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Sample records for eddy correlation technique

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNIQUES FOR EDDY-CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXED IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical technique for the measurement of the exchange (flux) of trace gases between the earth's surface and the atmosphere will be developed. Measurements will rely on the eddy correlation method (ECM). Target compounds are biogenically and anthropogenically emitted v...

  2. Assessing maize crop coefficient through eddy correlation technique in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horeschi, D.; Mancini, M.; Corbari, C.; Montaldo, N.

    2009-04-01

    The evapotranspiration (ET), also known as latent heat (LE) in energetic terms, has a key role in eco-hydrological processes. Direct measurements of ET, owing to the technique adopted (for instance the lysimeters), were not reliable, nor immediate. For this reason new methods developed by the scientific community suggested to estimate ET from energy budget using atmospheric data and parameters. Among these methods the FAO Penman-Monteith, which is largely diffused, evaluates the potential evapotranspiration of a generic crop as a product of a reference evapotranspiration (ET0) multiplied by a coefficient kc. Kc, called crop coefficient, should embody all the physiologic characteristics of a specific plant and should allow to pass from the reference ET0 to the potential ET of each crop. Such coefficients have been evaluated only in some regions of the planet, which may be quite different from the one in which they are applied. This means that available kc coefficients in literature, despite a correction procedure to adapt them to the local meteo-climate conditions, are yet not completely reliable (Katerji and Rana, 2006). Besides in this context the Eddy correlation technique (eddy-corr for simplicity), was developed in the last years. This method, built through a dimensional analysis application, demonstrated that the latent heat is proportional to the covariance of some measurable atmospheric variables. The paper discusses the reliability of the kc of maize, assessed by the FAO method comparing it with the eddy-corr analysis.

  3. Airborne eddy correlation gas flux measurements - Design criteria for optical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, John A.; Sachse, Glen W.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    Although several methods exist for the determination of the flux of an atmospheric species, the airborne eddy correlation method has the advantage of providing direct flux measurements that are representative of regional spatial domains. The design criteria pertinent to the construction of chemical instrumentation suitable for use in airborne eddy correlation flux measurements are discussed. A brief overview of the advantages and limitations of the current instrumentation used to obtain flux measurements for CO, CH4, O3, CO2, and water vapor are given. The intended height of the measurement within the convective boundary layer is also shown to be an important design criteria. The sensitivity, or resolution, which is required in the measurement of a scalar species to obtain an adequate species flux measurement is discussed. The relationship between the species flux resolution and the more commonly stated instrumental resolution is developed and it is shown that the standard error of the flux estimate is a complicated function of the atmospheric variability and the averaging time that is used. The use of the recently proposed intermittent sampling method to determine the species flux is examined. The application of this technique may provide an opportunity to expand the suite of trace gases for which direct flux measurements are possible.

  4. Assessment of benthic flux of dissolved organic carbon in wetland and estuarine sediments using the eddy-correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swett, M. P.; Amirbahman, A.; Boss, E.

    2009-12-01

    Wetland and estuarine sediments release significant amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) due to high levels of microbial activity, particularly sulfate reduction. Changes in climate and hydrologic conditions have a potential to alter DOC release from these systems as well. This is a concern, as high levels of DOC can lead to mobilization of toxic metals and organics in natural waters. In addition, source waters high in DOC produce undesirable disinfection byproducts in water treatment. Various in situ methods, such as peepers and sediment core centrifugation, exist to quantify vertical benthic fluxes of DOC and other dissolved species from the sediment-water interface (SWI). These techniques, however, are intrusive and involve disturbance of the sediment environment. Eddy-correlation allows for real-time, non-intrusive, in situ flux measurement of important analytes, such as O2 and DOC. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is used to obtain three-dimensional fluid velocity measurements. The eddy-correlation technique employs the mathematical separation of fluid velocity into mean velocity and fluctuating velocity components, with the latter representing turbulent eddy velocity. DOC concentrations are measured using a colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorometer, and instantaneous vertical flux is determined from the correlated data. This study assesses DOC flux at three project sites: a beaver pond in the Lower Penobscot Watershed, Maine; a mudflat in Penobscot River, Maine; and a mudflat in Great Bay, New Hampshire. Eddy flux values are compared with results obtained using peepers and centrifugation, as well as vertical profiling.

  5. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOEpatents

    Petri, Mark C.; Kupperman, David S.; Morman, James A.; Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  6. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  7. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California; with a section on estimating evapotranspiration using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, John B.; Stannard, David I.

    1997-01-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the ground-water-flow system associated with Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site of a high-level nuclear-waste repository. By using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique, measurements made between June 1983 and April 1984 to estimate evapotranspiration were found to range from 0.1 centimeter per day during winter months to about 0.3 centimeter per day during summer months; the annual average was 0.16 centimeter per day. These estimates were compared with evapotranspiration estimates calculated from six other methods.

  8. Energy budget measurements using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio techniques at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Den Hartog, G.; Neumann, H. H.; King, K. M.; Chipanshi, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    Fluxes of heat and water vapor were measured on a 20-m tower at Kinosheo Lake in the Hudson Bay lowlands using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio energy balance techniques. The study period was June 25 to July 28, 1990. Measurements were made over a peat bog consisting of a mixture of sphagnum moss and lichen hummocks and black pools. About 200 m west of the tower were several shallow ponds. The hummocks had a dry, insulating surface and were underlain by an ice layer near 50 cm depth until mid-July. At the beginning of the period the black pools were covered with water, and although the free water gradually disappeared over the study period, they remained saturated to the end of July. The depth of peat near the tower was about 3 m. Despite the ice layer under the hummocks, their daytime surface temperatures were high, near 35 C, and after the middle of July, above 40 C. Inspection of temperature, precipitation, and radiation data showed that the midsummer period of 1990 was warmer, drier, and sunnier than usual at Moosonee and so by influence at Lake Kinosheo. When all the data were combined to yield average diurnal energy balance components, the eddy correlation fluxes accounted for 90% of the available energy. Latent heat flux averaged 46% of the total available energy and the sensible heat flux averaged 34%. Daytime Bowen ratios were near 1 for the experimental period, suggesting that the bog behaved more like a dryland than a wetland. Eddy correlation measurements of sensible heat and latent heat flux were less than those measured using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique, the average ratios being 0.81 and 0.86 respectively. These differences were possibly due to the difficulty in measuring energy balance components of net radiation and ground heat flux over the mosaic surface.

  9. Effects of Eddy Viscosity on Time Correlations in Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Rubinstein, R.; Wang, Lian-Ping; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large. eddy simulation (LES) have generally been evaluated by their ability to predict single-time statistics of turbulent flows such as kinetic energy and Reynolds stresses. Recent application- of large eddy simulation to the evaluation of sound sources in turbulent flows, a problem in which time, correlations determine the frequency distribution of acoustic radiation, suggest that subgrid models should also be evaluated by their ability to predict time correlations in turbulent flows. This paper compares the two-point, two-time Eulerian velocity correlation evaluated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) with that evaluated from LES, using a spectral eddy viscosity, for isotropic homogeneous turbulence. It is found that the LES fields are too coherent, in the sense that their time correlations decay more slowly than the corresponding time. correlations in the DNS fields. This observation is confirmed by theoretical estimates of time correlations using the Taylor expansion technique. Tile reason for the slower decay is that the eddy viscosity does not include the random backscatter, which decorrelates fluid motion at large scales. An effective eddy viscosity associated with time correlations is formulated, to which the eddy viscosity associated with energy transfer is a leading order approximation.

  10. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  11. Eddy Diffusivities for Sensible Heat, Ozone and Momentum from Eddy Correlation and Gradient Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Karl Frederick

    Micrometeorological field measurements of the fluxes and the gradients of momentum, sensible heat and ozone are presented and discussed. The eddy-correlation measurement technique was used to obtain the flux data at the heights of three and eight meters. A method to accurately measure mass (ozone) gradients from surface -layer based meteorological towers was developed and used. Both flux and gradient measurements are used for the determination of eddy diffusivities. Exploratory analyses were made with the data to investigate similarity relationships between the eddy diffusivities of momentum K_{ rm m}, sensible heat K_ {rm h}, and mass K_ {rm c}, where ozone was used as the mass tracer. Eddy-diffusivity ratios were computed using dimensionless -gradient ratios classified from the data and from regression models. These ratios were classified by atmospheric stability determined at the geometric mean of the measurement heights. The assumption of similarity between the eddy diffusivities of ozone and sensible heat, K_ {rm c} = K_{ rm h}, based on scalar turbulent transfer theory, was verified for unstable atmospheric conditions. The results for eddy diffusivities of sensible heat and ozone for stable atmospheric conditions however, show that diffusivities of sensible heat are 50% greater than diffusivities of ozone. Chemical reaction of ozone, and/or the need for flux-measurement corrections, decrease the resulting values for ozone diffusivities during stable periods. Established eddy-diffusivity ratios for water vapor and momentum are valid for ozone and momentum under stable-atmospheric conditions over smooth-terrain but not under unstable conditions for flow disturbed by irregular terrain. The relationships between the eddy diffusivities of momentum and the eddy diffusivities of ozone, as well as those between momentum and sensible heat are controlled by free-convection conditions, K_{ rm m} < K_ {rm c} and K_{ rm m} < K_ {rm h}; these results are inconclusive for

  12. Ergodicity test of the eddy correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hu, Y.; Yu, Y.; Lü, S.

    2014-07-01

    The turbulent flux observation in the near-surface layer is a scientific issue which researchers in the fields of atmospheric science, ecology, geography science, etc. are commonly interested in. For eddy correlation measurement in the atmospheric surface layer, the ergodicity of turbulence is a basic assumption of the Monin-Obukhov (M-O) similarity theory, which is confined to steady turbulent flow and homogenous surface; this conflicts with turbulent flow under the conditions of complex terrain and unsteady, long observational period, which the study of modern turbulent flux tends to focus on. In this paper, two sets of data from the Nagqu Station of Plateau Climate and Environment (NaPlaCE) and the cooperative atmosphere-surface exchange study 1999 (CASE99) were used to analyze and verify the ergodicity of turbulence measured by the eddy covariance system. Through verification by observational data, the vortex of atmospheric turbulence, which is smaller than the scale of the atmospheric boundary layer (i.e., its spatial scale is less than 1000 m and temporal scale is shorter than 10 min) can effectively meet the conditions of the average ergodic theorem, and belong to a wide sense stationary random processes. Meanwhile, the vortex, of which the spatial scale is larger than the scale of the boundary layer, cannot meet the conditions of the average ergodic theorem, and thus it involves non-ergodic stationary random processes. Therefore, if the finite time average is used to substitute for the ensemble average to calculate the average random variable of the atmospheric turbulence, then the stationary random process of the vortex, of which spatial scale was less than 1000 m and thus below the scale of the boundary layer, was possibly captured. However, the non-ergodic random process of the vortex, of which the spatial scale was larger than that of the boundary layer, could not be completely captured. Consequently, when the finite time average was used to substitute

  13. PHREATOPHYTE WATER USE ESTIMATED BY EDDY-CORRELATION METHODS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, H.L.; Weeks, E.P.; Campbell, G.S.; Stannard, D.I.; Tanner, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    Water-use was estimated for three phreatophyte communities: a saltcedar community and an alkali-Sacaton grass community in New Mexico, and a greasewood rabbit-brush-saltgrass community in Colorado. These water-use estimates were calculated from eddy-correlation measurements using three different analyses, since the direct eddy-correlation measurements did not satisfy a surface energy balance. The analysis that seems to be most accurate indicated the saltcedar community used from 58 to 87 cm (23 to 34 in. ) of water each year. The other two communities used about two-thirds this quantity.

  14. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption for eddy correlation flux measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1991-01-01

    Biogenic emissions from and dry deposition to terrestrial surfaces are important processes determining the trace gas composition of the atmosphere. An instrument has been developed for flux measurements of gases such as CH4, N2O, and O3 based on the eddy correlation technique which combines trace gas fluctuation measurements with simultaneous windfield measurements. The instrument combines a tunable diode laser infrared light source with an open-path multipass absorption cell in order to provide the fast time response and short base pathlength required for the eddy correlation method. Initial field tests using the instrument to measure methane emissions from a local wetland demonstrate the capability for high precision eddy correlation flux measurements.

  15. Non-Destructive Techniques Based on Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  16. Non-destructive techniques based on eddy current testing.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  17. Ergodicity test of the eddy-covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hu, Y.; Yu, Y.; Lü, S.

    2015-09-01

    The ergodic hypothesis is a basic hypothesis typically invoked in atmospheric surface layer (ASL) experiments. The ergodic theorem of stationary random processes is introduced to analyse and verify the ergodicity of atmospheric turbulence measured using the eddy-covariance technique with two sets of field observational data. The results show that the ergodicity of atmospheric turbulence in atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is relative not only to the atmospheric stratification but also to the eddy scale of atmospheric turbulence. The eddies of atmospheric turbulence, of which the scale is smaller than the scale of the ABL (i.e. the spatial scale is less than 1000 m and temporal scale is shorter than 10 min), effectively satisfy the ergodic theorems. Under these restrictions, a finite time average can be used as a substitute for the ensemble average of atmospheric turbulence, whereas eddies that are larger than ABL scale dissatisfy the mean ergodic theorem. Consequently, when a finite time average is used to substitute for the ensemble average, the eddy-covariance technique incurs large errors due to the loss of low-frequency information associated with larger eddies. A multi-station observation is compared with a single-station observation, and then the scope that satisfies the ergodic theorem is extended from scales smaller than the ABL, approximately 1000 m to scales greater than about 2000 m. Therefore, substituting the finite time average for the ensemble average of atmospheric turbulence is more faithfully approximate the actual values. Regardless of vertical velocity or temperature, the variance of eddies at different scales follows Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) better if the ergodic theorem can be satisfied; if not it deviates from MOST. The exploration of ergodicity in atmospheric turbulence is doubtlessly helpful in understanding the issues in atmospheric turbulent observations and provides a theoretical basis for overcoming related difficulties.

  18. Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Coatings by Pulsed Eddy Current Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, Chris; Lee Changqing; Danon, Yaron

    2005-04-09

    A method that uses induced pulsed eddy currents for characterization of thick magnetron sputtered Nb coatings on steel is presented in this paper. The objectives of this work are to develop a system for rapid quantitative nondestructive inspection of coatings as well as to determine the correlation between coating properties, such as density and purity, and eddy current measured resistivity of coatings. A two-probe differential system having higher sensitivity and less noise than a one-probe system with 2-D scanning ability was developed.

  19. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train’s motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train’s vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  20. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train's motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train's vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  1. Technique for temperature compensation of eddy-current proximity probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Eddy-current proximity probes are used in turbomachinery evaluation testing and operation to measure distances, primarily vibration, deflection, or displacment of shafts, bearings and seals. Measurements of steady-state conditions made with standard eddy-current proximity probes are susceptible to error caused by temperature variations during normal operation of the component under investigation. Errors resulting from temperature effects for the specific probes used in this study were approximately 1.016 x 10 to the -3 mm/deg C over the temperature range of -252 to 100 C. This report examines temperature caused changes on the eddy-current proximity probe measurement system, establishes their origin, and discusses what may be done to minimize their effect on the output signal. In addition, recommendations are made for the installation and operation of the electronic components associated with an eddy-current proximity probe. Several techniques are described that provide active on-line error compensation for over 95 percent of the temperature effects.

  2. Correlation Between Eddy Current Signal Noise and Peened Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, S. E.; Hentscher, S. R.; Raithel, D. C.; Nakagawa, N.

    2007-03-01

    For advanced uses of eddy current (EC) NDE models in, e.g., model-assisted POD, there is a need to understand the origin of EC noise sources so that noise estimations can be made for a given set of inspection conditions, in addition to defect signal predictions. This paper focuses on the material-oriented noise sources that exhibit some universality when isolated from electrical and mechanical noises. Specifically, we report on experimental measurements that show explicit correlations between surface roughness and EC noise as seen in post-peen EC measurements of shot-peened roughness specimens. The samples are 3″-by-3″ Inconel 718 and Ti-6A1-4V blocks, pre-polished and shot-peened at Almen intensities ranging from a low of 4N to as high as 16A, created by smaller (˜350 μm) and larger (˜1 mm) diameter zirconium oxide shots. Strong correlations are observed between the Almen intensities and the measured surface roughness. The EC noise correlates equally strongly with the Almen intensities for the superalloy specimens. The correlation for the Ti-alloy samples is only apparent at higher intensities, while being weak for lower intensities, indicating the grain noise dominance for smoother surfaces.

  3. Correlation Between Eddy Current Signal Noise and Peened Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, S. E.; Hentscher, S. R.; Raithel, D. C.; Nakagawa, N.

    2007-03-21

    For advanced uses of eddy current (EC) NDE models in, e.g., model-assisted POD, there is a need to understand the origin of EC noise sources so that noise estimations can be made for a given set of inspection conditions, in addition to defect signal predictions. This paper focuses on the material-oriented noise sources that exhibit some universality when isolated from electrical and mechanical noises. Specifically, we report on experimental measurements that show explicit correlations between surface roughness and EC noise as seen in post-peen EC measurements of shot-peened roughness specimens. The samples are 3''-by-3'' Inconel 718 and Ti-6A1-4V blocks, pre-polished and shot-peened at Almen intensities ranging from a low of 4N to as high as 16A, created by smaller ({approx}350 {mu}m) and larger ({approx}1 mm) diameter zirconium oxide shots. Strong correlations are observed between the Almen intensities and the measured surface roughness. The EC noise correlates equally strongly with the Almen intensities for the superalloy specimens. The correlation for the Ti-alloy samples is only apparent at higher intensities, while being weak for lower intensities, indicating the grain noise dominance for smoother surfaces.

  4. Initial results from the Pawnee eddy correlation system for acid deposition research

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stellman, D.; Hazlett, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Pawnee grassland eddy correlation dry deposition project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with previous observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}; micrometeorological theory; and micrometeorological site characteristics.

  5. Analysis techniques for eddy current imaging of carbon fiber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Martin H.; Meyendorf, Norbert; Heuer, Henning

    2010-04-01

    Carbon fiber materials become more and more important for many applications. Unlike metal the technological parameters and certified quality control mechanisms for Raw Carbon Fiber Materials (RCF) have not yet been developed. There is no efficient and reliable testing system for in-line inspections and consecutive manual inspections of RCF and post laminated Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP). Based upon the multi-frequency Eddy Current system developed at Fraunhofer IZFP, structural and hidden defects such as missing carbon fiber bundles, lanes, suspensions, fringes, missing sewing threads and angle errors can be detected. Using an optimized sensor array and intelligent image pre-processing algorithms, the complex impedance signal can be allocated to different carbon fiber layers. This technique enables the detection of defects in depths of up to 5 layers, including the option of free scale measuring resolution and testing frequency. Appropriate parameter lists for optimal error classifications are available. The dimensions of the smallest detectable flaws are in the range of a few millimeters. Algorithms and basic Eddy Current C-Scan processing techniques for carbon fiber material testing are described in this paper.

  6. Eddy current techniques for super duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, C.; Sacramento, R.; Areiza, M. C.; Rocha, A.; Santos, R.; Rebello, J. M.; Pereira, G.

    2015-08-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a two-phase material where the microstructure consists of grains of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ). SDSS exhibit an attractive combination of properties, such as: strength, toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Nevertheless, SDSS attain these properties after a controlled solution heat treatment, leading to a similar volumetric fraction of δ and γ. Any further heat treatment, welding operation for example, can change the balance of the original phases, or may also lead to precipitation of a deleterious phase, such as sigma (σ). For these situations, the material corrosion resistance is severely impaired. In the present study, several SDSS samples with low σ phase content and non-balanced microstructure were intentionally obtained by thermally treating SDSS specimens. Electromagnetic techniques, conventional Eddy Current Testing (ECT) and Saturated Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), were employed to characterize the SDSS samples. The results showed that ECT and SLOFEC are reliable techniques to evaluate σ phase presence in SDSS and can provide an estimation of the δ content.

  7. The ARM eddy correlation system for monitoring surface fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.L.; Cook, D.R.; Wesely, M.L.

    1998-12-31

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was established by the Department of Energy as part of the US Global Climate Change Research Program to improve methods of determining radiative transfer and cloud processes in large-scale models. The ARM observational facility in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the US uses various types of instrument systems to make continuous measurements of the state of the atmosphere, cloud properties, radiative transfer, and other forms of energy transfer. Most of the instrument systems for these continuous observations come from commercial sources; many are adaptations of systems that have been used previously, mostly in short-term field campaigns. Eddy correlation systems (ECORs) are used to measure the air-surface exchange rates of heat, moisture, and momentum at eight locations in the overall area (350 km by 400 km) of the SGP site. At most locations, measurements are made at a height of about three meters above the ground over tilled agricultural land. At 14 other locations, air-surface exchange is measured above grasslands with an energy balance Bowen ratio system.

  8. Direct measurement of biosphere-atmosphere isotopic CO2 exchange using the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, T. J.; Sargent, S. D.; Baker, J. M.; Lee, X.; Tanner, B. D.; Greene, J.; Swiatek, E.; Billmark, K.

    2008-04-01

    Quantifying isotopic CO2 exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere presents a significant measurement challenge, but has the potential to provide important constraints on local, regional, and global carbon cycling. Past approaches have indirectly estimated isotopic CO2 exchange using relaxed eddy accumulation, the flask-based isoflux method, and flux-gradient techniques. Eddy covariance (EC) is an attractive method because it has the fewest theoretical assumptions and the potential to give a direct measure of isotopic CO2 flux, but it requires a highly sensitive and relatively fast response instrument. To date, no such field measurements have been reported. Here we describe the use of a closed-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and eddy covariance (EC-TDL) system for isotopic (C16O2, 13CO2, C18O16O) flux measurements. Results are presented from an intensive field experiment conducted over a soybean canopy from 18 July to 20 September 2006. This experiment represents a rigorous field test of the EC-TDL technique because the transport was dominated by relatively high frequency eddies. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange (FN) measured with the EC-TDL system showed strong correlation (r2 = 0.99) in the half-hourly fluxes with an EC open-path infrared gas analyzer (EC-IRGA) over the 60-d period. Net CO2 flux measured with the EC-IRGA and EC-TDL systems agreed to within 9%. Flux loss associated with diminished frequency response beyond 1 Hz for the EC-TDL system was approximately 8% during daytime windy (>4 m s-1) conditions. There was no significant evidence of a kinetic-type fractionation effect related to a phase shift among isotopologues due to tube attenuation. Investigation of isotopic spectral similarity in the flux ratio (δNx) for both 13CO2 and C18O16O transport showed that δNx was relatively independent of eddy scale for this ecosystem type. Flux loss, therefore, did not significantly bias δNx. There was excellent agreement between isofluxes (F

  9. Eddy correlation measurements of NO, NO{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; martin, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    The micrometeorological technique of eddy correlation was used to measure the vertical fluxes of NO, NO{sub 2}, and ozone in rural North Carolian during spring 1995 as part of the Natural emission of Oxidant precurssors-Validation of techniques and Assessment (NOVA) field experiment. Net flux densities were measured at heights 5 and 10 m above an agricultural field with short corn plants and large amount of exposed bare soil between the rows. Large upward eddy fluxes of NO{sub 2} were seen, and strong NO emissions from the soil were measured by collaborators using environmental enclosures on the soil surface. Data indicate that about 50% of the nitrogen emitted from the soil as NO was converted into NO{sub 2} at 5 m. Rest of the emitted nitrogen may remain as NO flux and be returned back to the vegetation and soil by deposition. Divergence of the NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} fluxes were detected between 5 and 10 m. This is consistent with likely net NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} destruction rates. The data will be used to help develop parameterizations of the flux of nitrogen oxides into the lower troposphere.

  10. Correlative Techniques in Microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imaging is an important component in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in agricultural commodities and products. An array of microscopes and techniques can be used illustrate the structure and microchemistry of diverse samples. Examples of the var...

  11. Isoprene Fluxes Measured By Eddy-correlation Over A Mixed Deciduous Forest In Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finco, A.; Cieslik, S.

    A measuring campaign was conducted from July to September 2001 at a mixed de- ciduous forest located at a flat site (Nonantola, 4441' N; 1107' E) in the North- ern Italian plain to determine isoprene fluxes. The measuring station, operated by the CNR-ISAO (Bologna ) and CNR-IATA (Florence) was part of the CARBOEU- ROFLUX network, whose main goal is the study of the carbon balance in European forests. The flux measuring system used the eddy-correlation technique and consisted of a Gill sonic anemometer installed at 13 m a.g.l., and a LI-COR CO2/H2O analyser. For isoprene, a Hills Fast Isoprene Sensor was used.In this forest, about 50% of the trees (oaks, poplars and willows) are isoprene emitters. The canopy is very dense and homogeneous; its average height is 8 meters a.g.l. The general daily course of isoprene concentrations consisted in an increase during morning hours, followed with a sharp maximum and a rapid decrease. Maximum val- ues were quite high (around 15 ppb) in July and August, decreasing in September. During daytime, fluxes appeared to be strongly correlated with latent heat fluxes, con- firming the hypothesis of emission through stomata. The concentration decrease ob- served in the afternoon shows exponential decay, suggesting that no emission occurs after the concentration maximum, when stomata are progressively closing. A resistance analysis confirmed the above hypothesis : the role of stomatal emission appears essential, practically excluding other pathways. A mathematical investigation of the stationarity state of the lower atmosphere dur- ing the observations was made in order to draw attention on limitations of the eddy- correlation method. During nighttime, non-stationary situations are frequent, causing apparent peaks of isoprene flux, not due to an emission from the plants. The method developed permits to eliminate these biases.

  12. Eddy current signal deconvolution technique for the improvement of steam generator tubing burst pressure predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M. C.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Kupperman, D. S.; Reifman, J.; Morman, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Eddy current techniques are extremely sensitive to the presence of axial cracks in nuclear power plant steam generator tube walls, but they are equally sensitive to the presence of dents, fretting, support structures, corrosion products, and other artifacts. Eddy current signal interpretation is further complicated by cracking geometries more complex than a single axial crack. Although there has been limited success in classifying and sizing defects through artificial neural networks, the ability to predict tubing integrity has, so far, eluded modelers. In large part, this lack of success stems from an inability to distinguish crack signals from those arising from artifacts. We present here a new signal processing technique that deconvolves raw eddy current voltage signals into separate signal contributions from different sources, which allows signals associated with a dominant crack to be identified. The signal deconvolution technique, combined with artificial neural network modeling, significantly improves the prediction of tube burst pressure from bobbin-coil eddy current measurements of steam generator tubing.

  13. Tests of a robust eddy correlation system for sensible heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, J. H.; Gay, L. W.

    1992-03-01

    Sensible heat flux estimates from a simple, one-propeller eddy correlation system (OPEC) were compared with those from a sonic anemometer eddy correlation system (SEC). In accordance with similarity theory, the performance of the OPEC system improved with increasing height of the sensor above the surface. Flux totals from the two systems at sites with adequate fetch were in excellent agreement after frequency response corrections were applied. The propeller system appears suitable for long periods of unattended measurement. The sensible heat flux measurements can be combined with net radiation and soil heat flux measurements to estimate latent heat as a residual in the surface energy balance.

  14. Remote field eddy current technique - Phantom exciter model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, D. L.; Czura, W.

    1993-03-01

    High resolution results of finite element calculations for remote field eddy current 'phantom exciter' simulations of slit defect interactions using single through wall transit are presented. These show that fine circumferential slits cause almost no field perturbations in the case of nonferromagnetic tubes but big perturbations in ferromagnetic tubes where high magnetic H fields occur in the slits. Defect-induced magnetic field perturbations must therefore be considered in addition to eddy current perturbations when ferromagnetic materials are inspected, particularly in the case of fine slits orthogonal to the magnetic field direction. Additional details seen are the funnelling of energy into slits in ferromagnetic pipes and precursor disturbances of fields approaching defects. It is suggested that these are due to the reflection of the electromagnetic waves dictated by boundary conditions at the near-side defect boundary.

  15. Parametric Studies and Optimization of Eddy Current Techniques through Computer Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, E. I.

    2007-03-21

    The paper demonstrates the use of computer models for parametric studies and optimization of surface and subsurface eddy current techniques. The study with high-frequency probe investigates the effect of eddy current frequency and probe shape on the detectability of flaws in the steel substrate. The low-frequency sliding probe study addresses the effect of conductivity between the fastener and the hole, frequency and coil separation distance on detectability of flaws in subsurface layers.

