Science.gov

Sample records for eddy-induced heat transport

  1. Optimal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Andre; Doering, Charles R.

    2015-11-01

    The transport of heat by buoyancy driven flows, i.e., thermal convection plays a central role in many natural phenomena and an understanding of how to control its mechanisms is relevant to many engineering applications. In this talk we will consider a variational formulation of optimal heat transport in simple geometries. Numerical results, limits on heat transport, and a comparison to Rayleigh-Bénard convection will be presented. Research supported by NSF Awards PHY-1205219, PHY-1338407, PHY-1443836, PHY-1533555 and DMS-1515161.

  2. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Bill L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

  3. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  4. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  5. Heat transport in nonuniform superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Caroline; Vorontsov, Anton B.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate electronic energy transport in inhomogeneous superconductors using a fully self-consistent nonequilibrium quasiclassical Keldysh approach. We develop a general theory and apply it to a superconductor with an order parameter that forms domain walls of the type encountered in the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state. The heat transport in the presence of a domain wall is inherently anisotropic and nonlocal. The bound states in the nonuniform region play a crucial role and control heat transport in several ways: (i) they modify the spectrum of quasiparticle states and result in Andreev reflection processes and (ii) they hybridize with the impurity band and produce a local transport environment with properties very different from those in a uniform superconductor. As a result of this interplay, heat transport becomes highly sensitive to temperature, magnetic field, and disorder. For strongly scattering impurities, we find that the transport across domain walls at low temperatures is considerably more efficient than in the uniform superconducting state.

  6. Solar heat transport fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made in the development and delivery of noncorrosive fluid subsystems is discussed. These subsystems are to be compatible with closed-loop solar heating or combined heating and hot water systems. They are also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems. The performance testing of a number of fluids is described.

  7. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation. PMID:26827343

  8. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  9. Solar heat transport fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made on the development and delivery of noncorrosive fluid subsystems is reported. These subsystems are to be compatible with closed-loop solar heating or combined heating and hot water systems. They are also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems. At least 100 gallons of each type of fluid recommended by the contractor will be delivered under the contract. The performance testing of a number of fluids is described.

  10. Heat transport through ion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Nahuel; Martinez, Esteban A.; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We study the thermodynamical properties of crystals of trapped ions which are laser cooled to two different temperatures in two separate regions. We show that these properties strongly depend on the structure of the ion crystal. Such structure can be changed by varying the trap parameters and undergoes a series of phase transitions from linear to zig-zag or helicoidal configurations. Thus, we show that these systems are ideal candidates to observe and control the transition from anomalous to normal heat transport. All structures behave as ‘heat superconductors’, with a thermal conductivity increasing linearly with system size and a vanishing thermal gradient inside the system. However, zig-zag and helicoidal crystals turn out to be hyper sensitive to disorder having a linear temperature profile and a length independent conductivity. Interestingly, disordered 2D ion crystals are heat insulators. Sensitivity to disorder is much smaller in the 1D case.

  11. Characteristics, vertical structures, and heat/salt transports of mesoscale eddies in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yu, Weidong; Yuan, Yeli; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Fan; Chen, Gengxin; Liu, Lin; Duan, Yongliang

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry sea surface height measurements reveal high mesoscale eddy activity in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO). In this study, the characteristics of mesoscale eddies in the SETIO are investigated by analyzing 564 cyclonic eddy (CE) tracks and 695 anticyclonic eddy (AE) tracks identified from a new version of satellite altimetry data with a daily temporal resolution. The mean radius, lifespan, propagation speed, and distance of CEs (AEs) are 149 (153) km, 50 (46) days, 15.3 (16.6) cm s-1, and 651 (648) km, respectively. Some significant differences exist in the eddy statistical characteristics between the new-version daily altimeter data and the former weekly data. Mean vertical structures of anomalous potential temperature, salinity, geostrophic current, as well as heat and salt transports of the composite eddies, are estimated by analyzing Argo profile data matched to altimeter-detected eddies. The composite analysis shows that eddy-induced ocean anomalies are mainly confined in the upper 300 dbar. In the eddy core, CE (AE) could induce a cooling (warming) of 2°C between 60 and 180 dbar and maximum positive (negative) salinity anomalies of 0.1 (-0.3) psu in the upper 50 (110) dbar. The meridional heat transport induced by the composite CE (AE) is southward (northward), whereas the salt transport of CE (AE) is northward (southward). Most of the meridional heat and salt transports are carried in the upper 300 dbar.

  12. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  13. Fusible pellet transport and storage of heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A new concept for both transport and storage of heat at high temperatures and heat fluxes is introduced and the first steps in analysis of its feasibility is taken. The concept utilizes the high energy storage capability of materials undergoing change of phase. The phase change material, for example a salt, is encapsulated in corrosion resistant sealed pellets and transported in a carrier fluid to heat source and storage. Calculations for heat transport from a typical solar collector indicate that the pellet mass flow rates are relatively small and that the required pumping power is only a small fraction of the energy transport capability of the system. Salts and eutectic salt mixtures as candidate phase change materials are examined and discussed. Finally, the time periods for melting or solidification of sodium chloride pellets is investigated and reported.

  14. Eddy-induced reduction of biological production in eastern boundary upwelling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Nicolas; Lachkar, Zouhair; Frenzel, Hartmut; Marchesiello, Patrick; Münnich, Matthias; McWilliams, James C.; Nagai, Takeyoshi; Plattner, Gian-Kasper

    2011-11-01

    Eddies and other mesoscale oceanic processes, such as fronts, can enhance biological production in the ocean, according to several open-ocean studies. The effect is thought to be particularly pronounced in low-nutrient environments, where mesoscale processes increase the net upward flux of limiting nutrients. However, eddies have been suggested to suppress production in the highly productive eastern boundary upwelling systems. Here, we examine the relationship between satellite-derived estimates of net primary production, of upwelling strength, and of eddy-kinetic energy--a measure of the intensity of mesoscale activity--in the four most productive eastern boundary upwelling systems. We show that high levels of eddy activity tend to be associated with low levels of biological production, indicative of a suppressive effect. Simulations using eddy-resolving models of two of these upwelling systems support the suggestion that eddies suppress production, and show that the downward export of organic matter is also reduced. According to these simulations, the reduction in production and export results from an eddy-induced transport of nutrients from the nearshore environment to the open ocean. Eddies might have a similar effect on marine productivity in other oceanic systems that are characterized by intense eddy activity, such as the Southern Ocean.

  15. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  16. Heat transport in active harmonic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz

    2011-08-15

    We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.

  17. Continuous observations of North Atlantic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), which transports warm water northward and cold water back southward, is important in transferring heat to the North Atlantic Ocean. Some models predict that AMOC will slow down as Earth's temperatures rise due to anthropogenic warming, which could have serious climate consequences for the Northern Hemisphere. However, the response of AMOC to global warming is uncertain—different models predict different rates of slowdown—and there have been few continuous observations of AMOC heat transport. Hobbs and Willis used temperature, salinity, and displacement data measured from foats in the Argo array, combined with sea surface heights measured by satellites, to estimate a continuous time series of Atlantic meridional heat transport from 2002 to 2010 at 41°N latitude. They found that the mean heat transport was about 0.5 petawatt. The authors note that this estimate is consistent with previous studies in similar latitudes based on atmospheric flux data but is lower than most hydrographic estimates. Heat transport varied on an annual cycle as well as on shorter time scales, with atmospheric variability explaining most of the short-term variance. The researchers note that the period of study was too short to infer any long-term trends, and they emphasize the need for continued monitoring of AMOC. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, doi:10.1029/2011JC007039, 2012)

  18. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  19. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules. PMID:27215814

  20. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    SciTech Connect

    Rind, D. ); Chandler, M. )

    1991-04-20

    The authors investigated the effect of increased ocean heat transports on climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). The warming is driven by the decreased sea ice/planetary albedo, a feedback which would appear to be instrumental for producing extreme high-latitude amplification of temperature changes. Resulting hydrologic and wind stress changes suggest that qualitatively the increased transports might be self-sustaining. As such, they would represent a possible mechanism to help account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary, and decadal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene, as well as a powerful feedback to amplify other climate forcings. It is estimated that ocean transport increases of 50-70% would have been necessary to reproduce the warmth of various Mesozoic (65-230 m.y. ago) climates without changes in atmospheric composition, while the 15% increase used in these experiments would have been sufficient to reproduce the general climatic conditions of the Eocene (40-55 Ma). A companion experiment indicates that increased topography during the Cenozoic (0-65 Ma) might have altered the surface wind stress in a manner that led to reduced heat transports; this effect would then need to be considered in understanding the beginning of ice ages. The large high-latitude amplification associated with ocean heat transport and sea ice changes differs significantly from that forecast for increased trace gases, for which water vapor increase is the primary feedback mechanism. The different signatures might allow for discrimination of these different forcings; e.g., the warming of the 1930s looks more like the altered ocean heat transport signal, while the warming of the 1980s is more like the trace gas effect.

  1. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rind, D.; Chandler, M.

    1991-04-01

    We investigated the effect of increased ocean heat transports on climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). The increases used were sufficient to melt all sea ice at high latitudes, and amounted to 15% on the global average. The resulting global climate is 2°C warmer, with temperature increases of some 20°C at high latitudes, and 1°C near the equator. The warming is driven by the decreased sea ice/planetary albedo, a feedback which would appear to be instrumental for producing extreme high-latitude amplification of temperature changes. Resulting hydrologic and wind stress changes suggest that qualitatively, for both the wind-driven and thermohaline circulation, the increased transports might be self-sustaining. As such, they would represent a possible mechanism to help account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary, and decadal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene, as well as a powerful feedback to amplify other climate forcings. It is estimated that ocean transport increases of 50-70% would have been necessary to reproduce the warmth of various Mesozoic (65-230 m.y. ago) climates without changes in atmospheric composition, while the 15% increase used in these experiments would have been sufficient to reproduce the general climatic conditions of the Eocene (40-55 Ma). A companion experiment indicates that increased topography during the Cenozoic (0-65 Ma) might have altered the surface wind stress in a manner that led to reduced heat transports; this effect would then need to be considered in understanding the beginning of ice ages. Colder climates, or rapid climate perturbations, might have been generated with the aid of such altered ocean transports. The large high-latitude amplification associated with ocean heat transport and sea ice changes differs significantly from that forecast for increased trace gases, for which water vapor increase is the primary feedback

  2. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  3. Electron heat transport down steep temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, J.P.; Virmont, J.

    1982-12-27

    Electron heat transport is studied by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with a spherical harmonic representation of the distribution function. The first two terms (f/sub 0/, f/sub 1/) suffice, even in steep temperature gradients. Deviations from the Spitzer-Haerm law appear for lambda/L/sub T/ ((mean free path)/(temperature gradient length))> or approx. =0.01, as a result of non-Maxwellian f/sub 0/. For lambda/L/sub T/> or approx. =1, the heat flux is (1/3) of the free-streaming value. In intermediate cases, a harmonic law describes well the hottest part of the plasma.

  4. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  5. The Effects of Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping on Mesoscale and Large-Scale Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelton, D. B., Jr.; Matano, R. P.; Combes, V.; Schlax, M.

    2014-12-01

    The simultaneous availability of scatterometer measurements of surface winds, microwave measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) and altimeter measurements of sea surface height (SSH) allows a quantitative assessment of the two mechanisms for self-induced Ekman pumping by oceanic mesoscale eddies. Analysis of these combined satellite datasets reveals that the effects of eddy-induced surface currents on the surface stress usually dominate the effects of air-sea interaction from the influence of eddy-induced SST anomalies on the surface wind field (see figure). The former arises from the surface current effect on the relative wind that determines the surface stress. The latter arises from the effects of SST on vertical mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer. Although this SST influence is generally weaker than the surface current effect, it is not negligible. While the effects of mesoscale eddies on Ekman pumping are clearly documented from the satellite data, it is not yet known how the feedback of this Ekman pumping on the ocean affect the kinematic properties and evolution of oceanic mesoscale eddies. This is being investigated from empirically coupled numerical model simulations in which the SST and surface current effects on eddy-induced Ekman pumping are imposed individually and together, and the resulting ocean circulation is compared with a Control run in which the eddy-induced Ekman pumping is turned off. Preliminary results have found that both SST and surface currents attenuate the mesoscale eddy field. Consistent with the analysis of QuikSCAT and other satellite data, surface current effects attenuate the eddy field more than SST effects. The SST effects are not negligible, however. They alter the eddy fields in the numerical simulations in more subtle but significant ways. The effects of eddy-induced Ekman pumping on the large-scale circulation will also be investigated from the various numerical simulations. Figure Caption: Maps of Ekman pumping

  6. Fast atomic transport without vibrational heating

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Ibanez, S.; Chen Xi; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.; Muga, J. G.

    2011-01-15

    We use the dynamical invariants associated with the Hamiltonian of an atom in a one dimensional moving trap to inverse engineer the trap motion and perform fast atomic transport without final vibrational heating. The atom is driven nonadiabatically through a shortcut to the result of adiabatic, slow trap motion. For harmonic potentials this only requires designing appropriate trap trajectories, whereas perfect transport in anharmonic traps may be achieved by applying an extra field to compensate the forces in the rest frame of the trap. The results can be extended to atom stopping or launching. The limitations due to geometrical constraints, energies, and accelerations involved are analyzed along with the relation to previous approaches based on classical trajectories or ''fast-forward'' and ''bang-bang'' methods, which can be integrated in the invariant-based framework.

  7. 2-Phase Fluid Flow & Heat Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-03-13

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional, geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. Itmore » can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and superheated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 degrees C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials.« less

  8. Thermal Transport Model for Heat Sink Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Brown, Ari D.; Smith, Stephen J.; Kilbourne, Caroline a.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the development of a finite element model for describing thermal transport through microcalorimeter arrays in order to assist in heat-sinking design. A fabricated multi-absorber transition edge sensor (PoST) was designed in order to reduce device wiring density by a factor of four. The finite element model consists of breaking the microcalorimeter array into separate elements, including the transition edge sensor (TES) and the silicon substrate on which the sensor is deposited. Each element is then broken up into subelements, whose surface area subtends 10 10 microns. The heat capacity per unit temperature, thermal conductance, and thermal diffusivity of each subelement are the model inputs, as are the temperatures of each subelement. Numerical integration using the Finite in Time Centered in Space algorithm of the thermal diffusion equation is then performed in order to obtain a temporal evolution of the subelement temperature. Thermal transport across interfaces is modeled using a thermal boundary resistance obtained using the acoustic mismatch model. The document concludes with a discussion of the PoST fabrication. PoSTs are novel because they enable incident x-ray position sensitivity with good energy resolution and low wiring density.

  9. Radiation heat transport in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, William

    Radiation heat transport through the internal void spaces of particle beds, fiber beds, packed beds, reactors and porous media with opaque, diffusely reflecting, gray body surfaces and large solid dimensions ( πd/ λth > 100) is considered. A the local particle surface radiosity, differential view factor and solid temperature, permits a rigorous solution of the dependent, long range multiple scattering problem. The conductivity results, applied to a bed of randomly overlapping spheres, agree exactly with pseudohomogeneous results in both the isotropic and anisotropic scattering limits and shed rigorous light on the anisotropic phase function expansion theory. Explicit calculations, performed for several other standard packings, e.g. fiber beds, exhibit a parallll upper and series lower bound over the various particle shapes and dispersion structures. Results show that an empirical equation first suggested by Vortmeyer (German Chem. Engng, 3, (1980) 124-137), but generalized herein from one P to four P0, P1, P2, P3 coefficients, which vary substantially with the various industrial packings, will provide a suitable generalization of the emissivity factor of krad for engineering conductivity modeling of radiation heat transport.

  10. Parameterization of Heat Transport in a Fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossainzadeh, S.; Tulaczyk, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    We aim to improve the coupling in the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) between the ocean model, Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and the ice sheet model, Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM), by developing a parameterization for the dominant processes in a typical Greenland fjord. The termini of tidewater glaciers and ice shelves may prove to be a critical forcing on outlet glacier mass balance. Recent studies have shown that warm deep water masses have penetrated far up-stream in fjords and sub-ice shelf cavities. We analyze the effects of bottom bathymetry, entrainment rate at the ice face due to freshwater plumes, surface outflow rates, undulating fjord geometries, and open ocean conditions at the fjord mouth on heat transport up-fjord. The fjord is represented as a two-layer (stratified) open channel flow with a substantial and sudden geometric widening at the mouth. Horizontal force balances as well as mass, salt and heat continuity relations of the upper layer provides an analytical solution for the velocity and thickness distribution along-fjord. Subsequently, the sensitivity of the bottom layer's up-fjord flow and heat transport to the ice face is determined and forms the basis of the parameterization of along-fjord processes. Open ocean scenarios (temperature, salinity and velocity profiles), typical of Arctic oceanographic conditions on the Greenland shelf, are prescribed from results of a coupled ocean-sea ice model configured at a regional scale for the pan-Arctic domain. The model was spun up for 48 years and forced by daily averaged atmospheric reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We validate this data from several decades-long time series of in situ data from the Gulf of Alaska and West Greenland. Our results provide ice melt rates which agree with current estimates.

  11. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  12. Apparatus for downward transport of heat

    DOEpatents

    Neeper, D.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1985-08-05

    An apparatus for the downward transport of heat by vaporization of a working fluid, usually from a collector which can be powered by the sun to a condenser which drains the condensed working fluid to a lower reservoir, is controled by a control valve which is operationally dependent upon the level of working fluid in either the lower reservoir or an upper reservoir which feeds the collector. Condensed working fluid is driven from the lower to the upper reservoir by vaporized working fluid whose flow is controled by the controll valve. The upper reservoir is in constant communication with the condenser which prevents a buildup in temperature/pressure as the apparatus goes through successive pumping cycles.

  13. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ~28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm-2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene-graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime.

  14. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A; Lambert, Colin J; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ∼28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm(-2). Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene-graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime. PMID:27125636

  15. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ∼28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm−2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene–graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime. PMID:27125636

  16. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  17. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in early Eocene climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, J. C.; Moore, T. C. Jr

    1995-01-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an approximately 30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  18. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  19. Eddy induced Temperature Exchange between Subpolar and Subtropical Gyre - a comparison of observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Vasco; Kieke, Dagmar; Myers, Paul G.; Mertens, Christian; Pennelly, Clark

    2016-04-01

    Eddies in the subpolar North Atlantic play an important role for temperature, freshwater and volume fluxes across the front between the subpolar and subtropical gyre and thus influence the hydrography and dynamics in the Subarctic and Arctic realm. Here, we ask where and how eddy induced mixing takes place, if there are localized hotspots of mixing and what are the main pathways of eddies between the gyres. We analyze the eddy field in more than 20 years of satellite altimetry observations with 1/4° horizontal resolution, using a geometry based eddy detection and tracking algorithm. To estimate the respective temperature flux of individual eddies, the eddy surface area and translation speed from the eddy detection and tracking algorithm are combined with anomalies of a real-time global sea surface temperature (SST) analysis. In order to analyze the effect of resolution on the results, we compare the findings in the observations to model experiments with the NEMO ocean model using two different set-ups: (1) ANHA4 with 1/4° horizontal resolution and (2) ANHA4 with an nested 1/12° horizontal resolution encompassing the subpolar North Atlantic. For the analysis of the temperature flux, we focus on the zonal section at 47°N as it represents a good approximation for the gyre boundary. Additionally, we have ship based velocity observations from 10 cruises between 2003 and 2014 available for this section, that allow us to compare the observed eddy temperature flux to the mean circulation across the section. In both observations and model, the shear region between Western Boundary Current, North Atlantic Current and the recirculation cell in the Newfoundland Basin is the most active region regarding eddy activity and eddy induced temperature flux across 47°N.

  20. Experimental Study of Heat Transport in Fractured Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta M.; Redondo, Jose M.; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in transport of natural resources or contaminants transport through subsurface systems. In recent years, interest has grown in investigating heat transport by means of tracer tests, driven by the important current development of geothermal applications. In literature different methods are available for predicting thermal breakthrough in fractured reservoirs based on the information coming from tracer tests. Geothermal energy is one of the largest sources of renewable energies that are extracted from the earth. The growing interest in this new energy source has stimulated attempts to develop methods and technologies for extracting energy also from ground resource at low temperature. An example is the exploitation of low enthalpy geothermal energy that can be obtained at any place with the aid of ground-source heat pump system from the soil, rock and groundwater. In such geothermal systems the fluid movement and thermal behavior in the fractured porous media is very important and critical. Existing theory of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is of limited usefulness when applied to fractured rocks. Many field and laboratory tracer tests in fractured media show that fracture -matrix exchange is more significant for heat than mass tracers, thus thermal breakthrough curves (BTCs) are strongly controlled by matrix thermal diffusivity. In this study the behaviour of heat transport in a fractured network at bench scale has been investigated. Heat tracer tests on an artificially created fractured rock sample have been carried out. The observed thermal BTCs obtained with six thermocouple probes located at different locations in the fractured medium have been modeled with the Explicit Network Model (ENM) based an adaptation of Tang's solution for solute transport in a semi-infinite single fracture embedded in a porous matrix. The ENM model is able to represent the behavior of observed heat transport except where the

  1. Heat transport model within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele; Bellin, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Temperature is a key quantity in controlling water quality, aquatic habitats and the distribution of aquatic invertebrates within the hyporheic zone. Despite its importance in all processes (e.g., biogeochemical reactions and organism metabolism, growth, movement and migration) occurring within the streambed sediment, only few experimental and numerical works analyzed temperature distribution within the hyporheic zone, while little is known on the control that river morphology exerts on temperature dynamics. In the present work, we analyze the effects of river morphology on the thermal regime of the hyporheic zone from a modelling perspective. Our goal is to identify the dominant processes that affect the hyporheic thermal regime and gradients, which influence the rates of microbial and biogeochemical processes. With this objective in mind, we developed a simplified process-based model, which predicts the temperature pattern within the streambed sediment taking into account the external forcing due to the daily temperature variations of the in-stream water and the hyporheic exchange due to streambed morphology. To simplify the analysis the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed sediment is assumed homogeneous and isotropic, and the hyporheic velocity field is obtained analytically by solving the flow equation with the near-bed piezometric head of the stream flow as the linkage between surface and subsurface flows. Furthermore, we solved the heat transport equation with a Lagrangian approach and by neglecting transverse dispersivity. Our model results show a complex near-bed hyporheic temperature distributions, which vary temporally and are strongly related to the in-stream water residence time into the hyporheic zone and consequently to the bed morphology and flow discharge. We compared the temperature dynamics within the hyporheic zone of both large low-gradient and small steep streams to investigate the effect of stream morphology. Results show that the

  2. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize salt corrosion as well as providing a general discussion of heat transfer loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and freeze-up vulnerability.

