, treatment of a USA300 MRSA skin infection with retapamulin ointment resulted in up to 85-fold reduction in bacterial burden and a 53% decrease in infection-induced inflammation. In contrast, mupirocin ointment had minimal clinical activity against this USA300 strain, resulting in only a 2-fold reduction in bacterial burden. Taken together, this S. aureus wound infection model provides a valuable preclinical screening method to investigate cutaneous immune responses and the efficacy of topical antimicrobial therapies. PMID:21191403

Cho, John S.; Zussman, Jamie; Donegan, Niles P.; Irene Ramos, Romela; Garcia, Nairy C.; Uslan, Daniel Z.; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Simon, Scott I.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Modlin, Robert L.; Kim, Jenny; Miller, Lloyd S.

2011-01-01

296

Combinatorial synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a biaryl hydroxyketone library as antivirulence agents against MRSA.  

PubMed

Antibiotic resistance coupled with decreased development of new antibiotics necessitates the search for novel antibacterial agents. Antivirulence agents offer an alternative to conventional antibiotics. In this work, we report on a family of small-molecule antivirulence agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the most widespread bacterial pathogen. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the development of a concise synthesis of a 148-member biarylhydroxyketone library. An acylation bond-forming process afforded resorcinols (1) and aryloxy acetonitriles (2) as synthons. A Lewis-acid-activated Friedel-Crafts' acylation step involving a nitrile functionality of 2 by ZnCl2, followed by nucleophilic attack by 1 was executed to obtain biaryl hydroxyketones in excellent yields. A large number of products crystallized. This strategy affords a range of biarylhydroxyketones in a single step. This is the first collective synthetic study documenting access to this class of compounds through a single synthetic operation. In vitro efficacy of compounds in this library was evaluated by a rabbit erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The most efficacious compound, 4f-12, inhibits hemolysis by 98.1 ± 0.1% compared to control in the absence of the compound. PMID:24372007

Yu, Guanping; Kuo, David; Shoham, Menachem; Viswanathan, Rajesh

2014-02-10

297

Antimicrobial Activity of Isothiocyanates from Cruciferous Plants against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  

PubMed

Purified isothiocyanates from cruciferous plants (Brassicacea, Syn. Cruciferae) plants were evaluated against 15 isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolated from diabetic foot-ulcer patients aiming the study of the potential usage of allyl-isothiocyanate, benzyl-isothiocyanate and 2-phenylethyl-isothiocyanate against this important bacteria. Disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods were used to access the antimicrobial activity. The index (Ia) and rate (Ra) of the antibacterial activity for each compound were calculated. The results showed a highly dose-dependent compound and chemical structure antibacterial effectiveness. The results showed a strong relation between the chemical structure of isothiocyanates and its antibacterial effectiveness. The benzyl-isothiocyanate was the most effective with a minimum inhibitory concentration varying between 2.9 and 110 µg·mL-1 with an antibacterial activity rate up to 87%. Moreover, their antibacterial activity was mainly bactericidal. This study provides scientific evidence that isothiocyanates have an interesting biological value and must be considered as an important tool to be used against MRSA. PMID:25353177

Dias, Carla; Aires, Alfredo; Saavedra, Maria José

2014-01-01

298

Identifying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lung infections in mice via breath analysis using secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS).  

PubMed

Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a serious health threat, causing an estimated 11,000?deaths?per year in the United States. MRSA pneumonias account for 16% of invasive infections, and can be difficult to detect as the current state-of-the-art diagnostics require that bacterial DNA is recovered from the infection site. Because 60% of patients with invasive infections die within 7?d of culturing positive for MRSA, earlier detection of the pathogen may significantly reduce mortality. We aim to develop breath-based diagnostics that can detect Staphylococcal lung infections rapidly and non-invasively, and discriminate MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), in situ. Using a murine lung infection model, we have demonstrated that secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) breathprinting can be used to robustly identify isogenic strains of MRSA and MSSA in the lung 24?h after bacterial inoculation. Principal components analysis (PCA) separates MRSA and MSSA breathprints using only the first component (p < 0.001). The predominant separation in the PCA is driven by shared peaks, low-abundance peaks, and rare peaks, supporting the use of biomarker panels to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of breath-based diagnostics. PMID:25307159

Bean, Heather D; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Sengle, Jackson C; Hill, Jane E

2014-12-01

299

Exposure of Clinical MRSA Heterogeneous Strains to ?-Lactams Redirects Metabolism to Optimize Energy Production through the TCA Cycle  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as one of the most important pathogens both in health care and community-onset infections. The prerequisite for methicillin resistance is mecA, which encodes a ?-lactam-insensitive penicillin binding protein PBP2a. A characteristic of MRSA strains from hospital and community associated infections is their heterogeneous expression of resistance to ?-lactam (HeR) in which only a small portion (?0.1%) of the population expresses resistance to oxacillin (OXA) ?10 µg/ml, while in other isolates, most of the population expresses resistance to a high level (homotypic resistance, HoR). The mechanism associated with heterogeneous expression requires both increase expression of mecA and a mutational event that involved the triggering of a ?-lactam-mediated SOS response and related lexA and recA genes. In the present study we investigated the cellular physiology of HeR-MRSA strains during the process of ?-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection at sub-inhibitory concentrations by using a combinatorial approach of microarray analyses and global biochemical profiling employing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to investigate changes in metabolic pathways and the metabolome associated with ?-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection in clinically relevant heterogeneous MRSA. We found unique features present in the oxacillin-selected SA13011-HoR derivative when compared to the corresponding SA13011-HeR parental strain that included significant increases in tricarboxyl citric acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and a concomitant decrease in fermentative pathways. Inactivation of the TCA cycle enzyme cis-aconitase gene in the SA13011-HeR strain abolished ?-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection demonstrating the significance of altered TCA cycle activity during the HeR/HoR selection. These results provide evidence of both the metabolic cost and the adaptation that HeR-MRSA clinical strains undergo when exposed to ?-lactam pressure, indicating that the energy production is redirected to supply the cell wall synthesis/metabolism, which in turn contributes to the survival response in the presence of ?-lactam antibiotics. PMID:23940684

Keaton, Mignon A.; Rosato, Roberto R.; Plata, Konrad B.; Singh, Christopher R.; Rosato, Adriana E.

2013-01-01

300

Hospital-wide infection control practice and Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit (ICU): an observational study  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives To estimate trends in infection/colonisation with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an intensive care unit (ICU). Design Observational study of results of ICU admission and weekly screens for MRSA. Setting and Participants All ICU admissions in 2001–2012. Interventions ICU admissions were screened for MRSA throughout. In late 2006, screening was extended to the whole hospital and extra measures taken in ICU. Main outcome measures Prevalence of MRSA in ICU admissions and number acquiring MRSA therein. Results In all, 366 of 6565 admissions to ICU were MRSA positive, including 270 of 4466 coming from within the hospital in which prevalence increased with time prior to transfer to ICU. Prevalence in this group was 9.4% (8.2–10.6) in 2001–2006, decreasing to 3.4% (2.3–4.5) in 2007–2009 and 1.3% (0.6–2.0) in 2010–2012, p?5 days on wards before ICU admission: 18.9% (15.6–22.2) in 2001–2006, 7.1% (4.0–10.2) in 2007–2009 and 1.6% (0.1–3.1) in 2010–2012, p?MRSA within ICU, the relative risk being greater when known positives present: 4.34 (3.98–4.70), p?MRSA bacteraemias, 38 were in 2001–2006. The risk of bacteraemia in those acquiring MRSA decreased from 25% (18.1–31.9) in 2001–2006 to 6.1% (0–12.8) thereafter, p?=?0.022. Conclusions Following better hospital-wide infection control, fewer MRSA-positive patients were admitted to ICU with a parallel decrease in acquisition therein. Better practice there reduced the risk of bacteraemia. PMID:25383196

Workman, Rella

2014-01-01

301

The increase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the presence of an unusual sequence type ST49 in slaughter pigs in Switzerland  

PubMed Central

Background In years past, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has been frequently detected in pigs in Europe, North America and Asia. Recent, yet sporadic studies have revealed a low occurrence of MRSA in Switzerland. In 2009, a monitoring survey of the prevalence and genetic diversity of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in slaughter pigs in Switzerland was conducted using methods recommended by the EU guidelines, and using a sampling strategy evenly distributed throughout the year and representative of the Swiss slaughter pig population. Monitoring should determine if the overall prevalence of MRSA in the entire country is increasing over the years and if specific multi-resistant MRSA clones are spreading over the country. Results In 2009, the nasal cavities of eight out of 405 randomly selected pigs were positive for MRSA, representing a prevalence of 2.0% (95% CI 0.9-3.9). The following year, 23 out of 392 pigs were positive for MRSA [5.9% prevalence (95% CI 3.8-8.7)]. Three multilocus sequence types (ST), four spa types and two types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements were detected. The most frequent genotypes were ST398 (MLST)-(spa)t034-V(SCCmec) (n = 18) and ST49-t208-V (n = 7), followed by ST398-t011-V (n = 4), ST398-t1451-V (n = 1), and ST1-t2279-IVc (n = 1). The isolates displayed resistance to ß-lactams [mecA, (31/31); blaZ, (19/31)]; tetracycline [tet(M), (31/31); tet(K), (30/31)] (n = 31); macrolides and lincosamides [erm(C) (4/31) or erm(A) (18/31)] (n = 22); tiamulin [vga(A)v (9/31) or unknown mechanism (18/31)] (n = 27); trimethoprim [dfr(G) (18/31); spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia (19/31) or unknown mechanism (3/31)] (n = 22); streptomycin [str (19/31)]; sulphamethoxazole (7/31) and ciprofloxacin (n = 1) (mechanisms not determined). Conclusions This study is the first to describe the presence of MRSA ST49 in slaughter pigs, and to demonstrate a significant and nearly three-fold increase of MRSA prevalence in pigs within two years. The presence of a specific clonal lineage of MRSA from Switzerland suggests that it has been selected in Swiss pig husbandry. Effective hygiene measures should be enhanced within the entire pig production chain to suppress the spread of these pathogens into the community. PMID:21702906

2011-01-01

302

Severe eczema and Hyper-IgE in Loeys-Dietz-syndrome - contribution to new findings of immune dysregulation in connective tissue disorders.  

PubMed

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a connective tissue disorder caused by monoallelic mutations in TGFBR1 and TGFBR2, which encode for subunits of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF?) receptor. Affected patients are identified by vascular aneurysms with tortuosity and distinct morphological presentations similar to Marfan syndrome; however, an additional predisposition towards asthma and allergy has recently been found. We describe two patients with a novel missense mutation in TGFBR1 presenting with highly elevated levels of IgE and severe eczema similar to autosomal-dominant Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES). Mild allergic manifestations with normal up to moderately increased IgE were observed in 3 out of 6 additional LDS patients. A comparison of this cohort with 4 HIES patients illustrates the significant overlap of both syndromes including eczema and elevated IgE as well as skeletal and connective tissue manifestations. PMID:24333532

Felgentreff, Kerstin; Siepe, Matthias; Kotthoff, Stefan; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Schachtrup, Kristina; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Walter, Jolan E; Ehl, Stephan

2014-01-01

303

Barrier repair therapy for facial atopic eczema with a non-steroidal emollient cream containing rhamnosoft, ceramides and iso-leucine. A six-case report series.  

PubMed

Atopic eczema (AE) is a skin disease very common in paediatric population and face region is commonly involved. AE of the face represents a therapeutic challenge limiting the use, especially for long periods, of corticosteroid topical products due to the high risk of atrophic skin changes. Skin barrier alterations and reduction of innate immune mechanisms (reduced levels of anti-microbial peptides) are now considered the hallmarks of AE. Therefore emollient and barrier repair therapies with topical steroid-free substances could be an alternative or an adjuvant strategy in managing AE especially for the face. A non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory moisturizing cream with barrier repair actions, containing rhamnosoft, ceramides and L-isoleucine (ILE) (Nutratopic pro-AMP) has been recently developed for the specific treatment of AE of the face. We report a series of 6 pediatric cases (2 female and 4 male, age from 6 months to 4 years) with facial eczema in children treated with pro-AMP cream for two/four weeks as single treatment, applied twice daily in the affected area with photograph documentation (baseline and after treatment). Pictures of the skin lesions at baseline and after treatment were taken in all cases using a high-definition digital camera. Pro-AMP cream use was associated with a clinical relevant improvement of all signs of eczema. The product was well tolerated. This case series document the clinical efficacy of a barrier repair therapy cream containing rhamnosoft, ceramides and iso-leucine in the treatment of atopic eczema of the face. PMID:25198568

Puviani, M; Agostinis, F; Milani, M

2014-08-01

304

Association of attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder and atopic eczema modified by sleep disturbance in a large population-based sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundA cross-sectional study was performed in a population-based German sample (n=13 318 children and adolescents aged 3–17) to replicate the recently reported independent association of atopic eczema (AE) and attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to further investigate the role of environmental and behavioural factors.MethodsThe odds ratio (OR) was calculated with allergic comorbidity and various environmental factors considered as confounders and sleeping

Marcel Romanos; Manfred Gerlach; Andreas Warnke; Jochen Schmitt

2009-01-01

305

Transcriptional gene silencing of kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 7 using siRNA prevents epithelial cell detachment induced by alkaline shock in an in vitro model of eczema.  

PubMed

Eczema is widely considered to be an exacerbation of alkaline stress to the skin. Epidermal barrier dysfunction is a feature of eczema pathology, which predisposes affected individuals to distressing morbid symptoms. At least two serine proteases, stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme (kallikrein 7 [KLK7]) and stratum corneum tryptic enzyme (kallikrien 5 [KLK5]), have increased activity levels in eczematous lesions and both have been implicated in the destruction of corneodesomosomes, which are crucial to epidermal integrity. The present in vitro study investigated whether transcriptional gene silencing after siRNA transfection could influence the activity of these signature enzymes in an in vitro model of eczema induced by alkaline shock. HaCaT epithelial cells were subjected to alkaline stress by the addition of 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl guanidine "superbase" (TMG) to the culture media. The culture media were subsequently tested for chymotryspin, trypsin, plasmin, and urokinase activity using colorimetric peptide assays and for reactive oxygen species using WST1 cell viability reagent. Cells that had been transfected with small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) against KLK5 and KLK7 for 24 h before alkaline shock did not exhibit the increase in serine protease levels observed in untreated controls. Moreover, an endpoint MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) confirmed that detachment of cells from the culture substrate observed in alkaline-stressed cells did not occur in siRNA-treated cells. This in vitro study has established the proof-of-principle that siRNA therapy appears to mitigate the consequences of alkaline shock to the serine protease-associated fragility of epithelial cells that is characteristic of eczema. PMID:22095688

Britland, Stephen; Hoyle, Milli

2012-01-01

306

High-Dose Ultraviolet A1 (UVA1), but Not UVA\\/UVB Therapy, Decreases IgE-Binding Cells in Lesional Skin of Patients with Atopic Eczema  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to further elucidate the mechanisms by which high-dose ultraviolet A1 (UVA1) therapy leads to improvement in patients with atopic eczema, we assessed skin sections from patients before and after high-dose UVA1 therapy (n = 5) or conventional UVA\\/UVB therapy (n = 4) for changes in Langerhans cells and mast cells expressing the high-affinity IgE receptor Fc?RI and in

Jürgen Grabbe; Pia Welker; Stefanie Humke; Markus Grewe; Erwin Schöpf; Beate M. Henz; Jean Krutmann

1996-01-01

307

Comparative Effectiveness of Homoeopathic vs. Conventional Therapy in Usual Care of Atopic Eczema in Children: Long-Term Medical and Economic Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background One in five children visiting a homeopathic physician suffers from atopic eczema. Objectives We aimed to examine the long-term effectiveness, safety and costs of homoeopathic vs. conventional treatment in usual medical care of children with atopic eczema. Methods In this prospective multi-centre comparative observational non-randomized rater-blinded study, 135 children (48 homoeopathy, 87 conventional) with mild to moderate atopic eczema were included by their respective physicians. Depending on the specialisation of the physician, the primary treatment was either standard conventional treatment or individualized homeopathy as delivered in routine medical care. The main outcome was the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) at 36 months by a blinded rater. Further outcomes included quality of life, conventional medicine consumption, safety and disease related costs at six, 12 and 36 months after baseline. A multilevel ANCOVA was used, with physician as random effect and the following fixed effects: age, gender, baseline value, severity score, social class and parents’ expectation. Results The adjusted mean SCORAD showed no significant differences between the groups at 36 months (13.7 95% CI [7.9–19.5] vs. 14.9 [10.4–19.4], p?=?0.741). The SCORAD response rates at 36 months were similar in both groups (33% response: homoeopathic 63.9% vs. conventional 64.5%, p?=?0.94; 50% response: 52.0% vs. 52.3%, p?=?0.974). Total costs were higher in the homoeopathic versus the conventional group (months 31–36 200.54 Euro [132.33–268.76] vs. 68.86 Euro [9.13–128.58], p?=?0.005). Conclusions Taking patient preferences into account, while being unable to rule out residual confounding, in this long-term observational study, the effects of homoeopathic treatment were not superior to conventional treatment for children with mild to moderate atopic eczema, but involved higher costs. PMID:23383019

Roll, Stephanie; Reinhold, Thomas; Pach, Daniel; Brinkhaus, Benno; Icke, Katja; Staab, Doris; Jackel, Tanja; Wegscheider, Karl; Willich, Stefan N.; Witt, Claudia M.