  16. Aquatic eddy correlation: quantifying the artificial flux caused by stirring-sensitive O2 sensors.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Moritz; Noss, Christian; Hancke, Kasper; Cathalot, Cecile; McGinnis, Daniel F; Lorke, Andreas; Glud, Ronnie N

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the aquatic eddy correlation (EC) technique has proven to be a powerful approach for non-invasive measurements of oxygen fluxes across the sediment water interface. Fundamental to the EC approach is the correlation of turbulent velocity and oxygen concentration fluctuations measured with high frequencies in the same sampling volume. Oxygen concentrations are commonly measured with fast responding electrochemical microsensors. However, due to their own oxygen consumption, electrochemical microsensors are sensitive to changes of the diffusive boundary layer surrounding the probe and thus to changes in the ambient flow velocity. The so-called stirring sensitivity of microsensors constitutes an inherent correlation of flow velocity and oxygen sensing and thus an artificial flux which can confound the benthic flux determination. To assess the artificial flux we measured the correlation between the turbulent flow velocity and the signal of oxygen microsensors in a sealed annular flume without any oxygen sinks and sources. Experiments revealed significant correlations, even for sensors designed to have low stirring sensitivities of ~0.7%. The artificial fluxes depended on ambient flow conditions and, counter intuitively, increased at higher velocities because of the nonlinear contribution of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The measured artificial fluxes ranged from 2-70 mmol m(-2) d(-1) for weak and very strong turbulent flow, respectively. Further, the stirring sensitivity depended on the sensor orientation towards the flow. For a sensor orientation typically used in field studies, the artificial flux could be predicted using a simplified mathematical model. Optical microsensors (optodes) that should not exhibit a stirring sensitivity were tested in parallel and did not show any significant correlation between O2 signals and turbulent flow. In conclusion, EC data obtained with electrochemical sensors can be affected by artificial flux and we

  17. Aquatic Eddy Correlation: Quantifying the Artificial Flux Caused by Stirring-Sensitive O2 Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Holtappels, Moritz; Noss, Christian; Hancke, Kasper; Cathalot, Cecile; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Lorke, Andreas; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the aquatic eddy correlation (EC) technique has proven to be a powerful approach for non-invasive measurements of oxygen fluxes across the sediment water interface. Fundamental to the EC approach is the correlation of turbulent velocity and oxygen concentration fluctuations measured with high frequencies in the same sampling volume. Oxygen concentrations are commonly measured with fast responding electrochemical microsensors. However, due to their own oxygen consumption, electrochemical microsensors are sensitive to changes of the diffusive boundary layer surrounding the probe and thus to changes in the ambient flow velocity. The so-called stirring sensitivity of microsensors constitutes an inherent correlation of flow velocity and oxygen sensing and thus an artificial flux which can confound the benthic flux determination. To assess the artificial flux we measured the correlation between the turbulent flow velocity and the signal of oxygen microsensors in a sealed annular flume without any oxygen sinks and sources. Experiments revealed significant correlations, even for sensors designed to have low stirring sensitivities of ~0.7%. The artificial fluxes depended on ambient flow conditions and, counter intuitively, increased at higher velocities because of the nonlinear contribution of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The measured artificial fluxes ranged from 2 - 70 mmol m-2 d-1 for weak and very strong turbulent flow, respectively. Further, the stirring sensitivity depended on the sensor orientation towards the flow. For a sensor orientation typically used in field studies, the artificial flux could be predicted using a simplified mathematical model. Optical microsensors (optodes) that should not exhibit a stirring sensitivity were tested in parallel and did not show any significant correlation between O2 signals and turbulent flow. In conclusion, EC data obtained with electrochemical sensors can be affected by artificial flux and we recommend

  18. Initial results from the Pawnee Eddy Correlation system for dry acid-deposition research. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stedman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Pawnee Grassland Eddy Correlation Dry Deposition Project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with: previously observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO/sub 2/ and NOx; micrometeorological theory; micrometeorological site characteristics.

  19. The eddy-current technique for nondestructive evaluation of generator retaining rings: Feasibility study: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Elmo, P.M.; Nottingham, L.D.

    1988-05-01

    An evaluation of the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive inspection techniques to detect intergranular stress corrosion in generator rotor retaining rings was conducted by the EPRI NDE Center. Experiments were conducted using a bend-bar containing representative stress corrosion damage, a calibration block containing electrical discharge machined (EDM) notches, and four retired retaining rings containing EDM notches and stress corrosion damage. An eddy current transducer transport was designed and fabricated to interface with an existing computer-controlled, two-axis positioner and digital eddy current data acquisition system. Test results of experiments performed with this equipment on the retaining ring test-bed provided experimental validation of the eddy current method's feasibility as a retaining ring inspection method. Details are given of the system and its performance under laboratory and simulated service-inspection conditions. 9 refs., 47 figs.

  20. Using the Cross-Correlation Function to Evaluate the Quality of Eddy-Covariance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yongfeng; Shang, Xiaodong; Chen, Guiying; Gao, Zhiqiu; Bi, Xueyan

    2015-11-01

    A cross-correlation test is proposed for evaluating the quality of 30-min eddy-covariance data. Cross-correlation as a function of time lag is computed for vertical velocity paired with temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide concentration. High quality data have a dominant peak at zero time lag and approach zero within a time lag of 20 s. Poor quality data have erratic cross-correlation functions, which indicates that the eddy flux may no longer represent the energy and mass exchange between the atmospheric surface layer and the canopy, and such data should be rejected in post-data analyses. Eddy-covariance data over grassland in July 2004 are used to evaluate the proposed test. The results show that 17, 29, and 36 % of the available data should be rejected because of poor quality measurements of sensible heat, latent heat, and CO2 fluxes, respectively. The rejected data mainly occurred on calm nights and day/night transitions when the atmospheric surface layer became stable or neutrally stratified. We found no friction velocity (u_*) threshold below which all data should be rejected, a test that many other studies have implemented for rejecting questionable data. We instead found that some data with low u_* were reliable, whereas other data with higher u_* were not. The poor quality measurements collected under less than ideal conditions were replaced by using the mean diurnal variation gap-filling method. The correction for poor quality data shifted the daily average CO2 flux by +0.34 g C m^{-2} day^{-1}. After applying the quality-control test, the eddy CO2 fluxes did not display a clear dependence on u_*. The results suggest that the cross-correlation test is a potentially valuable step in evaluating the quality of eddy-covariance data.

  1. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorczak, N.; Manz, P.; Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R.; Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C.

    2012-12-15

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  2. Temperature and humidity flux-variance relations determined by one-dimensional eddy correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Harold L.

    1990-10-01

    It may be possible to estimate surface fluxes of scalar quantities from measurement of their variance and mean wind speed. The flux-variance relation for temperature and humidity was investigated over prairie and desert-shrub plant communities. Fluxes were measured by one-dimensional eddy correlation, humidity by fast-response wet-bulb psychrometers and Krypton open-path hygrometers, temperature by fine-wire thermocouples, and mean windspeed by a cup anemometer. The quality of the flux-variance relation proved to be good enough for application to flux measurement. Regressions of flux estimated by the variance technique versus measured flux usually had r 2 values greater than 0.97 for sensible heat flux and greater than 0.88 for water vapor flux. More uniform surfaces tended to yield the same flux-variance relations except when fluxes were small. This exception supported the hypothesis that sparse sources of flux may increase variance downwind. Nonuniform surfaces yielded flux-variance relations that were less predictable, although reasonably accurate once determined. The flux-variance relation for humidity was quite variable over dry surfaces with senescent vegetation.

  3. Dry Deposition of Fine Aerosol Nitrogen to an Agricultural Field Measured by Eddy-Correlation Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.; Allen, J. O.

    2005-12-01

    In urban areas high emissions of reactive nitrogen species cause an increase in atmospheric aerosol nitrogen formation and deposition. This nitrogen is eventually removed from the atmosphere by wet or dry deposition, with dry deposition often accounting for more than half of the total deposition of particulate nitrate. Total N deposition is not adequately characterized, in part because dry deposition is difficult to measure or model. For example measured fine particle deposition to a forest canopy differs from predicted values by an order of magnitude. The eddy-correlation technique is a micrometeorological method used to directly measure fluxes from measurements made above the surface. Eddy-correlation mass spectrometry (ECMS) has been developed to directly measure aerosol particle deposition velocities from fast response aerosol concentration and wind velocity measurements. Using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), the size and composition of ambient aerosols were measured at 10~Hz. The AMS signal is proportional to non-refractory PM1.0 mass. Aerosol deposition fluxes for a given averaging period are then calculated directly as the covariance of the vertical wind velocity with the AMS signal (F = -\\overline{w'S'}). A field study was conducted to measure aerosol nitrogen dry deposition to an agricultural field immediately downwind of the Phoenix metropolitan area using eddy-correlation mass spectrometry. The study was supplemented with aerosol composition measurements including bulk deposition collectors and filter bank samplers. Here we compare the results of the flux estimates from bulk collection with inferential measurements (filter samples and modeled deposition velocities) and direct micrometeorological measurements (ECMS) in order to improve nitrogen deposition estimates.

  4. Dry Deposition of Fine Aerosol Nitrogen to an Agricultural Field Measured by Eddy-Correlation Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.; Allen, J. O.; Smith, K. A.; Hope, D.

    2004-12-01

    In urban areas high emissions of reactive nitrogen species cause an increase in atmospheric aerosol nitrogen formation and deposition. This nitrogen is eventually removed from the atmosphere by wet or dry deposition, with dry deposition often accounting for more than half of the total deposition of particulate nitrate (Lovett, 1994). Total N deposition is not adequately characterized, in part because dry deposition is difficult to measure or model. For example measured fine particle deposition to a forest canopy differs from predicted values by an order of magnitude (Gallagher et al., 1997). The eddy-correlation technique is a micrometeorological method used to directly measure fluxes from measurements made above the surface (Wesely and Hicks, 2000). Eddy-correlation mass spectrometry (ECMS) has been developed to directly measure aerosol particle deposition velocities from fast response aerosol concentration and wind velocity measurements. Using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) (Jayne et al., 2000), the size and composition of ambient aerosols is measured at a high frequency. The AMS signal is proportional to non-refractory PM1.0 mass. Aerosol deposition fluxes for a given averaging period are then calculated directly as the covariance of the vertical wind velocity with the AMS signal (F = -/line{w'S'}). A field study was conducted to measure aerosol nitrogen dry deposition to an agricultural field immediately downwind of the Phoenix metropolitan area using eddy-correlation mass spectrometry. The study was supplemented with aerosol composition measurements including bulk deposition collectors and filter bank samplers. Bulk deposition samples and 24-hour filter samples were analyzed for ammonia and nitrogen. Here we compare the results of the flux estimates from bulk collection with inferential measurements (filter samples and modeled deposition velocities) and direct micrometeorological measurements (ECMS) in order to improve N deposition estimates.

  5. A Fast, Portable, Fiber Optic Spectrofluorometer for Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement in the Aquatic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, I. H.; Senft-Grupp, S.; Hemond, H.

    2014-12-01

    The measurement of chemical fluxes between natural waters and their benthic sediments by most existing methods, such as benthic chambers and sediment core incubations, is slow, cumbersome, and often inaccurate. One promising new method for determining benthic fluxes is eddy correlation (EC), a minimally invasive, in situ technique based on high-speed velocity and concentration measurements. Widespread application of EC to a large range of chemicals of interest is currently limited, however, by the availability of rapid, high-resolution chemical sensors capable of precisely measuring concentrations at a point location and at sufficient speed (several Hz). A proof of concept spectrofluorometry instrument has been created that is capable of high-frequency concentration measurements of naturally fluorescent substances. Designed with the EC application in mind, the system utilizes optical fibers to transmit excitation and emission light, enabling in situ measurements at high spatial resolution. Emitted fluorescence light is passed through a tunable monochromator before reaching a photomultiplier tube; photons are quantified by a custom miniaturized, low-power photon counting circuit board. Preliminary results indicate that individual measurements made at 100 Hz of a 10 ppm humic acid solution were precise within 10%, thus yielding a precision of the order of +/- 1% in a second. Used in an EC system, this instrument will enable flux measurements of substances such as naturally occurring fluorescent dissolved organic material (FDOM). Measurement of fluxes of FDOM is significant in its own right, and also will allow the indirect measurement of the numerous other chemical fluxes that are associated with FDOM by using tracer techniques. The use of a tunable monochromator not only allows flexibility in detection wavelength, but also enables full wavelength scans of the emission spectrum, making the spectrofluorometer a dual-function device capable of both characterizing the

  6. The in-service inspection of coated steel welds using Eddy-Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. J.; Zaid, M.; Picton, P. D.; Mabbutt, S. J.

    2012-05-01

    Traditionally surface crack detection in coated Ferritic Steel Welds with Eddy-Current Techniques has been difficult due to the change in material properties in the Heat Affected Zone. These typically produce signals larger than crack signals. Sophisticated probe design and construction, combined with modern electronic equipment, have largely overcome the traditional problems and now enable the advantages of Eddy-Current Techniques to be applied to In-Service Inspection of Coated Ferritic Steel Structures in the as-we!ded conditions. Specifically, the advantage of the technique is that under quantifiable conditions an inspection may now be carried out through corrosion protection systems. It is the intention of this paper to review the current information available, establish the limiting parameters of the technique and detail the practical experiments conducted to determine the extent of the limiting parameters. The results of these experiments are detailed. Having determined the limiting factors, outline testing procedures have been established together with relative sensitivity settings.

  7. Pulsed remote eddy current field array technique for nondestructive inspection of ferromagnetic tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Li, Xuechao

    2010-03-01

    One pick-up coil with a large inner diameter is usually used in pulsed remote field eddy current technique, which decreases the identification ability to defect. With the purpose of overcoming this problem, array pulsed remote field eddy current technique is proposed to enhance the precision in quantification of defect. The finite element method is used to optimise the structure of probe and analyse of the influence effect of response signal with the variation of the defect depths. The results of experimental work confirm that the array pulsed remote field technique has the advantages of high precision and sensitivity, which can be used as an effective method for quantification of defect in tube.

  8. Application of Resonant Frequency Eddy Current Technique on a Shot-Peened Nickel-Based Engine-Grade Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Ray T.; Sathish, Shamachary; Boehnlein, Thomas R.; Blodgett, Mark P.

    2007-03-21

    The shot peening conditions of a nickel-based engine-grade material were evaluated using a novel eddy current measurement technique. With this technique, the shift of a resonant frequency was found to be dependent on variables which also affect conventional eddy current testing. The cable effect is another important variable, which is often neglected in a routine eddy current testing, is also discussed. Experimental results showed that at high frequencies, the shot peening conditions were easily distinguishable using this frequency shift technique.

  9. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the relaxed eddy accumulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensen, A.; Nemitz, E.; Flynn, M. J.; Blatter, A.; Jones, S. K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hensen, B.; Pryor, S.; Jensen, B.; Otjes, R. P.; Cobussen, J.; Loubet, B.; Erisman, J. W.; Gallagher, M. W.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.

    2008-10-01

    The exchange of NH3 between grassland and the atmosphere was determined using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements. The use of REA is of special interest for NH3, since the determination of fluxes at one height permits multiple systems to be deployed to quantify vertical flux divergence (either due to effects of chemical production or advection). During the Braunschweig integrated experiment four different continuous-sampling REA systems were operated during a period of about 10 days and were compared against a reference provided by independent application of the Aerodynamic Gradient Method (AGM). The experiment covered episodes before, after cutting and fertilising and provided a wide range of fluxes -60 3600 ng NH3 m-2 s-1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3 surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that auto-referencing periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects, further improvements in sampling precision are needed to allow measurement of flux divergence. Wet chemical techniques will be developed further since they use the sticky and reactive properties of NH3 that impedes development of cheaper optical systems.

  10. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensen, A.; Nemitz, E.; Flynn, M. J.; Blatter, A.; Jones, S. K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hensen, B.; Pryor, S. C.; Jensen, B.; Otjes, R. P.; Cobussen, J.; Loubet, B.; Erisman, J. W.; Gallagher, M. W.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    The exchange of Ammonia (NH3) between grassland and the atmosphere was determined using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements. The use of REA is of special interest for NH3, since the determination of fluxes at one height permits multiple systems to be deployed to quantify vertical flux divergence (either due to effects of chemical production or advection). During the Braunschweig integrated experiment four different continuous-sampling REA systems were operated during a period of about 10 days and were compared against a reference provided by independent application of the Aerodynamic Gradient Method (AGM). The experiment covered episodes before and after both cutting and fertilizing and provided a wide range of fluxes -60-3600 ng NH3 m-2 s-1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3 surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that reference sampling periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects, significant improvements in sampling precision are essential to allow robust determination of flux divergence in future studies. Wet chemical techniques will be developed further since they use the adsorptive and reactive properties of NH3 that impedes development of cheaper optical systems.

  11. Studies of the eddy structure in the lower ionosphere by the API technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev, Gennadii I.; Lapin, Victor G.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new application of the API technique to study of turbulent phenomena in the lower ionosphere. The main objective of these studies is experimental diagnostics of natural ordered eddy structures at the altitudes of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, such as those that occur when internal gravity waves propagate in stratified flows in the atmospheric boundary layer. To this end, we considered the impact of eddy motions in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere on the relaxation time and the frequency of the signal scattered by periodic irregularities. Theoretical study of eddy structures base on experiments using SURA heating facility (56,14 N; 44,1 W). It is known, artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) are formed in the field of the powerful standing wave as a result of the interference of the incident wave and reflected from the ionosphere (Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - 2002. Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. Copernicus GmbH. 160 p.). The relaxation or decay of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the amplitude and decay time of the API scattered signal in comparison with the diffusion time. We found a relation between the eddy period and the characteristic decay time of scattered signal, for which the synchronism of the waves scattered by a periodic structure is broken. Besides, it is shown, when the eddy structure moves by a horizontal wind exists at these heights, the frequency of the radio wave scattered by API structure will periodically increase and decrease compared with the frequency of the radiated diagnostic (probing) radio-wave. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation under grant No 14-12-00556.

  12. Application of Eddy Current Techniques for Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John

    2005-01-01

    The development and application of advanced nondestructive evaluation techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) components of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) was identified as a crucial step toward returning the shuttle fleet to service. In order to help meet this requirement, eddy current techniques have been developed for application to RCC components. Eddy current technology has been found to be particularly useful for measuring the protective coating thickness over the reinforced carbon-carbon and for the identification of near surface cracking and voids in the RCC matrix. Testing has been performed on as manufactured and flown RCC components with both actual and fabricated defects representing impact and oxidation damage. Encouraging initial results have led to the development of two separate eddy current systems for in-situ RCC inspections in the orbiter processing facility. Each of these systems has undergone blind validation testing on a full scale leading edge panel, and recently transitioned to Kennedy Space Center to be applied as a part of a comprehensive RCC inspection strategy to be performed in the orbiter processing facility after each shuttle flight.

  13. Pulsed remote field eddy current technique applied to non-magnetic flat conductive plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhanbin

    2013-12-01

    Non-magnetic metal plates are widely used in aviation and industrial applications. The detection of cracks in thick plate structures, such as multilayered structures of aircraft fuselage, has been challenging in nondestructive evaluation societies. The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique has shown advantages of deep penetration and high sensitivity to deeply buried anomalies. However, the RFEC technique is mainly used to evaluate ferromagnetic tubes. There are many problems that should be fixed before the expansion and application of this technique for the inspection of non-magnetic conductive plates. In this article, the pulsed remote field eddy current (PRFEC) technique for the detection of defects in non-magnetic conducting plates was investigated. First, the principle of the PRFEC technique was analysed, followed by the analysis of the differences between the detection of defects in ferromagnetic and non-magnetic plain structures. Three different models of the PRFEC probe were simulated using ANSYS. The location of the transition zone, defect detection sensitivity and the ability to detect defects in thick plates using three probes were analysed and compared. The simulation results showed that the probe with a ferrite core had the highest detecting ability. The conclusions derived from the simulation study were also validated by conducting experiments.

  14. Impact of water use efficiency on eddy covariance flux partitioning using correlation structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ray; Skaggs, Todd; Alfieri, Joseph; Kustas, William; Wang, Dong; Ayars, James

    2016-04-01

    Partitioned land surfaces fluxes (e.g. evaporation, transpiration, photosynthesis, and ecosystem respiration) are needed as input, calibration, and validation data for numerous hydrological and land surface models. However, one of the most commonly used techniques for measuring land surface fluxes, Eddy Covariance (EC), can directly measure net, combined water and carbon fluxes (evapotranspiration and net ecosystem exchange/productivity). Analysis of the correlation structure of high frequency EC time series (hereafter flux partitioning or FP) has been proposed to directly partition net EC fluxes into their constituent components using leaf-level water use efficiency (WUE) data to separate stomatal and non-stomatal transport processes. FP has significant logistical and spatial representativeness advantages over other partitioning approaches (e.g. isotopic fluxes, sap flow, microlysimeters), but the performance of the FP algorithm is reliant on the accuracy of the intercellular CO2 (ci) concentration used to parameterize WUE for each flux averaging interval. In this study, we tested several parameterizations for ci as a function of atmospheric CO2 (ca), including (1) a constant ci/ca ratio for C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathway plants, (2) species-specific ci/ca-Vapor Pressure Deficit (VPD) relationships (quadratic and linear), and (3) generalized C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathway ci/ca-VPD relationships. We tested these ci parameterizations at three agricultural EC towers from 2011-present in C4 and C3 crops (sugarcane - Saccharum officinarum L. and peach - Prunus persica), and validated again sap-flow sensors installed at the peach site. The peach results show that the species-specific parameterizations driven FP algorithm came to convergence significantly more frequently (~20% more frequently) than the constant ci/ca ratio or generic C3-VPD relationship. The FP algorithm parameterizations with a generic VPD relationship also had slightly higher transpiration (5 Wm-2

  15. On the Computation of Space-Time Correlations by Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guo-Wei; Wang, Meng; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical comparisons in decaying isotropic turbulence suggest that there exist discrepancies in time correlations evaluated by DNS and LES using eddy-viscosity-type SGS models. This is consistent with the previous observations in forced isotropic turbulence. Therefore, forcing is not the main cause of the discrepancies. Comparisons among different SGS models in the LES also indicate that the model choice affects the time correlations in the LES. The multi-scale LES method using the dynamic Smagorinsky model on the small scale equation is the most accurate of the all models, the classic Smagorinsky model is the least accurate and the dynamic Smagorinsky model and spectral eddy viscosity model give intermediate results with small differences. The generalized sweeping hypothesis implies that time correlations in decaying isotropic turbulence are mainly determined by the instantaneous energy spectra and sweeping velocities. The analysis based on the sweeping hypothesis explains the discrepancies in our numerical simulations: the LES overpredicts the decorrelation time scales because the sweeping velocities are smaller than the DNS values, and underpredicts the magnitudes of time correlations because the energy spectrum levels are lower than the DNS ones. Since the sweeping velocity is determined by the energy spectra, one concludes that an accurate prediction of the instantaneous energy spectra guarantees the accuracy of time correlations. An analytical expression of sound power spectra based on Lighthill's theory and the quasi-normal closure assumption suggests that the sound power spectra are sensitive to errors in time correlations. Small errors in time correlations can cause significant errors in the sound power spectra, which exhibit a sizable drop at moderate to high frequencies accompanied by a shift of the peaks to lower frequencies. Based on the above analysis, two possible ways to improve the acoustic power spectrum predictions can be considered. The first

  16. A comparison of short-term measurements of lake evaporation using eddy correlation and energy budget methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stannard, D.I.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    1991-01-01

    Concurrent short-term measurements of evaporation from a shallow lake, using eddy correlation and energy budget methods, indicate that sensible and latent heat flux between lake and atmosphere, and energy storage in the lake, may vary considerably across the lake. Measuring net radiation with a net radiometer on the lake appeared to be more accurate than measuring incoming radiation nearby and modeling outgoing radiation. Short-term agreement between the two evaporation measurements was obtained by using an energy storage term that was weighted to account for the area-of-influence of the eddy correlation sensors. Relatively short bursts of evaporation were indicated by the eddy correlation sensors shortly after midnight on two of three occasions. ?? 1991.

  17. Direct Measurement of Biosphere-Atmosphere Isotopic CO2 Exchange using the Eddy Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, T.; Sargent, S.; Tanner, B.; Greene, J.; Swiatek, E.; Baker, J.; Lee, X.

    2006-12-01

    Quantifying isotopic CO2 exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere presents a significant measurement challenge, but has the potential to provide important constraints on local, regional, and global carbon cycling. Such measurements are rare because of the difficulties quantifying CO2 isotope ratios or individual isotopomer mixing ratios at the precision and frequency required for continuous scalar flux estimation. This limitation has slowed the understanding of key isotope discrimination mechanisms and carbon cycle processes. Past approaches have indirectly estimated isotopic CO2 exchange using relaxed eddy accumulation, the flask-based isoflux method, and flux-gradient techniques. Eddy covariance is an attractive method because it has the fewest theoretical assumptions and the potential to give a direct measurement of isotopic CO2 exchange, but requires a highly sensitive and relatively fast-response instrument. To date, no such field measurements have been reported. Here, we describe the use of a closed- path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system (Trace Gas Analyzer, TGA100A, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and a sampling manifold optimized for eddy covariance isotopic (C16O2, 13CO2, C18O16O) flux measurements. The sampling system was designed to preserve frequency response, to avoid excessive consumption of expensive calibration gases and, more importantly, to avoid bias between the air sample and three calibration gas measurements. Results are presented from an intensive field experiment conducted at the University of Minnesota from July 18 to September 18, 2006. The field experiment was designed to evaluate: 1) the feasibility of making continuous isotopic flux measurement over extended periods of time; 2) differences in isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem CO2 exchange using the Keeling plot, flux-gradient, and eddy covariance methods, and 3) the potential for isotopic flux partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange.

  18. Development of "active correlation" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    With reaching to extremely high intensities of heavy-ion beams new requirements for the detection system of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) will definitely be set. One of the challenges is how to apply the "active correlations" method to suppress beam associated background products without significant losses in the whole long-term experiment efficiency value. Different scenarios and equations to develop the method according this requirement are under consideration in the present paper. The execution time to estimate the dead time parameter associated with the optimal choice of the life-time parameter is presented.

  19. Development of Airborne Eddy-Correlation Flux Measurement Capabilities for Reactive Oxides of Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurement Group (TTGAMG) endeavors to continue to push the evolution of the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE) into a sensor capable of making airborne eddy correlation measurements of nitrogen oxides. It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as well as its participation in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and the deliverables can not be achieved as proposed in the original funding of this grant. Most of these changes have been driven by the passing away of John Bradshaw, the original principal investigator.

  20. Investigation of correlation classification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A two-step classification algorithm for processing multispectral scanner data was developed and tested. The first step is a single pass clustering algorithm that assigns each pixel, based on its spectral signature, to a particular cluster. The output of that step is a cluster tape in which a single integer is associated with each pixel. The cluster tape is used as the input to the second step, where ground truth information is used to classify each cluster using an iterative method of potentials. Once the clusters have been assigned to classes the cluster tape is read pixel-by-pixel and an output tape is produced in which each pixel is assigned to its proper class. In addition to the digital classification programs, a method of using correlation clustering to process multispectral scanner data in real time by means of an interactive color video display is also described.

  1. Application of an eddy correlation system for the estimation of oxygen benthic fluxes in coastal permeable sediments impacted by submarine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donis, D.; Janssen, F.; Böttcher, M.; McGinnis, D.; Holtappels, M.; Wenzhöfer, F.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of solute exchange across the sediment-water interface are crucial for marine environment monitoring. This interface has fundamental filter functions for the mass exchange between the seafloor and the water column. Being a non-invasive technique, the eddy correlation method, is probably the most accurate measurement for benthic fluxes. It does not interfere with local hydrodynamics and integrates over large areas, showing considerable advantages compared to traditional methods, i.e., microprofiles and benthic chambers. One of the most important exchange processes across the sediment-water interface is flux of oxygen, which is a predominant control factor for the biogeochemical activity in the sediment, carbon processing and the composition of benthic communities. The eddy correlation method performs simultaneous recordings of vertical velocities and oxygen concentrations at a specific distance to the seafloor and is becoming a standard method for resolving dissolved oxygen fluxes in aquatic systems. However, data treatment and interpretation, especially in shallow environments, is still challenging. One major concern in eddy correlation studies of coastal environments is how to consider surface wave motions that can dominate the turbulence range and that may bias flux calculations. A critical part of the data treatment thus is the removal of wave biases from the vertical velocity component, by separating the wave frequency oscillations (due to a tilted or miss-aligned sensor) from those containing meaningful flux contributions. Here we present in situ benthic oxygen exchange rates as determined by an eddy correlation system (ECS) and simultaneously deployed stirred benthic chambers. The study was carried out in a coastal ecosystem of the southern Baltic Sea that was impacted by low salinity groundwater discharge (Hel peninsula, Poland). Oxygen fluxes determined with ECS compared well with results from benthic chambers. Flux data and seepage rates are

  2. Development of airborne eddy-correlation flux measurement capabilities for reactive oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John (Principal Investigator); Zheng, Xiaonan; Sandholm, Scott T.