  3. Heat generation and transport in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.

    1996-05-01

    During contraction of the heart, a large part of the energy in energy metabolism is converted to heat. The article presents the results of measurements of mechanical stresses in the myocardium and blood vessels, temperatures and rate of heat generation. Experimental data correlate well with the numerical solutions of the biothermal problem.

  4. SEAWAT-based simulation of axisymmetric heat transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenbohede, Alexander; Louwyck, Andy; Vlamynck, Nele

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of heat transport has its applications in geothermal exploitation of aquifers and the analysis of temperature dependent chemical reactions. Under homogeneous conditions and in the absence of a regional hydraulic gradient, groundwater flow and heat transport from or to a well exhibit radial symmetry, and governing equations are reduced by one dimension (1D) which increases computational efficiency importantly. Solute transport codes can simulate heat transport and input parameters may be modified such that the Cartesian geometry can handle radial flow. In this article, SEAWAT is evaluated as simulator for heat transport under radial flow conditions. The 1971, 1D analytical solution of Gelhar and Collins is used to compare axisymmetric transport with retardation (i.e., as a result of thermal equilibrium between fluid and solid) and a large diffusion (conduction). It is shown that an axisymmetric simulation compares well with a fully three dimensional (3D) simulation of an aquifer thermal energy storage systems. The influence of grid discretization, solver parameters, and advection solution is illustrated. Because of the high diffusion to simulate conduction, convergence criterion for heat transport must be set much smaller (10(-10) ) than for solute transport (10(-6) ). Grid discretization should be considered carefully, in particular the subdivision of the screen interval. On the other hand, different methods to calculate the pumping or injection rate distribution over different nodes of a multilayer well lead to small differences only. PMID:24571415

  5. Meridional heat transport at the onset of winter stratospheric warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conte, M.

    1981-01-01

    A continuous vertical flow of energy toward high altitude was verified. This process produced a dynamic instability of the stratospheric polar vortex. A meridional heat transport ws primed toward the north, which generated a warming trend.

  6. Total heat transport data for plastic honeycomb-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Platzer, W.J. )

    1992-11-01

    The total heat transport within honeycomb-type structures consists mainly of radiation and conduction heat transport, as convection is usually suppressed. For surface emissivities larger than 0.7, independent mode analysis may be used, and a splitting of the measured total heat transport into parts is possible. Only a few parameters used in simple modeling equations are needed to describe the heat transport in this approximation. They have been obtained by fitting the functions to experimental results and are presented in tabular form for 11 different materials. The thickness and temperature dependence is included in the results. The presented data may be used as input parameters either for simple calculations in an independent mode analysis (IMA) or for a dependent mode analysis (DMA). Thus even selective flat-plate honeycomb collectors may be modeled reliably.

  7. Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Bo

    2014-07-18

    Oceanic transports of heat, salt, fresh water, dissolved CO2, and other tracers regulate global climate change and the distribution of natural marine resources. The time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely by migrating mesoscale eddies. By combining available satellite altimetry and Argo profiling float data, we showed that the eddy-induced zonal mass transport can reach a total meridionally integrated value of up to 30 to 40 sverdrups (Sv) (1 Sv = 10(6) cubic meters per second), and it occurs mainly in subtropical regions, where the background flows are weak. This transport is comparable in magnitude to that of the large-scale wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation. PMID:25035491

  8. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  9. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years, and

  10. An oceanic heat transport pathway to the Amundsen Sea Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Angelica R.; Mazloff, Matthew R.; Gille, Sarah T.

    2016-05-01

    The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) on the West Antarctic coastline has been identified as a region of accelerated glacial melting. A Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) is analyzed over the 2005-2010 time period in the Amundsen Sea region. The SOSE oceanic heat budget reveals that the contribution of parameterized small-scale mixing to the heat content of the ASE waters is small compared to advection and local air-sea heat flux, both of which contribute significantly to the heat content of the ASE waters. Above the permanent pycnocline, the local air-sea flux dominates the heat budget and is controlled by seasonal changes in sea ice coverage. Overall, between 2005 and 2010, the model shows a net heating in the surface above the pycnocline within the ASE. Sea water below the permanent pycnocline is isolated from the influence of air-sea heat fluxes, and thus, the divergence of heat advection is the major contributor to increased oceanic heat content of these waters. Oceanic transport of mass and heat into the ASE is dominated by the cross-shelf input and is primarily geostrophic below the permanent pycnocline. Diagnosis of the time-mean SOSE vorticity budget along the continental shelf slope indicates that the cross-shelf transport is sustained by vorticity input from the localized wind-stress curl over the shelf break.

  11. Helicity and transport in electron MHD heat pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    Electrons are heated locally and temporally in a uniform magnetoplasma by applying a short current pulse to a loop antenna. The resultant heat pulse, satisfying electron MHD conditions ({omega}{sub {ital ce}}{sup {minus}1}{lt}{Delta}{ital t}{lt}{omega}{sub {ital ci}}{sup {minus}1}), generates helicity due to twisting of field lines by diamagnetic drifts. Heat convection and diffusion cool the pulse, which reduces its propagation to zero. The stationary temperature profile decays by cross-field transport conserving volume-integrated heat. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Eddy-induced upwelling off Cape São Tomé (22°S, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, L.; da Silveira, I. C. A.; Gangopadhyay, A.; de Castro, B. M.

    2010-06-01

    The regional ocean off southeast Brazil (20°S-28°S) is known as a current-eddy-upwelling region. The proximity of the Brazil Current to the coast in the Cape São Tomé vicinities, as well as of its quasi-stationary unstable meanders, suggests the possibility of background eddy-induced upwelling. Such phenomenon can intensify the prevalent coastal upwelling due to wind and topographic effects. In this paper, with the help of a numerical simulation, we provide evidence that eddy-induced upwelling in the absence of wind is possible in this region. The simulation was conducted with a regional configuration of the 3-D Princeton Ocean Model initialized by a feature-based implementation of the Brazil Current and Cape Frio eddy, blended with climatology.

  13. The importance of planetary rotation period for ocean heat transport.

    PubMed

    Cullum, J; Stevens, D; Joshi, M

    2014-08-01

    The climate and, hence, potential habitability of a planet crucially depends on how its atmospheric and ocean circulation transports heat from warmer to cooler regions. However, previous studies of planetary climate have concentrated on modeling the dynamics of atmospheres, while dramatically simplifying the treatment of oceans, which neglects or misrepresents the effect of the ocean in the total heat transport. Even the majority of studies with a dynamic ocean have used a simple so-called aquaplanet that has no continental barriers, which is a configuration that dramatically changes the ocean dynamics. Here, the significance of the response of poleward ocean heat transport to planetary rotation period is shown with a simple meridional barrier--the simplest representation of any continental configuration. The poleward ocean heat transport increases significantly as the planetary rotation period is increased. The peak heat transport more than doubles when the rotation period is increased by a factor of ten. There are also significant changes to ocean temperature at depth, with implications for the carbon cycle. There is strong agreement between the model results and a scale analysis of the governing equations. This result highlights the importance of both planetary rotation period and the ocean circulation when considering planetary habitability. PMID:25041658

  14. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Liu, Yuanming

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  15. The Importance of Planetary Rotation Period for Ocean Heat Transport

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, D.; Joshi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The climate and, hence, potential habitability of a planet crucially depends on how its atmospheric and ocean circulation transports heat from warmer to cooler regions. However, previous studies of planetary climate have concentrated on modeling the dynamics of atmospheres, while dramatically simplifying the treatment of oceans, which neglects or misrepresents the effect of the ocean in the total heat transport. Even the majority of studies with a dynamic ocean have used a simple so-called aquaplanet that has no continental barriers, which is a configuration that dramatically changes the ocean dynamics. Here, the significance of the response of poleward ocean heat transport to planetary rotation period is shown with a simple meridional barrier—the simplest representation of any continental configuration. The poleward ocean heat transport increases significantly as the planetary rotation period is increased. The peak heat transport more than doubles when the rotation period is increased by a factor of ten. There are also significant changes to ocean temperature at depth, with implications for the carbon cycle. There is strong agreement between the model results and a scale analysis of the governing equations. This result highlights the importance of both planetary rotation period and the ocean circulation when considering planetary habitability. Key Words: Exoplanet—Oceans—Rotation—Climate—Habitability. Astrobiology 14, 645–650. PMID:25041658

  16. The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knietzsch, M.-A.; Schröder, A.; Lucarini, V.; Lunkeit, F.

    2015-09-01

    A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized Earth-like aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is on the atmospheric mean meridional circulation and global thermodynamic properties. The atmosphere counterbalances to a large extent the imposed changes in the oceanic heat transport, but, nonetheless, significant modifications to the atmospheric general circulation are found. Increasing the strength of the oceanic heat transport up to 2.5 PW leads to an increase in the global mean near-surface temperature and to a decrease in its equator-to-pole gradient. For stronger transports, the gradient is reduced further, but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. Additionally, a stronger oceanic heat transport leads to a decline in the intensity and a poleward shift of the maxima of both the Hadley and Ferrel cells. Changes in zonal mean diabatic heating and friction impact the properties of the Hadley cell, while the behavior of the Ferrel cell is mostly controlled by friction. The efficiency of the climate machine, the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle and the material entropy production of the system decline with increased oceanic heat transport. This suggests that the climate system becomes less efficient and turns into a state of reduced entropy production as the enhanced oceanic transport performs a stronger large-scale mixing between geophysical fluids with different temperatures, thus reducing the available energy in the climate system and bringing it closer to a state of thermal equilibrium.

  17. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection. PMID:23696657

  18. Freshwater and heat transports from global ocean synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, M.; Haines, K.; Zuo, H.; Lea, D.

    2014-01-01

    An eddy-permitting ¼° global ocean reanalysis based on the Operational Met Office FOAM data assimilation system has been run for 1989-2010 forced by ERA-Interim meteorology. Freshwater and heat transports are compared with published estimates globally and in each basin, with special focus on the Atlantic. The meridional transports agree with observations within errors at most locations, but where eddies are active the transports by the mean flow are nearly always in better agreement than the total transports. Eddy transports are down gradient and are enhanced relative to a free run. They may oppose or reinforce mean transports and provide 40-50% of the total transport near midlatitude fronts, where eddies with time scales <1 month provide up to 15%. Basin-scale freshwater convergences are calculated with the Arctic/Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans north of 32°S, all implying net evaporation of 0.33 ± 0.04 Sv, 0.65 ± 0.07 Sv, and 0.09 ± 0.04 Sv, respectively, within the uncertainty of observations in the Atlantic and Pacific. The Indian is more evaporative and the Southern Ocean has more precipitation (1.07 Sv). Air-sea fluxes are modified by assimilation influencing turbulent heat fluxes and evaporation. Generally, surface and assimilation fluxes together match the meridional transports, indicating that the reanalysis is close to a steady state. Atlantic overturning and gyre transports are assessed with overturning freshwater transports southward at all latitudes. At 26°N eddy transports are negligible, overturning transport is 0.67 ± 0.19 Sv southward and gyre transport is 0.44 ± 0.17 Sv northward, with divergence between 26°N and the Bering Strait of 0.13 ± 0.23 Sv over 2004-2010.

  19. High thermal-transport capacity heat pipes for space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Albert W.; Gustafson, Eric; Roukis, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of performance tests of several dual-slot heat pipe test articles. The dual-slot configuration has a very high thermal transport capability and has been identified as a very promising candidate for the radiator system for the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. Two six-foot long aluminum heat pipes were built and tested with ammonia and acetone. A 20-ft long heat pipe was also built and tested with ammonia. The test results have been compared with performance predictions. A thermal transport capacity of 2000 W at an adverse tilt of 1 in. and a 1000 W capacity at an adverse tilt of 2 in. were achieved on the 20-ft long heat pipe. These values are in close agreement with the predicted performance limits.

  20. Nonlocal heat transport in a stochastic magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Rax, J.M.; White, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Heat transport in a stochastic magnetic field configuration is shown to be nonlocal. Collisional transport processes, in such a disordered media, cannot always be reduced to a standard diffusion process, and the concept of a diffusion coefficient is meaningless for a wide range of typical tokamak parameters. In the nonlocal regime the relaxation of a gradient is described by an integral equation, involving a nonlocal propagator. This propagator is calculated, and the relation to previous results is elucidated. 15 refs.

  1. Miniature Heat Transport System for Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, Jay M.; Ku, Jentung (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHP) are efficient devices for heat transfer and use the basic principle of a closed evaporation-condensation cycle. The advantage of using a loop heat pipe over other conventional methods is that large quantities of heat can be transported through a small cross-sectional area over a considerable distance with no additional power input to the system. By using LHPs, it seems possible to meet the growing demand for high-power cooling devices. Although they are somewhat similar to conventional heat pipes, LHPs have a whole set of unique properties, such as low pressure drops and flexible lines between condenser and evaporator, that make them rather promising. LHPs are capable of providing a means of transporting heat over long distances with no input power other than the heat being transported because of the specially designed evaporator and the separation of liquid and vapor lines. For LHP design and fabrication, preliminary analysis on the basis of dimensionless criteria is necessary because of certain complicated phenomena that take place in the heat pipe. Modeling the performance of the LHP and miniaturizing its size are tasks and objectives of current research. In the course of h s work, the LHP and its components, including the evaporator (the most critical and complex part of the LHP), were modeled with the corresponding dimensionless groups also being investigated. Next, analysis of heat and mass transfer processes in the LHP, selection of the most weighted criteria from known dimensionless groups (thermal-fluid sciences), heat transfer rate limits, (heat pipe theory), and experimental ratios which are unique to a given heat pipe class are discussed. In the third part of the report, two-phase flow heat and mass transfer performances inside the LHP condenser are analyzed and calculated for Earth-normal gravity and microgravity conditions. On the basis of recent models and experimental databanks, an analysis for condensing two-phase flow regimes

  2. Heat transport in the Hadean mantle: From heat pipes to plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankanamge, Duminda G. J.; Moore, William B.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonics is a unique feature of Earth, and it plays a dominant role in transporting Earth's internally generated heat. It also governs the nature, shape, and the motion of the surface of Earth. The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth has been difficult to establish observationally, and modeling of the plate breaking process has not consistently accounted for the nature of the preplate tectonic Earth. We have performed numerical simulations of heat transport in the preplate tectonic Earth to understand the transition to plate tectonic behavior. This period of time is dominated by volcanic heat transport called the heat pipe mode of planetary cooling. These simulations of Earth's mantle include heat transport by melting and melt segregation (volcanism), Newtonian temperature-dependent viscosity, and internal heating. We show that when heat pipes are active, the lithosphere thickens and lithospheric isotherms are kept flat by the solidus. Both of these effects act to suppress plate tectonics. As volcanism wanes, conduction begins to control lithospheric thickness, and large slopes arise at the base of the lithosphere. This produces large lithospheric stress and focuses it on the thinner regions of the lithosphere resulting in plate breaking events.

  3. Heat pipe heat transport system for the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Life issues relating to a sodium heat pipe heat transport system are described. The heat pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50 kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC). The converter is being developed under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration program. Since corrosion of heat pipe materials in contact with sodium can impact the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that the impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion process likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minimize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  4. Phonon hydrodynamics and its applications in nanoscale heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2015-09-01

    Phonon hydrodynamics is an effective macroscopic method to study heat transport in dielectric solid and semiconductor. It has a clear and intuitive physical picture, transforming the abstract and ambiguous heat transport process into a concrete and evident process of phonon gas flow. Furthermore, with the aid of the abundant models and methods developed in classical hydrodynamics, phonon hydrodynamics becomes much easier to implement in comparison to the current popular approaches based on the first-principle method and kinetic theories involving complicated computations. Therefore, it is a promising tool for studying micro- and nanoscale heat transport in rapidly developing micro and nano science and technology. However, there still lacks a comprehensive account of the theoretical foundations, development and implementation of this approach. This work represents such an attempt in providing a full landscape, from physical fundamental and kinetic theory of phonons to phonon hydrodynamics in view of descriptions of phonon systems at microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic levels. Thus a systematical kinetic framework, summing up so far scattered theoretical models and methods in phonon hydrodynamics as individual cases, is established through a frame of a Chapman-Enskog solution to phonon Boltzmann equation. Then the basic tenets and procedures in implementing phonon hydrodynamics in nanoscale heat transport are presented through a review of its recent wide applications in modeling thermal transport properties of nanostructures. Finally, we discuss some pending questions and perspectives highlighted by a novel concept of generalized phonon hydrodynamics and possible applications in micro/nano phononics, which will shed more light on more profound understanding and credible applications of this new approach in micro- and nanoscale heat transport science.

  5. Effect of nanofluid on the heat transport capability in an oscillating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. B.; Wilson, C.; Borgmeyer, B.; Park, K.; Yu, Q.; Choi, S. U. S.; Tirumala, Murli

    2006-04-01

    By combining nanofluids with thermally excited oscillating motion in an oscillating heat pipe (OHP), we developed an ultrahigh-performance cooling device, called the nanofluid oscillating heat pipe. Experimental results show that when the OHP is charged with nanofluid, heat transport capability significantly increases. For example, at the input power of 80.0W, diamond nanofluid can reduce the temperature difference between the evaporator and the condenser from 40.9to24.3°C. This study will accelerate the development of a highly efficient cooling device for ultrahigh-heat-flux electronic systems.

  6. Modeling for Convective Heat Transport Based on Mixing Length Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Convection is the most important mechanism for the Earth's internal dynamics, and plays a substantial role on its evolution. On investigating the thermal history of the Earth, convective heat transport should be taken into account. However, it is difficult to treat full convective flow throughout the Earth's entire history. Therefore, the parameterized convection has been developed and widely used. Convection occurring in the Earth's interior has some complicated aspects. It has large variation of viscosity, internal heating, phase boundaries, etc. Especially, the viscosity contrast has significant effect on the efficiency of the heat transport of the convection. The parameterized convection treats viscosity variation artificially, so it has many limitations. We developed an alternative method based on the concept of "mixing length theory". We can relate local thermal gradient with local convective velocity of fluid parcel. Convective heat transport is identified with effective thermal diffusivity, and we can calculate horizontally averaged temperature profile and heat flux by solving a thermal conduction problem. On estimating the parcel's velocity, we can include such as the effect of variable viscosity. In this study, we confirm that the temperature profile can be calculated correctly by this method, on comparing the experimental and 2D calculation results. We further show the effect of the viscosity contrast on the thermal structure of the convective fluid, and calculate the relationship between Nusselt number and modified Rayleigh number.

  7. Conservative bounds on heat transport in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, Ralf; Whitehead, Jared

    2012-11-01

    The scaling dependence of the Nusselt number measuring heat transport in turbulent convection with the driving force remains incompletely understood, despite considerable effort in experiment, direct numerical simulation and theory. Variational upper bounds derived systematically from the governing partial differential equations provide a constraint on the possible scaling behaviors. We survey conservative analytical bounds on turbulent heat transport derived via the background flow method, both those obtained rigorously and semi-optimal upper bounds computed by numerical solution of the variational problem over a restricted class of backgrounds. We consider a range of scenarios, including the effects of plate conductivity, velocity boundary conditions and/or infinite Prandtl number in Rayleigh-Bénard convection, as well as related problems such as internal-heating-driven and porous medium convection.

  8. Studies of local electron heat transport on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Chang, Z.Y.; Janos, A.; McGuire, K.M.; Scott, S.; Taylor, G.

    1993-08-16

    The anomalously fast relaxation of the perturbations to the electron temperature profile caused by a sawtooth crash has been studied extensively on TFTR. We will show that on a short timescale the heat pulse is not simply diffusive as has been generally assumed, but that modeling of the heat pulse requires a transient enhancement in {chi}{sub e} following the sawtooth crash. It will be shown that the time-dependent enhancement in {chi}{sub e} predicted by non-linear thermal transport models, i.e., incremental {chi} models or the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins transport model, is much smaller than that required to explain the anomalies in the heat pulse propagation.

  9. Effects of nonlocal heat transport on laser implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Mima, K.; Honda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Kato, S.

    1996-05-01

    A numerical simulation code describing the spherically symmetric implosion hydrodynamics has been developed to investigate the nonlocal heat transport effects on stable high velocity implosion and fast ignition. In the implosion simulation code HIMICO, the Fokker Planck equation for electron transport is solved to describe the nonlocal effects. For high ablation pressure implosion with a pressure higher than 200 Mbar, the isentrope is found higher by a factor 2 in the nonlocal transport model than in the Spitzer Harm model. As for the fast ignition simulation, the neutron yield for the high density compression with 10 KJ laser increases to be 20 times by injecting an additional heating pulse of 10 KJ with 1 psec. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Changes in ocean vertical heat transport with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zika, Jan D.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Sijp, Willem P.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Heat transport between the surface and deep ocean strongly influences transient climate change. Mechanisms setting this transport are investigated using coupled climate models and by projecting ocean circulation into the temperature-depth diagram. In this diagram, a "cold cell" cools the deep ocean through the downwelling of Antarctic waters and upwelling of warmer waters and is balanced by warming due to a "warm cell," coincident with the interhemispheric overturning and previously linked to wind and haline forcing. With anthropogenic warming, the cold cell collapses while the warm cell continues to warm the deep ocean. Simulations with increasingly strong warm cells, set by their mean Southern Hemisphere winds, exhibit increasing deep-ocean warming in response to the same anthropogenic forcing. It is argued that the partition between components of the circulation which cool and warm the deep ocean in the preindustrial climate is a key determinant of ocean vertical heat transport with global warming.

  11. Nanoscale mechanisms for the reduction of heat transport in bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Maxime; Sjakste, Jelena; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Vast, Nathalie

    2016-02-01

    Hand-on routes to reduce lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) in bismuth have been explored by employing a combination of Boltzmann's transport equation and ab initio calculations of phonon-phonon interaction within the density functional perturbation theory. We have first obtained the temperature dependence of the bulk LTC in excellent agreement with available experiments. A very accurate microscopic description of heat transport has been achieved and the electronic contribution to thermal conductivity has been determined. By controlling the interplay between phonon-phonon interaction and phonon scattering by sample boundaries, we predict the effect of size reduction for various temperatures and nanostructure shapes. The largest heat transport reduction is obtained in polycrystals with grain sizes smaller than 100 nm.