2013-01-01

308

High Incidence of Oxacillin-Susceptible mecA-Positive Staphylococcus aureus (OS-MRSA) Associated with Bovine Mastitis in China  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus aureus is a main cause of bovine mastitis and a major pathogen affecting human health. The emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a significant concern for both animal health and public health. This study investigated the incidence of MRSA in milk samples collected from dairy cows with clinical mastitis and characterized the MRSA isolates using antimicrobial susceptibility tests and genetic typing methods. In total, 103 S. aureus isolates were obtained from dairy farms in 4 different provinces in China, including Gansu, Shanghai, Sichuan, and Guizhou. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of these isolates revealed that the resistance rates to penicillin and sulfamethoxazole were high, while the resistance rates to ciprofloxacin and vancomycin were low. Among the 103 isolates, 49 (47.6%) were found to be mecA-positive, indicating the high incidence of MRSA. However, 37 of the 49 mecA-positive isolates were susceptible to oxacillin as determined by antimicrobial susceptibility assays and were thus classified as oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive S. aureus (OS-MRSA). These isolates could be misclassified as methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) if genetic detection of mecA was not performed. Molecular characterization of selected mecA-positive isolates showed that they were all negative with Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), but belonged to different spa types and SCCmec types. These results indicate that OS-MRSA is common in bovine mastitis in China and underscore the need for genetic methods (in addition to phenotypic tests) to accurately identify MRSA. PMID:24523877

Pu, WanXia; Su, Yang; Li, JianXi; Li, ChunHui; Yang, ZhiQiang; Deng, HaiPing; Ni, ChunXia

2014-01-01

309

Assessment of the efficacy of polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) against the infectivity of clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro and in vivo.  

PubMed

The response to treatment of severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections with the traditional antibiotics is sometimes unsatisfactory and multiple antibiotic resistance is common. Adjuvant therapy such as intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) could possibly be helpful in the treatment of such infections. The effect of IVIG on the capacity of human neutrophils to phagocytose and kill MRSA was investigated in vitro using the MTT assay and measuring the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). The efficiency of IVIG in neutralizing ?-hemolysin and coagulase of MRSA was also assessed. The capability of IVIG in the treatment and prevention of MRSA infections was also evaluated in a murine peritonitis model. IVIG significantly enhanced (p?MRSA by neutrophils at all concentrations tested (0.1-5 mg/ml) by 30-80 % of control values. It significantly (p?MRSA 10-fold and its coagulation capabilities by 50 %. When tested in vivo, groups receiving IVIG via tail vein infusion showed no significant improvement in their survival. Only when delivered to the same site of infection did IVIG show an improvement in the survival of mice (n?=?80). These results could pave the way for a better understanding of the mechanism of action of IVIG and suggest its clinical potential as an adjuvant preventive and therapeutic agent against life-threatening infections caused by MRSA and other bacteria. PMID:23532569

Farag, N; Mahran, L; Abou-Aisha, K; El-Azizi, M

2013-09-01

310

Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Luanda, Angola: First Description of the Spread of the MRSA ST5-IVa Clone in the African Continent.  

PubMed

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major human pathogen worldwide, and although surveillance studies are available in the most developed countries, data from Angola are inexistent. In June 2012, 295 inpatients and 199 healthcare workers from three hospitals in Luanda, Angola were nasal swabbed for S. aureus and MRSA carriage. A total of 117 individuals (23.7%) were S. aureus nasal carriers, out of which 68 (58.1%) were colonized with MRSA. The majority of the MRSA isolates (74%) belonged to a single clonal lineage, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) A-ST5-IVa associated with three spa types (spa types t105/t311/t11657), followed by PFGE C-ST88-IVa (spa types t186/t325/t786/t1951/t3869) (n=9; 12%); the other 11 MRSA isolates were representatives of 4 additional lineages. Almost half (49%) of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates belonged to three major clones: PFGE B-ST508 (spa types t050/t861/t1346/t1574/t2626/t12218), PFGE D-ST45 (spa types t939/t11656), and PFGE E-ST30 (spa types t1202/t9118). MSSA isolates presented a high variability of virulence factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidine (7.9%). MRSA carriage in Luanda is considerably high, and the major clone corresponds to a worldwide epidemic lineage, so far scarcely reported in Africa. Additional infection control measures in this metropolis are mandatory for a global MRSA control. PMID:24694289

Conceição, Teresa; Coelho, Céline; Santos-Silva, Isabel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

2014-10-01

311

Differences in Epidemiological and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in Children from a University Hospital and Day Care Centers  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been demonstrated in hospital settings; however, studies in the community have shown contrasting results regarding the relevance of colonization in infection by community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Colombia there are few studies on S. aureus colonization. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of nasal colonization by S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in children from a university hospital and day care centers (DCCs) of Medellin, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 400 children (200 in each setting), aged 0 months to 5 years, during 2011. Samples were collected from each nostril and epidemiological information was obtained from the parents. Genotypic analysis included spa typing, PFGE, MLST, SCCmec typing, detection of genes for virulence factors and agr groups. Results Frequency of S. aureus colonization was 39.8% (n?=?159) (hospital 44.5% and DCCs 35.0%) and by MRSA, 5.3% (n?=?21) (hospital 7.0% and DCCs 3.5%). Most S. aureus colonized children were older than two years (p?=?0.005), the majority of them boys (59.1%), shared a bedroom with a large number of people (p?=?0.028), with history of ?-Lactamase inhibitors usage (p?=?0.020). MSSA strains presented the greatest genotypic diversity with 15 clonal complexes (CC). MRSA isolates presented 6 CC, most of them (47.6%) belonged to CC8-SCCmec IVc and were genetically related to previously reported infectious MRSA strains. Conclusion Differences in epidemiological and molecular characteristics between populations may be useful for the understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics and for the design of strategies to prevent S. aureus infection and dissemination. The finding of colonizing MRSA with similar molecular characteristics of those causing infection demonstrates the dissemination capacity of S. aureus and the risk of infection among the child population. PMID:24987854

Rodriguez, Erika A.; Correa, Margarita M.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Atehortua, Santiago L.; Jimenez, J. Natalia

2014-01-01

312

Evaluation of a Chromogenic Biplate Medium (ChromID MRSA/ChromID S. aureus) for the Simultaneous Detection of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Preoperative Screening Samples from the Anterior Nares  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the performance of the ChromID MRSA/ChromID S. aureus biplate for the simultaneous detection of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in preoperative screening samples. The sensitivity and specificity were 94.2% and 93.6%, respectively, for the S. aureus compartment and 92.9% and 99.7% for the MRSA compartment after 48 h incubation. PMID:24478512

Mukovnikova, Marina; Yusuf, Erlangga; Cossey, Veerle; Schuermans, Annette

2014-01-01

313

Detection and partial characterisation of two antibacterial factors from the excretions\\/secretions of the medicinal maggot Lucilia sericata and their activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maggot therapy is a simple and highly successful method for cleansing infected and necrotic wounds. The use of maggots has become increasingly important in the treatment of non-healing wounds, particularly those infected with the multidrug-resistant pathogen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The increasing challenge concerning the treatment of MRSA infections and the recent finding of vancomycin-resistant strains of MRSA have elicited the

Alyson Bexfield; Yamni Nigam; Stephen Thomas; Norman A. Ratcliffe

2004-01-01

314

Prospective Comparison of a New Chromogenic Medium, MRSASelect, to CHROMagar MRSA and Mannitol-Salt Medium Supplemented with Oxacillin or Cefoxitin for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital-acquired infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been reported worldwide. Currently, MRSA is the most common pathogen identified in U.S. hospitals (3, 4). MRSA infections are associated with considerable morbidity, attributable mortality, and attributable excess cost (5). It has been shown that, in most cases, the source of S. aureus causing bacteremia is the patient's nose, and colonization

Luba Stoakes; Romina Reyes; Janis Daniel; Gwen Lennox; Michael A. John; Robert Lannigan; Zafar Hussain

2006-01-01

315

Prospective Comparison of a New Chromogenic Medium, MRSASelect, to CHROMagar MRSA and Mannitol-Salt Medium Supplemented with Oxacillin or Cefoxitin for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital-acquired infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been reported worldwide. Currently, MRSA is the most common pathogen identified in U.S. hospitals (3, 4). MRSA infections are associated with considerable morbidity, attributable mortality, and attributable excess cost (5). It has been shown that, in most cases, the source of S. aureus causing bacteremia is the patient's nose, and colonization

Luba Stoakes; Romina Reyes; Janis Daniel; Gwen Lennox; Michael A. John; Robert Lannigan; Zafar Hussain

316

Occurrence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among clinical samples in tehran-iran and its correlation with polymorphism of specific accessory gene regulator (AGR) groups  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for an increasing number of serious hospital and community acquired infections. Virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus is orchestrated by regulators such as the accessory gene regulator (agr). Staphylococcal strains are divided into four major agr groups (agrI-IV) on the basis of agrD and agrC polymorphisms. The purpose of this study was to define the prevalence of MRSA strains in appointed Tehran's hospitals and then to define and compare the proportion of agr I, II, III, IV polymorphisms between MRSA and Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) strains. A total of 235 isolates were evaluated by conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests and PCR for agr and mecA genes. 112 strains were MRSA (47.5%) and the most prevalent agr specific group was agr I followed by agr III, agr II and agr IV, respectively. The prevalence of agr groups amongst MRSA and MSSA strains was not statistically significant (P?0.05). This study suggests that agr I is not only the most prevalent agr type in MRSAs but also the most common one in Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) strains in Iran. PMID:24031890

Azimian, Amir; Najar-pirayeh, Shahin; Mirab-Samiee, Siamak; Naderi, Mahmood

2012-01-01

317

Mechanism of Honey Bacteriostatic Action Against MRSA and VRE Involves Hydroxyl Radicals Generated from Honey's Hydrogen Peroxide  

PubMed Central

It has been recently reported that honey hydrogen peroxide in conjunction with unknown honey components produced cytotoxic effects resulting in bacterial growth inhibition and DNA degradation. The objective of this study was twofold: (a) to investigate whether the coupling chemistry involving hydrogen peroxide is responsible for a generation of hydroxyl radicals and (b) whether •OH generation affects growth of multi-drug resistant clinical isolates. The susceptibility of five different strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and four strains of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) isolates from infected wounds to several honeys was evaluated using broth microdilution assay. Isolates were identified to genus and species and their susceptibility to antibiotics was confirmed using an automated system (Vitek®, Biomérieux®). The presence of the mec(A) gene, nuc gene and van(A) and (B) genes were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that no clinical isolate was resistant to selected active honeys. The median difference in honeys MICs against these strains ranged between 12.5 and 6.25% v/v and was not different from the MIC against standard Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Generation of •OH during bacteria incubation with honeys was analyzed using 3?-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) as the •OH trap. The •OH participation in growth inhibition was monitored directly by including APF in broth microdilution assay. The growth of MRSA and VRE was inhibited by •OH generation in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure of MRSA and VRE to honeys supplemented with Cu(II) augmented production of •OH by 30-fold and increased honey bacteriostatic potency from MIC90 6.25 to MIC90< 0.78% v/v. Pretreatment of honeys with catalase prior to their supplementation with Cu ions fully restored bacterial growth indicating that hydroxyl radicals were produced from H2O2 via the Fenton-type reaction. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that bacteriostatic effect of honeys on MRSA and VRE was dose-dependently related to generation of •OH from honey H2O2. PMID:22347223

Brudzynski, Katrina; Lannigan, Robert

2012-01-01

318

[Treament using a free omental flap for pulmonary Aspergillosis with chronic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus( MRSA) empyema after fenestration].  

PubMed

A case is 48-year-old man who had a history of Blalock-Taussig shunt and the radical operation for Fallot's tetralogy, had been performed cavernostomy and fenestration operation for aspergilloma of left upper lobe in the previous hospital due to control blood spitting. Although the contents of the abscess cavity were removed, the opened cavity was again infected by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and he was referred to our hospital. The plombage of free omental flap with vascular anastomosis was performed. He has been well without any symptoms or recurrence of empyema for 6 years after surgery. PMID:23917228

Yabuki, Hiroshi; Tabata, Toshiharu; Sugawara, Takafumi; Fukaya, Ken; Fujimura, Shigefumi

2013-08-01

319

Dysidinoid A, an Unusual Meroterpenoid with Anti-MRSA Activity from the South China Sea Sponge Dysidea sp.  

PubMed

An unusual meroterpenoid, dysidinoid A (1), was isolated from the South China Sea sponge Dysidea sp. Its structure was elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods including HRESIMS and 2D NMR, and its absolute configuration was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Dysidinoid A (1) is the first meroterpenoid from Nature bearing a 9,4-friedodrime skeleton and a 2,5-dionepyrrole unit. Dysidinoid A (1) showed potent antibacterial activity against two strains of pathogenic bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with MIC90 values of 8.0 ?g/mL against both. PMID:25379641

Jiao, Wei-Hua; Li, Jing; Liu, Qian; Xu, Ting-Ting; Shi, Guo-Hua; Yu, Hao-Bing; Yang, Fan; Han, Bing-Nan; Li, Min; Lin, Hou-Wen

2014-01-01

320

Galloylated flavonol rhamnosides from the leaves of Calliandra tergemina with antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  

PubMed

Galloylated flavonol rhamnosides identified as kaempferol-3-O-(2?,3?,4?-tri-O-galloyl)-?-l-rhamnopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-(3?,4?-di-O-galloyl)-?-l-rhamnopyranoside, and quercetin-3-O-(2?,3?,4?-tri-O-galloyl)-?-l-rhamnopyranoside, together with five known galloylated and non-galloylated flavonol rhamnosides, were isolated from leaves of Calliandra tergemina (L.) Benth. Their structures were established using spectroscopic methods and their antibacterial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were evaluated by a microdilution method. PMID:25174555

Chan, Elaine Wan Ling; Gray, Alexander I; Igoli, John O; Lee, Sui Mae; Goh, Joo Kheng

2014-11-01

321

Identification and crude protein extract of endophytic bacteria strain KLXD06 antagonistic against MRSA isolated from Hemsleya sinesis.  