    1996-01-01

    This research is aimed at producing a fundamental new research tool for characterizing the source strength of the most important compound controlling the hemispheric and global scale distribution of tropospheric ozone. Specifically, this effort seeks to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of a new general purpose laser-induced fluorescence based spectrometer for making airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen compounds. The new all solid-state laser technology being used in this advanced sensor will produce a forerunner of the type of sensor technology that should eventually result in highly compact operational systems. The proof-of-concept sensor being developed will have over two orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity than present-day instruments. In addition, this sensor will offer the possibility of eventual extension to airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and possibly other compounds, such as ammonia (NH3), peroxyradicals (HO2), nitrateradicals (NO3) and several iodine compounds (e.g., I and IO). Demonstration of the new sensor's ability to measure NO fluxes will occur through a series of laboratory and field tests. This proof-of-concept demonstration will show that not only can airborne fluxes of important ultra-trace compounds be made at the few parts-per-trillion level, but that the high accuracy/precision measurements currently needed for predictive models can also. These measurement capabilities will greatly enhance our current ability to quantify the fluxes of reactive nitrogen into the troposphere and significantly impact upon the accuracy of predictive capabilities to model O3's distribution within the remote troposphere. This development effort also offers a timely approach for producing the reactive nitrogen flux measurement capabilities that will be needed by future research programs such as NASA's planned 1999 Amazon Biogeochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry

  3. Flux of organic compounds from grass measured by relaxed eddy accumulation technique.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Marcus; Ek-Olausson, Birgitta; Ljungström, Evert; Langer, Sarka

    2003-12-01

    Fluxes of some Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from grass were measured at a golf course in western Sweden, using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) technique. The sampling was done by collecting VOC onto adsorbent tubes and the analysis was performed by thermal desorption followed by GC/MS. High emissions were observed after cutting. Transient fluxes of (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate (0.51 microg m(-2) s(-1)), (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol (0.14 microg m(-2) s(-1)) and (Z)-3-hexenal (0.40 microg m(-2) s(-1)) were measured, even at low temperatures. The REA technique requires a relatively large fetch area that is sometimes not available. Therefore, a procedure for correcting measured fluxes from a limited fetch is suggested. PMID:14710940

  4. Remote field eddy current technique applied to the inspection of nonmagnetic steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Young-Kil; Chung, Tae-Eon; Lord, William

    2001-04-01

    As steam generator (SG) tubes have aged, new and subtle degradations have appeared. Most of them start growing from outside the tubes. Since outer diameter defects might not be detected by conventional eddy current testing due to skin effect phenomena, this paper studies the feasibility of using the remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique, which has shown equal sensitivity to inner diameter (ID) and outer diameter (OD) defects in ferromagnetic pipe inspection. Finite element modeling studies show that the operating frequency needs to be increased up to a few hundred kHz in order for RFEC effects to occur in the nonmagnetic SG tube. The proper distance between exciter and sensor coils is also found to be 1.5 OD, which is half of the distance used in ferromagnetic pipe inspection. The resulting defect signals show equal sensitivity to ID and OD defects. These results demonstrate superior capability of the proposed RFEC probe compared to the differential ECT probe in detecting OD defects.

  5. Eddy Correlation Measurements of the Dry Deposition of Particles in Wintertime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, B.; Fairall, C. W.; Thomson, D. W.

    1988-05-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of the vertical fluxes of particles, momentum, heat and water vapor, were conducted over a partially snow covered field in central Pennsylvania during December 1985. The PMS ASASP-300 and CSASP-100-HV optical counters were used as sensors to measure particle-number fluxes. Overall, average dry deposition velocities for 28 half-hour runs were found to be 0.034 ± 0.014 and 0.021 ± 0.005 cm s1 for particles in two size ranges, 0.15-30 and 0.5-1.0 m, respectively. The average deposition velocity was close to results from prior wind-tunnel and theoretical investigations. These results were also comparable with those reported by other authors over grass. Relatively large sampling rates reduced the effects of counting noise on deposition measurements of 0.5-;1.0 m particles. Small correlation coefficients between vertical velocity and the particle concentration were found even after corrections for the effects of counting noise. The normalized average surface deposition velocity vds/u( for particles in diameter of 0.15-0.30 and 0.5-1.0 m appeared to be 0.006 and 0.002, respectively, in nearly neutral and stable conditions.

  6. [Research progress on urban carbon fluxes based on eddy covariance technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Fu, Yu-Ling; Yang, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Land use change and fossil fuel consumption due to urbanization have made significant effect on global carbon cycle and climate change. Accurate estimating and understanding of the carbon budget and its characteristics are the premises for studying carbon cycle and its driving mechanisms in urban system. Based on the theory of eddy covariance (EC) technique, the characteristics atmospheric boundary layer and carbon cycle in urban area, this study systematically reviewed the principles of CO2 flux monitoring in urban system with EC technique, and then summarized the problems faced in urban CO2 flux monitoring and the method for data processing and further assessment. The main research processes on urban carbon fluxes with EC technique were also illustrated. The results showed that the urban surface was mostly acting as net carbon source. The CO2 exchange between urban surface and atmosphere showed obvious diurnal, weekly and seasonal variation resulted from the vehicle exhaust, domestic heating and vegetation respiration. However, there still exist great uncertainties in urban flux measurement and its explanation due to high spatial heterogeneity and complex distributions of carbon source/sink in urban environments. In the end, we suggested that further researches on EC technique and data assessment in complex urban area should be strengthened. It was also requisite to develop models of urban carbon cycle on the basis of the system principle, to investigate the influencing mechanism and variability of urban cycle at regional scale with spatial analysis technique. PMID:24830264

  7. Very Large Eddy Simulation Technique for Noise Prediction and Control in Turbomachinery and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir V.

    2003-01-01

    The summer fellowship research project focused on further developing an advanced computational technique based on Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES) for analysis and control of major sources of noise in turbomachinery and propulsion systems, including jet noise and fan noise. Major part of the work during the 10-week tenure dealt with implementing a low-order, implicit A-stable time-stepping scheme in the existing explicit VLES code of Dr. Ray Hixon. The preliminary plan of the work also included application of a new time marching formulation to the problem of viscous gust-airfoil interaction. Other research items selected for implementation (possibly in the future) included investigating a set of new subgrid turbulent models for the code, and code application to a number of test cases, including a supersonic jet and swirling flow downstream of a rotor stage.

  8. Eddy current technique applied to the nondestructive evaluation of turbine blade wall thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bihan, Yann; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Placko, Dominique

    2000-05-01

    The high pressure turbine blades of jet engines show internal channels designed for air cooling. These recesses define the internal walls (partitions) and external walls of the blade. The external wall thickness is a critical parameter which has to be systematically checked in order to ensure the blade strength. The thickness evaluation is usually lead by ultrasonic technique or by X-ray tomography. Nevertheless, both techniques present some drawbacks related to measurement speed and automation capability. These drawbacks are bypassed by the eddy current (EC) technique, well known for its robustness and reliability. However, the wall thickness evaluation is made difficult because of the complexity of the blade geometry. In particular, some disturbances appear in the thickness evaluation because of the partitions, which exclude the use of classical EC probes such as cup-core probe. In this paper, we show the main advantages of probes creating an uniformly oriented magnetic field in order to reduce the partition disturbances. Furthermore, we propose a measurement process allowing to separate the wall thickness parameter from the EC signals. Finally, we present some experimental results validating the proposed technique.

  9. Eddy-correlation measurements of fluxes of CO 2 and H 2O above a spruce stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrom, A.; Schütz, C.; Tworek, T.; Morgenstern, K.; Oltchev, A.; Falk, M.; Constantin, J.; Gravenhorst, G.

    1996-12-01

    Atmospheric fluxes of CO 2 and H 2O above a mature spruce stand ( Picea abies (L.) Karst.) have been investigated using the eddy- correlation technique. A closed path sensor adapted to the special requirements of long-term studies has been developed and tested. Field measurements have been performed since April 1995. Estimates of fetch showed a very narrow source area dimension under instable stratification (≤ 200 m). Fetch requirements at night are not met in some directions. Energy balance closure was influenced systematically by the wind direction indicating a substantial attenuation of the vertical wind motion by the tower (up to 40 %). Even for optimal flow directions, energy balance closure was about 88%. Intercomparison of the used ultra sonic anemometer (USAT-3) with a GILL - anemometer showed systematically lower values of vertical wind speed fluctuations (13 %). Average CO 2-fluxes ranged between -13 at noon to 3 μ mol m-2, s-1 at night in summer. In November and December the stand released CO 2 on a daily basis. A preliminary estimate of the cumulative net carbon balance over the observed period of 9 months is 4-5 t, Cha-1.

  10. Evaluation of sensible heat flux from remote sensing and eddy correlation data for two Portuguese cork-oak forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, John; Paço, Teresa A.; Silva, Filipe Costa e.; David, Jorge S.; Pereira, João S.; Rufino, Iana; Galvão, Carlos; Valente, Fernanda

    2015-04-01

    Energy balance is a major determinant of Earth surface temperature and climate. However, the physics of energy balance computations are complex and vary in space and in time. Most of the data available on the energy balance of non-agricultural systems is from local measurements, only representative of the area around the measuring point. To overcome this, remote sensing techniques have been widely used, particularly in studies on the temporal land-cover changes and on their influences on the energy and water balances. Several remote sensors with different spatial, temporal and spectral resolutions have been used to understand these processes. In many applications, the main objective is to understand how landscape's changes over time can influence regional climate. Orbital information enables the analysis of the spatial and temporal features of the Earth's surface, and to understand the interactions between different land-cover types with topography, atmospheric and anthropogenic action. However, to test for accuracy and precision, data from satellite sensors and their derivatives need to be compared with ground-level field data. This study evaluates and tests sensible heat flux data obtained from the SEBAL algorithm using images by Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor aboard Landsat 5 satellite. These sensible heat flux data were compared with those of two ground level experiments, with the Eddy Covariance technique, in Évora and Coruche, Portugal. The footprints of the sensible heat flux measurements were calculated for six scenes of sensor TM, allowing the comparison between satellite data and surface flux data. Results showed a high correlation between sensible heat flux data derived from remote sense and ground-level measurements (R2=0.94). We conclude that the remote sensing technique is useful in estimating this energy balance component and may contribute to the understanding of vegetation dynamics.

  11. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  12. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  13. Optimizing correlation techniques for improved earthquake location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaff, D.P.; Bokelmann, G.H.R.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Zanzerkia, E.; Waldhauser, F.; Beroza, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    Earthquake location using relative arrival time measurements can lead to dramatically reduced location errors and a view of fault-zone processes with unprecedented detail. There are two principal reasons why this approach reduces location errors. The first is that the use of differenced arrival times to solve for the vector separation of earthquakes removes from the earthquake location problem much of the error due to unmodeled velocity structure. The second reason, on which we focus in this article, is that waveform cross correlation can substantially reduce measurement error. While cross correlation has long been used to determine relative arrival times with subsample precision, we extend correlation measurements to less similar waveforms, and we introduce a general quantitative means to assess when correlation data provide an improvement over catalog phase picks. We apply the technique to local earthquake data from the Calaveras Fault in northern California. Tests for an example streak of 243 earthquakes demonstrate that relative arrival times with normalized cross correlation coefficients as low as ???70%, interevent separation distances as large as to 2 km, and magnitudes up to 3.5 as recorded on the Northern California Seismic Network are more precise than relative arrival times determined from catalog phase data. Also discussed are improvements made to the correlation technique itself. We find that for large time offsets, our implementation of time-domain cross correlation is often more robust and that it recovers more observations than the cross spectral approach. Longer time windows give better results than shorter ones. Finally, we explain how thresholds and empirical weighting functions may be derived to optimize the location procedure for any given region of interest, taking advantage of the respective strengths of diverse correlation and catalog phase data on different length scales.

  14. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commercial cornfield (Zea mays) measured using the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, J.; Hui, D.; Miller, D. R.; Bhattarai, S.; Dennis, S.; Smart, D.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in observed atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have been well documented. However, information on event-related instantaneous emissions during fertilizer applications is lacking. With the development of fast-response N2O analyzers, the eddy covariance (EC) technique can be used to gather instantaneous measurements of N2O concentrations to quantify the exchange of nitrogen between the soil and atmosphere. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of a new EC system, to measure the N2O flux with the system, and finally to examine relationships of the N2O flux with soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, and fertilization events. An EC system was assembled with a sonic anemometer and a fast-response N2O analyzer (quantum cascade laser spectrometer) and applied in a cornfield in Nolensville, Tennessee during the 2012 corn growing season (4 April-8 August). Fertilizer amounts totaling 217 kg N ha-1 were applied to the experimental site. Results showed that this N2O EC system provided reliable N2O flux measurements. The cumulative emitted N2O amount for the entire growing season was 6.87 kg N2O-N ha-1. Seasonal fluxes were highly dependent on soil moisture rather than soil temperature. This study was one of the few experiments that continuously measured instantaneous, high-frequency N2O emissions in crop fields over a growing season of more than 100 days.

  15. Sediment-water gas exchange in two Swedish lakes measured by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokic, J.; Sahlee, E.; Brand, A.; Sobek, S.

    2014-12-01

    Lake sediments are hotspots for carbon (C) cycling, acting both as sinks and sources through C burial and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane. The fate of this CO2 in the water column is controlled by bottom water turbulence, a factor not accounted for in current estimates of sediment CO2 fluxes. This study is aimed to quantify the turbulent CO2 flux across the sediment-water interface (SWI) by measuring the oxygen (O2) flux with the non-invasive Eddy Correlation (EC) method that combines measurements of 3D velocity (ADV) and O2 fluctuations with a microsensor. Using the metabolic relation (respiratory quotient, RQ) of O2 and CO2 derived from a sediment incubation experiment we present the first estimates of turbulent lake sediment CO2 flux from two boreal lakes in Sweden (Erssjön and Erken, 0.07 km2 and 23.7 km2 respectively). Only ~10 % of the total dataset was extracted for flux calculations due to poor signal-to-noise ratio in the velocity and O2 signals. The sediment in Lake Erssjön was both consuming and producing O2, related to bacterial respiration and photosynthesis. Mean O2 flux was -0.19 and 0.17 μmol O2 m-2 sec-1, comparing to 0.04 μmol O2 m-2 sec-1 derived from the sediment incubation experiment. Fluxes for Lake Erken are still to be determined. Experimentally derived RQ of the both lake sediments were close to unity implying that in-situ CO2 fluxes are of similar magnitude as O2 fluxes, varying between -0.15 and 0.18 μmol C m-2 sec-1. The first measurement of turbulent sediment O2 flux and estimate of turbulent CO2 flux from a small boreal lake show higher and more variable fluxes than previously found in experimental studies. The low amount of data extracted for flux calculations (~10%) point towards the difficulties in EC measurement in low-turbulence environments. On-going work focuses on the turbulence structure in lakes and its influence on the gas fluxes at the SWI.

  16. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzalla, S.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad; Chabaat, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  17. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    SciTech Connect

    Harzalla, S. Chabaat, M.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  18. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for Detection of Deep Fatigue Cracks in Multi-Layer Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Thick, multi-layer aluminum structure has been widely used in aircraft design in critical wing splice areas. The multi-layer structure generally consists of three or four aluminum layers with different geometry and varying thickness, which are held together with fasteners. The detection of cracks under fasteners with ultrasonic techniques in subsurface layers away from the skin is impeded primarily by interlayer bonds and faying sealant condition. Further, assessment of such sealant condition is extremely challenging in terms of complexity of structure, limited access, and inspection cost. Although Eddy current techniques can be applied on in-service aircraft from the exterior of the skin without knowing sealant condition, the current eddy current techniques are not able to detect defects with wanted sensitivity. In this work a series of low frequency eddy current probes have been designed, fabricated and tested for this application. A probe design incorporating a shielded magnetic field sensor concentrically located in the interior of a drive coil has been employed to enable a localized deep diffusion of the electromagnetic field into the part under test. Due to the required low frequency inspections, probes have been testing using a variety of magnetic field sensors (pickup coil, giant magneto-resistive, anisotropic magneto-resistive, and spin-dependent tunneling). The probe designs as well as capabilities based upon a target inspection for sub-layer cracking in an airframe wing spar joint is presented.

  19. Active Correlation Technique: Status and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, Yury

    2010-04-30

    During the recent years, at the FLNR (JINR) a successful cycle of experiments has been accomplished on the synthesis of the superheavy elements with Z = 112-118 with {sup 48}Ca beam. From the viewpoint of the detection of rare decays and background suppression, this success was achieved due to the application of a new radical technique--the method of active correlations. The method employs search in a real-time mode for a pointer to a probable correlation like recoil-alpha for switching the beam off. In the case of detection in the same detector strip an additional alpha-decay event, of 'beam OFF' time interval is prolonged automatically.

  20. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for the Detection of Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A.; Simpson, John W.; Koshti, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    A recent identification of cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  1. Development of Eddy Current Technique for the Detection of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Koshti, Ajay

    2006-01-01

    A recent identification of stress corrosion cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  2. Correlative visualization techniques for multidimensional data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.; Goettsche, Craig

    1989-01-01

    Critical to the understanding of data is the ability to provide pictorial or visual representation of those data, particularly in support of correlative data analysis. Despite the advancement of visualization techniques for scientific data over the last several years, there are still significant problems in bringing today's hardware and software technology into the hands of the typical scientist. For example, there are other computer science domains outside of computer graphics that are required to make visualization effective such as data management. Well-defined, flexible mechanisms for data access and management must be combined with rendering algorithms, data transformation, etc. to form a generic visualization pipeline. A generalized approach to data visualization is critical for the correlative analysis of distinct, complex, multidimensional data sets in the space and Earth sciences. Different classes of data representation techniques must be used within such a framework, which can range from simple, static two- and three-dimensional line plots to animation, surface rendering, and volumetric imaging. Static examples of actual data analyses will illustrate the importance of an effective pipeline in data visualization system.

  3. Eddy correlation measurements of methane fluxes using a tunable diode laser at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, G. C.; Neumann, H. H.; Den Hartog, G.; Thurtell, G. W.; Kidd, G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) measurements of methane flux were made at the Kinosheo Lake tower site for a 1-month period during the 1990 summer intensive. The measurements were made with a diode-laser-based methane sensor using the eddy correlation technique. Measurements of the methane fluxes were made at two levels, 5 or 18 m. Approximately 900 half-hour average methane flux measurements were obtained. Weak temporal and diurnal trends were observed in the data. Fluxes averaged over the study period showed an overall methane emission of 16 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d with a daytime average of 20 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d and a nighttime average of 9 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d. The effect of emission footprint was evident in the data. A strong relationship between the daily average methane flux and wet bog temperature at 20-cm depth was observed.

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commercial cornfield (Zea mays) measured using the eddy-covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, J.; Hui, D.; Miller, D. R.; Bhattarai, S.; Dennis, S.; Smart, D.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, K. C.

    2014-08-01

    Increases in observed atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O), have been well documented. However, information on event-related instantaneous emissions during fertilizer applications is lacking. With the development of fast-response N2O analyzers, the eddy covariance (EC) technique can be used to gather instantaneous measurements of N2O concentrations to quantify the exchange of nitrogen between the soil and atmosphere. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of a new EC system, to measure the N2O flux with the system, and finally to examine relationships of the N2O flux with soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, and fertilization events. We assembled an EC system that included a sonic anemometer and a fast-response N2O analyzer (quantum cascade laser spectrometer) in a cornfield in Nolensville, Tennessee during the 2012 corn growing season (4 April-8 August). Fertilizer amounts totaling 217 kg N ha-1 were applied to the experimental site. The precision of the instrument was 0.066 ppbv for 10 Hz measurements. The seasonal mean detection limit of the N2O flux measurements was 2.10 ng N m-2 s-1. This EC system can be used to provide reliable N2O flux measurements. The cumulative emitted N2O for the entire growing season was 6.87 kg N2O-N ha-1. The 30 min average N2O emissions ranged from 0 to 11 100 μg N2O{-}N m-2 h-1 (mean = 257.5, standard deviation = 817.7). Average daytime emissions were much higher than night emissions (278.8 ± 865.8 vs. 100.0 ± 210.0 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1). Seasonal fluxes were highly dependent on soil moisture rather than soil temperature, although the diurnal flux was positively related to soil temperature. This study was one of the few experiments that continuously measured instantaneous, high-frequency N2O emissions in crop fields over a growing season of more than 100 days.

  5. Correlative stitching interferometer and its key techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingjie; Chen, Mingyi

    2002-06-01

    Correlative stitching is on the fact that the same area has the same information. This testing thought is meaningful in extending spatial measurement ranges, keeping high resolutions, high precision and low cost. So in order to test large-scale optical workpiece, people are designing large-scale interferometer, at the same time, they are also designing stitching interferometer. The keys to realize stitching measurement are to obtain high precision wavefront of each sub-aperture and apply appropriate stitching algorithm. There are many techniques to test sub-apertures, among which phase-shifting technique has high precision, and is applied widely. How to reduce its system error is a central problem. The paper will utilize difference of two testing results to remove the system error. How to reduce the accumulative error is a key problem in stitching. The paper will apply the stitching algorithm in Descartes coordinates presented by M. Otsubo and K. Okada to realize the connecting of sub-apertures. And the paper presents a method to deal with the main random errors in sub-aperture testing. Finally, the paper does some tests.

  6. New cyberinfrastructure for studying land-atmosphere interactions using eddy covariance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes, A.; Salayandia, L.; Gallegos, I.; Gates, A. Q.; Tweedie, C.

    2010-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) methods are used to measure the exchanges of mass and energy across the atmospheric boundary layer. EC is the basis of several large national and international flux networks of micrometeorological tower sites (i.e. FLUXNET, AMERIFLUX), that provide continuous observations and measurements to understand and quantify the spatial and temporal variations in carbon storage in plants, soils, and the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy, in major vegetation types across a range of disturbance historic and climatic conditions. A consistent quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedure of micrometeorological data is essential for measurement networks such as these. Although, a QA/QC procedure is very much a site-specific activity, there are a variety of components available to implement Eddy covariance methods, as well as, limited documentation about best practices or standards, results in different approaches being adopted throughout data capturing sites. In some cases, this can lead to a limited or inefficient data reusability and knowledge transfer among related projects. The amount of data being collected is rapidly increasing, and the ability to evaluate proper instrument operation and data accuracy is critical to ensure the results are not bias due to factors such as, instrument malfunction, erroneous definition of optimal measurement ranges, calibration errors and differences, and environmental conditions that can affect data quality (i.e. wind directions are not from the footprint of interest, heavy precipitation, dust/snow storms, etc). This study presents findings from Cyberinfrastructure research conducted on a data stream from a newly established Eddy Covariance Tower, located on the Jornada basin Experimental Range (JER), Las Cruces, NM. Specifically, property characterization and specification was developed under a series of laboratory and field experiments. Our intent was to characterize thresholds and range

  7. Applying a simple three-dimensional eddy correlation system for latent and sensible heat flux to contrasting forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhofer, Ch.

    1992-06-01

    A simple eddy correlation system is presented that allows on-line calculation of latent and sensible heat fluxes. The system is composed of a three dimensional propeller anemometer, a thermocouple and a capacitance relative humidity sensor. Results from two contrasting sites demonstrate the capability of the system to measure turbulent fluxes under varying conditions. A dry mixed (dominantly coniferous) forest in hilly terrain in Austria is compared to a well irrigated, heavily transpiring, deciduous pecan orchard in the Southwest of the US. The US site shows insufficient closure of the energy balance that is attributed to non-turbulent fluxes under advective conditions in a stable boundary layer (Blanford et al., 1991) while the Austrian site exhibits almost perfect closure with the use of the very same instruments when the boundary layer is convective and advection is negligible.

  8. A comparison of methane emission measurements using Eddy Covariance and manual and automated chamber-based techniques in Tibetan Plateau alpine wetland.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingfei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Guangshuai; Song, Weimin; Huang, Yao; Li, Sheng-Gong; Liang, Naishen; Tang, Yanhong; He, Jin-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Comparing of different CH4 flux measurement techniques allows for the independent evaluation of the performance and reliability of those techniques. We compared three approaches, the traditional discrete Manual Static Chamber (MSC), Continuous Automated Chamber (CAC) and Eddy Covariance (EC) methods of measuring the CH4 fluxes in an alpine wetland. We found a good agreement among the three methods in the seasonal CH4 flux patterns, but the diurnal patterns from both the CAC and EC methods differed. While the diurnal CH4 flux variation from the CAC method was positively correlated with the soil temperature, the diurnal variation from the EC method was closely correlated with the solar radiation and net CO2 fluxes during the daytime but was correlated with the soil temperature at nighttime. The MSC method showed 25.3% and 7.6% greater CH4 fluxes than the CAC and EC methods when measured between 09:00 h and 12:00 h, respectively. PMID:23838484

  9. Combined investigation of Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques for composite materials NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. W.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J. P.; Namkung, M.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced composites are not without trade-offs. Their increased designability brings an increase in the complexity of their internal geometry and, as a result, an increase in the number of failure modes associated with a defect. When two or more isotropic materials are combined in a composite, the isotropic material failure modes may also combine. In a laminate, matrix delamination, cracking and crazing, and voids and porosity, will often combine with fiber breakage, shattering, waviness, and separation to bring about ultimate structural failure. This combining of failure modes can result in defect boundaries of different sizes, corresponding to the failure of each structural component. This paper discusses a dual-technology NDE (Non Destructive Evaluation) (eddy current (EC) and ultrasonics (UT)) study of graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) laminate samples. Eddy current and ultrasonic raster (Cscan) imaging were used together to characterize the effects of mechanical impact damage, high temperature thermal damage and various types of inserts in gr/ep laminate samples of various stacking sequences.

  10. Combined investigation of Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques for composite materials NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.W.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J.P.; Namkung, M.

    1993-12-31

    Advanced composites are not without trade-offs. Their increased designability brings an increase in the complexity of their internal geometry and, as a result, an increase in the number of failure modes associated with a defect. When two or more isotropic materials are combined in a composite, the isotropic material failure modes may also combine. In a laminate, matrix delamination, cracking and crazing, and voids and porosity, will often combine with fiber breakage, shattering, waviness, and separation to bring about ultimate structural failure. This combining of failure modes can result in defect boundaries of different sizes, corresponding to the failure of each structural component. This paper discusses a dual-technology NDE (Non Destructive Evaluation) (eddy current (EC) and ultrasonics (UT)) study of graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) laminate samples. Eddy current and ultrasonic raster (Cscan) imaging were used together to characterize the effects of mechanical impact damage, high temperature thermal damage and various types of inserts in gr/ep laminate samples of various stacking sequences.

  11. Prospects and Techniques for Eddy-Resolving Acoustic Tomography in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, J. W.; Nechaev, D.; Roman, D. A.; Sidorovskaia, N. A.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2007-05-01

    For several decades monitoring and modeling the dynamics and physical structure of the Gulf of Mexico have been major efforts undertaken by oceanographers of the United States and other American countries. There are very interesting physical oceanographic features in the Gulf, not the least of which are the Gulf Loop Current and the eddies it spawns. Satellite sensing of IR and altimeter imagery has been a major input to modeling those features. Such efforts are very important to the economy and well being of much of the United States and Mexico, including fisheries, mineral economies, hurricane strengths and paths in the summer, and severe snow storms in the eastern US in the winter. A major shortcoming of the present monitoring of the Gulf is the lack of subsurface input to the dynamic models of the Gulf. Acoustic tomography is a viable means of providing that missing input. Several universities have come together to investigate the prospects for establishing a Gulf Eddy Monitoring System (GEMS) for the deep eastern half of the Gulf using acoustic tomography. The group has conducted several acoustics experiments and propagation studies to determine the feasibility of long-range propagation in the eastern Gulf and the mitigation of adverse effects on marine mammal populations in that region under the Office of Naval Research project entitled the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC). The group has also convened an invited session for the 9th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI 2005) Orlando, FL, July 2005. This paper discusses prospects for establishing the GEMS tomographic system, its technical characteristics, and its contributions to advancing the knowledge of the dynamics of the Gulf. This presentation will concentrate on the characteristics of a single-slice tomographic system, called GEMS Phase I, across the approaches to the DeSoto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf and its prospect for monitoring the movements of

  12. Nonlinear, non-stationary image processing technique for eddy current NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Dib, Gerges; Kim, Jaejoon; Zhang, Lu; Xin, Junjun; Udpa, Lalita

    2012-05-01

    Automatic analysis of eddy current (EC) data has facilitated the analysis of large volumes of data generated in the inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants. The traditional procedure for analysis of EC data includes data calibration, pre-processing, region of interest (ROI) detection, feature extraction and classification. Accurate ROI detection has been enhanced by pre-processing, which involves reducing noise and other undesirable components as well as enhancing defect indications in the raw measurement. This paper presents the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) for feature extraction and support vector machine (SVM) for classification. The performance is shown to significantly better than the existing rule based classification approach used in industry.

  13. Failure of the Cross Correlation Measurement Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Ken; Ham, Katie; Schock, Kris

    2014-03-01

    The experiment involves creating a sound wave that propagates down a pipe with 8 transducers attached at equally spaced intervals of 0.01016 meters. The numerical method used to solve for the phase component, the Cross Correlation Method, creates a high correlation value, but the speed of sound varies immensely. The method involves a Fast Fourier Transform of the collected data, which is used to find the phase of the sound wave, and the slope of the position versus time graph, which is used to calculate the speed of sound. This high correlation values shows that the data is correct, but the numerical method for analyzing the data is incorrect. We would like to thank Dr. Ken McGill for all of his time, help, and guidance with this research project. We would also like to thank Georgia College and State University for both the resources and space necessary for this experiment.

  14. Fluxes by eddy correlation over heterogeneous landscape: How shall we apply the Reynolds average?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.