  12. Thermodynamic description of heat and spin transport in magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, Laurent; Serrano-Guisan, Santiago; Reuse, François; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Spin-dependent heat and charge transport perpendicular to the plane of magnetic Co/Cu multilayers was studied experimentally and interpreted in the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The thermogalvanic voltage(TGV) is introduced. It measures the ac voltage response to a small temperature oscillation while a dc current is driven through the sample. TGV presents a magnetic response (MTGV) of 50%, much larger than magnetoresistance (GMR) and the magneto-thermoelectrical power (MTEP). The linear equations for transport of heat, charge, and spin-polarized currents in magnetic and nonmagnetic mediums are applied to a multilayer structure. The role of spin mixing in GMR, MTEP, and MTGV is shown. In particular, the asymmetry of the spin-mixing gives rise to spin-dependent effective Peltier coefficients. The three measurements can be accounted for with two parameters expressing the spin dependence of the transport coefficients.

  13. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  14. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong; Xiao, Y.; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  15. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Xiao, Y.; Holod, I.; Zhang, W. L.; Deng, Wenjun; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.; Kamath, Chandrika; Wichmann, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  16. On mobile element transport in heated Abee. [chondrite thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikramuddin, M.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Abee chondrite samples were heated at 700 C for one week at 0.00001 to 0.001 atm Ne or at 0.00001 atm H2. Samples heated in Ne showed greater loss of Bi and Se and greater retention of Zn than those heated in H2. An inverse relationship between Zn retention and ambient Ne pressure was found. Seven trace elements (Ag, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Te, and Tl) were retained or lost to the same extent regardless of the heating conditions. Variations in the apparent activation energy for C above and below 700 C suggest that diffusive loss from different hosts and/or different mobile transport processes over the temperature range may have been in effect.

  17. A simple Boltzmann transport equation for ballistic to diffusive transient heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maassen, Jesse; Lundstrom, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Developing simplified, but accurate, theoretical approaches to treat heat transport on all length and time scales is needed to further enable scientific insight and technology innovation. Using a simplified form of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), originally developed for electron transport, we demonstrate how ballistic phonon effects and finite-velocity propagation are easily and naturally captured. We show how this approach compares well to the phonon BTE, and readily handles a full phonon dispersion and energy-dependent mean-free-path. This study of transient heat transport shows (i) how fundamental temperature jumps at the contacts depend simply on the ballistic thermal resistance, (ii) that phonon transport at early times approach the ballistic limit in samples of any length, and (iii) perceived reductions in heat conduction, when ballistic effects are present, originate from reductions in temperature gradient. Importantly, this framework can be recast exactly as the Cattaneo and hyperbolic heat equations, and we discuss how the key to capturing ballistic heat effects is to use the correct physical boundary conditions.

  18. A simple Boltzmann transport equation for ballistic to diffusive transient heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Maassen, Jesse Lundstrom, Mark

    2015-04-07

    Developing simplified, but accurate, theoretical approaches to treat heat transport on all length and time scales is needed to further enable scientific insight and technology innovation. Using a simplified form of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), originally developed for electron transport, we demonstrate how ballistic phonon effects and finite-velocity propagation are easily and naturally captured. We show how this approach compares well to the phonon BTE, and readily handles a full phonon dispersion and energy-dependent mean-free-path. This study of transient heat transport shows (i) how fundamental temperature jumps at the contacts depend simply on the ballistic thermal resistance, (ii) that phonon transport at early times approach the ballistic limit in samples of any length, and (iii) perceived reductions in heat conduction, when ballistic effects are present, originate from reductions in temperature gradient. Importantly, this framework can be recast exactly as the Cattaneo and hyperbolic heat equations, and we discuss how the key to capturing ballistic heat effects is to use the correct physical boundary conditions.

  19. Radiation Transport through cylindrical foams with heated walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; MacLaren, Steve; Kallman, Joshua; Heinz, Ken; Hsing, Warren

    2012-10-01

    Radiation transport through low density SiO2 foams has been experimentally studied on the Omega laser. In particular these experiments examined the effects on radiation transport when the boundaries of the SiO2 foam are heated such that energy loss to the boundaries is minimized. The initial density of the SiO2 foams was determined by taking an x-ray radiograph of the foams using a monochromatic Henke source at multiple x-ray energies. The radiation drive used to both study the transport in the SiO2 foam as well as to heat the higher density CRF wall was generated in a laser-heated gold hohlraum using ˜7.5 kJ of the laser energy. The time-dependent spatial profile of the heat wave breaking out of the SiO2 foam was detected with an x-ray streak camera coupled with a soft x-ray transmission grating. The Omega DANTE diagnostic measured the radiation drive in the hohlraum and the Omega VISAR diagnostic monitored the spatial temperature gradient in the foam section of the hohlraum.

  20. HEAT AND WATER TRANSPORT IN A POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P

    2010-01-01

    In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for various applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance limitation in the PEFC comes from liquid water transport and the resulting flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the open pore space in the electrode and the fibrous diffusion layer leading to hindered oxygen transport. The electrode is also the only component in the entire PEFC sandwich which produces waste heat from the electrochemical reaction. The cathode electrode, being the host to several competing transport mechanisms, plays a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance limitation. In this work, an electrode model is presented in order to elucidate the coupled heat and water transport mechanisms. Two scenarios are specifically considered: (1) conventional, Nafion impregnated, three-phase electrode with the hydrated polymeric membrane phase as the conveyer of protons where local electro-neutrality prevails; and (2) ultra-thin, two-phase, nano-structured electrode without the presence of ionomeric phase where charge accumulation due to electro-statics in the vicinity of the membrane-CL interface becomes important. The electrode model includes a physical description of heat and water balance along with electrochemical performance analysis in order to study the influence of electro-statics/electro-migration and phase change on the PEFC electrode performance.

  1. Non-local heat transport in static solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaravella, A.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.

    1991-04-01

    The limits of applicability of the Spitzer-Harm thermal conductivity in solar coronal loops is investigated, and it is shown that the ratio of electron mean-free path to temperature scale height in large-scale structures can approach the limits of the Spitzer-Harm theory. A nonlocal formulation of heat transport is used to compute a grid of loop models: the effects of nonlocal transport on the distribution of differential emission measure are particularly important in the coronal part of loops longer than the pressure scale height.

  2. Local and nonlocal parallel heat transport in general magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of parallel transport in magnetized plasmas is presented. The method avoids numerical pollution issues of grid-based formulations and applies to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields with local or nonlocal parallel closures. In weakly chaotic fields, the method gives the fractal structure of the devil's staircase radial temperature profile. In fully chaotic fields, the temperature exhibits self-similar spatiotemporal evolution with a stretched-exponential scaling function for local closures and an algebraically decaying one for nonlocal closures. It is shown that, for both closures, the effective radial heat transport is incompatible with the quasilinear diffusion model.

  3. Linear delta-f simulations of nonlocal electron heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, S.; Valeo, E.; Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-27

    Nonlocal electron heat transport calculations are carried out by making use of some of the techniques developed previously for extending the delta f method to transport time scale simulations. By considering the relaxation of small amplitude temperature perturbations of a homogeneous Maxwellian background, only the linearized Fokker-Planck equation has to be solved, and direct comparisons can be made with the equivalent, nonlocal hydrodynamic approach. A quasineutrality-conserving algorithm is derived for computing the self-consistent electric fields driving the return currents. In the low-collisionality regime, results illustrate the importance of taking account of nonlocality in both space and time.

  4. Radiant heat test of Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP).

    SciTech Connect

    Gronewald, Patrick James; Oneto, Robert; Mould, John; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-08-01

    A conceptual design for a plutonium air transport package capable of surviving a 'worst case' airplane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A full-scale prototype, designated as the Perforated Metal Air Transport Package (PMATP) was thermally tested in the SNL Radiant Heat Test Facility. This testing, conducted on an undamaged package, simulated a regulation one-hour aviation fuel pool fire test. Finite element thermal predictions compared well with the test results. The package performed as designed, with peak containment package temperatures less than 80 C after exposure to a one-hour test in a 1000 C environment.

  5. Upper bound for heat transport due to ion temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Choi, K.

    1996-12-01

    Turbulent transport due to an ion temperature gradient is studied in the context of a fluid description in slab geometry. An upper bound on the heat transport is obtained through the use of a variational principle. The physical constraint of energy conservation that is included in the principle keeps the bound finite. Additional constraint is needed and employed for the magnetic shear effect to be accounted for. The bounding curve of the heat flux versus the ion temperature gradient, {eta}{sub {ital i}}, is presented along with the profiles of the fluctuations. The bound, after an extrapolation, is argued to be in the neighborhood of what numerical simulation predicts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Solar coronal loop heating by cross-field wave transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amendt, Peter; Benford, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Solar coronal arches heated by turbulent ion-cyclotron waves may suffer significant cross-field transport by these waves. Nonlinear processes fix the wave-propagation speed at about a tenth of the ion thermal velocity, which seems sufficient to spread heat from a central core into a large cool surrounding cocoon. Waves heat cocoon ions both through classical ion-electron collisions and by turbulent stochastic ion motions. Plausible cocoon sizes set by wave damping are in roughly kilometers, although the wave-emitting core may be only 100 m wide. Detailed study of nonlinear stabilization and energy-deposition rates predicts that nearby regions can heat to values intermediate between the roughly electron volt foot-point temperatures and the about 100 eV core, which is heated by anomalous Ohmic losses. A volume of 100 times the core volume may be affected. This qualitative result may solve a persistent problem with current-driven coronal heating; that it affects only small volumes and provides no way to produce the extended warm structures perceptible to existing instruments.

  7. Dynamics of heat and mass transport in a quantum insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    The real-time evolution of two pieces of quantum insulators, initially at different temperatures, is studied when they are glued together. Specifically, each subsystem is taken as a Bose-Hubbard model in a Mott insulator state. The process of temperature equilibration via heat transfer is simulated in real time using the minimally entangled typical thermal states algorithm. The analytic theory based on quasiparticle transport is also given.

  8. Climate in the Absence of Ocean Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, B. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The energy transported by the oceans to mid- and high latitudes is small compared to the atmosphere, yet exerts an outsized influence on the climate. A key reason is the strong interaction between ocean heat transport (OHT) and sea ice extent. I quantify this by comparing a realistic control climate simulation with a slab ocean simulation in which OHT is disabled. Using the state-of-the-art CESM with a realistic present-day continental configuration, I show that the absence of OHT leads to a 23 K global cooling and massive expansion of sea ice to near 30º latitude in both hemisphere. The ice expansion is asymmetric, with greatest extent in the South Pacific and South Indian ocean basins. I discuss implications of this enormous and asymmetric climate change for atmospheric circulation, heat transport, and tropical precipitation. Parameter sensitivity studies show that the simulated climate is far more sensitive to small changes in ice surface albedo in the absence of OHT, with some perturbations sufficient to cause a runaway Snowball Earth glaciation. I conclude that the oceans are responsible for an enormous global warming by mitigating an otherwise very potent sea ice albedo feedback, but that the magnitude of this effect is still rather uncertain. I will also present some ideas on adapting the simple energy balance model to account for the enhanced sensitivity of sea ice to heating from the ocean.

  9. Finite element analysis of heat transport in a hydrothermal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase heat transport in the vicinity of a heated, subsurface zone is important for evaluation of nuclear waste repository design and estimation of geothermal energy recovery, as well as prediction of magma solidification rates. Finite element analyses of steady, two-phase, heat and mass transport have been performed to determine the relative importance of conduction and convection in a permeable medium adjacent to a hot, impermeable, vertical surface. The model includes the effects of liquid flow due to capillarity and buoyancy and vapor flow due to pressure gradients. Change of phase, with its associated latent heat effects, is also modeled. The mechanism of capillarity allows for the presence of two-phase zones, where both liquid and vapor can coexist, which has not been considered in previous investigations. The numerical method employs the standard Galerkin/finite element method, using eight-node, subparametric or isoparametric quadrilateral elements. In order to handle the extreme nonlinearities inherent in two-phase, nonisothermal, porous-flow problems, steady-state results are computed by integrating transients out to a long time (a method that is highly robust).

  10. Effects of anomalous transport on lower hybrid electron heating

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.G.; Harvey, R.W.

    1981-02-01

    The transport of electron energy out of tokamaks is known to be far greater than that calculated using classical and neoclassical theory. However, low levels of non-axisymmetric magnetic field turbulence can couple the fast transport of electrons parallel to the magnetic field lines to radial transport, thus providing a plausible explanation for observed energy confinement. These models further predict that the electron loss rate is proportional to v/sub parallel bars/. This has subsequently been found to be consistent with data for runaway electrons in PLT, at energies up to 1 MeV. Recently it has been pointed out by Chan, Chiu and Ohkawa that anomalous transport processes should be taken into account in attempting to determine steady state electron distribution functions for cases involving RF electron tail heating, particularly in view of the v/sub parallel bars/ dependence of the loss rate. In this work these physical processes are modeled through a 2-D nonlinear program which describes the evolution of the electron distribution function in velocity magnitude; (v) and plasma radius (r), and which studies the efficiency of tail electron heating.

  11. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Heat Transport in Metals and Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; Kim, K.

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial thermal transport is of great importance in a number of practical applications where interfacial resistance between layers is frequently a major bottleneck to effective heat dissipation. For example, efficient heat transfer at silicon/aluminum and silicon/copper interfaces is very critical in power electronics packages used in hybrid electric vehicle applications. It is therefore important to understand the factors that govern and impact thermal transport at semiconductor/metal interfaces. Hence, in this study, we use classical molecular dynamics modeling to understand and study thermal transport in silicon and aluminum, and some preliminary modeling to study thermal transport at the interface between silicon and aluminum. A good match is shown between our modeling results for thermal conductivity in silicon and aluminum and the experimental data. The modeling results from this study also match well with relevant numerical studies in the literature for thermal conductivity. In addition, preliminary modeling results indicate that the interfacial thermal conductance for a perfect silicon/aluminum interface is of the same order as experimental data in the literature as well as diffuse mismatch model results accounting for realistic phonon dispersion curves.

  13. Thermophysical and heat transfer properties of phase change material candidate for waste heat transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizawa, Akihide; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Atsushi; Kamano, Hiroomi; Jozuka, Tetsuji; Senda, Takeshi; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2008-05-01

    A waste heat transportation system trans-heat (TH) system is quite attractive that uses the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM). The purpose of this paper is to study the thermophysical properties of various sugars and sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) as PCMs for a practical TH system and the heat transfer property between PCM selected and heat transfer oil, by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and a heat storage tube. As a result, erythritol, with a large latent heat of 344 kJ/kg at melting point of 117°C, high decomposition point of 160°C and excellent chemical stability under repeated phase change cycles was found to be the best PCM among them for the practical TH system. In the heat release experiments between liquid erythritol and flowing cold oil, we observed foaming phenomena of encapsulated oil, in which oil droplet was coated by solidification of PCM.

  14. Heat transport along domain walls and surfaces of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Anton; Richard, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    We calculate thermal transport in non-uniform states of unconventional superconductors, that appear near pairbreaking surfaces, or due to formation of domain walls in the order parameter. The spectrum of the quasiparticles states in these regions is dominated by the Andreev bound states, including topologically protected modes. We investigate how these states contribute to the heat transport, using non-equilibrium quasiclassical theory in linear response. We report self-consistent calculation of the order parameter, impurity self-energies, density of states and vertex corrections. Particular attention is paid to the non-local nature of the response. We show differences and similarities between domain walls in d-wave materials, and surfaces of multi-component chiral superconducting states. We describe results for Born and unitary impurity scattering limits, and effects of the Zeeman magnetic field on thermal transport. Supported by NSF Grants DMR-0954342.

  15. Theoretical analysis of the maximum heat transport in triangular grooves: A study of idealized micro heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.P.; Ma, H.B.

    1995-12-31

    A mathematical model for predicting the minimum meniscus radius and the maximum heat transport in micro heat pipes is presented. In this model, a theoretical minimum meniscus radius was found and used to calculate the capillary heat transport limit based on the physical characteristics and geometry. A control volume technique was employed to determine the flow characteristics of wickless micro heat pipes, and incorporate the effects of the frictional vapor-liquid interaction on the liquid flow. Unlike previous models, this model for the first time considers the true characteristics of micro heat pipes to determine the minimum meniscus radius and the maximum heat transport capacity. In order to compare the heat transport and flow characteristics, an effective hydraulic diameter was defined and the resulting model was solved numerically. The results indicate that the heat transport capacity of micro heat pipes is strongly dependent on the apex channel angle of the liquid arteries, the contact angle of the liquid flow, the length of the heat pipe, the vapor flow velocity and characteristics, and the tilt angle. In addition, the analysis presented here provides a mechanism, which for a given set of conditions, allows the geometry to be optimized and a micro heat pipe designed with a maximum heat transport capacity. This investigation will help optimize the design of micro heat pipes, making them capable of operating at increased power levels with greater reliability.

  16. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  17. On the mechanisms of heat transport across vacuum gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2011-12-01

    Heat exchange between closely positioned bodies has become an important issue for many areas of modern technology including, but not limited to, integrated circuits, atomic force microscopy, and high-density magnetic recording, which deal with bodies separated by gaps as narrow as a few nanometers. It is now recognized that heat transport across a gap of sub-micron width does not follow the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which is based on a conventional theory developed for sufficiently wide gaps. This paper describes the structure of thermally excited electromagnetic fields in arbitrarily narrow gaps, and it also shows that heat can be carried across narrow vacuum gaps by acoustic waves. The structure of the acoustic wave fields is also described, and it is shown that they become the dominant heat carriers in gaps narrower than a certain critical width, which is estimated to be a few nanometers. For example, consider a vacuum gap between silicon half-spaces. When the gap's width is below a critical value, which is about 7.5 nm, the contribution of acoustic waves must be taken into account. Assuming that the wavelength of thermally excited acoustic waves is of order 1 nm, it may be possible to estimate the contribution of acoustic waves to heat transport across gaps with 4 nm < h < 7.5 nm by the kinetic theory, but for narrower gaps with h < 4 nm, this approximation is not valid, and then the full wave theory must be used. Also for gaps narrower than about 2.5 nm, there is no need to take into account electromagnetic radiation because its contribution is negligible compared to that of acoustic waves.

  18. Thermal balance and quantum heat transport in nanostructures thermalized by local Langevin heat baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sääskilahti, K.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of thermal transport in practical nanostructures requires making tradeoffs between the size of the system and the completeness of the model. We study quantum heat transfer in a self-consistent thermal bath setup consisting of two lead regions connected by a center region. Atoms both in the leads and in the center region are coupled to quantum Langevin heat baths that mimic the damping and dephasing of phonon waves by anharmonic scattering. This approach treats the leads and the center region on the same footing and thereby allows for a simple and physically transparent thermalization of the system, enabling also perfect acoustic matching between the leads and the center region. Increasing the strength of the coupling reduces the mean-free path of phonons and gradually shifts phonon transport from ballistic regime to diffusive regime. In the center region, the bath temperatures are determined self-consistently from the requirement of zero net energy exchange between the local heat bath and each atom. By solving the stochastic equations of motion in frequency space and averaging over noise using the general fluctuation-dissipation relation derived by Dhar and Roy [J. Stat. Phys.JSTPBS0022-471510.1007/s10955-006-9235-3 125, 801 (2006)], we derive the formula for thermal current, which contains the Caroli formula for phonon transmission function and reduces to the Landauer-Büttiker formula in the limit of vanishing coupling to local heat baths. We prove that the bath temperatures measure local kinetic energy and can, therefore, be interpreted as true atomic temperatures. In a setup where phonon reflections are eliminated, the Boltzmann transport equation under gray approximation with full phonon dispersion is shown to be equivalent to the self-consistent heat bath model. We also study thermal transport through two-dimensional constrictions in square lattice and graphene and discuss the differences between the exact solution and linear approximations.

  19. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Chacon, L.

    2012-05-15

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly challenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), {chi}{sub ||} , and the perpendicular, {chi}{sub Up-Tack }, conductivities ({chi}{sub ||} /{chi}{sub Up-Tack} may exceed 10{sup 10} in fusion plasmas); (ii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality; and (iii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green's function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geometry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island), weakly chaotic (Devil's staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local parallel closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

  20. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly chal- lenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), , and the perpendicular, , conductivities ( / may exceed 1010 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green s function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geom- etry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island chain), weakly chaotic (devil s staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the appropriateness of the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

  1. Heat and salt transport throughout the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    Absolute geostrophic currents in the North Pacific Ocean are calculated using the P-vector method and gridded Argo profiling data from January 2004 to December 2012. Three-dimensional structures and seasonal variability of meridional heat transport (MHT) and meridional salt transport (MST) are analyzed. The results show that geostrophic and Ekman components are generally opposite in sign, with the southward geostrophic component dominating in the subtropics and the northward Ekman component dominating in the tropics. In combination with the net surface heat flux and the MST through the Bering Strait, the MHT and MST of the western boundary currents (WBCs) are estimated for the first time. The results suggest that the WBCs are of great importance in maintaining the heat and salt balance of the North Pacific. The total interior MHT and MST in the tropics show nearly the same seasonal variability as that of the Ekman components, consistent with the variability of zonal wind stress. The geostrophic MHT in the tropics is mainly concentrated in the upper layers, while MST with large amplitude and annual variation can extend much deeper. This suggests that shallow processes dominate MHT in the North Pacific, while MST can be affected by deep ocean circulation. In the extratropical ocean, both MHT and MST are weak. However, there is relatively large and irregular seasonal variability of geostrophic MST, suggesting the importance of the geostrophic circulation in the MST of that area.

  2. Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-07-31

    A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li/sub 2/O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li/sub 2/O granule throughput of 2.8 m/sup 3//s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber.

  3. Heat Transport in Graphene Ferromagnet-Insulator-Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Wei

    2011-04-01

    We study heat transport in a graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconducting junction. It is found that the thermal conductance of the graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor (FIS) junction is an oscillatory function of the barrier strength χ in the thin-barrier limit. The gate potential U0 decreases the amplitude of thermal conductance oscillation. Both the amplitude and phase of the thermal conductance oscillation varies with the exchange energy Eh. The thermal conductance of a graphene FIS junction displays the usual exponential dependence on temperature, reflecting the s-wave symmetry of superconducting graphene.

  4. Electron heat transport from stochastic fields in gyrokinetic simulationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, E.; Nevins, W. M.; Candy, J.; Hatch, D.; Terry, P.; Guttenfelder, W.

    2011-05-01

    GYRO is used to examine the perturbed magnetic field structure generated by electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of the CYCLONE base case as βe is varied from 0.1% to 0.7%, as investigated by J. Candy [Phys. Plasmas 12, 072307 (2005)]. Poincare surface of section plots obtained from integrating the self-consistent magnetic field demonstrates widespread stochasticity for all nonzero values of βe. Despite widespread stochasticity of the perturbed magnetic fields, no significant increase in electron transport is observed. The magnetic diffusion, dm [A. B. Rechester and M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett 40, 38 (1978)], is used to quantify the degree of stochasticity and related to the electron heat transport for hundreds of time slices in each simulation.

