Science.gov

Sample records for editor chi-tang ho

  1. Suan zao ren tang in combination with zhi zi chi tang as a treatment protocol for insomniacs with anxiety: a randomized parallel-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Wen-Juan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Yong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia is a serious worldwide health problem that is often comorbid with anxiety. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a Chinese formula containing Suan Zao Ren Tang (SZRT) and Zhi Zi Chi Tang (ZZCT; SZR-ZZC) for improving sleep quality and anxiety states with four indices of Polysomnography (PSG), the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Self Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). Methods. A randomized, parallel-controlled trial compared SZR-ZZC to lorazepam tablet in insomniacs with anxiety. Patients were randomized to the SZR-ZZC treatment group (n = 60) and the lorazepam tablet treatment group (n = 59). Results. SZR-ZZC significantly improved scores on all four treatment indices. Compared with lorazepam, treatment with SZR-ZZC resulted in a significant reduction in the ISI (P = 0.029), the PSQI (P = 0.017), and wake after sleep onset (WASO; P = 0.008) scores and improved sleep architecture (P = 0.000-0.003) after a 4-week treatment period. Only one subject in the SZR-ZZC group experienced adverse side effects. Conclusion. Treatment with SZR-ZZC for 4 weeks appears to be a relatively safe and effective complementary therapeutic option when aiming to improve sleep quality and anxiety in insomniacs with anxiety. PMID:25793006

  2. Suan Zao Ren Tang in Combination with Zhi Zi Chi Tang as a Treatment Protocol for Insomniacs with Anxiety: A Randomized Parallel-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lin-lin; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Wen-juan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Yong-hua

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia is a serious worldwide health problem that is often comorbid with anxiety. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a Chinese formula containing Suan Zao Ren Tang (SZRT) and Zhi Zi Chi Tang (ZZCT; SZR-ZZC) for improving sleep quality and anxiety states with four indices of Polysomnography (PSG), the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Self Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). Methods. A randomized, parallel-controlled trial compared SZR-ZZC to lorazepam tablet in insomniacs with anxiety. Patients were randomized to the SZR-ZZC treatment group (n = 60) and the lorazepam tablet treatment group (n = 59). Results. SZR-ZZC significantly improved scores on all four treatment indices. Compared with lorazepam, treatment with SZR-ZZC resulted in a significant reduction in the ISI (P = 0.029), the PSQI (P = 0.017), and wake after sleep onset (WASO; P = 0.008) scores and improved sleep architecture (P = 0.000–0.003) after a 4-week treatment period. Only one subject in the SZR-ZZC group experienced adverse side effects. Conclusion. Treatment with SZR-ZZC for 4 weeks appears to be a relatively safe and effective complementary therapeutic option when aiming to improve sleep quality and anxiety in insomniacs with anxiety. PMID:25793006

  3. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Low temperature magnetic properties of frustrated pyrochlore ferromagnets Ho2Sn2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhira, K.; Hinatsu, Y.; Tenya, K.; Sakakibara, T.

    2000-10-01

    AC and DC magnetic susceptibilities have been measured on frustrated pyrochlore ferromagnets Ho2Sn2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 at temperatures down to 100 mK. In the AC magnetic susceptibility, a dramatic drop of χ' (in-phase component) and a single maximum of χ'' (quadrature component) are observed at around 1 K. The frequency dependence of these peak positions indicates the presence of a slow magnetic relaxation at low temperature, whose relaxation time obeys the Arrhenius formula with the energy barrier Eb = 19.6 K and 27.5 K for Ho2Sn2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7, respectively. Strong irreversibility is also observed in the temperature dependence of the DC magnetization of Ho2Sn2O7 at 1 kOe below Tp~ 0.75 K the zero-field-cooling (ZFC) curve indicates a very sharp peak at Tp, whereas the field-cooling curve has no anomaly at Tp and increases monotonically with decreasing T. In the DC magnetization process of the ZFC state at 0.46 K, a steep increase of the moment occurs above 2 kOe, and the irreversibility disappears at around ~15 kOe where the moment ferromagnetically saturates. These results indicate a clustering of magnetic moment whose size is of the order of a few tetrahedra, consistent with a recently proposed `spin ice' model.

  4. New Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    It is an honour and a challenge to take up the editorship of the Messenger at this time of ESO's expanding role in European and worldwide astronomy. In order to mark the change, we have made a few adjustments to the appearance without departing from the overall style that Peter Shaver had evolved during his term as editor. I would like to thank Peter for gen-tly coaching me into the position and Jutta Boxheimer, the technical editor, for the high quality of the layout.

  5. TOAD Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1993-01-01

    Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) computer program (LAR-13755), implements format designed to facilitate transfer of data across communication networks and dissimilar host computer systems. Any data file conforming to TOAD format standard called TOAD file. TOAD Editor is interactive software tool for manipulating contents of TOAD files. Commonly used to extract filtered subsets of data for visualization of results of computation. Also offers such user-oriented features as on-line help, clear English error messages, startup file, macroinstructions defined by user, command history, user variables, UNDO features, and full complement of mathematical statistical, and conversion functions. Companion program, TOAD Gateway (LAR-14484), converts data files from variety of other file formats to that of TOAD. TOAD Editor written in FORTRAN 77.

  6. MPS Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and

  7. Journal Editors Celebrated at Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    At the Fall Meeting, the premiere social event for AGU's many journal editors is the annual Editors' Evening, an opportunity for members to celebrate and to recognize the efforts of retiring editors. At the event, AGU president Carol Finn welcomed all those in attendance and thanked them for volunteering their time for the benefit of AGU and the wider research community.

  8. DNA Align Editor: DNA Alignment Editor Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SNPAlignEditor is a DNA sequence alignment editor that runs on Windows platforms. The purpose of the program is to provide an intuitive, user-friendly tool for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments by providing functions for input, editing, and output of nucleotide sequence alignments....

  9. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  10. New Journal Editors Appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Solid Earth, Reviews of Geophysics, JGR-Space Physics, Paleoceanography, and Tectonics. At GRL, new editors Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia, Charlottesville), Ruth Harris (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.), Wolfgang Knorr (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK), Geoffrey Tyndall (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), and Michael Wysession (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.) have joined Editor-in-Chief Eric Calais and other editors Margaret Chen, Fabio Florindo, Anne Müller, Nikolai Ostgaard, Eric Rignot, and Meric Srokosz.

  11. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  12. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  13. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  14. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  15. LDAP Browser/Editor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-07-18

    The LDAP Browser/Editor provides a user-friendly Java-based interface to LDAP databases with tightly integrated browsing and editing capabilities. Entirely written in Java with help of the JFC (Swingset) and JNDI class libraries. It connects to any X.500, LDAP v2 and v3 servers and supports editing of multiple-value attributes.

  16. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  17. WRR editor Ronald Cummings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    It has been nearly a year since Ronald Cummings took over as policy sciences editor of Water Resources Research (WRR), and in that time he has worked to make the journal live up to its role as “an interdisciplinary journal integrating research in the social and natural sciences of water.” Cummings takes the “interdisciplinary” part seriously. “I'd like to see a much broader range of policy issues presented to readers,” he says. “I would hope it would then stimulate interchange between our colleagues concerning evolving issues of the '80s and '90s.”Cummings brings a solid background as a resource economist to his 4-year term as editor, which began last January and runs until December 1987. Cummings succeeds Jared Cohon as policy sciences editor. Stephen J. Burges is the WRR editor for hydrological, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Now a Professor of Economics and Director of the Program in Natural Resources Economics at the University of New Mexico, Cummings is a past president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. He has been a consultant in matters of water resources management, forestry management, and energy policy for more than a decade, working on projects in both the United States and Latin America. Since joining the faculty at New Mexico in 1975, he has, among other things, worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation'management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems.

  18. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  19. Meet the APS Journal Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-05-01

    The Editors of the APS journals invite you to join them for conversation. The Editors will be available to answer questions, hear your ideas, and discuss any comments about the journals. All are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

  20. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents The equivalence of mass and energy Peter Stansbury Head of Physics, Christ Church Grammar School, Claremont, Western Australia 6010 Comment on `A simple experiment to study parabolic surfaces' N Gauthier Department of Physics, The Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4, Canada

  1. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Criticisms of hands-on pseudoscience David J Fisher 27 Elderberry Road, Cardiff CF5 3RG, UK Measuring varying fields Don Koks Adelaide University, Australia Relativity at A-level: a comment David Sang 3 Ellasdale Road, Bognor Regis, PO21 2SG, UK

  2. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  3. EDITORIAL: Editor's Farewell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The completion of Volume 26, 1989, marked the end of my tenure as Editor of Metrologia. My association with the journal, its parent body the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, its host organization the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the publishers Springer-Verlag and last (but by no means least) the Editorial Board, has been a pleasant one and I trust that the subscribers will have found the product to be generally satisfactory. There have been, it is true, some disappointments along the way and I shall mention two of these while expressing the hope that the new Editor will enjoy a greater success in their regard. First is the question of circulation, which has stayed dangerously low, although the shrinkage has tapered off in the most recent years. Because of the narrow public support, the costs of production are relatively high and this, through a consequently high subscription rate, tends to enshrine the unsatisfactory state of affairs. Modest schemes to broaden the journal's appeal and bring in a wider readership have foundered upon the first step, namely, that of procuring from staff members of the national standards laboratories the hoped-for articles which would discuss the state of the art in delivering the highest-quality measurement services to the public. However, some very interesting and bolder schemes are presently under discussion. I had also hoped to leaven the journal's content a little by regularly appearing articles on the latest developments within the great national laboratories. But, as with technical review articles, it has proven very difficult to find the right authors who can also spare the time, and only a few laboratories have found it possible to collaborate. In taking my leave, it remains for me to thank all the contributors, referees and readers for their support, to express the hope of an ever brighter future for Metrologia and to wish to the new Editor, Dr D A Blackburn, a happy and successful tenure.

  4. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Heat and temperature Kevin Carlton Canterbury Christ Church University College, North Holmes Road, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU, UK James Bond's shoes J Oliver Linton Head of Physics, Wolverhampton Grammar School, Compton Road, Wolverhampton WV3 9RB, UK Of springs and strings Ronald Newburgh Extension School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Clarifying the concept Keith Atkin 14 Cortworth Road, Ecclesall, Sheffield S11 9LP, UK

  5. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Physics and history Arthur I Miller Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Physics and history: a reply David Miller Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Cathode rays, the electron and Thomson's discovery John Harris 33 Glentham Road, London SW13 9JD, UK Vectors: swallow them whole! David Wheeler Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

  6. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Comment on `Magnetic and electric field strengths of high voltage power lines and household appliances' José Luis Giordano Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, CPSI, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Twins paradox S R Carson Norton College, Malton, North Yorkshire, UK On alternative ways of finding the ratio of specific heats of gases Tomas Ficker Physics Department, Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic

  7. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Narrow-band interference filters for lecture demonstrations A P Ovcharenko, B M Valiyov and V D Yegorenkov Kharkov State University, Ukraine Static electricity and the gas lift chair P Cooke Department of Physics, University of South Australia, Levels Campus, Pooraka, South Australia Relativistic mass Simon Carson Norton College, Langton Road, Norton, Malton, North Yorkshire YO17 9PT, UK Magazine or journal? Philip Britton Head of Physics, Leeds Grammar School, UK

  8. Editors' report, 2012.

    PubMed

    García-Puig, J; Alonso-Vega, G Gaspar; Ríos-Blanco, J J

    2013-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española (Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: a) objectives and attainments; b) editorial activity; and c) objectives for 2013. In 2012 the most relevant modifications concerning the editorial activity have been: a) revision by the responsible editor of all manuscripts sent to peer review, and b) translation into English of five manuscripts with abstract of each issue. From the first January to the 30th September 2012 we handled 457 manuscripts (50 manuscripts per month) a figure 22.5% higher than in 2011 (40.8 manuscripts per month). We have accepted 27.2% of all manuscripts (originals, 13.0%). We asked for 295 revisions to 241 reviewers and we have received 66.1% of the revisions asked for in less than two weeks (mean time to receive a revision, 11.3 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accept»/«reject») has been 23.9 days (31.3 days in 2011; 35.4 in 2010). This figure has been 29.4 days for the original manuscripts (9.5 and 12.3 days less than in 2011 and 2010, respectively). The mean time taken since a manuscript is received to publication has dropped from 203 days in 2010, 168 in 2011 and 115 in 2012 (less than 3 months). The collaboration with the working groups has reported 19 published manuscripts in 2012. We hope that in 2013 both the English version and the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000) will become a reality. The renewal of the actual sections (i.e., clinical conference, an image for a diagnosis) pretends, with the collaboration of all, to make our journal, each day, better. PMID:23261839

  9. Editors in the Electronic Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Robert M., Ed.

    Intended for newspaper writers and editors, this collection of articles includes the following titles and authors: "VDTs, TV Haven't Shocked Editors" by Jay Rogers; "Opinions Vary on Electronics' Effect" by Bob Nordyke; "A Few Kind Words for the Censors" by Hugh A. Mulligan; "Those Awards Have Their Limitations" by Larry Fortner; "Obituaries Are…

  10. Modularized training for technical editors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.W.

    1988-09-08

    This paper outlines the editorial services provided at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), sketches a syllabus of basic training for technical editors, describes the approach being used to develop this cost-effective individualized instruction for editors (experienced or not) new to work at LLNL, and enumerates the advantages of this approach. 8 refs.

  11. HEART handbook for guest editors

    SciTech Connect

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1991-02-01

    This handbook outlines the basic job of guest editors for the HEART Conference proceedings, published by the DoD Nuclear Information and Analysis Center in the Journal of Radiation Effects, Research and Engineering. Suggestions are offered for procedures to aid the editors, authors, reviewers, and the publisher in assuring that the journal communicates clearly, concisely, and honestly.

  12. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  13. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans

  14. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  15. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    . Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  16. From the Editor's Desk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the admirable aspects of science is that its practitioners accept that advancing the field is an ongoing process. There is always more to be discovered. I view scientific publishing in a similar light. Last month, we instituted several changes to the journal, and I look forward to receiving your feedback. I anticipate some of the changes will be welcomed while others will not. ToxSci relies on the feedback from our readers, authors, and reviewers to assure that we are serving the research community to the highest degree. The editorial staff is dedicated to producing a high-quality journal that features outstanding science like that seen in this issue. In their Forum article, Wu and coworkers describe how increasing dietary diversity can reduce exposure to foodborne toxins. This is an important public health observation that can help mitigate many of the toxic effects described in the pages of the ToxSci. You will also note that we are using a new format for our Letters to the Editor. Rather than appearing at the end of the journal they immediately follow the highlights below. In this issue, the formulation of caroboxyfullerenes is the topic of discussion. I invite you to Look Inside ToxSci for the best original research in the field of toxicology. —Gary W. Miller PMID:25288704

  17. PREFACE: Scientific and Publishing Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    1.Scientific Editors Section 1: Particle physics Mikhail Skorohvatov - NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia Section 2: Nuclear physics Mikhail Danilov - ITEP NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia Section 3: Cosmic rays Arkady Galper - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Anatoly Petrukhin - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Section 4: Methods of experimental physics Valery Dmitrenko - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia 2.Publishing Editors Irene Arkhangelskaja - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Pavel Buzhan - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia

  18. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in recent years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA-Cadarache, France Jiaqui Dong, Southwestern Institute of Physics, China Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Ambrogio Fasoli, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland Eric Fredrickson, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Manuel Garcia-Munoz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany William Heidbrink, California University, USA Katsumi Ida, National Inst. For Fusion Science, Japan Peter Stangeby, Toronto University, Canada James Strachan, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Victor Yavorskij, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2012. Our thanks to them!

  19. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  20. SIERRA Editor v. 1.2.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-24

    The SIERRA Editor is a syntax editor for text-based input decks for the SIERRA modeling and simulations codes. The SIERRA Editor provides color coded syntax, error checking, hyperlink navigation to referenced entities (e.g. functions and materials), and visual verification of mesh entity references (blocks, sidesets, and nodesets). The SIERRA Editor helps modeling and simulation analysts who use the SIERRA codes to produce syntactically correct input decks.