    2007-12-01

    Top-down estimates of carbon exchange across the earth's surface are implicitly an integral scheme, deriving bulk exchanges over large areas. Bottom-up estimates explicitly integrate the individual components of exchange to derive a bulk value. If these approaches are to be properly compared, their estimates should represent the same quantity. Over heterogeneous landscape, eddy-covariance flux computations from towers or aircraft intended for comparison with top-down approach face a question of the proper definition of the mean or base state, the departures from which yield the fluxes by Reynolds averaging. 1)≠Use a global base state derived over a representative sample of the surface, insensitive to land use. The departure quantities then fail to sum to zero over any subsample representing an individual surface type, violating Reynolds criteria. Yet fluxes derived from such subsamples can be directly composed into a bulk flux, globally satisfying Reynolds criteria. 2)≠Use a different base state for each surface type. satisfying Reynolds criteria individually. Then some of the flux may get missed if a surface's characteristics significantly bias its base state. Base state≠(2) is natural for tower samples. Base state≠(1) is natural for airborne samples over heterogeneous landscape, especially in patches smaller than an appropriate averaging length. It appears (1) incorporates a more realistic sample of the flux, though desirably there would be no practical difference between the two schemes. The schemes are related by the expression w¯*a*)C - w¯'a¯')C = w¯'ã¯)C+ wtilde ¯a¯')C+ wtilde ¯ã¯)C Here w is vertical motion, and a is some scalar, such as CO2. The star denotes departure from the global base state≠(1), and the prime from the base state≠(2), defined only over surface class≠C. The overbar with round bracket denotes average over samples drawn from class≠C, determined by footprint model. Thus a¯')C = 0 but a¯*)C ≠ 0 in general. The

  15. Investigation of Frequency Mixing Techniques for Eddy Current Testing of Steam Generator Tubes in Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. J.; Kong, Y. B.; Song, S.-J.; Kim, C.-H.; Choi, Y. H.; Kang, S.-C.; Song, M. H.

    2007-03-01

    In eddy current testing (ECT) of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants, it is very important to extract flaw signals from the signals compound by flaws and supporting structures. To perform such an important task, the multifrequency ECT methods are widely adopted since they have a well-known capability of extracting the flaw signal from the compound signals. Therefore, various frequency mixing algorithms have been proposed up to now. In the present work, two different frequency mixing algorithms, a time-domain optimization method and a discrete cosine transform (DCT) based optimization method, are investigated using experimental signals captured from a ASME standard tube. In this paper, we discuss the basic principles and the performances of these two frequency mixing techniques.

  16. Impact of water use efficiency on eddy covariance flux partitioning using correlation structure analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partitioned land surfaces fluxes (e.g. evaporation, transpiration, photosynthesis, and ecosystem respiration) are needed as input, calibration, and validation data for numerous hydrological and land surface models. However, one of the most commonly used techniques for measuring land surface fluxes,...

  17. Frequency Optimization for Enhancement of Surface Defect Classification Using the Eddy Current Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengbao; Wang, Qi; Cao, Binghua; Ye, Bo; Sunny, Ali Imam; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Eddy current testing is quite a popular non-contact and cost-effective method for nondestructive evaluation of product quality and structural integrity. Excitation frequency is one of the key performance factors for defect characterization. In the literature, there are many interesting papers dealing with wide spectral content and optimal frequency in terms of detection sensitivity. However, research activity on frequency optimization with respect to characterization performances is lacking. In this paper, an investigation into optimum excitation frequency has been conducted to enhance surface defect classification performance. The influences of excitation frequency for a group of defects were revealed in terms of detection sensitivity, contrast between defect features, and classification accuracy using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and a support vector machine (SVM). It is observed that probe signals are the most sensitive on the whole for a group of defects when excitation frequency is set near the frequency at which maximum probe signals are retrieved for the largest defect. After the use of KPCA, the margins between the defect features are optimum from the perspective of the SVM, which adopts optimal hyperplanes for structure risk minimization. As a result, the best classification accuracy is obtained. The main contribution is that the influences of excitation frequency on defect characterization are interpreted, and experiment-based procedures are proposed to determine the optimal excitation frequency for a group of defects rather than a single defect with respect to optimal characterization performances. PMID:27164112

  18. Frequency Optimization for Enhancement of Surface Defect Classification Using the Eddy Current Technique.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mengbao; Wang, Qi; Cao, Binghua; Ye, Bo; Sunny, Ali Imam; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Eddy current testing is quite a popular non-contact and cost-effective method for nondestructive evaluation of product quality and structural integrity. Excitation frequency is one of the key performance factors for defect characterization. In the literature, there are many interesting papers dealing with wide spectral content and optimal frequency in terms of detection sensitivity. However, research activity on frequency optimization with respect to characterization performances is lacking. In this paper, an investigation into optimum excitation frequency has been conducted to enhance surface defect classification performance. The influences of excitation frequency for a group of defects were revealed in terms of detection sensitivity, contrast between defect features, and classification accuracy using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and a support vector machine (SVM). It is observed that probe signals are the most sensitive on the whole for a group of defects when excitation frequency is set near the frequency at which maximum probe signals are retrieved for the largest defect. After the use of KPCA, the margins between the defect features are optimum from the perspective of the SVM, which adopts optimal hyperplanes for structure risk minimization. As a result, the best classification accuracy is obtained. The main contribution is that the influences of excitation frequency on defect characterization are interpreted, and experiment-based procedures are proposed to determine the optimal excitation frequency for a group of defects rather than a single defect with respect to optimal characterization performances. PMID:27164112

  19. Eddy correlation measurements of methane fluxes using a tunable diode laser at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES)

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.C.; Kidd, G.; Thurtell, G.W.; Neumann, H.H.; Hartog, G. den

    1994-01-20

    As part of the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) measurements of methane flux were made at the Kinosheo Lake tower site for a 1-month period during the 1990 summer intensive. The measurements were made with a diode-laser-based methane sensor using the eddy correlation technique. Measurements of the methane fluxes were made at two levels, 5 or 18 m. Approximately 900 half-hour average methane flux measurements were obtained. Weak temporal and diurnal trends were observed in the data. Fluxes averaged over the study period showed an overall methane emission of 16 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1} with a daytime average of 20 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1} and a nighttime average of 9 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}. The effect of emission footprint was evident in the data. A strong relationship between the daily average methane flux and wet bog temperature at 20-cm depth was observed. 41 refs., 6 figs.

  20. The role of airborne eddy correlation measurements in global change studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, J. A.; Barrick, J. D. W.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Anderson, B. E.; Hill, G. F.; Woerner, M. A.; Harkleroad, J. E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained measurements of the mean and turbulent quantities of heat, moisture, momentum, O3, CO, and CH4 from an airborne platform. Species flux measurements obtained from these data provide unique regional-scale information which can be used to evaluate 'scaled-up' flux estimates based on smaller scale observations. Airborne flux data also provide a basis for assessing the uncertainties associated with large-scale ground level flux extrapolations. Airborne constituent budget analyses are possible with this suite of measurements. The local change in the mean value of a parameter can be explained in terms of horizontal advection, vertical turbulent transport, and, in the case of chemically reactive species (i.e., O3), in situ production or destruction. This technique is used to indicate a direct relationship between O3 precursors and the measured in situ production rate.

  1. Pulsed eddy current testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1980-10-01

    Since a large number of the procedures used for inspecting the external tank are concerned with determining flaws in welds, there is a need to develop an inspection technique, which can be automated, to determine flaws in welds and structures with complex geometries. Techniques whereby an eddy current is generated in a metallic material and the changes in the circuit parameters due to material differences are observed, were chosen as one possible approach. Pulsed eddy current and its relationship to multifrequency techniques is discussed as well as some preliminary results obtained from observing pulsed waveforms with apparatus and algorithms currently in use for ultrasonic testing of welds. It can be shown the pulsed eddy current techniques can provide similar results, can eliminate some of the noncritical parameters affecting the eddy current signals, and can facilitate in the detection of critical parameter such as flaws, subsurface voids, and corrosion.

  2. Optical correlator techniques applied to robotic vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hine, Butler P., III; Reid, Max B.; Downie, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Vision processing is one of the most computationally intensive tasks required of an autonomous robot. The data flow from a single typical imaging sensor is roughly 60 Mbits/sec, which can easily overload current on-board processors. Optical correlator-based processing can be used to perform many of the functions required of a general robotic vision system, such as object recognition, tracking, and orientation determination, and can perform these functions fast enough to keep pace with the incoming sensor data. We describe a hybrid digital electronic/analog optical robotic vision processing system developed at Ames Research Center to test concepts and algorithms for autonomous construction, inspection, and maintenance of space-based habitats. We discuss the system architecture design and implementation, its performance characteristics, and our future plans. In particular, we compare the performance of the system to a more conventional all digital electronic system developed concurrently. The hybrid system consistently outperforms the digital electronic one in both speed and robustness.

  3. Eddy Covariance Flux Measurements of Pollutant Gases in the Mexico City Urban Area: a Useful Technique to Evaluate Emissions inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Grivicke, R.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, G.; Jobson, T.; Westberg, H.; Lamb, B.; Ramos, R.; Molina, L.

    2007-12-01

    Direct measurements of emissions of pollutant gases that include all major and minor emissions sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to improve and evaluate emissions inventories. The quality of an urban emissions inventory relies on the accuracy of the information of anthropogenic activities, which in many cases is not available, in particular in urban areas of developing countries. As part of the MCMA-2003 field campaign, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance (EC) techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO2 from a residential district of Mexico City. Those flux measurements demonstrated to be also a valuable tool to evaluate the emissions inventory used for air quality modeling. With the objective to confirm the representativeness of the 2003 flux measurements in terms of magnitude, composition and diurnal distribution, as well to evaluate the most recent emissions inventory, a second flux system was deployed in a different district of Mexico City during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign. This system was located in a busy district surrounded by congested avenues close to the center of the city. In 2003 and 2006 fluxes of olefins and CO2 were measured by the EC technique using a Fast Isoprene Sensor calibrated with a propylene standard and an open path Infrared Gas Analyzer (IRGA), respectively. Fluxes of aromatic and oxygenated VOCs were analyzed by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectroscopy (PTR-MS) and the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique. In 2006 the number of VOCs was extended using a disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA) system. This system collected whole air samples as function of the direction of the vertical wind component, and the samples were analyzed on site by gas chromatography / flame ionization detection (GC-FID). In both studies we found that the urban surface is a net source of CO2 and VOCs. The diurnal patterns were similar, but the 2006 fluxes

  4. Detection of Anomalous Machining Damages in Inconel 718 and TI 6-4 by Eddy Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Shimon, M.; Nakagawa, N.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports on an eddy current (EC) study aimed at detecting anomalous machining damages in Inconel 718 and Ti 6-4 samples, including (i) surface discontinuities such as re-depositing of chips onto the machined surface, and (ii) microstructural damages manifested as a white surface layer and a subsurface layer of distorted grains, typically tens of microns thick. A series of pristine and machine-damaged coupons were studied by EC scans using a differential probe operated at 2 MHz to detect discontinuous surface anomalies, and by swept high frequency EC (SHFEC) measurements from 0.5 MHz to 65.5 MHz using proprietary detection coils to detect surface microstructural damages. In general, the EC c-scan data from machine-damaged surfaces show spatial variations with larger standard deviations than those from the undamaged surfaces. In some cases, the c-scan images exhibit characteristic bipolar indications in good spatial correlation with surface anomalies revealed by optical microscopy and laser profilometry. Results of the SHFEC measurements indicate a reduced near-surface conductivity of the damaged surfaces compared to the undamaged surfaces.

  5. Semidiurnal and seasonal variations in methane emissions from a sub-tropical hydroelectric reservoir (Nam Theun 2, Laos) measured by eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, C.; Serca, D.; Guerin, F.; Meyerfeld, Y.; Descloux, S.; Chanudet, V.; Pighini, S.; Godon, A.; Guedant, P.

    2012-12-01

    The quantification of sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHG) have become an important scientific issue. Hydroelectric reservoirs have been identified as considerable methane (CH4) sources to the atmosphere, especially in the tropics. Assessing these emissions and their variations on small and large time scale represent important challenges in our understanding of water-atmosphere exchange. In this context, objectives of this study are (i) to quantify the CH4 emissions, (ii) to determine the variations in the emissions on daily and seasonal time scale, and link these variations to environmental driving forces (iii) to compare different methodologies to assess CH4 emissions. Measurements of CH4 emissions were made in a recently impounded (in 2009) subtropical hydroelectric reservoir, Nam Theun 2 (NT2), in Lao PDR, Asia. The sampling strategy included three different types of flux measurement techniques: floating chambers, submerged funnels, and a micrometeorological station allowing for flux determination based on the eddy covariance technique (EC). We carried out flux measurements during four intensive field campaigns conducted in between May 2009 and June 2011. Eddy covariance system, composed by a 3D sonic anemometer coupled with a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer, was deployed on the mast in a large surface of open water corresponding to an homogeneous ecosystem (floodplain). Diffusive and bubbling fluxes were measured using respectively floating chambers and submerged funnel techniques around the mast. Our results from the all four field campaigns show that individual 30-min EC fluxes varied by 4 order of magnitude (from 0.01 to 102 mmol.m-2.day-1). Average EC fluxes of individual campaigns varied inversely with water depth, from 5±3.5 to 28±16 mmol.m-2.day-1 for respectively from 10.5 to 2 m of water depths. Diffusive fluxes measured by floating chambers ranged between 0.2 and 3.2 mmol.m-2.day-1. Bubbling fluxes were found to be highly

  6. Correlation of Three Techniques for Determining Soil Permeability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winneberger, John T.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses problems of acquiring adequate results when measuring for soil permeability. Correlates three relatively simple techniques that could be helpful to the inexperienced technician dealing with septic tank practices. An appendix includes procedures for valid percolation tests. (MLB)

  7. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca F.; Johnson, Darren J.; Neubauer, Scott C.; Raynie, Richard C.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 yr-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 yr-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 yr-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 yr-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  8. Development of Quality Assessment Techniques for Large Eddy Simulation of Propulsion and Power Systems in Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Large-eddy-simulation (LES) is quickly becoming a method of choice for studying complex thermo-physics in a wide range of propulsion and power systems. It provides a means to study coupled turbulent combustion and flow processes in parameter spaces that are unattainable using direct-numerical-simulation (DNS), with a degree of fidelity that can be far more accurate than conventional engineering methods such as the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approx- imation. However, development of predictive LES is complicated by the complex interdependence of different type of errors coming from numerical methods, algorithms, models and boundary con- ditions. On the other hand, control of accuracy has become a critical aspect in the development of predictive LES for design. The objective of this project is to create a framework of metrics aimed at quantifying the quality and accuracy of state-of-the-art LES in a manner that addresses the myriad of competing interdependencies. In a typical simulation cycle, only 20% of the computational time is actually usable. The rest is spent in case preparation, assessment, and validation, because of the lack of guidelines. This work increases confidence in the accuracy of a given solution while min- imizing the time obtaining the solution. The approach facilitates control of the tradeoffs between cost, accuracy, and uncertainties as a function of fidelity and methods employed. The analysis is coupled with advanced Uncertainty Quantification techniques employed to estimate confidence in model predictions and calibrate model's parameters. This work has provided positive conse- quences on the accuracy of the results delivered by LES and will soon have a broad impact on research supported both by the DOE and elsewhere.

  9. Application of Self Nulling Eddy Current Probe Technique to the Detection of Fatigue Crack Initiation and Control of Test Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Nath, S.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    A major part of fracture mechanics is concerned with studying the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. This typically requires constant monitoring of crack growth during fatigue cycles and the knowledge of the precise location of the crack tip at any given time. One technique currently available for measuring fatigue crack length is the Potential Drop method. The method, however, may be inaccurate if the direction of crack growth deviates considerably from what was assumed initially or the curvature of the crack becomes significant. Another popular approach is to optically view the crack using a high magnification microscope, but this entails a person constantly monitoring it. The present proposed technique uses an automated scheme, in order to eliminate the need for a person to constantly monitor the experiment. Another technique under development elsewhere is to digitize an optical image of the test specimen surface and then apply a pattern recognition algorithm to locate the crack tip. A previous publication showed that the self nulling eddy current probe successfully tracked a simulated crack in an aluminum sample. This was the impetus to develop an online real time crack monitoring system. An automated system has been developed which includes a two axis scanner mounted on the tensile testing machine, the probe and its instrumentation and a personal computer (PC) to communicate and control all the parameters. The system software controls the testing parameters as well as monitoring the fatigue crack as it propagates. This paper will discuss the experimental setup in detail and demonstrate its capabilities. A three dimensional finite element model is utilized to model the magnetic field distribution due to the probe and how the probe voltage changes as it scans the crack. Experimental data of the probe for different samples under zero load, static load and high cycle fatigue load will be discussed. The final section summarizes the major accomplishments

  10. Estimates of evapotranspiration in alkaline scrub and meadow communities of Owens Valley, California, using the Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and Penman-combination methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, L. F. W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In Owens Valley, evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the largest components of outflow in the hydrologic budget and the least understood. ET estimates for December 1983 through October 1985 were made for seven representative locations selected on the basis of geohydrology and the characteristics of phreatophytic alkaline scrub and meadow communities. The Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and Penman-combination methods were used to estimate ET. The results of the analyses appear satisfactory when compared to other estimates of ET. Results by the eddy-correlation method are for a direct and a residual latent-heat flux that is based on sensible-heat flux and energy budget measurements. Penman-combination potential ET estimates were determined to be unusable because they overestimated actual ET. Modification in the psychrometer constant of this method to account for differences between heat-diffusion resistance and vapor-diffusion resistance permitted actual ET to be estimated. The methods may be used for studies in similar semiarid and arid rangeland areas in the Western United States. Meteorological data for three field sites are included in the appendix. Simple linear regression analysis indicates that ET estimates are correlated to air temperature, vapor-density deficit, and net radiation. Estimates of annual ET range from 300 mm at a low-density scrub site to 1,100 mm at a high-density meadow site. The monthly percentage of annual ET was determined to be similar for all sites studied. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca; Johnson, Darren; Neubauer, Scott C; Raynie, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per-area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 y-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 y-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 y-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 y-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  12. Energy balance closure on a winter wheat stand: comparing the eddy covariance technique with the soil water balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imukova, K.; Ingwersen, J.; Hevart, M.; Streck, T.

    2015-05-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is typically not closed. The nature of the gap is usually not known, which hampers using EC data to parameterize and test models. The present study elucidates the nature of the energy gap of EC flux data from winter wheat stands in southwest Germany. During the vegetation periods 2012 and 2013, we continuously measured, in a half-hourly resolution, latent (LE) and sensible (H) heat fluxes using the EC technique. Measured fluxes were adjusted with either the Bowen-ratio (BR), H or LE post-closure method. The adjusted LE fluxes were tested against evapotranspiration data (ETWB) calculated using the soil water balance (WB) method. At sixteen locations within the footprint of an EC station, the soil water storage term was determined by measuring the soil water content down to a soil depth of 1.5 m. In the second year, the volumetric soil water content was also continuously measured in 15 min resolution in 10 cm intervals down to 90 cm depth with sixteen capacitance soil moisture sensors. During the 2012 vegetation period, the H post-closed LE flux data (ETEC = 3.4 ± 0.6 mm day-1) corresponded closest with the result of the WB method (3.3 ± 0.3 mm day-1). ETEC adjusted by the BR (4.1 ± 0.6 mm day-1) or LE (4.9 ± 0.9 mm day-1) post-closure method were higher than the ETWB by 20 and 33%, respectively. In 2013, ETWB was in best agreement with ETEC adjusted with the H post-closure method during the periods with low amount of rain and seepage. During these periods the BR and LE post-closure methods overestimated ET by about 30 and 40%, respectively. During a period with high and frequent rainfalls, ETWB was in-between ETEC adjusted by H and BR post-closure methods. We conclude that, at most vegetation periods on our site, LE is not a~major component of the energy balance gap. Our results indicate that the energy balance gap other energy fluxes and unconsidered or biased energy storage terms.

  13. Energy balance closure on a winter wheat stand: comparing the eddy covariance technique with the soil water balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imukova, K.; Ingwersen, J.; Hevart, M.; Streck, T.

    2016-01-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is typically not closed. The nature of the gap is usually not known, which hampers using EC data to parameterize and test models. In the present study we cross-checked the evapotranspiration data obtained with the EC method (ETEC) against ET rates measured with the soil water balance method (ETWB) at winter wheat stands in southwest Germany. During the growing seasons 2012 and 2013, we continuously measured, in a half-hourly resolution, latent heat (LE) and sensible (H) heat fluxes using the EC technique. Measured fluxes were adjusted with either the Bowen-ratio (BR), H or LE post-closure method. ETWB was estimated based on rainfall, seepage and soil water storage measurements. The soil water storage term was determined at sixteen locations within the footprint of an EC station, by measuring the soil water content down to a soil depth of 1.5 m. In the second year, the volumetric soil water content was additionally continuously measured in 15 min resolution in 10 cm intervals down to 90 cm depth with sixteen capacitance soil moisture sensors. During the 2012 growing season, the H post-closed LE flux data (ETEC = 3.4 ± 0.6 mm day-1) corresponded closest with the result of the WB method (3.3 ± 0.3 mm day-1). ETEC adjusted by the BR (4.1 ± 0.6 mm day-1) or LE (4.9 ± 0.9 mm day-1) post-closure method were higher than the ETWB by 24 and 48 %, respectively. In 2013, ETWB was in best agreement with ETEC adjusted with the H post-closure method during the periods with low amount of rain and seepage. During these periods the BR and LE post-closure methods overestimated ET by about 46 and 70 %, respectively. During a period with high and frequent rainfalls, ETWB was in-between ETEC adjusted by H and BR post-closure methods. We conclude that, at most observation periods on our site, LE is not a major component of the energy balance gap. Our results indicate that the energy balance gap is made up by

  14. Exchange of nitrous oxides and carbon dioxide measured using the eddy covariance technique in a high-latitude city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvi, Leena; Nordbo, Annika; Rannik, Üllar; Haapanala, Sami; Pihlatie, Mari; Mammarella, Ivan; Riikonen, Anu; Nikinmaa, Eero; Vesala, Timo

    2014-05-01

    In Helsinki, Finland, carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes have been measured continuously using the eddy covariance (EC) technique since 2005. In summer 2012, the measurements were supplemented with the fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) in order to examine how the exchanges of these two important greenhouse gases behave in urban environment. The EC measurements are made at the semi-urban measurement station SMEAR III Kumpula site located four kilometres north-east from the Helsinki city centre. The measurements are made on the top level of a 31 meters high lattice tower (60°12.17'N, 24°57.67'E) located on a hill, 26 m above sea level. The area around the tower can be divided into three surface cover sectors: built, road and vegetation, each representing the typical surface cover of the area. These areas allow us to examine the effect of different urban surface covers to the exchange of CO2 and N2O. The measurement setup includes an ultrasonic anemometer (USA-1, Metek GmbH) and a closed-path infrared gas analyzer (LI-7000, LI-COR) to measure the CO2 flux. During the summer 2012 measurement campaign lasting from 21 June till 27 November, the N2O flux was measured using a TDL spectrometer. Commonly accepted procedures were used to post-process the raw 10 Hz data. Overall, the measurement surroundings act as a source for both CO2 and N2O. The long-term measurements of the CO2 flux show a strong seasonal variation with clear effect from vegetation. In summer in the direction of high fraction of vegetation cover, the CO2 uptake exceeds its emissions and a downward flux reaching on average 10 μmol m-2 s-1 is observed. N2O on the other hand reaches its maxima values (campaign median 2.0 μmol m-2 h-1) in the same direction. This indicates that vegetation cannot be neglected in the urban greenhouse exchange studies. Traffic had a clear role emitting both N2O and CO2 with higher emissions during the rush hours than at other times. In the direction of the heavily trafficked road

  15. Study of eddy current probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Wang, Morgan

    1992-01-01

    The recognition of materials properties still presents a number of problems for nondestructive testing in aerospace systems. This project attempts to utilize current capabilities in eddy current instrumentation, artificial intelligence, and robotics in order to provide insight into defining geometrical aspects of flaws in composite materials which are capable of being evaluated using eddy current inspection techniques.

  16. Digital image correlation techniques applied to LANDSAT multispectral imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrud, L. O. (Principal Investigator); Miller, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Automatic image registration and resampling techniques applied to LANDSAT data achieved accuracies, resulting in mean radial displacement errors of less than 0.2 pixel. The process method utilized recursive computational techniques and line-by-line updating on the basis of feedback error signals. Goodness of local feature matching was evaluated through the implementation of a correlation algorithm. An automatic restart allowed the system to derive control point coordinates over a portion of the image and to restart the process, utilizing this new control point information as initial estimates.

  17. Weak value amplification via second-order correlated technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Cui; Jing-Zheng, Huang; Xiang, Liu; Gui-Hua, Zeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new framework combining weak measurement and second-order correlated technique. The theoretical analysis shows that weak value amplification (WVA) experiment can also be implemented by a second-order correlated system. We then build two-dimensional second-order correlated function patterns for achieving higher amplification factor and discuss the signal-to-noise ratio influence. Several advantages can be obtained by our proposal. For instance, detectors with high resolution are not necessary. Moreover, detectors with low saturation intensity are available in WVA setup. Finally, type-one technical noise can be effectively suppressed. Project supported by the Union Research Centre of Advanced Spaceflight Technology (Grant No. USCAST2013-05), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61170228, 61332019, and 61471239), and the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122901).

  18. Estimates of evapotranspiration in alkaline scrub and meadow communities of Owens Valley, California, using the Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and penman-combination methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, Lowell F. W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In Owens Valley, evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the largest components of outflow in the hydrologic budget and the least understood. ET estimates for December 1983 through October 1985 were made for seven representative locations selected on the basis of geohydrology and the characteristics of phreatophytic alkaline scrub and meadow communities. The Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and Penman-combination methods were used to estimate ET. The results of the analyses appear satisfactory when compared with other estimates of ET. Results by the eddy-correlation method are for a direct and a residual latent-heat flux that is based on sensible-heat flux and energy-budget measurements. Penman-combination potential-ET estimates were determined to be unusable because they overestimated actual ET. Modification of the psychrometer constant of this method to account for differences between heat-diffusion resistance and vapor-diffusion resistance permitted actual ET to be estimated. The methods described in this report may be used for studies in similar semiarid and arid rangeland areas in the Western United States. Meteorological data for three field sites are included in the appendix of this report. Simple linear regression analysis indicates that ET estimates are correlated to air temperature, vapor-density deficit, and net radiation. Estimates of annual ET range from 301 millimeters at a low-density scrub site to 1,137 millimeters at a high-density meadow site. The monthly percentage of annual ET was determined to be similar for all sites studied.

  19. Application of optical correlation techniques to particle imaging velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields nonintrusive measurements of velocity vectors across an extended 2-dimensional region of the flow field. The application of optical correlation techniques to the analysis of multiple exposure laser light sheet photographs can reduce and/or simplify the data reduction time and hardware. Here, Matched Spatial Filters (MSF) are used in a pattern recognition system. Usually MSFs are used to identify the assembly line parts. In this application, the MSFs are used to identify the iso-velocity vector contours in the flow. The patterns to be recognized are the recorded particle images in a pulsed laser light sheet photograph. Measurement of the direction of the partical image displacements between exposures yields the velocity vector. The particle image exposure sequence is designed such that the velocity vector direction is determined unambiguously. A global analysis technique is used in comparison to the more common particle tracking algorithms and Young's fringe analysis technique.

  20. Application of optical correlation techniques to particle imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields noninstrusive measurements of velocity vectors across an extended 2-dimensional region of the flow field. The application of optical correlation techniques to the analysis of multiple exposure laser light sheet photographs can reduce and/or simplify the data reduction time and hardware. Here, Matched Spatial Filters (MSF) are used in a pattern recognition system. Usuallay MSFs are used to identify the assembly line parts. In this application, the MSFs are used to identify the iso-velocity vector contours in the flow. The patterns to be recognized are the recorded particle images in a pulsed laser light sheet photograph. Measurement of the direction of the particle image displacements between exposures yields the velocity vector. The particle image exposure sequence is designed such that the velocity vector direction is determined unambiguously. A global analysis technique is used in comparison to the more common particle tracking algorithms and Young's fringe analysis technique.

  1. Evaluation of the Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Surface Algorithm (ACASA Model) Using Eddy Covariance Technique Over Sparse Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Spano, D.; Sirca, C.; Duce, P.; Snyder, R.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K. T.