  5. Electron heat transport from stochastic fields in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Nevins, W. M.; Candy, J.; Hatch, D.; Terry, P.; Guttenfelder, W.

    2011-05-15

    GYRO is used to examine the perturbed magnetic field structure generated by electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of the CYCLONE base case as {beta}{sub e} is varied from 0.1% to 0.7%, as investigated by J. Candy [Phys. Plasmas 12, 072307 (2005)]. Poincare surface of section plots obtained from integrating the self-consistent magnetic field demonstrates widespread stochasticity for all nonzero values of {beta}{sub e}. Despite widespread stochasticity of the perturbed magnetic fields, no significant increase in electron transport is observed. The magnetic diffusion, d{sub m}[A. B. Rechester and M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett 40, 38 (1978)], is used to quantify the degree of stochasticity and related to the electron heat transport for hundreds of time slices in each simulation.

  6. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Two physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32. m diameter by 0.99. m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed.Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1. cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9. cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6. cm of water and 55.9. cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat-sand-soil mix

  7. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-02-01

    SummaryTwo physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32 m diameter by 0.99 m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed. Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1 cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9 cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6 cm of water and 55.9 cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat

  8. Radiation transport in ultrafast heated high Z solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, Ioana; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Mancini, Roberto; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-intense laser-target interactions generate hot, dense, and radiating plasmas, especially in the case of high-Z target materials. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation and its transport on the laser-produced plasmas we have developed a radiation transport (RT) code and implemented it in a collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The code uses a database of emissivities and opacities as functions of photon frequency, created for given densities and temperatures by the non-equilibrium, collisional-radiative atomic kinetics 0-D code FLYCHK together with its postprocessor FLYSPECTRA. Using the two-dimensional RT-PICLS code we have studied the X-ray transport in an ultrafast heated copper target, the X-ray conversion efficiency, and the exchange of energy between the radiation field and the target. The details of these results obtained from the implementation of the radiation transport model into the PICLS calculations will be reported in this presentation. Work supported by the DOE Office of Science grant no. DE-SC0008827 and by the NNSA/DOE grant no. DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  9. Non-diffusive heat transport during electron cyclotron heating on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Lohr, J.; Matsuda, K.; Prater, R.; Stockdale, R. ); Hass, J.C.M. de; James, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Of central importance to magnetic confinement fusion is the understanding of cross-field heat transport, which is usually modeled as a diffusive process down a temperature gradient with a small additional convective term due to particle transport. This paper reports results from off-axis electron cyclotron heating (ECH) experiments which cannot be adequately described in this framework. In particular, net heat appears to be flowing up the temperature gradient in the electron channel. Electron cyclotron heating experiments at 60 GHz have been carried out in the DIII-D tokamak with launched power levels up to 1.4 MW. The ECH launch system, located on the inside wall at z = +13 cm, launches the extraordinary X-mode in a Gaussian pattern with a 12{degrees} half width. Eight antennas direct their power at 15{degrees} and two antennas direct their power at {plus minus}30{degrees} with respect to the major radius. The orientation is such to drive current aiding the Ohmic current for normal operation. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Simulation of fluid, heat transport to estimate desert stream infiltration.

    PubMed

    Kulongoski, Justin T; Izbicki, John A

    2008-01-01

    In semiarid regions, the contribution of infiltration from intermittent streamflow to ground water recharge may be quantified by comparing simulations of fluid and heat transport beneath stream channels to observed ground temperatures. In addition to quantifying natural recharge, streamflow infiltration estimates provide a means to characterize the physical properties of stream channel sediments and to identify suitable locations for artificial recharge sites. Rates of winter streamflow infiltration along stream channels are estimated based on the cooling effect of infiltrated water on streambed sediments, combined with the simulation of two-dimensional fluid and heat transport using the computer program VS2DH. The cooling effect of ground water is determined by measuring ground temperatures at regular intervals beneath stream channels and nearby channel banks in order to calculate temperature-depth profiles. Additional data inputs included the physical, hydraulic, and thermal properties of unsaturated alluvium, and monthly ground temperatures measurements over an annual cycle. Observed temperatures and simulation results can provide estimates of the minimum threshold for deep infiltration, the variability of infiltration along stream channels, and also the frequency of infiltration events. PMID:18194325

  11. Simulation of fluid, heat transport to estimate desert stream infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, J.T.; Izbicki, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In semiarid regions, the contribution of infiltration from intermittent streamflow to ground water recharge may be quantified by comparing simulations of fluid and heat transport beneath stream channels to observed ground temperatures. In addition to quantifying natural recharge, streamflow infiltration estimates provide a means to characterize the physical properties of stream channel sediments and to identify suitable locations for artificial recharge sites. Rates of winter streamflow infiltration along stream channels are estimated based on the cooling effect of infiltrated water on streambed sediments, combined with the simulation of two-dimensional fluid and heat transport using the computer program VS2DH. The cooling effect of ground water is determined by measuring ground temperatures at regular intervals beneath stream channels and nearby channel banks in order to calculate temperature-depth profiles. Additional data inputs included the physical, hydraulic, and thermal properties of unsaturated alluvium, and monthly ground temperatures measurements over an annual cycle. Observed temperatures and simulation results can provide estimates of the minimum threshold for deep infiltration, the variability of infiltration along stream channels, and also the frequency of infiltration events.

  12. Transport simulations of ITER with empirical heat diffusivity scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1998-02-01

    Radiative mantle scenarios of the ignited ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA) with argon and neon influxing are explored by computer experiments using special versions of the 1.5 dimensional (1.5-D) BALDUR predictive transport code. An empirical scaling law for the effective heat diffusivity, compatible with the ITERH92-P ELMy H mode scaling and validated against experiments, is applied. The prescribed flat density profiles, conductive heat loss across the separatrix of 200 MW and ratio τ*He/ τE,r of 10 are reached in the simulations. Self-sustained thermonuclear burn is achieved for at least 485 s. The helium ash concentrations of up to 9.5% are found to cause significant fuel dilution. Owing to the high electron density, only small argon and neon fractions of 0.07 and 0.27%, respectively, are needed. In the argon scenario, the required radiation corrected thermal energy confinement time τE,r is 4.8 s. The confinement time predicted by the local scaling law is 1.4 times longer and agrees with the global scaling prediction. With argon, the design parameters are reached by radiating 128 MW within the separatrix, thus reducing the energy flow to the divertor to 73 MW. In the neon case with its more peripheral radiation, the radiative loss within the separatrix has to be diminished. Owing to the flat profile of the fuel ion density, the neoclassical drift velocities of argon and neon are directed outwards in the whole plasma. In the argon scenario, the sensitivity of transport to the density profile shape is studied. It is found that τE,r remains almost unchanged, varying between 4.5 and 4.8 s, which is explained by an analytic expression for the thermal energy. Peaking of the electron and impurity densities does not alter the required argon concentration but causes a peaking of the radiation profiles and reduction in the temperatures. Sufficiently narrow fuel ion density profiles are shown to cause inward directed neoclassical drift velocities of argon in the

  13. Heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yee Kan

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures, and across solid-solid interfaces. Particularly, this dissertation emphasizes advancing understanding of the mean-free-paths (i.e., the distance phonons propagate without being scattered) of acoustic phonons, which are the dominant heat carriers in most crystalline semiconductor nanostructures. Two primary tools for the studies presented in this dissertation are time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) for measurements of thermal conductivity of nanostructures and thermal conductance of interfaces; and frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), which I developed as a direct probe of the mean-free-paths of dominant heat-carrying phonons in crystalline solids. The foundation of FDTR is the dependence of the apparent thermal conductivity on the frequency of periodic heat sources. I find that the thermal conductivity of semiconductor alloys (InGaP, InGaAs, and SiGe) measured by TDTR depends on the modulation frequency, 0.1 ≤ f ≤ 10 MHz, used in TDTR measurements. Reduction in the thermal conductivity of the semiconductor alloys at high f compares well to the reduction in the thermal conductivity of epitaxial thin films, indicating that frequency dependence and thickness dependence of thermal conductivity are fundamentally equivalent. I developed the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity into a convenient probe of phonon mean-free-paths, a technique which I call frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR). In FDTR, I monitor the changes in the intensity of the reflected probe beam as a function of the modulation frequency. To facilitate the analysis of FDTR measurements, I developed a nonlocal theory for heat conduction by phonons at high heating frequencies. Calculations of the nonlocal theory confirm my experimental findings that phonons with mean-free-paths longer than two times the penetration depth do not contribute to the apparent thermal

  14. Anisotropic heat transport in reversed shear configurations: shearless Cantori barriers and nonlocal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasevski, D.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2012-10-01

    Heat transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion. In Ref.footnotetext D. del-Castillo-Negrete, and L. Chac'on, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106, 195004 (2011); Phys. Plasmas 19, 056112 (2012). we proposed a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method to study this problem in the strongly anisotropic (χ=0) regime. The LG method bypasses the need to discretize the transport operators on a grid and it is applicable to general parallel flux closures and 3-D magnetic fields. Here we apply the LG method to parallel transport (with local and nonlocal parallel flux closures) in reversed shear magnetic field configurations known to exhibit robust transport barriers in the vicinity of the extrema of the q-profile. By shearless Cantori (SC) we mean the invariant Cantor sets remaining after the destruction of toroidal flux surfaces with zero magnetic shear, q^'=0. We provide numerical evidence of the role of SC in the anomalously slow relaxation of radial temperature gradients in chaotic magnetic fields with no transport barriers. The spatio-temporal evolution of temperature pulses localized in the reversed shear region exhibits non-diffusive self-similar evolution and nonlocal effective radial transport.

  15. Heat conduction in multifunctional nanotrusses studied using Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Nicholas G.; Minnich, Austin J.

    2016-01-01

    Materials that possess low density, low thermal conductivity, and high stiffness are desirable for engineering applications, but most materials cannot realize these properties simultaneously due to the coupling between them. Nanotrusses, which consist of hollow nanoscale beams architected into a periodic truss structure, can potentially break these couplings due to their lattice architecture and nanoscale features. In this work, we study heat conduction in the exact nanotruss geometry by solving the frequency-dependent Boltzmann transport equation using a variance-reduced Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that their thermal conductivity can be described with only two parameters, solid fraction and wall thickness. Our simulations predict that nanotrusses can realize unique combinations of mechanical and thermal properties that are challenging to achieve in typical materials.

  16. Heat- and mass-transport in aqueous silica nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turanov, A. N.; Tolmachev, Yuriy V.

    2009-10-01

    Using the transient hot wire and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods we determined the thermal conductivity and the solvent self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) in aqueous suspensions of quasi-monodisperse spherical silica nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity was found to increase at higher volume fraction of nanoparticles in accordance with the effective medium theory albeit with a smaller slope. On the other hand, the SDC was found to decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction faster than predicted by the effective medium theory. These deviations can be explained by the presence of an interfacial heat-transfer resistance and water retention by the nanoparticles, respectively. We found no evidence for anomalous enhancement in the transport properties of nanofluids reported earlier by other groups.

  17. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  18. Phononic heat transport in the transient regime: An analytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuovinen, Riku; Säkkinen, Niko; Karlsson, Daniel; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the time-resolved quantum transport properties of phonons in arbitrary harmonic systems connected to phonon baths at different temperatures. We obtain a closed analytic expression of the time-dependent one-particle reduced density matrix by explicitly solving the equations of motion for the nonequilibrium Green's function. This is achieved through a well-controlled approximation of the frequency-dependent bath self-energy. Our result allows for exploring transient oscillations and relaxation times of local heat currents, and correctly reduces to an earlier known result in the steady-state limit. We apply the formalism to atomic chains, and benchmark the validity of the approximation against full numerical solutions of the bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations for the Green's function. We find good agreement between the analytic and numerical solutions for weak contacts and baths with a wide energy dispersion. We further analyze relaxation times from low to high temperature gradients.

  19. Impact of slowdown of Atlantic overturning circulation on heat and freshwater transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Drushka, Kyla; Thompson, LuAnne; Le Bars, Dewi; McDonagh, Elaine L.

    2016-07-01

    Recent measurements of the strength of the Atlantic overturning circulation at 26°N show a 1 year drop and partial recovery amid a gradual weakening. To examine the extent and impact of the slowdown on basin wide heat and freshwater transports for 2004-2012, a box model that assimilates hydrographic and satellite observations is used to estimate heat transport and freshwater convergence as residuals of the heat and freshwater budgets. Using an independent transport estimate, convergences are converted to transports, which show a high level of spatial coherence. The similarity between Atlantic heat transport and the Agulhas Leakage suggests that it is the source of the surface heat transport anomalies. The freshwater budget in the North Atlantic is dominated by a decrease in freshwater flux. The increasing salinity during the slowdown supports modeling studies that show that heat, not freshwater, drives trends in the overturning circulation in a warming climate.

  20. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  1. Noise and fluctuation statistics in mesoscopic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averin, Dmitri

    2012-02-01

    Fluctuations play important role in thermodynamics of small systems. In the talk, I will discuss two recent results on fluctuations in mesosopic heat transport. One is the demonstration [1] that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for thermal conductance of a mesocopic junction is not valid at non-zero frequencies φ. Finite relaxation energy creates fluctuations of the energy flux in the junction even at vanishing temperature, T=0, when the conductance vanishes. This suggest that in contract to electrical conductance, there is no ``Kubo-Green formula'' for equilibrium thermal conductance at φ 0. Non-equilibrium heat transfer satisfies general ``fluctuation relations'' of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Recently, we have established the conditions of applicability of these relations to single-electron tunneling (SET), and calculated explicitly the statistics of dissipated energy in driven SET transitions [2], which gives an example of general statistics of energy dissipation in reversible information processing. An interesting consequence of this statistics is the possibility of implementing the electronic version of Maxwell's demon in the SET structures [3]. [4pt] [1] D.V. Averin and J.P. Pekola, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 220601 (2010). [0pt] [2] D.V. Averin and J.P. Pekola, arXiv:1105.041. [0pt] [3] D.V. Averin, M. Mottonen, and J.P. Pekola, arXiv:1108.5435.

  2. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Material transport is an important mechanism in microfluidics and drug delivery. The methods and solutions found in literature involve passively diffusing structures, microneedles and chemically fueled structures. In this work, we make use of optically actuated microtools with embedded metal layer as heating element for controlled loading and release. The new microtools take advantage of the photothermal-induced convection current to load and unload cargo. We also discuss some challenges encountered in realizing a self-contained polymerized microtool. Microfluidic mixing, fluid flow control and convection currents have been demonstrated both experimentally and numerically for static metal thin films or passively floating nanoparticles. Here we show an integration of aforementioned functionalities in an optically fabricated and actuated microtool. As proof of concept, we demonstrate loading and unloading of beads. This can be extended to controlled transport and release of genetic material, bio-molecules, fluorescent dyes. We envisioned these microtools to be an important addition to the portfolio of structure-mediated contemporary biophotonics.

  3. Ambipolar magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in toroidal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Ware, A.S.

    1996-05-01

    The total magnetic fluctuation-induced electron thermal flux has been determined in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [Fusion Technol. {bold 19}, 131 (1991)] from the measured correlation of the heat flux along perturbed fields with the radial component of the perturbed field. In the edge region the total flux is convective and intrinsically ambipolar constrained, as evidenced by the magnitude of the thermal diffusivity, which is well approximated by the product of ion thermal velocity and the magnetic diffusivity. A self-consistent theory is formulated and shown to reproduce the experimental results, provided nonlinear charge aggregation in streaming electrons is accounted for in the theory. For general toroidal configurations, it is shown that ambipolar constrained transport applies when remote magnetic fluctuations (i.e., global modes resonant at distant rational surfaces) dominate the flux. Near locations where the dominant modes are resonant, the transport is nonambipolar. This agrees with the radial variation of diffusivity in MST. Expectations for the tokamak are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  5. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, William

    2016-04-01

    The increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change requires an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This study describes a new model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use during fires. The model is based on conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10,000 and 50,000 Wm2. In general, the model simulates the observed temperature dynamics quite well, but is less precise (but still good) at capturing the moisture dynamics. The model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50-90 C), and can provide quite accurate predictions of the total amount of soil moisture evaporated during the laboratory experiments. Overall, this new model provides a much more physically realistic simulation over all previous models developed for the same purpose.

  6. DOS-HEATING6: A general conduction code with nuclear heat generation derived from DOT-IV transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.; Yuecel, A.; Nadkarny, S.

    1988-05-01

    The HEATING6 heat conduction code is modified to (a) read the multigroup particle fluxes from a two-dimensional DOT-IV neutron- photon transport calculation, (b) interpolate the fluxes from the DOT-IV variable (optional) mesh to the HEATING6 control volume mesh, and (c) fold the interpolated fluxes with kerma factors to obtain a nuclear heating source for the heat conduction equation. The modified HEATING6 is placed as a module in the ORNL discrete ordinates system (DOS), and has been renamed DOS-HEATING6. DOS-HEATING6 provides the capability for determining temperature distributions due to nuclear heating in complex, multi-dimensional systems. All of the original capabilities of HEATING6 are retained for the nuclear heating calculation; e.g., generalized boundary conditions (convective, radiative, finned, fixed temperature or heat flux), temperature and space dependent thermal properties, steady-state or transient analysis, general geometry description, etc. The numerical techniques used in the code are reviewed and the user input instructions and JCL to perform DOS-HEATING6 calculations are presented. Finally a sample problem involving coupled DOT-IV and DOS-HEATING6 calculations of a complex space-reactor configurations described, and the input and output of the calculations are listed. 10 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. 3D multi-scale analysis of coupled heat and moisture transport and its parallel implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    Parallel implementation of two-scale model of coupled heat and moisture transport is described. The coupled heat and moisture transport is based on the Künzel model. Motivation for the two-scale analysis comes from the requirement to describe distribution of the relative humidity and temperature in historical masonry structures.

  8. Nonlinear heat transport between the stack and the heat-exchangers of standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Berson, A.

    2008-06-01

    The development of high performance thermoacoustic refrigerators requires an efficient heat transport between the stack and the heat exchangers. A 1D nonlinear model for the thermal coupling of these two components is proposed in the case of a standing-wave thermaocoustic refrigerator. It shows the generation of temperature harmonics close to the edges of the plates that affects heat transport. In order to validate the model, the nonlinear temperature field close to the stack edges is measured using cold-wire anemometry.

  9. Interface Exchange as an Indicator for Eddy Heat Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Mark R.; Williams, Sean J.; Hecht, Matthew W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Hamann, Bernd; Patchett, John M.; Ahrens, James P.

    2012-06-12

    The ocean contains many large-scale, long-lived vortices, called mesoscale eddies, that are believed to have a role in the transport and redistribution of salt, heat, and nutrients throughout the ocean. Determining this role, however, has proven to be a challenge, since the mechanics of eddies are only partly understood; a standard definition for these ocean eddies does not exist and, therefore, scientifically meaningful, robust methods for eddy extraction, characterization, tracking and visualization remain a challenge. In order to shed light on the nature and potential roles of eddies, we have combined our previous research on eddy identification and tracking, and have used those approaches as the basis for analysis-driven computational experiments on the nature of eddies. Based on the resulting visualizations of eddy behavior, we have devised a new metric to characterize the transfer of water into and out of eddies across their boundary, and have developed visualization methods for this new metric to provide clues about the role eddies play in the global ocean and, potentially, climate change.

  10. SOLAR WIND MODELING WITH TURBULENCE TRANSPORT AND HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.; Breech, Benjamin A.

    2011-02-01

    We have developed an axisymmetric steady-state solar wind model that describes properties of the large-scale solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, and turbulence throughout the heliosphere from 0.3 AU to 100 AU. The model is based on numerical solutions of large-scale Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamic equations coupled with a set of small-scale transport equations for the turbulence energy, normalized cross helicity, and correlation scale. The combined set of time-dependent equations is solved in the frame of reference corotating with the Sun using a time-relaxation method. We use the model to study the self-consistent interaction between the large-scale solar wind and smaller-scale turbulence and the role of the turbulence in the large-scale structure and temperature distribution in the solar wind. To illuminate the roles of the turbulent cascade and the pickup protons in heating the solar wind depending on the heliocentric distance, we compare the model results with and without turbulence/pickup protons. The variations of plasma temperature in the outer heliosphere are compared with Ulysses and Voyager 2 observations.

  11. Enhanced heat transport in environmental systems using microencapsulated phase change materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, D. P.; Mulligan, J. C.; Bryant, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for enhanced heat transport and storage that uses a new two-component fluid mixture consisting of a microencapsulated phase change material (microPCM) for enhanced latent heat transport is outlined. SBIR investigations for NASA, USAF, SDIO, and NSF since 1983 have demonstrated the ability of the two-component microPCM coolants to provide enhancements in heat transport up to 40 times over that of the carrier fluid alone, enhancements of 50 to 100 percent in the heat transfer coefficient, practically isothermal operation when the coolant flow is circulated in an optimal manner, and significant reductions in pump work.

  12. Using Sea Level to Probe Linkages Between Heat Transport Convergence, Heat Storage Rate, and Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L.; Kelly, K. A.; Booth, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Annual mean surface heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere in midlatitudes are maximum in the Gulf Stream and that surface flux is driven by geostrophic heat transport convergence. Evidence is mounting that on interannual times scales, the surface flux of heat in the Gulf Stream region is controlled by the amount of heat that is stored in the region and that the heat storage rate is in turn controlled by geostrophic heat transport convergence. In addition, variations in meridional heat transport have been linked to the meridional overturning circulation just to the south of the Gulf Stream at the RAPID/MOCHA array at 26.5N, suggesting that changes in the meridional overturning circulation might be linked to surface heat exchange in the Gulf Stream. The twenty-year record of satellite sea level (SSH) along with high quality surface heat fluxes allow a detailed evaluation of the interaction between stored oceanic heat in this region and surface heat fluxes on interannual times scales. Using gridded sea level from AVISO as a proxy for upper ocean heat content along with surface turbulent heat flux from OAFlux, we evaluate the lagged correlations between interannual surface turbulent heat fluxes and SSH variability. Previous work has shown that where advection is small lagged correlations between SST (sea surface temperature) and surface turbulent heat flux are generally antisymmetric about zero lag with negative correlations when SST leads and positive correlations when SST lags. This indicates that surface heat fluxes force SST anomalies that at later times are damped by surface fluxes. In contrast, the lagged correlation between SSH anomalies and the turbulent flux of heat in the Gulf Stream region show a distinctly asymmetric relationship about zero-lag. The correlations are negative when SSH leads but are not significant when SSH lags indicating the dominant role in heat transport convergence in driving heat content changes, and that the heat content

  13. Numerical modeling for energy transport and isochoric heating in ultra-fast heated high Z target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Hakel, Peter; Mancini, Roberto C.

