Science.gov

Sample records for eddy accumulation technique

  1. Flux of organic compounds from grass measured by relaxed eddy accumulation technique.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Marcus; Ek-Olausson, Birgitta; Ljungström, Evert; Langer, Sarka

    2003-12-01

    Fluxes of some Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from grass were measured at a golf course in western Sweden, using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) technique. The sampling was done by collecting VOC onto adsorbent tubes and the analysis was performed by thermal desorption followed by GC/MS. High emissions were observed after cutting. Transient fluxes of (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate (0.51 microg m(-2) s(-1)), (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol (0.14 microg m(-2) s(-1)) and (Z)-3-hexenal (0.40 microg m(-2) s(-1)) were measured, even at low temperatures. The REA technique requires a relatively large fetch area that is sometimes not available. Therefore, a procedure for correcting measured fluxes from a limited fetch is suggested. PMID:14710940

  2. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the relaxed eddy accumulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensen, A.; Nemitz, E.; Flynn, M. J.; Blatter, A.; Jones, S. K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hensen, B.; Pryor, S.; Jensen, B.; Otjes, R. P.; Cobussen, J.; Loubet, B.; Erisman, J. W.; Gallagher, M. W.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.

    2008-10-01

    The exchange of NH3 between grassland and the atmosphere was determined using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements. The use of REA is of special interest for NH3, since the determination of fluxes at one height permits multiple systems to be deployed to quantify vertical flux divergence (either due to effects of chemical production or advection). During the Braunschweig integrated experiment four different continuous-sampling REA systems were operated during a period of about 10 days and were compared against a reference provided by independent application of the Aerodynamic Gradient Method (AGM). The experiment covered episodes before, after cutting and fertilising and provided a wide range of fluxes -60 3600 ng NH3 m-2 s-1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3 surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that auto-referencing periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects, further improvements in sampling precision are needed to allow measurement of flux divergence. Wet chemical techniques will be developed further since they use the sticky and reactive properties of NH3 that impedes development of cheaper optical systems.

  3. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensen, A.; Nemitz, E.; Flynn, M. J.; Blatter, A.; Jones, S. K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hensen, B.; Pryor, S. C.; Jensen, B.; Otjes, R. P.; Cobussen, J.; Loubet, B.; Erisman, J. W.; Gallagher, M. W.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    The exchange of Ammonia (NH3) between grassland and the atmosphere was determined using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements. The use of REA is of special interest for NH3, since the determination of fluxes at one height permits multiple systems to be deployed to quantify vertical flux divergence (either due to effects of chemical production or advection). During the Braunschweig integrated experiment four different continuous-sampling REA systems were operated during a period of about 10 days and were compared against a reference provided by independent application of the Aerodynamic Gradient Method (AGM). The experiment covered episodes before and after both cutting and fertilizing and provided a wide range of fluxes -60-3600 ng NH3 m-2 s-1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3 surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that reference sampling periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects, significant improvements in sampling precision are essential to allow robust determination of flux divergence in future studies. Wet chemical techniques will be developed further since they use the adsorptive and reactive properties of NH3 that impedes development of cheaper optical systems.

  4. Methane fluxes above the Hainich forest by True Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas; Gentsch, Lydia; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the role of forests for the global methane cycle requires quantifying vegetation-atmosphere exchange of methane, however observations of turbulent methane fluxes remain scarce. Here we measured turbulent fluxes of methane (CH4) above a beech-dominated old-growth forest in the Hainich National Park, Germany, and validated three different measurement approaches: True Eddy Accumulation (TEA, closed-path laser spectroscopy), and eddy covariance (EC, open-path and closed-path laser spectroscopy, respectively). The Hainich flux tower is a long-term Fluxnet and ICOS site with turbulent fluxes and ecosystem observations spanning more than 15 years. The current study is likely the first application of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) for the measurement of turbulent exchange of methane and one of the very few studies comparing open-path and closed-path eddy covariance (EC) setups side-by-side. We observed uptake of methane by the forest during the day (a methane sink with a maximum rate of 0.03 μmol m‑2 s‑1 at noon) and no or small fluxes of methane from the forest to the atmosphere at night (a methane source of typically less than 0.01 μmol m‑2 s‑1) based on continuous True Eddy Accumulation measurements in September 2015. First results comparing TEA to EC CO2 fluxes suggest that True Eddy Accumulation is a valid option for turbulent flux quantifications using slow response gas analysers (here CRDS laser spectroscopy, other potential techniques include mass spectroscopy). The TEA system was one order of magnitude more energy efficient compared to closed-path eddy covariance. The open-path eddy covariance setup required the least amount of user interaction but is often constrained by low signal-to-noise ratios obtained when measuring methane fluxes over forests. Closed-path eddy covariance showed good signal-to-noise ratios in the lab, however in the field it required significant amounts of user intervention in addition to a high power consumption. We

  5. Simultaneous Flux Measurements of CO2, its Stable Isotope Ratios and Trace Gases Based on Eddy Accumulation Technique for Flux Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hirata, R.

    2007-12-01

    for on-site measurement. Therefore, as a first step, we are planning to measure those fluxes based on an eddy accumulation technique coupled with flask sampling and high precision lab analysis. We report current progress of the development.

  6. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOEpatents

    Petri, Mark C.; Kupperman, David S.; Morman, James A.; Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  7. A True Eddy Accumulation - Eddy Covariance hybrid for measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is state-of-the-art in directly and continuously measuring turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapor. However, low signal-to-noise ratios, high flow rates and missing or complex gas analyzers limit it's application to few scalars. True eddy accumulation, based on conditional sampling ideas by Desjardins in 1972, requires no fast response analyzers and is therefore potentially applicable to a wider range of scalars. Recently we showed possibly the first successful implementation of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide of a grassland. However, most accumulation systems share the complexity of having to store discrete air samples in physical containers representing entire flux averaging intervals. The current study investigates merging principles of eddy accumulation and eddy covariance, which we here refer to as "true eddy accumulation in transient mode" (TEA-TM). This direct flux method TEA-TM combines true eddy accumulation with continuous sampling. The TEA-TM setup is simpler than discrete accumulation methods while avoiding the need for fast response gas analyzers and high flow rates required for EC. We implemented the proposed TEA-TM method and measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O) above a mixed beech forest at the Hainich Fluxnet and ICOS site, Germany, using a G2301 laser spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA). We further simulated a TEA-TM sampling system using measured high frequency CO2 time series from an open-path gas analyzer. We operated TEA-TM side-by-side with open-, enclosed- and closed-path EC flux systems for CO2, H2O and CH4 (LI-7500, LI-7200, LI-6262, LI-7700, Licor, USA, and FGGA LGR, USA). First results show that TEA-TM CO2 fluxes were similar to EC fluxes. Remaining differences were similar to those between the three eddy covariance setups (open-, enclosed- and closed-path gas analyzers). Measured TEA-TM CO2 fluxes from our physical

  8. Application of relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) on managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, M.; Hübner, J.; Ruppert, J.; Brand, W. A.; Foken, T.

    2014-05-01

    Relaxed eddy accumulation is applied for measuring fluxes of trace gases for which there is a lack of sensors fast enough in their resolution for eddy-covariance. On managed grasslands, the length of time between management events and the application of relaxed eddy accumulation has an essential influence on the determination of the proportionality factor b and thereby on the resulting flux. In this study this effect is discussed for the first time. Also, scalar similarity between proxy scalars and scalars of interest is affected until the ecosystem has completely recovered. Against this background, CO2 fluxes were continuously measured and 13CO2 isofluxes were determined with a high measurement precision on two representative days in summer 2010. This enabled the evaluation of the 13CO2 flux portion of the entire CO2 flux, in order to estimate potential influences on tracer experiments in ecosystem sciences and to compare a common method for the partitioning of the net ecosystem exchange into assimilation and respiration based on temperature and light response with an isotopic approach directly based on the isotope discrimination of the biosphere.

  9. A Comparison of GHG Flux Measurements by Relaxed Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance Methods Using FTIR and QCL Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, A. T.; Laborde, M.; Hensen, A.; van den Bulk, P.; Famulari, D.; Griffith, D. W.; Nemitz, E.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation results obtained with a novel system for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements using an Ecotech Spectronus FTIR analyzer (Griffth et al, 2012) will be compared to eddy covariance fluxes using an Aerodyne QCL and a Licor 6262 NDIR analyzer. The REA FTIR system can be easily combined with other standard (e.g. NDIR) analyzers suited for eddy covariance measurements to allow for scaling of the obtained up/down concentration differences with the directly measured fluxes. Furthermore the FTIR system allows for on-line simultaneous high precision concentration measurement of a large number of different gases and even isotope composition, next to the measurement of CO2, CH4 and N2O mixing ratios. The final design goal for the REA FTIR system is an attractive fully automated, low maintenance system for long-term monitoring of Greenhouse Gas fluxes at the hourly time scale and a spatial scale of about 1 km2. During a campaign of four weeks in June 2013 (in the framework of the InGOS EU project) at a grazed grassland site at Easter Bush, Scotland (UK), simultaneous surface flux measurements of N2O and additionally CO2 and CH4 have been performed using our systems and a number of setups from other groups.. Weather conditions during the campaign were excellent and after the application of fertilizer at the field and some rainfall the increased emission of N2O was detected clearly by all systems. Both the eddy covariance and REA methods performed well during the campaign and the measured fluxes compare satisfactorily. In general the resulting fluxes from the FTIR system are lower then the QCL based results. Reasons for these deviations will be discussed together with implications of the results for the design of future REA measurements using the FTIR system. Griffith, D.W.T., N.M. Deutscher, C.G.R. Caldow, G. Kettlewell, M. Riggenbach and S. Hammer, A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications. Atmospheric Measurement

  10. Toward finding a universally applicable parameterization of the β factor for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Teresa; Hrdina, Amy; Thomas, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The traditional eddy covariance (EC) technique requires the use of fast responding sensors (≥ 10 Hz) that do not exist for many chemical species found in the atmosphere. In this case, the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) method offers a means to calculate fluxes of trace gases and other scalar quantities (Businger and Oncley, 1990) and was originally derived from the eddy accumulation method (EA) first proposed by Desjardins (1972). While REA lessens the requirements for sensors and sampling and thus offers practical appeal, it introduces a dependence of the computed flux from a proportionality factor β. The accuracy of the REA fluxes hinges upon the correct determination of β, which was found to vary between 0.40 and 0.63 (Milne et al., 1999, Ammann and Meixner, 2002, Ruppert et al., 2006). However, formulating a universally valid parameterization for β instead of empirical evaluation has remained a conundrum and has been a main limitation for REA. In this study we take a fresh look at the dependencies and mathematical models of β by analyzing eddy covariance (EC) data and REA simulations for two field experiments in drastically contrasting environments: an exclusively physically driven environment in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and a biologically active system in a grassland in Germany. The main objective is to work toward a model parameterization for β that can be applied over wide range of surface conditions and forcings without the need for empirical evaluation, which is not possible for most REA applications. Our study discusses two different models to define β: (i) based upon scalar-scalar similarity, in which a different scalar is measured with fast-response sensors as a proxy for the scalar of interest, here referred to as β0; and (ii) computed solely from the vertical wind statistics, assuming a linear relationship between the scalar of interest and the vertical wind speed, referred to as βw. Results are presented for the carbon

  11. Non-Destructive Techniques Based on Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  12. Non-destructive techniques based on eddy current testing.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  13. Ergodicity test of the eddy-covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hu, Y.; Yu, Y.; Lü, S.

    2015-09-01

    The ergodic hypothesis is a basic hypothesis typically invoked in atmospheric surface layer (ASL) experiments. The ergodic theorem of stationary random processes is introduced to analyse and verify the ergodicity of atmospheric turbulence measured using the eddy-covariance technique with two sets of field observational data. The results show that the ergodicity of atmospheric turbulence in atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is relative not only to the atmospheric stratification but also to the eddy scale of atmospheric turbulence. The eddies of atmospheric turbulence, of which the scale is smaller than the scale of the ABL (i.e. the spatial scale is less than 1000 m and temporal scale is shorter than 10 min), effectively satisfy the ergodic theorems. Under these restrictions, a finite time average can be used as a substitute for the ensemble average of atmospheric turbulence, whereas eddies that are larger than ABL scale dissatisfy the mean ergodic theorem. Consequently, when a finite time average is used to substitute for the ensemble average, the eddy-covariance technique incurs large errors due to the loss of low-frequency information associated with larger eddies. A multi-station observation is compared with a single-station observation, and then the scope that satisfies the ergodic theorem is extended from scales smaller than the ABL, approximately 1000 m to scales greater than about 2000 m. Therefore, substituting the finite time average for the ensemble average of atmospheric turbulence is more faithfully approximate the actual values. Regardless of vertical velocity or temperature, the variance of eddies at different scales follows Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) better if the ergodic theorem can be satisfied; if not it deviates from MOST. The exploration of ergodicity in atmospheric turbulence is doubtlessly helpful in understanding the issues in atmospheric turbulent observations and provides a theoretical basis for overcoming related difficulties.

  14. Toward finding a universally applicable parameterization of the β factor for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Teresa; Hrdina, Amy; Thomas, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The traditional eddy covariance (EC) technique requires the use of fast responding sensors (≥ 10 Hz) that do not exist for many chemical species found in the atmosphere. In this case, the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) method offers a means to calculate fluxes of trace gases and other scalar quantities (Businger and Oncley, 1990) and was originally derived from the eddy accumulation method (EA) first proposed by Desjardins (1972). While REA lessens the requirements for sensors and sampling and thus offers practical appeal, it introduces a dependence of the computed flux from a proportionality factor β. The accuracy of the REA fluxes hinges upon the correct determination of β, which was found to vary between 0.40 and 0.63 (Milne et al., 1999, Ammann and Meixner, 2002, Ruppert et al., 2006). However, formulating a universally valid parameterization for β instead of empirical evaluation has remained a conundrum and has been a main limitation for REA. In this study we take a fresh look at the dependencies and mathematical models of β by analyzing eddy covariance (EC) data and REA simulations for two field experiments in drastically contrasting environments: an exclusively physically driven environment in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and a biologically active system in a grassland in Germany. The main objective is to work toward a model parameterization for β that can be applied over wide range of surface conditions and forcings without the need for empirical evaluation, which is not possible for most REA applications. Our study discusses two different models to define β: (i) based upon scalar-scalar similarity, in which a different scalar is measured with fast-response sensors as a proxy for the scalar of interest, here referred to as β0; and (ii) computed solely from the vertical wind statistics, assuming a linear relationship between the scalar of interest and the vertical wind speed, referred to as βw. Results are presented for the carbon

  15. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train’s motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train’s vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  16. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train's motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train's vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  17. Technique for temperature compensation of eddy-current proximity probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Eddy-current proximity probes are used in turbomachinery evaluation testing and operation to measure distances, primarily vibration, deflection, or displacment of shafts, bearings and seals. Measurements of steady-state conditions made with standard eddy-current proximity probes are susceptible to error caused by temperature variations during normal operation of the component under investigation. Errors resulting from temperature effects for the specific probes used in this study were approximately 1.016 x 10 to the -3 mm/deg C over the temperature range of -252 to 100 C. This report examines temperature caused changes on the eddy-current proximity probe measurement system, establishes their origin, and discusses what may be done to minimize their effect on the output signal. In addition, recommendations are made for the installation and operation of the electronic components associated with an eddy-current proximity probe. Several techniques are described that provide active on-line error compensation for over 95 percent of the temperature effects.

  18. Analysis techniques for eddy current imaging of carbon fiber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Martin H.; Meyendorf, Norbert; Heuer, Henning

    2010-04-01

    Carbon fiber materials become more and more important for many applications. Unlike metal the technological parameters and certified quality control mechanisms for Raw Carbon Fiber Materials (RCF) have not yet been developed. There is no efficient and reliable testing system for in-line inspections and consecutive manual inspections of RCF and post laminated Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP). Based upon the multi-frequency Eddy Current system developed at Fraunhofer IZFP, structural and hidden defects such as missing carbon fiber bundles, lanes, suspensions, fringes, missing sewing threads and angle errors can be detected. Using an optimized sensor array and intelligent image pre-processing algorithms, the complex impedance signal can be allocated to different carbon fiber layers. This technique enables the detection of defects in depths of up to 5 layers, including the option of free scale measuring resolution and testing frequency. Appropriate parameter lists for optimal error classifications are available. The dimensions of the smallest detectable flaws are in the range of a few millimeters. Algorithms and basic Eddy Current C-Scan processing techniques for carbon fiber material testing are described in this paper.

  19. Eddy current techniques for super duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, C.; Sacramento, R.; Areiza, M. C.; Rocha, A.; Santos, R.; Rebello, J. M.; Pereira, G.

    2015-08-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a two-phase material where the microstructure consists of grains of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ). SDSS exhibit an attractive combination of properties, such as: strength, toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Nevertheless, SDSS attain these properties after a controlled solution heat treatment, leading to a similar volumetric fraction of δ and γ. Any further heat treatment, welding operation for example, can change the balance of the original phases, or may also lead to precipitation of a deleterious phase, such as sigma (σ). For these situations, the material corrosion resistance is severely impaired. In the present study, several SDSS samples with low σ phase content and non-balanced microstructure were intentionally obtained by thermally treating SDSS specimens. Electromagnetic techniques, conventional Eddy Current Testing (ECT) and Saturated Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), were employed to characterize the SDSS samples. The results showed that ECT and SLOFEC are reliable techniques to evaluate σ phase presence in SDSS and can provide an estimation of the δ content.

  20. A lee-side eddy and its influence on snow accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Franziska; Mott, Rebecca; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of changes in seasonal mountain snow water resources is essential for e.g. hydropower companies. To successfully predict these changes a fundamental understanding of precipitation patterns and their changes in mountainous terrain is needed. Both, snow accumulation and ablation need to be investigated to make precise predictions of the amount of water stored in seasonal snow cover. Only if the processes governing snow accumulation and ablation are understood with sufficient quantitative accuracy, the evolution of snow water resources under a changing climate can be addressed. Additionally, knowledge of detailed snow accumulation patterns is essential to assess avalanche danger. In alpine terrain, snow accumulation is strongly dependent on the local wind field. Based on the concept of preferential deposition, reduced snow accumulation is expected on the upper windward slope of a mountain due to updrafts, while enhanced snow accumulation should occur through blocking at the windward foot or due to flow separation on the leeward side. However, the understanding of these processes is mainly based on numerical simulations, as they are hard to measure. A LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) campaign was conducted in October 2015 in the Dischma valley (Davos, CH) to investigate the local flow field in the lee of the Sattelhorn during a one-day snowfall event. The flow field was monitored using a plane position indicator (PPI) scan at 25/28° and a range height indicator (RHI) scan across the Sattelhorn. Additionally, snow height change measurements on the leeward side of the Sattelhorn were performed by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Analyses of the flow field in the framework of preferential deposition are in agreement with the concept of flow separation and preferred snow deposition on leeward slopes. A very persistent eddy that formed over the leeward slope of the Sattelhorn detached from the main flow became evident from the retrievals of the RHI scans. An

  1. Direct measurement of biosphere-atmosphere isotopic CO2 exchange using the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, T. J.; Sargent, S. D.; Baker, J. M.; Lee, X.; Tanner, B. D.; Greene, J.; Swiatek, E.; Billmark, K.

    2008-04-01

    Quantifying isotopic CO2 exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere presents a significant measurement challenge, but has the potential to provide important constraints on local, regional, and global carbon cycling. Past approaches have indirectly estimated isotopic CO2 exchange using relaxed eddy accumulation, the flask-based isoflux method, and flux-gradient techniques. Eddy covariance (EC) is an attractive method because it has the fewest theoretical assumptions and the potential to give a direct measure of isotopic CO2 flux, but it requires a highly sensitive and relatively fast response instrument. To date, no such field measurements have been reported. Here we describe the use of a closed-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and eddy covariance (EC-TDL) system for isotopic (C16O2, 13CO2, C18O16O) flux measurements. Results are presented from an intensive field experiment conducted over a soybean canopy from 18 July to 20 September 2006. This experiment represents a rigorous field test of the EC-TDL technique because the transport was dominated by relatively high frequency eddies. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange (FN) measured with the EC-TDL system showed strong correlation (r2 = 0.99) in the half-hourly fluxes with an EC open-path infrared gas analyzer (EC-IRGA) over the 60-d period. Net CO2 flux measured with the EC-IRGA and EC-TDL systems agreed to within 9%. Flux loss associated with diminished frequency response beyond 1 Hz for the EC-TDL system was approximately 8% during daytime windy (>4 m s-1) conditions. There was no significant evidence of a kinetic-type fractionation effect related to a phase shift among isotopologues due to tube attenuation. Investigation of isotopic spectral similarity in the flux ratio (δNx) for both 13CO2 and C18O16O transport showed that δNx was relatively independent of eddy scale for this ecosystem type. Flux loss, therefore, did not significantly bias δNx. There was excellent agreement between isofluxes (F

  2. Direct Measurement of Biosphere-Atmosphere Isotopic CO2 Exchange using the Eddy Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, T.; Sargent, S.; Tanner, B.; Greene, J.; Swiatek, E.; Baker, J.; Lee, X.

    2006-12-01

    Quantifying isotopic CO2 exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere presents a significant measurement challenge, but has the potential to provide important constraints on local, regional, and global carbon cycling. Such measurements are rare because of the difficulties quantifying CO2 isotope ratios or individual isotopomer mixing ratios at the precision and frequency required for continuous scalar flux estimation. This limitation has slowed the understanding of key isotope discrimination mechanisms and carbon cycle processes. Past approaches have indirectly estimated isotopic CO2 exchange using relaxed eddy accumulation, the flask-based isoflux method, and flux-gradient techniques. Eddy covariance is an attractive method because it has the fewest theoretical assumptions and the potential to give a direct measurement of isotopic CO2 exchange, but requires a highly sensitive and relatively fast-response instrument. To date, no such field measurements have been reported. Here, we describe the use of a closed- path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system (Trace Gas Analyzer, TGA100A, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and a sampling manifold optimized for eddy covariance isotopic (C16O2, 13CO2, C18O16O) flux measurements. The sampling system was designed to preserve frequency response, to avoid excessive consumption of expensive calibration gases and, more importantly, to avoid bias between the air sample and three calibration gas measurements. Results are presented from an intensive field experiment conducted at the University of Minnesota from July 18 to September 18, 2006. The field experiment was designed to evaluate: 1) the feasibility of making continuous isotopic flux measurement over extended periods of time; 2) differences in isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem CO2 exchange using the Keeling plot, flux-gradient, and eddy covariance methods, and 3) the potential for isotopic flux partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange.

  3. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  4. A High Frequency Response Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Flux Measurement System for Sampling Short-Lived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m−2 hr−1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozo...

  5. Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Coatings by Pulsed Eddy Current Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, Chris; Lee Changqing; Danon, Yaron

    2005-04-09

    A method that uses induced pulsed eddy currents for characterization of thick magnetron sputtered Nb coatings on steel is presented in this paper. The objectives of this work are to develop a system for rapid quantitative nondestructive inspection of coatings as well as to determine the correlation between coating properties, such as density and purity, and eddy current measured resistivity of coatings. A two-probe differential system having higher sensitivity and less noise than a one-probe system with 2-D scanning ability was developed.

  6. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  7. Eddy current signal deconvolution technique for the improvement of steam generator tubing burst pressure predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M. C.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Kupperman, D. S.; Reifman, J.; Morman, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Eddy current techniques are extremely sensitive to the presence of axial cracks in nuclear power plant steam generator tube walls, but they are equally sensitive to the presence of dents, fretting, support structures, corrosion products, and other artifacts. Eddy current signal interpretation is further complicated by cracking geometries more complex than a single axial crack. Although there has been limited success in classifying and sizing defects through artificial neural networks, the ability to predict tubing integrity has, so far, eluded modelers. In large part, this lack of success stems from an inability to distinguish crack signals from those arising from artifacts. We present here a new signal processing technique that deconvolves raw eddy current voltage signals into separate signal contributions from different sources, which allows signals associated with a dominant crack to be identified. The signal deconvolution technique, combined with artificial neural network modeling, significantly improves the prediction of tube burst pressure from bobbin-coil eddy current measurements of steam generator tubing.

  8. Remote field eddy current technique - Phantom exciter model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, D. L.; Czura, W.

    1993-03-01

    High resolution results of finite element calculations for remote field eddy current 'phantom exciter' simulations of slit defect interactions using single through wall transit are presented. These show that fine circumferential slits cause almost no field perturbations in the case of nonferromagnetic tubes but big perturbations in ferromagnetic tubes where high magnetic H fields occur in the slits. Defect-induced magnetic field perturbations must therefore be considered in addition to eddy current perturbations when ferromagnetic materials are inspected, particularly in the case of fine slits orthogonal to the magnetic field direction. Additional details seen are the funnelling of energy into slits in ferromagnetic pipes and precursor disturbances of fields approaching defects. It is suggested that these are due to the reflection of the electromagnetic waves dictated by boundary conditions at the near-side defect boundary.

  9. Parametric Studies and Optimization of Eddy Current Techniques through Computer Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, E. I.

    2007-03-21

    The paper demonstrates the use of computer models for parametric studies and optimization of surface and subsurface eddy current techniques. The study with high-frequency probe investigates the effect of eddy current frequency and probe shape on the detectability of flaws in the steel substrate. The low-frequency sliding probe study addresses the effect of conductivity between the fastener and the hole, frequency and coil separation distance on detectability of flaws in subsurface layers.

  10. Continuous determination of land-atmosphere Hg0 exchange using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, Stefan; Fritsche, Johannes; Nilsson, Mats B.; Alewell, Christine; Bishop, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental mercury (Hg0) with the earth surface. However, it remains challenging to quantify these exchanges which hold the key to a better understanding of mercury cycling at different scales, from the entire earth to specific environments. To better test hypotheses about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we applied dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) for short term measurements and developed a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) design for continuous flux monitoring. Accurate determination of Hg0 fluxes has proven difficult due to the technical challenges presented by the small concentration differences (< 1 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. To address this we present a dual-intake, single analyzer REA system including a calibration module for periodic quality-control measurements with reference gases. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from two contrasting environments: In February 2012 REA monitored a heterogeneous urban surface in the center of Basel, Switzerland where an average flux of 14 ng m-2 h-1 was detected with a distinct diurnal pattern. In May 2012, the REA monitored a boreal mire in northern Sweden with different turbulence regimes and Hg0 sink/source characteristics. During the snowmelt period in May 2012 the Hg0 flux averaged at 2 ng m-2 h-1. In order to better quantify inputs and outputs of Hg from boreal landscapes, we subsequently monitored the land-atmosphere exchange of Hg0 during a course of a year and compared the fluxes occasionally with DFC measurements. The amount of Hg0 volatilized from boreal mires was at a similar level as the annual export of Hg in stream water, identifying the mire as net source of Hg to neighboring environments. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant innovation which can help realize the potential of REA for continuous, long-term determination of land-atmosphere Hg0

  11. Dry deposition of PM2.5 sulfate above a hilly forest using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Ichiro; Mizukami, Kou; Ban, Satomi; Takahashi, Akira

    2015-04-01

    Sulfur compounds continue to be an important component of atmospheric deposition in East Asia. In order to better understand the dry deposition of PM2.5 sulfate, which is one of the most significant transboundary air pollutants in this region, we measured the dry deposition flux of PM2.5 sulfate above a hilly forest of the Field Museum Tamakyuryo (FM Tama) site in suburban Tokyo. We used the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method and took measurements during the summer, from 26 July to 2 August 2013, and the autumn, from 18 to 22 November 2013. We primarily focused on the evaluation of dry deposition above a forest on complex terrain. The total flux and 80% of the runs showed downward flux. The deposition velocities measured by the REA method during times when the wind direction was from a relatively uniform sloping surface over the forest were more reasonable than those measured when the wind direction was from a more complex surface. Using a resistance model that includes the effect of growth of hygroscopic aerosols, we inferred the deposition velocities during two experimental periods. When the fluxes were averaged for a long time (i.e., about 2 weeks) the inferred fluxes and deposition velocities were in reasonable agreement with the measurements. Although averages over long periods showed good agreement, the measured deposition velocities were distributed in a wider range than those inferred by the model. An increased range of deposition velocities was associated with flux footprints from complex terrain. It is possible that the agreements between measured and inferred fluxes or deposition velocities at the site are because the depositions of sulfate are largely controlled by surface factors rather than aerodynamic resistance.

  12. The eddy-current technique for nondestructive evaluation of generator retaining rings: Feasibility study: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Elmo, P.M.; Nottingham, L.D.