    2008-12-01

    Land surface models are usually used to quantify energy and mass fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere on micro- and regional scales. One of the most elaborate land surface models for flux modelling is the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA) model, which provides micro-scale as well as regional-scale fluxes when imbedded in a meso-scale meteorological model (e.g., MM5 or WRF). The model predicts vegetation conditions and changes with time due to plant responses to environment variables. In particular, fluxes and profiles of heat, water vapor, carbon and momentum within and above canopy are estimated using third-order equations. It also estimates turbulent profiles of velocity, temperature, humidity within and above canopy, and CO2 fluxes are estimated using a combination of Ball-Berry and Farquhar equations. The ACASA model is also able to include the effects of water stress on stomata, transpiration and CO2 assimilation. ACASA model is unique because it separates canopy domain into twenty atmospheric layers (ten layers within the canopy and ten layers above the canopy), and the soil is partitioned into fifteen layers of variable thickness. The model was mainly used over dense canopies in the past, so the aim of this work was to test the ACASA model over a sparse canopy as Mediterranean maquis. Vegetation is composed by sclerophyllous species of shrubs that are always green, with leathery leaves, small height, with a moderately sparse canopy, and that are tolerant at water stress condition. Eddy Covariance (EC) technique was used to collect continuous data for more than 3 years period. Field measurements were taken in a natural maquis site located near Alghero, Sardinia, Italy and they were used to parameterize and validate the model. The input values were selected by running the model several times varying the one parameter per time. A second step in the parameterization process was the simultaneously variation of some parameters

  2. A comparison of airborne eddy correlation and bulk aerodynamic methods for ocean-air turbulent fluxes during cold-air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien

    1993-01-01

    The viscous interfacial-sublayer model of Liu et al. (1979) is used to derive four bulk schemes (LKB, FG, D, and DB), with the flux-profile relationships of Lie et al., Francey and Garratt (1981), Dyer (1974), and Dyer and Bradley (1982). These schemes, with stability-dependent transfer coefficients, are tested against the eddy-correlation fluxes measured at the 50-m flight level above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold-air outbreaks. The bulk fluxes of momentum (tau), sensible heat (H), and latent heat (E) are found to increase with various von Karman constants. The dependence of transfer coefficients on wind speeds and roughness lengths is discussed. The transfer coefficients for tau and E agree excellently between LKB and FG. The ratio of the coefficent for H of LKB to that of FG, increasing with decreasing stability, is very sensitive to stability at low winds, but approaches the neutral value of 1.25 at high winds.

  3. Verifying eddy-correlation measurements of dry deposition: A study of the energy-balance components of the Pawnee grasslands. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Massman, W.J.; Fox, D.G.; Zeller, K.F.; Lukens, D.

    1990-02-01

    At the Central Plains Experimental Range/Long-Term Ecological Research (CPER/LTER) site at the Pawnee National Grasslands, scientists from both the Rocky Mountain Station and the Natural Resources Ecology Laboratory of Colorado State University are independently attempting to measure several major components of the surface energy balance. The report describes how well independent measurements of radiation and the transport of heat and water vapor achieve closure of the surface energy balance and, thereby, account for the gross energy available to and processed by an ecosystem. The motivation behind the study is to evaluate the eddy correlation technology which the authors have been using to measure the exchange of gaseous pollutants (NO{sub 2}, NOx, and O{sub 3}) between the atmosphere and the grassland ecosystem.

  4. Latitude dependence of eddy variances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Bell, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The eddy variance of a meteorological field must tend to zero at high latitudes due solely to the nature of spherical polar coordinates. The zonal averaging operator defines a length scale: the circumference of the latitude circle. When the circumference of the latitude circle is greater than the correlation length of the field, the eddy variance from transient eddies is the result of differences between statistically independent regions. When the circumference is less than the correlation length, the eddy variance is computed from points that are well correlated with each other, and so is reduced. The expansion of a field into zonal Fourier components is also influenced by the use of spherical coordinates. As is well known, a phenomenon of fixed wavelength will have different zonal wavenumbers at different latitudes. Simple analytical examples of these effects are presented along with an observational example from satellite ozone data. It is found that geometrical effects can be important even in middle latitudes.

  5. Investigations of eddy coherence in jet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    In turbulent shear flow the term coherent structures refers to eddies which are both spatially coherent, i.e., large eddies, aand also temporally coherent, i.e., they retain their identities for times which are long compared with their time scales in fixed point measurements. In transitional flows, the existence of such structures is evident from flow visualizations. In many other flows, such structures are not so evident. The reasons for the existence of these two classes of flows are discussed and attention is focused upon the more difficult flows, where coherent structures are not so evident. Techniques by which the existence (or nonexistence) of such structures in these flows can be established from point measurements, are also discussed. A major problem is shown to be the need to discriminate between real losses in eddy coherence and apparent losses in coherence introduced by phase scrambling effects which 'smear' multipoint correlations. The analysis of multiprobe time dependent data in cold and reacting round turbulent jets is described and it is shown how evidence of strong eddy coherence can be extracted from data.

  6. On the estimate of the transpiration in Mediterranean heterogeneous ecosystems with the coupled use of eddy covariance and sap flow techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Roberto; Curreli, Matteo; Montaldo, Nicola; Oren, Ram

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are commonly heterogeneous savanna-like ecosystems, with contrasting plant functional types (PFT) competing for the water use. Mediterranean regions suffer water scarcity due to the dry climate conditions. In semi-arid regions evapotranspiration (ET) is the leading loss term of the root-zone water budget with a yearly magnitude that may be roughly equal to the precipitation. Despite the attention these ecosystems are receiving, a general lack of knowledge persists about the estimate of ET and the relationship between ET and the plant survival strategies for the different PFTs under water stress. During the dry summers these water-limited heterogeneous ecosystems are mainly characterized by a simple dual PFT-landscapes with strong-resistant woody vegetation and bare soil since grass died. In these conditions due to the low signal of the land surface fluxes captured by the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer the widely used eddy covariance may fail and its ET estimate is not robust enough. In these conditions the use of the sap flow technique may have a key role, because theoretically it provides a direct estimate of the woody vegetation transpiration. Through the coupled use of the sap flow sensor observations, a 2D foot print model of the eddy covariance tower and high resolution satellite images for the estimate of the foot print land cover map, the eddy covariance measurements can be correctly interpreted, and ET components (bare soil evaporation and woody vegetation transpiration) can be separated. The case study is at the Orroli site in Sardinia (Italy). The site landscape is a mixture of Mediterranean patchy vegetation types: trees, including wild olives and cork oaks, different shrubs and herbaceous species. An extensive field campaign started in 2004. Land-surface fluxes and CO2 fluxes are estimated by an eddy covariance technique based micrometeorological tower. Soil moisture profiles were also continuously estimated using water

  7. NO2 flux evaluation using laser induced fluorescence measurements and eddy covariance technique, in the Borneo forest during OP3 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dari Salisburgo, Cesare; di Carlo, Piero; Aruffo, E.; Langford, Ben; Dorsey, James; Giammaria, F.

    2010-05-01

    Emissions (both anthropogenic and biogenic) are extremely important to reduce the uncertainty of most models used to predict the atmospheric chemical species evolution. Measurements of emission of compounds such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are very rare because they require measures with high sensitivity and frequencies (above 5 Hz). Direct measurements of NO2 using laser-induced fluorescence (at 10Hz) combined with those of three components of wind are used to quantify directly the NO2 flux applying the eddy covariance technique. In this presentation will be described the technique of measurements and results of the observations made in the forests of Borneo (Malaysia) during the OP3 campaign in summer 2008.

  8. Recent advances in remote field eddy current NDE techniques and their applications in detection, characterization, and monitoring of deeply hidden corrosion in aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yushi; Ouyang, Tianhe; Udpa, Satish S.

    1999-01-01

    The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique is based on the RFEC phenomenon which is characterized by differences in the energy flow patterns in the near and remote field regions. The energy released by the probe excitation coil traverses the pipe al twice before reaching the pickup coil. The RFEC technique, currently used in metallic tube inspection, is therefore characterized by its equal sensitivity to a flaw irrespective to its location in the tube wall. It can be used for detecting defects located several skin-depths away from the excitation source, since its inspection capacity is limited by the skin-depth of the specimen, but by the signal-to-noise ratio for a particular measurement condition.

  9. Nuclear material safeguards surveillance and accountancy by isotope correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.; Goleb, J.A.; Kroc, T.K.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT) to the Light Water Reactor (LWR) and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel cycles for nuclear material accountancy and safeguards surveillance. The isotopic measurement of the inventory input to the reprocessing phase of the fuel cycle is the primary direct determination that an anomaly may exist in the fuel management of nuclear material. The nuclear materials accountancy gap which exists between the fabrication plant output and the input to the reprocessing plant can be minimized by using ICT at the dissolver stage of the reprocessing plant. The ICT allows a level of verification of the fabricator's fuel content specifications, the irradiation history, the fuel and blanket assemblies management and scheduling within the reactor, and the subsequent spent fuel assembly flows to the reprocessing plant. The investigation indicates that there exist relationships between isotopic concentration which have predictable, functional behavior over a range of burnup. Several cross-correlations serve to establish the initial core assembly-averaged composition. The selection of the more effective functionals will depend not only on the level of reliability of ICT for verification, but also on the capability, accuracy and difficulty of developing measurement methods. The propagation of measurement errors on the correlation functions and respective sensitivities to isotopic compositional changes have been examined and found to be consistent with current measurement methods.

  10. Estimation of mixing parameters for cancellation of discretized eddy current signals using time and frequency domain techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Simaar, M.

    1985-03-01

    In this paper, we present two methods for estimating the mixing parameters used in scaling, rotating, and time shifting discrete time eddy current impedance plane trajectories in order to suppress unwanted support plate signals. One method operates directly on the time signals. The other method operates on the frequency domain representation of these signals and consequently is computationally more involved. Both methods require the minimization of a functional which measures the energy difference between the horizontal and vertical components of the high and low frequency data. Three illustrative examples are presented, and it is shown that the use of the frequency domain method is justified if the data are corrupted with random noise as well as with unknown multisample time shifts.

  11. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance and static chamber techniques at a temperate forest in central ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Geddes, J. A.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Thomas, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate forest (Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve) in central Ontario (45°17´11´´ N, 78°32´19´´ W) from June-October, 2011. Continuous measurements were made by an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA) from Los Gatos Research Inc. that measures methane (CH4) at 10 Hz sampling rates. Fluxes were calculated from the gas measurements in conjunction with wind data collected by a 3-D sonic anemometer using the eddy covariance (EC) method. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7 ± 0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. Methane fluxes showed a seasonal progression with average rates of uptake increasing from June through September and remaining high in October. This pattern was consistent with a decreasing trend in soil moisture content at the monthly time scale. On the diurnal timescale, there was evidence of increased uptake during the day, when the mid-canopy wind speed was at a maximum. These patterns suggest that substrate supply of CH4 and oxygen to methanotrophs, and in certain cases hypoxic soil conditions supporting methanogenesis in low-slope areas, drive the observed variability in fluxes. A network of soil static chambers used at the tower site showed close agreement with the eddy covariance flux measurements. This suggests that soil-level microbial processes, and not abiological leaf-level CH4 production, drive overall CH4 dynamics in temperate forest ecosystems such as Haliburton Forest.

  12. Buckling prediction of panels using the vibration correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, H.; Govich, D.; Grunwald, A.

    2015-10-01

    The Vibration Correlation Technique (VCT) for experimentally nondestructive determination of buckling loads of thin-walled structures is applied to stringer stiffened curved panels manufactured both from aluminum and laminated composite material. The modal behavior of the panels is investigated by exciting the structures using the modal hammer method. Natural frequencies of the panels are recorded as a function of the applied axial compression load. Unlike shell structures which present a non-stable post-buckling behavior, the stringer stiffened panels show a stable post-buckling behavior, enabling the measurement of the natural frequencies up to the actual experimental buckling load. The modal behavior of compressed panels is compared for reference to shells, yielding areas of applicability for VCT to predict efficiently the buckling loads of thin-walled structures. Guidelines are then formulated for the application of the VCT.

  13. Comparison of Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and weighing-lysimeter evapotranspiration for two sparse-canopy sites in eastern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomlinson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report compares evapotranspiration estimated with the Bowen-ratio and eddy-correlation methods with evapotranspiration measured by weighing lysimeters for two sparse-canopy sites in eastern Washington. The sites are located in a grassland area (grass lysimeter site) and a sagbrush- covered area (sage lysimeter site) on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve in Benton County, Washington. Lysimeter data were collected at the sites from August 1990 to November 1994. Bowen-ratio data were collected for varying periods from May 1993 to November 1994. Additional Bowen-ratio data without interchanging air- temperature and vapor-pressure sensors to remove sensor bias (fixed-sensor system) were collected from October 1993 to June 1994. Eddy-correlation data were collected at the grass lysimeter site from March to April 1994, and at the sage lysimeter site from April to May 1994. The comparisons of evapotranspiration determined by the various methods differed considerably, depending on the periods of record being compared and the sites being analyzed. The year 1993 was very wet, with about 50 percent more precipitation than average; 1994 was a very dry year, with only about half the average precipitation. The study showed that on an annual basis, at least in 1994, Bowen-ratio evapotranspiration closely matched lysimeter evapotranspiration. In 1993, Bowen-ratio and lysimeter evapotranspiration comparisons were variable. Evapotranspiration estimated with the Bowen-ratio method averaged 5 percent more than evapotranspiration measured by lysimeters at the grass lysimeter site from October 1993 to November 1994, and 3 percent less than lysimeters at the sage lysimeter site from November 1993 to October 1994. From March 24 to April 5, 1994, at the grass lysimeter site, the Bowen-ratio method estimated 11 percent less, the Bowen-ratio method utilizing the fixed sensor system about 7 percent more, and the eddy-correlation method about 28 percent less evapotranspiration than the

  14. Remote field eddy current detection of stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The feasibility of detecting stress-corrosion cracks (SSC) using the Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique was demonstrated. The RFEC technique interrogates the entire thickness of the pipe and is applicable for in-line inspection. If it can be shown that the RFEC technique is effective in detecting SSC, then the technique is an ideal method for detecting the defects of interest. A defect detection model is proposed for explaining the mechanism for crack detection. For axially oriented, closed cracks, such as SCC, the conventional defect detection model proved to be too simplistic and not applicable. Therefore, a new detection mode that examines the flow of circumferential eddy currents was developed based on experimental results. This model, though not rigorous, provides a general understanding of the applicability of the RFEC technique for finding SSC. The data from the cracks and various artificial defects is presented in three formats: isometric projections, pseudocolor images and line-of-sight data. Though only two cracks were found, the experimental results correlate well with the circumferential eddy current theory. A theoretical analysis of the effects of motion on the output signal of the receiver is presented. This analysis indicates that inspection speed of simple implementations may be limited to a few miles per hour. Remote field eddy current inspection has excellent potential for inspection of gas transmission lines for detecting stress corrosion cracks that should be further developed.

  15. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation.

  16. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation. PMID:27131700

  17. Transient eddies in the MACDA Mars reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooring, Todd A.; Wilson, R. John

    2015-10-01

    We present a survey of the transient eddy activity in the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) reanalysis. The spatial structure and propagation characteristics of the eddies are emphasized. Band-pass-filtered variance and covariance fields are found to be zonally modulated, indicating a longitude dependence of the typical amplitudes of Martian transient eddies. Considerable repeatability of the eddy field spatial structures is found across Mars years, including a roughly wave number 3 pattern of low-level eddy meridional temperature transport (v'T'¯) in the northern hemisphere that is evident before and after winter solstice and a possible tendency for northern hemisphere eddy kinetic energy maxima to be located above low-lying areas. Southern hemisphere eddy fields tend to feature two local maxima, one roughly south of Tharsis and the other associated with Hellas. Eddies are weakened near winter solstice in both hemispheres and were generally weakened in the northern hemisphere during the 2001 (Mars year 25) global dust storm, albeit with little change in spatial patterns. Because the transient eddies propagate in space, we also used a teleconnection map-based technique to estimate their phase velocities. Eddy propagation at the surface is found to follow topography, a phenomenon less evident at higher altitude. Possible physical mechanisms underlying the documented eddy phenomena are discussed.

  18. Flap noise characteristics measured by pressure cross correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. R.

    1980-03-01

    The aerodynamic sound generated by a realistic aircraft flap system was investigated through the use of cross correlations between surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound. Measurements were conducted in two subsonic wind tunnel studies to determine the strength, distribution, and directivity of the major sources of flap noise at speeds up to 79.0 m/sec. A pilot study was performed on a single flap model to test the measurement technique and provide initial data on the characteristics of flap noise. The major portion of this investigation studied the sound radiated by a realistic large scale model of a triple slotted flap system mounted on a sweptback 6.7 meter semispan model wing. The results of this investigation have identified the major sources of flap generated noise and their dependence of flow defining parameters. In addition, a possible avenue toward the reduction of flap generated noise has been identified via the placement of the flap actuator fairings on the flap system.

  19. Inexpensive Eddy-Current Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Robert F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Radial crack replicas serve as evaluation standards. Technique entails intimately joining two pieces of appropriate aluminum alloy stock and centering drilled hole through and along interface. Bore surface of hole presents two vertical stock interface lines 180 degrees apart. These lines serve as radial crack defect replicas during eddy-current technique setup and verification.

  20. Eddies in the Red Sea: A statistical and dynamical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Peng; Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-06-01

    Sea level anomaly (SLA) data spanning 1992-2012 were analyzed to study the statistical properties of eddies in the Red Sea. An algorithm that identifies winding angles was employed to detect 4998 eddies propagating along 938 unique eddy tracks. Statistics suggest that eddies are generated across the entire Red Sea but that they are prevalent in certain regions. A high number of eddies is found in the central basin between 18°N and 24°N. More than 87% of the detected eddies have a radius ranging from 50 to 135 km. Both the intensity and relative vorticity scale of these eddies decrease as the eddy radii increase. The averaged eddy lifespan is approximately 6 weeks. AEs and cyclonic eddies (CEs) have different deformation features, and those with stronger intensities are less deformed and more circular. Analysis of long-lived eddies suggests that they are likely to appear in the central basin with AEs tending to move northward. In addition, their eddy kinetic energy (EKE) increases gradually throughout their lifespans. The annual cycles of CEs and AEs differ, although both exhibit significant seasonal cycles of intensity with the winter and summer peaks appearing in February and August, respectively. The seasonal cycle of EKE is negatively correlated with stratification but positively correlated with vertical shear of horizontal velocity and eddy growth rate, suggesting that the generation of baroclinic instability is responsible for the activities of eddies in the Red Sea.

  1. Analysis of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over an Indian teak mixed deciduous forest for winter and summer months using eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Chandra Shekhar; Thumaty, Kiran Chand; Rodda, Suraj Reddy; Sonakia, Ajit; Dadhwal, Vinay Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we report initial results on analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapour (H2O), and energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat flux) over teak mixed deciduous forests of Madhya Pradesh, central India, during winter (November 2011 and January 2012) and summer (February-May 2012) seasons using eddy covariance flux tower datasets. During the study period, continuous fast response measurements of CO2, H2O and heat fluxes above the canopy were carried out at 10 Hz and averaged for 30 minutes. Concurrently, slow response measurements of meteorological parameters are also being carried out. Diurnal and seasonal variations of CO2, H2O and heat fluxes were analysed and correlated with the meteorological variables. The study showed strong influence of leaf off and on scenario on the CO2, H2O and energy fluxes due to prevalence of deciduous vegetation type in the study area. Maximum amount of CO2 was sequestered for photosynthesis during winter (monthly mean of mol/m2/s) compared to summer (monthly mean of mol/m2/s). Energy flux analysis (weekly mean) showed more energy being portioned into latent heat during winter (668 W/m2) and sensible heat during summer (718 W/m2).

  2. Exploring Eddy-Covariance Measurements Using a Spatial Approach: The Eddy Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, Christian; Bernhofer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis states that "standard" eddy-covariance measurements of fluxes at a fixed location can replace a spatial ensemble of instantaneous values at multiple locations. For testing this hypothesis, a unique turbulence measurement set-up was used for two measurement campaigns over desert (Namibia) and grassland (Germany) in 2012. This "Eddy Matrix" combined nine ultrasonic anemometer-thermometers and 17 thermocouples in a 10 m × 10 m regular grid with 2.5-m grid distance. The instantaneous buoyancy flux derived from the spatial eddy covariance of the Eddy Matrix was highly variable in time (from -0.3 to 1 m K s^{-1} ). However, the 10-min average reflected 83 % of the reference eddy-covariance flux with a good correlation. By introducing a combined eddy-covariance method (the spatial eddy covariance plus the additional flux of the temporal eddy covariance of the spatial mean values), the mean flux increases by 9 % relative to the eddy-covariance reference. Considering the typical underestimation of fluxes by the standard eddy-covariance method, this is seen as an improvement. Within the limits of the Eddy Matrix, Taylor's hypothesis is supported by the results.

  3. Numerical techniques for the study of long-time correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.

    1985-05-01

    In the study of long-time correlations extremely long orbits must be calculated. This may be accomplished much more reliably using fixed-point arithmetic. Use of this arithmetic on the Cray-1 computer is illustrated.

  4. Assessment of the soil water balance by the combination of cosmic ray neutron sensing and eddy covariance technique in an irrigated citrus orchard (Marrakesh, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroos, Katja; Baroni, Gabriele; Er-Raki, Salah; Francke, Till; Khabba, Said; Jarlan, Lionel; Hanich, Lahoucine; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation water requirement plays a crucial role in many agricultural areas and especially in arid and semi-arid landscapes. Improvements in the water management and the performance of the irrigation systems require a correct evaluation of the hydrological processes involved. However, some difficulties can arise due to the heterogeneity of the soil-plant system and of the irrigation scheme. To overcome these limitations, in this study, the soil water balance is analyzed by the combination of the Eddy Covariance technique (EC) and Cosmic Ray neutron Sensing (CRS). EC provides the measurement of the actual evapotranspiration over the area as it was presented in many field conditions. Moreover CRS showed to be a valuable approach to measure the root zone soil moisture integrated in a footprint of ~30 ha. In this way, the combination of the two methodologies should provide a better analysis of the soil water balance at field scale, as opposed to point observations, e.g. by TDR, evaporimeter and fluxmeter. Then, this could increase the capability to assess the irrigation efficiency and the agricultural water management. The study is conducted in a citrus orchard situated in a semi-arid region, 30 km southwest of Marrakesh (Morocco). The site is flat and planted with trees of same age growing in parallel rows with drip irrigation lines and application of fertilizer and pesticides. The original soil seems modified on the surface by the agricultural use, creating differences between trees, rows and lines. In addition, the drip irrigation creates also a spatial variability of the water flux distribution in the field, making this site an interesting area to test the methodology. Particular attention is given to the adaptation of the standard soil sampling campaign used for the calibration of the CRS and the introduction of a weighing function. Data were collected from June to December 2013, which corresponds to the high plant transpiration. Despite the intention of the

  5. Simultaneous Flux Measurements of CO2, its Stable Isotope Ratios and Trace Gases Based on Eddy Accumulation Technique for Flux Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hirata, R.

    2007-12-01

    for on-site measurement. Therefore, as a first step, we are planning to measure those fluxes based on an eddy accumulation technique coupled with flask sampling and high precision lab analysis. We report current progress of the development.

  6. The Fate of Ozone at a Ponderosa Pine Plantation: Partitioning Between Stomatal and Non-stomatal Deposition Using Sap Flow and Eddy Covariance Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpius, M. R.; McKay, M. M.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2001-12-01

    Major advances in quantifying ozone deposition to vegetated ecosystems have been made using above-canopy techniques -- such as eddy covariance -- that allow for the direct measure of ozone flux into natural systems. However, from above-canopy flux measurements alone, it is impossible to differentiate between deposition through stomatal openings of trees versus non-stomatal surfaces or within canopy chemical loss. Therefore, there is a need to partition ozone fluxes into plant stomatal and non-stomatal components. Sap flow measurements provide a direct measurement of stomatal conductance from which we can infer ozone uptake by trees: this represents a novel way to determine pollutant loading on stomatal surfaces of trees that is inexpensive, reliable, and can be deployed in a multitude of environments. Sap flow measurements were used to determine ozone uptake by ponderosa pine trees in the Sierra Nevada Mountains year-round starting in June 2000 at Blodgett Forest, an Ameriflux site located ~75 miles downwind of Sacramento, CA. Concurrently, total ecosystem ozone flux was measured using eddy covariance. Mean total ozone flux to the ecosystem was 46.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-15.1) in summer 2000, 27.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-14.2) in fall 2000, 8.2 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-5.1) in winter 2001, and 21.1 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-11.6) in spring 2001. Mean ozone flux through the stomata was 14.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-4.1) during summer 2000, 12.9 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-5.8) during fall 2000, 5.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-2.8) during winter 2001, and 12.7 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-3.7) during spring 2001. The percentage of total ozone deposition which occurred through the stomata was 31% in summer, 47% in fall, 69% but highly variable in winter, and 60% in spring. The difference between total ozone flux to the ecosystem and stomatal ozone flux to the trees varied exponentially with air temperature, suggesting that much of the non-stomatal deposition was actually due to chemical loss either on surfaces or within

  7. Problems and solutions in analyzing partial-reflection drift data by correlation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solutions in analyzing partial reflection drift data by correlation techniques are discussed. The problem of analyzing spaced antenna drift data breaks down into the general categories of raw data collection and storage, correlation calculation, interpretation of correlations, location of time lags for peak correlation, and velocity calculation.

  8. Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, M; Delrot, P; Leonard, I; Alfalou, A; Brosseau, C; Dogariu, A

    2013-02-10

    Underwater target detection is investigated by combining active polarization imaging and optical correlation-based approaches. Experiments were conducted in a glass tank filled with tap water with diluted milk or seawater and containing targets of arbitrary polarimetric responses. We found that target estimation obtained by imaging with two orthogonal polarization states always improves detection performances when correlation is used as detection criterion. This experimental study illustrates the potential of polarization imaging for underwater target detection and opens interesting perspectives for the development of underwater imaging systems. PMID:23400061

  9. Accurate prediction of unsteady and time-averaged pressure loads using a hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/large-eddy simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozinoski, Radoslav

    Significant research has been performed over the last several years on understanding the unsteady aerodynamics of various fluid flows. Much of this work has focused on quantifying the unsteady, three-dimensional flow field effects which have proven vital to the accurate prediction of many fluid and aerodynamic problems. Up until recently, engineers have predominantly relied on steady-state simulations to analyze the inherently three-dimensional ow structures that are prevalent in many of today's "real-world" problems. Increases in computational capacity and the development of efficient numerical methods can change this and allow for the solution of the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications. An integral part of this capability has been the performance and accuracy of the turbulence models coupled with advanced parallel computing techniques. This report begins with a brief literature survey of the role fully three-dimensional, unsteady, Navier-Stokes solvers have on the current state of numerical analysis. Next, the process of creating a baseline three-dimensional Multi-Block FLOw procedure called MBFLO3 is presented. Solutions for an inviscid circular arc bump, laminar at plate, laminar cylinder, and turbulent at plate are then presented. Results show good agreement with available experimental, numerical, and theoretical data. Scalability data for the parallel version of MBFLO3 is presented and shows efficiencies of 90% and higher for processes of no less than 100,000 computational grid points. Next, the description and implementation techniques used for several turbulence models are presented. Following the successful implementation of the URANS and DES procedures, the validation data for separated, non-reattaching flows over a NACA 0012 airfoil, wall-mounted hump, and a wing-body junction geometry are presented. Results for the NACA 0012 showed significant improvement in flow predictions

  10. Utility of correlation techniques in gravity and magnetic interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, V. W.; Koski, J. S.; Braice, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Internal correspondence uses Poisson's Theorem in a moving-window linear regression analysis between the anomalous first vertical derivative of gravity and total magnetic field reduced to the pole. The regression parameters provide critical information on source characteristics. The correlation coefficient indicates the strength of the relation between magnetics and gravity. Slope value gives delta j/delta sigma estimates of the anomalous source. The intercept furnishes information on anomaly interference. Cluster analysis consists of the classification of subsets of data into groups of similarity based on correlation of selected characteristics of the anomalies. Model studies are used to illustrate implementation and interpretation procedures of these methods, particularly internal correspondence. Analysis of the results of applying these methods to data from the midcontinent and a transcontinental profile shows they can be useful in identifying crustal provinces, providing information on horizontal and vertical variations of physical properties over province size zones, validating long wavelength anomalies, and isolating geomagnetic field removal problems.

  11. Comparative analysis of matter and energy fluxes determined by Bowen Ratio and Eddy Covariance techniques at a crop site in eastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, K.; Hehn, M.; Bernhofer, C.

    2012-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric fluxes is an important means to evaluate ecosystem exchanges. In 2009 and 2010, fluxes and gradients of heat, water vapour, and CO2 over winter barley and rapeseed were measured simultaneously at the Klingenberg cropland site in Germany. A Bowen Ratio (BR) system was employed alongside to an existing Eddy Covariance (EC) tower. The BR system is required to account for the longer response time of the chemiluminescence analysers measuring other trace gases, e.g. NOx. To test and evaluate the application of the NOx measurement setup, the two independent systems (BR/EC) are compared with respect to energy and CO2 fluxes. We show a regression and differences analysis, diurnal cycles of the obtained fluxes, and interpret their coherence to the growth stage of the crops. The regression analysis depicts that differences between the systems are largest for latent heat LE (BR detects apparently higher LE due to the forced closure of energy balance), whereby the matter fluxes of CO2 show fairly little differences. Both measurement systems are able to capture the fluctuations of fluxes adequately well. Additionally, a multiple linear regression revealed that differences between the obtained fluxes are not induced by atmospheric conditions. The results of the differences analysis for sensible and latent heat point out that the observed differences of fluxes between both systems are mainly due to deviations in the mean, while differences in variability and timing/shape are of smaller importance. The differences of CO2 fluxes between both measurement systems are particularly caused by deviations in timing and shape, which can be explained with the linear cross-correlation coefficient (R2=0.8). From the good results of the comparison of matter fluxes (CO2) we conclude that the use of the Bowen Ratio method is applicable to other matter fluxes (like NOx).