  1. New Editors, Editorial Advisory Board for Eos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2010-11-01

    Eos has two new editors and, with this issue, a revitalized Editorial Advisory Board. Christina M. S. Cohen, of the California Institute of Technology, is the new editor for space sciences. She succeeds Manuel Grande, who had served since 2006. Carol A. Stein, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, is the new editor for solid Earth. She succeeds John W. Geissman, who has been solid Earth editor since 2001; he will continue through the end of 2010.

  2. Learning To Use a Text Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Carole R.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.

    Designed to determine how quickly elementary school children can learn to use a text editor and what editing concepts are difficult for them to master, this study presents preliminary data on children's acquisition of text editor skills and on the kinds of revisions they accomplished with the text editor. Observations were made on a total of 25…

  3. Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

  4. Line-Editor Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

  5. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion

  6. Familiarizing with science editors' associations

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The number of science editors' associations is growing to resolve a variety of professional problems. The main objective of the associations is to educate their members by facilitating dissemination of information, publishing scholarly journals, books, networking of experts, and regular meetings. There are many science editing associations – general and specialized, traditional, and new. The article presents activities of some of these associations, which include upholding standards of science writing, editing, indexing, research reporting, peer review, editorial independence, and other editorial policies. PMID:22180273

  7. 2011 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    In the 2 October 2012 issue of Eos, the 2011 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing were announced (Eos, 93(40), 391-394, doi:10.1029/2012EO400012). The editors' citations recognize this special service to the Union, and these individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews. The reviewers listed below were inadvertently omitted from that announcement. They, too, have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing.

  8. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support for ITER. Such political visibility is good news, of course, but it brings with it the obligation to perform. Fortunately, good performance was much in evidence in the papers presented at the conference, of which a significant proportion contain 'ITER' in the title. Given this importance of ITER and the undertaking by the Nuclear Fusion journal to publish papers associated with Fusion Energy Conference presentations, the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board has decided to adopt a simplified journal scope that encompasses technology papers more naturally. The scope is available from http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Journal%20information but is reproduced here for clarity: Nuclear Fusion publishes articles making significant advances to the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The journal scope includes: the production, heating and confinement of high temperature plasmas; the physical properties of such plasmas; the experimental or theoretical methods of exploring or explaining them; fusion reactor physics; reactor concepts; fusion technologies. The key to scope acceptability is now '....significant advances....' rather than any particular area of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is hoped that this will make scope decisions easier for the Nuclear Fusion office, the referees and the Editor.The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. This is underlined by the fact that Nuclear Fusion has received an impact factor of 4.270, as listed in ISI's 2009 Science Citation

  9. Examining Editor-Author Ethics: Real-World Scenarios from Interviews with Three Journal Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amare, Nicole; Manning, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Those who submit manuscripts to academic journals may benefit from a better understanding of how editors weigh ethics in their interactions with authors. In an attempt to ascertain and to understand editors' ethics, we interviewed 3 current academic journal editors of technical and/or business communication journals. We asked them about the…

  10. ESO Vacancy - Editor (EDG 604)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Assignment: Within the ESO Education and Public Relations Department team, your main tasks and responsibilities will comprise: • Development, update and maintenance of the comprehensive ESO Outreach website in its new look, including preparation of related material (texts, images, etc.) to be displayed; • Design, layout and production of the ESO quarterly journal “The Messenger” (e.g. image selection and processing, technical editing, etc.), in close collaboration with the Messenger editor; • Conception and production of promotional brochures, posters and other EPR products, in close collaboration with the Head of the Education and Public Relations Dept. of ESO Press Releases and various high-level publications, including the ESO Annual Report.

  11. Farewell editorial from the founding editors.

    PubMed

    Izatt, Joseph A; Faris, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The retiring Editor-in-Chief and Deputy Editor provide a brief retrospective of the first six volumes of Biomedical Optics Express, thank the Editorial Board and OSA professional staff, and endorse the new journal leadership and the continued support of the journal by the biomedical optics community. PMID:26819829

  12. Letter to Editor - "Reply to RP Heaney"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A letter to the editor was submitted in reply to a letter written to the editor of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition regarding a recent publication (Hunt, CD. and Johnson, LK. Calcium requirements: new estimations for men and women by cross-sectional statistical analyses of calcium balance...

  13. Linguistic Prescriptivism in Letters to the Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukac, Morana

    2016-01-01

    The public's concern with the fate of the standard language has been well documented in the history of the complaint tradition. The print media have for centuries featured letters to the editor on questions of language use. This study examines a corpus of 258 language-related letters to the editor published in the English-speaking print media. By…

  14. 2010 editors' citations for excellence in refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    The reviewers listed on these pages have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing. The editors' citations recognize this special service to the Union. These individuals (photographs provided as available) are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  15. 2011 editors' citations for excellence in refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-10-01

    The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing. The editors' citations recognize this special service to the Union, and these individuals (photographs provided as available) are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  16. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Plasmaphysik, Germany) V. Philipps (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany) S. Zweben (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA) Y. Hirano (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan) Y. Takase (Tokyo University, Japan) In addition there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2008. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2007 award was Clemente Angioni for the paper entitled `Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade' (Nucl. Fusion 44 8277-845). The winner of the 2008 Nuclear Fusion award is Todd Evans et al for the paper `Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 45 595-607). The awards were presented by the IAEA Deputy Director General, Werner Burkart, and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, on 16 October 2008 at the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. Given the topicality of these papers for the ITER design, it is a matter of pride to the journal that the work should be published in Nuclear Fusion. Reviews Like many who have worked for a long time in the field, I still make use of Nuclear Fusion Reviews that go back 20 or 30 years. It is particularly useful, therefore, that the Board of Editors has been working to re-activate the review programme. The first fruits will appear in this issue, in the form of `A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa. The special procedures for Reviews should be noted: most specifically that they should normally be commissioned by the Board of Editors. However, not only is the Board of Editors working on a programme but I am sure that they would be pleased to consider suggestions for review subjects. Letters The reputation of Nuclear

  17. Editor's Choice Offered as a Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2010-06-01

    Editor's Choice is now being offered as a service rather than on a subscription basis. As in the past, articles will be selected by collection editors with assistance from advisory panels. The selected articles will be listed on the AGU Web site (http://www.agu.org/pubs/journals/virtual/editors_choice/); these lists will be accessible to anyone. Those who are interested in reading the articles can access them through a personal or institutional subscription or can purchase them either individually or as part of a MultiChoice packet.

  18. Editor profile: Donald H. Eckhardt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For Don Eckhardt, editor of AGU's Geodynamics book series, the scope of subjects appropriate for inclusion in the series is wide. “ The forces implied in the term ‘geodynamics’ operate on this planet on all scales and from the surface deep into the interior,” he says. The articles collected in the red volumes are often united, he suggests, by “an emphasis on common techniques as much as by subject matter.”Like the potential range of topics in the geodynamics series, the breadth of Eckhardt's professional responsibilities is large. As director of the Earth Sciences Division at the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory (AFGL) at Hanscom Air Force Base near Bedford, Mass., he oversees research and development in geodesy, gravity, seismology, geology, and dynamical astronomy. He administers more than 50 outside contracts while actively conducting theoretical and applied research of his own. In the past year, he has become well-known for his proposition that geophysical measurements made by an AFGL team demonstrate the existence and magnitude of two previously undetected fundamental forces in the universe, supplementing electromagnetism, the strong and weak nuclear forces, and Newtonian gravity.

  19. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.

    2013-01-01

    Dear readers, contributors, and members of the world laser physics community. It is a great honour for us to introduce to you our new publishing partner, IOP Publishing, a subsidiary of the Institute of Physics, United Kingdom. IOP Publishing is a world renowned authority in producing journals, magazines, websites and services that enable researchers and research organizations to present their work to a world-wide audience. Laser Physics, the first English-language scientific journal in Russia, was founded in 1990 on the initiative of Alexander M Prokhorov, a pioneer and leader in laser physics research. Professor Prokhorov served as the first Editor-in-Chief of the journal until 2002. We are proud that it is our 23rd year of publishing Laser Physics and our 10th year of publishing Laser Physics Letters. We would like to honour the memory of our friend, late Professor Igor Yevseyev, whose enthusiasm and unwavering dedication to our journals contributed most significantly to their success. It was initially his idea in 2011 to approach IOP with a partnership proposal. We deeply regret that he is no longer with us as we enter this productive alliance. Now, in partnership with IOP, we are turning a new page in providing world-wide access to the cutting-edge research results in our journals, serving our well established global audience. We see new horizons opening for our journals for years to come and hope that our readers share our enthusiasm and aspirations. Please accept our best wishes for all your new scientific endeavors in the exciting field of laser physics.

  20. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland. PMID:26969455

  1. Richard Gilbert, Reporter and Assistant City Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Looks at the experiences of Richard Gilbert, reporter and assistant editor for "The Herald Telephone," a daily newspaper in Bloomington, Indiana, and discusses Gilbert's suggested guidelines for high school journalism advisers. (MS)

  2. 2012 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  3. 2013 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  4. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  5. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA Cadarache, France Russell Doerner, University of California - San Diego, USA Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany Akihide Fujisawa, Kyushi University, Japan Gerardo Giruzzi, CEA Cadarache, France Grigory Kagan, LANL, USA Morten Lennholm, CCFE, UK Akinobu Matsuyama, NIFS, Japan Peter Stangeby, University of Toronto, Canada Leonid Zakharov, PPPL, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2011. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Award is H. Urano, for the paper 'Dimensionless parameter dependence of H-mode pedestal width using hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in JT-60U' (Nucl. Fusion 48 045008). The award was presented at the Plasma Conference 2011 (Joint meeting of 28th JSPF Annual Meeting, The 29th Symposium on Plasma Processing, and Division of Plasma Physics, 2011 Autumn Meeting of The Physical Society of Japan). This is the sixth year that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has awarded an annual prize to honour exceptional work published in Nuclear Fusion. IOP Publishing has generously made a contribution of $2500 to the award. The Nuclear Fusion Electronic Archive The journal's electronic archive has been online since the beginning of the year. The archive has been a roaring success and has contributed to the nearly 300 000 downloads of journal papers in 2011. The archive can be accessed via http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Archive. It has direct links to 16 landmark papers, from authors such as Artsimovich and Mercier. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also

  6. Report of the editors, 2014.

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2015-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) Objectives and attainments in 2014, (b) Editorial activity, 2014, and (c) 2013 impact factor. In 2014 we achieved the 5 planned objectives. We have published the 9 programmed issues and 103% of the planned papers according to the usual fixed sections. We emphasize the publication of 29 editorials, 21 of which are signed by prestigious foreign authors. From the first January to the 30th September 2014 we received 421 manuscripts (46.8 manuscripts per month), a slight lower figure to that obtained in 2013 (50.9 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 404 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 32.3% (originals, 22.4%). We asked for 315 revisions to 240 reviewers and we received 53.3% revisions in less than two weeks (10.4 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 18,3 (less than half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56,6 days in 2009 to 26.6 days in 2014. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 103 days. In 2014 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation (FEMI) has reported 11 published manuscripts. In July 2014 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports gave Rev Clin Esp an Impact Factor of 1,314 (year 2013). This Impact Factor without self-citations would have been 0.705 (in 2009 the global impact factor was 0,584). With the Editorial Committee farewell we welcome the new editorial team and we sincerely thank the SEMI Steering Committee, our colleagues, journal officers, reviewers, readers and authors that since 2009 have trusted on our editorial work. PMID:25441406

  7. [Report of the editors, 2013].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) objectives and attainments, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2014. In 2013 the most relevant modification concerning the editorial activity has been the translation into English of the 5 manuscripts with abstract contained in each issue (http://www.revclinesp.es/). From the first January to the 30th September 2013 we received 458 manuscripts (50.9 manuscripts per month), a similar figure to that obtained in 2012 (51.1 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 443 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 23.7% (originals, 11.8%). We asked for 253 revisions to 186 reviewers and we received 74.4% revisions in less than 2 weeks (10.9 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 20,3 (half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56.6 days in 2009 to 22.5 days in 2013. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 94.8 days in 2013 (110.5 in 2012 and 155.8 in 2011). In 2013 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation has reported 17 published manuscripts. In 2013 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports excluded Rev Clin Esp from its impact factor journal list due to its elevated self-citations. We have taken a number of actions to reduce self-citations and we expect to be a minority in 2014. Some other data concerning the editorial policy are encouraging. In this sense, manuscript citation to Rev Clin Esp published articles has seen a substantial increase from 19% in 2008 to 29% in 2012. We work to achieve the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000). The continuous renewal of the journal sections and the working groups collaboration are necessary elements to make our journal, each day

  8. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2010, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal and look ahead to 2011. As many of you are no doubt aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) is currently 1.317. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Measurement Science and Technology is a journal with a broad scope covering new measurement techniques in all fields of science and engineering. I therefore find it particularly enjoyable to read summaries of recent research in our strong topical review programme as these cover many varied topics of interest. In 2010 several interesting articles by international leaders in their field were published, for example: Single-photon generation and detection, by G S Buller and R J Collins of Heriot-Watt University [1]. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in life sciences, by Jan Willem Borst and Antonie J W G Visser, from the Microspectroscopy Centre of Wageningen University [2]. Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis, by Elfriede Simon of Siemens AG [3]. I hope that these articles, and the others published in 2010 and now in 2011, will provide a useful overview for our readers, and be helpful to new researchers. When speaking to young researchers I am particularly aware that having their articles published in a timely fashion is important, and I am pleased that our publication times are highly competitive, with most authors receiving a

  9. AGU Publications Volunteers Feted At Elegant Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting Editors' Evening, held at the City Club of San Francisco, was hosted by the Publications Committee and is the premier social event for editors and associate editors attending the Fall Meeting. The evening commenced with a welcome from Carol Finn, incoming AGU president, in which she expressed her thanks to the editors and associate editors for volunteering their time to benefit AGU.

  10. Writer/editor and the computer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.R.

    1985-04-01

    When the computer entered the publications process it created almost seismic shocks all along the line of creation from authoring to editing to composing to layout and to printing. Authors and editors of scientific and engineering documents felt the impact in adverse as well as beneficial ways. In the tradiational system, the writer/editor took from an author a manuscript and, using the powers of wordsmithing and the knowledge of the publications process, created a finished document using nothing more sophisticated than a red pencil for the mechanical process. Once the computer entered the scene, the writer/editor had to learn different hardware systems, try to keep up with the software explosion, and fight against a rising fear that a machine was going to take over. Fortunately, an innate flexibility and specialized knowledge of how to get a document into the best form for its specific audience guaranteed the writer/editor's survival, although there is still a long way to go in this transition phase from red pencil to VDT. This paper reviews the experiences of writer/editors in one scientific laboratory, experiences that typify challenges the forward-moving manager of a technical document production system can expect to encounter.

  11. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. As many of you are no doubt aware, our latest impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen to 1.228. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. The popularity of the journal amongst authors and readers has prompted us to introduce a new subject classification for articles, to make it easier for readers to find articles of interest. The eight subject categories are: Measurement theory and practical developments (e.g. precision measurements, metrology, new measurement principles, signal processing techniques, theory of measurement, calibration); Sensors and sensing systems (based on physical, chemical or biological principles; micro- and nano-scale systems; sensors for physical, chemical and biological quantities); Optical and laser based techniques (e.g. fibre optics, interferometry, etc); Fluid mechanics measurements (e.g. fluid flow, velocimetry, particle sizing, etc); Imaging techniques (e.g. tomography, microscopy, holography, THz, etc); Spectroscopy (e.g. optical, acoustic, dielectric, MS, NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS, fluorescence, PCS, x-ray, etc); New and improved techniques for materials evaluation (e.g. non-destructive testing and evaluation, structural measurements); Novel instrumentation. We kindly ask you to assign your paper to a category when you send it to the journal. In order to maintain our rapid

  12. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Marella de Angelis and her colleagues on precision gravimetry using atomic sensors and from Dr Peter Becker on determination of the Avogadro constant via enriched silicon-28. I recommend setting up a free e-mail alert so that you can read them as soon as they are published! As many of you are already aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen again to 1.297. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Of course the publication of high quality articles in the journal is dependent both on you the authors who trust us with the publication of your best work and on our referees and Editorial Board Members who we depend on to maintain the high standards you have grown to expect. I must also thank our referees for their rapid response when asked to review papers for Measurement Science and Technology. On average, authors receive a decision on their article in 45 days. Therefore I would like to end this message by saying thank you again to all those who have contributed to our success in the past year, and wish you all the best for a successful 2009!