PubMed

Hemsleya sinesis Cogn has a variety of medicinal value. Strain KLXD06 is an endophytic bacteria isolated from H. sinesis exhibited significant inhibitory activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This strain was identified by methods including 16S rDNA sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics analysis. Ccrude protein from KLXD06 was extracted by ammon ium sulfate salting-out. The results showed that strain KLXD06 was identified as Serratia marcescens. Antibacterial crude protein from KLXD06 was extracted by ammon ium sulfate salting-out, has a thermal stability. PMID:25016271

Tang, Mei; Gong, Mingfu; Xu, Chenghao; Wu, Sanlin; Liu, Fang

2014-07-01

322

A Panton-Valentine Leucocidin (PVL)Positive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strain, Another Such Strain Carrying a Multiple-Drug Resistance Plasmid, and Other More-Typical PVL-Negative MRSA Strains Found in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was collected from children with bullous impetigo in 2003 and 2004. One strain collected in 2003 was Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) positive. In 2004, a multiple-drug-resistant PVL CA-MRSA strain was isolated from an athlete with a cutaneous abscess. These strains were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing, spa typing, agr typing, coagulase typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec

Yoko Takizawa; Ikue Taneike; Saori Nakagawa; Tomohiro Oishi; Yoshiyuki Nitahara; Nobuhiro Iwakura; Kyoko Ozaki; Misao Takano; Teruko Nakayama; Tatsuo Yamamoto

2005-01-01

323

Supporting Self-Care for Families of Children With Eczema With a Web-Based Intervention Plus Health Care Professional Support: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Childhood eczema, or childhood atopic dermatitis, causes significant distress to children and their families through sleep disturbance and itch. The main cause of treatment failure is nonuse of prescribed treatments. Objective The objective of this study was to develop and test a Web-based intervention to support families of children with eczema, and to explore whether support from a health care professional (HCP) is necessary to engage participants with the intervention. Methods We followed the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: regular emollient use was the target behavior we were seeking to promote and we identified potential techniques to influence this. LifeGuide software was used to write the intervention website. Carers of children with eczema were invited through primary care mail-out and randomized to 3 groups: (1) website only, (2) website plus HCP support, or (3) usual care. Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores were measured online by carer report at baseline and at 12 weeks. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 13 HCPs (primarily practice nurses) and 26 participants to explore their experiences of taking part in the study. Results A total of 143 carers were recruited through 31 practices. We found a decrease of ?2 in follow-up compared with baseline POEM score in 23 of 42 (55%) participants in the website only group, 16 of 49 (33%) in the usual care group, and 18 of 47 (38%) in the website plus HCP group. Website use data showed that 75 of 93 (81%) participants allocated to the website groups completed the core modules, but less than half used other key components (videos: 35%; regular text reminders: 39%). There were no consistent differences in website use between the website only or the website plus HCP groups. Qualitative feedback showed that most HCPs had initial concerns about providing support for eczema self-care because this was not a condition that they felt expert in. However, HCPs reported productive consultations and that they found it helpful to use the website in consultations, while observing that some participants seemed to need more support than others. Qualitative interviews with participants suggested that HCP support was valued highly only by a minority, generally those who were less confident in their management of eczema or less confident using the Internet. Conclusions Our pilot trial demonstrated the potential for greater improvements in POEM scores in both website intervention groups and that a full-scale trial is feasible. Such a trial would quantify the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this intervention to determine whether it should be widely promoted to families of children with newly diagnosed eczema. In this study population, HCP support was not strongly valued by participants and did not lead to better outcomes or website use than use of the Web-based intervention alone. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 98560867; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN98560867 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6NcxvMtgN). PMID:24594972

Muller, Ingrid; Yardley, Lucy; Burgess, Hana; Selinger, Hannah; Stuart, Beth L; Little, Paul

2014-01-01

324

[Report of a case of glucagonoma misdiagnosed as "eczema" and "hepatic angioma" for three years and review of literature].  

PubMed

Glucagonoma is a rare pancreatic tumor, necrolytic migratory erythema is its distinctive feature and it is often associated with diabetes mellitus, weight loss, anemia, hypoaminoacidemia, glossitis and stomatitis. We reported a case of glucagonoma misdiagnosed as "eczema" and "benign hepatic anginoma" for 3 years. His blood glucagon level was 1,758 ng/L. The results of abdominal B-mode ultrasonography and CT scan were negative, but selected arteriogram showed a tumor mass between the pancreatic body and tail. Before operation, treatment with octreotide and supply of amino acids were given with improvement of the skin lesion. After resection of the tumor from pancreas, necrolytic migratory erythema disapeared, but his blood level of glucagon and amino acids did not improve. It is suggested that any diabetic patient with chronic skin damage should be checked for blood glucagon level. In suspected cases, selected arteriogram will be helpful for location of the tumor. Vigorous resection of the pancreatic tumor should be done as soon as possible, even though there is already metastases. PMID:7648942

Dai, W; Shi, Y; Cai, L

1995-03-01

325

'Perfect skin', the media and patients with skin disease: a qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema.  

PubMed

The relationship of skin disease with societal ideals of beauty, and the role of the media in this relationship, has not previously been researched. The overall objective of this study was to explore the psychological effects of skin disease. The theme of the ideal of perfect skin and the role of the media in generating this ideal arose via an inductive study methodology and was explored in the context of respondents' psychological morbidity. A qualitative study, 62 semi-structured interviews were conducted with respondents with acne, eczema or psoriasis recruited from both general practice and specialist dermatology practice in an Australian regional city. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis employing a process of constant comparison in which data collection and analysis were cumulative and concurrent. The themes of perfect skin, societal ideals and media influence emerged from this iterative process. Respondents identified a societal ideal of flawless skin, largely mediated by media portrayals of perfection. Failure to meet this ideal precipitated psychological morbidity in female, but not male, respondents. An appreciation of the pervasive pressures of society and media upon females with skin disease may inform management strategies, particularly psychological management strategies, in patients with skin disease. PMID:21645475

Magin, Parker; Adams, Jon; Heading, Gaynor; Pond, Dimity

2011-01-01

326

Recommendations for the prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates (MRSA) in hospitals and other healthcare facilities  

PubMed Central

The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Control (KRINKO) at the Robert Koch-Institute Berlin published the “Recommendations for Preventing and Controlling Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strains in Hospitals and Other Medical Facilities“ in the Federal Health Gazette in 1999 [1]. These recommendations were translated for the current edition of GMS Krankenhaushygiene Interdisziplinär by the German Society of Hospital Hygiene. KRINKO's work is legitimated by § 23 para. 2 of the Infection Protection Act. Regarding the legal nature of the KRINKO recommendations, it should be noted that they are neither a formal act or an administrative regulation. The KRINKO recommendations are instead an evidence-based consensus of particularly qualified experts. The consensus is reached by including the Federal States' authorities and all competent professional bodies and associations. This is to guarantee that the KRINKO recommendations reflect the state-of-the-art of medical science, and are met with a high degree of user acceptance. The recommendations are published in the Federal Health Gazette and on the RKI's Internet pages (http://www.rki.de/). Link to the German original edition of the MRSA recommendations PMID:20204101

2009-01-01

327

Bio-inspired synthesis yields a tricyclic indoline that selectively resensitizes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to ?-lactam antibiotics  

PubMed Central

The continuous emergence of resistant bacteria has become a major worldwide health threat. The current development of new antibacterials has lagged far behind. To discover reagents to fight against resistant bacteria, we initiated a chemical approach by synthesizing and screening a small molecule library, reminiscent of the polycyclic indole alkaloids. Indole alkaloids are a class of structurally diverse natural products, many of which were isolated from plants that have been used as traditional medicine for millennia. Specifically, we adapted an evolutionarily conserved biosynthetic strategy and developed a concise and unified diversity synthesis pathway. Using this pathway, we synthesized 120 polycyclic indolines that contain 26 distinct skeletons and a wide variety of functional groups. A tricyclic indoline, Of1, was discovered to selectively potentiate the activity of ?-lactam antibiotics in multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), but not in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. In addition, we found that Of1 itself does not have antiproliferative activity but can resensitize several MRSA strains to the ?-lactam antibiotics that are widely used in the clinic, such as an extended-spectrum ?-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and a first-generation cephalosporin cefazolin. These data suggest that Of1 is a unique selective resistance-modifying agent for ?-lactam antibiotics, and it may be further developed to fight against resistant bacteria in the clinic. PMID:24019472

Podoll, Jessica D.; Liu, Yongxiang; Chang, Le; Walls, Shane; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiang

2013-01-01

328

Genetic diversity of emerging Panton-Valentine leukocidine/arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME)-positive ST8 SCCmec-IVa meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains and ACME-positive CC5 (ST5/ST764) MRSA strains in Northern Japan.  

PubMed

Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL) is a distinctive virulence factor of community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) is a staphylococcal genomic island that enhances fitness and the ability of bacterial cells to colonize on skin and mucous membranes. ACME is characteristically found in USA300, which is a predominant CA-MRSA clone [sequence type (ST) 8] in the USA and is spreading globally, and has also been detected in non-ST8 MRSA at low frequency. In Japan, spread of MRSA with PVL and/or ACME and their genetic traits have not yet been well characterized. In the present study, the prevalence and genetic diversity of PVL(+)/ACME(+) MRSA were investigated for 422 MRSA clinical isolates collected from outpatients in northern Japan over a period of 1 year. All the isolates were genotyped for the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and coagulase genes (coa), and screened for PVL and ACME genes. The PVL(+)/ACME(+) isolates were studied further by genetic analysis, including single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis based on PVL genes (lukS-PV-lukF-PV), ACME (arc and opp3 clusters) and the sarU promoter region. Among all the isolates examined, PVL genes and ACME were detected in eight (SCCmec-II, n?=?1; SCCmec-IV, n?=?6; SCCmec-V, n?=?1) and 20 (SCCmec-II, n?=?14; SCCmec-IV, n?=?5; SCCmec-V, n?=?1) isolates, respectively. Five isolates were found to have both PVL genes and ACME (type I), and were classified into ST8/spa-t008/agr-I/coa-IIIa, which is the same genetic traits as USA300. Fifteen PVL(-)/ACME(+) isolates had type ?II-ACME, belonging to either ST5 or ST764 [clonal complex (CC) 5], and spa-t001, -t002 or -t3557. All the ST8 PVL(+)/ACME-I(+) MRSA had identical sequences of PVL genes (haplotype R) and ACME arc/opp3 clusters as those of USA300. In contrast, in the CC5 PVL(-)/ACME-?II(+) MRSA, SNPs in the arc cluster were detected in 11 sites (four haplotypes), with some different profiles of virulence/resistance factors. These results indicated single clonality of ST8 PVL(+)/ACME-I(+) MRSA and heterogeneity of CC5 PVL(-)/ACME-?II(+) MRSA, and suggest their potential spread in northern Japan. PMID:23946478

Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Ghosh, Souvik; Kuwahara, Osamu; Morimoto, Shigeo; Ito, Masahiko; Kudo, Kenji; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

2013-12-01

329

Nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia in Taiwan: Mortality analyses and the impact of vancomycin, MIC = 2 mg/L, by the broth microdilution method  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies regarding the prognosis of patients infected with MRSA isolates characterized by a high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for vancomycin have generally used a commercial Etest. Little research has been conducted on determining the vancomycin susceptibility of MRSA using a reference microdilution. Additionally, there is discordance between the MIC result from an Etest and the value determined using the reference microdilution method. Methods Using a reference microdilution method, we determined the MIC of vancomycin for isolates from 123 consecutive patients with nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. The clinical features and outcome for these patients were recorded and the MRSA isolates were genotyped. Results Among the 123 non-duplicated isolates, 21.1% had a MIC = 2 mg/L, 76.4% had a MIC = 1 mg/L and 2.4% had MIC = 0.5 mg/L. Patients with MRSA bacteremia in the ICU or those who had been hospitalized for a long time were more likely to be infected with strains of high vancomycin MIC MRSA (MIC = 2 mg/L; p < 0.05). Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the high MIC group had a significantly higher 30-day mortality than the low MIC group (HR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.20-4.79; p = 0.014). Multivariate analyses indicated that the presence of high MIC isolates, pneumonia, post-cardiothoracic surgery and a high Charlson comorbidity index were all independent predictors of a 30-day mortality. Genotyping of these high vancomycin MIC isolates demonstrated that SCCmec III, spa type037, was the predominant strain (> 80%). The rates of resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, levofloxacin, rifampin and tetracycline were also higher in the high MIC group than in the isolates belonging to low MIC group (p < 0.05). Conclusions In a high vancomycin MIC group in Taiwan, SCCmec III, spa type t037, was the predominant strain of MRSA identified. Patients with MRSA bacteremia in the ICU or who had prolonged hospitalization were more likely to be infected with S. aureus strains with high vancomycin MICs. The mortality rate was higher among patients infected with these strains compared to patients infected with low MIC strains. PMID:20529302

2010-01-01

330

PA03.01. A clinical study on the management of vicharchika (eczema) by brihat haridrakhanda and lepa of arka taila in children  

PubMed Central

Purpose: 1.To find out an easily available and considerably low cost, safe and effective remedy for the treatment of Vicharchika. 2. Clinical assessment of the efficiency of Brihat haridrakhanda orally & Arka taila as per in the management of Dry eczema. 3. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Brihat haridrakhanda ora lly & Arka taila as per in the management of Wet eczema. 4. To compare the effect of Brihat haridrakhanda orally & Arka taila on Dry & wet Eczema. Method: 30 cases of Vicharchika were selected randomly from OPD and IPD of Kaumarabhritya S.D.M. College of Ayurveda and Hospital, Hassan. Study is carried out in two groups, each containing 15 patients. Dry group Patient with dry lesion (Shushka Vicharchika). Wet group Patient with wet lesion. (Sravi Vicharchika)Both groups had given Brihat Haridrakhanda orally & Lepa of Arka Taila for 1month along with follow up for 1 month and results observed. Dose:a) Brihat Haridrakhand: 5gms mixed with lukewarm milk; twice daily half an hour before food.b) Arkataila: required quantity for external application. Result: The study showed there was statistically significant improvement in Kandu (83.33 %),Pidaka (58%),Vaivarnata (55 %) Rookshata (66.66 %) & number of patches (50%) in dry group & there was statistically significant improvement in Kandu (63.63 %), Pidaka (40 %), Vaivarnata (59.26 %), Srava (60 %) & number of patches (50%) in wet groupThe study concluded that there was better improvement in the Dry group in reduction of Kandu, Pidaka, Daha, & Number of patches compares to wet group while in wet group there was better improvement seen in reduction of Vaivarnata & Area of patch compare to Dry group. Conclusion: Local application and oral medication is more effective. The drugs are having the property Kaphahara, Kandughna, Sravahara & helps in reduction of Rookshata. Brihat Haridrakhanda is sweet and easily palatable.

Arya, TU; Rao, U Shailaja

2013-01-01

331

The search and destroy strategy prevents spread and long-term carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: results from the follow-up screening of a large ST22 (E-MRSA 15) outbreak in Denmark.  