  12. Eddy current scanning at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; Foley, M.; Brinkmann, A.; Ozelis, J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2005-07-01

    In the framework of SRF cavity development, Fermilab is creating the infrastructure needed for the characterization of the material used in the cavity fabrication. An important step in the characterization of ''as received'' niobium sheets is the eddy current scanning. Eddy current scanning is a non-destructive technique first adopted and further developed by DESY with the purpose of checking the cavity material for sub-surface defects and inclusions. Fermilab has received and further upgraded a commercial eddy current scanner previously used for the SNS project. The upgrading process included developing new filtering software. This scanner is now used daily to scan the niobium sheets for the Fermilab third harmonic and transverse deflecting cavities. This paper gives a status report on the scanning results obtained so far, including a discussion of the typology of signals being detected. We also report on the efforts to calibrate this scanner, a work conducted in collaboration with DESY.

  13. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  14. An Approach to Minimizing Artifacts Caused by Cross-Sensitivity in the Determination of Air-Sea CO2 Flux Using the Eddy-Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ziqiang; Gao, Huiwang; Gao, Zengxiang; Wang, Renlei; Xue, Yuhuan; Yao, Xiaohong

    2013-07-01

    The air-sea CO2 flux was measured from a research vessel in the North Yellow Sea in October 2007 using an open-path eddy-covariance technique. In 11 out of 64 samples, the normalized spectra of scalars (C}2, water vapour, and temperature) showed similarities. However, in the remaining samples, the normalized CO2 spectra were observed to be greater than those of water vapour and temperature at low frequencies. In this paper, the noise due to cross-sensitivity was identified through a combination of intercomparisons among the normalized spectra of three scalars and additional analyses. Upon examination, the cross-sensitivity noise appeared to be mainly present at frequencies {<}0.8 Hz. Our analysis also suggested that the high-frequency fluctuations of CO2 concentration (frequency {>}0.8 Hz) was probably less affected by the cross-sensitivity. To circumvent the cross-sensitivity issue, the cospectrum in the high-frequency range 0.8-1.5 Hz, instead of the whole range, was used to estimate the CO2 flux by taking the contribution of the high frequency to the CO2 flux to be the same as the contribution to the water vapour flux. The estimated air-sea CO2 flux in the North Yellow Sea was -0.039 ± 0.048 mg m^{-2} s^{-1}, a value comparable to the estimates using the inertial dissipation method and Edson's method (Edson et al., J Geophys Res 116:C00F10, 2011).

  15. Utility of correlation techniques in gravity and magnetic interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, V. W.; Koski, J. S.; Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Two methods of quantitative combined analysis, internal correspondence and clustering, are presented. Model studies are used to illustrate implementation and interpretation procedures of these methods, particularly internal correspondence. Analysis of the results of applying these methods to data from the midcontinent and a transcontinental profile show they can be useful in identifying crustal provinces, providing information on horizontal and vertical variations of physical properties over province size zones, validating long wave-length anomalies, and isolating geomagnetic field removal problems. Thus, these techniques are useful in considering regional data acquired by satellites.

  16. Vortex metrology using Fourier analysis techniques: vortex networks correlation fringes.

    PubMed

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Néstor

    2012-10-20

    In this work, we introduce an alternative method of analysis in vortex metrology based on the application of the Fourier optics techniques. The first part of the procedure is conducted as is usual in vortex metrology for uniform in-plane displacement determination. On the basis of two recorded intensity speckled distributions, corresponding to two states of a diffuser coherently illuminated, we numerically generate an analytical signal from each recorded intensity pattern by using a version of the Riesz integral transform. Then, from each analytical signal, a two-dimensional pseudophase map is generated in which the vortices are located and characterized in terms of their topological charges and their core's structural properties. The second part of the procedure allows obtaining Young's interference fringes when Fourier transforming the light passing through a diffracting mask with multiple apertures at the locations of the homologous vortices. In fact, we use the Fourier transform as a mathematical operation to compute the far-field diffraction intensity pattern corresponding to the multiaperture set. Each aperture from the set is associated with a rectangular hole that coincides both in shape and size with a pixel from recorded images. We show that the fringe analysis can be conducted as in speckle photography in an extended range of displacement measurements. Effects related with speckled decorrelation are also considered. Our experimental results agree with those of speckle photography in the range in which both techniques are applicable. PMID:23089799

  17. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, A. T.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2001-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Large Eddy Simulation of a non-buoyant jet issuing from a circular orifice in a wall, and developing in neutral surroundings. The effects of the subgrid scales on the large eddies have been modeled with the dynamic large eddy simulation model applied to the fully 3D domain in spherical coordinates. The simulation captures the unsteady motions of the large-scales within the jet as well as the laminar motions in the entrainment region surrounding the jet. The computed time-averaged statistics (mean velocity, concentration, and turbulence parameters) compare well with laboratory data without invoking an empirical entrainment coefficient as employed by line integral models. The use of the large eddy simulation technique allows examination of unsteady and inhomogeneous features such as the evolution of eddies and the details of the entrainment process.

  19. Unified Ultrasonic/Eddy-Current Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James; Butler, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging station for detecting cracks and flaws in solid materials developed combining both ultrasonic C-scan and eddy-current imaging. Incorporation of both techniques into one system eliminates duplication of computers and of mechanical scanners; unifies acquisition, processing, and storage of data; reduces setup time for repetitious ultrasonic and eddy-current scans; and increases efficiency of system. Same mechanical scanner used to maneuver either ultrasonic or eddy-current probe over specimen and acquire point-by-point data. For ultrasonic scanning, probe linked to ultrasonic pulser/receiver circuit card, while, for eddy-current imaging, probe linked to impedance-analyzer circuit card. Both ultrasonic and eddy-current imaging subsystems share same desktop-computer controller, containing dedicated plug-in circuit boards for each.

  20. Tracking Loop Current eddies with satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leben, Robert R.; Born, George H.

    1993-11-01

    Geosat altimeter derived sea surface height (SSH) anomaly fields have been optimally interpolated onto a regular space time grid using both crossover data from the nonrepeating Geodetic Mission (Geosat-GM) and collinear data from the Exact Repeat Mission (Geosat-ERM). Over four years of data were collected from the combined missions, spanning the time period from April 1985 through August 1989, during which six major and at least two minor Loop Current eddies were directly observed. Eddy paths determined by automated tracking of the local maximum values in the SSH anomaly fields were compared with eddy centers estimated from drifting buoy trajectories, validating the data processing and tracking techniques. Accurate tracking of eddy centers allowed transits of 90°W to be used as a benchmark for determination of eddy shedding periods. For this data set the average period between major eddy transits was 9.8 months, with individual separation periods ranging from 6 to 14 months. The two minor eddies observed were associated with the deepest penetrations of the Loop Current into the gulf, and were nearly coincident with the shedding of the strongest major Loop Current eddies.

  1. Southern Ocean eddy phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenger, I.; Münnich, M.; Gruber, N.; Knutti, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous features in the Southern Ocean, yet their phenomenology is not well quantified. To tackle this task, we use satellite observations of sea level anomalies and sea surface temperature (SST) as well as in situ temperature and salinity measurements from profiling floats. Over the period 1997-2010, we identified over a million mesoscale eddy instances and were able to track about 105 of them over 1 month or more. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the boundary current systems, and the regions where they interact are hot spots of eddy presence, representing also the birth places and graveyards of most eddies. These hot spots contrast strongly to areas shallower than about 2000 m, where mesoscale eddies are essentially absent, likely due to topographical steering. Anticyclones tend to dominate the southern subtropical gyres, and cyclones the northern flank of the ACC. Major causes of regional polarity dominance are larger formation numbers and lifespans, with a contribution of differential propagation pathways of long-lived eddies. Areas of dominance of one polarity are generally congruent with the same polarity being longer-lived, bigger, of larger amplitude, and more intense. Eddies extend down to at least 2000 m. In the ACC, eddies show near surface temperature and salinity maxima, whereas eddies in the subtropical areas generally have deeper anomaly maxima, presumably inherited from their origin in the boundary currents. The temperature and salinity signatures of the average eddy suggest that their tracer anomalies are a result of both trapping in the eddy core and stirring.

  2. Eddy current inspection of graphite fiber components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Bryson, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    The recognition of defects in materials properties still presents a number of problems for nondestructive testing in aerospace systems. This project attempts to utilize current capabilities in eddy current instrumentation, artificial intelligence, and robotics in order to provide insight into defining geometrical aspects of flaws in composite materials which are capable of being evaluated using eddy current inspection techniques. The unique capabilities of E-probes and horseshoe probes for inspecting probes for inspecting graphite fiber materials were evaluated and appear to hold great promise once the technology development matures. The initial results are described of modeling eddy current interactions with certain flaws in graphite fiber samples.

  3. Remote field eddy current detection of stress-corrosion cracks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The feasibility of detecting stress-corrosion cracks (SSC) using the Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique was demonstrated. The RFEC technique interrogates the entire thickness of the pipe and is applicable for in-line inspection. If it can be shown that the RFEC technique is effective in detecting SSC, then the technique is an ideal method for detecting the defects of interest. A defect detection model is proposed for explaining the mechanism for crack detection. For axially oriented, closed cracks, such as SCC, the conventional defect detection model proved to be too simplistic and not applicable. Therefore, a new detection mode that examines the flow of circumferential eddy currents was developed based on experimental results. This model, though not rigorous, provides a general understanding of the applicability of the RFEC technique for finding SSC. The data from the cracks and various artificial defects is presented in three formats: isometric projections, pseudocolor images and line-of-sight data. Though only two cracks were found, the experimental results correlate well with the circumferential eddy current theory. A theoretical analysis of the effects of motion on the output signal of the receiver is presented. This analysis indicates that inspection speed of simple implementations may be limited to a few miles per hour. Remote field eddy current inspection has excellent potential for inspection of gas transmission lines for detecting stress corrosion cracks that should be further developed.

  4. Phase demodulation from a single fringe pattern based on a correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Robin, Eric; Valle, Valéry

    2004-08-01

    We present a method for determining the demodulated phase from a single fringe pattern. This method, based on a correlation technique, searches in a zone of interest for the degree of similarity between a real fringe pattern and a mathematical model. This method, named modulated phase correlation, is tested with different examples. PMID:15298408

  5. Joint transform correlator based on CIELAB model with encoding technique for color pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiengsheng; Chen, Chulung; Liu, Chengyu; Chen, Yuming

    2010-10-01

    The CIELAB standard color vision model instead of the traditional RGB color model is utilized for polychromatic pattern recognition. The image encoding technique is introduced. The joint transform correlator is set to be the optical configuration. To achieve the distortion invariance in discrimination processes, we have used the minimum average correlation energy approach to yield sharp correlation peak. From the numerical results, it is found that the recognition ability based on CIELAB color specification system is accepted.

  6. Optimized swimmer tracking system by a dynamic fusion of correlation and color histogram techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benarab, D.; Napoléon, T.; Alfalou, A.; Verney, A.; Hellard, P.

    2015-12-01

    To design a robust swimmer tracking system, we took into account two well-known tracking techniques: the nonlinear joint transform correlation (NL-JTC) and the color histogram. The two techniques perform comparably well, yet they both have substantial limitations. Interestingly, they also seem to show some complementarity. The correlation technique yields accurate detection but is sensitive to rotation, scale and contour deformation, whereas the color histogram technique is robust for rotation and contour deformation but shows low accuracy and is highly sensitive to luminosity and confusing background colors. These observations suggested the possibility of a dynamic fusion of the correlation plane and the color scores map. Before this fusion, two steps are required. First is the extraction of a sub-plane of correlation that describes the similarity between the reference and target images. This sub-plane has the same size as the color scores map but they have different interval values. Thus, the second step is required which is the normalization of the planes in the same interval so they can be fused. In order to determine the benefits of this fusion technique, first, we tested it on a synthetic image containing different forms with different colors. We thus were able to optimize the correlation plane and color histogram techniques before applying our fusion technique to real videos of swimmers in international competitions. Last, a comparative study of the dynamic fusion technique and the two classical techniques was carried out to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique. The criteria of comparison were the tracking percentage, the peak to correlation energy (PCE), which evaluated the sharpness of the peak (accuracy), and the local standard deviation (Local-STD), which assessed the noise in the planes (robustness).

  7. Seasonal Dynamics of N2O and CO2 Emissions from a Corn Production System measured with the Eddy covariance and Chamber techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwuozo, S. A.; Hui, D.; Dennis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural Practices play a major role in the global fluxes of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. The use of fertilizer in Corn production has generated concerns about its contribution to global climate change. Thus, farmers and others concerned have become interested in more efficient fertilization management practice and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. To understand best management practices, in the 2012 and 2013 corn growing seasons, field experiments was conducted at Tennessee State University Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. The study examines the seasonal variations of (N2O) and (CO2) emissions from soil as a function of six treatment that include inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, chicken litter and biochar application. The combinations were: regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) no till, regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) conventional till, multiple URAN applications (4 times) no till, Denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application in no till, chicken litter with regular URAN application no till and URAN application with biochar in no tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated 6 times. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured using a closed chamber method after rainfall event(s), fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during gas sampling. Plant physiological and growth parameters were measured as appropriate and meteorological records were kept. N2O flux was also continuously measured in a commercial corn field using the eddy covariance (EC) technique fitted with a fast response N2O analyzer to check the N2O emissions at the large scale and compare it to the chamber method. Results obtained with the EC technique were comparable with the chamber methods. Preliminary data indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the agricultural

  8. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    The eddy heat flux generated by the statistically equilibrated baroclinic instability of a uniform, horizontal temperature gradient is studied using a two-mode quasigeostrophic model. An overview of the dependence of the eddy diffusivity of heat Dtau on the planetary potential vorticity gradient beta, the bottom friction kappa, the deformation radius lambda, the vertical shear of the large-scale flow 2U and the domain size L is provided at 70 numerical simulations with beta = 0 (f-plane) and 110 simulations with beta ≠ 0 (beta-plane). Strong, axisymmetric, well-separated baroclinic vortices dominate the equilibrated barotropic vorticity and temperature fields of f-plane turbulence. The heat flux arises from a systematic northward (southward) migration of anti-cyclonic (cyclonic) eddies with warm (cold) fluid trapped in the cores. Zonal jets form spontaneously on the beta-plane, and stationary, isotropic, jet-scale eddies align within the strong eastward-flowing regions of the jets. In both studies, the vortices and jets give rise to a strong anti-correlation between the barotropic vorticity zeta and the temperature field tau. The baroclinic mode is also an important contributor to dissipation by bottom friction and energizes the barotropic mode at scales larger than lambda. This in part explains why previous parameterizations for the eddy heat flux based on Kolmogorovian cascade theories are found to be unreliable. In a separate study, temperature and salinity profiles obtained with expendable conductivity, temperature and depth (XCTD) probes within Drake Passage, Southern Ocean are used to analyze the turbulent diapycnal eddy diffusivity kappa rho to a depth of 1000 meters. The Polar Front separates two dynamically different regions with strong, surface-intensified mixing north of the Front. South of the Polar Front mixing is weaker and peaks at a depth of approximately 500 m, near the local temperature maximum. Peak values of kapparho are found to exceed 10-3 m

  9. "Audibilization" in the Chemistry Laboratory: An Introduction to Correlation Techniques for Data Extraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, James W.; Murphy, Michael; Poler, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the development and advantages of various correlation techniques that are used for data extraction and are integral to all modern instrumentation. The "Audibilization" of the electronic signals in such cases is found to be very essential for the technique.

  10. Novel Optical Technique Developed and Tested for Measuring Two-Point Velocity Correlations in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Goldburg, Walter I.

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing turbulent flows was developed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The work is being done in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, through a grant from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. The technique we are using, Homodyne Correlation Spectroscopy (HCS), is a laser-light-scattering technique that measures the Doppler frequency shift of light scattered from microscopic particles in the fluid flow. Whereas Laser Doppler Velocimetry gives a local (single-point) measurement of the fluid velocity, the HCS technique measures correlations between fluid velocities at two separate points in the flow at the same instant of time. Velocity correlations in the flow field are of fundamental interest to turbulence researchers and are of practical importance in many engineering applications, such as aeronautics.

  11. A comparison of image registration techniques for the correlation of radiolabelled antibody distribution with tumour morphology.

    PubMed

    Flynn, A A; Green, A J; Boxer, G; Pedley, R B; Begent, R H

    1999-07-01

    Image registration is a powerful tool for correlating functional images with images of anatomical structure. This facilitates more accurate quantitation of regional radiopharmaceutical uptake. Similarly, registration of images of radiolabelled antibody distribution, in tissue sections, with the equivalent histological images allows the comparison and measurement of radiopharmaceutical distribution with morphological structure. The images used were obtained by storage phosphor plate technology, for the radiopharmaceutical distribution, and by digitization of the stained histological sections. Here we compare four fully automatic registration techniques and one manual technique in terms of their spatial accuracy. We have found that there was no difference in accuracy between cross-correlation, minimization of variance and mutual information. These techniques were more accurate than principal axes and the manual technique. However, minimization of variance and mutual information were more time-consuming than the other methods. Consequently, cross-correlation is the method of choice for automatic registration of large numbers of these image pairs. PMID:10442718

  12. Remote field eddy current inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique uses an internal probe to inspect conducting tubes nondestructively. A coaxial solenoidal exciter, energized with low frequency AC, and detector coils near the inside of the pipe wall are separated by about two pipe diameters to obtain through wall transmission and equal sensitivity to defects on the outside or inside of the pipe wall. Calculation methods are outlined and the voltage plane polar plot signal representation for defect measurement is described. Slit defect interactions in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic tubes are discussed. Defect-induced anomalous fields are interpreted in terms of anomalous source eddy current and missing magnetization defect models. The use of computer animations to represent the time variations of high resolution field measurements and calculations is described.

  13. Automated eddy current analysis of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for characterizing flaws in graphite-based filament-wound cylindrical structures is described. A major emphasis was also placed upon incorporating artificial intelligence techniques into the signal analysis portion of the inspection process. Developing an eddy current scanning system using a commercial robot for inspecting graphite structures (and others) was a goal in the overall concept and is essential for the final implementation for the expert systems interpretation. Manual scans, as performed in the preliminary work here, do not provide sufficiently reproducible eddy current signatures to be easily built into a real time expert system. The expert systems approach to eddy current signal analysis requires that a suitable knowledge base exist in which correct decisions as to the nature of a flaw can be performed. A robotic workcell using eddy current transducers for the inspection of carbon filament materials with improved sensitivity was developed. Improved coupling efficiencies achieved with the E-probes and horseshoe probes are exceptional for graphite fibers. The eddy current supervisory system and expert system was partially developed on a MacIvory system. Continued utilization of finite element models for predetermining eddy current signals was shown to be useful in this work, both for understanding how electromagnetic fields interact with graphite fibers, and also for use in determining how to develop the knowledge base. Sufficient data was taken to indicate that the E-probe and the horseshoe probe can be useful eddy current transducers for inspecting graphite fiber components. The lacking component at this time is a large enough probe to have sensitivity in both the far and near field of a thick graphite epoxy component.

  14. Multispectral image sharpening using wavelet transform techniques and spatial correlation of edges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, George P.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Several reported image fusion or sharpening techniques are based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT). The technique described here uses a pixel-based maximum selection rule to combine respective transform coefficients of lower spatial resolution near-infrared (NIR) and higher spatial resolution panchromatic (pan) imagery to produce a sharpened NIR image. Sharpening assumes a radiometric correlation between the spectral band images. However, there can be poor correlation, including edge contrast reversals (e.g., at soil-vegetation boundaries), between the fused images and, consequently, degraded performance. To improve sharpening, a local area-based correlation technique originally reported for edge comparison with image pyramid fusion is modified for application with the DWT process. Further improvements are obtained by using redundant, shift-invariant implementation of the DWT. Example images demonstrate the improvements in NIR image sharpening with higher resolution pan imagery.

  15. Mesoscale eddies in the NE Pacific tropical-subtropical zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurczyn, J. A.; Beier, E.; Lavín, M. F.; Chaigneau, A.

    2012-04-01

    Mesoscale eddy characteristics in the NE Pacific tropical-subtropical zone (16-30N) are analyzed using nearly 20 years of satellite altimetry maps and an automated eddy detection algorithm known as "the closed contours of sea-level anomaly (SLA)". The mean eddy characteristics of the study region are described based on the analysis of 1055 anticyclonic and 1097 cyclonic eddy trajectories. Eddies are preferentially formed near the coast in three main subregions: Punta Eugenia, Cabo San Lucas and Cabo Corrientes. The seasonally highest eddy generation occurs during spring in the three subregions, when surface winds are upwelling-favorable and strong upwelling events occur, thus promoting strong vertical shear between currents. Being highly non-linear and propagating toward the open ocean, mesoscale eddies can thus transport near-coastal seawater properties and plankton toward remote regions. In general, Punta Eugenia and Cabo San Lucas show the highest eddy occurrence. Long-lived eddies, having a life span greater than 16 weeks, are preferentially formed in Punta Eugenia. On average, eddy radii are larger than the Rossby internal radius of deformation, probably due to an up-scale energy cascade of geostrophic turbulence. Mean eddy propagation speeds in Cabo San Lucas and Punta Eugenia regions show higher values than the first baroclinic Rossby waves, while eddies south of ~19N travel slightly slower. The seasonal eddy generation and the eddy-prolific areas can be explained by the climatology of surface currents, where the eddy-prolific areas coincide with sites of strongest surface speeds, and the timing of the highest seasonal eddy generation corresponds with the strongest seasonal surface currents. Although relatively strong interannual variability is observed in terms of the local eddy activity index, no clear correlation is observed between eddy-generation events and large-scale climate indices such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation index or the Multivariate

  16. Study of photon correlation techniques for processing of laser velocimeter signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, W. T., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The objective was to provide the theory and a system design for a new type of photon counting processor for low level dual scatter laser velocimeter (LV) signals which would be capable of both the first order measurements of mean flow and turbulence intensity and also the second order time statistics: cross correlation auto correlation, and related spectra. A general Poisson process model for low level LV signals and noise which is valid from the photon-resolved regime all the way to the limiting case of nonstationary Gaussian noise was used. Computer simulation algorithms and higher order statistical moment analysis of Poisson processes were derived and applied to the analysis of photon correlation techniques. A system design using a unique dual correlate and subtract frequency discriminator technique is postulated and analyzed. Expectation analysis indicates that the objective measurements are feasible.

  17. Non-degenerated photoluminescence excitation correlation spectroscopy using an optical sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Takayuki; Masumoto, Naofumi; Harada, Tomonori; Makino, Takayuki; Takagi, Yoshihiro

    2012-10-15

    We have developed a highly time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy based on the excitation correlation method. Successive irradiation of a pair of ultrashort light pulses with different wavelength combinations taken from two sub-picosecond lasers has exposed both temporal and energetic correlation in photoluminescence intensity associated with a nonlinear response of a sample. An optical sampling technique has been introduced successfully in order to avoid consideration of the synchronization control of ultrashort light pulses. We have demonstrated the abilities of this technique by applying to the nonlinear photoluminescence dynamics of organic dye molecules in solution.

  18. Correlation of the deply technique with ultrasonic imaging of impact damage in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. T.; Heyman, J. S.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Blodgett, E. D.; Miller, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    The ultrasonic quantitative NDE of graphite-epoxy composites is difficult because of the inherent inhomogeneity of the material. An examination technique must discriminate between inherent scattering centers in an undamaged region and the scattering centers due to defects or damage. Two NDE techniques that can make this distinction were used to image and quantify the extent of damage resulting from a low-energy impact. These results were then compared with those from a destructive technique. The first NDE technique, polar backscatter, employed a nonzero polar angle insonifying method to reduce specular reflection from the surface of the sample; the second NDE technique used a normal-incidence ultrasonic beam. Results from both NDE methods were subsequently correlated with those from a destructive technique, the deply method. Both the qualitative and quantitative agreement of the methods was excellent.

  19. Pitch evaluation of gratings based on a digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yancong; Jia, Wei; Wei, Chunlong; Yu, Junjie; Li, Shubin; Li, Yanyang; Li, Minkang; Qiu, Jucheng; Wang, Shaoqing; Zhou, Changhe

    2016-04-01

    The digital image correlation (DIC) technique used for metrological grating evaluation is presented in this paper. A CCD camera is used to acquire the grating image, and the DIC technique together with the peak-position detection method is used to evaluate the grating pitches. The theoretical analysis and simulations are performed to confirm that the performance of our technique is as accurate as the Fourier transform (FT) technique, and is capable of noise resistance. As an example, the uniformity of the grating fabricated in our laboratory is measured using this method. The experimental results show that this grating has a peak-to-valley uniformity of 48 nm during a long range of 35 mm, and our technique has a higher repeatability than the FT technique in our measurement strategy. This work should be of great significance for the evaluation of metrological grating for optical encoders.

  20. A new gauge-invariant method for diagnosing eddy diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, J.; Maddison, J. R.; Marshall, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Coarse resolution numerical ocean models must typically include a parameterisation for mesoscale turbulence. A common recipe for such parameterisations is to invoke mixing of some tracer quantity, such as potential vorticity or buoyancy. However, it is well known that eddy fluxes include large rotational components which necessarily do not lead to any mixing; eddy diffusivities diagnosed from unfiltered fluxes are thus contaminated by the presence of these rotational components. Here a new methodology is applied whereby eddy diffusivities are diagnosed directly from the eddy force function. The eddy force function depends only upon flux divergences, is independent of any rotational flux components, and is inherently non-local and smooth. A one-shot inversion procedure is applied, minimising the mis-match between parameterised force functions and force functions derived from eddy resolving calculations. This enables diffusivities associated with the eddy potential vorticity and Gent-McWilliams coefficients associated with eddy buoyancy fluxes to be diagnosed. This methodology is applied to multi-layer quasi-geostrophic ocean gyre simulations. It is found that: (i) a strictly down-gradient scheme for mixing potential vorticity and quasi-geostrophic buoyancy has limited success in reducing the mis-match compared to one with no sign constraint on the eddy diffusivity or Gent--McWilliams coefficient, with prevalent negative signals around the time-mean jet; (ii) the diagnostic is successful away from the jet region and wind-forced top layer; (iii) the locations of closed mean stream lines correlate with signals of positive eddy potential vorticity diffusivity; (iv) there is indication that the magnitude of the eddy potential vorticity diffusivity correlates well with the eddy energy. Implications for parameterisation are discussed in light of these diagnostic results.

  1. Correlation between near infrared spectroscopy and electrical techniques in measuring skin moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, M.; Sabbri, A. R. M.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.; Omar, A. F.

    2014-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy technique serves as an important tool for the measurement of moisture content of skin owing to the advantages it has over the other techniques. The purpose of the study is to develop a correlation between NIR spectrometer with electrical conventional techniques for skin moisture measurement. A non-invasive measurement of moisture content of skin was performed on different part of human face and hand under control environment (temperature 21 ± 1 °C, relative humidity 45 ± 5 %). Ten healthy volunteers age between 21-25 (male and female) participated in this study. The moisture content of skin was measured using DermaLab® USB Moisture Module, Scalar Moisture Checker and NIR spectroscopy (NIRQuest). Higher correlation was observed between NIRQuest and Dermalab moisture probe with a coefficient of determination (R2) above 70 % for all the subjects. However, the value of R2 between NIRQuest and Moisture Checker was observed to be lower with the R2 values ranges from 51.6 to 94.4 %. The correlation of NIR spectroscopy technique successfully developed for measuring moisture content of the skin. The analysis of this correlation can help to establish novel instruments based on an optical system in clinical used especially in the dermatology field.

  2. Correlations Between Teacher and Student Backgrounds and Teacher Perceptions of Discipline Problems and Disciplinary Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, W. L.; Cooper, Harris

    1984-01-01

    A study in Columbia, Missouri, revealed that many teacher and student background characteristics correlated weakly but significantly with teachers' perceptions of the frequency of discipline infractions and the effectiveness of disciplinary techniques. The data (derived from school records and from a questionnaire to which 162 elementary teachers…

  3. Field transients of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation accessed via time-resolving and correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, A.; Semenov, A.; Hübers, H.-W.; Hoehl, A.; Ries, M.; Wüstefeld, G.; Ulm, G.; Ilin, K.; Thoma, P.; Siegel, M.

    2016-03-01

    Decaying oscillations of the electric field in repetitive pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation in the terahertz frequency range was evaluated by means of time-resolving and correlation techniques. Comparative analysis of real-time voltage transients of the electrical response and interferograms, which were obtained with an ultrafast zero-bias Schottky diode detector and a Martin-Puplett interferometer, delivers close values of the pulse duration. Consistent results were obtained via the correlation technique with a pair of Golay Cell detectors and a pair of resonant polarisation-sensitive superconducting detectors integrated on one chip. The duration of terahertz synchrotron pulses does not closely correlate with the duration of single-cycle electric field expected for the varying size of electron bunches. We largely attribute the difference to the charge density oscillations in electron bunches and to the low-frequency spectral cut-off imposed by both the synchrotron beamline and the coupling optics of our detectors.