  13. Panel Discussion With PR/PRL Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Panelists: Peter Adams, Physical Review B Irwin Oppenheim, Physical Review E & Massachsetts Institute of Technology Jack Sandweiss, Physical Review Letters & Yale University Reinhardt Schuhmann, Physical Review Letters The panel will include Editors from Physical Review Letters, Physical Review B, and Physical Review E. They will briefly discuss some current issues facing the journals, such as raising the standards for PRL acceptance and the role of electronic media attachments (e.g., movies) to journal articles. Opinions on these issues from the audience will be solicited. The Editors will also respond to questions and comments from the audience.

  14. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included

  15. Open Simulation Laboratories [Guest editors' introduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexander, Francis J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The introduction for the special issue on open simulation laboratories, the guest editors describe how OSLs will become more common as their potential is better understood and they begin providing access to valuable datasets to much larger segments of the scientific community. Moreover, new analysis tools and ways to do science will inevitably develop as a result.

  16. A Visual Editor in Java for View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansifer, Ryan

    2000-01-01

    In this project we continued the development of a visual editor in the Java programming language to create screens on which to display real-time data. The data comes from the numerous systems monitoring the operation of the space shuttle while on the ground and in space, and from the many tests of subsystems. The data can be displayed on any computer platform running a Java-enabled World Wide Web (WWW) browser and connected to the Internet. Previously a special-purpose program bad been written to display data on emulations of character-based display screens used for many years at NASA. The goal now is to display bit-mapped screens created by a visual editor. We report here on the visual editor that creates the display screens. This project continues the work we bad done previously. Previously we had followed the design of the 'beanbox,' a prototype visual editor created by Sun Microsystems. We abandoned this approach and implemented a prototype using a more direct approach. In addition, our prototype is based on newly released Java 2 graphical user interface (GUI) libraries. The result has been a visually more appealing appearance and a more robust application.

  17. Are Editors Out of the Tenure Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    University presses have complained for years that tenure committees unfairly expect their editors to be arbiters of what counts as tenure-worthy work. At the same time, the presses have been caught in a business-side squeeze between dwindling sales (and shrinking subsidies) and the ever-greater pressure on scholars to publish. In this article, the…

  18. Women's Page Editors: Self-Perceived Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Won; And Others

    The focal points of this study are the role perceptions and the environments of women's page editors from daily and weekly newspapers across the United States. In the role perception areas, equal rights, discrimination, and the role of women in journalism are examined. Salaries, education, college major and minor, and years in the profession are…

  19. Editors' Ability and Willingness to Work Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Julie

    1978-01-01

    Suggests that student editors know their jobs, set a good example for the staff, have regular staff meetings, make assignments clear, not "hog" good assignments, be available to the staff, help the staff learn to rewrite, attend all staff or editorial board meetings, and accept decisions of the board. (TJ)

  20. 2009 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    The reviewers listed on these pages have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing. The editors’ citations recognize this special service to the Union. These individuals (photographs provided as available) are commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  1. OPM Scheme Editor 2: A graphical editor for specifying object-protocol structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min A.; Markowitz, V.M.; Pang, F.; Ben-Shachar, O.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes an X-window based Schema Editor for the Object-Protocol Model (OPM). OPM is a data model that supports the specification of complex object and protocol classes. objects and protocols are qualified in OPM by attributes that are defined over (associated with) value classes. Connections of object and protocol classes are expressed in OPM via attributes. OPM supports the specification (expansion) of protocols in terms of alternative and sequences of component (sub) protocols. The OPM Schema Editor allows specifying, displaying, modifying, and browsing through OPM schemas. The OPM Schema Editor generates an output file that can be used as input to an OPM schema translation tool that maps OPM schemas into definitions for relational database management systems. The OPM Schema Editor was implemented using C++ and the X11 based Motif toolkit, on Sun SPARCstation under Sun Unix OS 4.1. This document consists of the following parts: (1) A tutorial consisting of seven introductory lessons for the OPM Schema Editor. (2) A reference manual describing all the windows and functions of the OPM Schema Editor. (3) An appendix with an overview of OPM.

  2. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur

  3. Editor and Student Views on the Censorship Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raburn, Josephine

    Out of 200 newspaper editors randomly selected from a directory, 64 responded to a questionnaire eliciting their opinions on the subject materials most often censored by groups in the United States. The editors' responses were compared to those of 121 freshmen at Cameron University (Oklahoma). A majority of the editors supported the First…

  4. Science, Politics, and Peer Review: An Editor's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the controversy that arose over an editor's decision to overrule an ad hoc action editor's acceptance of a journal article and request for additional changes to the manuscript. This controversy played out in various Internet discussion groups. Presents the editor's perspective, highlighting the need to protect the integrity and…

  5. Millard coffin is appointed Eos Tectonophysics editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard F. Coffin, of the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), has been named the Tectonophysics Editor of Eos for a term extending through 1998. He succeeds Louise Kellogg of the University of California-Davis.Recently, Coffin completed a term as associate editor for the solid Earth section of the Journal of Geophysical Research, and is looking forward to the move from a monthly to a weekly publication. His goal is are to serve the entire tectonophysics community, encompassing marine, terrestrial, and planetary research, through timely and frequent news items, a vigorous idea and results forum, and occasional review articles. He believes that the communication among field workers, experimentalists, and modelers afforded by Eos will benefit tectonophysicists strongly as well as effectively convey tectonophysics results to a broader audience.

  6. Evolutionary theory in letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Orion; Lowe, Clayton Cory

    2015-05-01

    This research note presents the results of a content analysis of 234 letters to the editors that discuss evolutionary theory and were published in American newspapers. We find that letters to the editor both support and hinder the cause of teaching evolutionary theory in American secondary schools. On the one hand, anti-evolutionary theory messages are marginalized in the letters section. This marginalization signals a low level of legitimacy for creationism. It might also contribute to the sense of tension that sustains creationist identities. On the other hand, relatively few letters explicitly note the fact that scientists or the scientific community accept evolution. Interestingly, the obscuration of the scientific community's support for evolutionary theory occurs both in letters supporting and opposing evolutionary theory. PMID:25540333

  7. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  8. Four are named Editors of Earth Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eric J. Barron of the Earth System Science Center at The Pennsylvania State University has been named chief editor of the new electronic journal, Earth Interactions. This journal will be co-published by AGU, the American Meteorological Society, and the Association of American Geographers. The three societies jointly agreed on the appointment of Barron. Each of the societies also appointed an editor to the board. George F. Hepner for AAG is from the Department of Geography at the University of Utah, David T. Sandwell for AGU is at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Kevin E. Trenberth for AMS is at the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  9. New “Editor's choice”: Online journals debut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Stephen

    With all AGU journal articles now published online in advance of the printed journal, AGU members have new options, in terms of how they access the latest research results. An innovative option for those with specific research interests that are covered in several journals is the " Editor's Choice" virtual journal. The first two "Editor's Choice" journals—Biogeosciences and Atmospheric Electricity— debuted in January and are, for a limited time, freely accessible to members on the AGU Web site.An "Editor's Choice" virtual journal is a collection of electronic articles recently published by AGU that have been specially selected for their relevance to a particular topic area. Everett Shock of Washington University St. Louis, is serving as the Collection Editor for "Editor's Choice: Biogeosciences." The "Editor's Choice: Atmospheric Electricity" Collection Editor is Richard E. Orville of Texas A&M University College Station, who is being assisted by advisors David Sentman, University of Alaska, and Vladimir Rakov, University of Florida.

  10. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur

  11. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  12. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content

  13. A Tisket, A Tasket--Out of the Editor's Basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2001-05-01

    In September 1940, the Journal introduced Out of the Editor's Basket for short items of interest: excerpts from letters, pamphlets, newspapers, and periodicals. By 1950, however, the Editor's Basket had evolved into a bulletin board for descriptions of new products and services, and it now contains almost exclusively press releases about recently marketed items. Now over 60 years old, the Editor's Basket still provides interesting tidbits for the Journal's broad readership.

  14. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  15. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  16. Information Scientists: Between Editors and Data Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouty, M.; Woelfel, F.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Claude, H.; Dubois, P.; Eisele, A.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Neuville, M.; Ochsenbein, F.; Perret, E.; Vannier, P.; Vonflie, P.; Chassagnard, G.

    2010-10-01

    Since the emergence of electronic publications in the early 1990s, astronomy has played a pioneering role in the development and implementation of new capabilities and services. As a data center, the CDS contributed significantly to this evolution: a synergy between data centers and journal editors started in the 1990s with the publication of large tables and data sets in electronic form and contributed to an efficient linking of publications with existing databases like SIMBAD or NED. This collaborative work, carried out in practice by information scientists, illustrates a new role for us who now have to deal with both editor and database requirements. After a short description of the CDS, we present our peculiar responsibilities related to the publication process: ensuring, prior to publication, that the link from selected objects quoted by the authors in their papers to the SIMBAD database is correct and maintained in the long term, that the tables and their complete descriptions are accessible through VizieR, and that the data and bibliography are correctly entered in SIMBAD. The Dictionary of Nomenclature, which plays an important role in these procedures, is briefly presented. Finally, the skills we developed for these activities are shortly discussed.

  17. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  18. HOED: Hypermedia Online Educational Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval, E.; Olivie, H.

    This paper presents HOED, a distributed hypermedia client-server system for educational resources. The aim of HOED is to provide a library facility for hyperdocuments that is accessible via the world wide web. Its main application domain is education. The HOED database not only holds the educational resources themselves, but also data describing…

  19. Minfong Ho: Politics in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Joy L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author interviews Minfong Ho, an award-winning Thai writer of children's and young adult novels. Ho was born in Burma to Chinese parents in 1951, raised in Singapore and Thailand, educated in Bangkok, Taiwan, and at Cornell University in New York. Ho's first novel, "Sing to the Dawn," won first prize from the Council of…

  20. John F. Dewey—Tectonics Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    ‘I want the journal to acquire a reputation for very rapid, fair, and accurate reviewing,’ asserted John F. Dewey, editor-in-chief of AGU's newest journal, Tectonics. Dewey said that he will rule the bimonthly, which will begin publication in February, ‘with a bit of a rod of iron’ to ensure that Tectonics is ‘where only original and important papers are published.’‘I'm going to be very strict with reviewers,’ Dewey explained in his quick British clip. ‘If the review does not come back to me within 10 days to 2 weeks, I'll review the paper myself. I'm also going to have a system whereby, if a paper needs major surgery after being refereed, it will be rejected. Papers will have to be in virtually publishable condition before they are first submitted,’ he said.

  1. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  2. How Newspaper Editors Reacted to "Post's" Pulitzer Prize Hoax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Douglas A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the findings of a nationwide survey of newspaper editors, revealing that most thought that the Janet Cooke hoax had been poorly handled by the "Washington Post." Notes that most of the editors said their newspapers had systems of review for stories coming from anonymous sources. (FL)

  3. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  4. Editors and author resource centers actively used by attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting, as in previous years, the Editors Resource Center located on the second floor of Moscone West was buzzing with activity: editors talking with other editors, collaborating with associate editors, speaking with authors, and meeting with students. In addition, several editors took part in "Meet the Editor" informal sessions, a new feature introduced for the 2011 meeting to strengthen the partnership between authors and editors. The map "Where are you from?" (see photo), outside the Editors Resource Center, drew the attention of many attendees who were eager to place their colored dots on the map. The Author Resource Center, located in the AGU Marketplace, became a hub for AGU veteran authors and potential authors alike. Staff were there to answer both editorial and technical questions, especially the most frequent one: What happens after my paper is accepted? The running slideshow that described all aspects of the AGU publications program sparked a myriad of questions, which AGU staff were happy to answer.

  5. Advisers, Editors and Principals Judge First Amendment Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, E. Joseph; Blackmon, C. Robert

    1978-01-01

    A test of the knowledge of 378 high school publications advisers, editors, and principals regarding First Amendment rights revealed that advisers had the most knowledge, followed by editors and then by principals. Characteristics of the most knowledgeable advisers were then identified. (GT)

  6. Technical Writing Style: Preferences of Scientists, Editors, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnellan, LaRae M.

    To determine whether scientists and science students would accept a simplified writing style, two studies were conducted. In the first study, respondents--1,089 scientists from agricultural experiment stations, 20 station editors, and 59 editors of scientific journals--answered a questionnaire requesting biographical information and reactions to a…

  7. Journal Editor Perceptions of Universities: Some Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainardes, Emerson Wagner; Raposo, Mario; Alves, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Out of considerations as to the importance of university relationships with their various stakeholders, the primary objective of this research project was to identify the perceptions of academic journal editors regarding universities. Editors were asked to provide their perceptions on: (a) the relevance of universities to academic publications;…

  8. Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xun, Gong

    2007-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power…

  9. Tropospheric HO determination by FAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hard, T. M.; Obrien, R. J.; Chan, C. Y.; Mehrabzadeh, A. A.

    1986-12-01

    In the detection of tropospheric HO by laser excited fluorescence, and alternative air-sampling method, named FAGE (Fluorescence Assay with Gas Expansion) was introduced. Here the air is expanded through a nozzle prior to excitation, in order to improve the ratio of the HO signal to the scattered, fluorescent, and photolytic backgrounds. The improvement comes from the differing pressure dependence of the intensities of these four terms, as well as the distinguishability of their temporal waveforms at low pressures when excited by a pulsed laser. HO has been excited by a YAG/dye laser. Other lasers and pumping paths may perform as well or better in this method. With FAGE, chemical modulation of the HO signal was achieved by hydrocarbon addition to the nozzle flow, converting photolytic HO from an interference to a background. Chemical calibration of the instrumental response to external HO was also achieved, by hydrocarbon decay, at HO concentrations within the ambient range.

  10. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  11. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  12. A Python-based IRAF Task Parameter Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, M. D.

    As part of the development of a new Python-based CL for IRAF tasks by the Science Software Group at STScI, we have developed a GUI-based parameter editor for IRAF tasks using Tkinter. This new parameter editor is intended to provide the equivalent functionality of the IRAF EPAR task, but to make parameter editing easier by using appropriate user interface elements, such as menu choice lists, action buttons, and file browsers. This paper describes the design and functionality of the parameter editor as well as planned enhancements.

  13. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  14. Team of three JGR-Space Physics editors appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three editors from the United States, Europe, and Asia have been appointed to lead JGR-Space Physics into the new millennium. This new team will recognize and foster the substantial contributions that scientists from the international community make to the journal. Janet Luhmann, a Senior Fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, will serve as Senior Editor. Luhmann will play a coordinating role for the regional editors, which will be especially important as the Union moves into electronic publishing and adopts new ways of using the technology to publish research findings.

  15. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  16. ESDAPT - APT PROGRAMMING EDITOR AND INTERPRETER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.

    1994-01-01

    ESDAPT is a graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. ESDAPT has a graphical user interface that provides the user with an APT syntax sensitive text editor and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statement can also be created using menus and screen picks. ESDAPT interprets APT geometry statements and displays the results in its view windows. Tool paths are generated by batching the APT source to an APT processor (COSMIC P-APT recommended). The tool paths are then displayed in the view windows. Hardcopy output of the view windows is in color PostScript format. ESDAPT is written in C-language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4 series computers running SunOS. ESDAPT requires 4Mb of disk space, 7Mb of RAM, and MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Release 4, or OpenWindows version 3 for execution. Program documentation in PostScript format and an executable for OpenWindows version 3 are provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ESDAPT is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. This program was developed in 1992.