PubMed

In the aftermath of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST22 hospital outbreak, we investigated the prevalence of long-term carriage, the efficacy of MRSA decolonization treatment (DT) and the spread of MRSA to households of patients and healthcare workers (HCWs). Furthermore, we evaluated the efficacy of repeated DT in long-term MRSA carriers. Of 250 index persons (58 HCWs and 192 patients), 102 persons (19 HCWs and 83 patients) and 67 household members agreed to participate. Samples from all 169 persons were taken from the nose, throat, wounds and devices/catheters, and urine samples were additionally taken from index persons. Samples from companion animals (n = 35) were taken from the nostrils and anus. Environmental sites (n = 490) screened were telephone, television remote control, toilet flush handle, favourite chair and skirting board beside the bed. Sixteen (19%) patients and two household members, but no HCWs, were ST22-positive. The throat was the most frequent site of colonization. In a multivariate analysis, chronic disease (p <0.001) and pharyngeal carriage (p <0.001) were associated with long-term MRSA carriage. MRSA was found in the environments of four long-term carriers. All animals tested were negative. MRSA-positive households were decolonized using nasal mupirocin TID and daily chlorhexidine body and hair wash for 5 days. Pharyngeal MRSA carriers also received fucidic acid (500 mg TID) combined with rifampicin (600 mg BID) or clindamycin (600 mg BID) for 7 days. The home environment was cleaned on days 2 and 5. At the end of follow-up, ten of 16 long-term carriers and the two household contacts were MRSA-negative. In conclusion, decolonization of MRSA carriers is possible, but should include treatment of household members and the environment. PMID:20041904

Böcher, S; Skov, R L; Knudsen, M A; Guardabassi, L; Mølbak, K; Schouenborg, P; Sørum, M; Westh, H

2010-09-01

332

Hands4U: A multifaceted strategy to implement guideline-based recommendations to prevent hand eczema in health care workers: design of a randomised controlled trial and (cost) effectiveness evaluation  

PubMed Central

Background Workers in wet work occupations have a risk for developing hand eczema. Prevention strategies exist, but compliance to the proposed recommendations is poor. Therefore, a multifaceted implementation strategy (MIS) is developed to implement these recommendations to reduce hand eczema among health care workers performing wet work. Methods/Design This study is a randomised controlled trial in three university hospitals in the Netherlands. Randomisation to the control or intervention group is performed at department level. The control group receives a leaflet containing the recommendations only. The intervention group receives the MIS which consists of five parts: 1) within a department, a participatory working group is formed to identify problems with the implementation of the recommendations, to find solutions for it and implement these solutions; 2) role models will help their colleagues in performing the desired behaviour; 3) education to all workers will enhance knowledge about (the prevention of) hand eczema; 4) reminders will be placed at the department reminding workers to use the recommendations; 5) workers receive the same leaflet as the control group containing the recommendations. Data are collected by questionnaires at baseline and after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is self-reported hand eczema. The most important secondary outcome measures are symptoms of hand eczema; actual use of the recommendations; sick leave; work productivity; and health care costs. Analyses will be performed according to the intention to treat principle. Cost-effectiveness of the MIS will be evaluated from both the societal and the employer's perspective. Discussion The prevention of hand eczema is important for the hospital environment. If the MIS has proven to be effective, a major improvement in the health of health care workers can be obtained. Results are expected in 2014. Trial registration number NTR2812 PMID:21867490

2011-01-01

333

Cloning, mapping and association studies of the ovine ABCG2 gene with facial eczema disease in sheep.  

PubMed

Facial eczema (FE) is a hepatogenous mycotoxicosis in sheep caused by the fungal toxin sporidesmin. Resistance to FE is a multigenic trait. To identify QTL associated with this trait, a scan of ovine chromosomes was implemented. In addition, ABCG2 was investigated as a possible positional candidate gene because of its sequence homology to the yeast PDR5 protein and its functional role as a xenobiotic transporter. The sequence of ovine ABCG2 cDNA was obtained from liver mRNA by RT-PCR and 5' and 3' RACE. The predicted protein sequence shares >80% identity with other mammalian ABCG2 proteins. SNPs were identified within exon 6, exon 9 and intron 4. The intron 4 SNP was used to map ABCG2 to ovine chromosome 6 (OAR6), about 2 cM distal to microsatellite marker OarAE101. Interestingly, this chromosomal region contains weak evidence for a FE QTL detected in a previous genome-scan experiment. To further investigate the association of ABCG2 with FE, allele frequencies for the three SNPs plus three neighbouring microsatellite markers were tested for differences in sheep selected for and against FE. Significant differences were detected in the allele frequencies of the intronic SNP marker among the resistant, susceptible and control lines. No difference in the levels of ABCG2 expression between the resistant and susceptible animals was detected by Northern hybridisation of liver RNA samples. However, significantly higher expression was observed in sporidesmin-dosed sheep compared with naïve animals. Our inference is that the ABCG2 gene may play a minor role in FE sensitivity in sheep, at least within these selection lines. PMID:17403009

Duncan, E J; Dodds, K G; Henry, H M; Thompson, M P; Phua, S H

2007-04-01

334

A genome-screen experiment to detect quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to facial eczema disease in sheep.  

PubMed

Facial eczema (FE) is a secondary photosensitization disease arising from liver cirrhosis caused by the mycotoxin sporidesmin. The disease affects sheep, cattle, deer and goats, and costs the New Zealand sheep industry alone an estimated NZ$63M annually. A long-term sustainable solution to this century-old FE problem is to breed for disease-resistant animals by marker-assisted selection. As a step towards finding a diagnostic DNA test for FE sensitivity, we have conducted a genome-scan experiment to screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting this trait in Romney sheep. Four F(1) sires, obtained from reciprocal matings of FE resistant and susceptible selection-line animals, were used to generate four outcross families. The resulting half-sib progeny were artificially challenged with sporidesmin to phenotype their FE traits measured in terms of their serum levels of liver-specific enzymes, namely gamma-glutamyl transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase. In a primary screen using selective genotyping on extreme progeny of each family, a total of 244 DNA markers uniformly distributed over all 26 ovine autosomes (with an autosomal genome coverage of 79-91%) were tested for linkage to the FE traits. Data were analysed using Haley-Knott regression. The primary screen detected one significant and one suggestive QTL on chromosomes 3 and 8 respectively. Both the significant and suggestive QTL were followed up in a secondary screen where all progeny were genotyped and analysed; the QTL on chromosome 3 was significant in this analysis. PMID:19032699

Phua, S H; Dodds, K G; Morris, C A; Henry, H M; Beattie, A E; Garmonsway, H G; Towers, N R; Crawford, A M

2009-02-01

335

Isolation of MRSA, ESBL and AmpC - ? -lactamases from Neonatal Sepsis at a Tertiary Care Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: The emergence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended spectrum ?–lactamases (ESBLs) in neonatal intensive care unit patients is increasing. This study aims to find out the bacteriological profile in neonatal sepsis and study their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern including detection of MRSA and ESBLs. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted for a period of one and a half years from January 2010 to June 2011 in a tertiary care hospital in Chennai. A total of 182 blood samples were collected using sterile precautions. They were processed following standard laboratory protocol. Antibiogram was done using appropriate antibiotics by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Isolated Staphylococcus aureus were tested for methicillin resistance using Cefoxitin disc (30?g), ESBL was detected using combined disc method, MIC reduction and Polymerase chain reaction, metallobetalactamases using EDTA and Amp-C beta lactamases using AmpC disc test. C-reactive protein (CRP) was estimated for all the cases. Results: Out of the 182 cases, 110 (60.4%) were culture positive. Fifty five (63.9 %) of early onset sepsis cases had Gram negative bacteria (GNB) and 19 (79.1%) of late onset sepsis cases had Gram positive bacteria. Out of the total pathogens, 31 (28.1%) were Klebsiella pneumoniae and 30 (27%) were Staphylococcus aureus. 17 (56.6 %) of Staphylococcus aureus were found to be MRSA and they were 100% sensitive to Vancomycin. 33 (67.3%) of Enterobacteriaceae were ESBL producers. ESBL isolates were 100% sensitive to Imipenem. Three (6.1%) of Enterobacteriaceae were AmpC producers and 3 (27.2%) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were MBL producers. CRP was positive in 99 (54.3%) cases, out of which 94 (94.9%) were culture positive. Conclusion: Klebsiella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were the commonest bacteria causing neonatal sepsis in this centre. Multidrug resistance among the isolates was common. Early diagnosis and institution of specific antibiotics after studying the sensitivity pattern will help in reducing neonatal morbidity and mortality and prevent emergence of drug resistant strains. PMID:25120982

Thyagarajan, Ravinder; Katragadda, Radhika; Leela, K.V.; Babu, R. Narayana

2014-01-01

336

Association between environmental factors and current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province - Bolivia: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, the prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in childhood has considerably increased in developing countries including Bolivia, possibly due to changes in lifestyle, environmental and domestic factors. This study aimed to assess the association between environmental factors and asthma, rhinoconjuctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province in Chuquisaca, Bolivia. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in 2340 children attending the fifth grade in 36 randomly selected elementary schools in Oropeza province. The prevalence of symptoms was determined using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. Environmental factors were assessed by the ISAAC environmental questionnaire including questions related to exposure to pets, farm animals, indoor and outdoor pollution, presence of disease vectors at home and precarious household conditions. Generalized linear mixed-effects models were adjusted for age, sex and place of living. Results Thirty seven percent of children reported that at least one of their parents smoked at home. Wood or coal was used as cooking fuel in 19% of the homes and 29% reported intense truck traffic on the street where they lived. With respect to hygiene conditions, 86% reported exposure to dogs, 59% exposure to cats and 36% regular contact to farm animals. More than one precarious household condition was reported by 8% of children. In the adjusted model exposure to dog (adjusted OR 1.4; CI 95% 1.0-1.9), cat (1.2; 1.0-1.5), farm animals (1.5; 1.2-1.8); intense truck traffic (1.3; 1.0-1.6), parents smoking at home (1.2; 1.0-1.5), presence of disease vectors at home (fourth quartile vs. first quartile: 1.6; 1.2-2.3) and two or more precarious household conditions (1.5; 1.0-2.2) were significantly associated with rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms. The associations were similar for asthma and eczema symptoms; however it did not reach the level of statistical significance for all items. Conclusion Our results support previous findings reported for poor communities especially in Latin America, showing that lower hygiene conditions did not have protective effect against asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms. PMID:24192069

2013-01-01

337

Development and Deployment of a Health Information Exchange to Understand the Transmission of MRSA across Hospitals via Molecular Genotyping and Social Networking Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a hardy and extremely virulent multidrug resistant organism that has been a major cause of hospital acquired infections ever since its discovery in the 1960's. It has severe consequences such as causing increased hospital length of stay, economic burden, morbidity, and…

Khan, Yosef M.

2012-01-01

338

Potent in vitro synergism of fusidic acid (FA) and berberine chloride (BBR) against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  

PubMed

It was found in the present study that combined use of fusidic acid (FA) and berberine chloride (BBR) offered an in vitro synergistic action against 7 of the 30 clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, with a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index ranging from 0.5 to 0.19. This synergistic effect was most pronounced on MRSA 4806, an FA-resistant isolate, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1,024 ?g/ml. The time-kill curve experiment showed that FA plus BBR yielded a 4.2 log10 c.f.u./ml reduction in the number of MRSA 4806 bacteria after 24-h incubation as compared with BBR alone. Viable count analysis showed that FA plus BBR produced a 3.0 log10 c.f.u./ml decrease in biofilm formation and a 1.5 log10 c.f.u./ml decrease in mature biofilm in viable cell density as compared with BBR alone. In addition, phase contrast micrographs confirmed that biofilm formation was significantly inhibited and mature biofilm was obviously destructed when FA was used in combination with BBR. These results provide evidence that combined use of FA and BBR may prove to be a promising clinical therapeutic strategy against MRSA. PMID:25108628

Liang, Rong-Mei; Yong, Xiao-Lan; Duan, Yu-Qin; Tan, Yong-Hong; Zeng, Ping; Zhou, Zi-Ying; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shi-Hua; Jiang, Yun-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Chun; Dong, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Ting-Ting; Shi, Hui-Qing; Li, Nan

2014-11-01

339

Population-Based Estimates of Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) Infections among High School Athletes--Nebraska, 2006-2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is an emerging cause of skin and soft-tissue infections among athletes. To determine statewide incidence among high school athletes, we surveyed all 312 Nebraska high schools regarding sport programs offered, program-specific participation numbers, number of athletes with physician-diagnosed…

Buss, Bryan F.; Mueller, Shawn W.; Theis, Max; Keyser, Alison; Safranek, Thomas J.

2009-01-01

340

Importance of the global regulators Agr and SaeRS in the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA USA300 infection.  

PubMed

CA-MRSA infection, driven by the emergence of the USA300 genetic background, has become epidemic in the United States. USA300 isolates are hypervirulent, compared with other CA- and HA-MRSA strains, in experimental models of necrotizing pneumonia and skin infection. Interestingly, USA300 isolates also have increased expression of core genomic global regulatory and virulence factor genes, including agr and saeRS. To test the hypothesis that agr and saeRS promote the observed hypervirulent phenotype of USA300, isogenic deletion mutants of each were constructed in USA300. The effects of gene deletion on expression and protein abundance of selected downstream virulence genes were assessed by semiquantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot, respectively. The effects of gene deletion were also assessed in mouse models of necrotizing pneumonia and skin infection. Deletion of saeRS, and, to a lesser extent, agr, resulted in attenuated expression of the genes encoding ?-hemolysin (hla) and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (lukSF-PV). Despite the differences in hla transcription, the toxin was undetectable in culture supernatants of either of the deletion mutants. Deletion of agr, but not saeRS, markedly increased the expression of the gene encoding protein A (spa), which correlated with increased protein abundance. Each deletion mutant demonstrated significant attenuation of virulence, compared with wild-type USA300, in mouse models of necrotizing pneumonia and skin infection. We conclude that agr and saeRS each independently contribute to the remarkable virulence of USA300, likely by means of their effects on expression of secreted toxins. PMID:21151999

Montgomery, Christopher P; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S

2010-01-01

341

Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from nasal samples by multiplex real-time PCR based on dual priming AT-rich primers.  

PubMed

In this study, we reported on the design of a multiplex real-time PCR assay based on SYBR Green I, incorporating dual priming adenine-thymine (AT)-rich primers for direct detection of MRSA from nasal samples. The multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay reported in this study is based on SYBR Green I with incorporation of six dual priming AT-rich primers designed from the SCCmec/orf junction. A string (4-6 bp) of low-melting bases, such as adenine and thymine, was incorporated into the primers, which virtually divided a single primer in two functional regions, thus decreasing non-specific PCR products. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of the RT-PCR assay was determined with genomic DNA of reference strains (MRSA, MSSA, and MRCoNS). RT-PCR assay was performed for analysis of 72 nasal swab specimens, and the results were confirmed by use of a culture method. Furthermore, the results of RT-PCR were compared with LightCycler MRSA advance test. The multiplex RT-PCR assay reproducibly detected a minimum of 1 pg genomic DNA (31.5 copy of genome) of MRSA reference strains and clinical isolates, with a specific melting peak at 83.5 ± 1.5°C, and neither fluorescence nor a melting peak was detected in non-target isolates. The concordance rate between RT-PCR assay and culture method was 87.5% with Cohen's kappa value (?) 0.75, which showed good agreement between the two assays. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the assay were 93.5%, 82.9%, 80.5%, and 94.4%, respectively. In a comparative study for the detection of 72 nasal samples, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the multiplex RT-PCR assay with respect to LightCycler MRSA advance test was 84.2%, 88.2%, 89%, and, 83.3%, respectively. The results of RT-PCR assay demonstrated high specificity (88.2%) and positive predictive value (89%) for the direct detection of MRSA from nasal samples. PMID:22187362

Yadav, M K; Kwon, S K; Huh, H J; Chae, S-W; Song, J-J

2012-01-01

342

New type of protective hybrid and nanocomposite hybrid coatings containing silver and copper with an excellent antibacterial effect especially against MRSA.  