  4. Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique based on a photon-number-resolving photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baicheng; Miao, Quanlong; Wang, Shenyuan; Hui, Debin; Zhao, Tianqi; Liang, Kun; Yang, Ru; Han, Dejun

    2016-05-01

    In this report, we present Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique and its applications in time-correlated Raman spectroscopy. The main difference between TCPC and existing Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is that the TCPC employs a photon-number-resolving photodetector (SiPM, silicon photomultiplier) and measures exact photon number rather than counting single photon by reducing pulse light intensity, thus high measurement speed and efficiency can be expected. A home-made Raman spectrometer has demonstrated an Instrument Response Function (IRF) ~100ps (FWHM) based on TCPC with a strip SiPM (1mm×0.05mm, containing 500 micro cells), fast and weak Raman signals was separated from slow and strong fluorescence background of bulk trinitrotoluene TNT sample. The original Raman spectrum of bulk TNT, measured by TCPC technique, is compared with the result obtained by a commercial Micro-Raman Spectrometer.

  5. Eddy-current testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasley, R. L.; Birdwell, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Eddy-current inspection is discussed as a method for locating subsurface flaws in electrically conductive materials. The physical principles and electrical circuitry are described along with the test equipment.

  6. Full-field detection of surface defects using real-time holography and optical correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackshire, James L.; Duncan, Bradley D.

    1999-02-01

    Innovative optical NDE techniques are being developed for the full-field detection and evaluation of surface defects and defect precursors in titanium and aluminum based alloys. The techniques are based on frequency-translated holography and optical correlation principles, and use bacteriohodopsin (bR) holographic films and temporal correlation techniques for real-time storage and retrieval of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) features and embedded surface defect information. The SAW waves induced on the material surface being studied are made to interfere with optical light waves, and fringes are produced that are a function of optical Doppler shifts induced by phonon-photon interaction on the surface of the materials. Visualization of these SAW patterns allow for NDE characterization of features on and near the surface of the materials, including defect and defect precursor sites. Preliminary results are provided for real-time bR holographic recordings of acoustic patterns induced on Al2024-T3 material surfaces.

  7. The eddy cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichevin, Thierry; Nof, Doron

    1996-09-01

    A new nonlinear mechanism for the generation of "Meddies" by a cape is proposed. The essence of the new process is that the flow-force associated with any steady current that curves back on itself around a cape cannot be balanced without generating and shedding eddies. The process is modeled as follows. A westward flowing density current advances along a zonal wall and turns eastward after reaching the edge of the wall (i.e. the Cape of St Vincent). Integration of the steady (and inviscid) momentum equation along the wall gives the long-shore flow-force and shows that, no matter what the details of the turning process are, such a scenario is impossible. It corresponds to an unbalanced flow-force and, therefore, cannot exist. Namely, in an analogy to a rocket, the zonal longshore current forces the entire system to the west. A flow field that can compensate for such a force is westward drifting eddies that push the system to the east. In a similar fashion to the backward push associated with a firing cannon, the westward moving eddies (bullets) balance the integrated momentum of the flow around the cape. Nonlinear solutions are constructed analytically using an approach that enables one to compute the eddies' size and generation frequency without solving for the incredibly complicated details of the generation process itself. The method takes advantage of the fact that, after each eddy is generated, the system returns to its original structure. It is based on the integration of the momentum equation (for periodic flows) over a control volume and a perturbation expansion in ɛ, the ratio between the eddies' westward drift and the parent current speed. It is found that, because of the relatively small size of the Mediterranean eddies, β is not a sufficiently strong mechanism to remove the eddies (from the Cape of St Vincent) at the observed frequency. It is, therefore, concluded that westward advection must also take place. Specifically, it is found that an advection

  8. Revolving Eddy-Current Probe Detects Cracks Near Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, James P.; Nath, Shridhar; Simpson, John

    1995-01-01

    Scanning eddy-current probe in circular pattern increases sensitivity with which probe indicates fatigue cracks and other defects in metal surfaces in vicinity of rivets. Technique devised to facilitate inspection of riveted joints in aircraft. Eddy-current probe in question described in "Electro-magnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use" (LAR-15046).

  9. Remote field eddy current inspection of support plate fretting wear

    SciTech Connect

    Shatat, A.; Atherton, D.L.

    1997-03-01

    This article demonstrates how the remote field eddy current technique might be extended to measure support plate fretting wear in heat exchanger tubes. A finite element analysis was used to examine the plate`s effect on the eddy current signal. Experimental data lend support to a suggested multifrequency method for sizing fretting grooves.

  10. Automated eddy current analysis of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    This research effort focused on the use of eddy current techniques for characterizing flaws in graphite-based filament-wound cylindrical structures. A major emphasis was on incorporating artificial intelligence techniques into the signal analysis portion of the inspection process. Developing an eddy current scanning system using a commercial robot for inspecting graphite structures (and others) has been a goal in the overall concept and is essential for the final implementation for expert system interpretation. Manual scans, as performed in the preliminary work here, do not provide sufficiently reproducible eddy current signatures to be easily built into a real time expert system. The expert systems approach to eddy current signal analysis requires that a suitable knowledge base exist in which correct decisions as to the nature of the flaw can be performed. In eddy current or any other expert systems used to analyze signals in real time in a production environment, it is important to simplify computational procedures as much as possible. For that reason, we have chosen to use the measured resistance and reactance values for the preliminary aspects of this work. A simple computation, such as phase angle of the signal, is certainly within the real time processing capability of the computer system. In the work described here, there is a balance between physical measurements and finite element calculations of those measurements. The goal is to evolve into the most cost effective procedures for maintaining the correctness of the knowledge base.

  11. Transient eddy current flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, J.; Stefani, F.

    2015-10-01

    Measuring local velocities or entire flow rates in liquid metals or semiconductor melts is a notorious problem in many industrial applications, including metal casting and silicon crystal growth. We present a new variant of an old technique which relies on the continuous tracking of a flow-advected transient eddy current that is induced by a pulsed external magnetic field. This calibration-free method is validated by applying it to the velocity of a spinning disk made of aluminum. First tests at a rig with a flow of liquid GaInSn are also presented.

  12. Relationships among the slopes of lines derived from various data analysis techniques and the associated correlation coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for fitting a straight line to a collection of data points is given. The relationships between the slopes and correlation coefficients, and between the corresponding standard deviations and correlation coefficient are given.

  13. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-25

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  14. The statistical behaviour of attached eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, J. D.; Marusic, I.

    2015-01-01

    Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis forms the basis of an established model of the logarithmic layer in wall-bounded turbulent flows in which this inertially dominated region is characterised by a hierarchy of geometrically self-similar eddying motions that scale with their distance to the wall. The hypothesis has gained considerable support from high Reynolds number measurements of the second-order moments of the fluctuating velocities. Recently, Meneveau and Marusic ["Generalized logarithmic law for high-order moments in turbulent boundary layers," J. Fluid Mech. 719, R1 (2013)] presented experimental evidence that all even-ordered moments of the streamwise velocity will exhibit a logarithmic dependence on the distance from the wall. They demonstrated that this was consistent with the attached eddy hypothesis, so long as the velocity distribution is assumed to be Gaussian (which allows the use of the central limit theorem). In this paper, we derive this result from the attached eddy model without assuming a Gaussian velocity distribution, and find that such logarithmic behaviours are valid in the large Reynolds number limit. We also revisit the physical and mathematical basis of the attached eddy hypothesis, in order to increase rigour and minimise the assumptions required to apply the hypothesis. To this end, we have extended the proof of Campbell's theorem to apply to the velocity field corresponding to a forest of variously sized eddies that are randomly placed on the wall. This enables us to derive all moments of the velocity in the logarithmic region, including cross-correlations between different components of the velocity. By contrast, previous studies of the attached eddy hypothesis have considered only the mean velocity and its second order moments. From this, we obtain qualitatively correct skewnesses and flatnesses for the spanwise and wall-normal fluctuations. The issue of the Reynolds number dependence of von Kármán's constant is also addressed.

  15. A simple cross-correlation technique between infrared and hard x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect

    Kraessig, B.; Dunford, R. W.; Kanter, E. P.; Landahl, E. C.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-04-27

    We report a gas phase technique to establish the temporal overlap of ultrafast infrared laser and hard x-ray pulses. We use tunnel ionization of a closed shell atom in the strong field at the focus of an infrared laser beam to open a distinct x-ray absorption resonance channel with a clear fluorescence signature. The technique has an intrinsic response of a few femtoseconds and is nondestructive to the two beams. It provides a step-functionlike cross-correlation result. The details of the transient provide a diagnostic of the temporal overlap of the two pulses.

  16. Active-passive correlation spectroscopy - A new technique for identifying ocean color algorithm spectral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new active-passive airborne data correlation technique has been developed which allows the validation of existing in-water oceoan color algorithms and the rapid search, identification, and evaluation of new sensor band locations and algorithm wavelength intervals. Thus far, applied only in conjunction with the spectral curvature algorithm (SCA), the active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS) technique shows that (1) the usual 490-nm (center-band) chlorophyll SCA could satisfactorily be placed anywhere within the nominal 460-510-nm interval, and (2) two other spectral regions, 645-660 and 680-695 nm, show considerable promise for chlorophyll pigment measurement. Additionally, the APCS method reveals potentially useful wavelength regions (at 600 and about 670 nm) of very low chlorophyll-in-water spectral curvature into which accessory pigment algorithms for phycoerythrin might be carefully positioned. In combination, the APCS and SCA methods strongly suggest that significant information content resides within the seemingly featureless ocean color spectrum.

  17. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  18. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous eddies

    SciTech Connect

    Pavia, E.G.

    1994-12-31

    This work deals with mesoscale warm oceanic eddies; i.e., self-contained bodies of water which transport heat, among other things, for several months and for several hundreds of kilometers. This heat transport is believed to play an important role in the atmospheric and oceanic conditions of the region where it is being transported. Here the author examines the difference in evolution between eddies modeled as blobs of homogeneous water and eddies in which density varies in the horizontal. Preliminary results suggest that instability is enhanced by inhomogeneities, which would imply that traditional modeling studies, based on homogeneous vortices have underestimated the rate of heat-release from oceanic eddies to the surroundings. The approach is modeling in the simplest form; i.e., one single active layer. Although previous studies have shown the drastic effect on stability brought by two or more dynamically-relevant homogeneous layers, the author believes the single-layer eddy-model has not been investigated thoroughly.

  19. Earthquake-explosion discrimination using waveform cross-correlation technique for mines in southeast of Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahbasi, A.; Moradi, A.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of man-made explosions in a seismic catalogue leads to errors in statistical analyses of seismicity. Recently, the need to monitor man-made explosions used for mining, road excavating, and other constructional applications has been become a demanding challenge for the seismologists. In this way, we gain new insight into the cross-correlation technique and conduct this approach to discriminate explosions from seismic datasets. Following this, improved P-wave arrival times are used for more precise relocation. In this study, the waveform cross-correlation technique provides a reliable means for discriminating explosions which have cross-correlation coefficients (CC) of 0.6 or greater with their own corresponding stacked waveforms. The results illustrate that approximately 80 % of seismicity of southeast of Tehran, recorded by the Iranian Seismological Center (IRSC), includes events which have cross-correlation coefficients of ≥0.6 with their corresponding stacked waveforms. Furthermore, with improved P-wave arrival time, there is a better chance to relocate explosions precisely in the region under study.

  20. Eddy current heating in magnetic refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Eddy current heating can be a significant source of parasitic heating in low temperature magnetic refrigerators. To study this problem a technique to approximate the heating due to eddy currents has been developed. A formula is presented for estimating the heating within a variety of shapes commonly found in magnetic refrigerators. These shapes include circular, square, and rectangular rods; cylindrical and split cylindrical shells; wire loops; and 'coil foil. One set of components evaluated are different types of thermal radiation shields. This comparison shows that a simple split shield is almost as effective (only 23 percent more heating) as using a shield, with the same axial thermal conductivity, made of 'coil foil'.

  1. The Tundra is a Net Source of CO2 Measured by Autochambers and Eddy Covariance Techniques During Five Years in a Site With Permafrost Thawing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, G.; Mauritz, M.; Bracho, R. G.; Salmon, V. G.; Webb, E.; Hutchings, J. A.; Natali, S.; Crummer, K. G.; Schuur, E.; Schaedel, C.

    2015-12-01

    Current and future warming of high latitude tundra ecosystems will play an important role in climate change through feedbacks to the global carbon (C) cycle. Long-term observational and experimental studies are pivotal for detecting and understanding changes in the coming decades. Yet studies of the C feedbacks from observational studies and manipulative experiments made on tundra plant communities often have significantly different conclusions with regards to impacts of warming on the ecosystem. Comparing results from these two study types, however, often involves integrating CO2 flux measurements that were collected on different spatial scales using a variety of methods. The process of data assimilation for landscape level analysis is often complicated by the fact that many projects only utilize one method for measuring CO2 fluxes at a given site. This study compares five years of C dynamics in a moist acidic tundra from control plots in a manipulative warming experiment (CiPEHR - plot-scale) and landscape-level natural permafrost thaw gradient (Gradient - Eddy covariance) observations all within a 1km distance from each other. We found net ecosystem exchange (NEE) to be an annual net source of carbon using both methods (Gradient 12.3 - 125.6 g CO2-C m-2 and CiPEHR warming manipulation 80.2 - 175.8 g CO2-C m-2). The differences between sites were biggest in the first three years of observation, and can be explained by lower growing season gross primary production (GPP - first three years) from the manipulation (CiPEHR), and lower ecosystem respiration (Reco) from CiPEHR in the first year only. Suppressed GPP and Reco could be from the impact of experimental setup (chamber soil collars - root damage), which lowered the plant community's capacity to fix C, but recovered within three years. This warrants caution of making generalization of short-term experiments in the tundra and more research is needed evaluating coupling of belowground and aboveground C dynamics.

  2. Extraction of correlated count rates using various gate generation techniques: Part II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzlova, D.; Croft, S.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, M. T.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental comparison of different neutron pulse train analysis methods developed to extract correlated count rates from the detected neutron arrival times. This work comprises a sequel to the previous paper (Part I Theory) [1], where the complete formalism of different analysis methods was presented. In the current paper, the signal triggered inspection (STI), randomly triggered inspection (RTI) and MIXED techniques (implemented in current shift register hardware) are compared using list mode data acquired from series of 252Cf sources. In addition, three techniques of randomly triggered inspection are investigated: gates generated at fixed clock frequency, i.e., consecutive (non-overlapping) gates and overlapping gates (known as fast accidentals sampling (FAS)), as well as gates generated after a long delay following each trigger pulse (delayed-signal gates). The average correlated count rates (singles (S), doubles (D) and triples (T)) are extracted using the STI, RTI and MIXED analysis techniques and compared to demonstrate their equivalence. In addition, an influence of different gate generation and pulse train analysis techniques on the precision of the measured S, D and T rates is investigated.

  3. F2DPR: a fast and robust cross-correlation technique for volumetric PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, Thomas; Jeon, Young Jin; Lecordier, Bertrand; David, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    The current state-of-the-art in cross-correlation based time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques are the fluid trajectory correlation, FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013) and the fluid trajectory evaluation based on an ensemble-averaged cross-correlation, FTEE (Jeon et al 2014a). These techniques compute the velocity vector as a polynomial trajectory Γ in space and time, enabling the extraction of beneficial quantities such as material acceleration whilst significantly increasing the accuracy of the particle displacement prediction achieved by standard two-frame PIV. In the context of time-resolved volumetric PIV, the drawback of trajectory computation is the computational expense of the three-dimensional (3D) cross-correlation, exacerbated by the requirement to perform N  ‑  1 cross-correlations, where N (for typically 5≤slant N≤slant 9 ) is the number of sequential particle volumes, for each velocity field. Therefore, the acceleration of this calculation is highly desirable. This paper re-examines the application of two-dimensional (2D) cross-correlation methods to three-dimensional (3D) datasets by Bilsky et al (2011) and the binning techniques of Discetti and Astarita (2012). A new and robust version of the 2D methods is proposed and described, called fast 2D projection—re-projection (f2dpr). Performance tests based on computational time and accuracy for both two-frame and multi-frame PIV are carried out on synthetically generated data. The cases presented herein include uniaxial uniform linear displacements and shear, and simulated turbulence data. The proposed algorithm is shown to be in the order of 10 times faster than a standard 3D FFT without loss of precision for a wide range of synthetic test cases, while combining with the binning technique can yield 50 times faster computation. The algorithm is also applied to reconstructed synthetic turbulent particle fields to investigate reconstruction noise on its performance and no

  4. Micromagnetics with eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, R.; Millhollon, J.; Long, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation for of a conducting, magnetic body. The modified LLG equations include the magnetic field due to eddy currents in the total effective magnetic field. We derive an expression for the magnetic field due to eddy current losses and show that it is well defined. We then show that the work done by the eddy currents in opposing the change of magnetization is a Rayleigh type dissipation function, and derive the modified LLG equations using the calculus of variations. Finally, we show that the modified LLG equations lead to a decrease in the Gibbs energy. This implies that the LLG equations describes a dynamic process proceeding spontaneously forward in time.

  5. Large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The three-dimensional, time-dependent primitive equations of motion were numerically integrated for the case of turbulent channel flow. A partially implicit numerical method was developed. An important feature of this scheme is that the equation of continuity is solved directly. The residual field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model, while the large-scale field was obtained directly from the solution of the governing equations. An important portion of the initial velocity field was obtained from the solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The pseudospectral method was used for numerical differentiation in the horizontal directions, and second-order finite-difference schemes were used in the direction normal to the walls. The large eddy simulation technique is capable of reproducing some of the important features of wall-bounded turbulent flows. The resolvable portions of the root-mean square wall pressure fluctuations, pressure velocity-gradient correlations, and velocity pressure-gradient correlations are documented.

  6. Eddy current damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Rich, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    A high torque capacity eddy current damper used as a rate limiting device for a large solar array deployment mechanism is discussed. The eddy current damper eliminates the problems associated with the outgassing or leaking of damping fluids. It also provides performance advantages such as damping torque rates, which are truly linear with respect to input speed, continuous 360 degree operation in both directions of rotation, wide operating temperature range, and the capability of convenient adjustment of damping rates by the user without disassembly or special tools.

  7. Pulsed eddy current testing. [nondestructive tests of the external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Since a large number of the procedures used for inspecting the external tank are concerned with determining flaws in welds, there is a need to develop an inspection technique, which can be automated, to determine flaws in welds and structures with complex geometries. Techniques whereby an eddy current is generated in a metallic material and the changes in the circuit parameters due to material differences are observed, were chosen as one possible approach. Pulsed eddy current and its relationship to multifrequency techniques is discussed as well as some preliminary results obtained from observing pulsed waveforms with apparatus and algorithms currently in use for ultrasonic testing of welds. It can be shown the pulsed eddy current techniques can provide similar results, can eliminate some of the noncritical parameters affecting the eddy current signals, and can facilitate in the detection of critical parameter such as flaws, subsurface voids, and corrosion.

  8. Techniques for estimating the unknown functions of incomplete experimental spectral and correlation response matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Borsoi, Laurent; Delaune, Xavier; Piteau, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose analytical and numerical straightforward approximate methods to estimate the unknown terms of incomplete spectral or correlation matrices, when the cross-spectra or cross-correlations available from multiple measurements do not cover all pairs of transducer locations. The proposed techniques may be applied whenever the available data includes the auto-spectra at all measurement locations, as well as selected cross-spectra which implicates all measurement locations. The suggested methods can also be used for checking the consistency between the spectral or correlation functions pertaining to measurement matrices, in cases of suspicious data. After presenting the proposed spectral estimation formulations, we discuss their merits and limitations. Then we illustrate their use on a realistic simulation of a multi-supported tube subjected to turbulence excitation from cross-flow. Finally, we show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques by extracting the modal responses of the simulated flow-excited tube, using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) method, from an incomplete response matrix 1

  9. Vector correlation technique for pixel-wise detection of collagen fiber realignment during injurious tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kyle P; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2009-01-01

    Excessive soft tissue loading can produce adverse structural and physiological changes in the absence of any visible tissue rupture. However, image-based analysis techniques to assess microstructural changes during loading without any visible rupture remain undeveloped. Quantitative polarized light imaging (QPLI) can generate spatial maps of collagen fiber alignment during loading with high temporal resolution and can provide a useful technique to measure microstructural responses. While collagen fibers normally realign in the direction that tissue is loaded, rapid, atypical fiber realignment during loading may be associated with the response of a local collagenous network to fiber failure. A vector correlation technique was developed to detect this atypical fiber realignment using QPLI and mechanical data collected from human facet capsular ligaments (n=16) loaded until visible rupture. Initial detection of anomalous realignment coincided with a measurable decrease in the tissue stiffness in every specimen and occurred at significantly lower strains than those at visible rupture (p<0.004), suggesting this technique may be sensitive to a loss of microstructural integrity. The spatial location of anomalous realignment was significantly associated with regions where visible rupture developed (p<0.001). This analysis technique provides a foundation to identify regional differences in soft tissue injury tolerances and relevant mechanical thresholds. PMID:19895112

  10. Methane fluxes above the Hainich forest by True Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas; Gentsch, Lydia; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the role of forests for the global methane cycle requires quantifying vegetation-atmosphere exchange of methane, however observations of turbulent methane fluxes remain scarce. Here we measured turbulent fluxes of methane (CH4) above a beech-dominated old-growth forest in the Hainich National Park, Germany, and validated three different measurement approaches: True Eddy Accumulation (TEA, closed-path laser spectroscopy), and eddy covariance (EC, open-path and closed-path laser spectroscopy, respectively). The Hainich flux tower is a long-term Fluxnet and ICOS site with turbulent fluxes and ecosystem observations spanning more than 15 years. The current study is likely the first application of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) for the measurement of turbulent exchange of methane and one of the very few studies comparing open-path and closed-path eddy covariance (EC) setups side-by-side. We observed uptake of methane by the forest during the day (a methane sink with a maximum rate of 0.03 μmol m‑2 s‑1 at noon) and no or small fluxes of methane from the forest to the atmosphere at night (a methane source of typically less than 0.01 μmol m‑2 s‑1) based on continuous True Eddy Accumulation measurements in September 2015. First results comparing TEA to EC CO2 fluxes suggest that True Eddy Accumulation is a valid option for turbulent flux quantifications using slow response gas analysers (here CRDS laser spectroscopy, other potential techniques include mass spectroscopy). The TEA system was one order of magnitude more energy efficient compared to closed-path eddy covariance. The open-path eddy covariance setup required the least amount of user interaction but is often constrained by low signal-to-noise ratios obtained when measuring methane fluxes over forests. Closed-path eddy covariance showed good signal-to-noise ratios in the lab, however in the field it required significant amounts of user intervention in addition to a high power consumption. We

  11. Interview with Eddie Reisch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Hazel

    2013-01-01

    Eddie Reisch is currently working as a policy advisor for Te Reo Maori Operational Policy within the Student Achievement group with the Ministry of Education in New Zealand, where he has implemented and led a range of e-learning initiatives and developments, particularly the Virtual Learning Network (VLN). He is regarded as one of the leading…

  12. Eddies off Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color satellite image shows a large phytoplankton bloom, several hundred square kilometers in size, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Tasmania. In this scene, the rich concentration of microscopic marine plants gives the water a lighter, more turquoise appearance which helps to highlight the current patterns there. Notice the eddies, or vortices in the water, that can be seen in several places. It is possible that these eddies were formed by converging ocean currents flowing around Tasmania, or by fresh river runoff from the island, or both. Often, eddies in the sea serve as a means for stirring the water, thus providing nutrients that help support phytoplankton blooms, which in turn provide nutrition for other organisms. Effectively, these eddies help feed the sea (click to read an article on this topic). This image was acquired November 7, 2000, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. Tasmania is located off Australia's southeastern coast. Image courtesy SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  13. Fracture analysis of plastic-bonded explosive by digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Zhang, J.; Xiong, Chun-Yang; Fang, J.; Hao, Y.; Wen, M. P.

    2002-05-01

    Plastic-bonded explosive is a kind of energy material used in military and civil engineering. It serves also as structures or components to sustain external loads. Safety and reliability of the material is of importance to prevent damage and fracture during both manufacturing and usage procedure. Digital image correlation technique was applied to analyze the deformation field of the material near crack tip. The specimen was loaded by uniaxial compression and a slot was preset at the specimen edge with 45 degrees orientation. The speckle images were captured during the load and the surface patterns were matched by correlation computation to obtain the displacement components. The stress intensity factors of the crack tip were evaluated by the deformation in the near region of the crack. By the comparison of the strain field and the surface profile, the damage form of the material can be analyzed that showed brittle behavior with axial splitting fracture.

  14. Emission-rotation correlation in pulsars: new discoveries with optimal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, P. R.; Karastergiou, A.; Johnston, S.; Kerr, M.; Shannon, R. M.; Roberts, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Pulsars are known to display short-term variability. Recently, examples of longer term emission variability have emerged that are often correlated with changes in the rotational properties of the pulsar. To further illuminate this relationship, we have developed techniques to identify emission and rotation variability in pulsar data, and determine correlations between the two. Individual observations may be too noisy to identify subtle changes in the pulse profile. We use Gaussian process (GP) regression to model noisy observations and produce a continuous map of pulse profile variability. Generally, multiple observing epochs are required to obtain the pulsar spin frequency derivative (dot{ν }). GP regression is, therefore, also used to obtain dot{ν }, under the hypothesis that pulsar timing noise is primarily caused by unmodelled changes in dot{ν }. Our techniques distinguish between two types of variability: changes in the total flux density versus changes in the pulse shape. We have applied these techniques to 168 pulsars observed by the Parkes radio telescope, and see that although variations in flux density are ubiquitous, substantial changes in the shape of the pulse profile are rare. We reproduce previously published results and present examples of profile shape changing in seven pulsars; in particular, a clear new example of correlated changes in profile shape and rotation is found in PSR J1602-5100. In the shape changing pulsars, a more complex picture than the previously proposed two state model emerges. We conclude that our simple assumption that all timing noise can be interpreted as dot{ν } variability is insufficient to explain our data set.

  15. Interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors using a VCSEL and correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, Cristian; Varón, Margarita; Pastor, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    We describe a demodulation technique for optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors based in the utilization of a long wavelength Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL). The identification of the FBG wavelength is performed by sweeping the VCSEL wavelength over the operation range of the sensors and correlating its raising and falling periods in order to automatically determine the initial and final points of the wavelength to time mapping readout. The process is carried out by a simple computational routine, which allows the identification of the FBGs' spectral position leading to a cost-effective scheme.

  16. Correlation techniques to determine model form in robust nonlinear system realization/identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stry, Greselda I.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The fundamental challenge in identification of nonlinear dynamic systems is determining the appropriate form of the model. A robust technique is presented which essentially eliminates this problem for many applications. The technique is based on the Minimum Model Error (MME) optimal estimation approach. A detailed literature review is included in which fundamental differences between the current approach and previous work is described. The most significant feature is the ability to identify nonlinear dynamic systems without prior assumption regarding the form of the nonlinearities, in contrast to existing nonlinear identification approaches which usually require detailed assumptions of the nonlinearities. Model form is determined via statistical correlation of the MME optimal state estimates with the MME optimal model error estimates. The example illustrations indicate that the method is robust with respect to prior ignorance of the model, and with respect to measurement noise, measurement frequency, and measurement record length.

  17. Comparisons of neural networks to standard techniques for image classification and correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paola, Justin D.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Neural network techniques for multispectral image classification and spatial pattern detection are compared to the standard techniques of maximum-likelihood classification and spatial correlation. The neural network produced a more accurate classification than maximum-likelihood of a Landsat scene of Tucson, Arizona. Some of the errors in the maximum-likelihood classification are illustrated using decision region and class probability density plots. As expected, the main drawback to the neural network method is the long time required for the training stage. The network was trained using several different hidden layer sizes to optimize both the classification accuracy and training speed, and it was found that one node per class was optimal. The performance improved when 3x3 local windows of image data were entered into the net. This modification introduces texture into the classification without explicit calculation of a texture measure. Larger windows were successfully used for the detection of spatial features in Landsat and Magellan synthetic aperture radar imagery.

  18. Automatic detection and classification of damage zone(s) for incorporating in digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudipta; Deb, Debasis

    2016-07-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a technique developed for monitoring surface deformation/displacement of an object under loading conditions. This method is further refined to make it capable of handling discontinuities on the surface of the sample. A damage zone is referred to a surface area fractured and opened in due course of loading. In this study, an algorithm is presented to automatically detect multiple damage zones in deformed image. The algorithm identifies the pixels located inside these zones and eliminate them from FEM-DIC processes. The proposed algorithm is successfully implemented on several damaged samples to estimate displacement fields of an object under loading conditions. This study shows that displacement fields represent the damage conditions reasonably well as compared to regular FEM-DIC technique without considering the damage zones.