    2010-11-01

    Collisional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code is an effective tool to study extreme energy density conditions achieved in intense laser-solid interactions. In the continuous process of developing PIC code, we have recently implemented models to incorporate dynamic ionizations, namely Saha and Thomas Fermi, and radiation cooling (due to Bremsstrahlung and line emissions). We have also revised the existing collision model to take into account bounded electrons in dynamically ionizing target (partially ionized target). One-dimensional PIC simulation of a gold target with new collision model shows strong local heating in a micron distance due to shorter stopping range of fast electrons, which reflects the increased collision frequency due to bound electrons. The peak temperature in the heated region drops significantly due to the radiation cooling to a level of a few hundred eV from keV. We also discuss the target Z dependence on radiation loss and two-dimensional effects such as the resistive magnetic fields in the hot electron transport in metal targets.

  14. Generalized parallel heat transport equations in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawaideh, Emad; Kim, N. S.; Najmabadi, Farrokh

    1988-11-01

    A new set of two-fluid heat-transport equations for heat conduction in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas was derived on the basis of gyrokinetic equations in flux coordinates. In these equations, no restrictions on the anisotropy of the ion distribution function or the collisionality are imposed. In the highly collisional limit, these equations reduce to the classical heat conduction equation of Spitzer and Haerm (1953), while in the weakly collisional limit, they describe a saturated heat flux. Numerical examples comparing these equations with conventional heat transport equations are presented.

  15. Strong eddy compensation for the Gulf Stream heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Oleg A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a high-resolution ocean model forced with high-resolution atmospheric fields, a 5 year mean heat budget of the upper ocean in the Gulf Stream (GS) region is analyzed. The heat brought to the region with the mean flows along the GS path is 2-3 times larger than the heat loss to the atmosphere, with the difference being balanced by a strong cooling effect due to lateral eddy heat fluxes. However, over a broad area off the Grand Banks, the eddies warm the uppermost ocean layers, partly compensating for the loss of heat to the atmosphere. The upward eddy heat flux, which brings heat from the deeper ocean to the upper layers, is 30-80% of the surface heat loss.

  16. Anomalous heat transport and condensation in convection of cryogenic helium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Pavel; Schmoranzer, David; Hanzelka, Pavel; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Skrbek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    When a hot body A is thermally connected to a cold body B, the textbook knowledge is that heat flows from A to B. Here, we describe the opposite case in which heat flows from a colder but constantly heated body B to a hotter but constantly cooled body A through a two-phase liquid–vapor system. Specifically, we provide experimental evidence that heat flows through liquid and vapor phases of cryogenic helium from the constantly heated, but cooler, bottom plate of a Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell to its hotter, but constantly cooled, top plate. The bottom plate is heated uniformly, and the top plate is cooled by heat exchange with liquid helium maintained at 4.2 K. Additionally, for certain experimental conditions, a rain of helium droplets is detected by small sensors placed in the cell at about one-half of its height. PMID:23576759

  17. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of local and regional heat transport processes into the subsurface urban heat island of Karlsruhe, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Menberg, Kathrin; Blum, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Temperatures in shallow urban ground are typically elevated. They manifest as subsurface urban heat islands, which are observed worldwide in different metropolitan areas and which have a site-specific areal extent and intensity. As of right now the governing heat transport processes accumulating heat in the subsurface of cities are insufficiently understood. Based on a spatial assessment of groundwater temperatures, six individual heat flux processes could be identified: (1) heat flux from elevated ground surface temperatures (GST), (2) heat flux from basements of buildings, (3) reinjection of thermal waste water, (4) sewage drains, (5) sewage leakage, and (6) district heating. In this study, the contributions of these processes are quantified on local and regional scales for the city of Karlsruhe in Germany. For the regional scale, the Regionalized Monte Carlo (RMC) method is used. This method applies a single Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the entire study area. At relatively low data demand, the RMC method provides basic insights into the heat contribution for the entire city. For the local scale, the Local Monte Carlo (LMC) method was developed and applied. This method analyzes all dominant heat fluxes spatially dependent by performing an MC simulation for each arbitrary sized pixel of the study area (here 10 x 10 m). This more intricate approach allows for a spatial representation of all heat flux processes, which is necessary for the local planning of geothermal energy use. In order to evaluate the heat transport processes on a regional scale, we compared the mean annual thermal energies that result from the individual heat flux processes. Both methods identify the heat flux from elevated GST and the heat flux from buildings as the dominant regional processes. However, reinjection of thermal wastewater is by far the most dominant local heat flux processes with an average heat flux of 16 ± 2 W/m2 in the affected areas. Although being dominant on the regional

  19. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. The key parameter ismore » $$\\gamma=\\sqrt{\\omega/2 \\chi_\\parallel}$$ that determines the length scale, $$1/\\gamma$$, of the heat wave penetration along the magnetic field line. For large perturbation frequencies, $$\\omega \\gg 1$$, or small parallel thermal conductivities, $$\\chi_\\parallel \\ll 1$$, parallel heat transport is strongly damped and the magnetic field partial barriers act as robust barriers where the heat wave amplitude vanishes and its phase speed slows down to a halt. On the other hand, in the limit of small $$\\gamma$$, parallel heat transport is largely unimpeded, global transport is observed and the radial amplitude and phase speed of the heat wave remain finite. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across magnetic islands are also presented. In qualitative agreement with recent experiments in LHD and DIII-D, it is shown that the elliptic (O) and hyperbolic (X) points of magnetic islands have a direct impact on the spatio-temporal dependence of the amplitude and the time delay

  20. Heat Transport Near the Lambda Line in a Channel Containing He II

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, M.; Sato, A.; Dantsuka, T.; Yuyama, M.; Kamioka, Y.

    2006-04-27

    We proposed a normalized representation of the thermal conductivity function for heat transport in He II in the previous work. In order to check its validity, steady state heat transport characteristics of He II was investigated near T{lambda}. The temperature profiles along the channels were measured at various pressures of 0.1, 1.0 and 1.5 MPa. The measured temperature profiles were analyzed to get the thermal conductivity function near T{lambda}. The validity of the universal heat transport formula was confirmed up to T / T{lambda} = 0.99.

  1. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.

    2015-03-01

    With increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change comes the need to improve modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing a one-dimensional non-equilibrium model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use with surface forcing ranging from daily solar cycles to extreme conditions encountered during fires. The model employs a linearized Crank-Nicolson scheme for the conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10 000 and 50 000 W m-2. The Hertz-Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. The model includes a dynamic residual soil moisture as a function of temperature and soil water potential, which allows the model to capture some of the dynamic aspects of the strongly bound soil moisture that seems to require temperatures well beyond 150 °C to fully evaporate. Furthermore, the model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50-90 °C). Sensitivity analyses indicate that the model's success results primarily from the use of a temperature and moisture potential dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term. The model's solution for water vapor density (and vapor pressure), which can exceed one standard atmosphere, cannot be experimentally verified, but they are supported by results from (earlier and very different) models developed for somewhat different purposes and for different porous media. Overall, this non

  2. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; et al

    2016-01-28

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-more » $${{T}_{\\text{e}}}$$ electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ($${{T}_{\\text{eo}}}=9$$ keV) at moderately low densities ($${{n}_{\\text{eo}}}=1.5\\times {{10}^{19}}$$ m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ($${{E}_{\\text{r}}}$$ ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. This provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.« less

  3. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high-Te ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; et al

    2016-01-28

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-more » $${{T}_{\\text{e}}}$$ electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ($${{T}_{\\text{eo}}}=9$$ keV) at moderately low densities ($${{n}_{\\text{eo}}}=1.5\\times {{10}^{19}}$$ m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ($${{E}_{\\text{r}}}$$ ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. Furthermore, this provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.« less

  4. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high-T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; Igamai, S.; Kubo, S.; Lazerson, S.; Matsuoka, S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Seki, R.; Shimozuma, T.; Suzuki, C.; Suzuki, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yamada, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-{{T}\\text{e}} electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ({{T}\\text{eo}}=9 keV) at moderately low densities ({{n}\\text{eo}}=1.5× {{10}19} m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ({{E}\\text{r}} ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. This provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.

  5. ANALYZING NUMERICAL ERRORS IN DOMAIN HEAT TRANSPORT MODELS USING THE CVBEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II

    1987-01-01

    Besides providing an exact solution for steady-state heat conduction processes (Laplace-Poisson equations), the CVBEM (complex variable boundary element method) can be used for the numerical error analysis of domain model solutions. For problems where soil-water phase change latent heat effects dominate the thermal regime, heat transport can be approximately modeled as a time-stepped steady-state condition in the thawed and frozen regions, respectively. The CVBEM provides an exact solution of the two-dimensional steady-state heat transport problem, and also provides the error in matching the prescribed boundary conditions by the development of a modeling error distribution or an approximate boundary generation.

  6. General circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating: Significance of planetary rotation and polar eddy heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    A high significance of planetary rotation and poleward eddy heat fluxes is determined for general circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating. In a high-resolution simplified Venus general circulation model, a planetary-scale mixed Rossby-gravity wave with meridional winds across the poles produces strong poleward heat flux and indirect circulation. This strong poleward heat transport induces downward momentum transport of indirect cells in the regions of weak high-latitude jets. It also reduces the meridional temperature gradient and vertical shear of the high-latitude jets in accordance with the thermal wind relation below the cloud layer. In contrast, strong equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets form in the cloud layer in the absence of polar indirect cells in an experiment involving Titan's rotation. Both the strong midlatitude jet and meridional temperature gradient are maintained in the situation that eddy horizontal heat fluxes are weak. The presence or absence of strong poleward eddy heat flux is one of the important factors determining the slow or fast superrotation state in the cloud layer through the downward angular momentum transport and the thermal wind relation. For fast Earth rotation, a weak global-scale Hadley circulation of the low-density upper atmosphere maintains equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets above the cloud layer, whereas multiple meridional circulations suppress the zonal wind speed below the cloud layer.

  7. Is the Standard Definition of Poleward Heat Transport Appropriate in Climate Research?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Minyi; Czaja, Arnaud; Graversen, Rune; Tailleux, Remi

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a problem with the standard definition of poleward heat transport is highlighted. This, we argue, arises because of the dependence of the standard definition on an arbitrary reference state for moist static energy. This dependence may result in large uncertainty in the estimates of ocean-atmosphere coupling, the signature in heat transport of the atmospheric storm track and annular modes of variability. A new definition is proposed to address the problem, which removes unrealistically large fluctuations (4PW) found when using the standard definition. A practical way to implement the new formulation is also discussed. The new heat transport definition is shown to lead to better correlations with climate indices compared to the traditional definition. In particular a clear relationship between the AO, El Niño and heat transport emerges in our analysis. In addition, it also produces different time sequence of event with large/weak poleward heat transport. It is hoped that the new heat transport definition may shed light on studies exploring the link between energy transport and climate variability.

  8. Partial barriers to heat transport in monotonic- q and reversed shear 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The quantitative understanding of the role of magnetic field stochasticity on transport in 3-D configurations is of paramount importance for the magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas. Problems of interest include the control of ELMs by RMPs and the assessment of heat fluxes at the divertor. In this contribution we present numerical solutions of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation describing transport of heat pulses in 3-D chaotic magnetic fields. To overcome the limitations of standard approaches, we use a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method that allows the efficient and accurate integration of the anisotropic heat transport equation with local and non-local parallel heat flux closures in integrable and chaotic B fields. The results provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations exhibit partial barriers to heat transport. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial ``leaky'' barriers that slow down or even stop the inward propagation of heat pulses. The magnetic field connection length, < lB > , exhibits a strong gradient where the partial barriers form, and it reaches a plateau whose value determines the ``porosity'' of the barrier. Heat pulses are shown to slow down considerably in the shear reversal region and, as a result, the time delay of the temperature response in chaotic reversed shear configurations is about an order of magnitude larger than the time delay in monotonic q-profiles.

  9. Intestinal transport of hexoses in the rat following chronic heat exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1979-01-01

    The study examines intestinal transport of sugars (D-glucose and D-galactose) in vitro and assesses organ maintenance in chronically heat-exposed rats. The results suggest that the response of intestinal absorption to heat exposure in the rat involves changes in intestinal weight and in glucose utilization. Despite the reduction in total intestinal weight, the ability of intestinal tissue to transport hexose per unit weight remains stable. Differences in intestinal weight and glucose utilization between pair-fed and heat-exposed animals suggest that the intestinal response to chronic heat exposure is not solely a function of the amount of food consumed. Alterations of hexose transport appear to be related to altered glucose metabolism and not altered transport capacity.

  10. Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Per F. Peterson

    2010-03-01

    This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

  11. Main Modes of Heat Transport in Rayleigh-Bénard Convection Analyzed by a POD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luelff, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection, i.e. the buoyancy-induced movement of a fluid enclosed between two horizontal plates, is the definite setup to study thermal convection. We are interested in the heat transport of the main modes that are found in the convection cell. To this end, we apply the technique of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to obtain a set of empirical basis modes from simulation data. Usually the POD method results in modes that are optimal in describing the generalized energy, i.e. kinetic energy plus temperature variance. We extend the technique so that instead it gives the optimal modes with respect to the heat transport, measured in terms of the Nusselt number. We then demonstrate at numerical simulations of different RB setups and geometries that the proposed ansatz performs consistently better than the standard approach in describing the heat transport. Furthermore, the coherent structures that are connected to the biggest heat transport are examined.

  12. ANALYZING NUMERICAL ERRORS IN DOMAIN HEAT TRANSPORT MODELS USING THE CVBEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II

    1985-01-01

    Besides providing an exact solution for steady-state heat conduction processes (Laplace Poisson equations), the CVBEM (complex variable boundary element method) can be used for the numerical error analysis of domain model solutions. For problems where soil water phase change latent heat effects dominate the thermal regime, heat transport can be approximately modeled as a time-stepped steady-state condition in the thawed and frozen regions, respectively. The CVBEM provides an exact solution of the two-dimensional steady-state heat transport problem, and also provides the error in matching the prescribed boundary conditions by the development of a modeling error distribution or an approximative boundary generation. This error evaluation can be used to develop highly accurate CVBEM models of the heat transport process, and the resulting model can be used as a test case for evaluating the precision of domain models based on finite elements or finite differences.

  13. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  14. Nonlocal heat transport by non-Maxwellian electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, K.; Short, R.W.

    1984-03-30

    The generalization of the Spitzer-Harm solution to steep density and temperature gradients requires the computation of the appropriate non-Maxwellian isotropic part of the electron distribution. We develop analytic solutions for a steady state, high-Z plasma, employing the diffusion approximation. Applications of our solution include computation of the resulting heat flux, thermal smoothing of transverse temperature perturbations, and modification of linear heat flow instabilities.

  15. Anomalous ion heating from ambipolar-constrained magnetic fluctuation-induced transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    A kinetic theory for the anomalous heating of ions from energy stored in magnetic turbulence is presented. Imposing self consistency through the constitutive relations between particle distributions and fields, a turbulent Kirchhoff's law is derived that expresses a direct connection between rates of ion heating and electron thermal transport. This connection arises from the kinematics of electron motion along turbulent fields, which results in granular structures in the electron distribution. The drag exerted on these structures through emission into collective modes mediates ambipolar-constrained transport. Resonant damping of the collective modes by ions produces the heating. In collisionless plasmas the rate of ion damping controls the rate of emission, and hence the ambipolar-constrained electron heat flux. The heating rate is calculated for both a resonant and non-resonant magnetic fluctuation spectrum and compared with observations. The theoretical heating rate is sufficient to account for the observed two-fold rise in ion temperature during sawtooth events in experimental discharges.

  16. Heat transport in the vicinity of an artificial recharge site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbohede, Alexander; van Houtte, Emmanuel; Lebbe, Luc

    2010-05-01

    observation well with reference to the ponds increases with depth (for instance from 28 days 4.1 m below surface to 154 days 10 m below surface for an observation well at 10 m from the ponds). This confirms previous flow modelling which showed that groundwater flows relatively rapidly laterally from the recharge ponds towards the extraction wells. Additionally, part of the recharge water flows in a deeper flow cycle towards the extraction wells. Residence times in this deeper flow cycle are evidently larger than in the direct lateral flow cycle from the ponds towards the wells. This explains the increase with depth. The 154 days (with respect to a mean time of 90 days) points to the fact that the extracted water contains a large spectrum of residence times with mean of 90 days for the heat transport, as was also derived by the flow modelling previously

  17. Development of a Two-Phase Capillary Pumped Heat Transport for Spacecraft Central Thermal Bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Triem; Brown, Michael; Baldauff, Robert; Cummings, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    Thermal requirements of future spacecraft and satellites will certainly outgrow the capability of conventional heat pipes in terms of heat transport, heat density, and temperature control. Emerging passive heat transport technologies such as Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) and Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) have demonstrated in both ground testing and micro-gravity flight experiments that they have the potential to replace heat pipes as primary heat transport devices in next generation thermal control technology. Like heat pipes, CPLs and LHPs are completely passive systems which have no mechanical moving part to wear out or to introduce unwanted vibration to the spacecraft. However, the heat transport capabilities of CPLs and LHPs are at least one order of magnitude higher than those of heat pipes. Despite sharing many operational characteristics. CPLs and LHPs do have differences. CPLs require a lengthy and tedious start-up procedure to prime the wicks before heat is applied to the evaporator plate. Even with the start-up procedure, start-ups are not always successful. LHPs, on the other hand, do not require a wick pre-conditioning process. But the LHP effective thermal conductance is not as high as that of a CPL. Temperature control of a LHP is not easily achieved. A novel concept, which combined a CPL and a LHP into one loop, was proposed to take advantage of selective features of each system without inheriting their shortcomings. The resultant loop was called Advanced Loop Heat Pipe (A-LHP). A proof-of-concept testbed was put together and tested at the Naval Research Laboratory. Test results showed that the A-LHP performed like a CPL without start-up problems associated with CPLs.

  18. Parallel heat transport in reversed shear magnetic field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevski, D.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2012-03-01

    Transport in magnetized plasmas is a key problem in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics. Three issues make this problem particularly challenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), χ, and the perpendicular, χ, conductivities (χ/χ may exceed 10^10 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport. We have recently developed a Lagrangian Green's function (LG) method to solve the local and non-local parallel (χ/χ->∞) transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields. footnotetext D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011); D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, APS Invited paper, submitted (2011). The proposed method overcomes many of the difficulties faced by standard finite different methods related to the three issues mentioned above. Here we apply the LG method to study transport in reversed shear configurations. We focus on the following problems: (i) separatrix reconnection of magnetic islands and transport; (ii) robustness of shearless, q'=0, transport barriers; (iii) leaky barriers and shearless Cantori.

  19. DYNAMICS OF WATER TRANSPORT AND STORAGE IN CONIFERS STUDIED WITH DEUTERIUM AND HEAT TRACING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume and complexity of their vascular systems make the dynamics of long-distance water transport difficult to study. We used heat and deuterated water (D2O) as tracers to characterize whole-tree water transport and storage properties in individual trees belonging to the co...

  20. Transports and budgets of volume, heat, and salt from a global eddy-resolving ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M.P.; Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The results from an integration of a global ocean circulation model have been condensed into an analysis of the volume, heat, and salt transports among the major ocean basins. Transports are also broken down between the model`s Ekman, thermocline, and deep layers. Overall, the model does well. Horizontal exchanges of mass, heat, and salt between ocean basins have reasonable values: and the volume of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) transport is in general agreement with what limited observations exist. On a global basis the zonally integrated meridional heat transport is poleward at all latitudes except for the latitude band 30{degrees}S to 45{degrees}S. This anomalous transport is most likely a signature of the model`s inability to form Antarctic Intermediate (AAIW) and Antarctic bottom water (AABW) properly. Eddy heat transport is strong at the equator where its convergence heats the equatorial Pacific about twice as much as it heats the equatorial Atlantic. The greater heating in the Pacific suggests that mesoscale eddies may be a vital mechanism for warming and maintaining an upwelling portion of the global conveyor-belt circulation. The model`s fresh water transport compares well with observations. However, in the Atlantic there is an excessive southward transport of fresh water due to the absence of the Mediterranean outflow and weak northward flow of AAIW. Perhaps the model`s greatest weakness is the lack of strong AAIW and AABW circulation cells. Accurate thermohaline forcing in the North Atlantic (based on numerous hydrographic observations) helps the model adequately produce NADW. In contrast, the southern ocean is an area of sparse observation. Better thermohaline observations in this area may be needed if models such as this are to produce the deep convection that will achieve more accurate simulations of the global 3-dimensional circulation. 41 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Transition between ballistic and diffusive heat transport regimes in silicon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldovan, Martin

    2012-09-01

    We study the extent of ballistic and diffusive thermal transport and the range of application of the Casimir and Fourier theories in semiconductor materials by using a theoretical model based on the Boltzmann transport equation. We show that combined effects of length scale, temperature, and boundary roughness are responsible for thermal transport transitions in silicon nanowires and thin films. We also introduce a more accurate principle for ballistic transport that considers the balance between internal and surface scattering. Phonon quantum confinement effects as well as the conditions for phonon wave interference in nanoscale heat transport are discussed.

  2. A statistical analysis of avalanching heat transport in stationary enhanced core confinement regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, S.; Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-09-15

    We present a statistical analysis of heat transport in stationary enhanced confinement regimes obtained from flux-driven gyrofluid simulations. The probability density functions of heat flux in improved confinement regimes, characterized by the Nusselt number, show significant deviation from Gaussian, with a markedly fat tail, implying the existence of heat avalanches. Two types of avalanching transport are found to be relevant to stationary states, depending on the degree of turbulence suppression. In the weakly suppressed regime, heat avalanches occur in the form of quasi-periodic (QP) heat pulses. Collisional relaxation of zonal flow is likely to be the origin of these QP heat pulses. This phenomenon is similar to transient limit cycle oscillations observed prior to edge pedestal formation in recent experiments. On the other hand, a spectral analysis of heat flux in the strongly suppressed regime shows the emergence of a 1/f (f is the frequency) band, suggesting the presence of self-organized criticality (SOC)-like episodic heat avalanches. This episodic 1/f heat avalanches have a long temporal correlation and constitute the dominant transport process in this regime.