  17. Introduction of our new associate editor.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Annick; Gunawardana, Roshaine

    2014-01-01

    Annick Desjardins, MD, FRCPC, speaks to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Annick Desjardins is Associate Professor within the Department of Neurology and is the Director of Clinical Research at The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke. In 2003, Dr Desjardins completed her residency in Adult Neurology at the Universite de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Following a 2-year fellowship in neuro-oncology at The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, she joined the Center as faculty, in July 2005. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada. She has been the Principal Investigator on over 30 therapeutic trials in neuro-oncology, including investigator initiated and international multicenter studies, and has held several Investigational New Drug applications. She has over 80 peer-review publications and six book chapters. She has written invited expert reviews for Hospital Pharmacy Europe, Nature Reviews Neurology, Clinical Care Options and MEDscape CME. She is reviewer for Neuro-Oncology, Cancer, Journal of Neuro-Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, Cancer Research, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics and Future Oncology. PMID:25363004

  18. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  19. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  20. Editorial independence and the editor-owner relationship: good editors never die, they just cross the line.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, J F

    2009-12-01

    The concept of editorial freedom or independence is examined in the light of the editor-owner relationship. Like individual and national freedom or independence, it is a rhetorical concept whose realisation flows from internal achievement as much as it depends on external validation. This freedom entails roles and responsibilities embodied in specific codes of practice for editors, such as the guidelines espoused by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Association of Medical Editors. The calling to embody these guidelines makes editing a vocation that demands isolation and distancing, separation and solitude. It involves bracketing one's biases, prejudgments and preconceptions. With such detachment comes real freedom; one that requires a moral fibre and trustworthiness that uphold truth and right, whether in full view of public scrutiny, or in the aloneness of private secrecy. The stereotypical tension between academic and commercial concerns highlights the editor-owner relationship, and bears directly on editorial independence. In practice, journal owners overstep their prerogatives. The absence of clear contracts defining editorial independence and the lack of established mechanisms governing the editor-owner relationship affect many small- to medium-sized journals in developing countries. Even large journals in developed and democratic nations or totalitarian states and societies are not spared. At the end of the day, editorial freedom exists only insofar as it is tolerated, or until editors cross the line. PMID:20087545

  1. Horatio Alger in the Newsroom: Social Origins of American Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jack R.

    1976-01-01

    Concludes that American newspaper editors of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries came from elite social backgrounds, which is contrary to the rags-to-riches image fostered by previous historians. (RB)

  2. Flagrant Misconduct of Reviewers and Editor: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kotchoubey, Boris; Bütof, Sarah; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2015-08-01

    A case of a particularly severe misbehavior in a review process is described. Two reviewers simply copied and pasted their critical comments from their previous reviews without reading the reviewed manuscript. The editor readily accepted the reviewers' opinion and rejected the manuscript. These facts give rise to some general questions about possible factors affecting the ethical behavior of reviewers and editors, as well as possible countermeasures to prevent ethical violations. PMID:25156788

  3. ZED- A LINE EDITOR FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZED editor for the DEC VAX is a simple, yet powerful line editor for text, program source code, and non-binary data. Line editors can be superior to screen editors in some cases, such as executing complex multiple or conditional commands, or editing via slow modem lines. ZED excels in the area of text processing by using procedure files. For example, such procedures can reformat a file of addresses or remove all comment lines from a FORTRAN program. In addition to command files, ZED also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, on-line help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. The ZED editor was originally developed at Cambridge University in London and has been continuously enhanced since 1976. Users of the Cambridge implementation have devised such elaborate ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating Pi. This implementation of ZED strives to maintain the characteristics of the Cambridge editor. A complete ZED manual is included on the tape. ZED is written entirely in C for either batch or interactive execution on the DEC VAX under VMS 4.X and requires 80,896 bytes of memory. This program was released in 1988 and updated in 1989.

  4. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/. PMID:24425826

  5. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  6. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-12-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  7. Writing filter processes for the SAGA editor, appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirslis, Peter A.

    1985-01-01

    The SAGA editor provides a mechanism by which separate processes can be invoked during an editing session to traverse portions of the parse tree being edited. These processes, termed filter processes, read, analyze, and possibly transform the parse tree, returning the result to the editor. By defining new commands with the editor's user defined command facility, which invoke filter processes, authors of filter can provide complex operations as simple commands. A tree plotter, pretty printer, and Pascal tree transformation program were already written using this facility. The filter processes are introduced, parse tree structure is described and the library interface made available to the programmer. Also discussed is how to compile and run filter processes. Examples are presented to illustrate aspect of each of these areas.

  8. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  9. HO:LULF and HO:LULF Laser Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Morrison, Clyde A. (Inventor); Filer, Elizabeth D. (Inventor); Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A laser host material LULF (LuLiF4) is doped with holmium (Ho) and thulium (Tm) to produce a new laser material that is capable of laser light production in the vicinity of 2 microns. The material provides an advantage in efficiency over conventional Ho lasers because the LULF host material allows for decreased threshold and upconversion over such hosts as YAG and YLF. The addition of Tm allows for pumping by commonly available GaAlAs laser diodes. For use with flashlamp pumping, erbium (Er) may be added as an additional dopant. For further upconversion reduction, the Tm can be eliminated and the Ho can be directly pumped.

  10. Ethics and the psychiatry journal editor: responsibilities and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David; D Strous, Rael

    2014-01-01

    An array of potential ethical stumbling blocks awaits the editors of scientific journals. There are issues of particular relevance to mental health journals, and others unique to local journals with a relatively small circulation and low impact factor. The blind review system, conflict of interests, redundant publication, fraud and plagiarism, guest and ghost authorship and ghost writing, advertising, language and stigma, patient consent, and "rigging" the Impact Factor are all issues of importance. It is critical that editors are aware and informed of these important issues, and have an accessible forum for evaluating problems as they arise. PMID:25618285

  11. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  12. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  13. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  14. Announcement: New Editor-In-Chief, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-06-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not

  15. Announcement: New Editor-In Robert C. Kennicutt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-06-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish

  16. Announcement: New Editor-in-Chief Robert C. Kennicutt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-05-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish

  17. {sup 163}Ho based experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, Loredana

    2015-07-15

    The analysis of the endpoint region of the calorimetrically measured {sup 163}Ho electron capture spectrum is a very promising way to determine the mass of the electron neutrino. The achievable sensitivity of {sup 163}Ho-based experiments and the experimental challenges will be presented. Three large collaborations aim at developing large scale experiments able to reach sub-eV sensitivity. Presently pilot experiments are performed to demonstrate the possibility to calorimetrically measure high precision and high statistics {sup 163}Ho spectra. The different approaches as well as the state of the art of the experimental efforts for the three collaborations will be discussed.

  18. LACE: A Web-Based, Structured Editor for PDS Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M.; Keller, R.; Sarram, P.

    2015-06-01

    PDS has moved to XML-based metadata, but many scientists are not familiar with XML and find its structure complicated. For these reasons, we have created LACE, an editor for PDS metadata that hides the complexity of XML from the user.

  19. September 2016 Letter to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Letter to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "One More Cause of Failure to Validate a CPR: Overfitting" with Author's Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):811-812. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0202. PMID:27581182

  20. Females' participation in psychopharmacology research as authors, editors, and subjects.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Durgin, Amy; Bradley, Kelly P; Porter, Lindsay K; Van Wagner, Karen; Weeden, Marc; Panos, John J

    2009-04-01

    This study determined the involvement of women as first authors and other authors for every article published in Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, and Psychopharmacology in 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006. Their involvement as editors also was determined. Women's participation as authors, but not as editors, slightly increased over time. In 2006, 43% of first authors, 38% of other authors, and 24% of editors were women. The gender of subjects was examined for the same years and journals, but could not be determined for 6% and 9% of articles employing nonhuman and human subjects, respectively. In 2006, when subjects' gender could be determined, 77% of articles involving nonhuman subjects used only males, 9% only females, and 14% both males and females. In articles using human subjects in that same year, 17% involved only males, 6% only females, and 77% both males and females. Women researchers clearly make substantial contributions to the psychopharmacology literature, but are nonetheless underrepresented as editors. Findings regarding subjects indicate that there is growing recognition of the importance of gender as a determinant of drug effects, although the vast majority of nonhuman studies continue to involve only male subjects. PMID:19331487

  1. Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

  2. Using a Computerized Text-Editor in Freshman Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Lisa

    To determine how useful a computerized text editor would be in helping students to revise their papers, an interactive text manipulation system (Wylbur) was made available to two classes of freshman composition students at the University of California, Los Angeles. Since the course received no advance publicity, students did not know when they…

  3. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  4. An Editor's View of Analytical Chemistry (the Discipline)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Royce W.

    2010-07-01

    The author recounts progress observed in analytical chemistry (the discipline) from the vantage point of a 20-year editor of Analytical Chemistry (the journal). The recounting draws liberally from the journal's monthly editorials. A complete listing of the editorials can be found in Supplemental Material .

  5. IN DEFENSE OF ECORISK ASSESSMENT (LETTER TO EDITOR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are writing to convey a more accurate portrayal of the status of ecological ("environmental" in Europe) risk assessment that was presented in the recent article by M. Power and L.S. McCarty (Fallacies in Ecological Risk Assessment Practices," August 1997, pp 370A-...

  6. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  7. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan Michael

    2011-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Paul Corkum will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2011. During my term as Editor-in-Chief atomic, molecular and optical science has continued to change rapidly: we have seen ultracold physics widening its original emphasis on Bose-Einstein condensates to the entanglement of light and matter in the most general sense towards a science of information. At the same time attosecond science and interaction of matter with short x-ray pulses develops rapidly. I am very happy that J. Phys. B with Paul Corkum as Editor-in-Chief will play a central role in publishing exciting results from this field. I would like to thank the publishing team at J. Phys. B for their fantastic job, in particular for the quality of the refereeing system the team has been able to maintain while at the same time bringing down the publication times considerably. I thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for the support of J. Phys. B.

  8. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  9. FLAn: A Free Hypermedia Editor to Create Foreign Language Learning Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilickaya, Ferit, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Glossing words is done via special software called multimedia editors. Foreign Language Annotator (FLAn), created by Thibeault (2011), is one of these multimedia editors. FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor that works on both Macs and PCs, allows instructors to turn static texts into dynamic learning units by attaching…

  10. PREFACE: Introductory remarks from the Editors Introductory remarks from the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Meseguer, A.; Marques, F.

    2012-06-01

    The local organizers of the 4th BIFD (Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics) Symposium held in Barcelona on 18-21 July 2011 would like to thank the editors of Fluid Dynamics Research for offering us the opportunity of publishing a peer-reviewed special issue of the journal with a selection of the contributions presented at this conference. We thank both the authors and the referees for working with us on the rather tight schedule necessary to release the issue within one year of the date of the conference. We also thank the invited speakers, B Eckhardt, L Tuckerman, and J M Vega, for contributing keynote papers to this special issue. The series of BIFD symposia started as a small workshop in Madeira, Portugal, in 2004 with no more than 20 participants. This number increased rapidly during the second and third symposia held in 2006 (Denmark) and 2009 (United Kingdom), with 40 and 110 participants, respectively. The 4th BIFD symposium has consolidated this event as one of the leading conferences in hydrodynamic stability, with nearly 200 participants from around the world. The main goal of this conference is to bring together scientists and engineers from different disciplines directly or indirectly related to fluid dynamics, bifurcation theory and hydrodynamic stability theory. The conference covered many research areas within the aforementioned fields, ranging from thermal, shear and centrifugal flows to biofluids, films, drops, viscoelastic flows and magnetohydrodynamics. The structure of the conference, with invited plenary talks and focused sessions, helped the participants find their home in the conference and share state-of-the-art knowledge within the field of hydrodynamic instabilities. The financial support from MICINN (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Grant no FIS2009-08065-E) and UPC (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) is greatly appreciated. The local organizers would also like to thank ETSAB (Barcelona School of Architecture

  11. Topics in Ho Morphophonology and Morphosyntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucilowski, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Ho, an under-documented North Munda language of India, is known for its complex verb forms. This dissertation focuses on analysis of several features of those complex verbs, using data from original fieldwork undertaken by the author. By way of background, an analysis of the phonetics, phonology and morphophonology of Ho is first presented. Ho has…

  12. From the desk of the Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2015-07-01

    Life Sciences in Space Research had a prominent presence at the International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR) meeting held in Kyoto, Japan from May 25th-29th, with seven of the eleven editors attending the meeting. A journal booth was also put up at the pre-ICRR satellite meeting on Space Radiation and Heavy Ions in Therapy (SRHITS) held a few days earlier in Osaka. Since the inception of LSSR last year, the editors and publisher have promoted the journal at a number of major conferences including COSPAR 2014 in Moscow, the annual meeting of the Radiation Research Society and the NASA Space Radiation Investigators Meeting. These efforts have increased awareness of the journal among investigators in space life sciences and related fields. The number of monthly downloads of articles from the journal website averages 2000, a respectable number for a brand new journal.

  13. Wysession begins term as Eos Section Editor for Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael

    In mid-April, Michael Wysession, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University, embarked on a 3-year term as section editor of Eos for seismology. Wysession brings to the position a strong background in research and teaching. Below are a few remarks from Wysession.“I recently became the new seismology editor for Eos. I look forward to presenting the many exciting areas of seismological research to the entire geophysical community. I have taught at Washington University since obtaining my Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1991. My interest in seismology began during my undergraduate years at Brown University (Sc.B., 1984), but my experience as an educator began after I graduated and taught high school math and physics in Staten Island, N.Y.

  14. Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

  15. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions. PMID:27510376

  16. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Gorin, Sergey V; Koroleva, Anna M; Kitas, George D

    2016-09-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions. PMID:27510376

  17. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Keith

    2005-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Jan-Michael Rost will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2005. As Editor-in-Chief I have seen the journal respond to the rapid and exciting developments in atomic, molecular and optical physics of recent years. There will, I am sure, be a great deal of new and important science in our field in the years ahead. I am also sure that Jan-Michael will do a fantastic job in guiding the journal through these times. The publishing team at J. Phys. B is a superbly responsive and effective one that does a great job in publishing the science we do. I want to thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for making J. Phys. B such a great journal to have been a part of.

  18. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  19. A perspective on computer documentation: System developer vs. technical editor

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, E.T.; Truett, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    Between the computer-knowledgeable {open_quotes}techie{close_quotes} and the technical writer is a chasm created by differences in knowledge bases and skills. Although this gap is widened by misunderstandings and misconceptions of system development roles, it is bridged by mutual need and dual appreciation. Often the editor/writer is {open_quotes}behind{close_quotes} from beginning to end. The writer normally joins the team after the programmers are well into system development and do not want to {open_quotes}waste time{close_quotes} discussing fundamentals. The writer is usually excluded from technical discussions because it is assumed that he/she would not understand anyway. Later in the system development cycle, the writer has no time to polish the documentation before a new version of the software is issued which implies that the documentation must be revised. Nevertheless, the editor/writer`s product is critical for the end-user`s appreciation of the software, a fact which promotes unity to complete the comprehensive package of software and documentation. This paper explores the planks in the bridge that spans the chasm between developers and their fundamental PR agents, the technical editors/writers. This paper defines approaches (e.g., The Circling Theory) and techniques (Bold Thrust!) employed for effective communication -- between software developer and technical writer as well as between the software and the end-user.