PubMed

Epidemics spread many types of pathogenic bacterial strains, especially strains of MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), which are being increasingly reported in many geographical areas [1]. This is becoming to be a serious global problem, particularly in hospitals. Not only are antibiotics proving to be increasingly ineffective but also the bacteria responsible for more than 70% of hospital-acquired bacterial infections are resistant to at least one of the drugs commonly used to treat them. In this study, hybrid coating A1 and nanocomposite hybrid coating A2 based on TMSPM (3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate, MMA (methyl methacrylate), TEOS (tetraethyl orthosilicate) and IPTI (titanium isopropoxide) containing silver and copper ions with or without nanoparticles of titanium dioxide were prepared by the sol-gel method. They were deposited on glass, poly(methyl methacrylate) and cotton using dip-coating or spin-coating, and then cured at 150°C for 3h or, in the case of poly(methyl methacrylate), at 100°C for 4.5h. The morphology and microstructure of these hybrid coatings were examined by SEM. The abrasion resistance was tested using a washability tester and found to depend heavily on the curing temperature. Seven types of bacterial strains were used to determine the profile of antibacterial activity, namely Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus - MRSA (CCM 4223), MRSA-2 (CCM 7112), Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus vulgaris (according to ALE-G18, CSNI). All the samples were tested by irradiating with either a UV-A or a daylight fluorescent lamp. All types of hybrid coating A1 and nanocomposite hybrid coating A2 were found to possess an excellent antibacterial effect, including against the pathogenic bacterial strains of MRSA, which present a dangerous threat on a global scale. PMID:25428071

Slamborová, Irena; Zajícová, Veronika; Karpíšková, Jana; Exnar, Petr; Stibor, Ivan

2013-01-01

343

Rifampicin-fosfomycin coating for cementless endoprostheses: Antimicrobial effects against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  

PubMed

New strategies to decrease infection rates in cementless arthroplasty are needed, especially in the context of the growing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a rifampicin-fosfomycin coating against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA in a rabbit infection prophylaxis model. Uncoated or rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated K-wires were inserted into the intramedullary canal of the tibia in rabbits and contaminated with an inoculation dose of 10(5) or 10(6) colony-forming units of MSSA EDCC 5055 in study 1 and MRSA T6625930 in study 2, respectively. After 28days the animals were killed and clinical, histological and microbiological assessment, including pulse-field gel electrophoresis, was conducted. Positive culture growth in agar plate testing and/or clinical signs and/or histological signs were defined positive for infection. Statistical evaluation was performed using Fisher's exact test. Both studies showed a statistically significant reduction of infection rates for rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implants compared to uncoated K-wires (P=0.015). In both studies none of the 12 animals that were treated with a rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implant showed clinical signs of infection or a positive agar plate testing result. In both studies, one animal of the coating group showed the presence of sporadic bacteria with concomitant inflammatory signs in histology. The control groups in both studies exhibited an infection rate of 100% with clear clinical signs of infection and positive culture growth in all animals. In summary, the rifampicin-fosfomycin-coating showed excellent antimicrobial activity against both MSSA and MRSA, and therefore warrants further clinical testing. PMID:24948548

Alt, Volker; Kirchhof, Kristin; Seim, Florian; Hrubesch, Isabelle; Lips, Katrin S; Mannel, Henrich; Domann, Eugen; Schnettler, Reinhard

2014-10-01

344

The antibacterial activity against MRSA strains and other bacteria of a <500 Da fraction from maggot excretions\\/secretions of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of Lucilia sericata larvae to chronic, infected wounds results in the rapid elimination of infecting microorganisms, including MRSA. Previously, we demonstrated in vitro antibacterial activity of native excretions\\/secretions (nES) from L. sericata and partially purified two low mass antibacterial compounds with masses of 0.5–10kDa and <500Da. The present study reports the antibacterial effects of the <500Da fraction (ES)

Alyson Bexfield; A. Elizabeth Bond; Emily C. Roberts; Edward Dudley; Yamni Nigam; Stephen Thomas; Russell P. Newton; Norman A. Ratcliffe

2008-01-01

345

Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside mediated inhibition of PBP2a: computational and experimental evidence to its anti-MRSA activity.  

PubMed

The PBP2a is a cell wall synthesizing protein, which causes resistivity in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from ?-lactam antibiotics but it is susceptible to 5th generation cephalosporin, ceftobiprole. Ceftobiprole inhibits the growth of MRSA by targeting the PBP2a-mediated cell wall synthesis, but it is reported to have adverse side effects. Due to this, there is a constant need to develop natural alternatives, which are generally free from adverse side effects. Hence in this study, in silico based docking analysis was performed with 37 quercetin derivatives towards PBP2a inhibition and their efficiencies were compared with ?-lactam antibiotic, ceftobiprole. The docking studies suggested that quercetin 3-O-rutinoside (ZINC5280805) interacted efficiently with PBP2a, attaining the highest LibDock score (187.32) compared to other quercetin derivatives. The structural stability and dynamics of the identified lead with PBP2a were validated through molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation results such as RMSD, RMSF, and Rg values indicated that the stability of quercetin 3-O-rutinoside with PBP2a was better, with respect to the un-ligated PBP2a. Furthermore, the quercetin 3-O-rutinoside was subjected to an antibacterial susceptibility test and found to have antibacterial activity at 500, 700, and 900 ?M concentration. Also, morphological changes in the bacterial colony and bacterial surface were observed using a scanning electron microscope, when MRSA was treated with 900 ?M concentration of quercetin 3-O-rutinoside. Collectively, results from this study suggest that the quercetin 3-O-rutinoside has the capability to inhibit PBP2a and hence could be used as an alternative or in combination with other drugs in treating MRSA infection. PMID:25286279

Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; Thanga Velan, Lakshmi Palanisamy; Arunachalam, Annamalai

2014-12-28

346

Prevalence and transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at the intensive care unit of Domat Al-Jandal Hospital, Al-Jouf, Saudi Arabia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) often colonize the anterior nares. Nasal carriage thus remains the main source of bacterial dissemination. The prevalence and rate of acquisition of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of Domat Al-Jandal Hospital were studied over one year in order to estimate the possible risk for those, who are initially free

Omer Mohamed Khalil; Meshref Awad Al-Ruaily

2008-01-01

347

Evaluation of MRSA-Screen, a Simple Anti-PBP 2a Slide Latex Agglutination Kit, for Rapid Detection of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The MRSA-Screen test (Denka Seiken Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan), consisting of a slide latex agglutination kit that detects PBP 2a with a monoclonal antibody, was blindly compared to the oxacillin disk diffusion test, the oxacillin-salt agar screen, and PCR of the mecA gene for the detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 120 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)

MATTHIAS CAVASSINI; ALINE WENGER; KATIA JATON; DOMINIQUE S. BLANC; JACQUES BILLE

1999-01-01

348

Isolation of patients in single rooms or cohorts to reduce spread of MRSA in intensive-care units: prospective two-centre study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Hospital-acquired infection due to meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is common within intensive-care units. Single room or cohort isolation of infected or colonised patients is used to reduce spread, but its benefit over and above other contact precautions is not known. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of moving versus not moving infected or colonised patients in intensive-care units to

J A Cepeda MRCP; B Cooper; S Hayman; Jorge A Cepeda; Tony Whitehouse; Janeane Hails; Karen Jones; Felicia Kwaku; Lee Taylor; Barry Cookson; Steve Shaw; Chris Kibbler; Mervyn Singer

2005-01-01

349

Genetic Pathway in Acquisition and Loss of Vancomycin Resistance in a Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strain of Clonal Type USA300  

Microsoft Academic Search

An isolate of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone USA300 with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin (SG-R) (i.e, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, VISA) and its susceptible “parental” strain (SG-S) were recovered from a patient at the end and at the beginning of an unsuccessful vancomycin therapy. The VISA phenotype was unstable in vitro generating a susceptible revertant strain (SG-rev). The availability of

Susana Gardete; Choonkeun Kim; Boris M. Hartmann; Michael Mwangi; Christelle M. Roux; Paul M. Dunman; Henry F. Chambers; Alexander Tomasz

2012-01-01

350

Proteomic and genomic analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) exposed to manuka honey in vitro demonstrated down-regulation of virulence markers  

PubMed Central

Objectives Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen. Its resistance to multiple antibiotics and its prevalence in healthcare establishments make it a serious threat to human health that requires novel interventions. Manuka honey is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that is gaining acceptance in the topical treatment of wounds. Because its mode of action is only partially understood, proteomic and genomic analysis was used to investigate the effects of manuka honey on MRSA at a molecular level. Methods Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with dual-channel imaging was combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry to determine the identities of differentially expressed proteins. The expression of the corresponding genes was investigated by quantitative PCR. Microarray analysis provided an overview of alterations in gene expression across the MRSA genome. Results Genes with increased expression following exposure to manuka honey were associated with glycolysis, transport and biosynthesis of amino acids, proteins and purines. Those with decreased expression were involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, cell division, quorum sensing and virulence. The greatest reductions were seen in genes conferring virulence (sec3, fnb, hlgA, lip and hla) and coincided with a down-regulation of global regulators, such as agr, sae and sarV. A model to illustrate these multiple effects was constructed and implicated glucose, which is one of the major sugars contained in honey. Conclusions A decreased expression of virulence genes in MRSA will impact on its pathogenicity and needs to be investigated in vivo. PMID:24176984

Jenkins, Rowena; Burton, Neil; Cooper, Rose

2014-01-01

351

In vitro activity of oritavancin against community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and daptomycin-non-susceptible S. aureus (DNSSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isolates of community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus (DNSSA) are increasing in frequency and new antistaphylococcal therapies are needed. Microdilution testing using Mueller–Hinton broth was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of oritavancin and nine additional antimicrobial agents against 92 CA-MRSA, 23 VISA, 7 DNSSA and

Louis D. Saravolatz; Joan Pawlak; Leonard B. Johnson

2010-01-01

352

A randomized controlled trial of tea tree oil (5%) body wash versus standard body wash to prevent colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in critically ill adults: research protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Over the past ten years MRSA has become endemic in hospitals and is associated with increased healthcare costs. Critically ill patients are most at risk, in part because of the number of invasive therapies that they require in the intensive care unit (ICU). Washing with 5% tea tree oil (TTO) has been shown to be effective in removing MRSA on the skin. However, to date, no trials have evaluated the potential of TTO body wash to prevent MRSA colonization or infection. In addition, detecting MRSA by usual culture methods is slow. A faster method using a PCR assay has been developed in the laboratory, but requires evaluation in a large number of patients. Methods/Design This study protocol describes the design of a multicentre, phase II/III prospective open-label randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a concentration of 5% TTO is effective in preventing MRSA colonization in comparison with a standard body wash (Johnsons Baby Softwash) in the ICU. In addition we will evaluate the cost-effectiveness of TTO body wash and assess the effectiveness of the PCR assay in detecting MRSA in critically ill patients. On admission to intensive care, swabs from the nose and groin will be taken to screen for MRSA as per current practice. Patients will be randomly assigned to be washed with the standard body wash or TTO body wash. On discharge from the unit, swabs will be taken again to identify whether there is a difference in MRSA colonization between the two groups. Discussion If TTO body wash is found to be effective, widespread implementation of such a simple colonization prevention tool has the potential to impact on patient outcomes, healthcare resource use and patient confidence both nationally and internationally. Trial Registration [ISRCTN65190967] PMID:19040726

Thompson, Gillian; Blackwood, Bronagh; McMullan, Ronan; Alderdice, Fiona A; Trinder, T John; Lavery, Gavin G; McAuley, Danny F

2008-01-01

353

Treating Eczema during Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... It is vital that dirt, bacteria, and other substances be washed away without causing further irritation. When looking for a cleanser, be sure to select one that is free of fragrances, antibacterial agents, and other chemicals that can irritate the ...

354

Eczema (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... sensitive to allergens in their environment such as pollens, molds, dust, animal dander, and certain foods. "Dermatitis" ... or improved by avoiding possible triggers such as: pollen mold dust animal dander dry winter air with ...

355

Treating Eczema with Steroids  

MedlinePLUS

... long-term topical therapy applied around the eyes. Glaucoma , an eye disease, can result when GCS treatment ... when patients are already at high risk for glaucoma. Gastrointestinal effects , such as nausea and vomiting, can ...

356

Teicoplanin as an Effective Alternative to Vancomycin for Treatment of MRSA Infection in Chinese Population: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate whether teicoplanin could be an alternative to vancomycin for treatment of MRSA infection in Chinese population using a meta-analysis in randomized controlled trials. Methods The following databases were searched: Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM), Chinese Journal Full-text database (CNKI), Wanfang database, Medline database, Ovid database and Cochrane Library. Articles published from 2002 to 2013 that studied teicoplanin in comparison to vancomycin in the treatment of MRSA infected patients were collected. Overall effects, publishing bias analysis and sensitivity analysis on clinical cure rate, microbiologic eradication rate and adverse events rate were performed by using Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 11.0 softwares. Results Twelve articles met entry criteria. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the clinical cure rate (risk ratio [RR], teicoplanin vs vancomycin, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.74?1.19; P?=?0.60), microbiological cure rate (risk ratio [RR], teicoplanin vs vancomycin, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.91?1.07; P?=?0.74) and adverse event rate (risk ratio [RR], teicoplanin vs vancomycin, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.40?1.84; P?=?0.70). Conclusions The meta-analysis results indicate that the two therapies are similar in both efficacy and safety, thus teicoplanin can act as an effective alternative to vancomycin for treating patients infected by MRSA. PMID:24260299

Bu, Tao; Chen, Xiaofeng; Bi, Jiaqi; Zhou, Junli; Yao, Zhenjiang

2013-01-01

357

A randomized, double-blind therapeutic trial of 0.25% desoxymethasone and 0.1% hydrocortisone 17-butyrate in the treatment of varicose eczema.  

PubMed

A double-blind, randomized trial was carried out in 60 patients with varicose (hypostatic) eczema to compare the efficacy and tolerance of treatment with 0.25% desoxymethasone in an oily cream base, the oily cream base alone, and 0.1% hydrocortisone 17-butyrate cream. The creams were applied twice daily and patients' progress followed for up to 38 days. Clinical ratings based on an assessment of individual signs and symptoms, the area of skin involved and the physician's overall impression demonstrated a significant difference from the oily cream base in favour of both active treatments within the first 10 days. No significant difference between the two active treatments was shown. All three treatments were well tolerated by the patients. PMID:6988176

Henry, M; Hanks, G; Whelan, A

1980-01-01

358

[Pharmacotherapy of atopic eczema--an analysis of the discrepancies between recent expert guidelines, official drug licenses, and evidence for efficacy of recommended drugs].  

PubMed

The Polish Physician's and Dentist's Profession Act and Polish Pharmaceutical Law oblige physicians to prescribing drugs strictly in line with the official indications listed in the Summaries of Product Characteristic (SPC). Prescriptions beyond SPC ('off-label') may be interpreted as 'medical experiments' with legal and financial liability resting solely with the doctor, the reimbursement is also denied. The aim of the study was to analyze discrepancies between up-to-date expert guidelines for treating atopic eczema (AE), indications listed in SPC, reimbursement policy, and scientific evidence for the efficacy of recommended drugs. Expert recommendations for the treatment of AE were confronted with SPC of recommended drugs and their reimbursement scheme. A systematic review of clinical trials was carried out, with their quality assessed using the GRADE tool. Among drugs recommended by experts for the treatment of AE, 484 medicinal products were licensed for use in Poland, including 89 with official indication for AE. Of these, clinical trials confirmed efficacy of active components of 36 topical or systemic calcineurin inhibitors and 19 topical glucocorticoid preparations. Thirty preparations for AE were reimbursed, including 19 recommended by experts and confirmed as effective. Further 75 products with active substances both recommended and effective were licensed for use in Poland, but not for AE. We conclude that regarding pharmacotherapy of atopic eczema, there are considerable discrepancies between expert recommendations, scientific evidence for the effectiveness of recommended drugs, and the acceptable uses of the drugs as determined by the Summaries of Product Characteristics (SPC) that are in force in Poland. PMID:24720120

Kordus, Katarzyna; Spiewak, Rados?aw

2013-01-01

359

Multidrug-Resistant and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Hog Slaughter and Processing Plant Workers and Their Community in North Carolina (USA)  

PubMed Central

Background: Use of antimicrobials in industrial food-animal production is associated with the presence of antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) among animals and humans. Hog slaughter/processing plants process large numbers of animals from industrial animal operations and are environments conducive to the exchange of bacteria between animals and workers. Objectives: We compared the prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) carriage among processing plant workers, their household members, and community residents. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of hog slaughter/processing plant workers, their household members, and community residents in North Carolina. Participants responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab. Swabs were tested for S. aureus, and isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Results: The prevalence of S. aureus was 21.6%, 30.2%, and 22.5% among 162 workers, 63 household members, and 111 community residents, respectively. The overall prevalence of MDRSA and MRSA tested by disk diffusion was 6.9% and 4.8%, respectively. The adjusted prevalence of MDRSA among workers was 1.96 times (95% CI: 0.71, 5.45) the prevalence in community residents. The adjusted average number of antimicrobial classes to which S. aureus isolates from workers were resistant was 2.54 times (95% CI: 1.16, 5.56) the number among isolates from community residents. We identified two MDRSA isolates and one MRSA isolate from workers as sequence type 398, a type associated with exposure to livestock. Conclusions: Although the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA was similar in hog slaughter/processing plant workers and their household and community members, S. aureus isolates from workers were resistant to a greater number of antimicrobial classes. These findings may be related to the nontherapeutic use of antimicrobials in food-animal production. Citation: Castillo Neyra R, Frisancho JA, Rinsky JL, Resnick C, Carroll KC, Rule AM, Ross T, You Y, Price LB, Silbergeld EK. 2014. Multidrug-resistant and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hog slaughter and processing plant workers and their community in North Carolina (USA). Environ Health Perspect 122:471–477;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306741 PMID:24508836

Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Frisancho, Jose Augusto; Rinsky, Jessica L.; Resnick, Carol; Carroll, Karen Colleen; Rule, Ana Maria; Ross, Tracy; You, Yaqi; Price, Lance B.