    1988-05-01

    An evaluation of the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive inspection techniques to detect intergranular stress corrosion in generator rotor retaining rings was conducted by the EPRI NDE Center. Experiments were conducted using a bend-bar containing representative stress corrosion damage, a calibration block containing electrical discharge machined (EDM) notches, and four retired retaining rings containing EDM notches and stress corrosion damage. An eddy current transducer transport was designed and fabricated to interface with an existing computer-controlled, two-axis positioner and digital eddy current data acquisition system. Test results of experiments performed with this equipment on the retaining ring test-bed provided experimental validation of the eddy current method's feasibility as a retaining ring inspection method. Details are given of the system and its performance under laboratory and simulated service-inspection conditions. 9 refs., 47 figs.

  13. A dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation system for long-term measurement of mercury flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, S.; Fritsche, J.; Alewell, C.; Schmutz, M.; Nilsson, M. B.; Jocher, G.; Sommar, J.; Rinne, J.; Bishop, K.

    2016-02-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental Hg with the earth surface. This exchange holds the key to a better understanding of Hg cycling from local to global scales, which has been difficult to quantify. To advance research about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we developed a dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system. REA is an established technique for measuring turbulent fluxes of trace gases and aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer. Accurate determination of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) fluxes has proven difficult due to technical challenges presented by extremely small concentration differences (typically < 0.5 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. We present an advanced REA design that uses two inlets and two pairs of gold cartridges for continuous monitoring of GEM fluxes. This setup reduces the major uncertainty created by the sequential sampling in many previous designs. Additionally, the instrument is equipped with a GEM reference gas generator that monitors drift and recovery rates. These innovations facilitate continuous, autonomous measurement of GEM flux. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from field campaigns in two contrasting environments: an urban setting with a heterogeneous fetch and a boreal peatland during snowmelt. The observed average emission rates were 15 and 3 ng m-2 h-1, respectively. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant improvement of the REA system for ultra-trace gases and can help to advance our understanding of long-term land-atmosphere GEM exchange.

  14. The in-service inspection of coated steel welds using Eddy-Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. J.; Zaid, M.; Picton, P. D.; Mabbutt, S. J.

    2012-05-01

    Traditionally surface crack detection in coated Ferritic Steel Welds with Eddy-Current Techniques has been difficult due to the change in material properties in the Heat Affected Zone. These typically produce signals larger than crack signals. Sophisticated probe design and construction, combined with modern electronic equipment, have largely overcome the traditional problems and now enable the advantages of Eddy-Current Techniques to be applied to In-Service Inspection of Coated Ferritic Steel Structures in the as-we!ded conditions. Specifically, the advantage of the technique is that under quantifiable conditions an inspection may now be carried out through corrosion protection systems. It is the intention of this paper to review the current information available, establish the limiting parameters of the technique and detail the practical experiments conducted to determine the extent of the limiting parameters. The results of these experiments are detailed. Having determined the limiting factors, outline testing procedures have been established together with relative sensitivity settings.

  15. Pulsed remote eddy current field array technique for nondestructive inspection of ferromagnetic tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Li, Xuechao

    2010-03-01

    One pick-up coil with a large inner diameter is usually used in pulsed remote field eddy current technique, which decreases the identification ability to defect. With the purpose of overcoming this problem, array pulsed remote field eddy current technique is proposed to enhance the precision in quantification of defect. The finite element method is used to optimise the structure of probe and analyse of the influence effect of response signal with the variation of the defect depths. The results of experimental work confirm that the array pulsed remote field technique has the advantages of high precision and sensitivity, which can be used as an effective method for quantification of defect in tube.

  16. Application of Resonant Frequency Eddy Current Technique on a Shot-Peened Nickel-Based Engine-Grade Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Ray T.; Sathish, Shamachary; Boehnlein, Thomas R.; Blodgett, Mark P.

    2007-03-21

    The shot peening conditions of a nickel-based engine-grade material were evaluated using a novel eddy current measurement technique. With this technique, the shift of a resonant frequency was found to be dependent on variables which also affect conventional eddy current testing. The cable effect is another important variable, which is often neglected in a routine eddy current testing, is also discussed. Experimental results showed that at high frequencies, the shot peening conditions were easily distinguishable using this frequency shift technique.

  17. Studies of the eddy structure in the lower ionosphere by the API technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev, Gennadii I.; Lapin, Victor G.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new application of the API technique to study of turbulent phenomena in the lower ionosphere. The main objective of these studies is experimental diagnostics of natural ordered eddy structures at the altitudes of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, such as those that occur when internal gravity waves propagate in stratified flows in the atmospheric boundary layer. To this end, we considered the impact of eddy motions in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere on the relaxation time and the frequency of the signal scattered by periodic irregularities. Theoretical study of eddy structures base on experiments using SURA heating facility (56,14 N; 44,1 W). It is known, artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) are formed in the field of the powerful standing wave as a result of the interference of the incident wave and reflected from the ionosphere (Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - 2002. Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. Copernicus GmbH. 160 p.). The relaxation or decay of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the amplitude and decay time of the API scattered signal in comparison with the diffusion time. We found a relation between the eddy period and the characteristic decay time of scattered signal, for which the synchronism of the waves scattered by a periodic structure is broken. Besides, it is shown, when the eddy structure moves by a horizontal wind exists at these heights, the frequency of the radio wave scattered by API structure will periodically increase and decrease compared with the frequency of the radiated diagnostic (probing) radio-wave. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation under grant No 14-12-00556.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNIQUES FOR EDDY-CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXED IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical technique for the measurement of the exchange (flux) of trace gases between the earth's surface and the atmosphere will be developed. Measurements will rely on the eddy correlation method (ECM). Target compounds are biogenically and anthropogenically emitted v...

  19. Assessing maize crop coefficient through eddy correlation technique in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horeschi, D.; Mancini, M.; Corbari, C.; Montaldo, N.

    2009-04-01

    The evapotranspiration (ET), also known as latent heat (LE) in energetic terms, has a key role in eco-hydrological processes. Direct measurements of ET, owing to the technique adopted (for instance the lysimeters), were not reliable, nor immediate. For this reason new methods developed by the scientific community suggested to estimate ET from energy budget using atmospheric data and parameters. Among these methods the FAO Penman-Monteith, which is largely diffused, evaluates the potential evapotranspiration of a generic crop as a product of a reference evapotranspiration (ET0) multiplied by a coefficient kc. Kc, called crop coefficient, should embody all the physiologic characteristics of a specific plant and should allow to pass from the reference ET0 to the potential ET of each crop. Such coefficients have been evaluated only in some regions of the planet, which may be quite different from the one in which they are applied. This means that available kc coefficients in literature, despite a correction procedure to adapt them to the local meteo-climate conditions, are yet not completely reliable (Katerji and Rana, 2006). Besides in this context the Eddy correlation technique (eddy-corr for simplicity), was developed in the last years. This method, built through a dimensional analysis application, demonstrated that the latent heat is proportional to the covariance of some measurable atmospheric variables. The paper discusses the reliability of the kc of maize, assessed by the FAO method comparing it with the eddy-corr analysis.

  20. Application of Eddy Current Techniques for Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John

    2005-01-01

    The development and application of advanced nondestructive evaluation techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) components of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) was identified as a crucial step toward returning the shuttle fleet to service. In order to help meet this requirement, eddy current techniques have been developed for application to RCC components. Eddy current technology has been found to be particularly useful for measuring the protective coating thickness over the reinforced carbon-carbon and for the identification of near surface cracking and voids in the RCC matrix. Testing has been performed on as manufactured and flown RCC components with both actual and fabricated defects representing impact and oxidation damage. Encouraging initial results have led to the development of two separate eddy current systems for in-situ RCC inspections in the orbiter processing facility. Each of these systems has undergone blind validation testing on a full scale leading edge panel, and recently transitioned to Kennedy Space Center to be applied as a part of a comprehensive RCC inspection strategy to be performed in the orbiter processing facility after each shuttle flight.

  1. Pulsed remote field eddy current technique applied to non-magnetic flat conductive plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhanbin

    2013-12-01

    Non-magnetic metal plates are widely used in aviation and industrial applications. The detection of cracks in thick plate structures, such as multilayered structures of aircraft fuselage, has been challenging in nondestructive evaluation societies. The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique has shown advantages of deep penetration and high sensitivity to deeply buried anomalies. However, the RFEC technique is mainly used to evaluate ferromagnetic tubes. There are many problems that should be fixed before the expansion and application of this technique for the inspection of non-magnetic conductive plates. In this article, the pulsed remote field eddy current (PRFEC) technique for the detection of defects in non-magnetic conducting plates was investigated. First, the principle of the PRFEC technique was analysed, followed by the analysis of the differences between the detection of defects in ferromagnetic and non-magnetic plain structures. Three different models of the PRFEC probe were simulated using ANSYS. The location of the transition zone, defect detection sensitivity and the ability to detect defects in thick plates using three probes were analysed and compared. The simulation results showed that the probe with a ferrite core had the highest detecting ability. The conclusions derived from the simulation study were also validated by conducting experiments.

  2. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  3. Airborne eddy correlation gas flux measurements - Design criteria for optical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, John A.; Sachse, Glen W.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    Although several methods exist for the determination of the flux of an atmospheric species, the airborne eddy correlation method has the advantage of providing direct flux measurements that are representative of regional spatial domains. The design criteria pertinent to the construction of chemical instrumentation suitable for use in airborne eddy correlation flux measurements are discussed. A brief overview of the advantages and limitations of the current instrumentation used to obtain flux measurements for CO, CH4, O3, CO2, and water vapor are given. The intended height of the measurement within the convective boundary layer is also shown to be an important design criteria. The sensitivity, or resolution, which is required in the measurement of a scalar species to obtain an adequate species flux measurement is discussed. The relationship between the species flux resolution and the more commonly stated instrumental resolution is developed and it is shown that the standard error of the flux estimate is a complicated function of the atmospheric variability and the averaging time that is used. The use of the recently proposed intermittent sampling method to determine the species flux is examined. The application of this technique may provide an opportunity to expand the suite of trace gases for which direct flux measurements are possible.

  4. Remote field eddy current technique applied to the inspection of nonmagnetic steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Young-Kil; Chung, Tae-Eon; Lord, William

    2001-04-01

    As steam generator (SG) tubes have aged, new and subtle degradations have appeared. Most of them start growing from outside the tubes. Since outer diameter defects might not be detected by conventional eddy current testing due to skin effect phenomena, this paper studies the feasibility of using the remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique, which has shown equal sensitivity to inner diameter (ID) and outer diameter (OD) defects in ferromagnetic pipe inspection. Finite element modeling studies show that the operating frequency needs to be increased up to a few hundred kHz in order for RFEC effects to occur in the nonmagnetic SG tube. The proper distance between exciter and sensor coils is also found to be 1.5 OD, which is half of the distance used in ferromagnetic pipe inspection. The resulting defect signals show equal sensitivity to ID and OD defects. These results demonstrate superior capability of the proposed RFEC probe compared to the differential ECT probe in detecting OD defects.

  5. Four-year measurement of methane flux over a temperate forest with a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakabe, A.; Kosugi, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Hamotani, K.; Takahashi, K.; Iwata, H.; Itoh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are generally assumed to be an atmospheric methane (CH4) sink (Le Mer and Roger, 2001). However, under Asian monsoon climate, forests are subject to wide spatiotemporal range in soil water status, where forest soils often became water-saturated condition heterogeneously. In such warm and humid conditions, forests may act as a CH4 source and/or sink with considerable spatiotemporal variations. Micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) method continuously measure spatially-representative flux at a canopy scale without artificial disturbance. In this study, we measured CH4 fluxes over a temperate forest during four-year period using a CH4 analyzer based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy detection with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method (Hamotani et al., 1996, 2001). We revealed the amplitude and seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes. The REA method is the attractive alternative to the EC method to measure trace-gas flux because it allows the use of analyzers with an optimal integration time. We also conducted continuous chamber measurements on forest floor to reveal spatial variations in soil CH4 fluxes and its controlling processes. The observations were made in an evergreen coniferous forest in central Japan. The site has a warm temperate monsoon climate with wet summer. Some wetlands were located in riparian zones along streams within the flux footprint area. For the REA method, the sonic anemometer (SAT-550, Kaijo) was mounted on top of the 29-m-tall tower and air was sampled from just below the sonic anemometer to reservoirs according to the direction of vertical wind velocity (w). After accumulating air for 30 minutes, the air in the reservoirs was pulled into a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-840, Li-Cor) and a CH4 analyzer (FMA-200, Los Gatos Research). Before entering the analyzers, the sampled air was dried using a gas dryer (PD-50 T-48; Perma Pure Inc.). The REA flux is obtained from the difference in the mean concentrations

  6. [Research progress on urban carbon fluxes based on eddy covariance technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Fu, Yu-Ling; Yang, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Land use change and fossil fuel consumption due to urbanization have made significant effect on global carbon cycle and climate change. Accurate estimating and understanding of the carbon budget and its characteristics are the premises for studying carbon cycle and its driving mechanisms in urban system. Based on the theory of eddy covariance (EC) technique, the characteristics atmospheric boundary layer and carbon cycle in urban area, this study systematically reviewed the principles of CO2 flux monitoring in urban system with EC technique, and then summarized the problems faced in urban CO2 flux monitoring and the method for data processing and further assessment. The main research processes on urban carbon fluxes with EC technique were also illustrated. The results showed that the urban surface was mostly acting as net carbon source. The CO2 exchange between urban surface and atmosphere showed obvious diurnal, weekly and seasonal variation resulted from the vehicle exhaust, domestic heating and vegetation respiration. However, there still exist great uncertainties in urban flux measurement and its explanation due to high spatial heterogeneity and complex distributions of carbon source/sink in urban environments. In the end, we suggested that further researches on EC technique and data assessment in complex urban area should be strengthened. It was also requisite to develop models of urban carbon cycle on the basis of the system principle, to investigate the influencing mechanism and variability of urban cycle at regional scale with spatial analysis technique. PMID:24830264

  7. Very Large Eddy Simulation Technique for Noise Prediction and Control in Turbomachinery and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir V.

    2003-01-01

    The summer fellowship research project focused on further developing an advanced computational technique based on Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES) for analysis and control of major sources of noise in turbomachinery and propulsion systems, including jet noise and fan noise. Major part of the work during the 10-week tenure dealt with implementing a low-order, implicit A-stable time-stepping scheme in the existing explicit VLES code of Dr. Ray Hixon. The preliminary plan of the work also included application of a new time marching formulation to the problem of viscous gust-airfoil interaction. Other research items selected for implementation (possibly in the future) included investigating a set of new subgrid turbulent models for the code, and code application to a number of test cases, including a supersonic jet and swirling flow downstream of a rotor stage.

  8. Eddy current technique applied to the nondestructive evaluation of turbine blade wall thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bihan, Yann; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Placko, Dominique

    2000-05-01

    The high pressure turbine blades of jet engines show internal channels designed for air cooling. These recesses define the internal walls (partitions) and external walls of the blade. The external wall thickness is a critical parameter which has to be systematically checked in order to ensure the blade strength. The thickness evaluation is usually lead by ultrasonic technique or by X-ray tomography. Nevertheless, both techniques present some drawbacks related to measurement speed and automation capability. These drawbacks are bypassed by the eddy current (EC) technique, well known for its robustness and reliability. However, the wall thickness evaluation is made difficult because of the complexity of the blade geometry. In particular, some disturbances appear in the thickness evaluation because of the partitions, which exclude the use of classical EC probes such as cup-core probe. In this paper, we show the main advantages of probes creating an uniformly oriented magnetic field in order to reduce the partition disturbances. Furthermore, we propose a measurement process allowing to separate the wall thickness parameter from the EC signals. Finally, we present some experimental results validating the proposed technique.

  9. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  11. Eddy Covariance Flux Measurements of Pollutant Gases in the Mexico City Urban Area: a Useful Technique to Evaluate Emissions inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Grivicke, R.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, G.; Jobson, T.; Westberg, H.; Lamb, B.; Ramos, R.; Molina, L.

    2007-12-01

    Direct measurements of emissions of pollutant gases that include all major and minor emissions sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to improve and evaluate emissions inventories. The quality of an urban emissions inventory relies on the accuracy of the information of anthropogenic activities, which in many cases is not available, in particular in urban areas of developing countries. As part of the MCMA-2003 field campaign, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance (EC) techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO2 from a residential district of Mexico City. Those flux measurements demonstrated to be also a valuable tool to evaluate the emissions inventory used for air quality modeling. With the objective to confirm the representativeness of the 2003 flux measurements in terms of magnitude, composition and diurnal distribution, as well to evaluate the most recent emissions inventory, a second flux system was deployed in a different district of Mexico City during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign. This system was located in a busy district surrounded by congested avenues close to the center of the city. In 2003 and 2006 fluxes of olefins and CO2 were measured by the EC technique using a Fast Isoprene Sensor calibrated with a propylene standard and an open path Infrared Gas Analyzer (IRGA), respectively. Fluxes of aromatic and oxygenated VOCs were analyzed by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectroscopy (PTR-MS) and the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique. In 2006 the number of VOCs was extended using a disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA) system. This system collected whole air samples as function of the direction of the vertical wind component, and the samples were analyzed on site by gas chromatography / flame ionization detection (GC-FID). In both studies we found that the urban surface is a net source of CO2 and VOCs. The diurnal patterns were similar, but the 2006 fluxes

  12. Assessment of benthic flux of dissolved organic carbon in wetland and estuarine sediments using the eddy-correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swett, M. P.; Amirbahman, A.; Boss, E.

    2009-12-01

    Wetland and estuarine sediments release significant amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) due to high levels of microbial activity, particularly sulfate reduction. Changes in climate and hydrologic conditions have a potential to alter DOC release from these systems as well. This is a concern, as high levels of DOC can lead to mobilization of toxic metals and organics in natural waters. In addition, source waters high in DOC produce undesirable disinfection byproducts in water treatment. Various in situ methods, such as peepers and sediment core centrifugation, exist to quantify vertical benthic fluxes of DOC and other dissolved species from the sediment-water interface (SWI). These techniques, however, are intrusive and involve disturbance of the sediment environment. Eddy-correlation allows for real-time, non-intrusive, in situ flux measurement of important analytes, such as O2 and DOC. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is used to obtain three-dimensional fluid velocity measurements. The eddy-correlation technique employs the mathematical separation of fluid velocity into mean velocity and fluctuating velocity components, with the latter representing turbulent eddy velocity. DOC concentrations are measured using a colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorometer, and instantaneous vertical flux is determined from the correlated data. This study assesses DOC flux at three project sites: a beaver pond in the Lower Penobscot Watershed, Maine; a mudflat in Penobscot River, Maine; and a mudflat in Great Bay, New Hampshire. Eddy flux values are compared with results obtained using peepers and centrifugation, as well as vertical profiling.

  13. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commercial cornfield (Zea mays) measured using the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, J.; Hui, D.; Miller, D. R.; Bhattarai, S.; Dennis, S.; Smart, D.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in observed atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have been well documented. However, information on event-related instantaneous emissions during fertilizer applications is lacking. With the development of fast-response N2O analyzers, the eddy covariance (EC) technique can be used to gather instantaneous measurements of N2O concentrations to quantify the exchange of nitrogen between the soil and atmosphere. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of a new EC system, to measure the N2O flux with the system, and finally to examine relationships of the N2O flux with soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, and fertilization events. An EC system was assembled with a sonic anemometer and a fast-response N2O analyzer (quantum cascade laser spectrometer) and applied in a cornfield in Nolensville, Tennessee during the 2012 corn growing season (4 April-8 August). Fertilizer amounts totaling 217 kg N ha-1 were applied to the experimental site. Results showed that this N2O EC system provided reliable N2O flux measurements. The cumulative emitted N2O amount for the entire growing season was 6.87 kg N2O-N ha-1. Seasonal fluxes were highly dependent on soil moisture rather than soil temperature. This study was one of the few experiments that continuously measured instantaneous, high-frequency N2O emissions in crop fields over a growing season of more than 100 days.

  14. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzalla, S.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad; Chabaat, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  15. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    SciTech Connect

    Harzalla, S. Chabaat, M.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  16. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for Detection of Deep Fatigue Cracks in Multi-Layer Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Thick, multi-layer aluminum structure has been widely used in aircraft design in critical wing splice areas. The multi-layer structure generally consists of three or four aluminum layers with different geometry and varying thickness, which are held together with fasteners. The detection of cracks under fasteners with ultrasonic techniques in subsurface layers away from the skin is impeded primarily by interlayer bonds and faying sealant condition. Further, assessment of such sealant condition is extremely challenging in terms of complexity of structure, limited access, and inspection cost. Although Eddy current techniques can be applied on in-service aircraft from the exterior of the skin without knowing sealant condition, the current eddy current techniques are not able to detect defects with wanted sensitivity. In this work a series of low frequency eddy current probes have been designed, fabricated and tested for this application. A probe design incorporating a shielded magnetic field sensor concentrically located in the interior of a drive coil has been employed to enable a localized deep diffusion of the electromagnetic field into the part under test. Due to the required low frequency inspections, probes have been testing using a variety of magnetic field sensors (pickup coil, giant magneto-resistive, anisotropic magneto-resistive, and spin-dependent tunneling). The probe designs as well as capabilities based upon a target inspection for sub-layer cracking in an airframe wing spar joint is presented.

  17. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for the Detection of Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A.; Simpson, John W.; Koshti, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    A recent identification of cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  18. Development of Eddy Current Technique for the Detection of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Koshti, Ajay

    2006-01-01

    A recent identification of stress corrosion cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  19. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commercial cornfield (Zea mays) measured using the eddy-covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, J.; Hui, D.; Miller, D. R.; Bhattarai, S.; Dennis, S.; Smart, D.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, K. C.

    2014-08-01

    Increases in observed atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O), have been well documented. However, information on event-related instantaneous emissions during fertilizer applications is lacking. With the development of fast-response N2O analyzers, the eddy covariance (EC) technique can be used to gather instantaneous measurements of N2O concentrations to quantify the exchange of nitrogen between the soil and atmosphere. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of a new EC system, to measure the N2O flux with the system, and finally to examine relationships of the N2O flux with soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, and fertilization events. We assembled an EC system that included a sonic anemometer and a fast-response N2O analyzer (quantum cascade laser spectrometer) in a cornfield in Nolensville, Tennessee during the 2012 corn growing season (4 April-8 August). Fertilizer amounts totaling 217 kg N ha-1 were applied to the experimental site. The precision of the instrument was 0.066 ppbv for 10 Hz measurements. The seasonal mean detection limit of the N2O flux measurements was 2.10 ng N m-2 s-1. This EC system can be used to provide reliable N2O flux measurements. The cumulative emitted N2O for the entire growing season was 6.87 kg N2O-N ha-1. The 30 min average N2O emissions ranged from 0 to 11 100 μg N2O{-}N m-2 h-1 (mean = 257.5, standard deviation = 817.7). Average daytime emissions were much higher than night emissions (278.8 ± 865.8 vs. 100.0 ± 210.0 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1). Seasonal fluxes were highly dependent on soil moisture rather than soil temperature, although the diurnal flux was positively related to soil temperature. This study was one of the few experiments that continuously measured instantaneous, high-frequency N2O emissions in crop fields over a growing season of more than 100 days.

  20. New cyberinfrastructure for studying land-atmosphere interactions using eddy covariance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes, A.; Salayandia, L.; Gallegos, I.; Gates, A. Q.; Tweedie, C.

    2010-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) methods are used to measure the exchanges of mass and energy across the atmospheric boundary layer. EC is the basis of several large national and international flux networks of micrometeorological tower sites (i.e. FLUXNET, AMERIFLUX), that provide continuous observations and measurements to understand and quantify the spatial and temporal variations in carbon storage in plants, soils, and the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy, in major vegetation types across a range of disturbance historic and climatic conditions. A consistent quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedure of micrometeorological data is essential for measurement networks such as these. Although, a QA/QC procedure is very much a site-specific activity, there are a variety of components available to implement Eddy covariance methods, as well as, limited documentation about best practices or standards, results in different approaches being adopted throughout data capturing sites. In some cases, this can lead to a limited or inefficient data reusability and knowledge transfer among related projects. The amount of data being collected is rapidly increasing, and the ability to evaluate proper instrument operation and data accuracy is critical to ensure the results are not bias due to factors such as, instrument malfunction, erroneous definition of optimal measurement ranges, calibration errors and differences, and environmental conditions that can affect data quality (i.e. wind directions are not from the footprint of interest, heavy precipitation, dust/snow storms, etc). This study presents findings from Cyberinfrastructure research conducted on a data stream from a newly established Eddy Covariance Tower, located on the Jornada basin Experimental Range (JER), Las Cruces, NM. Specifically, property characterization and specification was developed under a series of laboratory and field experiments. Our intent was to characterize thresholds and range

  1. Combined investigation of Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques for composite materials NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. W.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J. P.; Namkung, M.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced composites are not without trade-offs. Their increased designability brings an increase in the complexity of their internal geometry and, as a result, an increase in the number of failure modes associated with a defect. When two or more isotropic materials are combined in a composite, the isotropic material failure modes may also combine. In a laminate, matrix delamination, cracking and crazing, and voids and porosity, will often combine with fiber breakage, shattering, waviness, and separation to bring about ultimate structural failure. This combining of failure modes can result in defect boundaries of different sizes, corresponding to the failure of each structural component. This paper discusses a dual-technology NDE (Non Destructive Evaluation) (eddy current (EC) and ultrasonics (UT)) study of graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) laminate samples. Eddy current and ultrasonic raster (Cscan) imaging were used together to characterize the effects of mechanical impact damage, high temperature thermal damage and various types of inserts in gr/ep laminate samples of various stacking sequences.

  2. Combined investigation of Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques for composite materials NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.W.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J.P.; Namkung, M.

    1993-12-31

    Advanced composites are not without trade-offs. Their increased designability brings an increase in the complexity of their internal geometry and, as a result, an increase in the number of failure modes associated with a defect. When two or more isotropic materials are combined in a composite, the isotropic material failure modes may also combine. In a laminate, matrix delamination, cracking and crazing, and voids and porosity, will often combine with fiber breakage, shattering, waviness, and separation to bring about ultimate structural failure. This combining of failure modes can result in defect boundaries of different sizes, corresponding to the failure of each structural component. This paper discusses a dual-technology NDE (Non Destructive Evaluation) (eddy current (EC) and ultrasonics (UT)) study of graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) laminate samples. Eddy current and ultrasonic raster (Cscan) imaging were used together to characterize the effects of mechanical impact damage, high temperature thermal damage and various types of inserts in gr/ep laminate samples of various stacking sequences.

  3. Prospects and Techniques for Eddy-Resolving Acoustic Tomography in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, J. W.; Nechaev, D.; Roman, D. A.; Sidorovskaia, N. A.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2007-05-01

    For several decades monitoring and modeling the dynamics and physical structure of the Gulf of Mexico have been major efforts undertaken by oceanographers of the United States and other American countries. There are very interesting physical oceanographic features in the Gulf, not the least of which are the Gulf Loop Current and the eddies it spawns. Satellite sensing of IR and altimeter imagery has been a major input to modeling those features. Such efforts are very important to the economy and well being of much of the United States and Mexico, including fisheries, mineral economies, hurricane strengths and paths in the summer, and severe snow storms in the eastern US in the winter. A major shortcoming of the present monitoring of the Gulf is the lack of subsurface input to the dynamic models of the Gulf. Acoustic tomography is a viable means of providing that missing input. Several universities have come together to investigate the prospects for establishing a Gulf Eddy Monitoring System (GEMS) for the deep eastern half of the Gulf using acoustic tomography. The group has conducted several acoustics experiments and propagation studies to determine the feasibility of long-range propagation in the eastern Gulf and the mitigation of adverse effects on marine mammal populations in that region under the Office of Naval Research project entitled the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC). The group has also convened an invited session for the 9th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI 2005) Orlando, FL, July 2005. This paper discusses prospects for establishing the GEMS tomographic system, its technical characteristics, and its contributions to advancing the knowledge of the dynamics of the Gulf. This presentation will concentrate on the characteristics of a single-slice tomographic system, called GEMS Phase I, across the approaches to the DeSoto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf and its prospect for monitoring the movements of

  4. Nonlinear, non-stationary image processing technique for eddy current NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Dib, Gerges; Kim, Jaejoon; Zhang, Lu; Xin, Junjun; Udpa, Lalita

    2012-05-01

    Automatic analysis of eddy current (EC) data has facilitated the analysis of large volumes of data generated in the inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants. The traditional procedure for analysis of EC data includes data calibration, pre-processing, region of interest (ROI) detection, feature extraction and classification. Accurate ROI detection has been enhanced by pre-processing, which involves reducing noise and other undesirable components as well as enhancing defect indications in the raw measurement. This paper presents the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) for feature extraction and support vector machine (SVM) for classification. The performance is shown to significantly better than the existing rule based classification approach used in industry.

  5. Investigation of Frequency Mixing Techniques for Eddy Current Testing of Steam Generator Tubes in Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. J.; Kong, Y. B.; Song, S.-J.; Kim, C.-H.; Choi, Y. H.; Kang, S.-C.; Song, M. H.