  20. Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    I am very pleased to join the outstanding leadership team for the journal Nuclear Fusion as Scientific Editor. The journal's high position in the field of fusion energy research derives in no small measure from the efforts of the IAEA team in Vienna, the production and marketing of IOP Publishing, the Board of Editors led by its chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, the Associate Editor for Inertial Confinement Max Tabak and the outgoing Scientific Editor, Paul Thomas. During Paul's five year tenure submissions have grown by over 40%. The usage of the electronic journal has grown year by year with about 300 000 full text downloads of Nuclear Fusion articles in 2011, an impressive figure due in part to the launch of the full 50 year archive. High quality has been maintained while times for peer review and publishing have been reduced and the journal achieved some of the highest impact factors ever (as high as 4.27). The journal has contributed greatly to building the international scientific basis for fusion. I was privileged to serve from 2003 to 2010 as chairman of the Coordinating Committee for the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) which published in Nuclear Fusion the first ITER Physics Basis (1999) and its later update (2007). The scientific basis that has been developed to date for fusion has led to the construction of major facilities to demonstrate the production of power-plant relevant levels of fusion reactions. We look forward to the journal continuing to play a key role in the international effort toward fusion energy as these exciting major facilities and the various approaches to fusion continue to be developed. It is clear that Nuclear Fusion maintains its position in the field because of the perceived high quality of the submissions, the refereeing and the editorial processes, and the availability and utility of the online journal. The creation of the Nuclear Fusion Prize, led by the Board of Editors chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, for the most outstanding

  1. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    On 1 January, 2004, I assumed the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics. I will start by saying that I will do my best to justify the confidence of the journal management and publishing staff in my abilities. I was fortunate to have been able to work, as an Editorial Board member, with my predecessor, the previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Allister Ferguson. Allister has provided a high degree of intellectual stewardship for the journal in the last five years. He has made the job appear a worthy challenge for me. I therefore take this opportunity to thank Allister on behalf of the Editorial Board and publishing staff of the journal. Several other factors contributed to my decision to accept this position. The first is the group of people who actually go about the business of publishing. The Senior Publisher, Nicola Gulley (and her predecessor Sophy Le Masurier); the Managing Editor, Jill Membrey; the Publishing Administrators, Nina Blakesley and Sarah Towell; the Production Editor, Katie Gerrard and their office staff form an amazing group and have managed to make the operation of the journal incredibly efficient. An index of this is the speed with which incoming manuscripts are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and its web publication, if accepted, is 130 days. This is three to five times shorter than for most other journals. A factor that contributes to this success is a responsive pool of referees that the publishing staff have as a valuable resource. Ultimately, the standard bearers of any journal are the referees. Therefore, a grateful `thank you' is due from all of us at J. Phys. D to all our referees, who diligently perform this honourable task. The Associate Editors of the journal, Professors Lawler, Margaritondo and O'Grady, also provide immense scientific leadership. They help in defining new directions for the journal and in the publishing process. Last, but not least, a remarkable asset of

  2. Delayed cutaneous wound closure in HO-2 deficient mice despite normal HO-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lundvig, Ditte M S; Scharstuhl, Alwin; Cremers, Niels A J; Pennings, Sebastiaan W C; te Paske, Jeroen; van Rheden, René; van Run-van Breda, Coby; Regan, Raymond F; Russel, Frans G M; Carels, Carine E; Maltha, Jaap C; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing can lead to scarring, and aesthetical and functional problems. The cytoprotective haem oxygenase (HO) enzymes degrade haem into iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide. HO-1 deficient mice suffer from chronic inflammatory stress and delayed cutaneous wound healing, while corneal wound healing in HO-2 deficient mice is impaired with exorbitant inflammation and absence of HO-1 expression. This study addresses the role of HO-2 in cutaneous excisional wound healing using HO-2 knockout (KO) mice. Here, we show that HO-2 deficiency also delays cutaneous wound closure compared to WT controls. In addition, we detected reduced collagen deposition and vessel density in the wounds of HO-2 KO mice compared to WT controls. Surprisingly, wound closure in HO-2 KO mice was accompanied by an inflammatory response comparable to WT mice. HO-1 induction in HO-2 deficient skin was also similar to WT controls and may explain this protection against exaggerated cutaneous inflammation but not the delayed wound closure. Proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation were similar in both two genotypes. Next, we screened for candidate genes to explain the observed delayed wound closure, and detected delayed gene and protein expression profiles of the chemokine (C-X-C) ligand-11 (CXCL-11) in wounds of HO-2 KO mice. Abnormal regulation of CXCL-11 has been linked to delayed wound healing and disturbed angiogenesis. However, whether aberrant CXCL-11 expression in HO-2 KO mice is caused by or is causing delayed wound healing needs to be further investigated. PMID:25224969

  3. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  4. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  5. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  6. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  7. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  8. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  9. Editorial independence at medical journals owned by professional associations: a survey of editors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald M; Müllner, Marcus

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of editorial independence at a sample of medical journals and the relationship between the journals and their owners. We surveyed the editors of 33 medical journals owned by not-for-profit organizations ("associations"), including 10 journals represented on the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (nine of which are general medical journals) and a random sample of 23 specialist journals with high impact factors that are indexed by the Institute for Scientific Information. The main outcome measures were the authority to hire, fire, and oversee the work of the editor; the editor's tenure and financial compensation; control of the journal's budget; publication of material about the association; and the editor's perceptions about editorial independence and pressure over editorial content. Of the 33 editors, 23 (70%) reported having complete editorial freedom, and the remainder reported a high level of freedom (a score of > or = 8, where 10 equals complete editorial freedom and 1 equals no editorial freedom). Nevertheless, a substantial minority of editors reported having received at least some pressure in recent years over editorial content from the association's leadership (42%), senior staff (30%), or rank-and-file members (39%). The association's board of directors has the authority to hire (48%) or fire (55%) the editor for about half of the journals, and the editor reports to the board for 10 journals (30%). Twenty-three editors (70%) are appointed for a specific term (median term = 5 years). Three-fifths of the journals have no control over their profit, and the majority of journals use the association's legal counsel and/or media relations staff. Stronger safeguards are needed to give editors protection against pressure over editorial content, including written guarantees of editorial freedom and governance structures that support those guarantees. Strong safeguards are also needed because editors

  10. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  11. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  12. Ferroelectricity and competing interactions in Ho-deficient non-stoichiometric orthorhombic HoMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Yan, Z. B.; Xie, Y. L.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the consequences of the Ho-deficient non-stoichiometry in orthorhombic HoMnO{sub 3} in terms of microscopic mechanisms for ferroelectricity modulation. It is suggested that the Ho-deficiency (then Mn excess) results in Ho-vacancies and then Mn occupation of the Ho-site with increasing non-stoichiometry. The Ho-deficiency enhances the Mn-Mn symmetric exchange striction by suppressing the independent Ho-Ho interaction, and thus benefits to the induced Ho spin ordering against the independent Ho spin ordering. The symmetric Ho-Mn exchange striction is thus enhanced by this induced Ho spin ordering, leading to remarkably enhanced ferroelectric polarization as observed. This work presents an alternative scheme to modulate the multiferroicity in rare-earth manganites of strong 4f-3d coupling.

  13. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting. PMID:26847670

  14. Comments on ``Anonymous Reviews'' An Editor's View of Anonymous Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.

    I have read with great interest the recent Forum commentaries in Eos by Myrl Beck, Charles Robinove, Robert Criss, and Anne Hofmeister regarding anonymous reviews. I heartily support their position that anonymous reviews should be avoided. I have not written an anonymous review in ages (and regret the few that I did), and have always appreciated and respected greatly anyone who signs a critical review of one of my own papers. However, I would like to add some perspective from the editorial standpoint. I have served as JGR associate editor for 3 years (never anonymously!), and as Eos editor for seismology and tectonophysics for 4. Over the years, I have rejected a fair number of papers, most of those based on anonymous reviews (fortunately, none of the above commentators was one of them). The vast majority of anonymous reviews I received were well considered. While I would wish that all reviews were signed, I don't think we can summarily dismiss the fear that many would have of enmity and reprisal over a critical review. Some of these fears are likely justified. On more than one occasion, have I witnessed overly aggressive responses on the part of authors to anonymous reviews that I considered to be entirely fair and constructive in their criticisms. I do think we need to do all we can to discourage anonymous reviews, but it will be difficult to completely remove that choice from the process.

  15. Tm:YLF Pumped Ho:YAG and Ho:LuAG Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Walsh, Brian M.; Axenson, Theresa J.

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature Ho:YAG and Ho:LuAG lasers pumped by a Tm:YLF laser demonstrated a 3.4 mJ threshold and 0.41 slope efficiency, incident optical to laser output energy. Results for numerous rod lengths, Ho concentrations, and output mirror reflectivities are presented.

  16. A Generic Metadata Editor Supporting System Using Drupal CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Banks, N. G.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    Metadata handling is a key factor in preserving and reusing scientific data. In recent years, standardized structural metadata has become widely used in Geoscience communities. However, there exist many different standards in Geosciences, such as the current version of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC CSDGM), the Ecological Markup Language (EML), the Geography Markup Language (GML), and the emerging ISO 19115 and related standards. In addition, there are many different subsets within the Geoscience subdomain such as the Biological Profile of the FGDC (CSDGM), or for geopolitical regions, such as the European Profile or the North American Profile in the ISO standards. It is therefore desirable to have a software foundation to support metadata creation and editing for multiple standards and profiles, without re-inventing the wheels. We have developed a software module as a generic, flexible software system to do just that: to facilitate the support for multiple metadata standards and profiles. The software consists of a set of modules for the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), with minimal inter-dependencies to other Drupal modules. There are two steps in using the system's metadata functions. First, an administrator can use the system to design a user form, based on an XML schema and its instances. The form definition is named and stored in the Drupal database as a XML blob content. Second, users in an editor role can then use the persisted XML definition to render an actual metadata entry form, for creating or editing a metadata record. Behind the scenes, the form definition XML is transformed into a PHP array, which is then rendered via Drupal Form API. When the form is submitted the posted values are used to modify a metadata record. Drupal hooks can be used to perform custom processing on metadata record before and after submission. It is trivial to store the metadata record as an actual XML file

  17. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan, Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ray Basu, M.; Raut, R.; Ganguly, G.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Basu, S. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, P.; Goswami, A.

    2016-08-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho have been studied by the La57(20Ne139,6 n ) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from γ -γ coincidence, directional correlation, and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-γ time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  18. Educating science editors: is there a comprehensive strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Gorin, Sergey V.; Kitas, George D.

    2014-01-01

    The article considers available options to educate science editors in the fast-transforming digital environment. There is no single course or resource that can cover their constantly changing and diversifying educational needs. The involvement in research, writing, and reviewing is important for gaining editing skills, but that is not all. Membership in editorial associations and access to updated scholarly information in the field are mandatory for maintaining editorial credentials. Learned associations offer access to a few widely-recognized periodicals. There are also formal training courses covering issues in science writing and ethical editing, but no high-level evidence data exist to promote any of these. Networking with like-minded specialists within the global and regional editorial associations seems a useful strategy to upgrade editorial skills and resolve problems with the quality control and digitization of scholarly periodicals. PMID:25559840

  19. Automatic adverse drug events detection using letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research. PMID:23304379

  20. Automatic Adverse Drug Events Detection Using Letters to the Editor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research. PMID:23304379

  1. Improving systems documentation using an online copy editor

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    For the last three years the author has been using Writers Workbench, a UNIX text-editing tool, to edit computer documentation. In this article the author outlines his experiences using the system, noting both the advantages to explore and pitfalls to avoid in using this tool. Writers Workbench is especially useful for improving a writer's basic skills - punctuation, spelling, and grammar. When used effectively, Writers Workbench can cut down on wordiness and improve the consistency of a manual. It can help in the creation of a table of contents, index, glossary, and bibliography and in checking readability. Furthermore, by creating user-defined dictionaries, authors or editors can customize the tool to fit their purposes and styles. However, Writers Workbench is not good at catching problems relating to organization, focus, and clarity.

  2. Highlighting impact: Do editors' selections identify influential papers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    A recent trend in scientific publishing is that journal editors highlight each week a select set among the papers published (usually) in their respective journals. The highlighted papers are deemed of higher quality, importance, or interest than the 'average' paper and feature prominently in the publishers' websites. We perform a citation analysis of the highlighted papers for a number of journals from various publishers in physics. By comparing the performance of highlighted papers relative to (a) typical papers and (b) highly cited papers in their source journals and in other journals in the field, we explore whether, and to what extent, the selection process at the time of publication identifies papers that will turn out to be influential. We discuss the broader implications for research assessment.

  3. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  4. The X-windows interactive navigation data editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    A new computer program called the X-Windows Interactive Data Editor (XIDE) was developed and demonstrated as a prototype application for editing radio metric data in the orbit-determination process. The program runs on a variety of workstations and employs pull-down menus and graphical displays, which allow users to easily inspect and edit radio metric data in the orbit data files received from the Deep Space Network (DSN). The XIDE program is based on the Open Software Foundation OSF/Motif Graphical User Interface (GUI) and has proven to be an efficient tool for editing radio metric data in the navigation operations environment. It was adopted by the Magellan Navigation Team as their primary data-editing tool. Because the software was designed from the beginning to be portable, the prototype was successfully moved to new workstation environments. It was also itegrated into the design of the next-generation software tool for DSN multimission navigation interactive launch support.

  5. Letters to the Editor: Public Writing as a Response to Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehammer, Nora

    A study conducted by the copy editor of a small daily newspaper in Porter County, Indiana examines readers' motivations for writing letters to the editor. Analysis was based on letters that appeared in "The Vidette Messenger" September 16-30, 1992. Of 75 letters, 32 were responses to information published in the paper during the last 2 weeks. All…

  6. Debunking the Mutilated Boy: A Study of Newspaper Editors and an Inflammatory Rumor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lee

    A study examined how newspaper editors resolve issues relating to rumors--that is whether to cover stories which may turn out to be false. The "mutilated boy" rumor was chosen for its antiquity and endurance, its powerful theme, and its ability to create intense anxiety in a community. Thirty-three of the 86 editors who responded to the…

  7. The Student Press under Fire and College Newspaper Editors by Race: A Chronicle Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Douglas; Shea, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Colleges' student newspapers are criticized for poor coverage of minority groups. Survey reveals that few student editors are minority group members. Table detailing the survey results shows college newspaper editors by race for 111 colleges. Although diversity is cited as a goal, it is not easy to accomplish. Separate sections and minority-group…

  8. Self-Interest and Scholarly Publication: The Dilemma of Researchers, Reviewers, and Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.; Roberts, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Academic misconduct in research is of growing concern to funding agencies, scholars, and academic journal editors. Scholarly publication has ethical implications researchers, reviewers, and journal editors. The theoretical background of the ethics of scholarly publication is explored as well as the use of a case study of an untenured researcher…

  9. Adolescent Sexual Initiation through the Lens of Letters to the Editor Published in Polish Teenage Magazines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacz, Marek S.; Bajka-Kopacz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called "advice columns," often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published in Polish…

  10. Error Pattern Analysis Applied to Technical Writing: An Editor's Guide for Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monagle, E. Brette

    The use of error pattern analysis can reduce the time and money spent on editing and correcting manuscripts. What is required is noting, classifying, and keeping a frequency count of errors. First an editor should take a typical page of writing and circle each error. After the editor has done a sufficiently large number of pages to identify an…

  11. A "Situational" and "Coorientational" Measure of Specialized Magazine Editors' Perceptions of Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Dennis W.

    A study was undertaken of specialized magazine editors' perceptions of audience characteristics as well as the perceived role of their publications. Specifically, the study examines the relationship between the editors' perceptions of reader problem recognition, level of involvement, constraint recognition, and possession of reference criteria and…

  12. Appropriate roles for the subscriber, publisher, editor, author, and reviewer in the archives of plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2013-11-01

    Authors, editors and reviewers, publishers, and subscribers all play their role in scientific journals. These 5 stakeholders are essential to journals. In this paper, firstly, I briefly summarize the role of each journal stakeholder and their respective goals. Secondly, the status of each participant in the Archives of Plastic Surgery is described. Finally, I propose an appropriate role and plan for each of them. Specific roles and responsibilities include the following: subscribers should welcome and submit the critiques of published papers in letters to the editor. Publishers should trust editors and provide them with adequate financial support for ongoing quality improvement of the journal. The editor-in-chief should be given a sufficient period of time-several years-to build up journal quality and train the incoming editor. The editors, including section editors, are also responsible for increasing the author pool. One editor might be designated a 'devil's referee', that is, a kind of devil's advocate with the responsibility of examining the originality of the manuscript, taking a skeptical view of the manuscript, and looking for holes in the methods and results of reported experiments. Authors' responsibilities include submitting manuscripts with scientific integrity and being ready to take responsibility for their articles even long after publication. Finally, reviewers' responsibilities include identifying similar articles not cited. Reviewers are also welcome to write a discussion on the article they review. PMID:24286037

  13. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  14. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  15. A survey of orthopaedic journal editors determining the criteria of manuscript selection for publication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the characteristics of editors and criteria used by orthopaedic journal editors in assessing submitted manuscripts. Methods Between 2008 to 2009 all 70 editors of Medline listed orthopaedic journals were approached prospectively with a questionnaire to determine the criteria used in assessing manuscripts for publication. Results There was a 42% response rate. There was 1 female editor and the rest were male with 57% greater than 60 years of age. 67% of the editors worked in university teaching hospitals and 90% of publications were in English. The review process differed between journals with 59% using a review proforma, 52% reviewing an anonymised manuscript, 76% using a routine statistical review and 59% of journals used 2 reviewers routinely. In 89% of the editors surveyed, the editor was able to overrule the final decision of the reviewers. Important design factors considered for manuscript acceptance were that the study conclusions were justified (80%), that the statistical analysis was appropriate (76%), that the findings could change practice (72%). The level of evidence (70%) and type of study (62%) were deemed less important. When asked what factors were important in the manuscript influencing acceptance, 73% cited an understandable manuscript, 53% cited a well written manuscript and 50% a thorough literature review as very important factors. Conclusions The editorial and review process in orthopaedic journals uses different approaches. There may be a risk of language bias among editors of orthopaedic journals with under-representation of non-English publications in the orthopaedic literature. PMID:21527007

  16. Magazine Article Placement: How Editors, Regular Contributors, and Novice Writers Rate Query Letters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    About 350,000 freelance magazine articles were purchased by magazine editors last year from the 22,000 freelancers and 225,000 would-be freelancers in the United States. A study examined the factors editors judge most important in selecting freelance magazine article proposals, using factor analysis and qualitative examination of persuasive…

  17. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793.11 Section 793.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the...