2014-01-01

360

Decolonisation of MRSA, S. aureus and E. coli by Cold-Atmospheric Plasma Using a Porcine Skin Model In Vitro  

PubMed Central

In the last twenty years new antibacterial agents approved by the U.S. FDA decreased whereas in parallel the resistance situation of multi-resistant bacteria increased. Thus, community and nosocomial acquired infections of resistant bacteria led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapy, prolonging treatment time and increasing healthcare costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of cold atmospheric plasma for decolonisation of Gram-positive (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) using an ex vivo pig skin model. Freshly excised skin samples were taken from six month old female pigs (breed: Pietrain). After application of pure bacteria on the surface of the explants these were treated with cold atmospheric plasma for up to 15 min. Two different plasma devices were evaluated. A decolonisation efficacy of 3 log10 steps was achieved already after 6 min of plasma treatment. Longer plasma treatment times achieved a killing rate of 5 log10 steps independently from the applied bacteria strains. Histological evaluations of untreated and treated skin areas upon cold atmospheric plasma treatment within 24 h showed no morphological changes as well as no significant degree of necrosis or apoptosis determined by the TUNEL-assay indicating that the porcine skin is still vital. This study demonstrates for the first time that cold atmospheric plasma is able to very efficiently kill bacteria applied to an intact skin surface using an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results emphasize the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a new possible treatment option for decolonisation of human skin from bacteria in patients in the future without harming the surrounding tissue. PMID:22558091

Maisch, Tim; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

2012-01-01

361

Cohort study for the presence of livestock-associated MRSA in piglets: effect of sow status at farrowing and determination of the piglet colonization age.  

PubMed

A longitudinal study was performed to determine the age at which piglets become colonized with livestock-associated MRSA and the effect of the sow MRSA status on the colonization status of their offspring. On four farrow-to-finish farms (A-D), nasal swabs were collected during a 6-month period from 12 sows and their offspring per farm. Piglets and sows were sampled throughout the nursery period. Additionally, the piglets were sampled after weaning, before and after moving to the finishing unit and before slaughterhouse transport. The environment of one pen (wall, floor and air) was sampled every time the pigs were sampled. Two MRSA colonization profiles were observed. On farms A and B, the sows' colonization prevalence reached 17% and 33%, respectively. The proportion of positive piglets remained low in the nursing unit (farm A: 0-7%, farm B: 0-36%) and increased at the end of their stay in the growing unit (farm A: 91%, farm B: 69%). On farms C and D, the sows' and piglets' colonization percentages were high from the beginning of the sampling series and finally reached 100%. On all farms, a decrease in colonization was observed towards slaughter age. The colonization age differed between farms. A statistically significant effect of the sow status at farrowing on the piglets' status was observed. The present study indicates that the sow's colonization status is important and should be included in control measures. However, the observed differences in colonization percentages among the farms complicate implementation of control measures on the farm. PMID:23067724

Verhegghe, Marijke; Pletinckx, Larissa J; Crombé, Florence; Van Weyenberg, Stephanie; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick; Heyndrickx, Marc; Rasschaert, Geertrui

2013-03-23

362

Detection of mecC-Positive Staphylococcus aureus (CC130-MRSA-XI) in Diseased European Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in Sweden  

PubMed Central

Recently, a novel mec gene conferring beta-lactam resistance in Staphylococcus aureus has been discovered. This gene, mecC, is situated on a SCCmec XI element that has to date been identified in clonal complexes 49, 130, 425, 599 and 1943. Some of the currently known isolates have been identified from animals. This, and observations of mecA alleles that do not confer beta-lactam resistance, indicate that mec genes might have a reservoir in Staphylococcus species from animals. Thus it is important also to screen wildlife isolates for mec genes. Here, we describe mecC-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ST130-MRSA-XI) and the lesions related to the infection in two diseased free-ranging European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus). One was found dead in 2003 in central Sweden, and suffered from S. aureus septicaemia. The other one, found on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea in 2011, showed a severe dermatitis and was euthanised. ST130-MRSA-XI isolates were isolated from lesions from both hedgehogs and were essentially identical to previously described isolates from humans. Both isolates carried the complete SCCmec XI element. They lacked the lukF-PV/lukS-PV and lukM/lukF-P83 genes, but harboured a gene for an exfoliative toxin homologue previously described from Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and other S. aureus of the CC130 lineage. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of CC130-MRSA-XI in hedgehogs. Given that one of the samples was taken as early as 2003, this was the earliest detection of this strain and of mecC in Sweden. This and several other recent observations suggest that CC130 might be a zoonotic lineage of S. aureus and that SCCmec XI/mecC may have originated from animal pathogens. PMID:23776626

Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widen, Dolores; Mattsson, Roland; Rangstrup-Christensen, Lena; Lazaris, Alexandros; Coleman, David C.; Shore, Anna C.; Ehricht, Ralf

2013-01-01

363

Early-Life Exposure to Outdoor Air Pollution and Respiratory Health, Ear Infections, and Eczema in Infants from the INMA Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Prenatal and early-life periods may be critical windows for harmful effects of air pollution on infant health. Objectives: We studied the association of air pollution exposure during pregnancy and the first year of life with respiratory illnesses, ear infections, and eczema during the first 12–18 months of age in a Spanish birth cohort of 2,199 infants. Methods: We obtained parentally reported information on doctor-diagnosed lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) and parental reports of wheezing, eczema, and ear infections. We estimated individual exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and benzene with temporally adjusted land use regression models. We used log-binomial regression models and a combined random-effects meta-analysis to estimate the effects of air pollution exposure on health outcomes across the four study locations. Results: A 10-µg/m3 increase in average NO2 during pregnancy was associated with LRTI [relative risk (RR) = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.12] and ear infections (RR = 1.18; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.41). The RRs for an interquartile range (IQR) increase in NO2 were 1.08 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.21) for LRTI and 1.31 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.76) for ear infections. Compared with NO2, the association for an IQR increase in average benzene exposure was similar for LRTI (RR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.19) and slightly lower for ear infections (RR = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.93, 1.46). Associations were slightly stronger among infants whose mothers spent more time at home during pregnancy. Air pollution exposure during the first year was highly correlated with prenatal exposure, so we were unable to discern the relative importance of each exposure period. Conclusions: Our findings support the hypothesis that early-life exposure to ambient air pollution may increase the risk of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infants. PMID:23221880

Pedersen, Marie; Garcia-Esteban, Raquel; Ballester, Ferran; Basterrechea, Mikel; Esplugues, Ana; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Lertxundi, Aitana; Tardón, Adonina; Sunyer, Jordi

2012-01-01

364

Climate and prevalence of atopic eczema in 6- to 7-year-old school children in Spain. ISAAC PhASE III  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic skin disease. Recent reports indicate that the worldwide prevalence of AE is increasing and that various environmental factors are implicated in its aetiology. Climatic conditions have been related with AE prevalence, and Spain has varying climatic conditions. The aim of this study is to document the possible climatic influence on the prevalence of AE in schoolchildren aged 6-7 years in three different climatic regions in Spain. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based survey of 28,394 schoolchildren aged 6-7 years from 10 Spanish centres in three different climatic regions. The mean participation rate was 76.5%. AE prevalence was assessed using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire and the Spanish Academy of Dermatology criteria used in Spain to diagnose AE. The data, including annual temperature, precipitation, relative humidity and the annual number of sunny hours per climatic region, were obtained from the Spanish National Institute of Meteorology. Different AE prevalences were found in all three climatic regions studied: Atlantic, 32.9; Mediterranean 28.3; and Continental 31.2 per 100 children studied ( p < 0.005). AE was positively associated with precipitation and humidity, and was negatively associated with temperature and the number of sunny hours. The results show that AE is significantly dependent on meteorological conditions.

Suárez-Varela, María Morales; García-Marcos Alvarez, Luís; Kogan, Michael D.; González, Agustín Llopis; Gimeno, Antonio Martínez; Ontoso, Inés Aguinaga; Díaz, Carlos González; Pena, Alberto Arnedo; Aurrecoechea, Begoña Domínguez; Monge, Rosa María Busquets; Quiros, Alfredo Blanco; Garrido, José Batlles; Canflanca, Iñaqui Miner; Varela, Ángel López-Silvarrey

2008-11-01

365

Residential culturable fungi, (1-3, 1-6)-?-d-glucan, and ergosterol concentrations in dust are not associated with asthma, rhinitis, or eczema diagnoses in children.  

PubMed

Qualitative reporting of home indoor moisture problems predicts respiratory diseases. However, causal agents underlying such qualitative markers remain unknown. In the homes of 198 multiple allergic case children and 202 controls in Sweden, we cultivated culturable fungi by directly plating dust, and quantified (1-3, 1-6)-?-D-glucan and ergosterol in dust samples from the child's bedroom. We examined the relationship between these fungal agents and degree of parent or inspector-reported home indoor dampness, and microbiological laboratory's mold index. We also compared the concentrations of these agents between multiple allergic cases and healthy controls, as well as IgE-sensitization among cases. The concentrations of culturable fungal agents were comparable between houses with parent and inspector-reported mold issues and those without. There were no differences in concentrations of the individual or the total summed culturable fungi, (1-3, 1-6)-?-D-glucan, and ergosterol between the controls and the multiple allergic case children, or individual diagnosis of asthma, rhinitis, or eczema. Culturable fungi, (1-3, 1-6)-?-D-glucan, and ergosterol in dust were not associated with qualitative markers of indoor dampness or mold or indoor humidity. Furthermore, these agents in dust samples were not associated with any health outcomes in the children. PMID:24016225

Choi, H; Byrne, S; Larsen, L S; Sigsgaard, T; Thorne, P S; Larsson, L; Sebastian, A; Bornehag, C-G

2014-04-01

366

Drawing the eczema aesthetic: the psychological effects of chronic skin disease as depicted in the works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald.  

PubMed

How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases--John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald--some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which leads to personality disorders and co-morbid affective disorders such as anxiety and depression. The vertiginous feeling that results can be noted in the paradoxical characters, figures, and psyches portrayed in the works of these artists. This essay will examine the more specific ways in which artists disclose and/or conceal their experiences and the particular ways in which these manifest in their works. While certain nuances exist, the common denominators give us a starting point for developing an eczema aesthetic, a code for interpreting the ways in which artists' experiences with skin disease manifest in their works. PMID:20186566

Tatum, Karen E

2010-06-01

367

Residential Culturable Fungi, (1-3, 1-6)-?-D-glucan, and Ergosterol Concentrations in Dust Are Not Associated with Asthma, Rhinitis or Eczema Diagnoses in Children  

PubMed Central

Background Qualitative reporting of home indoor moisture problems predicts respiratory diseases. However, causal agents underlying such qualitative markers remain unknown. Methods In the homes of 198 multiple allergic case children and 202 controls in Sweden, we cultivated culturable fungi by directly plating dust, and quantified(1–3, 1–6)-?-D-glucan, and ergosterol in dust samples from the child’s bedroom. We examined the relationship between these fungal agents and degree of parent or inspector reported home indoor dampness, and microbiological laboratory’s mold index. We also compared the concentrations of these agents between multiple allergic cases and healthy controls, as well as IgE-sensitization among cases. Results The concentrations of culturable fungal agents were comparable between houses with parent and inspector reported mold issues and those without. There were no differences in concentrations of the individual or the total summed culturable fungi, (1–3, 1–6)-?-D-glucan, and ergosterol between the controls and the multiple allergic case children, or individual diagnosis of asthma, rhinitis or eczema. Conclusion Culturable fungi, (1–3, 1–6)-?-D-glucan, and ergosterol in dust were not associated with qualitative markers of indoor dampness or mold or indoor humidity. Furthermore, these agents in dust samples were not associated with any health outcomes in the children. PMID:24016225

Choi, Hyunok; Byrne, Sam; Larsen, Lisbeth Suldrup; Sigsgaard, Torben; Thorne, Peter S.; Larsson, Lennart; Sebastian, Aleksandra; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf

2014-01-01

368

A double-blind comparison of 0.25% and 0.05% desoxymethasone, 0.1% betamethasone valerate and 1% hydrocortisone creams in the treatment of eczema.  

PubMed

The efficacy and acceptability of 0.25% and 0.05% desoxymethasone, 0.1% betamethasone valerate and 1% hydrocortisone creams were compared in patients with eczema. A double-blind parallel group multi-centre design was employed in which 96 patients were recruited by four centres. Patients used one cream for a 3-week period and follow-up assessment visits were made at weekly intervals. Efficacy variables were: erythema/redness, scaling, itching and extent of area affected. These variables were assessed by both the investigator and the patient. The 0.25% desoxymethasone was the most effective treatment, producing the greatest degree of improvement in all clinical parameters, hydrocortisone was the least effective and 0.05% desoxymethasone was of intermediate effectiveness. The 0.1% betamethasone produced similar results to 0.25% desoxymethasone for half the assessments; for the other half the results were similar to 0.05% desoxymethasone. No adverse effects were reported during the study. The results are discussed in terms of physical properties of the vehicles and corticosteroid potency. PMID:3301455

Ashton, R E; Catterall, M; Morley, N; Fairris, G; Joseph, D N

1987-01-01

369

Value of Xpert MRSA/SA blood culture assay on the Gene Xpert® Dx System for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci in patients with staphylococcal bacteremia.  

PubMed

The Xpert MRSA/SA BC assay was examined prospectively in patients with staphylococcal bacteremia including 6 patients with blood culture bottles inoculated with biological fluid (synovial fluid in 4 cases and peritoneal fluid in 2 cases). Among the 56 Staphylococci species isolated, 80.3% were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and 19.7% were S. aureus. Methicillin susceptibility test results showed that 77.8% of isolates were methicillin-resistant CoNS (MRCoNS) and 22.2% of isolates were methicillin-susceptible CoNS (MSCoNS). Of 11 S. aureus isolates, 63.7% were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 36.3% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Xpert MRSA/SA BC results showed that genotypic results were in concordance with phenotypic results in 94.6% of cases versus 5.4% of discordant cases. Of these 3 discordant cases, 1 S. aureus isolate had an MRSA phenotype and an SPA(+)mec(+)SCCmec(-) genotype and another S. aureus isolate was phenotypically MSSA and genotypically SPA(+)mec(+)SCCmec(-), and 1 S. epidermidis isolate was phenotypically MSCoNS and genotypically SPA(-)mec(+)SCCmec(-). PMID:23273338

Biendo, Maurice; Mammeri, Hedi; Pluquet, Emilie; Guillon, Hélène; Rousseau, Florence; Canarelli, Brigitte; Belmekki, Mohamed; Eb, François

2013-02-01

370

Clinical and economic outcomes of oral linezolid versus intravenous vancomycin in the treatment of MRSA-complicated, lower-extremity skin and soft-tissue infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundResistant bacteria often complicate the management of skin and soft tissue infections of the lower extremities. This open-label study compared oral linezolid and intravenous vancomycin for management of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

J. Neal Sharpe; Eugene H. Shively; Hiram C. Polk

2005-01-01

371

Characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec insertion site in 108 isolates lacking the mecA gene and identified as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by the Xpert MRSA assay.  