    2007-03-01

    In eddy current testing (ECT) of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants, it is very important to extract flaw signals from the signals compound by flaws and supporting structures. To perform such an important task, the multifrequency ECT methods are widely adopted since they have a well-known capability of extracting the flaw signal from the compound signals. Therefore, various frequency mixing algorithms have been proposed up to now. In the present work, two different frequency mixing algorithms, a time-domain optimization method and a discrete cosine transform (DCT) based optimization method, are investigated using experimental signals captured from a ASME standard tube. In this paper, we discuss the basic principles and the performances of these two frequency mixing techniques.

  6. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-07-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  7. Frequency Optimization for Enhancement of Surface Defect Classification Using the Eddy Current Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengbao; Wang, Qi; Cao, Binghua; Ye, Bo; Sunny, Ali Imam; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Eddy current testing is quite a popular non-contact and cost-effective method for nondestructive evaluation of product quality and structural integrity. Excitation frequency is one of the key performance factors for defect characterization. In the literature, there are many interesting papers dealing with wide spectral content and optimal frequency in terms of detection sensitivity. However, research activity on frequency optimization with respect to characterization performances is lacking. In this paper, an investigation into optimum excitation frequency has been conducted to enhance surface defect classification performance. The influences of excitation frequency for a group of defects were revealed in terms of detection sensitivity, contrast between defect features, and classification accuracy using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and a support vector machine (SVM). It is observed that probe signals are the most sensitive on the whole for a group of defects when excitation frequency is set near the frequency at which maximum probe signals are retrieved for the largest defect. After the use of KPCA, the margins between the defect features are optimum from the perspective of the SVM, which adopts optimal hyperplanes for structure risk minimization. As a result, the best classification accuracy is obtained. The main contribution is that the influences of excitation frequency on defect characterization are interpreted, and experiment-based procedures are proposed to determine the optimal excitation frequency for a group of defects rather than a single defect with respect to optimal characterization performances. PMID:27164112

  8. Frequency Optimization for Enhancement of Surface Defect Classification Using the Eddy Current Technique.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mengbao; Wang, Qi; Cao, Binghua; Ye, Bo; Sunny, Ali Imam; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Eddy current testing is quite a popular non-contact and cost-effective method for nondestructive evaluation of product quality and structural integrity. Excitation frequency is one of the key performance factors for defect characterization. In the literature, there are many interesting papers dealing with wide spectral content and optimal frequency in terms of detection sensitivity. However, research activity on frequency optimization with respect to characterization performances is lacking. In this paper, an investigation into optimum excitation frequency has been conducted to enhance surface defect classification performance. The influences of excitation frequency for a group of defects were revealed in terms of detection sensitivity, contrast between defect features, and classification accuracy using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and a support vector machine (SVM). It is observed that probe signals are the most sensitive on the whole for a group of defects when excitation frequency is set near the frequency at which maximum probe signals are retrieved for the largest defect. After the use of KPCA, the margins between the defect features are optimum from the perspective of the SVM, which adopts optimal hyperplanes for structure risk minimization. As a result, the best classification accuracy is obtained. The main contribution is that the influences of excitation frequency on defect characterization are interpreted, and experiment-based procedures are proposed to determine the optimal excitation frequency for a group of defects rather than a single defect with respect to optimal characterization performances. PMID:27164112

  9. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  10. Pulsed eddy current testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1980-10-01

    Since a large number of the procedures used for inspecting the external tank are concerned with determining flaws in welds, there is a need to develop an inspection technique, which can be automated, to determine flaws in welds and structures with complex geometries. Techniques whereby an eddy current is generated in a metallic material and the changes in the circuit parameters due to material differences are observed, were chosen as one possible approach. Pulsed eddy current and its relationship to multifrequency techniques is discussed as well as some preliminary results obtained from observing pulsed waveforms with apparatus and algorithms currently in use for ultrasonic testing of welds. It can be shown the pulsed eddy current techniques can provide similar results, can eliminate some of the noncritical parameters affecting the eddy current signals, and can facilitate in the detection of critical parameter such as flaws, subsurface voids, and corrosion.

  11. Application of a GC-ECD for measurements of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of peroxyacetyl nitrate using the relaxed eddy accumulation and gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Foken, T.; Trebs, I.

    2014-02-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) may constitute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. Current knowledge about the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of PAN is limited and only few studies have investigated the deposition of PAN to terrestrial ecosystems. We developed a flux measurement system for the determination of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of PAN using both the hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) method and the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. The system consists of a modified, commercially available gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD, Meteorologie Consult GmbH, Germany). Sampling was performed by trapping PAN onto two pre-concentration columns; during HREA operation one was used for updraft and one for downdraft events and during MBR operation the two columns allowed simultaneous sampling at two measurement heights. The performance of the PAN flux measurement system was tested at a natural grassland site, using fast response ozone (O3) measurements as a proxy for both methods. The measured PAN fluxes were comparatively small (daytime PAN deposition was on average -0.07 nmol m-2 s-1 and, thus, prone to significant uncertainties. A major challenge in the design of the system was the resolution of the small PAN mixing ratio differences. Consequently, the study focuses on the performance of the analytical unit and a detailed analysis of errors contributing to the overall uncertainty. The error of the PAN mixing ratio differences ranged from 4 to 15 ppt during the MBR and between 18 and 26 ppt during the HREA operation, while during daytime measured PAN mixing ratios were of similar magnitude. Choosing optimal settings for both the MBR and HREA method, the study shows that the HREA method did not have a significant advantage towards the MBR method under well mixed conditions as it was expected.

  12. Application of a GC-ECD for measurements of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of peroxyacetyl nitrate using the relaxed eddy accumulation and gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Foken, T.; Trebs, I.

    2014-07-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) may constitute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. Current knowledge about the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of PAN is limited, and only few studies have investigated the deposition of PAN to terrestrial ecosystems. We developed a flux measurement system for the determination of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of PAN using both the hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) method and the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. The system consists of a modified, commercially available gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD, Meteorologie Consult GmbH, Germany). Sampling was performed by trapping PAN onto two pre-concentration columns; during HREA operation one was used for updraft and one for downdraft events, and during MBR operation the two columns allowed simultaneous sampling at two measurement heights. The performance of the PAN flux measurement system was tested at a natural grassland site, using fast-response ozone (O3) measurements as a proxy for both methods. The measured PAN fluxes were comparatively small (daytime PAN deposition was on average -0.07 nmol m-2 s-1) and, thus, prone to significant uncertainties. A major challenge in the design of the system was the resolution of the small PAN mixing ratio differences. Consequently, the study focuses on the performance of the analytical unit and a detailed analysis of errors contributing to the overall uncertainty. The error of the PAN mixing ratio differences ranged from 4 to 15 ppt during the MBR and between 18 and 26 ppt during the HREA operation, while during daytime measured PAN mixing ratios were of similar magnitude. Choosing optimal settings for both the MBR and HREA method, the study shows that the HREA method did not have a significant advantage towards the MBR method under well-mixed conditions as was expected.

  13. Effect of imprecise lag time and high-frequency attenuation on surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes determined with the relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Trebs, I.; Foken, T.

    2013-09-01

    eddy accumulation (REA) systems that employ one single long inlet tube are prone to measurement uncertainties caused by (a) an imprecisely determined lag time between the change of sign in the vertical wind velocity and the switching of the splitter valves and (b) attenuation of high-frequency concentration fluctuations in the tube flow. However, there is currently no commonly applied procedure to address these uncertainties. In this study, we first evaluated the lag time error of the volume flow, mass flow, and cross-correlation method (online and offline) and experimentally determined the magnitude of high-frequency attenuation for a 21.5 m long inlet tube of an operating REA system. In a second step, we simulated the impact for different artificial lag time errors and low-pass filter strengths on the REA concentration differences and, thus, on the REA flux, using high-frequency time series of temperature, O3, CO2, and H2O. The reduction of scalar fluxes was mainly correlated with increasing switching frequencies and ranged for typical lag time errors of the investigated REA system between <5% and 50%, whereas the flux loss due to high-frequency attenuation was between <5% and 30%. The results were very similar for all scalar quantities. Based on our results, we derived empirical correction functions for both imprecise lag times and high-frequency attenuation, discuss their potential application to correct fluxes measured with other REA systems, and give a general procedure to address the uncertainties in future REA setups.

  14. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    for the field (one to two orders of magnitude lower compared to current closed-path laser based eddy covariance systems). Potential applications include fluxes of CO2, CH4, N2O, VOCs and other tracers. Finally we assess the flux accuracy of the Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) approach as in our real implementation relative to alternative techniques including eddy covariance (EC) and relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). We further quantify various sources of instrument and method specific measurement errors. This comparison uses real measurements of 20 Hz turbulent time series of 3D wind velocity, sonic temperature and CO2 mixing ratio over a mixed decidious forest at the 'ICOS' flux tower site 'Hainich', Germany. Results from a simulation using real wind and CO2 timeseries from the Hainich site from 30 April to 3 November 2014 and real instrument performance suggest that the maximum flux estimates error (50% and 75% error quantiles) from Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) relative to the true flux is 1.3% and 10%, respectively for monthly net fluxes, 1.6% and 7%, respectively for daily net fluxes and 8% and 35%, respectively for 30-minute CO2 flux estimates. Those results from CES are promising and outperform our REA estimates by about a factor of 50 assuming REA with constant b value. Results include flux time series from the EC, CES and REA approaches from 30-min to annual resolution.

  15. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca F.; Johnson, Darren J.; Neubauer, Scott C.; Raynie, Richard C.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 yr-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 yr-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 yr-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 yr-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  16. Development of Quality Assessment Techniques for Large Eddy Simulation of Propulsion and Power Systems in Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Large-eddy-simulation (LES) is quickly becoming a method of choice for studying complex thermo-physics in a wide range of propulsion and power systems. It provides a means to study coupled turbulent combustion and flow processes in parameter spaces that are unattainable using direct-numerical-simulation (DNS), with a degree of fidelity that can be far more accurate than conventional engineering methods such as the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approx- imation. However, development of predictive LES is complicated by the complex interdependence of different type of errors coming from numerical methods, algorithms, models and boundary con- ditions. On the other hand, control of accuracy has become a critical aspect in the development of predictive LES for design. The objective of this project is to create a framework of metrics aimed at quantifying the quality and accuracy of state-of-the-art LES in a manner that addresses the myriad of competing interdependencies. In a typical simulation cycle, only 20% of the computational time is actually usable. The rest is spent in case preparation, assessment, and validation, because of the lack of guidelines. This work increases confidence in the accuracy of a given solution while min- imizing the time obtaining the solution. The approach facilitates control of the tradeoffs between cost, accuracy, and uncertainties as a function of fidelity and methods employed. The analysis is coupled with advanced Uncertainty Quantification techniques employed to estimate confidence in model predictions and calibrate model's parameters. This work has provided positive conse- quences on the accuracy of the results delivered by LES and will soon have a broad impact on research supported both by the DOE and elsewhere.

  17. Application of Self Nulling Eddy Current Probe Technique to the Detection of Fatigue Crack Initiation and Control of Test Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Nath, S.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    A major part of fracture mechanics is concerned with studying the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. This typically requires constant monitoring of crack growth during fatigue cycles and the knowledge of the precise location of the crack tip at any given time. One technique currently available for measuring fatigue crack length is the Potential Drop method. The method, however, may be inaccurate if the direction of crack growth deviates considerably from what was assumed initially or the curvature of the crack becomes significant. Another popular approach is to optically view the crack using a high magnification microscope, but this entails a person constantly monitoring it. The present proposed technique uses an automated scheme, in order to eliminate the need for a person to constantly monitor the experiment. Another technique under development elsewhere is to digitize an optical image of the test specimen surface and then apply a pattern recognition algorithm to locate the crack tip. A previous publication showed that the self nulling eddy current probe successfully tracked a simulated crack in an aluminum sample. This was the impetus to develop an online real time crack monitoring system. An automated system has been developed which includes a two axis scanner mounted on the tensile testing machine, the probe and its instrumentation and a personal computer (PC) to communicate and control all the parameters. The system software controls the testing parameters as well as monitoring the fatigue crack as it propagates. This paper will discuss the experimental setup in detail and demonstrate its capabilities. A three dimensional finite element model is utilized to model the magnetic field distribution due to the probe and how the probe voltage changes as it scans the crack. Experimental data of the probe for different samples under zero load, static load and high cycle fatigue load will be discussed. The final section summarizes the major accomplishments

  18. Characterisation of Phosphate Accumulating Organisms and Techniques for Polyphosphate Detection: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tarayre, Cédric; Nguyen, Huu-Thanh; Brognaux, Alison; Delepierre, Anissa; De Clercq, Lies; Charlier, Raphaëlle; Michels, Evi; Meers, Erik; Delvigne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate minerals have long been used for the production of phosphorus-based chemicals used in many economic sectors. However, these resources are not renewable and the natural phosphate stocks are decreasing. In this context, the research of new phosphate sources has become necessary. Many types of wastes contain non-negligible phosphate concentrations, such as wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, phosphorus is eliminated by physicochemical and/or biological techniques. In this latter case, a specific microbiota, phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), accumulates phosphate as polyphosphate. This molecule can be considered as an alternative phosphate source, and is directly extracted from wastewater generated by human activities. This review focuses on the techniques which can be applied to enrich and try to isolate these PAOs, and to detect the presence of polyphosphate in microbial cells. PMID:27258275

  19. Characterisation of Phosphate Accumulating Organisms and Techniques for Polyphosphate Detection: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tarayre, Cédric; Nguyen, Huu-Thanh; Brognaux, Alison; Delepierre, Anissa; De Clercq, Lies; Charlier, Raphaëlle; Michels, Evi; Meers, Erik; Delvigne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate minerals have long been used for the production of phosphorus-based chemicals used in many economic sectors. However, these resources are not renewable and the natural phosphate stocks are decreasing. In this context, the research of new phosphate sources has become necessary. Many types of wastes contain non-negligible phosphate concentrations, such as wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, phosphorus is eliminated by physicochemical and/or biological techniques. In this latter case, a specific microbiota, phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), accumulates phosphate as polyphosphate. This molecule can be considered as an alternative phosphate source, and is directly extracted from wastewater generated by human activities. This review focuses on the techniques which can be applied to enrich and try to isolate these PAOs, and to detect the presence of polyphosphate in microbial cells. PMID:27258275

  20. Application of Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) method to estimate CO2 and CH4 surface fluxes in the city of Krakow, southern Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Pieniazek, Katarzyna; Jasek, Alina; Chmura, Lukasz; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2013-04-01

    There is a growing interest in the recent years in studies aimed at quantifying carbon cycling in urban centres. Worldwide migration of human population from rural to urban areas and corresponding growth of extensive urban agglomerations and megacities leads to intensification of anthropogenic emissions of carbon and strong disruption of natural carbon cycle on these areas. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the carbon "metabolism" of such regions is required. Apart of better quantification of surface carbon fluxes, also a thorough understanding of the functioning of biosphere under strong anthropogenic influence is needed. Nowadays, covariance methods are widely applied for studying gas exchange between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface. Relaxed Eddy Accumulation method (REA), combined with the CO2 and CH4 CRDS analyser allows simultaneous measurements of surface fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane within the chosen footprint of the detection system, thus making possible thorough characterisation of the overall exchange of those gases between the atmosphere and the urban surface across diverse spatial and temporal scales. Here we present preliminary results of the study aimed at quantifying surface fluxes of CO2 and CH4 in Krakow, southern Poland. The REA system for CO2 and CH4 flux measurements has been installed on top of a 20m high tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building, close to the city centre of Krakow. The sensors were installed ca 42 m above the local ground. Gill Windmaster-Pro sonic anemometer was coupled with self-made system, designed by the Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland, for collecting air samples in two pairs of 10-liter Tedlar bags, and with Picarro G2101-i CRDS analyser. The air was collected in 30-min intervals. The CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios in these cumulative downdraft and updraft air samples were determined by the CRDS analyser after each sampling interval. Based on the measured mixing ratios difference and the

  1. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca; Johnson, Darren; Neubauer, Scott C; Raynie, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per-area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 y-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 y-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 y-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 y-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  2. Energy balance closure on a winter wheat stand: comparing the eddy covariance technique with the soil water balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imukova, K.; Ingwersen, J.; Hevart, M.; Streck, T.

    2015-05-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is typically not closed. The nature of the gap is usually not known, which hampers using EC data to parameterize and test models. The present study elucidates the nature of the energy gap of EC flux data from winter wheat stands in southwest Germany. During the vegetation periods 2012 and 2013, we continuously measured, in a half-hourly resolution, latent (LE) and sensible (H) heat fluxes using the EC technique. Measured fluxes were adjusted with either the Bowen-ratio (BR), H or LE post-closure method. The adjusted LE fluxes were tested against evapotranspiration data (ETWB) calculated using the soil water balance (WB) method. At sixteen locations within the footprint of an EC station, the soil water storage term was determined by measuring the soil water content down to a soil depth of 1.5 m. In the second year, the volumetric soil water content was also continuously measured in 15 min resolution in 10 cm intervals down to 90 cm depth with sixteen capacitance soil moisture sensors. During the 2012 vegetation period, the H post-closed LE flux data (ETEC = 3.4 ± 0.6 mm day-1) corresponded closest with the result of the WB method (3.3 ± 0.3 mm day-1). ETEC adjusted by the BR (4.1 ± 0.6 mm day-1) or LE (4.9 ± 0.9 mm day-1) post-closure method were higher than the ETWB by 20 and 33%, respectively. In 2013, ETWB was in best agreement with ETEC adjusted with the H post-closure method during the periods with low amount of rain and seepage. During these periods the BR and LE post-closure methods overestimated ET by about 30 and 40%, respectively. During a period with high and frequent rainfalls, ETWB was in-between ETEC adjusted by H and BR post-closure methods. We conclude that, at most vegetation periods on our site, LE is not a~major component of the energy balance gap. Our results indicate that the energy balance gap other energy fluxes and unconsidered or biased energy storage terms.

  3. Energy balance closure on a winter wheat stand: comparing the eddy covariance technique with the soil water balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imukova, K.; Ingwersen, J.; Hevart, M.; Streck, T.

    2016-01-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is typically not closed. The nature of the gap is usually not known, which hampers using EC data to parameterize and test models. In the present study we cross-checked the evapotranspiration data obtained with the EC method (ETEC) against ET rates measured with the soil water balance method (ETWB) at winter wheat stands in southwest Germany. During the growing seasons 2012 and 2013, we continuously measured, in a half-hourly resolution, latent heat (LE) and sensible (H) heat fluxes using the EC technique. Measured fluxes were adjusted with either the Bowen-ratio (BR), H or LE post-closure method. ETWB was estimated based on rainfall, seepage and soil water storage measurements. The soil water storage term was determined at sixteen locations within the footprint of an EC station, by measuring the soil water content down to a soil depth of 1.5 m. In the second year, the volumetric soil water content was additionally continuously measured in 15 min resolution in 10 cm intervals down to 90 cm depth with sixteen capacitance soil moisture sensors. During the 2012 growing season, the H post-closed LE flux data (ETEC = 3.4 ± 0.6 mm day-1) corresponded closest with the result of the WB method (3.3 ± 0.3 mm day-1). ETEC adjusted by the BR (4.1 ± 0.6 mm day-1) or LE (4.9 ± 0.9 mm day-1) post-closure method were higher than the ETWB by 24 and 48 %, respectively. In 2013, ETWB was in best agreement with ETEC adjusted with the H post-closure method during the periods with low amount of rain and seepage. During these periods the BR and LE post-closure methods overestimated ET by about 46 and 70 %, respectively. During a period with high and frequent rainfalls, ETWB was in-between ETEC adjusted by H and BR post-closure methods. We conclude that, at most observation periods on our site, LE is not a major component of the energy balance gap. Our results indicate that the energy balance gap is made up by

  4. Exchange of nitrous oxides and carbon dioxide measured using the eddy covariance technique in a high-latitude city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvi, Leena; Nordbo, Annika; Rannik, Üllar; Haapanala, Sami; Pihlatie, Mari; Mammarella, Ivan; Riikonen, Anu; Nikinmaa, Eero; Vesala, Timo

    2014-05-01

    In Helsinki, Finland, carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes have been measured continuously using the eddy covariance (EC) technique since 2005. In summer 2012, the measurements were supplemented with the fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) in order to examine how the exchanges of these two important greenhouse gases behave in urban environment. The EC measurements are made at the semi-urban measurement station SMEAR III Kumpula site located four kilometres north-east from the Helsinki city centre. The measurements are made on the top level of a 31 meters high lattice tower (60°12.17'N, 24°57.67'E) located on a hill, 26 m above sea level. The area around the tower can be divided into three surface cover sectors: built, road and vegetation, each representing the typical surface cover of the area. These areas allow us to examine the effect of different urban surface covers to the exchange of CO2 and N2O. The measurement setup includes an ultrasonic anemometer (USA-1, Metek GmbH) and a closed-path infrared gas analyzer (LI-7000, LI-COR) to measure the CO2 flux. During the summer 2012 measurement campaign lasting from 21 June till 27 November, the N2O flux was measured using a TDL spectrometer. Commonly accepted procedures were used to post-process the raw 10 Hz data. Overall, the measurement surroundings act as a source for both CO2 and N2O. The long-term measurements of the CO2 flux show a strong seasonal variation with clear effect from vegetation. In summer in the direction of high fraction of vegetation cover, the CO2 uptake exceeds its emissions and a downward flux reaching on average 10 μmol m-2 s-1 is observed. N2O on the other hand reaches its maxima values (campaign median 2.0 μmol m-2 h-1) in the same direction. This indicates that vegetation cannot be neglected in the urban greenhouse exchange studies. Traffic had a clear role emitting both N2O and CO2 with higher emissions during the rush hours than at other times. In the direction of the heavily trafficked road

  5. Study of eddy current probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Wang, Morgan

    1992-01-01

    The recognition of materials properties still presents a number of problems for nondestructive testing in aerospace systems. This project attempts to utilize current capabilities in eddy current instrumentation, artificial intelligence, and robotics in order to provide insight into defining geometrical aspects of flaws in composite materials which are capable of being evaluated using eddy current inspection techniques.

  6. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California; with a section on estimating evapotranspiration using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, John B.; Stannard, David I.

    1997-01-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the ground-water-flow system associated with Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site of a high-level nuclear-waste repository. By using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique, measurements made between June 1983 and April 1984 to estimate evapotranspiration were found to range from 0.1 centimeter per day during winter months to about 0.3 centimeter per day during summer months; the annual average was 0.16 centimeter per day. These estimates were compared with evapotranspiration estimates calculated from six other methods.

  7. Evaluation of the Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Surface Algorithm (ACASA Model) Using Eddy Covariance Technique Over Sparse Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Spano, D.; Sirca, C.; Duce, P.; Snyder, R.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K. T.

    2008-12-01

    Land surface models are usually used to quantify energy and mass fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere on micro- and regional scales. One of the most elaborate land surface models for flux modelling is the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA) model, which provides micro-scale as well as regional-scale fluxes when imbedded in a meso-scale meteorological model (e.g., MM5 or WRF). The model predicts vegetation conditions and changes with time due to plant responses to environment variables. In particular, fluxes and profiles of heat, water vapor, carbon and momentum within and above canopy are estimated using third-order equations. It also estimates turbulent profiles of velocity, temperature, humidity within and above canopy, and CO2 fluxes are estimated using a combination of Ball-Berry and Farquhar equations. The ACASA model is also able to include the effects of water stress on stomata, transpiration and CO2 assimilation. ACASA model is unique because it separates canopy domain into twenty atmospheric layers (ten layers within the canopy and ten layers above the canopy), and the soil is partitioned into fifteen layers of variable thickness. The model was mainly used over dense canopies in the past, so the aim of this work was to test the ACASA model over a sparse canopy as Mediterranean maquis. Vegetation is composed by sclerophyllous species of shrubs that are always green, with leathery leaves, small height, with a moderately sparse canopy, and that are tolerant at water stress condition. Eddy Covariance (EC) technique was used to collect continuous data for more than 3 years period. Field measurements were taken in a natural maquis site located near Alghero, Sardinia, Italy and they were used to parameterize and validate the model. The input values were selected by running the model several times varying the one parameter per time. A second step in the parameterization process was the simultaneously variation of some parameters

  8. Energy budget measurements using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio techniques at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Den Hartog, G.; Neumann, H. H.; King, K. M.; Chipanshi, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    Fluxes of heat and water vapor were measured on a 20-m tower at Kinosheo Lake in the Hudson Bay lowlands using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio energy balance techniques. The study period was June 25 to July 28, 1990. Measurements were made over a peat bog consisting of a mixture of sphagnum moss and lichen hummocks and black pools. About 200 m west of the tower were several shallow ponds. The hummocks had a dry, insulating surface and were underlain by an ice layer near 50 cm depth until mid-July. At the beginning of the period the black pools were covered with water, and although the free water gradually disappeared over the study period, they remained saturated to the end of July. The depth of peat near the tower was about 3 m. Despite the ice layer under the hummocks, their daytime surface temperatures were high, near 35 C, and after the middle of July, above 40 C. Inspection of temperature, precipitation, and radiation data showed that the midsummer period of 1990 was warmer, drier, and sunnier than usual at Moosonee and so by influence at Lake Kinosheo. When all the data were combined to yield average diurnal energy balance components, the eddy correlation fluxes accounted for 90% of the available energy. Latent heat flux averaged 46% of the total available energy and the sensible heat flux averaged 34%. Daytime Bowen ratios were near 1 for the experimental period, suggesting that the bog behaved more like a dryland than a wetland. Eddy correlation measurements of sensible heat and latent heat flux were less than those measured using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique, the average ratios being 0.81 and 0.86 respectively. These differences were possibly due to the difficulty in measuring energy balance components of net radiation and ground heat flux over the mosaic surface.

  9. An advanced test technique to quantify thermomechanical fatigue damage accumulation in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanical test technique was developed to assist in quantifying the accumulation of damage in composite materials during thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) cycling. This was accomplished by incorporating definitive elastic mechanical property measurements into an ongoing load-controlled TMF test without disturbing the test specimen or significantly altering the test conditions. The technique allows two fundamental composite properties consisting of the isothermal elastic static moduli and the macroscopic coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to be measured and collected as functions of the TMF cycles. The specific implementation was incorporated into the commonly employed idealized in-phase and out-of-phase TMF cycles. However, the techniques discussed could be easily implemented into any form of load-controlled TMF mission cycle. By quantifying the degradations of these properties, tremendous insights are gained concerning the progression of macroscopic composite damage and often times the progression of damage within a given constituent. This information should also be useful for the characterization and essential for the verification of analytical damage modeling methodologies. Several examples utilizing this test technique are given for three different fiber lay-ups of titanium metal matrix composites.

  10. On the estimate of the transpiration in Mediterranean heterogeneous ecosystems with the coupled use of eddy covariance and sap flow techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Roberto; Curreli, Matteo; Montaldo, Nicola; Oren, Ram

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are commonly heterogeneous savanna-like ecosystems, with contrasting plant functional types (PFT) competing for the water use. Mediterranean regions suffer water scarcity due to the dry climate conditions. In semi-arid regions evapotranspiration (ET) is the leading loss term of the root-zone water budget with a yearly magnitude that may be roughly equal to the precipitation. Despite the attention these ecosystems are receiving, a general lack of knowledge persists about the estimate of ET and the relationship between ET and the plant survival strategies for the different PFTs under water stress. During the dry summers these water-limited heterogeneous ecosystems are mainly characterized by a simple dual PFT-landscapes with strong-resistant woody vegetation and bare soil since grass died. In these conditions due to the low signal of the land surface fluxes captured by the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer the widely used eddy covariance may fail and its ET estimate is not robust enough. In these conditions the use of the sap flow technique may have a key role, because theoretically it provides a direct estimate of the woody vegetation transpiration. Through the coupled use of the sap flow sensor observations, a 2D foot print model of the eddy covariance tower and high resolution satellite images for the estimate of the foot print land cover map, the eddy covariance measurements can be correctly interpreted, and ET components (bare soil evaporation and woody vegetation transpiration) can be separated. The case study is at the Orroli site in Sardinia (Italy). The site landscape is a mixture of Mediterranean patchy vegetation types: trees, including wild olives and cork oaks, different shrubs and herbaceous species. An extensive field campaign started in 2004. Land-surface fluxes and CO2 fluxes are estimated by an eddy covariance technique based micrometeorological tower. Soil moisture profiles were also continuously estimated using water

  11. NO2 flux evaluation using laser induced fluorescence measurements and eddy covariance technique, in the Borneo forest during OP3 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dari Salisburgo, Cesare; di Carlo, Piero; Aruffo, E.; Langford, Ben; Dorsey, James; Giammaria, F.