  18. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793.11 Section 793.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the...

  19. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793.11 Section 793.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the...

  20. Letter to the editor of TAAP, in response to letter from Anders et al.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology: We would like to address the letter to the editor submitted by Anders et al. regarding the substantive issues raised regarding our paper "Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physi...

  1. "Clones," Codes, and Conflicts of Interest in Cartooning: Cartoonists and Editors Look at Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel; And Others

    A study examined differences between political cartoonists and op-ed page editors on both traditional ethical issues (such as conflicts of interest) and the special, style-related concerns of editorial cartoonists. Hypotheses proposed were that editors and cartoonists (1) would condemn "cloning" or copying, reflecting an ethical principle…

  2. EDITORIAL: A word from the new Editor-in-Chief A word from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    TIn the autumn of 2010 I became the Editor-in Chief of European Journal of Physics (EJP). EJP is a place for teachers, instructors and professors to exchange their views on teaching physics at university level and share their experience. It is general opinion that no good research is possible without connection with good, high-quality teaching, at the university level in particular. Therefore excellence in physics teaching is important to the physics community. European Journal of Physics is proud of its contribution to achieving this goal. As Editor-in-Chief, I will continue to work to this general objective of the journal. We will publish articles on specific topics in physics, stressing originality of presentation and suitability for use in students'laboratories, lectures and physics teaching in general. We will also publish more pedagogical papers presenting the achievements of particular teaching methods. In addition, we will continue to publish special sections on particular areas of physics, as well as the annual special section on physics competitions. European Journal of Physics is in good shape. Due to the work of the previous editors and the publisher, the readership is high and growing steadily, and many excellent papers are being submitted and published. I hope that this positive trend for the journal will continue, and I will do my best to keep to this high standard. A few words about myself. I work in the Institute of Physics in Warsaw, Poland. My main research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and I have published about 80 research papers on this topic. For many years I was involved in teaching physics at university and in high school. I am a co-author of a textbook on physics for high-school students and of a problem book in quantum mechanics. For the last ten years, I have been involved in the International Physics Olympiad and over the last few years I have been a member of the Editorial Board of European Journal of Physics.

  3. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  4. Registration of "HoCP 00-950" Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HoCP 00-950 sugarcane was selected from progeny of the cross HoCP 93-750 x HoCP 92-676 made at Canal Point, Florida. HoCP 00-950 was developed through cooperative research by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Stati...

  5. THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Shrestha, Biva; Palanisamy, Giri; Hook, Leslie A; Killeffer, Terri S; Boden, Thomas A; Cook, Robert B; Zolly, Lisa; Hutchison, Viv; Frame, Mike; Cialella, Alice; Lazer, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register

  6. Presence of an HO-1 expression threshold in renal glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Detsika, Maria G; Atsaves, Vassileios; Papalois, Apostolos; Lianos, Elias A

    2015-12-01

    This article reports data describing HO-1 expression patterns of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in isolated rat glomeruli and in cultured glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) in response to its natural substrate heme. Qualitative and quantitative data are presented to support presence of a HO-1 expression threshold in glomeruli but not in GEC. Interpretation of our data and further insight into HO-1 expression pattern in glomeruli may be found in 'HO-1 expression control in the rat glomerulus' [1]. PMID:26702422

  7. Thermochemistry of HO2 + HO2 → H2O4: Does HO2 Dimerization Affect Laboratory Studies?

    PubMed

    Sprague, Matthew K; Irikura, Karl K

    2015-07-01

    Self-reaction is an important sink for the hydroperoxy radical (HO2) in the atmosphere. It has been suggested (Denis, P. A.; Ornellas, F. R. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2009, 113 (2), 499-506) that the minor product hydrogen tetroxide (HO4H) may act as a reservoir of HO2. Here, we compute the thermochemistry of HO2 self-reactions to determine if either HO4H or the cyclic hydrogen-bound dimer (HO2)2 can act as reservoirs. We computed electronic energies using coupled-cluster calculations in the complete basis set limit, CCSD(T)/CBS[45]//CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ. Our model chemistry includes corrections for vibrational anharmonicity in the zero-point energy and vibrational partition functions, core-valence correlation, scalar relativistic effects, diagonal Born-Oppenheimer, spin-orbit splitting, and higher-order corrections. We compute the Gibbs energy of dimerization to be (-20.1 ± 1.6) kJ/mol at 298.15 K (2σ uncertainty), and (-32.3 ± 1.5) kJ/mol at 220 K. For atmospherically relevant [HO2] = 10(8) molecules per cm(3), our thermochemistry indicates that dimerization will be negligible, and thus H2O4 species are atmospherically unimportant. Under conditions used in laboratory experiments ([HO2] > 10(12) molecules per cm(3), 220 K), H2O4 formation may be significant. We compute two absorption spectra that could be used for laboratory detection of HO4H: the OH stretch overtone (near-IR) and electronic (UV) spectra. PMID:26066551

  8. The New Online Metadata Editor for Generating Structured Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, R.; Shrestha, B.; Palanisamy, G.; Hook, L.; Killeffer, T.; Boden, T.; Cook, R. B.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Frame, M. T.; Cialella, A. T.; Lazer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nobody is better suited to "describe" data than the scientist who created it. This "description" about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [1] [2]. Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. How is OME helping Big Data Centers like ORNL DAAC? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the ESDIS Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and

  9. Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors, Version 4. 0

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.K.; Skinner, N.L.; Wood, S.T. )

    1992-05-01

    The Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors allow the user to graphically build and edit fault trees, event trees, and piping instrumentation diagrams (P IDs). The software is designed to enable the use of graphical-based editors found in the Integrated Reliability and Risk Assessment System (IRRAS). FEP is made up of three separate editors (Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping Instrumentation Diagram) and a utility module. This reference manual provides a screen-by-screen walkthrough of the entire FEP System.

  10. Training the unseasoned technical writer-editor: From the trainee's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Many unseasoned technical writer-editors who are not adequately trained may become seasoned inadequately trained technical writer-editors. This problem can occur when a trainee is involved in an ineffective training program, but it can be alleviated by the trainer's assessing the unseasoned writer's talents, becoming involved with the trainee's growth in writing and editing skills, and helping him to visualize his potential as a technical writer-editor. Assessment, support, mentoring, and nurturing are important elements in the trainee's growth process and in any good training or internship program. 1 ref.

  11. Ho:YLF pumped HBr laser.

    PubMed

    Botha, L R; Bollig, C; Esser, M J D; Campbell, R N; Jacobs, C; Preussler, D R

    2009-10-26

    A Ho:YLF laser pumped HBr molecular laser was developed that produced up to 2.5 mJ of energy in the 4 micron wavelength region. The Ho:YLF laser was fiber pumped using a commercial Tm:fibre laser. The Ho:YLF laser was operated in a single longitudinal mode via injection seeding with a narrow band diode laser which in turn was locked to one of the HBr transitions. The behavior of the HBr laser was described using a rate equation mathematical model and this was solved numerically. Good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively between the model and experimental results was obtained. PMID:19997290

  12. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    2011-12-01

    At the end of 2011 I will retire as Editor-in-Chief of Semiconductor Science and Technology, and I am very pleased to announce that the job will be taken over by Professor Kornelius Nielsch. In the ten years I have held this position, I have seen many new topics entering the journal: spintronics, organic semiconductors, and Dirac fermion physics, to name just a few. The journal has also witnessed a strong internationalization of the authorship, with an especially strong increase in contributions from the Far East—a growth that is likely to continue in the coming years. I am certain that Kornelius will do an excellent job in guiding the journal through the developments of the coming decade. I would like to thank the publishing team of SST, or rather the three consecutive teams I witnessed during my tenure at the journal, for the help and support they have given me. The people at IOP Publishing are doing a great job in running the journal, and have made it possible to considerably reduce the time to publication for our submissions. I much enjoyed the collaboration with the other members of the Editorial Board; our annual meetings have always been a source of inspiration. Last, but certainly not least, I would like to thank you, the scientific community, authors, referees and readers, for your continuing support of the journal.

  13. The Technical Editor and the Non-Native Speaker of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leki, Ilona

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes current views of second-language acquisition, focusing on the types and origins of the problems of nonnative technical writers. Offers suggestions to help editors avoid or alleviate the problems. (PRA)

  14. Local Measurement of Tropospheric HO(x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1994-01-01

    In March of 1992 a workshop sponsored by NASA and NSF was held at SRI International to assess the current ability to measure atmospheric OH and HO2. The measurement techniques reviewed during the workshop for detection of OH included five laser-induced fluorescence schemes, five laser-based adsorption techniques, and four non-laser methods. Six instruments or instrument concepts for HO2 detection, including chemical amplification, conversion to OH with subsequent OH detection, or direct spectroscopic detection of the HO2 were also discussed. The conclusions from the workshop identify several measurement techniques for OH and HO2 that are ready for field tests. These have the ability to measure the radicals with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy to form meaningful comparison with atmospheric model predictions. The workshop conclusions also include recommendations for informal and formal intercomparison protocols.

  15. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the 13 years since it was first published the "Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals" (the Vancouver style), developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, has been widely accepted by both authors and editors; over 400 journals have stated that they will consider manuscripts that conform to its requirements. This is the fourth edition of the "Uniform requirements." PMID:8287338

  16. EDITORIAL: Message from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R.

    2005-01-01

    On 1 January 2005 I become Editor-in-Chief of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. I look forward to assisting contributors, referees and the Board in maintaining the high standards of this international journal, whose bibliometric impact factor has consistently matched or exceeded that of other journals in the field. The robust, good health of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion reflects that of its user communities. With a decision to proceed to the construction of ITER apparently imminent, magnetic confinement fusion research is preparing to take a major step forwards. A new generation of laser-plasma interaction facilities for inertial fusion research is also rising at key sites around the world. Technical progress in our field is underpinned by scientific excellence, and the publication of results in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion will, I hope, continue to play its part. The journal will continue to offer the benefits of refereeing by two experts, combined with the rapid turnaround achieved by the highly efficient editorial office at the Institute of Physics Publishing in Bristol. Looking elsewhere, there may be opportunities for gentle incremental broadening of the scientific scope of the journal, in the medium term. One looks in particular to those branches of plasma physics that, in recent years, have become more strongly represented in the series of conferences organized by the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society. The recent special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) B1--592) provides an indication. Finally, it is a pleasure to thank my predecessor, Professor Ian Hutchinson of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for handing on his role with the journal in such promising condition.

  17. Energy levels of HoBr 63-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Peter A.

    1986-12-01

    The excitation, electronic absorption and luminescence spectra of cubic Cs 2NaHoBr 6 have been recorded at temperatures down to that of liquid helium. The detailed spectral analyses enable comparisons to be made of the crystal-field splittings of Russell—Saunders terms with those in Cs 2NaHoCl 6. Under intense 647.1 nm laser excitation, luminescence is observed in the neat material in the spectral region between 17800 and 21750 cm -1.

  18. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    As I begin my tenure as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM), I look upon this opportunity as both an honour and a real challenge. The journal is in great shape thanks to the work of my predecessors, Marshall Stoneham and David Ferry. The journal's solid reputation is based largely on the work these gentlemen have done over the past decade. The other main reason for the success of JPCM is the amazing staff in Bristol; keep up the good work, please. When discussing the journal with scientists from all corners of the globe, one thing is always mentioned—JPCM is a very reliable journal with well-written, high-quality papers, and a fast but rigorous peer-review process that provides fair, detailed and constructive referee reports for the benefit of authors. This is due almost entirely to our great authors and referees; we rely on them every day—thank you. As the new Editor-in-Chief I hope to continue to improve still further the journal's status in condensed matter science. As mentioned above, our reputation is excellent, but the reality is that we live in a world of bibliometrics and rankings. Over the past few years JPCM has been repositioned as a journal at the forefront of condensed matter physics, and the impact of the journal should increase further as a result of continued emphasis on commissioning in cutting-edge areas identified by the Editorial Board and the journal team. In addition to regular papers, JPCM has a number of other content streams that authors and readers can benefit from. Fast track communications (FTCs) offer exceptionally fast publication for work of the highest impact and urgency. By their select nature, FTCs benefit from personal treatment by the Editorial Board and the average receipt-to-first-decision time is just 11 days (the average receipt-to-publication time is just 45 days). Topical reviews in JPCM make the journal one of the most authoritative sources of review content for condensed matter physics

  19. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As a journal that reports advances in atomic, molecular and optical science (AMO), Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) provides the AMO research community with three unique fora: topical reviews, tutorials and special issues. Developed under the leadership of editor Jan Michael Rost and his Editorial Board, these sections have cemented J. Phys. B's reputation as a major journal showcasing the AMO community's advances. For me, an AMO scientist, it is therefore a special pleasure to be entrusted with continuing the tradition of excellence established by Jan Michael and the Editorial Board. I intend to build on this foundation by ensuring that the journal makes full use of these tools. Topical reviews: a unique focus When J. Phys. B becomes the first journal you turn to for initial reviews about important emerging areas in your field, we as an Editorial Board will have succeeded. To us, a topical review is different from a traditional review—a topical review focuses on emerging sub-fields of AMO physics. Its function is to alert and educate our readers about emerging opportunities. Topical reviews can also serve a closely related function for readers: keeping us up-to-date with critical technologies that lie slightly outside our own fields, such as advances in free-electron lasers science, (which will surely affect our field). Our overall goal is to make your research more productive because of the topical reviews you read within the journal. Tutorials J. Phys. B tutorials are aimed at graduate students or researchers venturing into a new field. Just as in my own research group I encourage all graduate students to write their theses in a way that will be useful to both future graduate students and the larger community beyond my group, J. Phys. B has designed tutorials to fill this function on the journal scale. Thus, tutorial authors are able to write in greater depth than can be included in a paper in nature, science or in the

  20. EDITORIAL: Thank you and farewell from the Founding Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskes, Mike

    2005-07-01

    I have been involved with Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering (MSMSE) from the very beginning when it was merely an idea, over 14 years ago, to the current journal that is well supported by the community. During my time as Editor there have been many changes in the journal, including the introduction of electronic submissions, web-based services and free printed colour where it is essential to the article, as well as completely free colour online. The journal has seen excellent growth in the number and quality of submissions and the number of articles published continues to rise, enabling us to expand the journal to eight issues in 2005. Web accesses and downloads have greatly surpassed even my wildest dreams. In my opinion, the emergence of MSMSE as a top materials modelling journal has confirmed the vision of Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) and the Executive Board that this area of science and engineering was ripe for a specialized journal. I feel that, having seen the journal through the early years and watched it grow into a successful arena for multidisciplinary materials research, it is now an appropriate time for me to hand over the reins. The journal has a great foundation for future growth and development and is supported by an excellent Editorial Board, who have given me a great deal of help and advice over the years. I feel sure that they will continue to support the journal when Bill Curtin, Brown University, takes over on 1 July 2005. Bill has the diverse experience in modelling at the atomic, dislocation, and continuum levels to lead the journal to new heights. Finally I would like to thank all of the readers, authors and referees who have greatly contributed to MSMSE over the years. Thank you for your support and help, and I hope you will continue to support the journal. Last, but not least, I would like to thank the staff at IOPP. Without their expert assistance, the journal could not have been as successful as it is

  1. 75 FR 52534 - Su Van Ho: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Salmonella bacteria, with verification of such exportation or destruction by FDA. Mr. Ho concealed and... with Salmonella bacteria. As a result of his conviction, on June 10, 2010, FDA sent Mr. Ho a notice...