  19. Forest Ecosystem respiration estimated from eddy covariance and chamber measurements under high turbulence and substantial tree mortality from bark beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speckman, Heather N.; Frank, John M.; Bradford, John B.; Miles, Brianna L.; Massman, William J.; Parton, William J.; Ryan, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Eddy covariance nighttime fluxes are uncertain due to potential measurement biases. Many studies report eddy covariance nighttime flux lower than flux from extrapolated chamber measurements, despite corrections for low turbulence. We compared eddy covariance and chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration at the GLEES Ameriflux site over seven growing seasons under high turbulence (summer night mean friction velocity (u*) = 0.7 m s−1), during which bark beetles killed or infested 85% of the aboveground respiring biomass. Chamber-based estimates of ecosystem respiration during the growth season, developed from foliage, wood and soil CO2 efflux measurements, declined 35% after 85% of the forest basal area had been killed or impaired by bark beetles (from 7.1 ±0.22 μmol m−2 s−1 in 2005 to 4.6 ±0.16 μmol m−2 s−1 in 2011). Soil efflux remained at ~3.3 μmol m−2 s−1 throughout the mortality, while the loss of live wood and foliage and their respiration drove the decline of the chamber estimate. Eddy covariance estimates of fluxes at night remained constant over the same period, ~3.0 μmol m−2 s−1 for both 2005 (intact forest) and 2011 (85% basal area killed or impaired). Eddy covariance fluxes were lower than chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration (60% lower in 2005, and 32% in 2011), but the mean night estimates from the two techniques were correlated within a year (r2 from 0.18-0.60). The difference between the two techniques was not the result of inadequate turbulence, because the results were robust to a u* filter of > 0.7 m s−1. The decline in the average seasonal difference between the two techniques was strongly correlated with overstory leaf area (r2=0.92). The discrepancy between methods of respiration estimation should be resolved to have confidence in ecosystem carbon flux estimates.

  20. Time reversal imaging and cross-correlations techniques by normal mode theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, J.; Fink, M.; Capdeville, Y.; Phung, H.; Larmat, C.

    2007-12-01

    Time-reversal methods were successfully applied in the past to acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics, non destructive testing and recently to seismic waves in seismology for earthquake imaging. The increasing power of computers and numerical methods (such as spectral element methods) enables one to simulate more and more accurately the propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media and to develop new applications, in particular time reversal in the three-dimensional Earth. Generalizing the scalar approach of Draeger and Fink (1999), the theoretical understanding of time-reversal method can be addressed for the 3D- elastic Earth by using normal mode theory. It is shown how to relate time- reversal methods on one hand, with auto-correlation of seismograms for source imaging and on the other hand, with cross-correlation between receivers for structural imaging and retrieving Green function. The loss of information will be discussed. In the case of source imaging, automatic location in time and space of earthquakes and unknown sources is obtained by time reversal technique. In the case of big earthquakes such as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of december 2004, we were able to reconstruct the spatio-temporal history of the rupture. We present here some new applications at the global scale of these techniques on synthetic tests and on real data.

  1. Measuring the thermal expansion coefficient of tubular steel specimens with digital image correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Strycker, M.; Schueremans, L.; Van Paepegem, W.; Debruyne, D.

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution it is investigated whether it is possible to measure the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of steel with the aid of the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. DIC is first used to obtain reference values of the CTE of well-known steels (S235 and SS304) on simple geometries (rectangular blocks) within a low temperature interval (up to 120 °C). Although the strains that occur in this process are small, the CTE can be determined with good accuracy if enough images are available. The influence of the different parameters that control the correlation process showed no influence on the results. The values for the CTE are compared to available literature references and strain gauge measurements. The technique is extended to measure within a higher temperature interval (up to 600 °C), three-dimensional geometries (tubular samples), and a third material (SS409). It is shown that also in these cases, the results obtained are reliable. This contribution is part of a larger research effort predicting the residual stress in tubes coming from the welding process with finite element (FE) simulation. The goal of this research is therefore twofold: firstly obtaining the CTE in function of temperature, which can be used as input for the FE simulations; and secondly exploring the possibilities of measuring small thermal strains with DIC.

  2. Extraction of correlated count rates using various gate generation techniques: Part I theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Henzlova, D.; Hauck, D. K.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of different gate generation techniques that can be used to extract correlated counting rates from neutron pulse trains in the context of Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting (PNMC). PNMC based on shift register pulse train time autocorrelation analyzers is an important Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) method used in the quantification of plutonium and other spontaneously fissile materials across the nuclear fuel cycle. Traditionally PNMC employs signal-triggered gate generation followed by a random gate, separated from the trigger pulse by a long delay, to extract the totals rate (gross or singles), the pairs (coincidences or doubles) rate, and the triplets (or triples) rate of correlated neutron pulse trains. In this paper we provide expressions for singles, doubles and triples rates using the information available in both, the random and signal-triggered gates (traditional shift register analysis), in the randomly triggered gates only, and introduce a third approach to extract the correlated rates using signal-triggered gates only. In addition, we expand the formalism for randomly triggered gate generation to include Fast Accidental Sampling (FAS) and consecutive gate generation.

  3. Determination of correlation functions of turbulent velocity and sound speed fluctuations by means of ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Tatiana A.; Durgin, William W.

    2011-12-01

    An experimental study of the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through grid-generated turbulence by means of an ultrasound technique is discussed. Experimental data were obtained for ultrasonic wave propagation downstream of heated and non-heated grids in a wind tunnel. A semi-analytical acoustic propagation model that allows the determination of the spatial correlation functions of the flow field is developed based on the classical flowmeter equation and the statistics of the travel time of acoustic waves traveling through the kinematic and thermal turbulence. The basic flowmeter equation is reconsidered in order to take into account sound speed fluctuations and turbulent velocity fluctuations. It allows deriving an integral equation that relates the correlation functions of travel time, sound speed fluctuations and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Experimentally measured travel time statistics of data with and without grid heating are approximated by an exponential function and used to analytically solve the integral equation. The reconstructed correlation functions of the turbulent velocity and sound speed fluctuations are presented. The power spectral density of the turbulent velocity and sound speed fluctuations are calculated.

  4. Correlation and registration of ERTS multispectral imagery. [by a digital processing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrud, L. O.; Henrikson, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Examples of automatic digital processing demonstrate the feasibility of registering one ERTS multispectral scanner (MSS) image with another obtained on a subsequent orbit, and automatic matching, correlation, and registration of MSS imagery with aerial photography (multisensor correlation) is demonstrated. Excellent correlation was obtained with patch sizes exceeding 16 pixels square. Qualities which lead to effective control point selection are distinctive features, good contrast, and constant feature characteristics. Results of the study indicate that more than 300 degrees of freedom are required to register two standard ERTS-1 MSS frames covering 100 by 100 nautical miles to an accuracy of 0.6 pixel mean radial displacement error. An automatic strip processing technique demonstrates 600 to 1200 degrees of freedom over a quater frame of ERTS imagery. Registration accuracies in the range of 0.3 pixel to 0.5 pixel mean radial error were confirmed by independent error analysis. Accuracies in the range of 0.5 pixel to 1.4 pixel mean radial error were demonstrated by semi-automatic registration over small geographic areas.

  5. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof

  6. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    for the field (one to two orders of magnitude lower compared to current closed-path laser based eddy covariance systems). Potential applications include fluxes of CO2, CH4, N2O, VOCs and other tracers. Finally we assess the flux accuracy of the Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) approach as in our real implementation relative to alternative techniques including eddy covariance (EC) and relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). We further quantify various sources of instrument and method specific measurement errors. This comparison uses real measurements of 20 Hz turbulent time series of 3D wind velocity, sonic temperature and CO2 mixing ratio over a mixed decidious forest at the 'ICOS' flux tower site 'Hainich', Germany. Results from a simulation using real wind and CO2 timeseries from the Hainich site from 30 April to 3 November 2014 and real instrument performance suggest that the maximum flux estimates error (50% and 75% error quantiles) from Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) relative to the true flux is 1.3% and 10%, respectively for monthly net fluxes, 1.6% and 7%, respectively for daily net fluxes and 8% and 35%, respectively for 30-minute CO2 flux estimates. Those results from CES are promising and outperform our REA estimates by about a factor of 50 assuming REA with constant b value. Results include flux time series from the EC, CES and REA approaches from 30-min to annual resolution.

  7. Interannual forcing mechanisms of California Current transports II: Mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Andrew; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Mesoscale eddies exert dominant control of cross-shelf exchanges, yet the forcing dynamics underlying their interannual and decadal variability remain uncertain. Using an ensemble of high-resolution ocean model hindcasts of the central and eastern North Pacific from 1950 to 2010 we diagnose the forcing mechanisms of low-frequency eddy variability in the California Current System (CCS). We quantify eddy activity by developing eddy counts based on closed contours of the Okubo-Weiss parameter and find that the spatial and temporal features of model-derived counts largely reproduce the short AVISO observational record. Comparison of model ensemble members allows us to separate the intrinsic and deterministic fractions of eddy variability in the northern CCS (34.5-50°N) and in the southern CCS (28.5-34.5°N). In the North, a large fraction of low-frequency eddy variability (30% anticyclones, 20% cyclones) is deterministic and shared with satellite observations. We develop a diagnostic model based on indices of the large-scale barotropic and baroclinic states of the CCS which recovers this deterministic variance. This model also strongly correlates with local atmospheric forcing. In contrast to the North, Southern CCS eddy counts exhibit very little deterministic variance, and eddy formation closely resembles a red-noise process. This new understanding of the external forcings of eddy variability allows us to better estimate how climate variability and change impact mesoscale transports in the California Current. The skill of our diagnostic model and its close association with local wind stress curl indicate that local atmospheric forcing is the dominant driver of eddy activity on interannual and decadal time scales north of pt. conception (~33°N).

  8. Application and correlation of nano resolution microscopy techniques to viral protein localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Jeffery Allen

    This dissertation is primarily focused on the application of super-resolution microscopy techniques to localization of viral proteins within envelope viruses. Advances in optical super-resolution microscopy techniques have enabled scientists to observe phenomena much smaller than the Abbe diffraction limit by stochastically limiting the number of molecules excited at a given instance and localizing their positions one at a time. Additionally, methods such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allow scientists to measure the topological features and material properties of samples through contact with a force probe. This dissertation describes the application of these two techniques to virology in order to localize internal viral proteins of enveloped virions, and measure their effect on the elastic properties of the virion. By utilizing super-resolution microscopy techniques such as Fluorescent Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy (fPALM) on virions, which have had their surface glycoproteins labeled with a photo-switchable label, the viral envelope may be accurately recovered. This dissertation describes the development and application of this technique as it applies to envelope recovery of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1). By fluorescently labeling proteins, which are internal to each of these viruses, I have been able to localize a variety of viral proteins within their recovered envelopes. This is done without significant damage to the virion, making this method a highly effective in vivo technique. In the case of VSV, an asymmetric localization along the central axis towards the blunt 5' end was found to exist for both the polymerase and phosphoproteins. These have been determined to occupy a region in the central cavity of ˜57 +/- 12 nm on the 5' end. This inhomogeneity of the underlying proteins such an asymmetry would predict that the Young's modulus would vary along the central axis of the virion. This dissertation

  9. Assessment of two-filter technique for correlating actinium-227 concentrations in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Fraizer, W.K.; Patch, K.D.; Reynolds, B.A.

    1980-02-01

    Concentrations of actinium-227 in soil samples from waste-disposal sites for uranium procession plants were successfully correlated with radon-219 measurements obtained by the two-filter technique, thus avoiding time-consuming and difficult radiochemical analyses. A flow-through sampling device and procedure were developed which determined actinium levels with a precision of 2 pCi/g +- 50%. Theoretical relations for the production of radon from actinium, the decay of radon, and the decay and diffusion of radon daughters in the two-filter apparatus were formulated. Measurements indicated that the emanation fraction for radon-219 was about 15%. Sampling filters collected radon daughters with a 93% efficiency while radon could be scrubbed from air samples by use of an activated-charcoal canister.

  10. Core noise source diagnostics on a turbofan engine using correlation and coherence techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A.; Reshotko, M.

    1976-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure measurements at several locations within the core of a turbofan engine were made simultaneously with far-field acoustic measurements. Correlation and coherence techniques were used to determine the relative amplitude and phase relationships between core pressures at these various locations and between the core pressures and far-field acoustic pressure. The results indicate that the combustor is a low-frequency source region for acoustic propagation through the core nozzle and out to the far-field. Specifically, it was found that the relation between source pressure and the resulting sound pressure involves a 180 deg phase shift and an amplitude transfer function which varies approximately as frequency squared. This is shown to be consistent with a simplified model using fluctuating entropy as a source term.

  11. Neutron multiplicity equation and its application for (n,2n) multiplication measurements by statistical correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Srinivasan, M.

    1986-07-01

    A new equation, called the neutron multiplicity equation (NME), has been derived starting from basic physics principles. Neutron multiplicity v is defined as the integral number of neutrons leaking from a neutron multiplying system for a source neutron introduced into it. Probability distribution of neutron multiplicities (PDNMs) gives the probability of leakage of neutrons as a function of their multiplicity v. The PDNM is directly measurable through statistical correlation techniques. In a specific application, the NME has been solved for PDNM as a function of v for /sup 9/Be spheres of varying radii and driven by a centrally located 14-MeV deuterium-tritium neutron source. The potential of NME for sensitivity analysis is demonstrated through a particular modification of secondary neutron transfer cross sections of /sup 9/Be. It turns out that PDNM is very sensitive, even as the ''average'' neutron leakage is practically insensitive to it.

  12. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  13. Optical cryptographic system employing multiple reference-based joint transform correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed Nazrul; Karim, Mohammad Ataul; Alam, Mohammad Showkat; Asari, K. Vijayan

    2011-06-01

    An optical joint transform correlation-based cryptographic system is a used to feed multiple phase-shifted encryption keys into four parallel channels along with a to-be-encrypted signal in the form of an image. The resulting joint power spectra (JPS) signals are phase-shifted and then combined to yield a modified JPS signal. Inverse Fourier transformation of the modified JPS signal yields the secured encrypted image. For decryption purpose, the received encrypted signal is first Fourier transformed and multiplied by the encryption key used in encryption. The derived signal is then inverse Fourier transformed to generate the output signal. The proposed system offers a nonlinear encryption without the involvement of any complex mathematical operation on the encryption key otherwise required in similar encryption techniques and is invariant to noise. Computer simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme with binary, as well as gray images in both noise-free and noisy environment.

  14. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  15. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  16. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Rochet, A; Hofmann, G; Kraut, M; Grunwaldt, J-D

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies. PMID:26133867

  17. Core noise source diagnostics on a turbofan engine using correlation and coherence techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.; Reshotko, M.

    1976-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure measurements at several locations within the core of a turbofan engine were made simultaneously with far field acoustic measurements. Correlation and coherence techniques were used to determine the relative amplitude and phase relationships between core pressures at these various locations and between the core pressures and far field acoustic pressure. The combustor is a low frequency source region for acoustic propagation through the core nozzle and out to the far field. The relation between source pressure and the resulting sound pressure involves a 180 degree phase shift and an amplitude transfer function which varies approximately as frequency squared. This is consistent with a simplified model using fluctuating entropy as a source term.

  18. Tensile-shear correlations obtained from shear punch test technique using a modified experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, V.; Visweswaran, P.; Vijayraghavan, A.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Shear punch testing has been a very useful technique for evaluating mechanical properties of irradiated alloys using a very small volume of material. The load-displacement data is influenced by the compliance of the fixture components. This paper describes a modified experimental approach where the compliances of the punch and die components are eliminated. The analysis of the load-displacement data using the modified setup for various alloys like low carbon steel, SS316, modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo indicate that the shear yield strength evaluated at 0.2% offset of normalized displacement relates to the tensile YS as per the Von Mises yield relation ( σys = 1.73 τys). A universal correlation of type UTS = mτmax where m is a function of strain hardening exponent, is seen to be obeyed for all the materials in this study. The use of analytical models developed for blanking process are explored for evaluating strain hardening exponent from the load-displacement data. This study is directed towards rationalizing the tensile-shear empirical correlations for a more reliable prediction of tensile properties from shear punch tests.

  19. Nanoscale deformation measurement of microscale interconnection assemblies by a digital image correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaofeng; Pang, John H L; Fan, Wei

    2007-10-01

    The continuous miniaturization of microelectronic devices and interconnections demand more and more experimental strain/stress analysis of micro- and nanoscale components for material characterization and structure reliability analysis. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique, with the aid of scanning probe microscopes, has become a very promising tool to meet this demand. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to scan and digitally image micro-interconnection assemblies in a micro-thermoelectric cooler. AFM images of the scan region of interest were obtained separately when the microelectronic device was operated before and after the cooling and heating stages. The AFM images were then used to obtain the in-plane deformation fields in the observed region of the micro-assembly. AFM image correlation is performed for nanoscale deformation analysis using the authors' AFM-DIC program. The results show that the observed region was subjected to cyclic strains when the device worked between its cooling and heating stages, and cyclic strain in the vertical direction was found to be a significant deformation mode. The thermally induced deformation behavior of the micro-assembly device was modeled by finite element analysis (FEA). Both thermal-electric analysis and thermal stress analysis were conducted on a 3D finite element model of the device. It is shown that the experimental results were able to validate the finite element analysis results. PMID:21730419

  20. Digital Image Correlation Techniques Applied to Large Scale Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Rocket engine hot-fire ground testing is necessary to understand component performance, reliability and engine system interactions during development. The J-2X upper stage engine completed a series of developmental hot-fire tests that derived performance of the engine and components, validated analytical models and provided the necessary data to identify where design changes, process improvements and technology development were needed. The J-2X development engines were heavily instrumented to provide the data necessary to support these activities which enabled the team to investigate any anomalies experienced during the test program. This paper describes the development of an optical digital image correlation technique to augment the data provided by traditional strain gauges which are prone to debonding at elevated temperatures and limited to localized measurements. The feasibility of this optical measurement system was demonstrated during full scale hot-fire testing of J-2X, during which a digital image correlation system, incorporating a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains was installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The camera and facility setup, pre-test calibrations, data collection, hot-fire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  1. Eddy current pulsed phase thermography and feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Tian, GuiYun; Pan, Mengchun; Chen, Dixiang

    2013-08-01

    This letter proposed an eddy current pulsed phase thermography technique combing eddy current excitation, infrared imaging, and phase analysis. One steel sample is selected as the material under test to avoid the influence of skin depth, which provides subsurface defects with different depths. The experimental results show that this proposed method can eliminate non-uniform heating and improve defect detectability. Several features are extracted from differential phase spectra and the preliminary linear relationships are built to measure these subsurface defects' depth.

  2. Automation of a McBain-Bakr-type thermogravimetric analyzer using a digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trexler, M. D.; Sanders, T. H.; Singh, P. M.

    2006-02-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis was used to obtain corrosion kinetics data for several materials in high-temperature environments. A thermogravimetric analyzer has been developed that uses a McBain-Bakr quartz spring balance in conjunction with a digital image acquisition and analysis package to accurately characterize materials through image correlation. This provides a new method for automatically measuring mass changes continuously with a variable resolution depending on the spring component. The decomposition of calcium oxalate was used to verify the validity of the technique. The results show two reactions, whose reaction temperatures were determined by the intercept method, upon heating to 650 °C. The mass loss at the first reaction temperature, 200 °C, was 20% and a 30% loss was observed at 500 °C. Comparison of the experimentally obtained results with those of other researchers who used commercial instruments suggests that the method of using digital image analysis in conjunction with a spring to monitor mass change is a viable and accurate replacement for automatic electrobalances and cathetometers for thermal analysis of materials. Additional comparison between corrosion tests performed on SA210 steel in H2S using both a commercial thermobalance and the developed technique confirmed that high-temperature corrosion can be monitored accurately with the proposed method.

  3. Automation of a McBain-Bakr-type thermogravimetric analyzer using a digital image correlation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Trexler, M.D.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Singh, P.M.

    2006-02-15

    Thermogravimetric analysis was used to obtain corrosion kinetics data for several materials in high-temperature environments. A thermogravimetric analyzer has been developed that uses a McBain-Bakr quartz spring balance in conjunction with a digital image acquisition and analysis package to accurately characterize materials through image correlation. This provides a new method for automatically measuring mass changes continuously with a variable resolution depending on the spring component. The decomposition of calcium oxalate was used to verify the validity of the technique. The results show two reactions, whose reaction temperatures were determined by the intercept method, upon heating to 650 deg. C. The mass loss at the first reaction temperature, 200 deg. C, was 20% and a 30% loss was observed at 500 deg. C. Comparison of the experimentally obtained results with those of other researchers who used commercial instruments suggests that the method of using digital image analysis in conjunction with a spring to monitor mass change is a viable and accurate replacement for automatic electrobalances and cathetometers for thermal analysis of materials. Additional comparison between corrosion tests performed on SA210 steel in H{sub 2}S using both a commercial thermobalance and the developed technique confirmed that high-temperature corrosion can be monitored accurately with the proposed method.

  4. Digital image correlation: a technique for determining local mechanical conditions within early bone callus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M S; Schell, H; Lienau, J; Duda, G N

    2007-09-01

    Local mechanical conditions are known to play a role during the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues, and histomorphometrical investigations of the time course of healing have enabled specific conclusions regarding the mechanosensitivity of tissue differentiation. However, the mechanism for this influence is not clearly understood. In order to extend this analysis, it is essential to link local histological understanding with direct characterisation of the local mechanical environment. Digital image correlation (DIC) is a computer-based image analysis technique that enables the non-contact measurement of strains on material surfaces and is finding application in many areas of biomechanics. Here we report a DIC technique to investigate the local distribution of mechanical strain within regenerating soft tissue sections. We provide exemplary data from analysis of a section of sheep bone callus. An assessment of displacement measurement accuracy gave an RMS error of 4.2 microm, corresponding to an estimated strain error of 1.4%. The sections showed concentrations of up to four times the applied strain and comparison of the strain patterns with histological analysis confirmed that these concentrations reflected boundaries between hard and soft callus. PMID:17045512

  5. Eddy current correction in volume-localized MR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Wendt, R. E. 3rd; Evans, H. J.; Rowe, R. M.; Hedrick, T. D.; LeBlanc, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    The quality of volume-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy is affected by eddy currents caused by gradient switching. Eddy currents can be reduced with improved gradient systems; however, it has been suggested that the distortion due to eddy currents can be compensated for during postprocessing with a single-frequency reference signal. The authors propose modifying current techniques for acquiring the single-frequency reference signal by using relaxation weighting to reduce interference from components that cannot be eliminated by digital filtering alone. Additional sequences with T1 or T2 weighting for reference signal acquisition are shown to have the same eddy current characteristics as the original signal without relaxation weighting. The authors also studied a new eddy current correction method that does not require a single-frequency reference signal. This method uses two free induction decays (FIDs) collected from the same volume with two sequences with opposite gradients. Phase errors caused by eddy currents are opposite in these two FIDs and can be canceled completely by combining the FIDs. These methods were tested in a phantom. Eddy current distortions were corrected, allowing quantitative measurement of structures such as the -CH = CH- component, which is otherwise undetectable.

  6. Remote-field eddy current signal representation

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, D.L.; Mackintosh, D.D.; Sullivan, S.P.; Dubois, J.M.S.; Schmidt, T.R. . Dept. of Physics.)

    1993-07-01

    While conventional reflected impedance eddy current testing (ET) techniques are limited by skin depth considerations to near surface defects, the RFEC (remote field eddy current) technique exploits skin effects. The RFEC method is a through-wall inspection technique. Only the field which has made a double transit of the pipe wall is detected. The skin depth equation can be used to predict the approximate effect of metal loss on the RFEC signal. Metal loss effectively reduces the shielding so that the attenuation and phase lag of the field is less. A method of analyzing RFEC defect signals is therefore to compare the signals with the phase and amplitude in uncorroded pipe. RFEC probes are used for inspecting ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic tubulars for corrosion and, since eddy current detectors are generally well suited to crack detection, there is considerable interest in their potential to detect stress corrosion cracking in pipelines. Here the authors first of all summarize the impedance plane representation and scope monitor displays customarily used for conventional exploring coil ET probes in tubes. They then present the normalized voltage plane and monitor displays that are most appropriate for RFEC probes. They discuss the similarities and differences between the preferred monitor displays.

  7. Correlations between forced oscillation technique parameters and pulmonary densitovolumetry values in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Camilo, G B; Carvalho, A R S; Machado, D C; Mogami, R; Kasuki, L; Gadelha, M R; Melo, P L; Lopes, A J

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and pulmonary densitovolumetry in acromegalic patients and to examine the correlations between these findings. In this cross-sectional study, 29 non-smoking acromegalic patients and 17 paired controls were subjected to the FOT and quantification of lung volume using multidetector computed tomography (Q-MDCT). Compared with the controls, the acromegalic patients had a higher value for resonance frequency [15.3 (10.9-19.7) vs 11.4 (9.05-17.6) Hz, P=0.023] and a lower value for mean reactance [0.32 (0.21-0.64) vs 0.49 (0.34-0.96) cm H2O/L/s2, P=0.005]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, the acromegalic patients had higher percentages of total lung volume (TLV) for nonaerated and poorly aerated areas [0.42% (0.30-0.51%) vs 0.25% (0.20-0.32%), P=0.039 and 3.25% (2.48-3.46%) vs 1.70% (1.45-2.15%), P=0.001, respectively]. Furthermore, the acromegalic patients had higher values for total lung mass in both inspiratory and expiratory Q-MDCT [821 (635-923) vs 696 (599-769) g, P=0.021 and 844 (650-945) vs 637 (536-736) g, P=0.009, respectively]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, TLV showed significant correlations with all FOT parameters. The TLV of hyperaerated areas showed significant correlations with intercept resistance (rs=-0.602, P<0.001) and mean resistance (rs=-0.580, P<0.001). These data showed that acromegalic patients have increased amounts of lung tissue as well as nonaerated and poorly aerated areas. Functionally, there was a loss of homogeneity of the respiratory system. Moreover, there were correlations between the structural and functional findings of the respiratory system, consistent with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26445330

  8. Correlations between forced oscillation technique parameters and pulmonary densitovolumetry values in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, G.B.; Carvalho, A.R.S.; Machado, D.C.; Mogami, R.; Kasuki, L.; Gadelha, M.R.; Melo, P.L.; Lopes, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and pulmonary densitovolumetry in acromegalic patients and to examine the correlations between these findings. In this cross-sectional study, 29 non-smoking acromegalic patients and 17 paired controls were subjected to the FOT and quantification of lung volume using multidetector computed tomography (Q-MDCT). Compared with the controls, the acromegalic patients had a higher value for resonance frequency [15.3 (10.9-19.7) vs 11.4 (9.05-17.6) Hz, P=0.023] and a lower value for mean reactance [0.32 (0.21-0.64) vs 0.49 (0.34-0.96) cm H2O/L/s2, P=0.005]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, the acromegalic patients had higher percentages of total lung volume (TLV) for nonaerated and poorly aerated areas [0.42% (0.30-0.51%) vs 0.25% (0.20-0.32%), P=0.039 and 3.25% (2.48-3.46%) vs 1.70% (1.45-2.15%), P=0.001, respectively]. Furthermore, the acromegalic patients had higher values for total lung mass in both inspiratory and expiratory Q-MDCT [821 (635-923) vs 696 (599-769) g, P=0.021 and 844 (650-945) vs 637 (536-736) g, P=0.009, respectively]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, TLV showed significant correlations with all FOT parameters. The TLV of hyperaerated areas showed significant correlations with intercept resistance (rs=−0.602, P<0.001) and mean resistance (rs=−0.580, P<0.001). These data showed that acromegalic patients have increased amounts of lung tissue as well as nonaerated and poorly aerated areas. Functionally, there was a loss of homogeneity of the respiratory system. Moreover, there were correlations between the structural and functional findings of the respiratory system, consistent with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26445330

  9. Gyrokinetic large eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Navarro, A. Banon; Albrecht-Marc, M.; Carati, D.; Merz, F.; Goerler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2011-07-15

    The large eddy simulation approach is adapted to the study of plasma microturbulence in a fully three-dimensional gyrokinetic system. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is studied with the GENE code for both a standard resolution and a reduced resolution with a model for the sub-grid scale turbulence. A simple dissipative model for representing the effect of the sub-grid scales on the resolved scales is proposed and tested. Once calibrated, the model appears to be able to reproduce most of the features of the free energy spectra for various values of the ion temperature gradient.

  10. NOTE: A comparison of image registration techniques for the correlation of radiolabelled antibody distribution with tumour morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, A. A.; Green, A. J.; Boxer, G.; Pedley, R. B.; Begent, R. H. J.

    1999-07-01

    Image registration is a powerful tool for correlating functional images with images of anatomical structure. This facilitates more accurate quantitation of regional radiopharmaceutical uptake. Similarly, registration of images of radiolabelled antibody distribution, in tissue sections, with the equivalent histological images allows the comparison and measurement of radiopharmaceutical distribution with morphological structure. The images used were obtained by storage phosphor plate technology, for the radiopharmaceutical distribution, and by digitization of the stained histological sections. Here we compare four fully automatic registration techniques and one manual technique in terms of their spatial accuracy. We have found that there was no difference in accuracy between cross-correlation, minimization of variance and mutual information. These techniques were more accurate than principal axes and the manual technique. However, minimization of variance and mutual information were more time-consuming than the other methods. Consequently, cross-correlation is the method of choice for automatic registration of large numbers of these image pairs.