    2010-05-01

    Emissions (both anthropogenic and biogenic) are extremely important to reduce the uncertainty of most models used to predict the atmospheric chemical species evolution. Measurements of emission of compounds such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are very rare because they require measures with high sensitivity and frequencies (above 5 Hz). Direct measurements of NO2 using laser-induced fluorescence (at 10Hz) combined with those of three components of wind are used to quantify directly the NO2 flux applying the eddy covariance technique. In this presentation will be described the technique of measurements and results of the observations made in the forests of Borneo (Malaysia) during the OP3 campaign in summer 2008.

  12. Recent advances in remote field eddy current NDE techniques and their applications in detection, characterization, and monitoring of deeply hidden corrosion in aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yushi; Ouyang, Tianhe; Udpa, Satish S.

    1999-01-01

    The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique is based on the RFEC phenomenon which is characterized by differences in the energy flow patterns in the near and remote field regions. The energy released by the probe excitation coil traverses the pipe al twice before reaching the pickup coil. The RFEC technique, currently used in metallic tube inspection, is therefore characterized by its equal sensitivity to a flaw irrespective to its location in the tube wall. It can be used for detecting defects located several skin-depths away from the excitation source, since its inspection capacity is limited by the skin-depth of the specimen, but by the signal-to-noise ratio for a particular measurement condition.

  13. Assessment of damage accumulation in thermal barrier coatings using a fluorescent dye infiltration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, B.; Jordan, E.; Gell, M.; Geary, A.

    1999-03-01

    Thermal barrier coatings, used extensively on hot section gas turbine engine components, weaken and spall after repeated thermal exposure during normal engine operation. A new technique has been developed, involving the use of vacuum impregnation of the porous ceramic with a mixture of epoxy and fluorescent dye (rhodamine-B) and the ASTM C 633 79 direct pull test, to preserve and reveal incipient damage and accumulated damage prior to spallation in thermal barrier coatings. Excellent definition of damage is provided by the dye in electron beam physical vapor deposited coatings, but the damage is more difficult to distinguish in the highly porous plasma coatings. Image processing is used to quantify the area fraction of debonding. For the electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating evaluated, a local area fraction of debonding of up to 20% was observed at 80% of spallation life.

  14. Estimation of mixing parameters for cancellation of discretized eddy current signals using time and frequency domain techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Simaar, M.

    1985-03-01

    In this paper, we present two methods for estimating the mixing parameters used in scaling, rotating, and time shifting discrete time eddy current impedance plane trajectories in order to suppress unwanted support plate signals. One method operates directly on the time signals. The other method operates on the frequency domain representation of these signals and consequently is computationally more involved. Both methods require the minimization of a functional which measures the energy difference between the horizontal and vertical components of the high and low frequency data. Three illustrative examples are presented, and it is shown that the use of the frequency domain method is justified if the data are corrupted with random noise as well as with unknown multisample time shifts.

  15. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance and static chamber techniques at a temperate forest in central ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Geddes, J. A.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Thomas, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate forest (Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve) in central Ontario (45°17´11´´ N, 78°32´19´´ W) from June-October, 2011. Continuous measurements were made by an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA) from Los Gatos Research Inc. that measures methane (CH4) at 10 Hz sampling rates. Fluxes were calculated from the gas measurements in conjunction with wind data collected by a 3-D sonic anemometer using the eddy covariance (EC) method. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7 ± 0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. Methane fluxes showed a seasonal progression with average rates of uptake increasing from June through September and remaining high in October. This pattern was consistent with a decreasing trend in soil moisture content at the monthly time scale. On the diurnal timescale, there was evidence of increased uptake during the day, when the mid-canopy wind speed was at a maximum. These patterns suggest that substrate supply of CH4 and oxygen to methanotrophs, and in certain cases hypoxic soil conditions supporting methanogenesis in low-slope areas, drive the observed variability in fluxes. A network of soil static chambers used at the tower site showed close agreement with the eddy covariance flux measurements. This suggests that soil-level microbial processes, and not abiological leaf-level CH4 production, drive overall CH4 dynamics in temperate forest ecosystems such as Haliburton Forest.

  16. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation.

  17. Detection of Anomalous Machining Damages in Inconel 718 and TI 6-4 by Eddy Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Shimon, M.; Nakagawa, N.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports on an eddy current (EC) study aimed at detecting anomalous machining damages in Inconel 718 and Ti 6-4 samples, including (i) surface discontinuities such as re-depositing of chips onto the machined surface, and (ii) microstructural damages manifested as a white surface layer and a subsurface layer of distorted grains, typically tens of microns thick. A series of pristine and machine-damaged coupons were studied by EC scans using a differential probe operated at 2 MHz to detect discontinuous surface anomalies, and by swept high frequency EC (SHFEC) measurements from 0.5 MHz to 65.5 MHz using proprietary detection coils to detect surface microstructural damages. In general, the EC c-scan data from machine-damaged surfaces show spatial variations with larger standard deviations than those from the undamaged surfaces. In some cases, the c-scan images exhibit characteristic bipolar indications in good spatial correlation with surface anomalies revealed by optical microscopy and laser profilometry. Results of the SHFEC measurements indicate a reduced near-surface conductivity of the damaged surfaces compared to the undamaged surfaces.

  18. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation. PMID:27131700

  19. Transient eddies in the MACDA Mars reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooring, Todd A.; Wilson, R. John

    2015-10-01

    We present a survey of the transient eddy activity in the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) reanalysis. The spatial structure and propagation characteristics of the eddies are emphasized. Band-pass-filtered variance and covariance fields are found to be zonally modulated, indicating a longitude dependence of the typical amplitudes of Martian transient eddies. Considerable repeatability of the eddy field spatial structures is found across Mars years, including a roughly wave number 3 pattern of low-level eddy meridional temperature transport (v'T'¯) in the northern hemisphere that is evident before and after winter solstice and a possible tendency for northern hemisphere eddy kinetic energy maxima to be located above low-lying areas. Southern hemisphere eddy fields tend to feature two local maxima, one roughly south of Tharsis and the other associated with Hellas. Eddies are weakened near winter solstice in both hemispheres and were generally weakened in the northern hemisphere during the 2001 (Mars year 25) global dust storm, albeit with little change in spatial patterns. Because the transient eddies propagate in space, we also used a teleconnection map-based technique to estimate their phase velocities. Eddy propagation at the surface is found to follow topography, a phenomenon less evident at higher altitude. Possible physical mechanisms underlying the documented eddy phenomena are discussed.

  20. Inexpensive Eddy-Current Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Robert F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Radial crack replicas serve as evaluation standards. Technique entails intimately joining two pieces of appropriate aluminum alloy stock and centering drilled hole through and along interface. Bore surface of hole presents two vertical stock interface lines 180 degrees apart. These lines serve as radial crack defect replicas during eddy-current technique setup and verification.

  1. A comparison of methane emission measurements using Eddy Covariance and manual and automated chamber-based techniques in Tibetan Plateau alpine wetland.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingfei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Guangshuai; Song, Weimin; Huang, Yao; Li, Sheng-Gong; Liang, Naishen; Tang, Yanhong; He, Jin-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Comparing of different CH4 flux measurement techniques allows for the independent evaluation of the performance and reliability of those techniques. We compared three approaches, the traditional discrete Manual Static Chamber (MSC), Continuous Automated Chamber (CAC) and Eddy Covariance (EC) methods of measuring the CH4 fluxes in an alpine wetland. We found a good agreement among the three methods in the seasonal CH4 flux patterns, but the diurnal patterns from both the CAC and EC methods differed. While the diurnal CH4 flux variation from the CAC method was positively correlated with the soil temperature, the diurnal variation from the EC method was closely correlated with the solar radiation and net CO2 fluxes during the daytime but was correlated with the soil temperature at nighttime. The MSC method showed 25.3% and 7.6% greater CH4 fluxes than the CAC and EC methods when measured between 09:00 h and 12:00 h, respectively. PMID:23838484

  2. Semidiurnal and seasonal variations in methane emissions from a sub-tropical hydroelectric reservoir (Nam Theun 2, Laos) measured by eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, C.; Serca, D.; Guerin, F.; Meyerfeld, Y.; Descloux, S.; Chanudet, V.; Pighini, S.; Godon, A.; Guedant, P.

    2012-12-01

    The quantification of sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHG) have become an important scientific issue. Hydroelectric reservoirs have been identified as considerable methane (CH4) sources to the atmosphere, especially in the tropics. Assessing these emissions and their variations on small and large time scale represent important challenges in our understanding of water-atmosphere exchange. In this context, objectives of this study are (i) to quantify the CH4 emissions, (ii) to determine the variations in the emissions on daily and seasonal time scale, and link these variations to environmental driving forces (iii) to compare different methodologies to assess CH4 emissions. Measurements of CH4 emissions were made in a recently impounded (in 2009) subtropical hydroelectric reservoir, Nam Theun 2 (NT2), in Lao PDR, Asia. The sampling strategy included three different types of flux measurement techniques: floating chambers, submerged funnels, and a micrometeorological station allowing for flux determination based on the eddy covariance technique (EC). We carried out flux measurements during four intensive field campaigns conducted in between May 2009 and June 2011. Eddy covariance system, composed by a 3D sonic anemometer coupled with a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer, was deployed on the mast in a large surface of open water corresponding to an homogeneous ecosystem (floodplain). Diffusive and bubbling fluxes were measured using respectively floating chambers and submerged funnel techniques around the mast. Our results from the all four field campaigns show that individual 30-min EC fluxes varied by 4 order of magnitude (from 0.01 to 102 mmol.m-2.day-1). Average EC fluxes of individual campaigns varied inversely with water depth, from 5±3.5 to 28±16 mmol.m-2.day-1 for respectively from 10.5 to 2 m of water depths. Diffusive fluxes measured by floating chambers ranged between 0.2 and 3.2 mmol.m-2.day-1. Bubbling fluxes were found to be highly

  3. A new approach of weighted integration technique based on accumulated images using dynamic PET and H2(15)O

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, T.; Kanno, I.; Iida, H.; Miura, S.; Uemura, K. )

    1991-05-01

    We developed a new technique of weighted integration for the measurement of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and the blood-tissue partition coefficient (p) using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and H2(15)O. The weighted integration in the new technique is carried out on the equation of the first time integration of the Kety-Schmidt differential equation. Practically, serially accumulated images with sequentially prolonged accumulation times are weighted by two arbitrary functions. The weighting functions do not have to be differentiated because of the exclusion of the differential term in the starting equation. Consequently, the method does not require data at the end of the scan. The technique was applied to H2(15)O dynamic PET performed on four normal subjects, and was verified to provide a better signal-to-noise ratio than the previously developed integrated projection (IP) technique. Computer simulations were carried out to investigate the effects of statistical noise, tissue heterogeneity, and time delay and dispersion in arterial input function. The simulation showed that the new technique provided about a 1.4 times lower statistical error in both LCBF and p at 50 ml 100 g-1 min-1 compared to the IP technique, and it should be noted that the new technique was less sensitive to the shape of the weighting functions. The new technique provides a new strategy with respect to the statistical error for estimation of LCBF and p.

  4. OSL and TL techniques combined in a beryllium oxide detector to evaluate simultaneously accumulated and single doses.

    PubMed

    Malthez, Anna L M C; Freitas, Marcelo B; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M; Umisedo, Nancy K; Button, Vera L S N

    2016-04-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) are similar techniques widely used in radiation dosimetry. The main difference between these techniques is the stimulus to induce luminescence emission: TL technique uses thermal stimulation, whereas OSL uses optical stimulation. One of the main intrinsic characteristics of the OSL technique is the possibility of reading several times the dosimetric materials with a negligible loss of signal. In the case of BeO, recent studies have shown that TL stimulation up to 250°C does not affect its OSL signal. Taking the advantages of dosimetric characteristics of BeO combined with both techniques, in this study, we demonstrated the possibility of measuring accumulated and single doses in the same BeO-based detector in order to use it to improve individual monitoring of radiation workers exposed to X-ray or gamma-ray fields. Single doses were measured using TL technique by heating the detector up to 250°C, whereas accumulated doses were estimated using OSL technique in the same detector in a relatively short time of optical stimulation. The detectors were exposed to two energies: 28keV X-rays and 1.25MeV Co-60 gamma rays. The doses estimated by OSL and TL of BeO (Thermalox 995) were compared with those obtained with LiF (TLD-100) and recorded with a calibrated ionization chamber. The results indicate that combined OSL and TL signals of BeO detectors can provide additional information of accumulated dose, with additional exploration of the advantages of both techniques, such as speed in readouts with OSL, and double-check the doses using TL and OSL intensities from BeO. PMID:26784853

  5. Thin film eddy current impulse deicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samuel O.; Zieve, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    Two new styles of electrical impulse deicers has been developed and tested in NASA's Icing Research Tunnel. With the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing Boot (EDB), a thin and flexible spiral coil is encapsulated between two thicknesses of elastomer. The coil, made by an industrial printed circuit board manufacturer, is bonded to the aluminum aircraft leading edge. A capacitor bank is discharged through the coil. Induced eddy currents repel the coil from the aluminum aircraft structure and shed accumulated ice. A second configuration, the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing-Strip (EDS) uses an outer metal erosion strip fastened over the coil. Opposite flowing eddy currents repel the strip and create the impulse deicing force. The outer strip serves as a surface for the collection and shedding of ice and does not require any structural properties. The EDS is suitable for composite aircraft structures. Both systems successfully dispelled over 95 percent of the accumulated ice from airfoils over the range of the FAA icing envelope.

  6. Application of optically stimulated luminescence technique to evaluate simultaneously accumulated and single doses with the same dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malthez, Anna Luiza M. C.; Freitas, Marcelo B.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Button, Vera L. S. N.

    2014-02-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) can be read several times with a negligible loss (degradation) of signal. In this work, we explore this OSL property to estimate simultaneously the accumulated and single doses using a unique Al2O3 dosimeter, irradiated repeated times along over 4 months. This was done through several irradiations of OSLD (Landauer Luxel Dots) with two energies (28 keV X-rays and 1.25 MeV Co-60 gamma rays) and several doses distributed over time. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used as a reference to compare the estimated doses obtained with OSLD. For each irradiation, and both energies, a calibration curve was evaluated with OSLD and TLD to estimate the dose values. The OSL readouts were made with a MicroStar (Landauer) OSL reader. To estimate background (BG) over time, a set of OSLD and TLD (Bycron TLD100) was not irradiated and BG was monitored at each readout section. After irradiations, the OSL and TL signals were converted to dose and values were compared. As a set of OSLD suffered no bleaching after the readouts, it was possible to estimate simultaneously the accumulated and single doses with a unique OSLD. Each single dose was estimated through the subtraction of successive accumulated doses determined for each single OSLD. We concluded that the single doses determined by OSL and TL techniques were compatible, and that the accumulated dose, obtained with OSL technique was comparable to the sum of single doses determined with TLD. We can conclude that using OSL technique and Al2O3 dosimeters it is possible to estimate simultaneously accumulated and single doses with the same dosimeter irradiated with low or high energy photons.

  7. Assessment of the soil water balance by the combination of cosmic ray neutron sensing and eddy covariance technique in an irrigated citrus orchard (Marrakesh, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroos, Katja; Baroni, Gabriele; Er-Raki, Salah; Francke, Till; Khabba, Said; Jarlan, Lionel; Hanich, Lahoucine; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation water requirement plays a crucial role in many agricultural areas and especially in arid and semi-arid landscapes. Improvements in the water management and the performance of the irrigation systems require a correct evaluation of the hydrological processes involved. However, some difficulties can arise due to the heterogeneity of the soil-plant system and of the irrigation scheme. To overcome these limitations, in this study, the soil water balance is analyzed by the combination of the Eddy Covariance technique (EC) and Cosmic Ray neutron Sensing (CRS). EC provides the measurement of the actual evapotranspiration over the area as it was presented in many field conditions. Moreover CRS showed to be a valuable approach to measure the root zone soil moisture integrated in a footprint of ~30 ha. In this way, the combination of the two methodologies should provide a better analysis of the soil water balance at field scale, as opposed to point observations, e.g. by TDR, evaporimeter and fluxmeter. Then, this could increase the capability to assess the irrigation efficiency and the agricultural water management. The study is conducted in a citrus orchard situated in a semi-arid region, 30 km southwest of Marrakesh (Morocco). The site is flat and planted with trees of same age growing in parallel rows with drip irrigation lines and application of fertilizer and pesticides. The original soil seems modified on the surface by the agricultural use, creating differences between trees, rows and lines. In addition, the drip irrigation creates also a spatial variability of the water flux distribution in the field, making this site an interesting area to test the methodology. Particular attention is given to the adaptation of the standard soil sampling campaign used for the calibration of the CRS and the introduction of a weighing function. Data were collected from June to December 2013, which corresponds to the high plant transpiration. Despite the intention of the

  8. The Fate of Ozone at a Ponderosa Pine Plantation: Partitioning Between Stomatal and Non-stomatal Deposition Using Sap Flow and Eddy Covariance Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpius, M. R.; McKay, M. M.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2001-12-01

    Major advances in quantifying ozone deposition to vegetated ecosystems have been made using above-canopy techniques -- such as eddy covariance -- that allow for the direct measure of ozone flux into natural systems. However, from above-canopy flux measurements alone, it is impossible to differentiate between deposition through stomatal openings of trees versus non-stomatal surfaces or within canopy chemical loss. Therefore, there is a need to partition ozone fluxes into plant stomatal and non-stomatal components. Sap flow measurements provide a direct measurement of stomatal conductance from which we can infer ozone uptake by trees: this represents a novel way to determine pollutant loading on stomatal surfaces of trees that is inexpensive, reliable, and can be deployed in a multitude of environments. Sap flow measurements were used to determine ozone uptake by ponderosa pine trees in the Sierra Nevada Mountains year-round starting in June 2000 at Blodgett Forest, an Ameriflux site located ~75 miles downwind of Sacramento, CA. Concurrently, total ecosystem ozone flux was measured using eddy covariance. Mean total ozone flux to the ecosystem was 46.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-15.1) in summer 2000, 27.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-14.2) in fall 2000, 8.2 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-5.1) in winter 2001, and 21.1 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-11.6) in spring 2001. Mean ozone flux through the stomata was 14.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-4.1) during summer 2000, 12.9 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-5.8) during fall 2000, 5.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-2.8) during winter 2001, and 12.7 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-3.7) during spring 2001. The percentage of total ozone deposition which occurred through the stomata was 31% in summer, 47% in fall, 69% but highly variable in winter, and 60% in spring. The difference between total ozone flux to the ecosystem and stomatal ozone flux to the trees varied exponentially with air temperature, suggesting that much of the non-stomatal deposition was actually due to chemical loss either on surfaces or within

  9. Accurate prediction of unsteady and time-averaged pressure loads using a hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/large-eddy simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozinoski, Radoslav

    Significant research has been performed over the last several years on understanding the unsteady aerodynamics of various fluid flows. Much of this work has focused on quantifying the unsteady, three-dimensional flow field effects which have proven vital to the accurate prediction of many fluid and aerodynamic problems. Up until recently, engineers have predominantly relied on steady-state simulations to analyze the inherently three-dimensional ow structures that are prevalent in many of today's "real-world" problems. Increases in computational capacity and the development of efficient numerical methods can change this and allow for the solution of the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications. An integral part of this capability has been the performance and accuracy of the turbulence models coupled with advanced parallel computing techniques. This report begins with a brief literature survey of the role fully three-dimensional, unsteady, Navier-Stokes solvers have on the current state of numerical analysis. Next, the process of creating a baseline three-dimensional Multi-Block FLOw procedure called MBFLO3 is presented. Solutions for an inviscid circular arc bump, laminar at plate, laminar cylinder, and turbulent at plate are then presented. Results show good agreement with available experimental, numerical, and theoretical data. Scalability data for the parallel version of MBFLO3 is presented and shows efficiencies of 90% and higher for processes of no less than 100,000 computational grid points. Next, the description and implementation techniques used for several turbulence models are presented. Following the successful implementation of the URANS and DES procedures, the validation data for separated, non-reattaching flows over a NACA 0012 airfoil, wall-mounted hump, and a wing-body junction geometry are presented. Results for the NACA 0012 showed significant improvement in flow predictions

  10. Eddy current scanning at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; Foley, M.; Brinkmann, A.; Ozelis, J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2005-07-01

    In the framework of SRF cavity development, Fermilab is creating the infrastructure needed for the characterization of the material used in the cavity fabrication. An important step in the characterization of ''as received'' niobium sheets is the eddy current scanning. Eddy current scanning is a non-destructive technique first adopted and further developed by DESY with the purpose of checking the cavity material for sub-surface defects and inclusions. Fermilab has received and further upgraded a commercial eddy current scanner previously used for the SNS project. The upgrading process included developing new filtering software. This scanner is now used daily to scan the niobium sheets for the Fermilab third harmonic and transverse deflecting cavities. This paper gives a status report on the scanning results obtained so far, including a discussion of the typology of signals being detected. We also report on the efforts to calibrate this scanner, a work conducted in collaboration with DESY.

  11. An Approach to Minimizing Artifacts Caused by Cross-Sensitivity in the Determination of Air-Sea CO2 Flux Using the Eddy-Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ziqiang; Gao, Huiwang; Gao, Zengxiang; Wang, Renlei; Xue, Yuhuan; Yao, Xiaohong

    2013-07-01

    The air-sea CO2 flux was measured from a research vessel in the North Yellow Sea in October 2007 using an open-path eddy-covariance technique. In 11 out of 64 samples, the normalized spectra of scalars (C}2, water vapour, and temperature) showed similarities. However, in the remaining samples, the normalized CO2 spectra were observed to be greater than those of water vapour and temperature at low frequencies. In this paper, the noise due to cross-sensitivity was identified through a combination of intercomparisons among the normalized spectra of three scalars and additional analyses. Upon examination, the cross-sensitivity noise appeared to be mainly present at frequencies {<}0.8 Hz. Our analysis also suggested that the high-frequency fluctuations of CO2 concentration (frequency {>}0.8 Hz) was probably less affected by the cross-sensitivity. To circumvent the cross-sensitivity issue, the cospectrum in the high-frequency range 0.8-1.5 Hz, instead of the whole range, was used to estimate the CO2 flux by taking the contribution of the high frequency to the CO2 flux to be the same as the contribution to the water vapour flux. The estimated air-sea CO2 flux in the North Yellow Sea was -0.039 ± 0.048 mg m^{-2} s^{-1}, a value comparable to the estimates using the inertial dissipation method and Edson's method (Edson et al., J Geophys Res 116:C00F10, 2011).

  12. Analysis and encoder prevention techniques for pathological IDCT drift accumulation in static video scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Gary J.

    2007-09-01

    This paper discusses the problem of severe pathological encoder-decoder IDCT drift in video compression coding when using a very small quantization step size and typical encoding techniques to encode video sequences with areas of completely static source content. We suggest that there are two ways to try to address the problem: 1) using a highaccuracy IDCT (or an encoder-matched IDCT) in a decoder design, and 2) using encoder techniques to avoid such drift build-up. The primary problem is asserted to be the encoder's behavior. Effective encoder techniques to avoid the problem are described, including a simple "generalized Morris drift test", which is suggested as being superior to the test currently described in the MPEG-2 video specification. Experiment results are reported to show that performing this test in an encoder will completely solve the problem. Other encoding techniques to address the problem are also discussed.

  13. Electrochemical Evaluation of Lead Base Composite Anodes Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasi, Maryam; Keshavarz Alamdari, Eskandar

    2015-04-01

    Accumulative roll bonding is used for the first time in lead systems to fabricate advanced lead base composite anodes. For this purpose, Ag as the most common and effective additive, Co as the best metallic immiscible substitution for Ag, and MnO2 as the ceramic and electrocatalytic agent have been used as additives to produce anodes. The accumulative roll bonding processed sheets have been fabricated under determined conditions. The electrochemical properties of the prepared samples are investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, Polarization tests, electrowinning tests, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results indicate that the ARB-processed composite lead sheets can be perfectly used as novel developed anodes. The advantages include 5.51 times increase of current density, in the Pb-pct0.5Ag 9-pass sample compared to pure lead anode, decreased charge transfer resistance from 56.31 (Ω cm2) in pure lead anode to 17.5 (Ω cm2) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (72 pct lower), and decreased oxygen evolution potential from 1.95 (V/SHE) in pure lead anode to 1.77 (V/SHE) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (0.18 (V/SHE) lower). Electrowinning tests results reveal Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass showed best anodic performance withsignificant lower compared corrosion rate (75 pct), product and electrolyte contamination, slime formation, energy consumption and higher Zn deposit and energy conservation (to 294 kWh/t-Zn). Finest Zn deposit morphology (effective reduced grain size corresponding to smoothness and compaction) has been supplied by Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass sample resulted from enhanced growth rate of Zn in lack of Pb contaminations that could act as suitable nucleation sites.

  14. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, A. T.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2001-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Large Eddy Simulation of a non-buoyant jet issuing from a circular orifice in a wall, and developing in neutral surroundings. The effects of the subgrid scales on the large eddies have been modeled with the dynamic large eddy simulation model applied to the fully 3D domain in spherical coordinates. The simulation captures the unsteady motions of the large-scales within the jet as well as the laminar motions in the entrainment region surrounding the jet. The computed time-averaged statistics (mean velocity, concentration, and turbulence parameters) compare well with laboratory data without invoking an empirical entrainment coefficient as employed by line integral models. The use of the large eddy simulation technique allows examination of unsteady and inhomogeneous features such as the evolution of eddies and the details of the entrainment process.

  16. Unified Ultrasonic/Eddy-Current Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James; Butler, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging station for detecting cracks and flaws in solid materials developed combining both ultrasonic C-scan and eddy-current imaging. Incorporation of both techniques into one system eliminates duplication of computers and of mechanical scanners; unifies acquisition, processing, and storage of data; reduces setup time for repetitious ultrasonic and eddy-current scans; and increases efficiency of system. Same mechanical scanner used to maneuver either ultrasonic or eddy-current probe over specimen and acquire point-by-point data. For ultrasonic scanning, probe linked to ultrasonic pulser/receiver circuit card, while, for eddy-current imaging, probe linked to impedance-analyzer circuit card. Both ultrasonic and eddy-current imaging subsystems share same desktop-computer controller, containing dedicated plug-in circuit boards for each.

  17. Tracking Loop Current eddies with satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leben, Robert R.; Born, George H.

    1993-11-01

    Geosat altimeter derived sea surface height (SSH) anomaly fields have been optimally interpolated onto a regular space time grid using both crossover data from the nonrepeating Geodetic Mission (Geosat-GM) and collinear data from the Exact Repeat Mission (Geosat-ERM). Over four years of data were collected from the combined missions, spanning the time period from April 1985 through August 1989, during which six major and at least two minor Loop Current eddies were directly observed. Eddy paths determined by automated tracking of the local maximum values in the SSH anomaly fields were compared with eddy centers estimated from drifting buoy trajectories, validating the data processing and tracking techniques. Accurate tracking of eddy centers allowed transits of 90°W to be used as a benchmark for determination of eddy shedding periods. For this data set the average period between major eddy transits was 9.8 months, with individual separation periods ranging from 6 to 14 months. The two minor eddies observed were associated with the deepest penetrations of the Loop Current into the gulf, and were nearly coincident with the shedding of the strongest major Loop Current eddies.

  18. Southern Ocean eddy phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenger, I.; Münnich, M.; Gruber, N.; Knutti, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous features in the Southern Ocean, yet their phenomenology is not well quantified. To tackle this task, we use satellite observations of sea level anomalies and sea surface temperature (SST) as well as in situ temperature and salinity measurements from profiling floats. Over the period 1997-2010, we identified over a million mesoscale eddy instances and were able to track about 105 of them over 1 month or more. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the boundary current systems, and the regions where they interact are hot spots of eddy presence, representing also the birth places and graveyards of most eddies. These hot spots contrast strongly to areas shallower than about 2000 m, where mesoscale eddies are essentially absent, likely due to topographical steering. Anticyclones tend to dominate the southern subtropical gyres, and cyclones the northern flank of the ACC. Major causes of regional polarity dominance are larger formation numbers and lifespans, with a contribution of differential propagation pathways of long-lived eddies. Areas of dominance of one polarity are generally congruent with the same polarity being longer-lived, bigger, of larger amplitude, and more intense. Eddies extend down to at least 2000 m. In the ACC, eddies show near surface temperature and salinity maxima, whereas eddies in the subtropical areas generally have deeper anomaly maxima, presumably inherited from their origin in the boundary currents. The temperature and salinity signatures of the average eddy suggest that their tracer anomalies are a result of both trapping in the eddy core and stirring.