  3. Seasonal Cycles of Meridional Overturning and Heat Transport of the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Marotzke, Jochem

    1998-01-01

    A general circulation model of the Indian Ocean is fitted to monthly averaged climatological temperatures, salinities, and surface fluxes using the adjoint method. Interannual variability is minimized by penalizing the temporal drift from one seasonal cycle to another during a two-year integration. The resultant meridional overturning and heat transport display large seasonal variations, with maximum amplitudes of 18 and 22 (x 10(exp 6) cubic m/s) for the overturning and 1.8 and 1.4 (x 10(exp 15) W) for heat transport near 10 S and 10 N, respectively. A dynamical decomposition of the overturning and heat transport shows that the time-varying Ekman How plus its barotropic compensation can explain a large part of the seasonal variations in overturning and heat transport. The maximum variations at 10 deg N and 10 deg S are associated with monsoon reversal over the northern Indian Ocean and changes of the easterlies over the southern Indian Ocean. An external mode with variable topography has a moderate contribution where the Somali Current and the corresponding gyre reverse direction seasonally. Contribution front vertical shear (thermal wind and ageostrophic shear) is dominant near the southern boundary and large near the Somali Current latitudes. The dominant balance in the zonally integrated heat budget is between heat storage change and heat transport convergence except south of 15 S. Optimization with seasonal forcings improves estimates of sea surface temperatures, but the annual average overturning and heat transport are very similar to previous results with annual mean forcings. The annual average heat transport consists of roughly equal contributions from time-mean and time-varying fields of meridional velocities and temperatures in the northern Indian Ocean. indicating a significant rectification to the heat transport due to the time-varying fields. The time-mean and time-varying contributions are primarily due to the overturning and horizontal gyre

  4. Operational demonstration of a field of high performance flat plate collectors with isothermal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merges, V.; Klippel, E.

    1983-12-01

    A solar plant with 21 sq m of highly efficient flat plate collectors and which requires no electricity is described. Heat transport is provided by saturated steam that condenses in a four cubic meter storage tank. The operation temperature is set by the buffer gas pressure between 100 and 140 C, and an absorption chiller is simulated as a heat consumer. The solar collectors were observed to exhibit high performance. Heat transport and temperature control offered high reliability and the thermal stratification in the tank was satisfactory. The positive result permits the design and construction of larger solar plants following the same technical principles.

  5. The role of polar regions in global climate, and a new parameterization of global heat transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Farrell, B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the transport of heat between polar regions and other latitudes on climate sensitivity and stability are examined within the framework of simple energy balance models. New heat transport parameterizations adjust radiative equilibrium distributions of temperature with latitude on the basis of Hadley cells and baroclinically unstable eddies; including the effects of static stability changes with latitude eliminates the possible error in estimating the pole-equator temperature difference. It is found that climate sensitivity and stability for the new transport parameterizations can differ from other models, and is capable of simulating the sensitivity required by existing climate data.

  6. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an “eyeball.” For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs’ habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  7. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-14

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an "eyeball." For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs' habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  8. Heat transport in the Red Lake Bog, Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, J.M.; Siegel, D.I.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Glaser, P.H.; Voss, C.I.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large bog in the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands. For 2 years, starting in July 1998, we recorded temperature at 12 depth intervals from 0 to 400 cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal conductivity of 0.5 W m-1 ??C-1 and model vertical heat transport through the peat using the SUTRA model. The model was calibrated to the first year of data, and then evaluated against the second year of collected heat data. The model results suggest that advective pore-water flow is not necessary to transport heat within the peat profile and most of the heat is transferred by thermal conduction alone in these waterlogged soils. In the spring season, a zero-curtain effect controls the transport of heat through shallow depths of the peat. Changes in local climate and the resulting changes in thermal transport still may cause non-linear feedbacks in methane emissions related to the generation of methane deeper within the peat profile as regional temperatures increase. Copyright ?? 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K{sub d} model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  10. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  11. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  12. Comparison of transient electron heat transport in LHD helical and JT-60U tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, S.; Takenaga, H.; Ida, K.; Isayama, A.; Tamura, N.; Takizuka, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Kamada, Y.; Kubo, S.; Miura, Y.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Sudo, S.; Ohkubo, K.; LHD Experimental Group; JT-60 Team

    2006-01-01

    Transient transport experiments are performed in plasmas with and without internal transport barriers (ITB) on LHD and JT-60U. The dependence of χe on the electron temperature, Te, and on the electron temperature gradient, ∇Te, is analysed with an empirical non-linear heat transport model. In plasmas without an ITB, two different types of non-linearity of the electron heat transport are observed from cold/heat pulse propagation: the χe depends on Te and ∇Te in JT-60U, while the ∇Te dependence is weak in LHD. Inside the ITB region, there is none or weak ∇Te dependence both in LHD and JT-60U. Growth of the cold pulse driven by the negative Te dependence of χe is observed inside the ITB region (LHD) and near the boundary of the ITB region (JT-60U).

  13. Possibility of long-distance heat transport in weightlessness using supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, D.; Chatain, D.; Nikolayev, V. S.; Ouazzani, J.; Garrabos, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Heat transport over large distances is classically performed with gravity or capillarity driven heat pipes. We investigate here whether the “piston effect,” a thermalization process that is very efficient in weightlessness in compressible fluids, could also be used to perform long-distance heat transfer. Experiments are performed in a modeling heat pipe (16.5 mm long, 3 mm inner diameter closed cylinder), with nearly adiabatic polymethylmethacrylate walls and two copper base plates. The cell is filled with H2 near its gas-liquid critical point (critical temperature: 33 K). Weightlessness is achieved by submitting the fluid to a magnetic force that compensates gravity. Initially the fluid is isothermal. Then heat is sent to one of the bases with an electrical resistance. The instantaneous amount of heat transported by the fluid is measured at the other end. The data are analyzed and compared with a two-dimensional numerical simulation that allows an extrapolation to be made to other fluids (e.g., CO2 , with critical temperature of 300 K). The major result is concerned with the existence of a very fast response at early times that is only limited by the thermal properties of the cell materials. The yield in terms of ratio, injected or transported heat power, does not exceed 10-30% and is limited by the heat capacity of the pipe. These results are valid in a large temperature domain around the critical temperature.

  14. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  15. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  16. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  17. Effect of wind forcing on the meridional heat transport in a coupled climate model: equilibrium response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haijun; Dai, Haijin

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the ocean surface winds on the meridional heat transports is studied in a coupled model. Shutting down the global surface winds causes significant reductions in both wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulations, resulting in a remarkable decrease in the poleward oceanic heat transport (OHT). The sea surface temperature responds with significant warming in the equator and cooling off the equator, causing an enhancement and equatorward shift in the Hadley cell. This increases the poleward atmospheric heat transport (AHT), which in turn compensates the decrease in the OHT. This compensation implies a fundamental constraint in changes of ocean-atmosphere energy transports. Several other compensation changes are also identified. For the OHT components, the changes in the Eulerian mean and bolus OHT are compensated with each other in the Southern Ocean, since a stronger wind driven Ekman transport is associated with a stronger meridional density gradient (stronger bolus circulation) and vice versa. For the AHT components, the changes in the dry static energy (DSE) and latent energy transports are compensated within the tropics (30°N/S), because a stronger Hadley cell causes a stronger equatorward convergence of moisture. In the extratropics, the changes in the mean and eddy DSE transports show perfect compensation, as a result of the equatorward shift of the Ferrell Cell and enhancement of atmospheric baroclinicity in mid-high latitudes, particularly over the North Atlantic. This work also shows how the Earth's climate is trying to maintain the balance between two hemispheres: the ocean in the Northern Hemisphere is colder than that in the Southern Hemisphere due to much reduced northward heat transports cross the Equator in the Atlantic, therefore, the atmosphere responds to the ocean with temperature colder in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere by transporting more heat northward cross the equator over the Pacific, in association

  18. The general circulation and meridional heat transport of the subtropical South Atlantic determined by inverse methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L.-L.

    1981-01-01

    The circulation and meridional heat transport of the subtropical South Atlantic Ocean are determined through the application of the inverse method of Wunsch (1978) to hydrographic data from the IGY and METEOR expeditions. Meridional circulation results of the two data sets agree on a northward mass transport of about 20 million metric tons/sec for waters above the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), and a comparable southward transport of deep waters. Additional gross features held in common are the Benguela, South Equatorial and North Brazilian Coastal currents' northward transport of the Surface Water, and the deflection of the southward-flowing NADW from the South American Coast into the mid ocean by a seamount chain near 20 deg S. Total heat transport is equatorward, with a magnitude of 0.8 X 10 to the 15th W near 30 deg S and indistinguishable from zero near 8 deg S.

  19. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fan, Z.; Neff, J.C.; Harden, J.W.; Zhang, T.; Veldhuis, H.; Czimczik, C.I.; Winston, G.C.; O'Donnell, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil water content strongly affects permafrost dynamics by changing the soil thermal properties. However, the movement of liquid water, which plays an important role in the heat transport of temperate soils, has been under-represented in boreal studies. Two different heat transport models with and without convective heat transport were compared to measurements of soil temperatures in four boreal sites with different stand ages and drainage classes. Overall, soil temperatures during the growing season tended to be over-estimated by 2-4??C when movement of liquid water and water vapor was not represented in the model. The role of heat transport in water has broad implications for site responses to warming and suggests reduced vulnerability of permafrost to thaw at drier sites. This result is consistent with field observations of faster thaw in response to warming in wet sites compared to drier sites over the past 30. years in Canadian boreal forests. These results highlight that representation of water flow in heat transport models is important to simulate future soil thermal or permafrost dynamics under a changing climate. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Pump, and earth-testable spacecraft capillary heat transport loop using augmentation pump and check valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes heat-generating payload equipment, and a heat transport system with a cold plate thermally coupled to the equipment and a capillary-wick evaporator, for evaporating coolant liquid to cool the equipment. The coolant vapor is coupled to a condenser and in a loop back to the evaporator. A heated coolant reservoir is coupled to the loop for pressure control. If the wick is not wetted, heat transfer will not begin or continue. A pair of check valves are coupled in the loop, and the heater is cycled for augmentation pumping of coolant to and from the reservoir. This augmentation pumping, in conjunction with the check valves, wets the wick. The wick liquid storage capacity allows the augmentation pump to provide continuous pulsed liquid flow to assure continuous vapor transport and a continuously operating heat transport system. The check valves are of the ball type to assure maximum reliability. However, any type of check valve can be used, including designs which are preloaded in the closed position. The check valve may use any ball or poppet material which resists corrosion. For optimum performance during testing on Earth, the ball or poppet would have neutral buoyancy or be configured in a closed position when the heat transport system is not operating. The ball may be porous to allow passage of coolant vapor.

  1. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across magnetic islands are also presented. In qualitative agreement with recent experiments in large helical device and DIII-D, it is shown that the elliptic (O) and hyperbolic (X) points of magnetic islands have a direct impact on the spatio-temporal dependence of the amplitude of modulated heat pulses.

  2. Analysis for Heat Transfer in a High Current-Passing Carbon Nanosphere Using Nontraditional Thermal Transport Model.

    PubMed

    Hol C Y; Chen, B C; Tsai, Y H; Ma, C; Wen, M Y

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the thermal transport in hollow microscale and nanoscale spheres subject to electrical heat source using nontraditional thermal transport model. Working as supercapacitor electrodes, carbon hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres needs excellent heat transfer characteristics to maintain high specific capacitance, long cycle life, and high power density. In the nanoscale regime, the prediction of heat transfer from the traditional heat conduction equation based on Fourier's law deviates from the measured data. Consequently, the electrical heat source-induced heat transfer characteristics in hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are studied using nontraditional thermal transport model. The effects of parameters on heat transfer in the hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are discussed in this study. The results reveal that the heat transferred into the spherical interior, temperature and heat flux in the hollow sphere decrease with the increasing Knudsen number when the radius of sphere is comparable to the mean free path of heat carriers. PMID:26726687

  3. Analysis of heat transfer and contaminant transport in fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the analysis of three-dimensional flow patterns and the associated heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a fume hood enclosure. The flow enters the hood through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leaves the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow pattern around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its training surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. Both temperature and concentration were found to be maximum near the source and gradually decreased as the heated air or gaseous contaminant entrained with incoming air. The local concentration decreased with increase in sash opening area. The results will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air inside the room.

  4. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U.; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample’s surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions.

  5. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U.; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample’s surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions. PMID:26690696

  6. Dynamical transition of heat transport in a physical gel near the sol-gel transition.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study heat transport in a gelatin solution near a reversible sol-gel transition point where viscosity strongly depends on temperature. We visualize the temperature field and velocity field using thermochromic liquid crystals and polystyrene latex particles, respectively. During the initial stages of heating, we find that heat transport undergoes a dynamical transition from conductive to convective. Subsequently, during later stages, we observe that the transport dynamics are much more complex than conventional thermal convections. At the sample's surface we observe the formation of stagnant domains, which lack fluid flow. Their formation is not due to the effects of local cooling. We determine that it is the dynamics of these stagnant domains that induce convective-conductive-convective transitions. PMID:26690696

  7. Constraints on oceanic meridional heat transport from combined measurements of oxygen and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resplandy, L.; Keeling, R. F.; Stephens, B. B.; Bent, J. D.; Jacobson, A.; Rödenbeck, C.; Khatiwala, S.

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance to the climate system, the ocean meridional heat transport is still poorly quantified. We identify a strong link between the northern hemisphere deficit in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO = O_2 + 1.1 × CO_2 ) and the asymmetry in meridional heat transport between northern and southern hemispheres. The recent aircraft observations from the HIPPO campaign reveal a northern APO deficit in the tropospheric column of - 10.4 ± 1.0 per meg, double the value at the surface and more representative of large-scale air-sea fluxes. The global northward ocean heat transport asymmetry necessary to explain the observed APO deficit is about 0.7-1.1 PW, which corresponds to the upper range of estimates from hydrographic sections and atmospheric reanalyses.

  8. Nanoscale heat transport via electrons and phonons by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Hua

    Nanoscale heat transport has become a crucial research topic due to the growing importance of nanotechnology for manufacturing, energy conversion, medicine and electronics. Thermal transport properties at the nanoscale are distinct from the macroscopic ones since the sizes of nanoscale features, such as free surfaces and interfaces, are comparable to the wavelengths and mean free paths of the heat carriers (electrons and phonons), and lead to changes in thermal transport properties. Therefore, understanding how the nanoscale features and energy exchange between the heat carriers affect thermal transport characteristics are the goals of this research. Molecular dynamics (MD) is applied in this research to understand the details of nanoscale heat transport. The advantage of MD is that the size effect, anharmonicity, atomistic structure, and non-equilibrium behavior of the system can all be captured since the dynamics of atoms are described explicitly in MD. However, MD neglects the thermal role of electrons and therefore it is unable to describe heat transport in metal or metal-semiconductor systems accurately. To address this limitation of MD, we develop a method to simulate electronic heat transport by implementing electronic degrees of freedom to MD. In this research, nanoscale heat transport in semiconductor, metal, and metal-semiconductor systems is studied. Size effects on phonon thermal transport in SiGe superlattice thin films and nanowires are studied by MD. We find that, opposite to the macroscopic trend, superlattice thin films can achieve lower thermal conductivity than nanowires at small scales due to the change of phonon nature caused by adjusting the superlattice periodic length and specimen length. Effects of size and electron-phonon coupling rate on thermal conductivity and thermal interface resistivity in Al and model metal-semiconductor systems are studied by MD with electronic degrees of freedom. The results show that increasing the specimen

  9. Unified model of tectonics and heat transport in a frigid Enceladus

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki; Marshak, Stephen; Kieffer, Susan W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent data from the Cassini spacecraft have revealed that Enceladus, the 500-km-diameter moon of Saturn, has a southern hemisphere with a distinct arrangement of tectonic features, intense heat flux, and geyser-like plumes. How did the tectonic features form? How is the heat transported from depth? To address these questions, we formulate a simple model that couples the mechanics and thermodynamics of Enceladus and gives a unified explanation of the salient tectonic features, the plumes, and the transport of heat from a source at a depth of tens of kilometers to the surface. Our findings imply that tiny, icy moons can develop complex surficial geomorphologies, high heat fluxes, and geyser-like activity even if they do not have hot, liquid, and/or convecting interiors. PMID:17699628

  10. Unified model of tectonics and heat transport in a frigid Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki; Marshak, Stephen; Kieffer, Susan W

    2007-08-21

    Recent data from the Cassini spacecraft have revealed that Enceladus, the 500-km-diameter moon of Saturn, has a southern hemisphere with a distinct arrangement of tectonic features, intense heat flux, and geyser-like plumes. How did the tectonic features form? How is the heat transported from depth? To address these questions, we formulate a simple model that couples the mechanics and thermodynamics of Enceladus and gives a unified explanation of the salient tectonic features, the plumes, and the transport of heat from a source at a depth of tens of kilometers to the surface. Our findings imply that tiny, icy moons can develop complex surficial geomorphologies, high heat fluxes, and geyser-like activity even if they do not have hot, liquid, and/or convecting interiors. PMID:17699628

  11. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu∼Pr^{1/4}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1/2}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≪1 and Nu∼Pr^{0}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≫1. These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 10^{5} to 10^{10} and Pr from 10^{-2} to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10^{-1}. PMID:27300823

  12. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu˜Pr1/4Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1/2Ra1/2 for Pr≪1 and Nu˜Pr0Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1Ra1/2 for Pr≫1 . These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 10-2 to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10-1.

  13. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. PMID:27461058

  14. Screening for heat transport by groundwater in closed geothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer due to groundwater flow can significantly affect closed geothermal systems. Here, a screening method is developed, based on Peclet numbers for these systems and Darcy's law. Conduction-only conditions should not be expected where specific discharges exceed 10(-8)  m/s. Constraints on hydraulic gradients allow for preliminary screening for advection based on rock or soil types. Identification of materials with very low hydraulic conductivity, such as shale and intact igneous and metamorphic rock, allow for analysis with considering conduction only. Variability in known hydraulic conductivity allows for the possibility of advection in most other rocks and soil types. Further screening relies on refinement of estimates of hydraulic gradients and hydraulic conductivity through site investigations and modeling until the presence or absence of conduction can be confirmed. PMID:24438345

  15. Heat-driven spin transport in a ferromagnetic metal

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yadong; Yang, Bowen; Tang, Chi; Jiang, Zilong; Shi, Jing; Schneider, Michael; Whig, Renu

    2014-12-15

    As a non-magnetic heavy metal is attached to a ferromagnet, a vertically flowing heat-driven spin current is converted to a transverse electric voltage, which is known as the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (SSE). If the ferromagnet is a metal, this voltage is also accompanied by voltages from two other sources, i.e., the anomalous Nernst effect in both the ferromagnet and the proximity-induced ferromagnetic boundary layer. By properly identifying and carefully separating those different effects, we find that in this pure spin current circuit the additional spin current drawn by the heavy metal generates another significant voltage by the ferromagnetic metal itself which should be present in all relevant experiments.

  16. Particle transport and heat loads in NIO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonnesu, N.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 is a compact radio frequency ion source designed to generate a 60 kV-135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam and it aims at continuous operation, which implies a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the beam-facing components, in particular, the accelerator grids. A 3D analysis of the entire NIO1 beam has been performed for the first time with a fully 3D version of EAMCC, a relativistic particle tracking code for the calculation of the grid power deposition induced by particle impacts. According to the results presented in this paper, secondary and co-extracted electrons cause a non-negligible heat load on the grids, where different high-power density regions, within reasonable sustainable standard limits, are calculated.

  17. Heat transport in laminar flow of erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, A S

    1975-07-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity were made in laminar flow of dog and turkey erythrocyte suspensions in a stainless stell tube of about 1 mm ID. These measurements were independent of the shear rate, showing that the red cell motion relative to plasma in flowing blood had no effect on the heat transfer. Measurements of thermal conductivity were further made in suspensions of polystyrene spheres of 100 mum and were found to be dependent upon the shear rate. The Graetz solution corresponding to uniform wall temperature was used for determining the value of thermal conductivity in an apparatus calibrated with tap water. The overall accuracy of the results is within 10%. A model based on the particle rotation with the entrained fluid is proposed. It is pointed out that the diffusion of platelets, red cells, and possibly plasma proteins (such as fibrinogen) will be augmented if they happen to be in the hydrodynamic field of rotating erythrocytes. PMID:1150598

  18. A predictive transport modeling code for ICRF-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hwang, D.Q. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Houlberg, W.; Attenberger, S.; Tolliver, J.; Hively, L. )

    1992-02-01

    In this report, a detailed description of the physic included in the WHIST/RAZE package as well as a few illustrative examples of the capabilities of the package will be presented. An in depth analysis of ICRF heating experiments using WHIST/RAZE will be discussed in a forthcoming report. A general overview of philosophy behind the structure of the WHIST/RAZE package, a summary of the features of the WHIST code, and a description of the interface to the RAZE subroutines are presented in section 2 of this report. Details of the physics contained in the RAZE code are examined in section 3. Sample results from the package follow in section 4, with concluding remarks and a discussion of possible improvements to the package discussed in section 5.

  19. Particle transport and heat loads in NIO1.

    PubMed

    Fonnesu, N; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G; Veltri, P

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 is a compact radio frequency ion source designed to generate a 60 kV-135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam and it aims at continuous operation, which implies a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the beam-facing components, in particular, the accelerator grids. A 3D analysis of the entire NIO1 beam has been performed for the first time with a fully 3D version of EAMCC, a relativistic particle tracking code for the calculation of the grid power deposition induced by particle impacts. According to the results presented in this paper, secondary and co-extracted electrons cause a non-negligible heat load on the grids, where different high-power density regions, within reasonable sustainable standard limits, are calculated. PMID:26932077

  20. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications.Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02144A

  1. Solar-energy heats a transportation test center--Pueblo, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Petroleum-base, thermal energy transport fluid circulating through 583 square feet of flat-plate solar collectors accumulates majority of energy for space heating and domestic hot-water of large Test Center. Report describes operation, maintenance, and performance of system which is suitable for warehouses and similar buildings. For test period from February 1979 to January 1980, solar-heating fraction was 31 percent, solar hot-water fraction 79 percent.