PubMed

During a 3-year period, 848 patients were detected as carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Xpert MRSA assay (Cepheid). Among them, 108 patients (12.7 %) were colonized with strains showing methicillin-susceptible phenotypes and absence of the mecA gene, despite being positive with the rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. DNA sequences of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) insertion site of these "false-positive" strains was determined by direct sequencing of the genomic DNA. More than half (53.7 %) of the strains had DNA sequences unrelated to either SCC or SCCmec and one-third had DNA sequences related to non-mec SCC. Only 10.2 % of the strains carried sequences related to SCCmec, suggesting that a sequence containing the mecA gene was lost from an SCCmec. These findings differ from the general idea that all methicillin-susceptible S. aureus having positive Xpert MRSA assay results are essentially MRSA that lost the mecA gene. PMID:24906440

Stojanov, M; Blanc, D S

2014-11-01

372

Identifying chromosomal selection-sweep regions in facial eczema selection-line animals using an ovine 50K-SNP array.  

PubMed

Facial eczema (FE) is a hepato-mycotoxicosis found mainly in New Zealand sheep and cattle. When genetics was found to be a factor in FE susceptibility, resistant and susceptible selection lines of Romney sheep were established to enable further investigations of this disease trait. Using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip, we conducted a selection-sweep experiment on these FE genetic lines. Two analytical methods were used to detect selection signals, namely the Peddrift test (Dodds & McEwan, 1997) and fixation index FST (Weir & Hill, 2002). Of 50 975 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers tested, there were three that showed highly significant allele frequency differences between the resistant and susceptible animals (Peddrift nominal P < 0.000001). These SNP loci are located on chromosomes OAR1, OAR11 and OAR12 that coincide precisely with the three highest genomic FST peaks. In addition, there are nine less significant Peddrift SNPs (nominal P ? 0.000009) on OAR6 (n = 2), OAR9 (n = 2), OAR12, OAR19 (n = 2), OAR24 and OAR26. In smoothed FST (five-SNP moving average) plots, the five most prominent peaks are on OAR1, OAR6, OAR7, OAR13 and OAR19. Although these smoothed FST peaks do not coincide with the three most significant Peddrift SNP loci, two (on OAR6 and OAR19) overlap with the set of less significant Peddrift SNPs above. Of these 12 Peddrift SNPs and five smoothed FST regions, none is close to the FE candidate genes catalase and ABCG2; however, two on OAR1 and one on OAR13 fall within suggestive quantitative trait locus regions identified in a previous genome screen experiment. The present studies indicated that there are at least eight genomic regions that underwent a selection sweep in the FE lines. PMID:24521158

Phua, S H; Brauning, R; Baird, H J; Dodds, K G

2014-04-01

373

Comparative in situ topoproteome analysis reveals differences in patch test-induced eczema: cytotoxicity-dominated nickel versus pleiotrope pollen reaction.  

PubMed

A subgroup of patients with atopic eczema develops acute eczematous reactions to type I allergy-inducing agents such as pollen that clinically resemble type IV allergies induced by haptens like metal ions. To clarify the underlying immunologic mechanisms, this study was designed to map the inflammatory in situ topoproteome of eczematous responses to grass/birch pollen and nickel by using atopy patch test (APT) and nickel patch test (NPT) as an appropriate clinical model, respectively. Biopsies from NPT (n = 6) and APT (n = 6) with positive reactions at 72 h were analysed by multiple epitope ligand cartography (MELC), which enabled to investigate coexpression of 49 different epitopes immunohistochemically in a single given tissue section. Colocalisation of IgE and FcepsilonRI was investigated by confocal microscopy. Compared with APT responses, NPT reactions were dominated by cytotoxic TIA-1 + and CD8 + T cells. In contrast, the immune response in APT reactions appeared more pleiotrope - as detected by colocalisation analysis. Multiple combinatorial molecular phenotype (CMP) motifs containing naive, early maturation and memory T cell (CD45RA, CD7, CD44, CD45R0), and general activation markers (CLA, HLA-DR, CD13, CD29, CD58, CD71, CD138) were significantly higher expressed in APT when compared with NPT reactions. APT response was confirmed to be accompanied by IgE bound to FcepsilonRI. In summary, our results demonstrate that the NPT reaction is clearly dominated by cytotoxic events, while the APT reaction to pollen grains is more heterogeneous and elicits a combined humoral and cellular immune reaction. PMID:19758337

Eyerich, Kilian; Böckelmann, Raik; Pommer, Ansgar J; Foerster, Stefanie; Hofmeister, Henning; Huss-Marp, Johannes; Cavani, Andrea; Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannes; Gollnick, Harald; Bonnekoh, Bernd; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

2010-06-01

374

Cost-effectiveness of oral alitretinoin in patients with severe chronic hand eczema - a long-term analysis from a Swiss perspective  

PubMed Central

Background The impact on patients suffering from chronic hand eczema (CHE) is enormous, as no licensed systemic treatment option with proven efficacy for CHE is available. Alitretinoin is a novel agent which showed high clinical efficacy in patients with severe, refractory CHE. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of alitretinoin for CHE patient treatment from a Swiss third party payer perspective. A further objective of this study was to determine the burden of disease in Switzerland. Methods A long-term Markov cohort simulation model was used to estimate direct medical costs (€) and clinical effectiveness (quality adjusted life years, QALYs) of treating severe CHE patients with alitretinoin. Comparison was against the standard treatment of supportive care (optimised emollient therapy). Information on response rates were derived from a randomized controlled clinical trial. Costs were considered from the perspective of the Swiss health system. Swiss epidemiological data was derived from official Swiss Statistic institutions. Results Annual costs of alitretinoin treatment accounted for €2'212. After a time horizon of 22.4 years, average remaining long-term costs accounted for €42'208 or €38'795 in the alitretinoin and the standard treatment arm, respectively. Compared with the standard therapy, the addition of alitretinoin yielded an average gain of 0.230 QALYs at the end of the simulation. Accordingly, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio resulted in €14'816/QALY gained. These results were robust to changes in key model assumptions. Conclusion The therapy for CHE patients is currently insufficient. In our long-term model we identified the treatment with alitretinoin as a cost-effective alternative for the therapy of CHE patients in Switzerland. PMID:20579358

2010-01-01

375

[Phenotyping and microarray based genotyping of the antibiotic resistance of MRSA and MSSA from quarter milk samples of clinically healthy dairy cows].  

PubMed

The aim of this investigation was the comprehensive characterization of the in vitro antibiotic resistance profile and of the detectable resistance determinants in a systematic sampling of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from raw milk from clinically healthy cows. Quarter milk samples from all asymptomatic, milk producing cows from 34 Thuringian dairy herds were taken twice (n = 10421 and 10 417 respectively) and investigated bacteriologically. 189 out of the 1902 detected Staphylococcus aureus isolates were selected and established in terms of their resistance pattern using DNA-microarray analysis and agar diffusion test (AVID 1998) for the determination of the genotypic and phenotypic resistance, respectively. 135 isolates (71.4%) did not carry any resistance gene represented on the array. The penicillin resistance gene blaZ was found in 21 isolates (11.1%), which were tested resistant to penicillin by agar diffusion test. Only four isolates (2.1%) harboured the methicillin resistance gene mecA and were thus defined as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). They belonged to the clonal complex CC398 and possessed, beside mecA, also tetracycline resistance genes. Other resistance markers were very rare, with macrolide and aminoglycoside resistance genes being found in only one isolate (0.5%) each. On one hand, the present survey shows the (still) limited antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinically healthy dairy cows. On the other hand, the study demonstrates that MRSA can be detected in raw milk in small quantities, but these strains show only few additional resistance properties. PMID:23367667

Schlotter, Katharina; Hotzel, Helmut; Ehricht, Ralf; Pfeffer, Martin; Monecke, Stefan; Donat, Karsten

2013-01-01

376

Identification, expression and characterization of a major salivary allergen (Cul s 1) of the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis relevant for summer eczema in horses  

PubMed Central

Salivary proteins of Culicoides biting midges are thought to play a key role in summer eczema (SE), a seasonal recurrent allergic dermatitis in horses. The present study describes the identification, expression and clinical relevance of a candidate allergen of the North American midge Culicoides sonorensis. Immunoblot analysis of midge saliva revealed a 66 kDa protein (Cul s 1) that was bound by IgE from several SE-affected (SE+) horses. Further characterization by fragmentation, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics identified Cul s 1 as maltase, an enzyme involved in sugar meal digestion. A cDNA encoding Cul s 1 was isolated and expressed as a polyhistidine-tagged fusion protein in a baculovirus/insect cell expression system. The clinical relevance of the affinity-purified recombinant Cul s 1 (rCul s 1) was investigated by immunoblotting, histamine release testing (HRT) and intradermal testing (IDT) in eight SE+ and eight control horses. Seven SE+ horses had rCul s 1-specific IgE, whereas only one control animal had IgE directed against this allergen. Furthermore, the HRT showed rCul s 1 induced basophil degranulation in samples from seven of eight SE+ horses but in none of the control animals. rCul s 1 also induced immediate (7/8), late-phase (8/8) and delayed (1/8) skin reactivity in IDT on all SE+ horses that had a positive test with the whole body extract (WBE) of C. sonorensis. None of the control horses showed immediate or delayed skin reactivity with rCul s 1, and only one control horse had a positive late-phase response, while several non-specific late-phase reactions were observed with the insect WBE. Thus, we believe rCul s 1 is the first specific salivary allergen of C. sonorensis to be described that promises to advance both in vitro and in vivo diagnosis and may contribute to the development of immunotherapy for SE in horses. PMID:18708061

Langner, Kathrin F. A.; Jarvis, Donald L.; Nimtz, Manfred; Heselhaus, Julia E.; McHolland, Linda E.; Leibold, Wolfgang; Drolet, Barbara S.

2009-01-01

377

Genotyping of skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI)-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains among outpatients in a teaching hospital in Japan: application of a phage-open reading frame typing (POT) kit.  

PubMed

We aimed to elucidate the current epidemiological features of outpatient skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI)-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Japan. Altogether, we evaluated the performance of a phage-open reading frame typing (POT) kit for genotyping these MRSA strains. We collected 57 MRSA strains from all outpatients with SSTIs attending a teaching hospital in Japan. Drug susceptibility measurement and genotyping including SCCmec typing, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and commercial POT-kit were performed. The majority of strains (39 strains, 68 %) had the SCCmec-II element. Seventeen strains (30 %) with SCCmec-IV accounted for the second largest population. Strains with SCCmec-IV and SCCmec-V appeared multiclonal, and a predominance of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene-negative CC8/spa-CC008 strains, as well as the first isolate of an ST93 strain in Japan, was observed among them. Only one USA300 strain was identified. Strains with SCCmec-IV and SCCmec-V were significantly susceptible to antimicrobials. The PVL gene was found in 5 SCCmec-IV strains and 1 SCCmec-V strain. The POT-kit successfully predicted the SCCmec type in 54 strains (95 %), and typing by POT1 scores was highly concordant with SCCmec typing and spa typing. Moreover, three PVL-positive strains fell into a particular POT type (POT scores, 106-77-113). Simpson's index of the POT-kit was 0.977. In conclusion, the present study clarified the multiclonal nature of outpatient SSTI-associated MRSA in a teaching hospital in Japan. These data also underscore the utility of the POT-kit for non-outbreak surveillance through its simple platform consisting of two multiplex PCRs without sequencing. PMID:23150115

Maeda, Tadashi; Saga, Tomoo; Miyazaki, Taito; Kouyama, Yuichi; Harada, Sohei; Iwata, Morihiro; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Kimura, Soichiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Urita, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Motonobu; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro

2012-12-01

378

Comparison of the Vitek Gram-Positive Susceptibility 106 Card and the MRSA-Screen Latex Agglutination Test for Determining Oxacillin Resistance in Clinical Bloodstream Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Vitek automated susceptibility testing system with a modified Gram-Positive Susceptibility (GPS) 106 Card (bioMerieux Vitek, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) and a rapid slide latex agglutination test (MRSA-Screen; Denka Seiken Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) were evaluated for their ability to detect oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The oxacillin-salt agar screen (OS) test, the reference broth microdilution method, and the detection of

T. Yamazumi; S. A. Marshall; W. W. Wilke; D. J. Diekema; M. A. Pfaller; R. N. Jones

2001-01-01

379

Staphylococcus aureus mutants lacking cell wall-bound protein A found in isolates from bacteraemia, MRSA infection and a healthy nasal carrier.  

PubMed

Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a multitude of virulence factors enables it to cause infections, from superficial lesions to life-threatening systemic conditions. Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is a surface protein contributing to S. aureus pathogenesis by interfering with immune responses and activating inflammation. Seven isolates with frameshift mutations in the spa repeat region were investigated to determine whether these mutations lead to truncation and secretion of SpA into the extracellular environment. Five isolates originated from blood cultures, one from an MRSA infection and one from a persistent nasal carrier. Full-length spa genes from the seven isolates were sequenced, and Western blot experiments were performed to localize SpA. Three isolates had identical deviating 25-bp spa repeats, but all isolates displayed different repeat successions. The DNA sequence revealed that the frameshift mutations created premature stop codons in all seven isolates, resulting in truncated SpA of different lengths, however, all lacking the XC region with the C-terminal sorting signal. SpA was detected by Western blot in six of the seven isolates, mainly extracellularly. Our findings demonstrate that S. aureus isolates with truncated SpA, not anchored to the cell wall, can still be found in bacteraemia, infection and among carriers. PMID:23620116

Sørum, Marit; Sangvik, Maria; Stegger, Marc; Olsen, Renate S; Johannessen, Mona; Skov, Robert; Sollid, Johanna U E

2013-02-01

380

The impact of ?-toxin on host cell plasma membrane permeability and cytokine expression during human blood infection by CA-MRSA USA300  

PubMed Central

This investigation examines the influence of ?-toxin (Hla) expression by CA-MRSA on host immune cell integrity and cytokine expression during infection of human blood. Flow cytometry analysis of human blood infected by Staphylococcus aureus PFGE type USA300 or a USA300?hla demonstrated that Hla expression significantly increased plasma membrane permeability of human CD14+ monocytes. The increased susceptibility of human CD14+ monocytes to Hla toxicity paralleled the high cell-surface expression on these cell types of ADAM10. USA300 rapidly associated with PMNs and monocytes but not T cells following inoculation of human blood. Transcription analysis indicated a strong up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine transcription following infection of human blood by USA300 and USA300?hla. CBAs and ELISAs determined that IL-6, IL-10, TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-1?, IL-8, and IL-4 are significantly up-regulated during the initial phases of human blood infection by USA300 relative to mock-infected blood but failed to distinguish any significant differences in secreted cytokine protein concentrations during infection by USA300?hla relative to USA300. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that expression of Hla by USA300 has a significant impact on human CD14+ monocyte plasma membrane integrity but is not exclusively responsible for the proinflammatory cytokine profile induced by USA300 during the initial stages of human blood infection. PMID:24026286

Nygaard, Tyler K.; Pallister, Kyler B.; Zurek, Oliwia W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

2013-01-01

381

Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of antibacterial effect of Ag nanoparticles against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  