  19. Using passive, thermal remote sensing techniques for detecting subsurface gravel accumulations in vegetated, unconsolidated sedimentary terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Gregory S.; Scholen, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Multiband radiometric data from an airborne imaging thermal scanner are being studied for use in finding buried gravel deposits. The techniques are based on measuring relative differences in the thermal properties between gravel-laden targets and the surrounding gravelless background. These properties are determined from modeling the spectral radiant emittance recorded over both types of surfaces in conjunction with ground measurements of the most significant heat flows above and below the surface. Thermodynamic properties of sampled materials from control sites are determined, and diurnal and annual subsurface heat waves are recorded. Thermal models that account for heat exchange at the surface, as well as varying levels of soil moisture, humidity, and vegetation, are needed for adaptation and modification to simulate the physical and radiative environments of this region.

  20. Eddy current inspection of graphite fiber components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Bryson, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    The recognition of defects in materials properties still presents a number of problems for nondestructive testing in aerospace systems. This project attempts to utilize current capabilities in eddy current instrumentation, artificial intelligence, and robotics in order to provide insight into defining geometrical aspects of flaws in composite materials which are capable of being evaluated using eddy current inspection techniques. The unique capabilities of E-probes and horseshoe probes for inspecting probes for inspecting graphite fiber materials were evaluated and appear to hold great promise once the technology development matures. The initial results are described of modeling eddy current interactions with certain flaws in graphite fiber samples.

  1. Nonlinear optimisation techniques for accelerator performance improvement on-line: recent trials and experiment for the CERN antiproton accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, Vinod

    1986-06-01

    The use of function minimisation techniques for optimum design according to given performance criteria is well-known. Given a well-defined criterion and a means of evaluating it precisely, the problem reduces to choosing the best optimisation procedure to suit the problem. Direct search techniques which do not generally rely on the computation of derivatives of the error function are ideal for on-line improvement of the global accelerator performance since the error function is not known analytically, e.g. the number of antiprotons stored in the antiproton accumulator ring on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of all the antiproton production and stochastic cooling system parameters. The user-friendliness of the NODAL interpreter at the man-machine interaction level, its capability to easily control and manipulate equipment as well as its capability to synchronise with respect to time events on a cycle-to-cycle basis makes it suitable for an on-line accelerator performance optimisation type of application. A modular procedure, based on the Simplex technique [1] has been implemented recently which allows function minimisation depending on the error function definition module. This enables an easy manipulation of variables and synchronization with machine events. For the antiproton accumulator (AA), while the circulating beam current transformer lacks the resolution to measure the exact number of antiprotons stored on a pulse-to-pulse basis, there are a large number of electrons produced in the production process [2] and a signal emanating from these can be adapted to provide the performance criterion and appropriate parameters used as function variables in the optimisation process. First trials based on optimisation of injection of antiprotons in the AA look promising, but further work is necessary in the direct definition of the error functions.

  2. Seasonal Dynamics of N2O and CO2 Emissions from a Corn Production System measured with the Eddy covariance and Chamber techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwuozo, S. A.; Hui, D.; Dennis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural Practices play a major role in the global fluxes of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. The use of fertilizer in Corn production has generated concerns about its contribution to global climate change. Thus, farmers and others concerned have become interested in more efficient fertilization management practice and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. To understand best management practices, in the 2012 and 2013 corn growing seasons, field experiments was conducted at Tennessee State University Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. The study examines the seasonal variations of (N2O) and (CO2) emissions from soil as a function of six treatment that include inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, chicken litter and biochar application. The combinations were: regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) no till, regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) conventional till, multiple URAN applications (4 times) no till, Denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application in no till, chicken litter with regular URAN application no till and URAN application with biochar in no tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated 6 times. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured using a closed chamber method after rainfall event(s), fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during gas sampling. Plant physiological and growth parameters were measured as appropriate and meteorological records were kept. N2O flux was also continuously measured in a commercial corn field using the eddy covariance (EC) technique fitted with a fast response N2O analyzer to check the N2O emissions at the large scale and compare it to the chamber method. Results obtained with the EC technique were comparable with the chamber methods. Preliminary data indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the agricultural

  3. Remote field eddy current inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique uses an internal probe to inspect conducting tubes nondestructively. A coaxial solenoidal exciter, energized with low frequency AC, and detector coils near the inside of the pipe wall are separated by about two pipe diameters to obtain through wall transmission and equal sensitivity to defects on the outside or inside of the pipe wall. Calculation methods are outlined and the voltage plane polar plot signal representation for defect measurement is described. Slit defect interactions in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic tubes are discussed. Defect-induced anomalous fields are interpreted in terms of anomalous source eddy current and missing magnetization defect models. The use of computer animations to represent the time variations of high resolution field measurements and calculations is described.

  4. Automated eddy current analysis of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for characterizing flaws in graphite-based filament-wound cylindrical structures is described. A major emphasis was also placed upon incorporating artificial intelligence techniques into the signal analysis portion of the inspection process. Developing an eddy current scanning system using a commercial robot for inspecting graphite structures (and others) was a goal in the overall concept and is essential for the final implementation for the expert systems interpretation. Manual scans, as performed in the preliminary work here, do not provide sufficiently reproducible eddy current signatures to be easily built into a real time expert system. The expert systems approach to eddy current signal analysis requires that a suitable knowledge base exist in which correct decisions as to the nature of a flaw can be performed. A robotic workcell using eddy current transducers for the inspection of carbon filament materials with improved sensitivity was developed. Improved coupling efficiencies achieved with the E-probes and horseshoe probes are exceptional for graphite fibers. The eddy current supervisory system and expert system was partially developed on a MacIvory system. Continued utilization of finite element models for predetermining eddy current signals was shown to be useful in this work, both for understanding how electromagnetic fields interact with graphite fibers, and also for use in determining how to develop the knowledge base. Sufficient data was taken to indicate that the E-probe and the horseshoe probe can be useful eddy current transducers for inspecting graphite fiber components. The lacking component at this time is a large enough probe to have sensitivity in both the far and near field of a thick graphite epoxy component.

  5. Eddy-current testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasley, R. L.; Birdwell, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Eddy-current inspection is discussed as a method for locating subsurface flaws in electrically conductive materials. The physical principles and electrical circuitry are described along with the test equipment.

  6. The eddy cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichevin, Thierry; Nof, Doron

    1996-09-01

    A new nonlinear mechanism for the generation of "Meddies" by a cape is proposed. The essence of the new process is that the flow-force associated with any steady current that curves back on itself around a cape cannot be balanced without generating and shedding eddies. The process is modeled as follows. A westward flowing density current advances along a zonal wall and turns eastward after reaching the edge of the wall (i.e. the Cape of St Vincent). Integration of the steady (and inviscid) momentum equation along the wall gives the long-shore flow-force and shows that, no matter what the details of the turning process are, such a scenario is impossible. It corresponds to an unbalanced flow-force and, therefore, cannot exist. Namely, in an analogy to a rocket, the zonal longshore current forces the entire system to the west. A flow field that can compensate for such a force is westward drifting eddies that push the system to the east. In a similar fashion to the backward push associated with a firing cannon, the westward moving eddies (bullets) balance the integrated momentum of the flow around the cape. Nonlinear solutions are constructed analytically using an approach that enables one to compute the eddies' size and generation frequency without solving for the incredibly complicated details of the generation process itself. The method takes advantage of the fact that, after each eddy is generated, the system returns to its original structure. It is based on the integration of the momentum equation (for periodic flows) over a control volume and a perturbation expansion in ɛ, the ratio between the eddies' westward drift and the parent current speed. It is found that, because of the relatively small size of the Mediterranean eddies, β is not a sufficiently strong mechanism to remove the eddies (from the Cape of St Vincent) at the observed frequency. It is, therefore, concluded that westward advection must also take place. Specifically, it is found that an advection

  7. Revolving Eddy-Current Probe Detects Cracks Near Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, James P.; Nath, Shridhar; Simpson, John

    1995-01-01

    Scanning eddy-current probe in circular pattern increases sensitivity with which probe indicates fatigue cracks and other defects in metal surfaces in vicinity of rivets. Technique devised to facilitate inspection of riveted joints in aircraft. Eddy-current probe in question described in "Electro-magnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use" (LAR-15046).

  8. Remote field eddy current inspection of support plate fretting wear

    SciTech Connect

    Shatat, A.; Atherton, D.L.

    1997-03-01

    This article demonstrates how the remote field eddy current technique might be extended to measure support plate fretting wear in heat exchanger tubes. A finite element analysis was used to examine the plate`s effect on the eddy current signal. Experimental data lend support to a suggested multifrequency method for sizing fretting grooves.

  9. Automated eddy current analysis of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    This research effort focused on the use of eddy current techniques for characterizing flaws in graphite-based filament-wound cylindrical structures. A major emphasis was on incorporating artificial intelligence techniques into the signal analysis portion of the inspection process. Developing an eddy current scanning system using a commercial robot for inspecting graphite structures (and others) has been a goal in the overall concept and is essential for the final implementation for expert system interpretation. Manual scans, as performed in the preliminary work here, do not provide sufficiently reproducible eddy current signatures to be easily built into a real time expert system. The expert systems approach to eddy current signal analysis requires that a suitable knowledge base exist in which correct decisions as to the nature of the flaw can be performed. In eddy current or any other expert systems used to analyze signals in real time in a production environment, it is important to simplify computational procedures as much as possible. For that reason, we have chosen to use the measured resistance and reactance values for the preliminary aspects of this work. A simple computation, such as phase angle of the signal, is certainly within the real time processing capability of the computer system. In the work described here, there is a balance between physical measurements and finite element calculations of those measurements. The goal is to evolve into the most cost effective procedures for maintaining the correctness of the knowledge base.

  10. Transient eddy current flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, J.; Stefani, F.

    2015-10-01

    Measuring local velocities or entire flow rates in liquid metals or semiconductor melts is a notorious problem in many industrial applications, including metal casting and silicon crystal growth. We present a new variant of an old technique which relies on the continuous tracking of a flow-advected transient eddy current that is induced by a pulsed external magnetic field. This calibration-free method is validated by applying it to the velocity of a spinning disk made of aluminum. First tests at a rig with a flow of liquid GaInSn are also presented.

  11. Mesoscale Eddies Are Oases for Higher Trophic Marine Life

    PubMed Central

    Godø, Olav R.; Samuelsen, Annette; Macaulay, Gavin J.; Patel, Ruben; Hjøllo, Solfrid Sætre; Horne, John; Kaartvedt, Stein; Johannessen, Johnny A.

    2012-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies stimulate biological production in the ocean, but knowledge of energy transfers to higher trophic levels within eddies remains fragmented and not quantified. Increasing the knowledge base is constrained by the inability of traditional sampling methods to adequately sample biological processes at the spatio-temporal scales at which they occur. By combining satellite and acoustic observations over spatial scales of 10 s of km horizontally and 100 s of m vertically, supported by hydrographical and biological sampling we show that anticyclonic eddies shape distribution and density of marine life from the surface to bathyal depths. Fish feed along density structures of eddies, demonstrating that eddies catalyze energy transfer across trophic levels. Eddies create attractive pelagic habitats, analogous to oases in the desert, for higher trophic level aquatic organisms through enhanced 3-D motion that accumulates and redistributes biomass, contributing to overall bioproduction in the ocean. Integrating multidisciplinary observation methodologies promoted a new understanding of biophysical interaction in mesoscale eddies. Our findings emphasize the impact of eddies on the patchiness of biomass in the sea and demonstrate that they provide rich feeding habitat for higher trophic marine life. PMID:22272294

  12. Analysis of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over an Indian teak mixed deciduous forest for winter and summer months using eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Chandra Shekhar; Thumaty, Kiran Chand; Rodda, Suraj Reddy; Sonakia, Ajit; Dadhwal, Vinay Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we report initial results on analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapour (H2O), and energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat flux) over teak mixed deciduous forests of Madhya Pradesh, central India, during winter (November 2011 and January 2012) and summer (February-May 2012) seasons using eddy covariance flux tower datasets. During the study period, continuous fast response measurements of CO2, H2O and heat fluxes above the canopy were carried out at 10 Hz and averaged for 30 minutes. Concurrently, slow response measurements of meteorological parameters are also being carried out. Diurnal and seasonal variations of CO2, H2O and heat fluxes were analysed and correlated with the meteorological variables. The study showed strong influence of leaf off and on scenario on the CO2, H2O and energy fluxes due to prevalence of deciduous vegetation type in the study area. Maximum amount of CO2 was sequestered for photosynthesis during winter (monthly mean of mol/m2/s) compared to summer (monthly mean of mol/m2/s). Energy flux analysis (weekly mean) showed more energy being portioned into latent heat during winter (668 W/m2) and sensible heat during summer (718 W/m2).

  13. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous eddies

    SciTech Connect

    Pavia, E.G.

    1994-12-31

    This work deals with mesoscale warm oceanic eddies; i.e., self-contained bodies of water which transport heat, among other things, for several months and for several hundreds of kilometers. This heat transport is believed to play an important role in the atmospheric and oceanic conditions of the region where it is being transported. Here the author examines the difference in evolution between eddies modeled as blobs of homogeneous water and eddies in which density varies in the horizontal. Preliminary results suggest that instability is enhanced by inhomogeneities, which would imply that traditional modeling studies, based on homogeneous vortices have underestimated the rate of heat-release from oceanic eddies to the surroundings. The approach is modeling in the simplest form; i.e., one single active layer. Although previous studies have shown the drastic effect on stability brought by two or more dynamically-relevant homogeneous layers, the author believes the single-layer eddy-model has not been investigated thoroughly.

  14. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  15. Eddy current heating in magnetic refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Eddy current heating can be a significant source of parasitic heating in low temperature magnetic refrigerators. To study this problem a technique to approximate the heating due to eddy currents has been developed. A formula is presented for estimating the heating within a variety of shapes commonly found in magnetic refrigerators. These shapes include circular, square, and rectangular rods; cylindrical and split cylindrical shells; wire loops; and 'coil foil. One set of components evaluated are different types of thermal radiation shields. This comparison shows that a simple split shield is almost as effective (only 23 percent more heating) as using a shield, with the same axial thermal conductivity, made of 'coil foil'.

  16. Comparative analysis of matter and energy fluxes determined by Bowen Ratio and Eddy Covariance techniques at a crop site in eastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, K.; Hehn, M.; Bernhofer, C.

    2012-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric fluxes is an important means to evaluate ecosystem exchanges. In 2009 and 2010, fluxes and gradients of heat, water vapour, and CO2 over winter barley and rapeseed were measured simultaneously at the Klingenberg cropland site in Germany. A Bowen Ratio (BR) system was employed alongside to an existing Eddy Covariance (EC) tower. The BR system is required to account for the longer response time of the chemiluminescence analysers measuring other trace gases, e.g. NOx. To test and evaluate the application of the NOx measurement setup, the two independent systems (BR/EC) are compared with respect to energy and CO2 fluxes. We show a regression and differences analysis, diurnal cycles of the obtained fluxes, and interpret their coherence to the growth stage of the crops. The regression analysis depicts that differences between the systems are largest for latent heat LE (BR detects apparently higher LE due to the forced closure of energy balance), whereby the matter fluxes of CO2 show fairly little differences. Both measurement systems are able to capture the fluctuations of fluxes adequately well. Additionally, a multiple linear regression revealed that differences between the obtained fluxes are not induced by atmospheric conditions. The results of the differences analysis for sensible and latent heat point out that the observed differences of fluxes between both systems are mainly due to deviations in the mean, while differences in variability and timing/shape are of smaller importance. The differences of CO2 fluxes between both measurement systems are particularly caused by deviations in timing and shape, which can be explained with the linear cross-correlation coefficient (R2=0.8). From the good results of the comparison of matter fluxes (CO2) we conclude that the use of the Bowen Ratio method is applicable to other matter fluxes (like NOx).

  17. The Tundra is a Net Source of CO2 Measured by Autochambers and Eddy Covariance Techniques During Five Years in a Site With Permafrost Thawing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, G.; Mauritz, M.; Bracho, R. G.; Salmon, V. G.; Webb, E.; Hutchings, J. A.; Natali, S.; Crummer, K. G.; Schuur, E.; Schaedel, C.

    2015-12-01

    Current and future warming of high latitude tundra ecosystems will play an important role in climate change through feedbacks to the global carbon (C) cycle. Long-term observational and experimental studies are pivotal for detecting and understanding changes in the coming decades. Yet studies of the C feedbacks from observational studies and manipulative experiments made on tundra plant communities often have significantly different conclusions with regards to impacts of warming on the ecosystem. Comparing results from these two study types, however, often involves integrating CO2 flux measurements that were collected on different spatial scales using a variety of methods. The process of data assimilation for landscape level analysis is often complicated by the fact that many projects only utilize one method for measuring CO2 fluxes at a given site. This study compares five years of C dynamics in a moist acidic tundra from control plots in a manipulative warming experiment (CiPEHR - plot-scale) and landscape-level natural permafrost thaw gradient (Gradient - Eddy covariance) observations all within a 1km distance from each other. We found net ecosystem exchange (NEE) to be an annual net source of carbon using both methods (Gradient 12.3 - 125.6 g CO2-C m-2 and CiPEHR warming manipulation 80.2 - 175.8 g CO2-C m-2). The differences between sites were biggest in the first three years of observation, and can be explained by lower growing season gross primary production (GPP - first three years) from the manipulation (CiPEHR), and lower ecosystem respiration (Reco) from CiPEHR in the first year only. Suppressed GPP and Reco could be from the impact of experimental setup (chamber soil collars - root damage), which lowered the plant community's capacity to fix C, but recovered within three years. This warrants caution of making generalization of short-term experiments in the tundra and more research is needed evaluating coupling of belowground and aboveground C dynamics.

  18. Micromagnetics with eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, R.; Millhollon, J.; Long, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation for of a conducting, magnetic body. The modified LLG equations include the magnetic field due to eddy currents in the total effective magnetic field. We derive an expression for the magnetic field due to eddy current losses and show that it is well defined. We then show that the work done by the eddy currents in opposing the change of magnetization is a Rayleigh type dissipation function, and derive the modified LLG equations using the calculus of variations. Finally, we show that the modified LLG equations lead to a decrease in the Gibbs energy. This implies that the LLG equations describes a dynamic process proceeding spontaneously forward in time.

  19. Eddy current damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Rich, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    A high torque capacity eddy current damper used as a rate limiting device for a large solar array deployment mechanism is discussed. The eddy current damper eliminates the problems associated with the outgassing or leaking of damping fluids. It also provides performance advantages such as damping torque rates, which are truly linear with respect to input speed, continuous 360 degree operation in both directions of rotation, wide operating temperature range, and the capability of convenient adjustment of damping rates by the user without disassembly or special tools.

  20. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  1. Effects of Eddy Viscosity on Time Correlations in Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Rubinstein, R.; Wang, Lian-Ping; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large. eddy simulation (LES) have generally been evaluated by their ability to predict single-time statistics of turbulent flows such as kinetic energy and Reynolds stresses. Recent application- of large eddy simulation to the evaluation of sound sources in turbulent flows, a problem in which time, correlations determine the frequency distribution of acoustic radiation, suggest that subgrid models should also be evaluated by their ability to predict time correlations in turbulent flows. This paper compares the two-point, two-time Eulerian velocity correlation evaluated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) with that evaluated from LES, using a spectral eddy viscosity, for isotropic homogeneous turbulence. It is found that the LES fields are too coherent, in the sense that their time correlations decay more slowly than the corresponding time. correlations in the DNS fields. This observation is confirmed by theoretical estimates of time correlations using the Taylor expansion technique. Tile reason for the slower decay is that the eddy viscosity does not include the random backscatter, which decorrelates fluid motion at large scales. An effective eddy viscosity associated with time correlations is formulated, to which the eddy viscosity associated with energy transfer is a leading order approximation.

  2. Pulsed eddy current testing. [nondestructive tests of the external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Since a large number of the procedures used for inspecting the external tank are concerned with determining flaws in welds, there is a need to develop an inspection technique, which can be automated, to determine flaws in welds and structures with complex geometries. Techniques whereby an eddy current is generated in a metallic material and the changes in the circuit parameters due to material differences are observed, were chosen as one possible approach. Pulsed eddy current and its relationship to multifrequency techniques is discussed as well as some preliminary results obtained from observing pulsed waveforms with apparatus and algorithms currently in use for ultrasonic testing of welds. It can be shown the pulsed eddy current techniques can provide similar results, can eliminate some of the noncritical parameters affecting the eddy current signals, and can facilitate in the detection of critical parameter such as flaws, subsurface voids, and corrosion.

  3. Potential of a New Technique for Remote Sensing of Hydrocarbon Accumulations and Blind Uranium Deposits: Buried Lif Thermoluminescence Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, F. R.; Vaz, J. E.; Lindholm, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Buried thermoluminescence dosimeters may be useful in remote sensing of petroleum and natural gas accumulations and blind uranium deposits. They act as integrating detectors that smooth out the effects of environmental variations that affect other measuring systems and result in irregularities and poor repeatability in measurements made during gas and radiometric surveys.

  4. Interview with Eddie Reisch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Hazel

    2013-01-01

    Eddie Reisch is currently working as a policy advisor for Te Reo Maori Operational Policy within the Student Achievement group with the Ministry of Education in New Zealand, where he has implemented and led a range of e-learning initiatives and developments, particularly the Virtual Learning Network (VLN). He is regarded as one of the leading…

  5. Eddies off Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color satellite image shows a large phytoplankton bloom, several hundred square kilometers in size, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Tasmania. In this scene, the rich concentration of microscopic marine plants gives the water a lighter, more turquoise appearance which helps to highlight the current patterns there. Notice the eddies, or vortices in the water, that can be seen in several places. It is possible that these eddies were formed by converging ocean currents flowing around Tasmania, or by fresh river runoff from the island, or both. Often, eddies in the sea serve as a means for stirring the water, thus providing nutrients that help support phytoplankton blooms, which in turn provide nutrition for other organisms. Effectively, these eddies help feed the sea (click to read an article on this topic). This image was acquired November 7, 2000, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. Tasmania is located off Australia's southeastern coast. Image courtesy SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  6. Investigations of eddy coherence in jet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    In turbulent shear flow the term coherent structures refers to eddies which are both spatially coherent, i.e., large eddies, aand also temporally coherent, i.e., they retain their identities for times which are long compared with their time scales in fixed point measurements. In transitional flows, the existence of such structures is evident from flow visualizations. In many other flows, such structures are not so evident. The reasons for the existence of these two classes of flows are discussed and attention is focused upon the more difficult flows, where coherent structures are not so evident. Techniques by which the existence (or nonexistence) of such structures in these flows can be established from point measurements, are also discussed. A major problem is shown to be the need to discriminate between real losses in eddy coherence and apparent losses in coherence introduced by phase scrambling effects which 'smear' multipoint correlations. The analysis of multiprobe time dependent data in cold and reacting round turbulent jets is described and it is shown how evidence of strong eddy coherence can be extracted from data.

  7. Eddy current pulsed phase thermography and feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Tian, GuiYun; Pan, Mengchun; Chen, Dixiang

    2013-08-01

    This letter proposed an eddy current pulsed phase thermography technique combing eddy current excitation, infrared imaging, and phase analysis. One steel sample is selected as the material under test to avoid the influence of skin depth, which provides subsurface defects with different depths. The experimental results show that this proposed method can eliminate non-uniform heating and improve defect detectability. Several features are extracted from differential phase spectra and the preliminary linear relationships are built to measure these subsurface defects' depth.

  8. A comparison of winter mercury accumulation at forested and no-canopy sites measured with different snow sampling techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, S.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Weathers, K.C.; Loftin, C.S.; Fernandez, I.J.; Kahl, J.S.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is delivered to ecosystems via rain, snow, cloud/fog, and dry deposition. The importance of snow, especially snow that has passed through the forest canopy (throughfall), in delivering Hg to terrestrial ecosystems has received little attention in the literature. The snowpack is a dynamic system that links atmospheric deposition and ecosystem cycling through deposition and emission of deposited Hg. To examine the magnitude of Hg delivery via snowfall, and to illuminate processes affecting Hg flux to catchments during winter (cold season), Hg in snow in no-canopy areas and under forest canopies measured with four collection methods were compared: (1) Hg in wet precipitation as measured by the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) for the site in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA, (2) event throughfall (collected after snowfall cessation for accumulations of >8 cm), (3) season-long throughfall collected using the same apparatus for event sampling but deployed for the entire cold season, and (4) snowpack sampling. Estimates (mean ?? SE) of Hg deposition using these methods during the 91-day cold season in 2004-2005 at conifer sites showed that season-long throughfall Hg flux (1.80 ??g/m2) < snowpack Hg (2.38 ?? 0.68 ??g/m2) < event throughfall flux (5.63 ?? 0.38 ??g/m2). Mercury deposition at the MDN site (0.91 ??g/m2) was similar to that measured at other no-canopy sites in the area using the other methods, but was 3.4 times less than was measured under conifer canopies using the event sampling regime. This indicates that snow accumulated under the forest canopy received Hg from the overstory or exhibited less re-emission of Hg deposited in snow relative to open areas. The soil surface of field-scale plots were sprayed with a natural rain water sample that contained an Hg tracer (202Hg) just prior to the first snowfall to explore whether some snowpack Hg might be explained from soil emissions. The appearance of the 202Hg tracer in the snowpack (0

  9. Eddy current correction in volume-localized MR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Wendt, R. E. 3rd; Evans, H. J.; Rowe, R. M.; Hedrick, T. D.; LeBlanc, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    The quality of volume-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy is affected by eddy currents caused by gradient switching. Eddy currents can be reduced with improved gradient systems; however, it has been suggested that the distortion due to eddy currents can be compensated for during postprocessing with a single-frequency reference signal. The authors propose modifying current techniques for acquiring the single-frequency reference signal by using relaxation weighting to reduce interference from components that cannot be eliminated by digital filtering alone. Additional sequences with T1 or T2 weighting for reference signal acquisition are shown to have the same eddy current characteristics as the original signal without relaxation weighting. The authors also studied a new eddy current correction method that does not require a single-frequency reference signal. This method uses two free induction decays (FIDs) collected from the same volume with two sequences with opposite gradients. Phase errors caused by eddy currents are opposite in these two FIDs and can be canceled completely by combining the FIDs. These methods were tested in a phantom. Eddy current distortions were corrected, allowing quantitative measurement of structures such as the -CH = CH- component, which is otherwise undetectable.

  10. Remote-field eddy current signal representation

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, D.L.; Mackintosh, D.D.; Sullivan, S.P.; Dubois, J.M.S.; Schmidt, T.R. . Dept. of Physics.)

    1993-07-01

    While conventional reflected impedance eddy current testing (ET) techniques are limited by skin depth considerations to near surface defects, the RFEC (remote field eddy current) technique exploits skin effects. The RFEC method is a through-wall inspection technique. Only the field which has made a double transit of the pipe wall is detected. The skin depth equation can be used to predict the approximate effect of metal loss on the RFEC signal. Metal loss effectively reduces the shielding so that the attenuation and phase lag of the field is less. A method of analyzing RFEC defect signals is therefore to compare the signals with the phase and amplitude in uncorroded pipe. RFEC probes are used for inspecting ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic tubulars for corrosion and, since eddy current detectors are generally well suited to crack detection, there is considerable interest in their potential to detect stress corrosion cracking in pipelines. Here the authors first of all summarize the impedance plane representation and scope monitor displays customarily used for conventional exploring coil ET probes in tubes. They then present the normalized voltage plane and monitor displays that are most appropriate for RFEC probes. They discuss the similarities and differences between the preferred monitor displays.

  11. Gyrokinetic large eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Navarro, A. Banon; Albrecht-Marc, M.; Carati, D.; Merz, F.; Goerler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2011-07-15

    The large eddy simulation approach is adapted to the study of plasma microturbulence in a fully three-dimensional gyrokinetic system. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is studied with the GENE code for both a standard resolution and a reduced resolution with a model for the sub-grid scale turbulence. A simple dissipative model for representing the effect of the sub-grid scales on the resolved scales is proposed and tested. Once calibrated, the model appears to be able to reproduce most of the features of the free energy spectra for various values of the ion temperature gradient.

  12. Electrical Resistance as a NDE Technique to Monitor Processing and Damage Accumulation in SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to process components reliable and to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution that leads to failure under stressed-oxidation conditions. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. Electrical resistance of SiC/SiC composites is one technique that shows special promise towards this end. Since both the matrix and the fibers are conductive, changes in matrix or fiber properties should relate to changes in electrical conductivity along the length of a specimen or part. Initial efforts to quantify the electrical resistance of different fiber and different matrix SiC/SiC composites will be presented. Also, the effect of matrix cracking on electrical resistivity for several composite systems will be presented. The implications towards electrical resistance as a technique applied to composite processing, damage detection, and life-modeling will be discussed.

  13. Are Eddy Covariance series stationary?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral analysis via a discrete Fourier transform is used often to examine eddy covariance series for cycles (eddies) of interest. Generally the analysis is performed on hourly or half-hourly data sets collected at 10 or 20 Hz. Each original series is often assumed to be stationary. Also automated ...