  2. Advective heat transport associated to regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Chiarabba, Claudio; Frondini, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The main springs of central Italy Apennines were investigated, in order to compute the amount of heat transported by groundwaters and to compute the fraction of heat due to the geothermal heat flux. The 46 investigated springs represent a significant portion of the permeable structures of the Apennine being characterised by a cumulative flow rate of 130 m3/s, i.e. ~ 50% of the water discharged in this sector of the Apennines. The groundwaters are characterised by relatively low temperatures, but the occurrence of an heat anomaly is evident when the differences between the temperatures of springs and recharge waters are compared with the corresponding altitude difference. A total amount of heat of ~ 2.1 × 109 J/s has been estimated to be transported by these groundwaters. Most of this heat (57%) is given by geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. The computed geothermal warming implies very high heat flux, with values higher than 300 mW/m2, in a large sector of the Apennines which was considered to date be characterised by normal to low conductive heat flux. The same area is affected by high fluxes of CO2 from a deep source and the strict correlation between the geothermal warming and the input of deep CO2-rich fluids is testified by the fact that all the thermally anomalous groundwaters are also affected by the input of deeply derived CO2 contrary to those not thermally anomalous which display any input of deeply derived CO2. This correspondence reasonably suggest the geothermal heat is transported from depth by CO2 rich fluids, which enter the aquifers and mix with infiltrating waters. The amount of geothermal heat transported by central Apennine cold groundwaters is in absolute very high. It results the double than the hydrothermal heat discharge of the US Cascade Range (~1×103 MW) and is about the half of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone, one of the largest hydrothermal system of the world (5-6

  3. Estimating the effect of shallow groundwater on diurnal heat transport in a vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianmei; Zhao, Lin; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    The influence of shallow groundwater on the diurnal heat transport of the soil profile was analyzed using a soil sensor automatic monitoring system that continuously measures temperature and water content of soil profiles to simulate heat transport based on the Philip and de Vries (PDV) model. Three experiments were conducted to measure soil properties at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm, and 30 cm when groundwater tables reached 10 cm, 30 cm, and 60 cm (Experiments I, II, and III). Results show that both the soil temperature near shallow groundwater and the soil water content were effectively simulated by the PDV model. The root mean square errors of the temperature at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm were 1.018°C, 0.909°C, and 0.255°C, respectively. The total heat flux generated the convergent and divergent planes in space-time fields with valley values of-161.5W•m-2 at 7:30 and-234.6W•m-2 at 11:10 in Experiments II and III, respectively. The diurnal heat transport of the saturated soil occurred in five stages, while that of saturated-unsaturated and unsaturated soil profiles occurred in four stages because high moisture content led to high thermal conductivity, which hastened the heat transport.

  4. Heat and mass transport during a groundwater replenishment trial in a highly heterogeneous aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Simone; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Harris, Brett; Trefry, Mike; Martin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Changes in subsurface temperature distribution resulting from the injection of fluids into aquifers may impact physiochemical and microbial processes as well as basin resource management strategies. We have completed a 2 year field trial in a hydrogeologically and geochemically heterogeneous aquifer below Perth, Western Australia in which highly treated wastewater was injected for large-scale groundwater replenishment. During the trial, chloride and temperature data were collected from conventional monitoring wells and by time-lapse temperature logging. We used a joint inversion of these solute tracer and temperature data to parameterize a numerical flow and multispecies transport model and to analyze the solute and heat propagation characteristics that prevailed during the trial. The simulation results illustrate that while solute transport is largely confined to the most permeable lithological units, heat transport was also affected by heat exchange with lithological units that have a much lower hydraulic conductivity. Heat transfer by heat conduction was found to significantly influence the complex temporal and spatial temperature distribution, especially with growing radial distance and in aquifer sequences with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution. We attempted to estimate spatially varying thermal transport parameters during the data inversion to illustrate the anticipated correlations of these parameters with lithological heterogeneities, but estimates could not be uniquely determined on the basis of the collected data.

  5. LES of turbulent heat transfer: proper convection numerical schemes for temperature transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Châtelain, A.; Ducros, F.; Métais, O.

    2004-03-01

    Large eddy simulations of two basic configurations (decay of isotropic turbulence, and the academic plane channel flow) with heat transfer have been performed comparing several convection numerical schemes, in order to discuss their ability to evaluate temperature fluctuations properly. Results are compared with the available incompressible heat transfer direct numerical simulation data. It is shown that the use of regularizing schemes (such as high order upwind type schemes) for the temperature transport equation in combination with centered schemes for momentum transport equation gives better results than the use of centred schemes for both equations.

  6. Pore-Scale Simulations Of Flow And Heat Transport In Saturated Permeable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, G. R., Sr.; Herrera, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The study of heat transport in porous media is important for applications such as the use of temperature as environmental tracer, geothermal energy, fuel cells, etc. In recent years, there have been several advances in computational techniques that have allowed to investigate different processes in porous media at the pore-scale through detailed numerical simulations that considered synthetic porous media formed by regular grains and pore bodies arranged in different geometrical configurations. The main objective of this research is to investigate the influence of pore configurations on flow velocity and heat transport in 2D saturated porous media. We use OpenFOAM to solve flow and heat transport equations at the pore-scale. We performed detailed pore-scale numerical simulations in synthetic 2D porous media generated from regularly placed and randomly distributed circular solid grains. For each geometrical configuration we performed numerical simulations to compute the flow field in order to calculate properties such as as tortuosity, mean velocity and hydraulic conductivity, and to identify Lagrangian coherent structures to charaterize the velocity fields. We then perform heat transport simulations to relate the properties of the velocity fields and the main heat transport mechanisms. The analysis of the simulations results showed that in all the simulated configurations effective flow properties become valid at scales of 10 to 15 pore bodies. For the same porosity and boundary conditions we obtained that as expected tortuosity in the random structure is higher than in the regular configurations, while hydraulic conductivity is smaller for the random case. The results of heat transport simulations show significant differences in temperature distribution for the regular and random pore structures. For the simulated boundary and initial conditions, heat transport is more efficient in the random structure than in the regular geometry. This result indicates that the

  7. Evidences for and the Models of Fast Nonlocal Transport of Heat in Magnetic Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Cherepanov, K. V.

    2009-07-01

    The paper gives a short survey of (i) recent evidences for fast nonlocal transport of the heat in magnetically confined plasmas (above all, the "cold/heat pulse" experiments), (ii) interpretations of such phenomena in terms of nonlocal transport formalisms, based on the dominance of long mean-free-path energy carriers, including the interpretations of "cold pulse" experiments, and gives (iii) quantitative evidence for the domination of nonlocality in the spatial profile of electron cyclotron net radiated power in fusion reactor-grade tokamak (strong toroidal magnetic field, BT>5 T, highly reflecting walls, Rwall>0.5, and hot electron plasma, >10 keV).

  8. On the optimum fields and bounds for heat and mass transport in two turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay

    2011-12-01

    The optimum theory of turbulence is one of the few tools for obtaining analytical results for transport of heat, mass or momentum by turbulent flows. This is achieved by asymptotic theory which is valid for large values of the characteristic numbers of the investigated fluid system. For small and intermediate values of the Reynolds, Rayleigh or Taylor numbers we have to solve numerically the Euler-Lagrange equations of the corresponding variational problems. Below we discuss numerical results from the application of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence to two problems: convective heat transport in non-rotating and rotating fluid layer and mass transport in pipe flow. We obtain profiles of the optimum fields and discuss the evolution of the thickness of the boundary layers as well as present our first results about the lower bound on the mass transport in a pipe flow.

  9. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory`s site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone {sup 14}C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  10. Investigation of heat and momentum transport in turbulent flows via numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, John

    1988-01-01

    Turbulent transport of heat is studied by examining the flow fields obtained from a direct simulation of a turbulent channel flow. The turbulence structures associated with the velocity and scalar fields are presented using air (Pr = 0.71) as the medium. A comparison is made between the wall-layer structures identified by the temperature field and the structures found in the velocity field. Consideration is also given to the role of the organized turbulence structures in scalar transport.

  11. Modeling of diagenesis in relation to coupled mass and heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrak, R.

    1996-12-31

    Pore fluid flow is an important factor influencing the diagenetic evolution of rocks, as has been shown by various diagenetic studies, especially in connection with fluid inclusion measurements. A 3D- computer model is presented, which allows to simulate coupled mass and heat transport in porous rocks. The model is used to study the interaction of heat and mass transport with respect to the temporal and spatial evolution of sandstones. Mineral dissolution or precipitation change the mineralogical composition of rocks, and modify the physical properties at the same time. Altering the permeability of the rock affects the fluid flow system in the rock which determines the mass transport of the entire system. In addition to mass transport, fluid flow transports thermal energy, which may modify the temperature evolution of the rock. The model will be used to examine the effect of convective heat and mass transport on temperature and diagenetic evolution of clastic rocks. Although the model cannot claim to simulate nature, it can be used to study the effect of different mechanisms, and their interaction within the coupled system. For practical applications, the model may be used to determine possible flow rates, which are necessary to explain the observed diagenetic and thermal history of sandstones.

  12. A passive solar system for downward heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and testing of a unique passive solar DHW system employing roof mounted conventional flat plate collectors and a conventional coil-in-tank hot water heater located 20 feet below the collectors. The system operates as an intermittent heat pipe in a two stroke cycle involving day time boil down/night time condensate return. System concept, construction details, and test results are presented for the 40 ft/sup 2/, 40 gpd workhorse prototype DHW system. Passive system cycling was experimentally confirmed to be completely reliable under both design and off-design conditions of usage, isolation, and weather. Day long system efficiency averaged 35% to 40% between July and December in northern New England and reached 45% under favorable ambient conditions. System attributes regarding performance, reliability, and site/installation flexibility are described and discussed. Key advantages of boiling/condensing fluid systems in solar applications are noted, and the need for further development of appropriate working fluids is discussed in the context of evolving codes.

  13. An alternative treatment of heat flow for charge transport in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Matt

    2009-12-15

    A unique thermodynamic model of Fermi gases suitable for semiconductor device simulation is presented. Like other models, such as drift diffusion and hydrodynamics, it employs moments of the Boltzmann transport equation derived using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. However, unlike other approaches, it replaces the concept of an electron thermal conductivity with the heat capacity of an ideal Fermi gas to determine heat flow. The model is used to simulate a field-effect transistor and show that the external current-voltage characteristics are strong functions of the state space available to the heated Fermi distribution.

  14. Salt loaded heat pipes: steady-state operation and related heat and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, A.; Ghassemi, A.

    2003-10-01

    Fluids in the deep-seated zones (3.5-4.5 km) of active geothermal zones are known to have increased salinity and acidity that can enhance interaction with surrounding porous rocks. A possible mechanism for brine generation is the separation of the rising magmatic fluid into a gas-like and a liquid-like component. This work illustrates the main features of this mechanism by investigating the conditions for heat pipe convection of natural brines in hydrothermal systems. The well-established heat pipe regime for convection of two-phase pure water (vapor-liquid) in a porous column is extended to the case of boiling brines. In particular, the NaCl-H 2O system is used to model the 1-D reactive flow with dissolution-precipitation in geothermal reservoirs. The quasi steady-state equations of the conservation of matter, Darcy's law for the gas and liquid phases, and the heat balance equation have been examined while neglecting the temporal variation of porosity. A semi-analytical procedure is used to solve these equations for a two-phase fluid in equilibrium with a solid salt. The solution is in the form of the dependence of liquid volume fraction as a function of temperature for different heat fluxes. The solution is separated into two isolated regions by the temperature T=596°C, at the maximum fluid pressure for three-phase (H-L-V) equilibrium. In the case of unsaturated two-phase flow at the reference permeability of porous rocks (3·10 -16 m 2), the maximum heat flux that can be transferred through the porous column via convection is analytically estimated to be 4.3 W/m 2. This is close to the corresponding value for the three-phase case that is numerically calculated to be 6 W/m 2. Due to dissolution (partial leaching of oxide components by acid condensates) and precipitation of salt at the boiling front, heat transfer in a heat pipe in soluble media occurs in a direction opposite to the associated mass transfer. This can cause deep hydrothermal karsting that is

  15. Transport of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Larsen, K. M. H.; Hátún, H.; Kristiansen, R.; Mortensen, E.; Østerhus, S.

    2015-09-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intense of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes), which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), which is projected to weaken during the 21st century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport has made it difficult to establish whether there are trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW = 1012 W). Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall increase over the 2 decades of observation was 9 ± 8 % for volume transport and 18 ± 9 % for heat transport (95 % confidence intervals). During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93) more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the

  16. Turbulent anomalous transport and anisotropic electron heating in a return current system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang Wu; Buechner, Joerg

    2011-02-15

    Anisotropic electron heating due to self-generated electromagnetic turbulences is observed in collisionless return current plasmas. The corresponding energy conversion, electron heating, and associated anomalous momentum transport are investigated by means of a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code. The return current model consists of two counterstreaming electron beams with different temperatures and a stationary ion background. First, a general multifluid dispersion analyzer is presented in a clear matrix form that allows to study electron streaming instabilities. The numerical simulation confirms the predicted electrostatic electron-electron acoustic instability. Generating electromagnetic waves, the system evolves into a nonlinear stage. As a result, the electron drifts are slowed down due to turbulence-induced anomalous momentum exchange. Localized electric and magnetic field fluctuations play major roles in the energy conversion. Perpendicular electron heating follows the growth of magnetic field perturbations and the slowing of the electron drifts. Parallel and perpendicular electron heating occurs at different time scales. It is shown that the longer lasting perpendicular electron heating is caused by preheated parallel electron flows. The deflection of the preheated parallel electron flows in the localized turbulences, which is essentially a two-dimensional effect, leads to perpendicular electron heating even after the saturation of parallel electron heating. We conclude that the self-generated magnetic turbulence dominates the anomalous transport process in the late stage of return current system evolution.

  17. A pumped, two-phase flow heat transport system for orbiting instrument payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowle, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pumped two-phase (heat absorption/heat rejection) thermal transport system for orbiting instrument payloads is investigated. The thermofluid characteristics necessary for the system design are discussed. A preliminary design with a series arrangement of four instrument heat stations and six radiators in a single loop is described in detail, and the total mass is estimated to be 134 kg, with the radiators, instrument heat stations, and fluid reservoir accounting for approximately 86, 24, and 12 kg, respectively. The evaluation of preliminary test results shows that the system has potential advantages; however, further research is necessary in the areas of one-g and zero-g heat transfer coefficients/fluid regimes, fluid by-pass temperature control, and reliability of small pumps.

  18. Dissection of Photosynthetic Electron Transport Process in Sweet Sorghum under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kun; Chen, Peng; Shao, Hongbo; Shao, Chuyang; Zhao, Shijie; Brestic, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis and photosystem II (PSII) are susceptible to high temperature. However, photosynthetic electron transport process under heat stress remains unclear. To reveal this issue, chlorophyll a fluorescence and modulated 820 nm reflection were simultaneously detected in sweet sorghum. At 43°C, J step in the chlorophyll a fluorescence transient was significantly elevated, suggesting that electron transport beyond primary quinone of PSII (QA) (primary quinone electron acceptor of PSII) was inhibited. PSI (Photosystem I) photochemical capacity was not influenced even under severe heat stress at 48°C. Thus, PSI oxidation was prolonged and PSI re-reduction did not reach normal level. The inhibition of electron transport between PSII and PSI can reduce the possibility of PSI photoinhibition under heat stress. PSII function recovered entirely one day after heat stress at 43°C, implying that sweet sorghum has certain self-remediation capacity. When the temperature reached 48°C, the maximum quantum yield for primary photochemistry and the electron transport from PSII donor side were remarkably decreased, which greatly limited the electron flow to PSI, and PSI re-reduction suspended. The efficiency of an electron transferred from the intersystem electron carrier (plastoquinol, PQH2) to the end electron acceptors at the PSI acceptor side increased significantly at 48°C, and the reason was the greater inhibition of electron transport before PQH2. Thus, the fragment from QA to PQH2 is the most heat sensitive in the electron transport chain between PSII and PSI in sweet sorghum. PMID:23717388

  19. Competing orders in LSCO probed by heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyan; Hawthorn, D. G.; Taillefer, Louis; Yamada, K.

    2006-03-01

    We elucidate the nature of the thermal metal-to-insulator transition in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) [1] through measurements of the thermal conductivity κ performed very close to the transition, down to temperatures as low as 50 mK and in magnetic fields H up to 17 T. For a single crystal with x = 0.15, a monotonic increase in the residual linear term κ0/T is observed up to 17 T, as expected for a d-wave superconductor. For a crystal with x = 0.144, however, we observe an initial increase in κ0/T at low field, followed by a decrease when H exceeds a critical field H^*. This result is consistent with recent neutron scattering measurements on a similar sample [2], which show that static spin-density-wave (SDW) order is not present in zero field, but sets in at a critical magnetic field H^*, and then co-exists/competes with superconductivity (SC) for H > H^*. Taken together, these two measurements reveal that the SC phase gives way to a phase which is both magnetic and insulating, whether by increasing magnetic field or by decreasing doping. Using low-energy quasiparticle transport, we map out the T = 0 field-doping (H-x) phase diagram of LSCO. [1] D.G. Hawthorn et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 197004 (2003); X.F. Sun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 117004 (2003). [2] B. Khaykovich et al., Phys. Rev. B 71, 220508(R) (2005).

  20. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  1. Performance and heat transfer characteristics of the laser-heated rocket - A future space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.; Larson, V. R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of advanced liquid-bipropellant rocket engine analysis techniques has been utilized for prediction of the potential delivered performance and the design of thruster wall cooling schemes for laser-heated rocket thrusters. Delivered specific impulse values greater than 1000 lbf-sec/lbm are potentially achievable based on calculations for thrusters designed for 10-kW and 5000-kW laser beam power levels. A thruster wall-cooling technique utilizing a combination of regenerative cooling and a carbon-seeded hydrogen boundary layer is presented. The flowing carbon-seeded hydrogen boundary layer provides radiation absorption of the heat radiated from the high-temperature plasma. Also described is a forced convection thruster wall cooling design for an experimental test thruster.

  2. Measurements of Combined Axial Mass and Heat Transport in He II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Warren W.; Jones, Michael C.

    An experiment was performed that allowed measurements of both axial mass and heat transport of He-II (the superfluid phase of helium 4) in a long tube. The apparatus allowed the pressure difference and the temperature difference across the flow tube to each be independently adjusted, and the resulting steady-state values of net fluid velocity and…

  3. Micropaleontological evidence for increased meridional heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean during the pliocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Poore, R.Z.; Thompson, R.S.; Whatley, R.C.; Wood, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Middle Pliocene (???3 million years ago) has been identified as the last time the Earth was significantly warmer than it was during the Last Interglacial and Holocene. A quantitative micropaleontological paleotemperature transect from equator to high latitudes in the North Atlantic indicates that Middle Pliocene warmth involved increased meridional oceanic heat transport.

  4. Influence of geologic layering on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, D. W.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-09-01

    A modeling study was carried out to evaluate the influence of aquifer heterogeneity, as represented by geologic layering, on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada. Two 3D heat transport models were developed and calibrated using the flow and heat transport code FEFLOW including: a "non-layered" model domain with homogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties; and, a "layered" model domain with variable hydraulic and thermal properties assigned to discrete geological units to represent aquifer heterogeneity. The base model (non-layered) shows limited sensitivity for the ranges of all thermal and hydraulic properties expected at the site; the model is most sensitive to vertical anisotropy and hydraulic gradient. Simulated and observed temperatures within the wells reflect a combination of screen placement and layering, with inconsistencies largely explained by the lateral continuity of high permeability layers represented in the model. Simulation of heat injection, storage and recovery show preferential transport along high permeability layers, resulting in longitudinal plume distortion, and overall higher short-term storage efficiencies.

  5. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  6. Phonon and magnon heat transport and drag effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, Joseph P.

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators and coolers constitute today's solid-state energy converters. The two goals in thermoelectrics research are to enhance the thermopower while simultaneously maintaining a high electrical conductivity of the same material, and to minimize its lattice thermal conductivity without affecting its electronic properties. Up to now the lattice thermal conductivity has been minimized by using alloy scattering and, more recently, nanostructuring. In the first part of the talk, a new approach to minimize the lattice thermal conductivity is described that affects phonon scattering much more than electron scattering. This can be done by selecting potential thermoelectric materials that have a very high anharmonicity, because this property governs phonon-phonon interaction probability. Several possible types of chemical bonds will be described that exhibit such high anharmonicity, and particular emphasis will be put on solids with highly-polarizable lone-pair electrons, such as the rock salt I-V-VI2 compounds (e.g. NaSbSe2). The second part of the talk will give an introduction to a completely new class of solid-state thermal energy converters based on spin transport. One configuration for such energy converters is based on the recently discovered spin-Seebeck effect (SSE). This quantity is expressed in the same units as the conventional thermopower, and we have recently shown that it can be of the same order of magnitude. The main advantage of SSE converters is that the problem of optimization is now distributed over two different materials, a ferromagnet in which a flux of magnetization is generated by a thermal gradient, and a normal metal where the flux of magnetization is converted into electrical power. The talk will focus on the basic physics behind the spin-Seebeck effect. Recent developments will then be described based on phonon-drag of spin polarized electrons. This mechanism has made it possible to reach magnitudes of SSE that are comparable

  7. Dissolved gas exsolution to enhance gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    Condensation of volatile organic compounds in colder zones can be detrimental to the performance of an in situ thermal treatment application for the remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones. A novel method to increase gas production and limit convective heat loss in more permeable, potentially colder, zones involves the injection and liberation of dissolved gas from solution during heating. Bench-scale electrical resistance heating experiments were performed with a dissolved carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution to investigate exsolved gas saturations and transport regimes at elevated, but sub-boiling, temperatures. At sub-boiling temperatures, maximum exsolved gas saturations of Sg = 0.12 were attained, and could be sustained when the carbon dioxide solution was injected during heating rather than emplaced prior to heating. This gas saturation was estimated to decrease groundwater relative permeability to krw = 0.64. Discontinuous gas transport was observed above saturations of Sg = 0.07, demonstrating the potential of exsolved CO2 to bridge vertical gas transport through colder zones.

  8. Analysis of simulation methodology for calculation of the heat of transport for vacancy thermodiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, William C.; Schelling, Patrick K.

    2014-07-01

    Computation of the heat of transport Q a * in monatomic crystalline solids is investigated using the methodology first developed by Gillan [J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 11, 4469 (1978)] and further developed by Grout and coworkers [Philos. Mag. Lett. 74, 217 (1996)], referred to as the Grout-Gillan method. In the case of pair potentials, the hopping of a vacancy results in a heat wave that persists for up to 10 ps, consistent with previous studies. This leads to generally positive values for Q a * which can be quite large and are strongly dependent on the specific details of the pair potential. By contrast, when the interactions are described using the embedded atom model, there is no evidence of a heat wave, and Q a * is found to be negative. This demonstrates that the dynamics of vacancy hopping depends strongly on the details of the empirical potential. However, the results obtained here are in strong disagreement with experiment. Arguments are presented which demonstrate that there is a fundamental error made in the Grout-Gillan method due to the fact that the ensemble of states only includes successful atom hops and hence does not represent an equilibrium ensemble. This places the interpretation of the quantity computed in the Grout-Gillan method as the heat of transport in doubt. It is demonstrated that trajectories which do not yield hopping events are nevertheless relevant to computation of the heat of transport Q a *.