  2. CHAIRMEN'S PREFACE AND EDITORS' NOTE: Unification of Fundamental Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Lars; Nilsson, Jan S.; Salomonson, Per; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

    1987-01-01

    Vainshtein. We had hoped that the Nobel Symposium should be a signal for improved relations between East and West, but in this respect we failed. The Symposium was held in the small town of Marstrand, a summer resort on an island outside Göteborg. The idea was to have it relatively close to home and to show the participants perhaps the best part of the local nature. Another motive was to keep the participants semi-isolated to provide ample time for discussions. With the somewhat heavy programme we found that even so, the days were not long enough. This Symposium was the second Nobel Symposium on elementary particle physics. The first one, also organized by our group, was held in 1968. We hope and believe that the next one need not be awaited another 18 years! The Symposium was made possible by a generous grant from the Nobel Foundation. An additional grant from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences was also essential. A grant from Nordita made it possible to invite some ten Nordic observers. We also gratefully acknowledge help with the organization of the Symposium from the city of Goteborg, the city of Kungälv, Volvo, Skandinaviska Enskilda banken, Ericsson AB and IBM Sweden. We thank all the participants for all their efforts, to come to our remote part of the world, to give excellent talks, to write up their talks astonishingly quickly and to share with us so much of their knowledge and expertise. Last but not least we are indebted to the members of the organizing committee, members of the group and the secretarial staff. Goteborg, August 1986 Editors' NoteIn these Proceedings the lectures are given in the order of their oral presentation at the Symposium. Regrettably, a few contributors could not participate (V. Gribov, A. Linde, V. Ogievetsky, M. Shifman and A. M. Polyakov). Their contributions have been placed close to the end of the Proceedings. As these authors did not have the opportunity of correcting the proofs, responsibility for printing errors must rest with

  3. US health journal editors' opinions and policies on research in race, ethnicity, and health.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, T.; Bhopal, R.

    1998-01-01

    Health research on race and ethnicity has been criticized for lacking rigor in conceptualization, terminology, and analysis. Scientific journals' editorial processes help determine research quality. This survey assessed editors' awareness of current debates, attitudes toward recent recommendations, and involvement in developing editorial policies. Twenty-nine editors of health journals with impact factors of > or = 1 (based on citation ratings) were sent a questionnaire including four key problems identified in research literature and recommendations from federal agencies; 23 (79%) responded. Seven editors relevant policies. Two had read the federal directive on racial and ethnic classification; one was aware of its current review. Most perceived the four key problems as uncommon. The majority agreed with Public Health Service recommendations on race and ethnicity research, except for analyzing effects of racism. Approximately 20% had discussed issues with co-editors, editorial boards, or reviewers. About 40% saw further discussion as beneficial; four planned to draft guidelines. Editors' potential for helping resolve problems in race/ethnicity research is not being realized. Greater participation would be beneficial to public health research and practice. PMID:9685775

  4. STK Integrated Message Production List Editor (SIMPLE) for CEO Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, Mike; Heydorn, James

    2014-01-01

    Late in fiscal year 2011, the Crew Earth Observations (CEO) team was tasked to upgrade and replace its mission planning and mission operations software systems, which were developed in the Space Shuttle era of the 1980s and 1990s. The impetuses for this change were the planned transition of all workstations to the Windows 7 64-bit operating system and the desire for more efficient and effective use of Satellite Tool Kit (STK) software required for reliable International Space Station (ISS) Earth location tracking. An additional requirement of this new system was the use of the same SQL database of CEO science sites from the SMMS, which was also being developed. STK Integrated Message Production List Editor (SIMPLE) is the essential, all-in-one tool now used by CEO staff to perform daily ISS mission planning to meet its requirement to acquire astronaut photography of specific sites on Earth. The sites are part of a managed, long-term database that has been defined and developed for scientific, educational, and public interest. SIMPLE's end product is a set of basic time and location data computed for an operator-selected set of targets that the ISS crew will be asked to photograph (photography is typically planned 12 to 36 hours out). The CEO operator uses SIMPLE to (a) specify a payload operations planning period; (b) acquire and validate the best available ephemeris data (vectors) for the ISS during the planning period; (c) ingest and display mission-specific site information from the CEO database; (d) identify and display potential current dynamic event targets as map features; (e) compute and display time and location information for each target; (f) screen and select targets based on known crew availability constraints, obliquity constraints, and real-time evaluated constraints to target visibility due to illumination (sun elevation) and atmospheric conditions (weather); and finally (g) incorporate basic, computed time and location information for each selected

  5. Presence of an HO-1 expression threshold in renal glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Detsika, Maria G; Atsaves, Vassileios; Papalois, Apostolos; Lianos, Elias A.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports data describing HO-1 expression patterns of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in isolated rat glomeruli and in cultured glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) in response to its natural substrate heme. Qualitative and quantitative data are presented to support presence of a HO-1 expression threshold in glomeruli but not in GEC. Interpretation of our data and further insight into HO-1 expression pattern in glomeruli may be found in ‘HO-1 expression control in the rat glomerulus’ [1]. PMID:26702422

  6. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

  7. A Tcl/Tk-Based, Intelligent Graphical Editor for Preparing HST Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asson, D. J.; Bose, A.; Krueger, A.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) built the Proposal Editor (PED) system to be an intelligent graphical editor for creating a detailed observing program for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Previously, users would type in an observing program in a text editor, and then essentially compile it to check for errors. PED gives users an interactive session that provides menus and selections whenever possible, eliminating many possible errors resulting from typos. Multiple choice selections include the invalid values with explanations as to why they are invalid. A declarative constraint mechanism is used to encode legal and illegal values for individual program parts as well as relationships between parts. Error checking is provided on individual parts, as well as on the program as a whole.

  8. An interactive editor for definition of touch-sensitive zones for a graphic display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Burt L., III; Jones, Denise R.

    1987-01-01

    In the continuing effort to develop more efficient man-machine communications methods, touch displays have shown potential as straightforward input systems. The development of software necessary to handle such systems, however, can become tedious. In order to reduce the need for redundant programming, a touch editor has been developed which allows a programmer to interactively define touch-sensitive areas for a graphic display. The information produced during the editing process is written to a data file, which can be accessed easily when needed by an application program. This paper outlines the structure, logic, and use of the editor, as well as the hardware with which it is presently compatible.

  9. Conflicts of interest for medical publishers and editors: protecting the integrity of scientific scholarship.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2011-09-01

    Competition of interest may exist at all levels in the medical publication process. Ensuring the integrity of scientific scholarship involves protecting editorial independence, promoting the use of scientific arbitration boards, promoting transparency throughout all stages of publication, and protecting the relationship between the publisher and its editors through an effective legal framework. It is incumbent upon the publisher, editors, authors, and readers to ensure that the highest standards of scientific scholarship are upheld. Doing so will help reduce fraud and misrepresentation in medical research and increase the trustworthiness of landmark findings in science. PMID:21872119

  10. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  11. Kinetics of the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, S. P.; Peterson, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The flash photolysis/ultraviolet absorption technique was used to measure the rate constants for the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M over the pressure range 50-700 torr and temperature range 229-362 K using He, O2, and N2 as diluent gases. The data were fit to the expression derived by Troe (1979) and co-workers for describing the pressure and temperature dependence of reactions in the falloff region. By combining these data with recent measurements of the rate constant for HO2NO2 thermal decomposition values of 73.8 + or - 2 eu for the standard entropy and -12.6 + or - kcal/mol for the standard enthalpy of formation of HO2NO2 were obtained. A significant enhancement in the rate constant was observed when water vapor was added to the system.

  12. HO-1/CO system in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metabolism - Targeting HO-1 as an anti-tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Loboda, Agnieszka; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, hmox-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation processes. Out of three by-products of HO-1 activity, biliverdin, iron ions and carbon monoxide (CO), the latter was mostly shown to mediate many beneficial HO-1 effects, including protection against oxidative injury, regulation of apoptosis, modulation of inflammation as well as contribution to angiogenesis. Mounting evidence suggests that HO-1/CO systemmay be of special benefit in protection inmany pathological conditions, like atherosclerosis or myocardial infarction. By contrast, the augmented expression of HO-1 in tumor tissues may have detrimental effect as HO-1 accelerates the formation of tumor neovasculature and provides the selective advantage for tumor cells to overcome the increased oxidative stress during tumorigenesis and during treatment. The inhibition of HO-1 has been proposed as an anti-cancer therapy, however, because of non-specific effects of known HO-1 inhibitors, the discovery of ideal drug lowering HO-1 expression/activity is still an open question. Importantly, in several types of cancer HO-1/CO system exerts opposite activities, making the possible treatment more complicated. All together indicates the complex role for HO-1/CO in various in vitro and in vivo conditions. PMID:26392237

  13. Improving the quality of papers submitted to dental journals: Transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Cape Town on Wednesday, 25 June 2014.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Giannobile, William V; Sourgen, Deborah L; Balaji, S M; Honkala, Eino; Lynch, Christopher D

    2015-08-01

    This satellite symposium was the fourth in a series for editors, publishers, reviewers and all those with an interest in scientific publishing. It was held on Wednesday 25th June 2014 at the IADR International meeting in Cape Town, South Africa. The symposium attracted more than 180 attendees. This symposium placed an emphasis on how the quality of papers submitted to dental journals could be improved. The panel included representation from editors, researchers and publishers from North America, India and the Gulf States. The symposium identified a number of challenges for editors and publishers, including the poor quality of many papers submitted to dental and other scientific journals, plagiarism, attempted duplicate publication and sometimes fraudulent results. Where possible speakers are identified by name. A subsequent symposium was held during the IADR meeting in Boston on March 11th 2015. Involvement open to editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. PMID:25748020

  14. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    I am honoured to take on the leadership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) as the successor to Professor Mark J Kushner, with whom I have had the pleasure to work on the journal for many years. Under Mark's insightful and energetic leadership over the last six years, PSST has cemented its position as the journal of choice within its subject area and is now one of the most successful journals in the field. In this first issue of 2014, I would like to reflect on some of the events and achievements of 2013. At the start of the year the PSST Editorial Board, recognizing the vital importance of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) data to low-temperature plasma physics, agreed that PSST would accept papers reporting such new data, generated through both experiment and theory. Jonathan Tennyson joined the Editorial Board to represent this area. In March Anne Bourdon joined the Associate Editor team and has since then played a key part in the journal's review process alongside our other Editors. During the autumn, PSST moved to a new editorial management system. In December Deborah O'Connell was awarded the 2013 Hershkowitz Early Career Award and Review and joins the Editorial Board as of 2014. I would also like to thank Miles Turner for his work in leading the drafting of a guide on the details necessary in the reporting of the results of computer simulations; the main conclusions of this report have been incorporated into the journal policy. Overall 2013 has been another successful year for PSST; paper submissions were up by 8% on the previous year and there was the highest ever number of downloads of PSST papers in one year. Another noteworthy feature of 2013 was the continuing improvement in publication times while maintaining our high standards for acceptance and providing expert feedback coupled with encouragement particularly to younger researchers and groups. Largely as a result of the hard work of our referees and Associate Editors, the average time

  15. A Study of the Coorientation of High School Principals, Journalism Teachers, and Local Newspaper Editors in Selected Iowa Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jane W.

    A study investigated the extent to which high school journalism teachers, principals, and local newspaper editors in selected Iowa communities have a common understanding of each other and the issues of high school journalism. A questionnaire sent to 187 newspaper editors, high school principals, and journalism teachers was returned by 118…

  16. What Editors and Journalism Educators Expect from Journalism Education; An ANPA News Research Center Survey. News Research Bulletin No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulteng, John L.

    The purpose of this survey was to assemble data about the expectations of editors and journalism educators as to journalism education, with the objective of providing a basis for an informed dialogue about ways to advance and support education for journalism. Some of the findings were: editors much less than educators perceived newly-hired…

  17. Referees, editors, and publication practices: Improving the reliability and usefulness of the peer review system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    1997-03-01

    The documented low levels of reliability of the peer review process present a serious challenge to editors who must often base their publication decisions on conflicting referee recommendations. The purpose of this article is to discuss this process and examine ways to produce a more reliable and useful peer review system.

  18. Letter to the Editor Re: Nissensohn M. et al.; Nutrients 2016, 8, 232.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Pêgo, Cíntia; Babio, Nancy; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Dear Editor, We read with interest the recently published original article entitled "Beverage Consumption Habits and Association with TotalWater and Energy Intakes in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study" by Nissensohn et al. [1] in Nutrients.[...]. PMID:27472360

  19. Print versus Electronic: Editors' Insights on the Costs and Benefits of Online Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Brian D.; Smith, Gabie E.

    1998-01-01

    Responses from 26 of 40 editors of electronic journals indicates that 57% were motivated to go online by creative possibilities; only 42% had existing print-journal counterparts; 34.6% felt they reach a broader or different audience online; and 50% felt online journals were less costly and had the advantage of speed of production. (SK)

  20. An International Call for Democratizing the Academic Journal Culture from a Community of Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Pryor, Caroline R.; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Harris, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    In our reflective essay from our multiple perspectives as journal editors, peer reviewers, and published authors, we present ideas about editorial support, democracy, and innovation in the publishing process. As four tenured professors who work in universities in the states of Illinois, Virginia, Texas, and Kentucky, we are a community of editors…

  1. The Creators of "Making Up Megaboy": A Writer/Illustrator/Editor Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Virginia; Roeckelein, Katrina; Jackson, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Presents a conversation between editor Richard Jackson, author Virginia Walter, and illustrator Katrina Roeckelein that traces the creation of "Making Up Megaboy," a story that reconstructs a killing by a 12-year-old boy. Highlights include questions about possible readership, types of illustrations needed, and the artfulness of books. (LRW)

  2. Using letters to the editor to try to bring science to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Gordon

    2009-10-01

    The local paper here, the Delaware Gazette, publishes many letters from global warming skeptics and people ignorant of energy policy. I explain how I attempt to bring some sense to the situation through reply letters to the editor. Scientists need to express scientific views in public as our duty to fellow citizens.

  3. Evolution of Novice Programming Environments: The Structure Editors of Carnegie Mellon University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Philip; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes three projects at Carnegie Mellon University (Pennsylvania) that developed novice programming environments based on structure editors: GNOME, MacGNOME and ACSE (Advanced Computing for Science Education). Tracks the evolution of the programming environments and courses, documenting important lessons and discoveries about novice…

  4. Professional Wisdom and Writing for Publication: Qualitative Interviews with Editors and Authors in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2013-01-01

    College and university faculty members specializing in early childhood education face some unique challenges in scholarly writing. The purpose of this research was to use open-ended interviews as a way to gather the collective wisdom of a group of key informants about academic writing and publishing in the field. Twenty-two editors and/or authors,…

  5. Improving the Yield of Rural Education Research: An Editor's Swan Song

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coladarci, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    In my 15th and final year as JRRE editor, I identify methodological and substantive shortcomings in the rural education research literature and, in turn, suggest strategies for improvement. I structure my observations around the following considerations: describing the rural context of research, making the rural argument, framing the research…

  6. The Location of Knowledge: A Conversation with the Editors on Knowledge, Experience, and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Lynette; Kelly, Jennifer; Weber-Pillwax, Cora

    2009-01-01

    As co-editors of this theme issue of this journal, the authors have accepted that knowledge systems and teacher education programs are deeply interconnected. Further, they claim that teacher education programs must incorporate in theory and practice the fact that knowledge systems are a determining factor in the effectiveness of a teacher…

  7. Persnickety editor, Founding Father, Mentor and Friend: The Legacy of Fred Mumpton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a tribute to Dr Fred Munpton, the founder of the International Committee on Natural Zeolites (ICNZ), by one of his students, who later succeed him as president of the ICNZ. The tribute reflects on Dr. Mumpton's skills as an editor and his zeal for the study of natural zeolites.

  8. The Newspaper Editor As Graphic Strategist. ANPA News Research Report No. 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Mario R.