  14. Remote field eddy current-crack and defect detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, W.

    1989-03-16

    No single nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique is currently capable of detecting and characterizing all the defect types that can occur in gas pipeline. Conventional in-line inspection tools for example, have not shown significant sensitivity to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. For this reason considerable research and development work is still needed in order to provide the in-line inspection tools whose results are essential for structural integrity evaluations. The remote field eddy current method shows more promise than conventional eddy current methods, in gas pipeline inspection, due to the increased sensitivity to inner and outer pipe wall inhomogeneities. Even though the fundamental physical principles governing the conventional eddy current method and the remote field eddy current method is one and the same (that of electromagnetic induction), the differences in operating frequencies in the two methods result in field patterns that have different characteristic properties, such as extremely small skin depths associated with conventional eddy currents testing and the phenomena of potential valley'' and phase knot'' associated with remote field eddy current technique. 20 refs., 26 figs.

  15. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  16. Eddy current detection of pitting corrosion around fastener holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heida, J. H.; Thart, W. G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the eddy current technique for the detection and depth assessment of corrosion around fastener holes in F-16 lower wing skins is described. The corrosion type in this structure is pitting corrosion at the countersink edge of the fastener holes. Due to a corrosion clean-up limit of only 1.5 - 2.5 percent, a maximum thickness reduction in the range of 0.08 - 0.32 mm is allowed (depending on local skin thickness). This specifies the needed sensitivity for in-service corrosion inspection. In the evaluation use was made of specimens cut out of the F-16 lower wing skin structure. In total twelve specimens were exposed to an accelerated corrosion test (EXCO-test). Eddy current inspection of the specimens with installed fasteners was performed with a standard eddy scope and four different eddy current probes. After the eddy current inspection cross-sections of the twelve-specimens were made to determine the extent of pitting corrosion at the countersink edges. After evaluation of the inspection results the following conclusions can be drawn: for in-service detection of countersink edge corrosion standard visual inspection is the preferred technique regarding the simplicity, sensitivity and reliability of inspection; and for the purpose of depth assessment the eddy current technique is capable of detecting countersink edge corrosion with a depth from about 0.1 mm. Due to the corrosion clean-up limit of only 1.5 - 2.5 percent (0.08 - 0.32 mm), however, the eddy current technique is considered not applicable for in-service depth assessment of countersink edge corrosion in F-16 lower wing skins.

  17. Characteristic eddy decomposition of turbulence in a channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Moser, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The proper orthogonal decomposition technique (Lumley's decomposition) is applied to the turbulent flow in a channel to extract coherent structures by decomposing the velocity field into characteristic eddies with random coefficients. In the homogeneous spatial directions, a generaliztion of the shot-noise expansion is used to determine the characteristic eddies. In this expansion, the Fourier coefficients of the characteristic eddy cannot be obtained from the second-order statistics. Three different techniques are used to determine the phases of these coefficients. They are based on: (1) the bispectrum, (2) a spatial compactness requirement, and (3) a functional continuity argument. Results from these three techniques are found to be similar in most respects. The implications of these techniques and the shot-noise expansion are discussed. The dominant eddy is found to contribute as much as 76 percent to the turbulent kinetic energy. In both 2D and 3D, the characteristic eddies consist of an ejection region straddled by streamwise vortices that leave the wall in the very short streamwise distance of about 100 wall units.

  18. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  19. Anomalous eddy heat and freshwater transport in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, John M.; Johnson, Gregory C.

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of eddies in the Gulf of Alaska are assessed from January 2003 through April 2012. Ensemble statistics for eddy subsurface water properties on isopycnals are computed using temperature and salinity profiles from Argo profiling floats located within eddies, which are identified in sea-surface height using objective techniques. Ninety cyclonic and 154 anticyclonic eddies are identified during this period. The anticyclonic eddies are strongly nonlinear and exhibit significant warm subsurface temperature anomalies and associated salty anomalies on isopycnals while no clear distinguishing subsurface anomalies on isopycnals are detected in association with the cyclonic eddies. Heat and freshwater fluxes for the eddies are estimated from integrations in depth coordinates. The anticyclonic eddies transport heat both westward off the continental shelf into the Subarctic Gyre and westward within the Alaskan Stream. However, they transport salt into the Subarctic Gyre and freshwater within the Alaskan Stream. In both pathways eddy heat and freshwater transport show possible year-to-year fluctuations, varying from 0 to 50.4 × 1018 J a-1 and -16.8 to +7.4 km3 a-1, respectively. The anticyclonic eddies are capped by relatively fresh water year-round.

  20. Method and apparatus for correcting eddy current signal voltage for temperature effects

    DOEpatents

    Kustra, Thomas A.; Caffarel, Alfred J.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring physical characteristics of an electrically conductive material by the use of eddy-current techniques and compensating measurement errors caused by changes in temperature includes a switching arrangement connected between primary and reference coils of an eddy-current probe which allows the probe to be selectively connected between an eddy current output oscilloscope and a digital ohm-meter for measuring the resistances of the primary and reference coils substantially at the time of eddy current measurement. In this way, changes in resistance due to temperature effects can be completely taken into account in determining the true error in the eddy current measurement. The true error can consequently be converted into an equivalent eddy current measurement correction.

  1. Lagrangian analysis of formation, structure, evolution and splitting of anticyclonic Kuril eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Lobanov, V. B.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    We studied in detail a mesoscale anticylonic eddy that has been sampled in the R/V Professor Gagarinskiy cruise (June-July 2012) in the area east of the Kuril Islands in the northwestern subarctic Pacific. Lagrangian approach was applied to study formation, structure and evolution of this feature called the eddy A and of its parent eddy B using a simulation with synthetic tracers advected by the AVISO velocity field. We used different Lagrangian methods and techniques to identify those eddies and their boundaries, to know their structure and to document their deformation, metamorphoses and splitting. It has been found that the eddy A was born as a result of splitting of the eddy B with the core water to be borrowed from the eddy B which, in turn, was influenced by the Okhotsk Sea water flowing into the ocean through the Kuril straits. The periphery of the eddy A was formed mainly by East Kamchatka Current water in the process of its winding onto the eddy A core by portions. All these processes have been documented in detail with the help of drift and tracking Lagrangian maps computed forward and backward in time with a large number of synthetic tracers distributed over the studied area. We have found a Lagrangian structure of those eddies and the ways how they have gained and released water. Simulated and measured locations of the center of the eddy A and its boundary have been be estimated to coincide with the accuracy of ≈ 7-10 and ≈ 15-20 km, respectively. Our simulations were validated in part by tracks of available surface drifters and Argo floats. We presented CTD hydrographic observations of the Kuril eddy A from the surface to deep waters and compared observed and simulated results in order to establish origin and properties of water masses constituting that eddy.

  2. Latitude dependence of eddy variances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Bell, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The eddy variance of a meteorological field must tend to zero at high latitudes due solely to the nature of spherical polar coordinates. The zonal averaging operator defines a length scale: the circumference of the latitude circle. When the circumference of the latitude circle is greater than the correlation length of the field, the eddy variance from transient eddies is the result of differences between statistically independent regions. When the circumference is less than the correlation length, the eddy variance is computed from points that are well correlated with each other, and so is reduced. The expansion of a field into zonal Fourier components is also influenced by the use of spherical coordinates. As is well known, a phenomenon of fixed wavelength will have different zonal wavenumbers at different latitudes. Simple analytical examples of these effects are presented along with an observational example from satellite ozone data. It is found that geometrical effects can be important even in middle latitudes.

  3. Wind-driven freshwater buildup and release in the Beaufort Gyre constrained by mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manucharyan, Georgy E.; Spall, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the Beaufort Gyre has accumulated over 20,000 km3 of freshwater in response to strong anticyclonic atmospheric winds that have prevailed over the gyre for almost two decades. Here we explore key physical processes affecting the accumulation and release of freshwater within an idealized eddy-resolving model of the Beaufort Gyre. We demonstrate that a realistic halocline can be achieved when its deepening tendency due to Ekman pumping is counteracted by the cumulative action of mesoscale eddies. Based on this balance, we derive analytical scalings for the depth of the halocline and its spin-up time scale and emphasize their explicit dependence on eddy dynamics. Our study further suggests that the Beaufort Gyre is currently in a state of high sensitivity to atmospheric winds. However, an intensification of surface stress would inevitably lead to a saturation of the freshwater content—a constraint inherently set by the intricacies of the mesoscale eddy dynamics.

  4. Tone Burst Eddy-Current Thermography (tbet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ch. N. Kiran; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Maxfield, Bruce W.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2008-02-01

    This paper reports on a Tone Burst Eddycurrent Thermography (TBET) technique that uses short-time bursts of eddy-currents induced in conducting media to generate local heating inside the material. The transient diffusion of the heat inside the material, induced by pulsed/short-time induction heating, is imaged by measuring the transient temperature profiles on the surface of the material. The presence and characteristics of the defects inside the materials changes the surface temperature transients and thus can be used for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of conducting materials. Axisymmetric numerical models of the conventional transient thermography technique are used to benchmark the TBET technique. From the temperature profile data, temperature contrast information is obtained for the different defect depths. Temperature contrast data obtained for TBET, in this process, was compared with that obtained from conventional transient thermography data. It was found that the frequency of the eddy-current and, consequently, the skin-depth of the induced field play an important role in the effective utilization of this technique. Simulation details and the experimental results are presented in the paper. Possible advantages of TBET over conventional flash thermography are also discussed and supported by experimental data.

  5. Relation of technetium-99m pyrophosphate accumulation to time interval after onset of acute myocardial infarction as assessed by a tomographic acquisition technique.

    PubMed

    Krause, T; Kasper, W; Zeiher, A; Schuemichen, C; Moser, E

    1991-12-15

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-99m PYP) myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 110 clinically stable patients with acute or healed acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Tomography was performed 12 hours to 7 days (group A), 7 to 30 days (Group B), 1 to 6 months (Group C) and after greater than 6 months (group D) after AMI. All 40 patients in group A, 9 of 31 in group B, 1 of 22 in group C, and no patient (0 of 17) in group D had a pathologic Tc-99m PYP tomogram. Relative Tc-99m PYP accumulation within the area of infarction was measured as infarct zone to blood pool ratio, which decreased significantly (p less than 0.001) from group A (1.54 +/- 0.39) to group B (0.89 +/- 0.24), group C (0.8 +/- 0.19) and group D (0.76 +/- 0.13). These data were confirmed by sequential scintigraphy in 17 patients. It is concluded that a persisting Tc-99m PYP uptake is rarely found greater than 1 month after AMI using tomographic imaging techniques in clinically stable patients with coronary artery disease. Positive results on Tc-99m PYP tomography are a reliable indicator of AMI. Thus, Tc-99m PYP tomography is not only a sensitive but also a specific imaging technique for AMI, which might be especially useful for diagnosis of reinfarction. PMID:1836101

  6. Construction of three-dimensional liver tissue models by cell accumulation technique and maintaining their metabolic functions for long-term culture without medium change.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hepatocyte cultures have attracted much attention to obtain high biological functions of hepatocyte for pharmaceutical drug assessment. However, maintaining the high functions for over one month is still a key challenge although many approaches have been reported. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time simple and rapid construction of 3D-hepatocyte constructs by our cell accumulation technique and their high biological functions for one month, without any medium change. The human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) cells were coated with ∼ 7 nm-sized extracellular matrix (ECM) films consisting of fibronectin (FN) and gelatin (G), and then incubated in cell culture insert to construct 3D-tissue constructs for 24 h. The thickness of obtained 3D-HepG2 constructs was easily controlled by altering seeding cell number and the maximum is over 100 μm. When a large volume of culture media was employed, the 3D-constructs showed higher mRNA expression of albumin and some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes as compared to general two-dimensional (2D) culture. Surprisingly, their high cell viabilities (over 80%) and high mRNA expressions were successfully maintained without medium change for at least 27 days. These results demonstrate novel easy and rapid technique to construct 3D-human liver tissue models which can maintain their high functions and viability for 1 month without medium change. PMID:25088964

  7. Hot-cell design considerations for interfacing eddy-current systems

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, E.M.; Webb, J.P.; Larson, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North conducts remote eddy-current examination of irradiated fuel elements. Applications include cladding breach detection and irradiation-induced ferrite examination. The seccussful use of remote eddy-current techniques is achieved by applying basic test parameters and interfacing considerations. These include impedance matching, operating frequency, and feedthrough considerations.

  8. Eddy current pulsed thermography for fatigue evaluation of gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Yin, Aijun; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Jishan; Shaw, Brian

    2014-02-01

    The pulsed eddy current (PEC) technique generates responses over a wide range of frequencies, containing more spectral coverage than traditional eddy current inspection. Eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT), a newly developed non-destructive testing (NDT) technique, has advantages such as rapid inspection of a large area within a short time, high spatial resolution, high sensitivity and stand-off measurement distance. This paper investigates ECPT for the evaluation of gear fatigue tests. The paper proposes a statistical method based on single channel blind source separation to extract details of gear fatigue. The discussion of transient thermal distribution and patterns of fatigue contact surfaces as well as the non-contact surfaces have been reported. In addition, the measurement for gears with different cycles of fatigue tests by ECPTand the comparison results between ECPT with magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) have been evaluated. The comparison shows the competitive capability of ECPT in fatigue evaluation.

  9. NONDESTRUCTIVE EDDY CURRENT TESTING

    DOEpatents

    Renken, C.J. Jr.

    1961-05-23

    An eddy current testing device is described for measuring metal continuity independent of probe-to-sample spacing. An inductance would test probe is made a leg of a variable impedance bridge and the bridge is balanced with the probe away from the sample. An a-c signal is applied across the input terminals of the bridge circuit. As the probe is brought into proximity with the metal sample, the resulting impedance change in the probe gives an output signal from the bridge whose phase angle is proportional to the sample continuity and amplitude is proportional to the probe-tosample spacing. The output signal from the bridge is applied to a compensating network where, responsive to amplitude changes from the bridge output signal, a constant phased voltage output is maintained when the sample is continuous regardless of probe-to-sample spacing. A phase meter calibrated to read changes in resistivity of the metal sample measures the phase shift between the output of the compensating network and the original a-c signal applied to the bridge.

  10. High frequency eddy current device for near surface material characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmann, S.; Heuer, H.; Meyendorf, N.

    2009-03-01

    For near surface characterization a new high frequency eddy current device was been developed. By using a measurement frequency up to 100 MHz information of near surface areas can be acquired. Depending on the investigated material high resolution depth profiles can be derived. The obtained data with the new device were compared to those obtained with a high precision impedance analyser. It could be demonstrated that the new device measures the eddy current conductivity signal in the high frequencies much better than the impedance analyser. By sweeping the frequency from 100 kHz up to 100 MHz the technique delivers a depth profile of the electrical conductivity of the material. This kind of high frequency eddy current technique can be used for quality assurance, surface contamination control or near surface material characterization e.g. microstructure and cold work influences. It can be a powerful tool to obtain information for process control or a good / bad decision in mass production processes like for example rolling, coating, and surface treatments. The big advantage of the high frequency eddy current method is that it is fast und precise. This paper presents results with a new developed prototype Eddy-Current-Device for measurement frequencies up to 100 MHz which is first time suitable in rough industrial environment and makes expensive lab network analysers unnecessary for this kind of investigations.

  11. Eddy Diffusivities for Sensible Heat, Ozone and Momentum from Eddy Correlation and Gradient Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Karl Frederick

    Micrometeorological field measurements of the fluxes and the gradients of momentum, sensible heat and ozone are presented and discussed. The eddy-correlation measurement technique was used to obtain the flux data at the heights of three and eight meters. A method to accurately measure mass (ozone) gradients from surface -layer based meteorological towers was developed and used. Both flux and gradient measurements are used for the determination of eddy diffusivities. Exploratory analyses were made with the data to investigate similarity relationships between the eddy diffusivities of momentum K_{ rm m}, sensible heat K_ {rm h}, and mass K_ {rm c}, where ozone was used as the mass tracer. Eddy-diffusivity ratios were computed using dimensionless -gradient ratios classified from the data and from regression models. These ratios were classified by atmospheric stability determined at the geometric mean of the measurement heights. The assumption of similarity between the eddy diffusivities of ozone and sensible heat, K_ {rm c} = K_{ rm h}, based on scalar turbulent transfer theory, was verified for unstable atmospheric conditions. The results for eddy diffusivities of sensible heat and ozone for stable atmospheric conditions however, show that diffusivities of sensible heat are 50% greater than diffusivities of ozone. Chemical reaction of ozone, and/or the need for flux-measurement corrections, decrease the resulting values for ozone diffusivities during stable periods. Established eddy-diffusivity ratios for water vapor and momentum are valid for ozone and momentum under stable-atmospheric conditions over smooth-terrain but not under unstable conditions for flow disturbed by irregular terrain. The relationships between the eddy diffusivities of momentum and the eddy diffusivities of ozone, as well as those between momentum and sensible heat are controlled by free-convection conditions, K_{ rm m} < K_ {rm c} and K_{ rm m} < K_ {rm h}; these results are inconclusive for

  12. Remote field eddy current detection of stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The feasibility of detecting stress-corrosion cracks (SSC) using the Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique was demonstrated. The RFEC technique interrogates the entire thickness of the pipe and is applicable for in-line inspection. If it can be shown that the RFEC technique is effective in detecting SSC, then the technique is an ideal method for detecting the defects of interest. A defect detection model is proposed for explaining the mechanism for crack detection. For axially oriented, closed cracks, such as SCC, the conventional defect detection model proved to be too simplistic and not applicable. Therefore, a new detection mode that examines the flow of circumferential eddy currents was developed based on experimental results. This model, though not rigorous, provides a general understanding of the applicability of the RFEC technique for finding SSC. The data from the cracks and various artificial defects is presented in three formats: isometric projections, pseudocolor images and line-of-sight data. Though only two cracks were found, the experimental results correlate well with the circumferential eddy current theory. A theoretical analysis of the effects of motion on the output signal of the receiver is presented. This analysis indicates that inspection speed of simple implementations may be limited to a few miles per hour. Remote field eddy current inspection has excellent potential for inspection of gas transmission lines for detecting stress corrosion cracks that should be further developed.

  13. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  14. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  15. Remote Field Eddy Current Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Joseph Maurice Stephane

    1992-01-01

    The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique is a non-destructive inspection technique used for anomaly detection in tubulars. The RFEC technique uses exciter and detector coils, both located inside the pipe, to detect interior and exterior corrosion with approximately equal sensitivity. The presence of both direct and indirect electromagnetic coupling paths distinguishes the RFEC technique from conventional reflected impedance eddy current techniques. The RFEC pipe inspection technique normally operates with the detector coil in the remote field region at distances of two or more pipe diameters from the internal exciter coil. At this spacing, the direct coupled field, dominant near the exciter (less than 1 pipe ID), is strongly attenuated and is overshadowed by the indirect field generated by an indirect energy transmission path which diffuses outwardly at the exciter coil location and tends to be guided by the pipe wall. In the remote field region, the field energy is greater outside than inside the pipe and some of the energy diffuses back inside the pipe. In the intermediate region (from 1 to 2 pipe diameters), called the transition zone, direct and indirect fields interact. The transition zone interaction produces a resultant field which is very sensitive to variations in pipe properties or wall thickness. The effect is maximal at the point where the indirect and direct fields have equal magnitudes and opposite phases. Small variations in the indirect field at this crossover point produce large changes in the resultant field. Experimental examples of the resultant axial magnetic field are presented to demonstrate the transition zone characteristics. An improved understanding of the effects of localized inner and outer wall defects and of pipe wall thinning on the direct and indirect field components in the transition zone is needed to better exploit the RFEC technique. Operating the RFEC probe in the transition zone with carefully selected frequency and

  16. Flux Partitioning by Isotopic Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 is routinely measured by eddy covariance at sites around the world, but studies of ecosystem processes are more interested in the gross photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes that comprise the net flux. The standard method of partitioning the net flux into these components has been to extrapolate nighttime respiration into daytime based on a relationship between nighttime respiration, temperature, and sometimes moisture. However, such relationships generally account for only a small portion of the variation in nighttime respiration, and the assumption that they can predict respiration throughout the day is dubious. A promising alternate method, known as isotopic flux partitioning, works by identifying the stable isotopic signatures of photosynthesis and respiration in the CO2 flux. We have used this method to partition the net flux at Harvard Forest, MA, based on eddy covariance measurements of the net 12CO2 and 13CO2 fluxes (as well as measurements of the sensible and latent heat fluxes and other meteorological variables). The CO2 isotopologues were measured at 4 Hz by an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser spectrometer with a δ13C precision of 0.4 % in 0.25 sec and 0.02 % in 100 sec. In the absence of such high-frequency, high-precision isotopic measurements, past attempts at isotopic flux partitioning have combined isotopic flask measurements with high-frequency (total) CO2 measurements to estimate the isoflux (the EC/flask approach). Others have used a conditional flask sampling approach called hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA). We 'sampled' our data according to each of these approaches, for comparison, and found disagreement in the calculated fluxes of ~10% for the EC/flask approach, and ~30% for HREA, at midday. To our knowledge, this is the first example of flux partitioning by isotopic eddy covariance. Wider use of this method, enabled by a new generation of laser spectrometers, promises to open a new window

  17. Applied large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G; Lardeau, Sylvain

    2009-07-28

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is now seen more and more as a viable alternative to current industrial practice, usually based on problem-specific Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods. Access to detailed flow physics is attractive to industry, especially in an environment in which computer modelling is bound to play an ever increasing role. However, the improvement in accuracy and flow detail has substantial cost. This has so far prevented wider industrial use of LES. The purpose of the applied LES discussion meeting was to address questions regarding what is achievable and what is not, given the current technology and knowledge, for an industrial practitioner who is interested in using LES. The use of LES was explored in an application-centred context between diverse fields. The general flow-governing equation form was explored along with various LES models. The errors occurring in LES were analysed. Also, the hybridization of RANS and LES was considered. The importance of modelling relative to boundary conditions, problem definition and other more mundane aspects were examined. It was to an extent concluded that for LES to make most rapid industrial impact, pragmatic hybrid use of LES, implicit LES and RANS elements will probably be needed. Added to this further, highly industrial sector model parametrizations will be required with clear thought on the key target design parameter(s). The combination of good numerical modelling expertise, a sound understanding of turbulence, along with artistry, pragmatism and the use of recent developments in computer science should dramatically add impetus to the industrial uptake of LES. In the light of the numerous technical challenges that remain it appears that for some time to come LES will have echoes of the high levels of technical knowledge required for safe use of RANS but with much greater fidelity. PMID:19531503

  18. Large-Eddy Simulation of Flow Through an Array of Cubes with Local Grid Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfriend, Elijah; Katopodes Chow, Fotini; Vanella, Marcos; Balaras, Elias

    2016-05-01

    High resolution simulations of the transport of urban contaminants are important for disaster response and city planning. Large-eddy simulation (LES) and mesh refinement can each be used to decrease the computational cost of modelling, but combining these techniques can result in additional errors at grid-refinement interfaces. Here, we study the effect of the turbulence closure on the accuracy of LES results, for grids with mesh refinement, in a test case of flow through a periodic array of cubes. It is found that a mixed-model turbulence closure, using both an eddy viscosity and a scale similarity component, reduces energy accumulation at grid-refinement interfaces when used with explicit filtering of the advection term. The mixed model must be used with explicit filtering to control high wavenumber errors generated by the non-linear scale-similarity model. The results demonstrate that the turbulence closure mitigates errors associated with using LES on block-structured grids for urban-flow simulations.

  19. Might eddies dominate carbon export ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Rixen, M.; Fielding, S.; Mustard, A.; Brown, L.; Sanders, R.

    2003-04-01

    Yes - from a review of recent data sets we present a scale analysis of the potential for globally integrated carbon export, from the surface ocean, due to the vertical transports of mesoscale eddies. Mesoscale eddies are the oceanic equivalent of atmospheric storms, most are a fundamental result of horizontally unstable density gradients on the surface of a rotating sphere (baroclinic instability) and ~ 90% of the oceans energy exchanges take place at this scale. Recent studies from satellite remote sensing and high resolution models show that mesoscale eddies are a ubiquitous feature of the open ocean in both time and space; they are even present in sub-tropical oligotrophic gyres. Individual atmospheric weather systems generally have little ecological impact on terrestrial or marine biological systems. Grass grows and herbivores munch through many cyclone and anticyclone periods. In the open ocean we have a very different picture. The primary producers and herbivores have shorter time scales; time scales that coincide with those of mesoscale eddies. Plankton can have either good or bad weather lifetimes associated with just a single cyclone or anticyclone period. Furthermore, although the spring bloom may be the single largest source of material for the export of carbon from the upper ocean, it is short lived and may not be dominant everywhere in the annual export budget. The magnitude of vertical motion associated with mesoscale eddies is significant on biological timescales both for phytoplankton growth and the development of zooplankton grazing pressure. Critically this motion does not form a closed vertical circulation; baroclinic instability releases potential energy and thus water masses are exchanged both vertically and horizontally across water mass boundaries. Thus mesoscale eddies have been shown to provide a mechanism for export both in the direct transport of biomass downwards out of the surface mixed layer and the fertilisation of an exhausted

  20. A new eddy-covariance method using empirical mode decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We introduce a new eddy-covariance method that uses a spectral decomposition algorithm called empirical mode decomposition. The technique is able to calculate contributions to near-surface fluxes from different periodic components. Unlike traditional Fourier methods, this method allows for non-ortho...

  1. Variations of global mesoscale eddy energy observed from Geosat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, C. K.; Werner, R. A.; Sandwell, D. T.; Zhang, B. H.; Tapley, B. D.; Nerem, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Data on oceanic-current variability were extracted from Geosat altimeter observations for 44 17-day repeat cycles, using the Sandwell and Zhang (1989) technique to process the altimeter data and to produce a sea-surface-slope profile having an estimated accuracy of 0.2 microrad. These were used to generate a series of global eddy kinetic energy maps, each averaged over 3 months, together with their mean. It was found that the maximum mean eddy kinetic energy per unit mass exceeds 2000 sq cm/sq sec for most of the western boundary currents; for the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, however, this value reaches only 500 sq cm/sq sec.

  2. Eddy Current Testing for Detecting Small Defects in Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Obeid, Simon; Tranjan, Farid M.; Dogaru, Teodor

    2007-03-21

    Presented here is a technique of using Eddy Current based Giant Magneto-Resistance sensor (GMR) to detect surface and sub-layered minute defects in thin films. For surface crack detection, a measurement was performed on a copper metallization of 5-10 microns thick. It was done by scanning the GMR sensor on the surface of the wafer that had two scratches of 0.2 mm, and 2.5 mm in length respectively. In another experiment, metal coatings were deposited over the layers containing five defects with known lengths such that the defects were invisible from the surface. The limit of detection (resolution), in terms of defect size, of the GMR high-resolution Eddy Current probe was studied using this sample. Applications of Eddy Current testing include detecting defects in thin film metallic layers, and quality control of metallization layers on silicon wafers for integrated circuits manufacturing.

  3. Physical interpretation and separation of eddy current pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Aijun; Gao, Bin; Yun Tian, Gui; Woo, W. L.; Li, Kongjing

    2013-02-01

    Eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT) applies induction heating and a thermal camera for non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). Because of the variation in resultant surface heat distribution, the physical mechanism that corresponds to the general behavior of ECPT can be divided into an accumulation of Joule heating via eddy current and heat diffusion. However, throughout the literature, the heating mechanisms of ECPT are not given in detail in the above two thermal phenomena and they are difficult to be separated. Nevertheless, once these two physical parameters are separated, they can be directly used to detect anomalies and predict the variation in material properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability and microstructure. This paper reports physical interpretation of these two physical phenomena that can be found in different time responses given the ECPT image sequences. Based on the phenomenon and their behaviors, the paper proposes a statistical method based on single channel blind source separation to decompose the two physical phenomena using different stages of eddy current and thermal propagation from the ECPT images. Links between mathematical models and physical models have been discussed and verified. This fundamental understanding of transient eddy current distribution and heating propagation can be applied to the development of feature extraction and pattern recognition for the quantitative analysis of ECPT measurement images and defect characterization.