  9. Steady-State Thermodynamics for Crossed Transport Phenomena of Heat and Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kimie; Takeyama, Naokata

    1992-08-01

    Crossed transport phenomena of heat and matter are thermodynamically discussed by using transported enthalpy and entropy, and those of transport, without using linear kinetic equations. The steady-state thermodynamics developed here is effective in dealing with thermo-osmosis, thermal diffusion and thermoelectricity. It is important to distinguish between transported thermal quantities and those of transport in any case. All of the results obtained agree exactly with corresponding expressions of linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics based on the Onsager theorem of reciprocity. Quasithermodynamic ambiguities are consistently eliminated by introducing entropy generated internally, diS, in harmony with the second law of thermodynamics. At the same time, a few points confused by many authors are corrected.

  10. Analyses of core heat transport in plasmas with different toroidal rotation profiles in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Emi; Honda, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Urano, Hajime; Ide, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that in H-mode plasmas, toroidal rotation in the co direction with respect to the plasma current is more favorable for energy confinement than that in the counter direction. Effects of toroidal rotation on core temperature profiles have been pointed out, whereas the improved confinement has been found to be due to an increase in the pedestal temperature with co-toroidal rotation and profile resilience. In JT-60U, roles of toroidal rotation have been studied using neutral beam injection changes. In this study, core heat transport of these plasmas with different toroidal rotation profiles is investigated with several transport models implemented in the transport code TOPICS. These transport models give the anomalous heat diffusivity and are tested against conventional H-mode plasmas in JT-60U. The calculations are performed with the E × B shear effect. The relationship between heat transport and toroidal rotation is examined with a flux-tube gyrokinetic code, which we will present in the paper. Work supported by JSPS Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  11. Gyrokinetic simulations of momentum transport and fluctuation spectra for ICRF-heated L-Mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierchio, J. M.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Sung, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Candy, J.

    2014-10-01

    We examine ICRF-heated L-mode plasmas in Alcator C-Mod, with differing momentum transport (hollow vs. peaked radial profiles of intrinsic toroidal rotation) but similar heat and particle transport. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of heat and particle transport with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] have previously been compared with these experiments [White et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056106 (2013); Howard et al. PPCF submitted (2014)] as part of an effort to validate the gyrokinetic model for core turbulent transport in C-Mod plasmas. To further test the model for these plasmas, predicted core turbulence characteristics such as fluctuation spectra will be compared with experiment. Using synthetic diagnostics for the CECE, reflectometry, and PCI systems at C-Mod, synthetic spectra and, when applicable, fluctuation amplitudes, are generated. We compare these generated results with fluctuation measurements from the experiment. We also report the momentum transport results from simulations of these plasmas and compare them to experiment. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Heat transport in the quasi-single-helicity islands of EXTRAP T2R

    SciTech Connect

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J.

    2009-03-15

    The heat transport inside the magnetic island generated in a quasi-single-helicity regime of a reversed-field pinch device is studied by using a numerical code that simulates the electron temperature and the soft x-ray emissivity. The heat diffusivity {chi}{sub e} inside the island is determined by matching the simulated signals with the experimental ones. Inside the island, {chi}{sub e} turns out to be from one to two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusivity in the surrounding plasma, where the magnetic field is stochastic. Furthermore, the heat transport properties inside the island are studied in correlation with the plasma current and with the amplitude of the magnetic fluctuations.

  13. [The design of heat dissipation of the field low temperature box for storage and transportation].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiancang; Suin, Jianjun; Wu, Jian

    2013-02-01

    Because of the compact structure of the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, which is due to the same small space where the compressor, the condenser, the control circuit, the battery and the power supply device are all placed in, the design for heat dissipation and ventilation is of critical importance for the stability and reliability of the box. Several design schemes of the heat dissipation design of the box were simulated using the FLOEFD hot fluid analysis software in this study. Different distributions of the temperature field in every design scheme were constructed intimately in the present study. It is well concluded that according to the result of the simulation analysis, the optimal heat dissipation design is decent for the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, and the box can operate smoothly for a long time using the results of the design. PMID:23488142

  14. Heat transport in a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma at melting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Zhdanov, S.; Morfill, G.; Goree, J.; Piel, A.

    2007-11-01

    The heat transport in a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma undergoing a phase transition was studied experimentally. A single layer of highly charged polymer microspheres was suspended in a plasma sheath. In the absence of manipulation, the suspension forms a 2D triangular lattice. To melt this lattice and form a liquid, we used a laser-heating method. Two focused laser beams were moved rapidly around in the monolayer. The kinetic temperature of the particles increased with the laser power applied, and above a threshold a melting transition occurred. We used video microscopy for direct imaging and particle tracking. The spatial profiles of the particle kinetic temperature were calculated. Using the heat transport equation with an additional term to account for the energy dissipation due to the gas drag, we analyzed the temperature profiles to find a thermal conductivity, which did not depend on temperature.

  15. Vapor transport of zirconium and silicon during heat-treatment of Zircaloy in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Knittel, D.R.; Cubicciotti, D.

    1980-01-01

    When pieces of Zircaloy are heated above 600/sup 0/C in sealed silica capsules, silicon is deposited on the Zircaloy surface as zirconium silicides and zirconium is deposited on the silica in two forms: as an oxide layer in the high temperature region and as a metallic mirror on lower temperature surfaces. Samples of Zircaloy were heated in silica capsules under various conditions and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the deposits resulted from vapor transport processes involving volatile zirconium and silicon fluorides. Residual fluoride on Zircaloy surfaces, remaining from acid pickling treatments, was observed by Auger electron spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy in amounts sufficient to cause the transport. The thermodynamics of the vapor transport reactions are in accord with the fluoride mechanism. 4 figures.

  16. Skylab and solar exploration. [chromosphere-corona structure, energy production and heat transport processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the findings concerning solar structure, energy production, and heat transport obtained with the aid of the manned Skylab space station observatory launched on May 14, 1973. Among the topics discussed are the observation of thermonuclear fusion processes which cannot be simulated on earth, the observation of short-wave solar radiation not visible to observers on earth, and the investigation of energy-transport processes occurring in the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona. An apparent paradox is noted in that the cooler chromosphere is heating the hotter corona, seemingly in defiance of the second law of thermodynamics, thus suggesting that a nonthermal mechanism underlies the energy transport. Understanding of this nonthermal mechanism is regarded as an indispensable prerequisite for future development of plasma systems for terrestrial applications.

  17. 1D momentum-conserving systems: the conundrum of anomalous versus normal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunyun; Liu, Sha; Li, Nianbei; Hänggi, Peter; Li, Baowen

    2015-04-01

    Transport and the spread of heat in Hamiltonian one dimensional momentum conserving nonlinear systems is commonly thought to proceed anomalously. Notable exceptions, however, do exist of which the coupled rotator model is a prominent case. Therefore, the quest arises to identify the origin of manifest anomalous energy and momentum transport in those low dimensional systems. We develop the theory for both, the statistical densities for momentum- and energy-spread and particularly its momentum-/heat-diffusion behavior, as well as its corresponding momentum/heat transport features. We demonstrate that the second temporal derivative of the mean squared deviation of the momentum spread is proportional to the equilibrium correlation of the total momentum flux. Subtracting the part which corresponds to a ballistic momentum spread relates (via this integrated, subleading momentum flux correlation) to an effective viscosity, or equivalently, to the underlying momentum diffusivity. We next put forward the intriguing hypothesis: normal spread of this so adjusted excess momentum density causes normal energy spread and alike normal heat transport (Fourier Law). Its corollary being that an anomalous, superdiffusive broadening of this adjusted excess momentum density in turn implies an anomalous energy spread and correspondingly anomalous, superdiffusive heat transport. This hypothesis is successfully corroborated within extensive molecular dynamics simulations over large extended time scales. Our numerical validation of the hypothesis involves four distinct archetype classes of nonlinear pair-interaction potentials: (i) a globally bounded pair interaction (the noted coupled rotator model), (ii) unbounded interactions acting at large distances (the coupled rotator model amended with harmonic pair interactions), (iii) the case of a hard point gas with unbounded square-well interactions and (iv) a pair interaction potential being unbounded at short distances while displaying an

  18. Construction of the adjoint MIT ocean general circulation model and application to Atlantic heat transport sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotzke, Jochem; Giering, Ralf; Zhang, Kate Q.; Stammer, Detlef; Hill, Chris; Lee, Tong

    1999-12-01

    We first describe the principles and practical considerations behind the computer generation of the adjoint to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (GCM) using R. Giering's software tool Tangent-Linear and Adjoint Model Compiler (TAMC). The TAMC's recipe for (FORTRAN-) line-by-line generation of adjoint code is explained by interpreting an adjoint model strictly as the operator that gives the sensitivity of the output of a model to its input. Then, the sensitivity of 1993 annual mean heat transport across 29°N in the Atlantic, to the hydrography on January 1, 1993, is calculated from a global solution of the GCM. The "kinematic sensitivity" to initial temperature variations is isolated, showing how the latter would influence heat transport if they did not affect the density and hence the flow. Over 1 year the heat transport at 29°N is influenced kinematically from regions up to 20° upstream in the western boundary current and up to 5° upstream in the interior. In contrast, the dynamical influences of initial temperature (and salinity) perturbations spread from as far as the rim of the Labrador Sea to the 29°N section along the western boundary. The sensitivities calculated with the adjoint compare excellently to those from a perturbation calculation with the dynamical model. Perturbations in initial interior salinity influence meridional overturning and heat transport when they have propagated to the western boundary and can thus influence the integrated east-west density difference. Our results support the notion that boundary monitoring of meridional mass and heat transports is feasible.

  19. Generalized parallel heat transport equations in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zawaideh, E.; Kim, N.S.; Najmabadi, F.

    1988-11-01

    A new set of two-fluid heat transport equations that is valid from collisional to weakly collisional limits is derived. Starting from gyrokinetic equations in flux coordinates, a set of moment equations describing plasma energy transport along the field lines of a space- and time-dependent magnetic field is derived. No restrictions on the anisotropy of the ion distribution function or collisionality are imposed. In the highly collisional limit, these equations reduce to the classical heat conduction equation (e.g., Spitzer and Haerm or Braginskii), while in the weakly collisional limit, they describe a saturated heat flux (flux limited). Numerical examples comparing these equations with conventional heat transport equations show that in the limit where the ratio of the mean free path lambda to the scale length of the temperature gradient L/sub T/ approaches zero, there is no significant difference between the solutions of the new and conventional heat transport equations. As lambda/L/sub T/..-->..1, the conventional heat conduction equation contains a significantly larger error than (lambda/L/sub T/)/sup 2/. The error is found to be O(lambda/L)/sup 2/, where L is the smallest of the scale lengths of the gradient in the magnetic field, or the macroscopic plasma parameters (e.g., velocity scale length, temperature scale length, and density scale length). The accuracy of the flux-limited model depends significantly on the value of the flux limit parameter which, in general, is not known. The new set of equations shows that the flux-limited parameter is a function of the magnetic field and plasma parameter profiles.

  20. Estimating uncertainty caused by ocean heat transport to the North Sea: experiments downscaling EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, T.; Su, J.; Boberg, F.; Yang, S.; Schmith, T.

    2016-01-01

    The heat content of the North Sea is determined by the surface heat flux and the ocean heat transport into the region. The uncertainty in the projected warming in the North Sea caused by ocean heat transport has rarely been quantified. The difference in the estimates using regional ocean models is known to arise from the poorly prescribed temperature boundary forcing, either provided by global models at coarse grid resolutions, or from anomaly correction (using difference of the simulation from observed climatology) without interannual variation. In this study, two marine downscaling experiments were performed using boundary temperature forcings prepared with the two above mentioned strategies: one interpolated from a global model simulation (MI: model incl. interannual variation), and the other from observed climatology with warming trends in the future ocean derived from the global model simulation (OT: observed climatol. plus trend). The comparative experiments allowed us to estimate the uncertainty caused by ocean heat transport to the North Sea. The global climate model EC-Earth CMIP5 simulations of historical and future scenarios were used to provide lateral boundary forcing for regional models. The OT boundary was found to affect deep water temperatures (below 50 m) in the North Sea because of reduced interannual variability. The difference of mean temperature changes by 2100 (MI - OT) was up to 0.5 °C near the bottom across 58°N. While the deep water temperature in the North Sea did not directly link to the large-scale atmospheric circulation, the Norwegian outflow was highly correlated with the NAO index and heat transport of the Atlantic inflow provided by EC-Earth. It was found that model uncertainty due to the choice of lateral boundary forcing could be significant in the interannual variation of thermal stratification in the northern North Sea in a long-term simulation.

  1. Thermal transport in shock wave-compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Lone, B. M.; Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-01

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ˜25 GPa and ˜1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  2. Thermal transport in shock wave–compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-15

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ∼25 GPa and ∼1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  3. Cross-Field Electron Heat Transport in a Magnetoplasma, in the Presence of Ion Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needelman, David Dore

    Cross-field heat transport through a cylindrical pulsed argon afterglow magnetoplasma, (B_0 = 48-300G, rm T_{e} ~ 0.5-7 eV, n_{e} ~ 10^{11} cm^{ -3}, Phi_{s } ~ 2V, radius = 5 cm), is investigated. The study of heat flow is relevant to the fields of fusion engineering and space physics. A BaO-coated dispenser cathode is used to produce a pulsed electron beam, (V_{b}=750 V, I_{b} = 1A, radius = 1.27 cm, tau_{b} = 5 - 10mus, fired 300 mus into the afterglow), propagating down the central axis of the plasma. The beam heats the background electrons within some centimeters of the beam launching point (Whe85); heat diffuses along field lines, forming a "flux tube" of hot plasma. Biased grids, (radius = 5 cm, V_{g} = -200V), are used to retard the axial heat flow through the tube. A radially inserted Langmuir probe is used to map T_{e}, n_ {e}, and Phi_{s } as a function of position and time. There profiles are used to deduce the electron cross-field thermal conductivity coefficient, kappa_| . Anomalous heat transport is found for all cases studied; kappa_| is found to be up to two orders of magnitude above classical predictions. Such transport is attributed to quasilinear effects; collisions of the background electrons with radial ion acoustic waves created indirectly by the beam, through action of the beam/plasma and oscillating two-stream instabilities (Whe85), and with azimuthal ion acoustic waves, created by the pressure-gradient instability(All74). An enhanced collision frequency leads to faster cross-field particle and heat diffusion. Measurements of wave amplitudes are presented, as are correlation measurements proving the waves are ion acoustic. Comparisons of experimental measurements with quasilinear theory predictions (Man78) are shown to be quite close.

  4. Topics in quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yunjin

    In the thesis, we present a series of investigations for quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems. The first topic of the thesis focuses on the fundamental quantum problems which can be studied with electron transport along with the correlations of detectors to measure physical properties. We theoretically describe a generalized ``which-path'' measurement using a pair of coupled electronic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. In the second topic of thesis, we investigate an operational approach to measure the tunneling time based on the Larmor clock. To handle the cases of indirect measurement from the first and second topics, we introduce the contextual values formalism. The form of the contextual values provides direct physical insight into the measurement being performed, providing information about the correlation strength between system and detector, the measurement inefficiency, the proper background removal, and the conditioned average value of the system operator. Additionally, the weak interaction limit of these conditioned averages produces weak values of the system operator and an additional detector dependent disturbance term for both cases. In our treatment of the third topic of the thesis, we propose a three terminal heat engine based on semiconductor superlattices for energy harvesting. The periodicity of the superlattice structure creates an energy miniband, giving an energy window to allow electron transport. We find that this device delivers a large amount of power, nearly twice that produced by the heat engine based on quantum wells, with a small reduction of efficiency. This engine also works as a refrigerator in a different regime of the system's parameters. The thermoelectric performance of the refrigerator is analyzed, including the cooling power and coefficient of performance in the optimized condition. We also calculate phonon heat current through the system and explore the reduction of phonon heat current compared to the bulk

  5. Numerical Modeling of Mantle Convection with Heat-pipe Melt Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Sebastian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2015-04-01

    During the early evolution of terrestrial bodies, a large amount of mantle melting is expected to affect significantly the energy budget of the interior through heat transport by volcanism. Partial melt, generated when the mantle temperature exceeds the solidus, can propagate to the surface through dikes, thereby advecting upwards a large amount of heat. This so-called heat-pipe mechanism is an effective way to transport thermal energy from the meltregion to the planetary surface. Indeed, recent studies suggest that this mechanism may have shaped the Earth's earliest evolution by controlling interior heat loss until the onset of plate tectonics [1]. Furthermore, heat-piping is likely the primary mechanism through which Jupiter's moon Io loses its tidally generated heat, leading to massive volcanism able to cause a present-day heat-flux about 40 times higher than the Earth's average heat-flux [2]. However, despite its obvious importance, heat-piping is often neglected in mantle convection models of terrestrial planets because of its additional complexity and vaguely defined parameterization. In this study, adopting the approach of [1] we model mantle convection in a generic stagnant lid planet and study heat-piping effects in a systematic way. Assuming that melt is instantaneously extracted to the surface and melting regions are refilled by downward advection of cold mantle material in order to ensure mass conservation, we investigate the influence of heat-pipes on the mantle temperature and stagnant lid thickness using the numerical code Gaia [3]. To this end, we run a large set of simulations in 2D Cartesian geometry spanning a wide parameter space. Our results are consistent with [1] and show that in systems with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity the heat-pipe mechanism sets in at a Rayleigh number Ra ~ 2 × 107. Upon increasing Ra up to ~ 6 × 107

  6. Ocean heat transport into the Arctic in the twentieth and twenty-first century in EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigk, Torben; Brodeau, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    The ocean heat transport into the Arctic and the heat budget of the Barents Sea are analyzed in an ensemble of historical and future climate simulations performed with the global coupled climate model EC-Earth. The zonally integrated northward heat flux in the ocean at 70°N is strongly enhanced and compensates for a reduction of its atmospheric counterpart in the twenty first century. Although an increase in the northward heat transport occurs through all of Fram Strait, Canadian Archipelago, Bering Strait and Barents Sea Opening, it is the latter which dominates the increase in ocean heat transport into the Arctic. Increased temperature of the northward transported Atlantic water masses are the main reason for the enhancement of the ocean heat transport. The natural variability in the heat transport into the Barents Sea is caused to the same extent by variations in temperature and volume transport. Large ocean heat transports lead to reduced ice and higher atmospheric temperature in the Barents Sea area and are related to the positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The net ocean heat transport into the Barents Sea grows until about year 2050. Thereafter, both heat and volume fluxes out of the Barents Sea through the section between Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya are strongly enhanced and compensate for all further increase in the inflow through the Barents Sea Opening. Most of the heat transported by the ocean into the Barents Sea is passed to the atmosphere and contributes to warming of the atmosphere and Arctic temperature amplification. Latent and sensible heat fluxes are enhanced. Net surface long-wave and solar radiation are enhanced upward and downward, respectively and are almost compensating each other. We find that the changes in the surface heat fluxes are mainly caused by the vanishing sea ice in the twenty first century. The increasing ocean heat transport leads to enhanced bottom ice melt and to an extension of the area with bottom ice

  7. Carbon transport in a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, L.V.; Spalaris, C.N.; Roy, P.

    1980-04-01

    Carbon transport data from a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor are discussed. The results of bulk carbon analyses after 15,000 hours' exposure indicate a pattern of carburization of Type 304 stainless steel foils which is independent of loop sodium temperature. A model based on carbon activity gradients accounting for this behavior is proposed. Data also indicate that carburization of Type 304 stainless steel is a diffusion-controlled process; however, decarburization of the ferritic 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel is not. It is proposed that the decarburization of the ferritic steel is controlled by the dissolution of carbides in the steel matrix. The differences in the sodium decarburization behavior of electroslag remelted and vacuum-arc remelted 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel are also highlighted.

  8. Effects of Pr on Optimal Heat Transport in Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondak, David; Budišić, Marko; Waleffe, Fabian; Smith, Leslie

    2015-11-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers Pr and Rayleigh number up to Ra ~109 . The presence of two local maxima of Nu with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same Ra leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport where the Nusselt number Nu is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. For Pr <= 7 , optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber whereas for Pr > 7 at high-enough Ra the optimal structure occurs at the larger maximal wavenumber. Three regions are observed in the optimal mean temperature profiles, T y : 1.) d T / dy < 0 in the boundary layers, 2.) d T / dy > 0 (Pr <= 7) or d T / dy < 0 (Pr > 7) in the central region, and 3.) d T / dy > 0 between the boundary layers and central region. We also search for a signature of these optimal structures in a fully-developed turbulent flow by employing modal decompositions such as the proper orthogonal decomposition and the Koopman mode decomposition. Partial support from NSF-DMS grant 1147523 is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Gravity Wave and Turbulence Transport of Heat and Na in the Mesopause Region over the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yafang; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    The vertical heat and Na fluxes induced by gravity waves and turbulence are derived based on over 600 hours of observations from the Na wind/temperature lidar located at Andes lidar Observatory (ALO), Cerro Pachón, Chile. In the 85-100 km region, the annual mean vertical fluxes by gravity waves show downward heat transport with a maximum of 0.78K m/s at 90 km, and downward Na transport with a maximum of 210 m/s/cm3 at 94km. The maximum cooing rate reaches -24 K/d at 94km. The vertical fluxes have strong seasonal variations, with large differences in magnitudes and altitudes of maximum fluxes between winter and summer. The vertical fluxes due to turbulence eddies are also derived with a novel method that relates turbulence fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind with photon count fluctuations at very high resolution (25 m, 6 s). The results show that the vertical transports are comparable to those by gravity waves and they both play significant roles in the atmospheric thermal structure and constituent distribution. This direct measure of turbulence transport also enables estimate of the eddy diffusivity for heat and constituent in the mesopause region.

  10. Basin-scale transport of heat and fluid induced by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Manga, M.; Wang, L.; Chen, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes are known to cause widespread changes in groundwater flow at distances thousands of kilometers away from the epicenter, yet their relation to subsurface transport is unknown. Since groundwater flow is effective in transporting subsurface heat, studies of earthquake-induced changes in groundwater temperature may be useful for better understanding earthquake-induced heat transport. Here we report systematic changes in groundwater temperature after the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan, recorded by a dense network of monitoring wells over a large (1,800 km2) alluvial fan near the epicenter. The data documented a clear trend of increase from negative changes (temperature decrease) near the upper rim of the fan near the ruptured fault to positive changes (temperature increase) near the coast. Analysis of the data reveals a hitherto unknown system of earthquake-triggered basin-wide groundwater flow, which scavenges geothermal heat from depths, changing groundwater temperature across the basin. The newly identified earthquake-triggered groundwater flow may have significant implications on post-seismic groundwater supply and quality, contaminant transport, underground repository safety, and hydrocarbon production.