PubMed

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been shown great interest because of their potential antibacterial effect. Recently, this has been increased due to resistance in some pathogenic bacteria strains to conventional antibiotics, which has initiated new studies to search for more effective treatments against resistant microorganisms. For these reasons, AgNPs have become an important approach for applications in nanobiotechnology in the development of antibiotic treatment of different bacterial infections. This study was aimed at synthesizing AgNPs using cysteine as a reducer agent and cetyl-tri-methyl-ammonium bromide as a stabilizer in order to obtain more efficient treatment against the pathogen bacteria Escherichia coli O157:H7. These AgNPs were characterized through UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. From these analyses, formation of spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 55 nm was confirmed. Finally, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericide concentration (MBC) of these AgNPs against pathogenic strains E. coli O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were determined in both solid and liquid media. MIC and MBC values were around 0.25 ?g/mL and 1 ?g/mL, respectively. These parameters were comparable to those reported in the literature and were even more effective than other synthesized AgNPs. PMID:24729707

Paredes, Daissy; Ortiz, Claudia; Torres, Rodrigo

2014-01-01

382

Differential Role of Rapamycin and Torin/KU63794 in Inflammatory Response of 264.7 RAW Macrophages Stimulated by CA-MRSA  

PubMed Central

Background. Rapamycin suppresses the RAW264.7 macrophage mediated inflammatory response but in lower doses induces it. In the present study, we tested the suppression of the inflammatory response in the presence of mTOR 1 and 2 inhibitors, Torin and KU63794. Methods. RAW264.7 cells were stimulated for 18?hrs with 106 to 107?CFU/mL inocula of community-acquired- (CA-) MRSA isolate, USA400 strain MW2, in the presence of Vancomycin. Then, in sequential experiments, we added Torin, KU63794, and Rapamycin alone and in various combinations. Supernatants were collected and assayed for TNF, IL-1, IL-6, INF, and NO. Results. Rapamycin induces 10–20% of the inflammatory cascade at dose of 0.1?ng/mL and suppresses it by 60% at dose of 10?ng/mL. The induction is abolished in the presence of Torin KU63794. Torin and KU63794 are consistently suppressing cytokine production 50–60%. Conclusions. There is a differential response between Rapamycin (mTOR-1 inhibitor) and Torin KU63794 (mTOR 1 and 2 inhibitors). Torin and KU63794 exhibit a dose related suppression. Rapamycin exhibits a significant induction-suppression biphasic response. Knowledge of such response may allow manipulation of the septic inflammatory cascade for clinical advantages. PMID:24800098

Shappley, Rebekah K. H.

2014-01-01

383

The impact of ?-toxin on host cell plasma membrane permeability and cytokine expression during human blood infection by CA-MRSA USA300.  

PubMed

This investigation examines the influence of ?-toxin (Hla) expression by CA-MRSA on host immune cell integrity and cytokine expression during infection of human blood. Flow cytometry analysis of human blood infected by Staphylococcus aureus PFGE type USA300 or a USA300?hla demonstrated that Hla expression significantly increased plasma membrane permeability of human CD14(+) monocytes. The increased susceptibility of human CD14(+) monocytes to Hla toxicity paralleled the high cell-surface expression on these cell types of ADAM10. USA300 rapidly associated with PMNs and monocytes but not T cells following inoculation of human blood. Transcription analysis indicated a strong up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine transcription following infection of human blood by USA300 and USA300?hla. CBAs and ELISAs determined that IL-6, IL-10, TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-1?, IL-8, and IL-4 are significantly up-regulated during the initial phases of human blood infection by USA300 relative to mock-infected blood but failed to distinguish any significant differences in secreted cytokine protein concentrations during infection by USA300?hla relative to USA300. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that expression of Hla by USA300 has a significant impact on human CD14(+) monocyte plasma membrane integrity but is not exclusively responsible for the proinflammatory cytokine profile induced by USA300 during the initial stages of human blood infection. PMID:24026286

Nygaard, Tyler K; Pallister, Kyler B; Zurek, Oliwia W; Voyich, Jovanka M

2013-11-01

384

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Children  

MedlinePLUS

... Notice This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information ... Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. ...

385

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... Notice This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information ... Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. ...

386

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Infants  

MedlinePLUS

... Notice This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information ... Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. ...

387

JAMA Patient Page: Atopic Eczema  

MedlinePLUS

... because of severe side effects. • Light therapy with UV light can be used alone or along with the drug psoralen for children older than 12 years. • Antibiotics are used if the skin gets infected. Changes ...

388

Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema): An Appraisal  

PubMed Central

Atopic (spontaneous) allergies and nonatopic (induced) allergies are often confused. The meaning of these terms is definite, but the occurrence of either (in a given individual) may depend upon his autonomic nervous system control. The evidence that allergens produce the cutaneous changes in atopic dermatitis is flimsy, and neurodermatitis would be a more appropriate term since the entity falls into that pattern of skin changes. Treatment carried out, from infancy sometimes to old age, consists of careful management of the patient in the physical and emotional spheres, avoidance of external irritation and the use of a multiplicity of anti-pruritic, anti-inflammatory and sedative agents. PMID:13955448

Hudson, Arthur L.

1962-01-01

389

Natural advances in eczema care.  

PubMed

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing dermatitis characterized by increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and subjective symptoms of pruritus, inflammation, skin sensitivity, and dryness. AD is a frequent issue for individuals of color, though it may be underrecognized. Therapy for AD is based on reducing pruritus and inflammation, and normalizing skin surface lipids, particularly ceramides. Topical corticosteroids are the gold-standard treatment for controlling disease flares, but a variety of active natural ingredients can be used adjunctively to help control itch, inflammation, and dryness. Oatmeal, particularly avenanthramides, a newly discovered oat fraction, may be of particular value in restoring the cutaneous barrier and reducing symptoms of AD. Feverfew, licorice, and dexpanthenol also have been shown to be effective in the management of inflammation. Licorice, which has some skin-lightening activity, may be helpful in patients with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). The compromised skin barrier in AD is especially vulnerable to UV radiation exposure. Several new long-lasting photostable sunscreen ingredients provide longer durations of protection with improved cosmetic attributes. PMID:18277662

Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Fowler, Joseph F; Rigel, Darrell S; Taylor, Susan C

2007-12-01

390

Helping Kids with Severe Eczema  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Diseases NIAID Researchers Identify Potential Drug Target for Allergies Herpes Virus Exploits Protein on Skin Cell Surfaces to Enhance Disease Allergies May Have Evolved to Protect Against Toxins Skip ...

391

The ongoing battle against multi-resistant strains: in-vitro inhibition of hospital-acquired MRSA, VRE, Pseudomonas, ESBL E. coli and Klebsiella species in the presence of plant-derived antiseptic oils.  

PubMed

The fight against hospital-acquired infections involving antibiotic-resistant microorganisms has become of critical concern to surgeons worldwide. In addition to the development of new effective antibiotic chemotherapy, exploration of 'forgotten' topical antibacterial agents from the pre-antibiotic era has recently gained new attention. We report the promising efficacy of plant-derived antiseptic oils used in traditional aboriginal and south-east Asian treatments such as Lemongrass, Eucalyptus and Tea Tree Oil in the inhibition of clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the in-vitro setting. Large consistent zones of inhibition were observed for all three plant-derived oils tested in an agar diffusion test. The commonly used antibacterial agents chlorhexidine 0.1%, and ethanol (70%), and standard olive oil consistently demonstrated notably lower or no efficacy in regard to growth inhibition of strains. Notably, Lemongrass oil proved to be particularly active against gram-positive bacteria, while Tea Tree oil showed superior inhibition of gram-negative microorganisms. As proven in vitro, plant-derived antiseptic oils may represent a promising and affordable topical agent to support surgical treatment against multi-resistant and hospital-acquired infections. PMID:23199627

Warnke, Patrick H; Lott, Alexander J S; Sherry, Eugene; Wiltfang, Joerg; Podschun, Rainer

2013-06-01

392

National Eczema Association for Science and Education  

MedlinePLUS

... ascomycin derivative, is a nonstero… Read More » U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding Source ... good th… Read More » Skin pH: From Basic Science to Basic Skin Care Source Ali SM, Yosipovitch ...

393

Pediatric herpes simplex virus infections: an evidence-based approach to treatment.  

PubMed

Herpes simplex virus is a common virus that causes a variety of clinical presentations ranging from mild to life-threatening. Orolabial and genital herpes are common disorders that can often be managed in an outpatient setting; however, some patients do present to the emergency department with those conditions, and emergency clinicians should be aware of possible complications in the pediatric population. Neonatal herpes is a rare disorder, but prompt recognition and initiation of antiviral therapy is imperative, as the morbidity and mortality of the disease is high. Herpes encephalitis is an emergency that also requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Herpes simplex virus is also responsible for a variety of other clinical presentations, including herpes gladiatorum, herpetic whitlow, eczema herpeticum, and ocular herpes. This issue reviews the common clinical presentations of the herpes simplex virus, the life-threatening infections that require expedient identification and management, and recommended treatment regimens. PMID:24649621

Sanders, Jennifer E; Garcia, Sylvia E

2014-01-01

394

Virulence gene and expression analysis of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus causing iliopsoas abscess and discitis with thrombocytopenia.  

PubMed

Iliopsoas abscesses (IPAs) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are rare; however, IPAs from community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) may be increasing. In Japan, we previously described an adolescent athlete case of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive ST30 CA-MRSA (strain NN12). In this study, we describe an IPA and discitis case from a variant of the successful PVL-negative CA-MRSA clone (ST8 CA-MRSA/J) in Japan. The patient was a 62-year-old man with intractable eczema, who had been diagnosed with IPAs and discitis (L1-L2). CA-MRSA (strain NN55) was isolated from blood, pus, and joint fluid. The invasive infections seemed to have originated in his intractable eczema, and the characteristics of this case, systemic myalgia and marked thrombocytopenia, seemed to have been caused by an exotoxin. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that NN55 possessed genotype ST8/spa606(t1767)/agr1/CoaIII and SCCmecIV of a novel subtype (encoding new cell-wall-anchored surface protein/J [CWASP/J]), exhibited enhanced expression of the cytolytic peptide genes, psm? and hld, and was resistant to gentamicin (caused by aacA-aphD), similar to ST8 CA-MRSA/J; however, NN55 lacked pathogenicity island SaPIj50 [carrying tst, encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1)] of ST8 CA-MRSA/J, suggesting a variant (ST8 CA-MRSA/Jv). Strains NN12 and NN55 both caused bacteremia, IPAs, and adjacent musculoskeletal infections, preceded by intractable skin infections, and possessed high potential for adherence and enhanced expression of psm? and hld. The data suggest the role of a combination of CA-MRSA adhesin/cytolytic peptides (not PVL or TSST-1) in the pathogenesis of IPAs (and perhaps of systemic myalgia and marked thrombocytopenia). PMID:23371452

Hung, Wei-Chun; Mori, Hiromitsu; Tsuji, Sayaka; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

2013-10-01

395

Environmental Cleaning and Disinfecting for MRSA  

MedlinePLUS

... detergents are products that are used to remove soil, dirt, dust, organic matter, and germs (like bacteria, viruses, and fungi). Cleaners or detergents work by washing the surface to lift dirt and germs off surfaces so they can be rinsed away with water. The same thing happens when you wash your ...

396

MRSA: The Private-Sector Response  

PubMed Central

With Medicare eliminating payment for the treatment of several preventable hospital errors and infections, the market for effective infection-control interventions is poised to grow quickly. Products that merge information technology with biotechnology can improve quality of care, reduce unnecessary suffering, and eliminate waste of resources. PMID:22478702

JACKSON, VIRGINIA; NASH, DAVID B.

2008-01-01

397

A study of the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in dermatology inpatients  

PubMed Central

Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a cause of increased morbidity and mortality in debilitated and immunocompromised patients. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of MRSA among dermatology inpatients and elucidate its predisposing factors and antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Materials and Methods: This prospective study involved all the inpatients in the dermatology ward with suspected bacterial infections, both primary and secondary. Gram's stain, pus culture, and antibiotic sensitivity were the main tests done. Results: There were 61 patients in this study, with 36 males (59%) and 25 females (41%). The age group maximally affected was 41-50 years (21.6%). Vesiculobullous disorders (22, 36.1%) and eczemas (16, 26.2%) were the commonest dermatoses with secondary infection. Extremities (72.1%) and the trunk (26.2%) were the commonest sites involved. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was the commonest systemic illness (11.5%). Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest isolate, grown in 52 patients (85.2%) of whom 16 (30.80%) were MRSA positive. MRSA constituted 22.2% of the total bacterial isolates. All the MRSA isolates (100%) were resistant to cloxacillin and oxacillin, while all the isolates (100%) were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. Conclusions: The prevalence of MRSA in this study was high. It was most commonly seen in patients with vesiculobullous disorders. A high sensitivity of MRSA was found to amikacin. There was no relation between prolonged antibiotic therapy and MRSA in this study.

Vijayamohan, N.; Nair, S. Pradeep

2014-01-01

398

Inverse association between eczema and meningioma: a meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose  The pathogenesis of primary brain tumors may be related to immune response. Prior studies have shown a strong association\\u000a between allergy and glioma; however, so far no significant association has been established between allergy and meningioma.\\u000a Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies to investigate the association of meningioma with the overall and\\u000a specific allergic conditions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  PubMed,

Mei Wang; Chao Chen; Jintao Qu; Tao Xu; Yicheng Lu; Juxiang Chen; Shenhong Wu

399

[Comparison between 2 steroid dosage forms in psoriasis and eczema].  

PubMed

This trial was designed to evaluate the clinical effect of a new Topical steroid, the desoximetasone (test name A 41 304 from Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft). A randomized, double-blind, right-left comparative trial has been carried out in 22 patients with atopic dermatitis and on 24 patients with psoriasis. As a comparative drug, a betamethasone 17-valerate preparation, being the strongest on the market, has been used. The new compound showed a better effect on both indications, the difference being significant (p less than 0,005) on psoriasis. PMID:779298

Björnberg, A; Hellgren, L

1975-01-01

400

Case History of Infected Eczema Treated with Essential Oils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The following case history details a treatment with essential oils of an infected eczematous lesion over the author's own right calf. The use of tea tree, lemon, bergamot, lavender and niaouli resulted in demonstrable healing after six days. Lavender and tea tree had an immediate effect on itchiness. Detailed and controlled studies are required to confirm the role of these

C. Blamey

401

Pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm after MRSA septicemia in a pediatric patient.  

PubMed

We document a previously unreported case of a pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm (PAP) that developed in a pediatric patient initially presenting with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus hip joint sepsis. This is the first reported case of PAP of infectious origin in a pediatric patient, and this case is unique as the evolution of the PAP was documented by computed tomography. PMID:23701806

Garnett, Gwendolyn M; Kimball, Sarah; Kon, Kevin; Woo, Russell K

2013-05-01

402

MRSA infection of buttocks, vulva, and genital tract in women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staphylococcus aureus, although a common commensal bacterium, is a frequent cause of skin and soft tissue infections as well as life-threatening\\u000a blood stream infections. Resistance to methicillin, which previously was associated with only hospitalized patients, has become\\u000a a common community-based phenomenon. Less well known is S. aureus vaginal colonization and heterosexual transmission, mainly by skin-mucosa contact. Recognizing the vagina as

Orna Reichman; Jack D. Sobel

2009-01-01

403

Spontaneous MRSA postcricoid abscess: A case report and literature review.  

PubMed

Laryngeal abscesses are rare but potentially life-threatening infections due to potential airway obstruction. Most abscesses occur in the epiglottis or preepiglottic space as a sequela of acute supraglottitis. Abscesses in the posterior larynx are extremely rare and typically due to instrumentation or trauma. Appropriate workup and management of the airway are essential for optimizing outcomes in these patients. We present an interesting case and our management of a spontaneous posterior laryngeal abscess due to methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus. Laryngoscope, 124:2583-2585, 2014. PMID:25044135

Boyce, Brian J; deSilva, Brad W

2014-11-01

404