  4. Methane Emissions from Permafrost Regions using Low-Power Eddy Covariance Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G.; Sturtevant, C.; Schreiber, P.; Peltola, O.; Zulueta, R.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Rinne, J.; Vesala, T.; McDermitt, D.; Oechel, W.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential 23 times that of carbon dioxide over a 100-year cycle. The permafrost regions of the world store significant amounts of organic materials under anaerobic conditions, leading to large methane production and accumulation in the upper layers of bedrock, soil and ice. These regions are currently undergoing dramatic change in response to warming trends, and may become a significant potential source of global methane release under a warming climate over the coming decades and centuries. Presently, most measurements of methane fluxes in permafrost regions have been made with static chamber techniques, and very few were done with the eddy covariance approach using closed-path analyzers. Although chambers and closed-path analyzers have advantages, both techniques have significant limitations, especially for permafrost research. Static chamber measurements are discrete in time and space, and particularly difficult to use over polygonal tundra with highly non-uniform micro-topography and active water layer. They also may not capture the dynamics of methane fluxes on varying time scales (hours to annual estimates). In addition, placement of the chamber may disturb the surface integrity causing a significant over-estimation of the measured flux. Closed-path gas analyzers for measuring methane eddy fluxes employ advanced technologies such as TDLS (Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy), ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy), WS-CRDS (wavelength scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy), but require high flow rates at significantly reduced optical cell pressures to provide adequate response time and sharpen absorption features. Such methods, when used with the eddy covariance technique, require a vacuum pump and a total of 400-1500 Watts of grid power for the pump and analyzer system. The weight of such systems often exceeds 100-200 lbs, restricting practical applicability for remote or portable field studies. As a

  5. Eddy diffusion at Saturn's homopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandel, B. R.; Mcconnell, J. C.; Strobel, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of Saturn's He 584 A dayglow and the CH4 density profile deduced from stellar occultation data near the homopause have been combined to infer an eddy diffusion coefficient of 8 + or - 4 x 10 to the 7th sq cm/s and a temperature of 125 + 40 or - 25 K near the homopause at Voyager 2 encounter. It appears that the eddy diffusion coefficient may have increased between the Voyager encounters. Saturn's H Ly-alpha dayglow is qualitatively compatible with this increase and the interpretation of the He 584 A dayglow and CH4 absorption measurement.

  6. Eddy current array probe for corrosion mapping on ageing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Rémi; Samson, Rock

    2000-05-01

    The life of an airplane in the civil and military fleet is expanding by many years. The corrosion on aircraft is becoming a serious problem. The corrosion can also lead to the development of "multi-site damage" (MSD) and catastrophic failure. The need for a fast and reliable nondestructive technique for the detection of corrosion is a prime concern. A simple eddy current or ultrasonic probe can be very time consuming in the inspection because of the small area covered by the probe. The use of an eddy current array probe can cut the time use for an inspection or increase the surface scanned. Because it is an eddy current technology, the surface preparation is minimal compared to other techniques like ultrasound. It is also possible to detect defects beyond the first layer in a multiple layer panel. A flexible probe was employed to demonstrate the capacities of an eddy current array probe. This flexible probe can also match the profile of the structure to inspect limiting the lift-off. The C-scan technique is used in the display to see all the data on the same screen. The interpretation is also simplified.

  7. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo D'Ottone, Marcela; Bravo, Luis; Ramos, Marcel; Pizarro, Oscar; Karstensen, Johannes; Gallegos, Mauricio; Correa-Ramirez, Marco; Silva, Nelson; Farias, Laura; Karp-Boss, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of the circulation in the eastern South Pacific (ESP) Ocean, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from the productive shelves to the open ocean. Some of these eddies exhibit subsurface hypoxic or suboxic conditions and may serve as important hotspots for nitrogen loss, but little is known about oxygen consumption rates and nitrogen transformation processes associated with these eddies. In the austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a suboxic (< 2 µmol kg-1 of O2), subsurface layer (200-400 m) was detected ˜ 900 km off the Chilean shore (30° S, 81° W). The core of the eddy's suboxic layer had a temperature-salinity signature characteristic of Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted to an area near the coast. Measurements of nitrogen species within the eddy revealed undersaturation (below 44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 µM), suggesting that active denitrification occurred in this water mass. Using satellite altimetry, we were able to track the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). Field studies conducted in Chilean shelf waters close to the time of eddy formation provided estimates of initial O2 and N2O concentrations of the ESSW source water in the eddy. By the time of its offshore sighting, concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the eddy were lower than concentrations in surrounding water and "source water" on the shelf, indicating that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. These results show that mesoscale eddies affect open-ocean biogeochemistry in the ESP

  8. Eddy current distributions in cylindrical samples: effect on equivalent sample resistance.

    PubMed

    Harpen, M D

    1989-09-01

    We present a general technique for the determination of eddy current distributions within an irregularly shaped conducting sample in the uniform field of an NMR RF coil. Also presented is a general expression for the sample-induced coil resistance. The technique is applied specifically to a conducting cylindrical solid. Unlike previous descriptions of cylindrical samples in solenoidal coils where the induction is parallel to the axis of the cylinder and eddy current streamlines are circular, we treat the case where the induction is perpendicular to the cylindrical axis and where consequently eddy current streamlines take on an irregular shape. PMID:2798558

  9. Expert system for analyzing eddy current measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.J.; Oppenlander, J.E.; Brudnoy, D.M.; Englund, J.M.; Loomis, K.C.

    1994-08-16

    A method and apparatus (called DODGER) analyzes eddy current data for heat exchanger tubes or any other metallic object. DODGER uses an expert system to analyze eddy current data by reasoning with uncertainty and pattern recognition. The expert system permits DODGER to analyze eddy current data intelligently, and obviate operator uncertainty by analyzing the data in a uniform and consistent manner. 21 figs.

  10. Expert system for analyzing eddy current measurements

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Arthur J.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Brudnoy, David M.; Englund, James M.; Loomis, Kent C.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus (called DODGER) analyzes eddy current data for heat exchanger tubes or any other metallic object. DODGER uses an expert system to analyze eddy current data by reasoning with uncertainty and pattern recognition. The expert system permits DODGER to analyze eddy current data intelligently, and obviate operator uncertainty by analyzing the data in a uniform and consistent manner.

  11. Seismic observations from a Yakutat eddy in the northern Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q. S.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Sun, L. T.

    2014-06-01

    Recent works show that the seismic oceanography technique allows us to relate water column seismic reflections to oceanic finescale structures. In this study, finescale structures of a surface anticyclonic eddy have been unveiled by reprocessing two seismic transects acquired in the northern Gulf of Alaska using an 8 km hydrophone streamer and 6600 cu in linear airgun array in September 2008. The eddy was a typical bowl-like structure with around 55 km width and 700 m depth. It has two fringes around the eddy base and a spiral arm at the NE edge. The in situ sea surface temperature and salinity data from a shipboard thermosalinograph help to confirm our interpretations of a spiral arm shed from the warm eddy and the entrained cold water from elsewhere. Nearby the eddy and offshore the shelf-break, there is a strong frontal feature, probably the Alaska Current. The eddy likely formed offshore Yakutat shelf and transported along the offshore shelf-break by tracking the sea level anomalies. Its equivalent diameter of 65 km was measured using the along-track altimeter and the seismic constraints. It was comparable with results from the representative conventional algorithms of eddy detection. Geostrophic velocities of the eddy were estimated from the dipping seismic reflections under the assumptions of approximate isopycnals and geostrophic balance. Measured water properties including sea surface temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll revealed that eddy translation transports coastal water to the pelagic regions. Structures synthesized from CTD profiles that sampled an earlier eddy suggest that thin striae around the base might be a common feature in Gulf of Alaska eddies.

  12. From Phenomena to Objects: Segmentation of Fuzzy Objects and its Application to Oceanic Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingling

    A challenging image analysis problem that has received limited attention to date is the isolation of fuzzy objects---i.e. those with inherently indeterminate boundaries---from continuous field data. This dissertation seeks to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, the recognized need for Object-Based Image Analysis of fuzzy remotely sensed features, and on the other, the optimization of existing image segmentation techniques for the extraction of more discretely bounded features. Using mesoscale oceanic eddies as a case study of a fuzzy object class evident in Sea Surface Height Anomaly (SSHA) imagery, the dissertation demonstrates firstly, that the widely used region-growing and watershed segmentation techniques can be optimized and made comparable in the absence of ground truth data using the principle of parsimony. However, they both have significant shortcomings, with the region growing procedure creating contour polygons that do not follow the shape of eddies while the watershed technique frequently subdivides eddies or groups together separate eddy objects. Secondly, it was determined that these problems can be remedied by using a novel Non-Euclidian Voronoi (NEV) tessellation technique. NEV is effective in isolating the extrema associated with eddies in SSHA data while using a non-Euclidian cost-distance based procedure (based on cumulative gradients in ocean height) to define the boundaries between fuzzy objects. Using this procedure as the first stage in isolating candidate eddy objects, a novel "region-shrinking" multicriteria eddy identification algorithm was developed that includes consideration of shape and vorticity. Eddies identified by this region-shrinking technique compare favorably with those identified by existing techniques, while simplifying and improving existing automated eddy detection algorithms. However, it also tends to find a larger number of eddies as a result of its ability to separate what other techniques identify as connected

  13. Eddy current thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Gary J.; Sinclair, Frank; Soskov, Alexander; Buff, James S.

    2015-06-16

    A sheet of a material is disposed in a melt of the material. The sheet is formed using a cooling plate in one instance. An exciting coil and sensing coil are positioned downstream of the cooling plate. The exciting coil and sensing coil use eddy currents to determine a thickness of the solid sheet on top of the melt.

  14. Eddy-Current Inspection of Narrow Metal Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, H. H.; Kleint, R. E.; Kirkham, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Inspection technique for narrow-bore metal tubing involves use of small internal eddy-current probe. Probe consists of thin copper wire wrapped on bobbin. Probe small enough to pass through bends in tube being measured. Technique useful for strain measurements where operating conditions or inaccessibility prevent use of such conventional methods as X-ray diffraction, electrical-resistance measurements, strain gages, or holography.

  15. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    The eddy heat flux generated by the statistically equilibrated baroclinic instability of a uniform, horizontal temperature gradient is studied using a two-mode quasigeostrophic model. An overview of the dependence of the eddy diffusivity of heat Dtau on the planetary potential vorticity gradient beta, the bottom friction kappa, the deformation radius lambda, the vertical shear of the large-scale flow 2U and the domain size L is provided at 70 numerical simulations with beta = 0 (f-plane) and 110 simulations with beta ≠ 0 (beta-plane). Strong, axisymmetric, well-separated baroclinic vortices dominate the equilibrated barotropic vorticity and temperature fields of f-plane turbulence. The heat flux arises from a systematic northward (southward) migration of anti-cyclonic (cyclonic) eddies with warm (cold) fluid trapped in the cores. Zonal jets form spontaneously on the beta-plane, and stationary, isotropic, jet-scale eddies align within the strong eastward-flowing regions of the jets. In both studies, the vortices and jets give rise to a strong anti-correlation between the barotropic vorticity zeta and the temperature field tau. The baroclinic mode is also an important contributor to dissipation by bottom friction and energizes the barotropic mode at scales larger than lambda. This in part explains why previous parameterizations for the eddy heat flux based on Kolmogorovian cascade theories are found to be unreliable. In a separate study, temperature and salinity profiles obtained with expendable conductivity, temperature and depth (XCTD) probes within Drake Passage, Southern Ocean are used to analyze the turbulent diapycnal eddy diffusivity kappa rho to a depth of 1000 meters. The Polar Front separates two dynamically different regions with strong, surface-intensified mixing north of the Front. South of the Polar Front mixing is weaker and peaks at a depth of approximately 500 m, near the local temperature maximum. Peak values of kapparho are found to exceed 10-3 m

  16. Does eddy subduction matter in the northeast Atlantic Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey

    2007-06-01

    Mesoscale eddies are an important contributor to subduction in the Gulf Stream region and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, but is eddy subduction also important in the relatively quiescent interior of the world's subtropical gyres? Observations from the Subduction Experiment of the northeast Atlantic do not have the spatial resolution necessary to calculate eddy subduction and answer this question. Regional numerical models can diagnose subduction, but their representativeness is unknown. Furthermore, water mass budgets in an open-ocean domain show that the simulated properties of subducted water directly depend upon uncertain open-boundary conditions and surface fluxes. To remedy these problems, a state estimate of the ocean circulation is formed by constraining an eddy-permitting general circulation model to observations by adjusting the model parameters within their uncertainty. The resulting estimate is self-consistent with the equations of motion and has the necessary resolution for diagnosing subduction. In the northeast Atlantic during 1991-1993, the time-variable circulation contributes less than 1 Sv of net subduction, while the total subduction is 4 Sv. Eddy volume fluxes of 40 m/yr in the North Equatorial Current and the Azores Current, however, are significant and rival the subduction by Ekman pumping locally. Furthermore, a state estimate at 1/6° resolution has 2-3 Sv more subduction in the density bands centered around σ = 24.0 kg/m3 and σ = 26.0 kg/m3 than a 2° state estimate. This result implies that the inability to accurately simulate mesoscale phenomena and surface fluxes in climate models would lead to an accumulation of errors in water mass properties over 10-20 years, even in the interior of the subtropical gyre.

  17. A new climatological oceanic eddy census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Evan; Pascual, Ananda; Pujol, Isabel; Faugère, Yannice; Delepoulle, Antoine; Briol, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    We present a new climatological oceanic eddy census dataset based on gridded sea level anomalies from satellite altimeter observations that is due for release by Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data (AVISO). The identification and automated tracking of oceanic eddies is carried out using the py-eddy-tracker of Mason et al. (2014). Daily outputs of eddy properties (including position, radius, amplitude and nonlinearity) covering the period 1993-2013 over the global domain are presented and discussed. Validation and comparison is made with the published global eddy track database of Chelton et al. (2011).

  18. Pulsed eddy current thickness measurements of transuranic waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, T.K.; Kunerth, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Thickness measurements on fifty five gallon waste drums for drum integrity purposes have been traditionally performed at the INEL using ultrasonic testing methods. Ultrasonic methods provide high resolution repeatable thickness measurements in a timely manner, however, the major drawback of using ultrasonic techniques is coupling to the drum. Areas with severe exterior corrosion, debonded paper labels or any other obstacle in the acoustic path will have to be omitted from the ultrasonic scan. We have developed a pulsed eddy current scanning system that can take thickness measurements on fifty five gallon carbon steel drums with wall thicknesses up to 65 mils. This type of measurement is not susceptible to the problems mentioned above. Eddy current measurements in the past have excluded ferromagnetic materials such as carbon steel because of the difficulty in penetrating the material and in compensating for changes in permeability from material to material. New developments in data acquisition electronics as well as advances in personal computers have made a pulsed eddy current system practical and inexpensive. Certain aspects of the pulsed eddy current technique as well as the operation of such a system and features such as real time pass/fail thresholds for overpacking identification and full scan data archiving for future evaluation will be discussed.

  19. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  20. Eddy transport of reacting substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flierl, Glenn

    2015-11-01

    We examine an exact formulation of eddy fluxes but extended to tracers which react with each other. The resulting formula is evaluated using the lattice model approach, allowing not only control (including elimination) of sub-grid-scale diffusion and efficient enough computation to generate an adequate ensemble. The theory predicts that the flux is a non-local average of the mean gradients, even for passive scalars, and we can calculate the averaging kernel. The reaction terms alter the effective transport for a single scalar depending on decay time scale compared to that of the Lagrangian covariance. But, in addition, the eddies produce ``cross-fluxes'' whereby the transport of each tracer depends on the gradients of all of them.

  1. Development of an ultralow frequency eddy current instrument for the detection and sizing of stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Hayford, D.T.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes an investigation of the potential to use remote field eddy currents at low frequencies that would permit penetration of pipeline steels and use this technique to detect stress corrosion cracking on coated pipelines without requiring coating to be removed. The report describes development of a prototype eddy current instrument.

  2. Large eddy simulation applications in gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Kevin

    2009-07-28

    The gas turbine presents significant challenges to any computational fluid dynamics techniques. The combination of a wide range of flow phenomena with complex geometry is difficult to model in the context of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers. We review the potential for large eddy simulation (LES) in modelling the flow in the different components of the gas turbine during a practical engineering design cycle. We show that while LES has demonstrated considerable promise for reliable prediction of many flows in the engine that are difficult for RANS it is not a panacea and considerable application challenges remain. However, for many flows, especially those dominated by shear layer mixing such as in combustion chambers and exhausts, LES has demonstrated a clear superiority over RANS for moderately complex geometries although at significantly higher cost which will remain an issue in making the calculations relevant within the design cycle. PMID:19531505

  3. electromagnetics, eddy current, computer codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-03-12

    TORO Version 4 is designed for finite element analysis of steady, transient and time-harmonic, multi-dimensional, quasi-static problems in electromagnetics. The code allows simulation of electrostatic fields, steady current flows, magnetostatics and eddy current problems in plane or axisymmetric, two-dimensional geometries. TORO is easily coupled to heat conduction and solid mechanics codes to allow multi-physics simulations to be performed.

  4. The morphology of shelfbreak eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvine, R. W.; Wong, K.-C.; Gawarkiewicz, G. G.; McCarthy, R. K.; Houghton, R. W.; Aikman, F.

    1988-12-01

    We used a combination of buoy tracking, intensive hydrography, satellite thermal imagery, and moored current meters to resolve the structure of eddies at the shelfbreak front in the Middle Atlantic Bight south of New England. Eddylike features were always present at the front in our study area throughout the 15-day period of observations in June 1984. We found that hydrographic features in our across-shelf hydrographic transects that appeared to represent the detached parcels of shelf water often reported in the literature were, in fact, part of the three-dimensional structure of shelfbreak eddies. Adequate alongshelf resolution, in particular, enabled us to determine that no detached parcels were present. The two prominent features of the eddy groups we found were plumes of lighter shelf water that protruded into slope water, curling "backward" opposite the direction of mean shelf flow, and neighboring cyclones with warmer, saltier slope water in their cores, partly or wholly encircled by the plumes. The plumes have the potential especially for producing vigorous across-front exchange of heat, salt, and nutrients and may play roles analogous to the "squirts" found on the California shelf.

  5. Eddy Covariance Measurements of the Sea-Spray Aerosol Flu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, I. M.; Norris, S. J.; Yelland, M. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Prytherch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Historically, almost all estimates of the sea-spray aerosol source flux have been inferred through various indirect methods. Direct estimates via eddy covariance have been attempted by only a handful of studies, most of which measured only the total number flux, or achieved rather coarse size segregation. Applying eddy covariance to the measurement of sea-spray fluxes is challenging: most instrumentation must be located in a laboratory space requiring long sample lines to an inlet collocated with a sonic anemometer; however, larger particles are easily lost to the walls of the sample line. Marine particle concentrations are generally low, requiring a high sample volume to achieve adequate statistics. The highly hygroscopic nature of sea salt means particles change size rapidly with fluctuations in relative humidity; this introduces an apparent bias in flux measurements if particles are sized at ambient humidity. The Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) was developed specifically to make high rate measurements of aerosol size distributions for use in eddy covariance measurements, and the instrument and data processing and analysis techniques have been refined over the course of several projects. Here we will review some of the issues and limitations related to making eddy covariance measurements of the sea spray source flux over the open ocean, summarise some key results from the last decade, and present new results from a 3-year long ship-based measurement campaign as part of the WAGES project. Finally we will consider requirements for future progress.

  6. Eddy covariance based methane flux in Sundarbans mangroves, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Chandra Shekhar; Rodda, Suraj Reddy; Thumaty, Kiran Chand; Raha, A. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-06-01

    We report the initial results of the methane flux measured using eddy covariance method during summer months from the world's largest mangrove ecosystem, Sundarbans of India. Mangrove ecosystems are known sources for methane (CH4) having very high global warming potential. In order to quantify the methane flux in mangroves, an eddy covariance flux tower was recently erected in the largest unpolluted and undisturbed mangrove ecosystem in Sundarbans (India). The tower is equipped with eddy covariance flux tower instruments to continuously measure methane fluxes besides the mass and energy fluxes. This paper presents the preliminary results of methane flux variations during summer months (i.e., April and May 2012) in Sundarbans mangrove ecosystem. The mean concentrations of CH4 emission over the study period was 1682 ± 956 ppb. The measured CH4 fluxes computed from eddy covariance technique showed that the study area acts as a net source for CH4 with daily mean flux of 150.22 ± 248.87 mg m-2 day-1. The methane emission as well as its flux showed very high variability diurnally. Though the environmental conditions controlling methane emission is not yet fully understood, an attempt has been made in the present study to analyse the relationships of methane efflux with tidal activity. This present study is part of Indian Space Research Organisation-Geosphere Biosphere Program (ISRO-GBP) initiative under `National Carbon Project'.

  7. EDDY CURRENT INVERSION AND ESTIMATION METRICS FOR EVALUATING THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Knopp, Jeremy S.; Aldrin, John C.; Nyenhuis, John

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, sophisticated eddy-current techniques incorporating model-based inverse methods were successfully demonstrated to measure the thickness and remaining-life of high-temperature coatings. To further assure the performance of these inverse methods, several estimation metrics including Fisher Information, Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), covariance, and singular value decomposition (SVD) are introduced. The connections and utility of these metrics are illustrated in the design of eddy current methods for estimating layer thickness, conductivity and probe liftoff.

  8. Finite Element Modeling of Pulsed Eddy Current Signals from Aluminum Plates Having Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbar, V. K.; Harlley, D.; Krause, T. W.

    2010-02-01

    The pulsed eddy current technique is being developed for detection of flaws located at depth within conducting structures. The present work investigates the pulsed eddy current response from flat-plate conductors having defects by using finite element modeling. Modeling revealed the optimum probe position with respect to a multilayer defect geometry. Models were also produced to investigate the effect of changing some probe parameters on pickup signal and penetration depth.

  9. Eddy Current Inversion and Estimation Metrics for Evaluating Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Knopp, Jeremy S.; Aldrin, John C.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Nyenhuis, John

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, sophisticated eddy-current techniques incorporating model-based inverse methods were successfully demonstrated to measure the thickness and remaining-life of high-temperature coatings. To further assure the performance of these inverse methods, several estimation metrics including Fisher Information, Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), covariance, and singular value decomposition (SVD) are introduced. The connections and utility of these metrics are illustrated in the design of eddy current methods for estimating layer thickness, conductivity and probe liftoff.

  10. Evaluation and Improvement of Eddy Current Position Sensors in Magnetically Suspended Flywheel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Thomas, Erwin M., III; Jansen, Ralph H.; McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Soeder, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Eddy current position sensor performance is evaluated for use in a high-speed flywheel development system. The flywheel utilizes a five axis active magnetic bearing system. The eddy current sensors are used for position feedback for the bearing controller. Measured characteristics include sensitivity to multiple target materials and susceptibility to noise from the magnetic bearings and from sensor-to-sensor crosstalk. Improvements in axial sensor configuration and techniques for noise reduction are described.

  11. Observations of Three Dimensional Surfzone Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. L.; Henderson, S. M.; Solovitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the vertical structure of surfzone eddies (frequencies 0.0005-0.01 Hz). From 16 Oct to 07 Nov 2011, an array of 12 Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADPs) measured velocity profiles in 0-6 m water depth on a natural beach near Duck, North Carolina. We will analyze and describe vertical variations in eddy velocity. Vertical variability of eddy magnitude will be presented, as well as coherence and phase between near-surface and near-bed velocities. We aim to shed light on the causes and consequences of vertical eddy variability, which has recently been recognized in observations, but is not yet well understood.

  12. Software compensation of eddy current fields in multislice high order dynamic shimming

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat; Avison, Malcolm J.; Gore, John C.; Welch, E. Brian

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic B0 shimming (DS) can produce better field homogeneity than static global shimming by dynamically updating slicewise shim values in a multislice acquisition. The performance of DS however is limited by eddy current fields produced by the switching of 2nd and 3rd order unshielded shims. In this work, we present a novel method of eddy field compensation (EFC) applied to higher order shim induced eddy current fields in multislice DS. This method does not require shim shielding, extra hardware for eddy current compensation or subject specific prescanning. The interactions between shim harmonics are modeled assuming steady state of the medium and long time constant, cross and self term eddy fields in a DS experiment and ‘correction factors’ characterizing the entire set of shim interactions are derived. The correction factors for a given time between shim switches are shown to be invariable with object scanned, shim switching pattern and actual shim values, allowing for their generalized prospective use. Phantom and human head, 2nd and 3rd order DS experiments performed without any hardware eddy current compensation using the technique show large reductions in field gradients and offsets leading to significant improvements in image quality. This method holds promise as an alternative to expensive hardware based eddy current compensation required in 2nd and 3rd order DS. PMID:21458339

  13. Eddy current system for inspection of train hollow axles

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, Tomasz; Psuj, Grzegorz; Sikora, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Spychalski, Ireneusz

    2014-02-18

    The structural integrity of wheelsets used in rolling stock is of great importance to the safety. In this paper, electromagnetic system with an eddy current transducer suitable for the inspection of hollow axles have been presented. The transducer was developed to detect surface braking defects having depth not smaller than 0.5 mm. Ultrasound technique can be utilized to inspect the whole axle, but it is not sufficiently sensitive to shallow defects located close to the surface. Therefore, the electromagnetic technique is proposed to detect surface breaking cracks that cannot be detected by ultrasonic technique.

  14. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  15. Instantaneous Wavelet Energetic Transfers between Atmospheric Blocking and Local Eddies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Aimé

    2005-07-01

    A new wavelet energetics technique, based on best-shift orthonormal wavelet analysis (OWA) of an instantaneous synoptic map, is constructed for diagnosing nonlinear kinetic energy (KE) transfers in five observed blocking cases. At least 90% of the longitudinal variance of time and latitude band mean 50-kPa geopotential is reconstructed by only two wavelets using best shift. This superior efficiency to the standard OWAs persists for time-evolving structures. The cases comprise two categories, respectively dominated by zonal-wavenumber sets {1} and {1, 2}. Further OWA of instantaneous residual nonblocking structures, combined with new “nearness” criteria, yields three more orthogonal components, representing smaller-scale eddies near the block (upstream and downstream) and distant structures. This decomposition fulfills a vision expressed to the author by Saltzman. Such a decomposition is not obtainable by simple Fourier analysis.Eddy patterns apparent in the components' contours suggest inferring geostrophic energetic interactions, but the component Rossby numbers may be too large to support the inference. However, a new result enabled by this method is the instantaneous attribution of blocking strain-field effects to particular energetically interactive eddies, consistent with Shutts' hypothesis. Such attribution was only possible before in simplified models or in a time-average sense. In four of five blocks, the upstream eddies feed KE to the block, which in turn, in three of four cases, transmits KE to the downstream eddies. The small case size precludes statistically significant conclusions. The appendixes link low-order blocking structure and dynamics to some wavelet design principles and propose a new interaction diagnosis, similar to E-vector analysis, but instantaneous.

  16. Video Analysis of Eddy Structures from Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present a method of analyzing turbulent eddy structures in explosive volcanic eruptions using high definition video. Film from the eruption of Sakurajima on 25 September 2011 was analyzed using a modified version of FlowJ, a Java-based toolbox released by National Institute of Health. Using the Lucas and Kanade algorithm with a Gaussian derivative gradient, it tracks the change in pixel position over a 23 image buffer to determine the optical flow. This technique assumes that the optical flow, which is the apparent motion of the pixels, is equivalent to the actual flow field. We calculated three flow fields per second for the duration of the video. FlowJ outputs flow fields in pixels per frame that were then converted to meters per second in Matlab using a known distance and video rate. We constructed a low pass filter using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and critical point analysis to identify the underlying eddy structure with boundaries determined by tracing the flow lines. We calculated the area of each eddy and noted its position over a series of velocity fields. The changes in shape and position were tracked to determine the eddy growth rate and overall eddy rising velocity. The eddies grow in size 1.5 times quicker than they rise vertically. Presently, this method is most successful in high contrast videos when there is little to no effect of wind on the plumes. Additionally, the pixel movement from the video images represents a 2D flow with no depth, while the actual flow is three dimensional; we are continuing to develop an algorithm that will allow 3D reprojection of the 2D data. Flow in the y-direction lessens the overall velocity magnitude as the true flow motion has larger y-direction component. POD, which only uses the pattern of the flow, and analysis of the critical points (points where flow is zero) is used to determine the shape of the eddies. The method allows for video recorded at remote distances to be used to study eruption dynamics

  17. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  18. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approximate 10 to the 25th g in mass; and a later stage in which the approximately 10 to the 25th g planetesimals accumulate into the final planets. In the terrestrial planet region, an initial planetesimal swarm corresponding to the critical mass of dust layer gravitational instabilities is considered. In order to better understand the accumulation history of Mercury-sized bodies, 19 Monte-Carlo simulations of terrestrial planet growth were calculated. A Monte Carlo technique was used to investigate the orbital evolution of asteroidal collision debris produced interior to 2.6 AU. It was found that there are two regions primarily responsible for production of Earth-crossing meteoritic material and Apollo objects. The same techniques were extended to include the origin of Earth-approaching asteroidal bodies. It is found that these same two resonant mechanisms predict a steady-state number of Apollo-Amor about 1/2 that estimated based on astronomical observations.

  19. Improved Imaging With Laser-Induced Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.

    1993-01-01

    System tests specimen of material nondestructively by laser-induced eddy-current imaging improved by changing method of processing of eddy-current signal. Changes in impedance of eddy-current coil measured in absolute instead of relative units.

  20. Application of neutron capture autoradiography to Boron Delivery seeking techniques for selective accumulation of boron compounds to tumor with intra-arterial administration of boron entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikado, S.; Yanagie, H.; Yasuda, N.; Higashi, S.; Ikushima, I.; Mizumachi, R.; Murata, Y.; Morishita, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Shinohara, A.; Ogura, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Iikura, H.; Ando, H.; Ishimoto, M.; Takamoto, S.; Eriguchi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Kimura, M.

    2009-06-01

    It is necessary to accumulate the 10B atoms selectively to the tumor cells for effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In order to achieve an accurate measurement of 10B accumulations in the biological samples, we employed a technique of neutron capture autoradiography (NCAR) of sliced samples of tumor tissues using CR-39 plastic track detectors. The CR-39 track detectors attached with the biological samples were exposed to thermal neutrons in the thermal column of the JRR3 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). We obtained quantitative NCAR images of the samples for VX-2 tumor in rabbit liver after injection of 10BSH entrapped water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion by intra-arterial injection via proper hepatic artery. The 10B accumulations and distributions in VX-2 tumor and normal liver of rabbit were investigated by means of alpha-track density measurements. In this study, we showed the selective accumulation of 10B atoms in the VX-2 tumor by intra-arterial injection of 10B entrapped WOW emulsion until 3 days after injection by using digitized NCAR images (i.e. alpha-track mapping).

  1. Toward large eddy simulation of turbulent flow over an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon

    1993-01-01

    The flow field over an airfoil contains several distinct flow characteristics, e.g. laminar, transitional, turbulent boundary layer flow, flow separation, unstable free shear layers, and a wake. This diversity of flow regimes taxes the presently available Reynolds averaged turbulence models. Such models are generally tuned to predict a particular flow regime, and adjustments are necessary for the prediction of a different flow regime. Similar difficulties are likely to emerge when the large eddy simulation technique is applied with the widely used Smagorinsky model. This model has not been successful in correctly representing different turbulent flow fields with a single universal constant and has an incorrect near-wall behavior. Germano et al. (1991) and Ghosal, Lund & Moin have developed a new subgrid-scale model, the dynamic model, which is very promising in alleviating many of the persistent inadequacies of the Smagorinsky model: the model coefficient is computed dynamically as the calculation progresses rather than input a priori. The model has been remarkably successful in prediction of several turbulent and transitional flows. We plan to simulate turbulent flow over a '2D' airfoil using the large eddy simulation technique. Our primary objective is to assess the performance of the newly developed dynamic subgrid-scale model for computation of complex flows about aircraft components and to compare the results with those obtained using the Reynolds average approach and experiments. The present computation represents the first application of large eddy simulation to a flow of aeronautical interest and a key demonstration of the capabilities of the large eddy simulation technique.

  2. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Bravo, L.; Ramos, M.; Pizarro, O.; Karstensen, J.; Gallegos, M.; Correa-Ramirez, M.; Silva, N.; Farias, L.; Karp-Boss, L.

    2015-09-01

    Eastern boundary upwelling systems are characterized by high productivity that often leads to subsurface hypoxia on the shelf. Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of circulation in these regions, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from shelves to the open ocean. In austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, a subsurface layer (200-400 m) in which the concentration of oxygen was very low (< 2 μmol kg-1 of O2) was observed in the eastern South Pacific, ~ 900 km offshore (30° S, 81° W). Satellite altimetry combined with CTD observations associated the local oxygen anomaly with an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a diameter of about 150 km. The eddy contained Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted near the coast. Undersaturation (44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 μM) gave evidence for denitrification in this water mass. Based on satellite altimetry, we tracked the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). We estimate that the eddy formed in April 2010. Field studies conducted on the Chilean shelf in June 2010 provided approximate information on initial O2 and N2O concentrations of "source water" in the region at the time of eddy formation. Concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the offshore eddy were lower than its surroundings or "source water" on the shelf, suggesting that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. Our results show that mesoscale eddies in the ESP not only transport physical properties of the ESSW from the coast to the ocean interior, but also export and transform biogeochemical properties, creating suboxic environments in the oligotrophic

  3. Linkages between controlled floods, eddy sandbar dynamics, and riparian vegetation along the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, E. R.; Grams, P. E.; Hazel, J. E., Jr.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Controlled floods are released from Glen Canyon Dam to build and maintain eddy sandbars along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. Long-term monitoring shows that the topographic response to controlled floods varies considerably between eddies, likely reflecting different geometric configurations and flow hydraulics. Differences in eddy sandbar response also reflect the degree of vegetation establishment since the 1980s when reservoir spills more than double the magnitude of controlled floods cleared most sandbars of vegetation. Here we explore the geomorphology of sandbar responses in the context of controlled floods, debris fan-eddy geometry, and riparian vegetation establishment. In Marble Canyon, the proportion of eddy area stabilized by vegetation is negatively correlated with water surface slope and the rate of stage change with discharge. Less vegetated sites are more dynamic; they tend to build open sandbars during controlled floods and show greater topographic variability in the eddy compared to the main channel. In contrast, deposition of open sandbars is limited where vegetation establishment has decreased channel width, altering the pattern of eddy recirculation and sediment redistribution. In these locations, deposition during controlled floods is more akin to floodplain sedimentation, and the elevation of vegetated bar surfaces increases with successive floods. Changes in sand storage in the main channel are greater than storage change in the eddy at these lower gradient sites, and controlled floods tend to evacuate sand that has accumulated on the bed. The degree to which vegetation has stabilized sandbar surfaces may thus provide a proxy for different hydraulic conditions and a better canyon-wide assessment of controlled flood response. Our results apply primarily to large eddies in Marble Canyon, and ongoing flow modeling and vegetation composition mapping will allow further assessment of eddy sandbar-riparian vegetation interactions

  4. Evidence of various mechanisms of Cd sequestration in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri, the non-accumulator Arabidopsis lyrata, and their progenies by combined synchrotron-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Huguet, Stéphanie; Meyer, Claire-Lise; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Testemale, Denis; Vantelon, Delphine; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is a model plant for Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the chemical forms of Cd, its distribution in leaves, and Cd accumulation and tolerance. An interspecific cross was carried out between A. halleri and the non-tolerant and non-hyperaccumulating relative A. lyrata providing progenies segregating for Cd tolerance and accumulation. Cd speciation and distribution were investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and microfocused X-ray fluorescence. In A. lyrata and non-tolerant progenies, Cd was coordinated by S atoms only or with a small contribution of O groups. Interestingly, the proportion of O ligands increased in A. halleri and tolerant progenies, and they were predominant in most of them, while S ligands were still present. Therefore, the binding of Cd with O ligands was associated with Cd tolerance. In A. halleri, Cd was mainly located in the xylem, phloem, and mesophyll tissue, suggesting a reallocation process for Cd within the plant. The distribution of the metal at the cell level was further discussed. In A. lyrata, the vascular bundles were also Cd enriched, but the epidermis was richer in Cd as compared with the mesophyll. Cd was identified in trichomes of both species. This work demonstrated that both Cd speciation and localization were related to the tolerance character of the plant. PMID:25873676

  5. Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brodie; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank

    2015-11-01

    The highest resolution global climate models (GCMs) can now resolve the largest scales of mesoscale dynamics in the ocean. This has the potential to increase the fidelity of GCMs. However, the effects of the smallest, unresolved, scales of mesoscale dynamics must still be parametrized. One such family of parametrizations are mesoscale ocean large eddy simulations (MOLES), but the effects of including MOLES in a GCM are not well understood. In this presentation, several MOLES schemes are implemented in a mesoscale-resolving GCM (CESM), and the resulting flow is compared with that produced by more traditional sub-grid parametrizations. Large eddy simulation (LES) is used to simulate flows where the largest scales of turbulent motion are resolved, but the smallest scales are not resolved. LES has traditionally been used to study 3D turbulence, but recently it has also been applied to idealized 2D and quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence. The MOLES presented here are based on 2D and QG LES schemes.

  6. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  7. Southern Ocean Eddies as Weather Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenger, Ivy; Byrne, David; Gruber, Nicolas; Knutti, Reto; Münnich, Matthias; Papritz, Lukas

    2013-04-01

    Several hundred mesoscale eddies populate the Southern Ocean south of 30°S at any time, however, little is known about their effect on the overlying atmosphere. As these eddies feature sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies one can expect them to play a role in the coupling of the atmosphere and the ocean. Here we show based on satellite observations of about 600,000 eddies occurring between 1997 and 2010, that these ocean eddies significantly alter near surface wind, cloud properties and rainfall by several percent. Relative to the atmospheric variability, the magnitude of the anomalies related to ocean eddies represents ±13-15 % (wind, cloud fraction), ±6-10 % (cloud water content) and ±2-6 % (rain). This impact on the atmosphere is striking given the fact that oceanic eddies constitute non-stationary SST fronts of moderate size relative to the much larger atmospheric low pressure systems which are constantly passing by at these latitudes. The spatial pattern of these changes is consistent with a mechanism labeled downward momentum mechanism in which the SST anomalies related to eddies modify the stability and thus turbulence of the atmospheric boundary layer. We will investigate the mechanisms and impact of the atmospheric modifications associated with ocean eddies in a regional high-resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean model (COSMO-ROMS) over the Southern Ocean.

  8. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  9. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport.

  10. Mesoscale Eddies in the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. G.; Kessler, W. S.; McWilliams, J. C.; Molemaker, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Water mass transformation in the strong equatorward flows through the Solomon Sea influences the properties of the Equatorial Undercurrent and subsequent cold tongue upwelling. High eddy activity in the interior Solomon Sea seen in altimetric sea surface height (SSH) and in several models may provide a mechanism for these transformations. We investigate these effects using a mesoscale (4-km resolution) sigma-coordinate (ROMS) model of the Solomon Sea nested in a basin solution, forced by a repeating seasonal cycle, and evaluated against observational data. The model generates a vigorous upper layer eddy field; some of these are apparently shed as the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent threads through the complex topography of the region, others are independent of the strong western boundary current. We diagnose the scales and vertical structure of the eddies in different parts of the Solomon Sea to illuminate their generation processes and propagation characteristics, and compare these to observed eddy statistics. Hypotheses tested are that the Solomon Sea mesoscale eddies are generated locally by baroclinic instability, that the eddies are shed as the South Equatorial Current passes around and through the Solomon Island chain, that eddies are generated by the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent, or that eddies occurring outside of the Solomon Sea propagate into the Solomon Sea. These different mechanisms have different implications for the resulting mixing and property fluxes. They also provide different interpretations for SSH signals observed from satellites (e.g., that will be observed by the upcoming SWOT satellite).

  11. Exploring Eddy-Covariance Measurements Using a Spatial Approach: The Eddy Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, Christian; Bernhofer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis states that "standard" eddy-covariance measurements of fluxes at a fixed location can replace a spatial ensemble of instantaneous values at multiple locations. For testing this hypothesis, a unique turbulence measurement set-up was used for two measurement campaigns over desert (Namibia) and grassland (Germany) in 2012. This "Eddy Matrix" combined nine ultrasonic anemometer-thermometers and 17 thermocouples in a 10 m × 10 m regular grid with 2.5-m grid distance. The instantaneous buoyancy flux derived from the spatial eddy covariance of the Eddy Matrix was highly variable in time (from -0.3 to 1 m K s^{-1} ). However, the 10-min average reflected 83 % of the reference eddy-covariance flux with a good correlation. By introducing a combined eddy-covariance method (the spatial eddy covariance plus the additional flux of the temporal eddy covariance of the spatial mean values), the mean flux increases by 9 % relative to the eddy-covariance reference. Considering the typical underestimation of fluxes by the standard eddy-covariance method, this is seen as an improvement. Within the limits of the Eddy Matrix, Taylor's hypothesis is supported by the results.

  12. Wind changes above warm Agulhas Current eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouault, M.; Verley, P.; Backeberg, B.

    2016-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) estimated from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E onboard the Aqua satellite and altimetry-derived sea level anomalies are used south of the Agulhas Current to identify warm-core mesoscale eddies presenting a distinct SST perturbation greater than to 1 °C to the surrounding ocean. The analysis of twice daily instantaneous charts of equivalent stability-neutral wind speed estimates from the SeaWinds scatterometer onboard the QuikScat satellite collocated with SST for six identified eddies shows stronger wind speed above the warm eddies than the surrounding water in all wind directions, if averaged over the lifespan of the eddies, as was found in previous studies. However, only half of the cases showed higher wind speeds above the eddies at the instantaneous scale; 20 % of cases had incomplete data due to partial global coverage by the scatterometer for one path. For cases where the wind is stronger above warm eddies, there is no relationship between the increase in surface wind speed and the SST perturbation, but we do find a linear relationship between the decrease in wind speed from the centre to the border of the eddy downstream and the SST perturbation. SST perturbations range from 1 to 6 °C for a mean eddy SST of 15.9 °C and mean SST perturbation of 2.65 °C. The diameter of the eddies range from 100 to 250 km. Mean background wind speed is about 12 m s-1 (mostly southwesterly to northwesterly) and ranging mainly from 4 to 16 m s-1. The mean wind increase is about 15 %, which corresponds to 1.8 m s-1. A wind speed increase of 4 to 7 m s-1 above warm eddies is not uncommon. Cases where the wind did not increase above the eddies or did not decrease downstream had higher wind speeds and occurred during a cold front associated with intense cyclonic low-pressure systems, suggesting certain synoptic conditions need to be met to allow for the development of wind speed anomalies over warm-core ocean eddies. In many cases

  13. A turnkey data logger program for field-scale energy flux density measurements using eddy covariance and surface renewal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micrometeorological methods and ecosystem-scale energy and mass flux density measurements have become increasingly important in soil, agricultural, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Eddy cov...

  14. Intense submesoscale upwelling in anticyclonic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannigan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations from around the global ocean show that enhanced biological activity can be found in anticyclonic eddies. This may mean that upwelling of nutrient-rich water occurs within the eddy, but such upwelling is not captured by models that resolve mesoscale processes. High-resolution simulations presented here show intense submesoscale upwelling from the thermocline to the mixed layer in anticyclonic eddies. The properties of the upwelling are consistent with a process known as symmetric instability. A simple limiting nutrient experiment shows that this upwelling can drive much higher biological activity in anticyclonic eddies when there is a high nutrient concentration in the thermocline. An estimate for the magnitude of upwelling associated with symmetric instability in anticyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea shows that it may be of comparable magnitude to other processes, though further work is required to understand the full implications for basin-scale nutrient budgets.

  15. Observed characteristics of Mozambique Channel eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, N. C.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Ridderinkhof, H.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2010-09-01

    The flow in the Mozambique Channel is dominated by large, southward propagating, anti-cyclonic eddies, as opposed to a steady western boundary current. These Mozambique Channel eddies feed their waters into the Agulhas Current system, where they are thought to have a significant influence on the formation of the Natal Pulse and Agulhas Ring shedding. Here we use in situ hydrographic and nutrient data, together with satellite altimetry and surface velocity profilers to provide a detailed characterization of the Mozambique Channel eddies. Two warm eddies in the Channel at 20°S and 24°S had diameters of over 200 km. They rotated anti-cyclonically with a tangential velocity of over 0.5 m.s-1. Vertical sections show that the eddies reached to the bottom of the water column. Relative to the surrounding waters, the features were warm and saline. The total heat and salt anomalies for the southernmost eddy were computed relative to a reference station close by. At 24°S the total anomalies were 1.3 × 1020 J and 6.9 × 1012 kg, respectively, being on par with Agulhas rings. Mozambique Channel eddies thus have the potential to form a major contribution to the southward eddy heat flux in the Agulhas Current system. The feature also had positive nutrient and negative oxygen anomalies. The large magnitude of the water mass anomalies within the eddy suggests that interannual variability in Mozambique Channel eddy numbers would have a significant impact on downstream water mass characteristics.

  16. A High Performance Sample Delivery System for Closed-Path Eddy Covariance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottrott, Anders; Leggett, Graham; Alstad, Karrin; Wahl, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The Picarro G2311-f Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) measures CO2, CH4 and water vapor at high frequency with parts-per-billion (ppb) sensitivity for eddy covariance, gradient, eddy accumulation measurements. In flux mode, the analyzer measures the concentration of all three species at 10 Hz with a cavity gas exchange time of 5 Hz. We developed an enhanced pneumatic sample delivery system for drawing air from the atmosphere into the cavity. The new sample delivery system maintains a 5 Hz gas exchange time, and allows for longer sample intake lines to be configured in tall tower applications (> 250 ft line at sea level). We quantified the system performance in terms of vacuum pump head room and 10-90% concentration step response for several intake line lengths at various elevations. Sample eddy covariance data are shown from an alfalfa field in Northern California, USA.

  17. CO2 and CH4 fluxes along a latitudinal transect in Northern Alaska using eddy covariance technique in challenging conditions: first results of a long term experiment in the Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreaux, V.; Oechel, W. C.; Losacco, S.; McEwing, R.; Murphy, P.; Zona, D.

    2013-12-01

    the first year of a new long-term study that includes the results of the upgrading of 5 sites in Northern Alaska across a latitudinal transect (Barrow, Atqasuk, and Ivotuk) and across a moisture gradient (Barrow) in the Arctic. These sites are equipped with different eddy covariance systems to follow CO2 and CH4 fluxes, combined with a full data set of meteorological and soil measurements. The study summarizes a full analysis of energy balance, CO2 and CH4 fluxes correlated to changes in meteorological and soil conditions on the 5 sites of the transect. Based on the results available, CH4 fluxes averaged approximatively 8 mgC m-2 d-1 in the north (Barrow) to 13 mgC m-2 d-1 in the south (Ivotuk). In between these two sites, a daily value of about 20 mgC m-2 d-1 in the wetter, vegetated drained lake basin was observed. Surprisingly, from our preliminary data investigation, the southernmost and warmer site (Ivotuk) did not present the highest CH4 emission, which instead was the highest in the 200 km north site (Atqasuk) with a mean daily value of 25 mgC m-2 d-1. The importance of fall season CH4 emissions will also be presented and their importance relative to summertime emissions.

  18. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  19. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phil; Rackow, Kirk A.; Hohman, Ed

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  20. Eddy Covariance Method: Overview of General Guidelines and Conventional Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Anderson, D. J.; Amen, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric flux measurements are widely used to estimate water, heat, carbon dioxide and trace gas exchange between the ecosystem and the atmosphere. The Eddy Covariance method is one of the most direct, defensible ways to measure and calculate turbulent fluxes within the atmospheric boundary layer. However, the method is mathematically complex, and requires significant care to set up and process data. These reasons may be why the method is currently used predominantly by micrometeorologists. Modern instruments and software can potentially expand the use of this method beyond micrometeorology and prove valuable for plant physiology, hydrology, biology, ecology, entomology, and other non-micrometeorological areas of research. The main challenge of the method for a non-expert is the complexity of system design, implementation, and processing of the large volume of data. In the past several years, efforts of the flux networks (e.g., FluxNet, Ameriflux, CarboEurope, Fluxnet-Canada, Asiaflux, etc.) have led to noticeable progress in unification of the terminology and general standardization of processing steps. The methodology itself, however, is difficult to unify, because various experimental sites and different purposes of studies dictate different treatments, and site-, measurement- and purpose-specific approaches. Here we present an overview of theory and typical workflow of the Eddy Covariance method in a format specifically designed to (i) familiarize a non-expert with general principles, requirements, applications, and processing steps of the conventional Eddy Covariance technique, (ii) to assist in further understanding the method through more advanced references such as textbooks, network guidelines and journal papers, (iii) to help technicians, students and new researchers in the field deployment of the Eddy Covariance method, and (iv) to assist in its use beyond micrometeorology. The overview is based, to a large degree, on the frequently asked questions

  1. Multiple dipole eddies in the Alaska Coastal Current detected with Landsat thematic mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlnas, Kristina; Royer, Thomas C.; George, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen dipole eddies, including five large, well-formed ones, three second-generation eddies, and two double eddies, were observed in the Alaska Coastal Current near Kayak Island in one single scene of the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) on April 22, l985. The digital Landsat TM satellite data were computer analyzed to extract details in the near coastal circulation in the northern Gulf of Alaska. Enhancement techniques were applied to the visible and thermal IR bands. The features are evident only in the visible bands because of the ability of these bands to detect the distribution of sediments in the near surface. These eddies did not have a significant thermal signature.The sources of these sediments are the glacial streams found throughout the Gulf of Alaska coast. Eddies of this configuration and frequency have never been observed here previously. However, the oceanographic and meteorological conditions are typical for this time of year. These eddies should be important to the cross-shelf mixing processes in the Alaska Coastal Current and are an indicator that the flow here can be unstable at certain times of the year.

  2. Subsurface Defect Detection in Metals with Pulsed Eddy Current

    SciTech Connect

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Bantz, Walter J.

    2005-04-09

    The eddy current (EC) method is traditionally used for open surface crack detection in metallic components. Subsurface voids in bulk metals can also be detected by the eddy current devices. Taking into consideration the skin effect in conductive materials, a lower frequency of electromagnetic excitation is used for a deeper penetration. A set of special specimens was designed and fabricated to investigate sensitivity to subsurface voids. Typically, flat bottom holes (FBHs) are used for subsurface defect simulation. This approach is not very representative of real defects for eddy current inspection because the FBH depth extends to the bottom of the specimen. Two-layer specimens with finite depth FBHs were fabricated and scanned with conventional EC of variable frequency. Sensitivity and spatial resolution of EC diminish with flaw depth. The pulsed EC approach was applied for flaw detection at variable distance under the surface. The transient response from multi-layer model was derived and compared to experiments. The multi-frequency nature of pulsed excitation provides effective coverage of a thick layer of material in one pass. Challenging aspects of subsurface flaw detection and visualization using the EC technique are discussed.

  3. Eddy current scanning of niobium for SRF cavities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; Foley, M.; Antoine, C.; Cooper, C.; Brinkmann, A.; /DESY

    2006-08-01

    In the framework of SRF cavity development, Fermilab is creating the infrastructure needed for the characterization of the material used in the cavity fabrication. An important step in the characterization of ''as received'' niobium sheets is eddy current scanning. Eddy current scanning is a non-destructive technique first adopted and further developed by DESY with the purpose of checking the cavity material for subsurface defects and inclusions. Fermilab has received and further upgraded a commercial eddy current scanner previously used for the SNS project. This scanner is now used daily to scan the niobium sheets for the Fermilab third harmonic, the ILC, and the Proton Driver cavities. After optical inspection, more than 400 squares and disks have been scanned and when necessary checked at the optical and electron microscopes, anodized, or measured with profilometers looking for surface imperfections that might limit the performance of the cavities. This paper gives a status report on the scanning results obtained so far, including a discussion of the classification of signals being detected.

  4. Eddy current inspection of bonded composite crack repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Thomas K., Jr.; Guijt, Cornelius; Fredell, Robert

    1996-11-01

    The aging of the US aircraft fleet poses serious economic and safety challenges. Fatigue cracks in the 7079-T6 aluminum fuselage skin of aging transports have presented zn opportunity to test a prototype repair. GLARE, a fiber metal laminate, has been applied to repair fuselage cracks in the fuselage skin of a US transport aircraft. This affordable prototype solution to extend the life of aging aircraft requires an inspection method to track crack growth and monitor the effectiveness of the patch on repaired fuselage skin. The fiber metal laminate patch is opaque and the fuselage skin at the damage location generally can only be accessed from the outside surface requiring the use of a non-destructive means to monitor crack length. Advances in eddy current inspection technology have provided a means to detect and track crack growth beneath patches on fuselage skins. This paper describes the development of low-frequency eddy current techniques to monitor cracks under bonded composite repair patches applied to stiffened fuselage structures. The development involved the use of a rugged portable eddy current inspection unit. The results show crack growth can be monitored to ensure the continued structural integrity of repaired flawed structures; however, the influence of substructure present a challenge to the inspector in detecting crack growth.

  5. Seasonal variability in global eddy diffusion and the effect on neutral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilinski, M. D.; Crowley, G.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a method for making single-satellite estimates of the seasonal variability in global-average eddy diffusion coefficients. Eddy diffusion values as a function of time were estimated from residuals of neutral density measurements made by the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and simulations made using the thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics global circulation model (TIME-GCM). The eddy diffusion coefficient results are quantitatively consistent with previous estimates based on satellite drag observations and are qualitatively consistent with other measurement methods such as sodium lidar observations and eddy diffusivity models. Eddy diffusion coefficient values estimated between January 2004 and January 2008 were then used to generate new TIME-GCM results. Based on these results, the root-mean-square sum for the TIME-GCM model is reduced by an average of 5% when compared to density data from a variety of satellites, indicating that the fidelity of global density modeling can be improved by using data from a single satellite like CHAMP. This approach also demonstrates that eddy diffusion could be estimated in near real-time from satellite observations and used to drive a global circulation model like TIME-GCM. Although the use of global values improves modeled neutral densities, there are limitations to this method, which are discussed, including that the latitude dependence of the seasonal neutral-density signal is not completely captured by a global variation of eddy diffusion coefficients. This demonstrates the need for a latitude-dependent specification of eddy diffusion which is also consistent with diffusion observations made by other techniques.

  6. Seasonal Variability in Global Eddy Diffusion and the Effect on Thermospheric Neutral Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilinski, M.; Crowley, G.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a method for making single-satellite estimates of the seasonal variability in global-average eddy diffusion coefficients. Eddy diffusion values as a function of time between January 2004 and January 2008 were estimated from residuals of neutral density measurements made by the CHallenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and simulations made using the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics - Global Circulation Model (TIME-GCM). The eddy diffusion coefficient results are quantitatively consistent with previous estimates based on satellite drag observations and are qualitatively consistent with other measurement methods such as sodium lidar observations and eddy-diffusivity models. The eddy diffusion coefficient values estimated between January 2004 and January 2008 were then used to generate new TIME-GCM results. Based on these results, the RMS difference between the TIME-GCM model and density data from a variety of satellites is reduced by an average of 5%. This result, indicates that global thermospheric density modeling can be improved by using data from a single satellite like CHAMP. This approach also demonstrates how eddy diffusion could be estimated in near real-time from satellite observations and used to drive a global circulation model like TIME-GCM. Although the use of global values improves modeled neutral densities, there are some limitations of this method, which are discussed, including that the latitude-dependence of the seasonal neutral-density signal is not completely captured by a global variation of eddy diffusion coefficients. This demonstrates the need for a latitude-dependent specification of eddy diffusion consistent with diffusion observations made by other techniques.

  7. Eddy Current Testing, RQA/M1-5330.17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    As one in the series of classroom training handbooks, prepared by the U.S. space program, instructional material is presented in this volume concerning familiarization and orientation on eddy current testing. The subject is presented under the following headings: Introduction, Eddy Current Principles, Eddy Current Equipment, Eddy Current Methods,…

  8. Large-eddy Advection in Evapotranspiration Estimates from an Array of Eddy Covariance Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Evett, S. R.; Gowda, P. H.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Aiken, R.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration was continuously measured by an array of eddy covariance systems and large weighting lysimeter in a sorghum in Bushland, Texas in 2014. The advective divergence from both horizontal and vertical directions were measured through profile measurements above canopy. All storage terms were integrated from the depth of soil heat flux plate to the height of eddy covariance measurement. Therefore, a comparison between the eddy covariance system and large weighing lysimeter was conducted on hourly and daily basis. The results for the discrepancy between eddy covariance towers and the lysimeter will be discussed in terms of advection and storage contributions in time domain and frequency domain.

  9. Production and destruction of eddy kinetic energy in forced submesoscale eddy-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sonaljit; Ramachandran, Sanjiv; Tandon, Amit; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-09-01

    We study the production and dissipation of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in a submesoscale eddy field forced with downfront winds using the Process Study Ocean Model (PSOM) with a horizontal grid resolution of 0.5 km. We simulate an idealized 100 m deep mixed-layer front initially in geostrophic balance with a jet in a domain that permits eddies within a range of O(1 km-100 km). The vertical eddy viscosities and the dissipation are parameterized using four different subgrid vertical mixing parameterizations: the k - ɛ , the KPP, and two different constant eddy viscosity and diffusivity profiles with a magnitude of O(10-2m2s-1) in the mixed layer. Our study shows that strong vertical eddy viscosities near the surface reduce the parameterized dissipation, whereas strong vertical eddy diffusivities reduce the lateral buoyancy gradients and consequently the rate of restratification by mixed-layer instabilities (MLI). Our simulations show that near the surface, the spatial variability of the dissipation along the periphery of the eddies depends on the relative alignment of the ageostrophic and geostrophic shear. Analysis of the resolved EKE budgets in the frontal region from the simulations show important similarities between the vertical structure of the EKE budget produced by the k - ɛ and KPP parameterizations, and earlier LES studies. Such an agreement is absent in the simulations using constant eddy-viscosity parameterizations.

  10. Process Specification for Eddy Current Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    This process specification establishes the minimum requirements for eddy current inspection of flat surfaces, fastener holes, threaded fasteners and seamless and welded tubular products made from nonmagnetic alloys such as aluminum and stainless steel.