    This report discusses the graphic strategies available to editors for positioning the day's news. The purposes of the report are: (1) to introduce those in charge of designing the newspaper page to the structural approach to design (the structural approach is defined as incorporating horizontal and vertical structures in the available spaces,…

  9. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Education and Research Division. Section: RT of Editors of Library Journals. Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Presented as part of a roundtable discussion by editors of library journals at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, "Electronic Publishing," by Hirokazu Iwata of Japan, discusses Dai Nippon Printing's response to new media and electronic publishing. Various aspects of the computerized processing and…

  10. More on Lexical Bias: How Efficient Can a "Lexical Editor'" Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nozari, Nazbanou; Dell, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The lexical bias effect (the tendency for phonological speech errors to create words more often than nonwords) has been debated for over 30 years. One account attributes the effect to a lexical editor, a strategic component of the production system that examines each planned phonological string, and suppresses it if it is a nonword. The…

  11. SPADE: A Grammar Based Editor for Planning and Debugging Programs. AI Memo 386.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark L.; Goldstein, Ira P.

    The Structured Planning and Debugging Editor (SPADE) is a new kind of interactive programming environment in which computer programs are generated by explicitly articulating planning decisions. The design of SPADE is based upon the development of a grammar of plans from a taxonomy of basic planning techniques. The utility of this approach to…

  12. Editorial: Conflict of interest policy for Editors of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrity in the publication process requires impartiality at all levels of review. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) adheres to the policy of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals: Writin...

  13. Learning the Attachment Theory with the CM-ED Concept Map Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueda, U.; Arruarte, A.; Elorriaga, J. A.; Herran, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU with the aim of evaluating the CM-ED (concept map editor) with social education students. Concept mapping is a widely accepted technique that promotes meaningful learning. Graphically representing concepts of the learning domain and relationships between them…

  14. Guidelines for Reviewers and the Editor at the Nuclear Safety Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetsel, H. B.

    The main purpose of this report is to help novice reviewers accelerate their apprenticeship at the Nuclear Safety Information Center, a computerized information service sponsored by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Guidelines for reviewers are presented in Part 1; Part 2 contains guidelines for the novice editor. The goal of the reviewers and…

  15. Light chain editors of anti-DNA receptors in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalinina, Olga; Wang, Yue; Sia, Kevin; Radic, Marko; Cazenave, Pierre-André

    2014-01-01

    Receptor editing is a mechanism of self-tolerance used in newly generated B cells. The expressed heavy (H) or light (L) chain of an autoreactive receptor is replaced by upstream V genes which eliminate or modify autoreactivity. Editing of anti-DNA receptors has been characterized in anti-DNA transgenic mouse models including 3H9, 3H9/56R, and their revertant 3H9GL. Certain L chains, termed editors, rescue anti-DNA B cells by neutralizing or modifying DNA binding of the H chain. This editing mechanism acts on the natural H chain repertoire; endogenous H chains with anti-DNA features are expressed primarily in combination with editor L chains. We ask whether a similar set of L chains exists in the human repertoire, and if so, do they edit H chains with anti-DNA signatures? We compared the protein sequences of mouse editors to all human L chains and found several human L chains similar to mouse editors. These L chains diminish or veto anti-DNA binding when expressed with anti-DNA H chains. The human H chains expressed with these L chains also have relatively high arginine (Arg) content in the H chain complementarity determining region (H3), suggesting that receptor editing plays a role in establishing tolerance to DNA in humans. PMID:24470445

  16. University-government relationships in the training of technical writers-editors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohrer, Freda F.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional and nontraditional methods of training technical writers-editors are reviewed. Combining work experience with classroom instruction in the form of cooperative education provides a method of strengthening the Federal career service in professional occupations. The NASA Langley experience that successfully introduced students to the special demands of technical writing and editing is described.

  17. Guidelines, editors, pharma and the biological paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajai R; Singh, Shakuntala A

    2007-01-01

    relatively recent survey of 2002, it was found that about 60% of 192 authors of clinical practice guidelines reported they had financial connections with the companies whose drugs were under consideration. There is a strong case for making CPGs based not just on effectivity but cost effectivity. The various ramifications of this need to be spelt out. Work of bodies like the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration and Guidelines Advisory Committee (GAC) are also worth a close look.Even the actions of Foundations that work for disease amelioration have come under scrutiny. The process of setting up 'Best Practices' Guidelines for interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and clinicians has already begun and can have important consequences for patient care. Similarly, Good Publication Practice (GPP) for pharmaceutical companies have also been set up aimed at improving the behaviour of drug companies while reporting drug trialsThe rapidly increasing trend toward influence and control by industry has become a concern for many. It is of such importance that the Association of American Medical Colleges has issued two relatively new documents - one, in 2001, on how to deal with individual conflicts of interest; and the other, in 2002, on how to deal with institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), as also medical education and research institutions at other places, have to adopt means that minimize their conflicts of interest.Both medical associations and research journal editors are getting concerned with individual and institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research and documents are now available which address these issues. The 2001 ICMJE revision calls for full disclosure of the sponsor's role in research, as well as assurance that the investigators are independent of the sponsor, are fully accountable for the design and conduct of the trial, have

  18. High Energy Directly Pumped Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Ji-Rong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly used crystal architecture to produce 2 micrometer laser is co-doping Ho and Tm into a single host crystal. In this method, the stored energy transfer from the Tm (3)F4 to the Ho (5)I7 manifold is not fast enough to warrant high efficiency for short pulse applications. By separating the Ho and the Tm ions and doping the Tm in YALO3 and the Ho in YLF, we were able to directly pump the Ho (5)I7 manifold with 1.94 micrometers. The Ho:YLF laser has produced 33 mJ at 2.062 micrometers with a quantum efficiency of 0.88. The performance of each laser will be presented.

  19. Rotational bands in neutron-rich 160-162Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Escrig, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Binder, B.; Dietrich, A.; Haertlein, T.; Bauer, H.; Gund, Ch.; Pansegrau, D.; Schwalm, D.; Bazzacco, D.; De Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D.R.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Ur, C.

    2004-02-27

    We have studied the high spin states in 160-162Ho in order to investigate the properties of the rotational bands and their dependence on the single particle orbits involved. The reaction 158,160Gd(7Li,xn) at 56 MeV were used to produce the Ho isotopes of interest. In all three Ho isotopes the known rotational bands have been significantly extended. New band-crossings have been observed for the first time in this work.

  20. Spectroscopic and lasing properties of Ho:Tm:LuAG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Filer, Elizabeth D.; Naranjo, Felipe L.; Rodriguez, Waldo J.; Kokta, Milan R.

    1993-01-01

    Ho:Tm:LuAG has been grown, examined spectroscopically, and lased at 2.1 microns. Ho:Tm:LuAG was selected for this experimental investigation when quantum-mechanical modeling predicted that it would be a good laser material for Ho laser operation on one of the 5I7 to 5I8 transitions. Lasing was achieved at 2.100 microns, one of the three wavelengths predicted to be most probable for laser action.

  1. Reentrant superconductivity in HoNi5-NbN-HoNi5 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gyanendra; Joshi, P. C.; Hossain, Z.; Budhani, R. C.

    2013-08-01

    Superconductivity (S) and ferromagnetism (F) are probed through transport and magnetization measurements in nanometer scale HoNi5-NbN (F-S) bilayers and HoNi5-NbN-HoNi5 (F-S-F) trilayers. The choice of materials has been made on the basis of their comparable ordering temperatures and strong magnetic anisotropy in HoNi5. We observe the normal state reentrant behavior in resistance vs. temperature plots of the F-S-F structures just below the superconducting transition in the limited range of HoNi5 layer thickness dHN (20\\ \\text{nm}) when d_{\\textit{NbN}} is fixed at{}\\simeq 10\\ \\text{nm} . The reentrance is quenched by increasing the out-of-plane (H_{\\perp} ) magnetic field and transport current where as in-plane (H_{\\parallel} ) field of \\leq 1500\\ \\text{Oe} has no effect on the reentrance. The origin of the reentrant behavior seen here in the range T_{\\textit{Curie}}/T_C \\leq 0.92 is attributed to a delicate balance between the magnetic exchange energy and the condensation energy in the interfacial regions of the trilayer.

  2. Efficient, low threshold, cryogenic Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Ganija, Miftar; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Haub, John; Veitch, Peter; Munch, Jesper

    2016-05-30

    We report the development of an efficient, liquid-nitrogen conduction cooled Ho:YAG slab laser with good beam quality. Detailed measurements resolving the structure of the 1900-1911 nm absorption band in Ho:YAG at 77 K are presented. Stress-free conduction cooled mounting of the Ho:YAG slab was demonstrated and the resulting laser operated with a large mode volume of 42 mm3, a slope efficiency of 75% and a threshold of 0.84 W. To our knowledge this corresponds to the lowest reported threshold intensity for a Ho:YAG laser. PMID:27410084

  3. Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Zarro, Carlos A. D.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, a minisuperspace model for the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity without the detailed-balance condition is investigated. The Wheeler-DeWitt equation is derived and its solutions are studied and discussed for some particular cases where, due to Hořava-Lifshitz gravity, there is a “potential barrier” nearby a=0. For a vanishing cosmological constant, a normalizable wave function of the Universe is found. When the cosmological constant is nonvanishing, the WKB method is used to obtain solutions for the wave function of the Universe. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, one discusses how the transition from quantum to classical regime occurs and, for the case of a positive cosmological constant, the scale factor is shown to grow exponentially, hence recovering the general relativity behavior for the late Universe.

  4. Ho Doped BixSby Nanopolycrystalline Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, K. C.; Joshi, G.; Wang, Dezhi; Ren, Z. F.; Opeil, C. P.

    2011-03-01

    Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, 02467. Bismuth-Antimony alloys have been shown to have high ZT values below room temperature, especially for single crystals. For polycrystalline samples, impurity doping and magnetic field have proven to be powerful tools in the search for understanding and improving thermoelectric performance. Nanopolycrystalline BixSby doped with 1 and 3 % Ho were prepared by ball milling and dc hot pressing technique. Electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, carrier concentration, mobility, and magnetization are measured in a temperature range of 5-350 K and in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla. The effects of Ho doping on the thermoelectric properties of BixSby in magnetic field will be discussed. D.O.E. Energy Frontier Research Center Grant (S3TEC), at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  5. [Co-editors and editors with Jewish origins of the first German journals for anaesthesia. Their fate under National Socialism and an attempt at a biographical appreciation].

    PubMed

    Goerig, M; Goetz, A E

    2010-09-01

    The decision to publish the journals Der Schmerz and Narkose und Anaesthesie in 1928 was an important step towards the professionalization of anaesthesiology in Germany. The appearance of both journals, which for economic reasons merged into Schmerz - Narkose - Anaesthesie 1 year later, was initiated and vehemently supported by Jewish physicians. As editors and co-editors they were deeply involved with the editorial tasks of the journals for years from the early beginnings. When the National Socialistic Party took over the government in Germany many of the Jewish colleagues were forced to quit their editorial tasks, were eliminated and replaced by "Arians", they were persecuted and often arrested, forced to emigrate or decided to commit suicide due to inhumane personal circumstances. It is our intention to recall the biography and the terrible fate of the nearly unknown Jewish members of the editorial board of the first German anaesthesia journals. Moreover the biographic sketches promote a continuous discussion about the victims of an inhumane and barbarous ideology. PMID:20842476

  6. Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors, Version 4.0. Reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.K.; Skinner, N.L.; Wood, S.T.

    1992-05-01

    The Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping & Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors allow the user to graphically build and edit fault trees, event trees, and piping & instrumentation diagrams (P & IDs). The software is designed to enable the use of graphical-based editors found in the Integrated Reliability and Risk Assessment System (IRRAS). FEP is made up of three separate editors (Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping & Instrumentation Diagram) and a utility module. This reference manual provides a screen-by-screen walkthrough of the entire FEP System.

  7. Low noise, tunable Ho:fiber soliton oscillator for Ho:YLF amplifier seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Ruehl, Axel; Bransley, Colleen; Hartl, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    We present a passively mode-locked, tunable soliton Ho:fiber ring oscillator, optimized for seeding of holmium-doped yttrium lithium flouride (Ho:YLF) amplifiers. The oscillator is independently tunable in central wavelength and spectral width from 2040 to 2070 nm and from 5 to 10 nm, respectively. At all settings the pulse energy within the soliton is around 800 pJ. The soliton oscillator was optimized to fully meet the spectral requirements for seeding Ho:YLF amplifiers. Its Kelly sidebands are located outside the amplifier gain spectrum, resulting in a train of about 1 ps long pedestal-free pulses with relative intensity noise of only 0.13% RMS when integrated from 1 Hz to Nyquist frequency.

  8. Programming the Navier-Stokes computer: An abstract machine model and a visual editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David; Crockett, Tom; Tomboulian, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes computer is a parallel computer designed to solve Computational Fluid Dynamics problems. Each processor contains several floating point units which can be configured under program control to implement a vector pipeline with several inputs and outputs. Since the development of an effective compiler for this computer appears to be very difficult, machine level programming seems necessary and support tools for this process have been studied. These support tools are organized into a graphical program editor. A programming process is described by which appropriate computations may be efficiently implemented on the Navier-Stokes computer. The graphical editor would support this programming process, verifying various programmer choices for correctness and deducing values such as pipeline delays and network configurations. Step by step details are provided and demonstrated with two example programs.

  9. Are the Editors faced with e-problems performing their duties and responsibilities satisfactorily?

    PubMed

    Ali Jawaid, Shaukat; Jawaid, Masood

    2013-09-01

    Astonishing revolution in information technology, developments in electronic publishing and availability of manuscript management software's has provided lot of facilities to authors, reviewers as well as editors but it has also given birth to lot of e-problems. This communication highlights some of these e-problems besides discussing the manuscript management system practiced by Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences through modified Open Journal System. It also cautions the editors of small journals faced with financial and human resource constraints to keep themselves abreast of all these developments, go for automation in e publishing gradually as all the stake holders i.e. authors, reviewers and office management staff learns these and become used to it. PMID:24353696

  10. Ensuring the Quality, Fairness, and Integrity of Journal Peer Review: A Possible Role of Editors.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Elmore, Susan A

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of literature has identified potential problems that can compromise the quality, fairness, and integrity of journal peer review, including inadequate review, inconsistent reviewer reports, reviewer biases, and ethical transgressions by reviewers. We examine the evidence concerning these problems and discuss proposed reforms, including double-blind and open review. Regardless of the outcome of additional research or attempts at reforming the system, it is clear that editors are the linchpin of peer review, since they make decisions that have a significant impact on the process and its outcome. We consider some of the steps editors should take to promote quality, fairness and integrity in different stages of the peer review process and make some recommendations for editorial conduct and decision-making. PMID:25633924

  11. Writing a narrative biomedical review: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Blackmore, Heather; Kitas, George D

    2011-11-01

    Review articles comprehensively covering a specific topic are crucial for successful research and academic projects. Most editors consider review articles for special and regular issues of journals. Writing a review requires deep knowledge and understanding of a field. The aim of this review is to analyze the main steps in writing a narrative biomedical review and to consider points that may increase the chances of success. We performed a comprehensive search through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science using the following keywords: review of the literature, narrative review, title, abstract, authorship, ethics, peer review, research methods, medical writing, scientific writing, and writing standards. Opinions expressed in the review are also based on personal experience as authors, peer reviewers, and editors. PMID:21800117

  12. Are Women Underrepresented as Authors and Editors of Educational Psychology Journals?

    PubMed

    Robinson; McKay; Katayama; Fan

    1998-07-01

    To determine the progress women have made in the last 20 years in terms of contributions to the knowledge base (i.e., authorship) and reputations as leading contributors (i.e., appointments as editors and editorial board members) in educational psychology, we analyzed data from six journals: the American Educational Research Journal, Contemporary Educational Psychology, the Educational Psychologist, Educational Psychology Review, the Journal of Experimental Education, and the Journal of Educational Psychology. Results indicated that (a) women's progress in terms of authorships could be predicted by their increasing representation as educational psychologists, (b) opportunities for females to become editorial board members seem to be getting better, and (c) opportunities for females to become editors seem to be getting worse. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9665794

  13. On being the Editor of the Medical Journal of Australia: Living dangerously.

    PubMed

    Van Der Weyden, Martin B

    2012-01-01

    Editorial independence is crucial for the viability of a journal and editors have many masters - the public, the readers, the authors and the owners. Negotiating the resultant minefield requires a purposeful and independent stance. This is particularly so in instances of a relatively modern phenomenon: concerted attempts by clinical groups to influence, or even abort, publication of articles, which may threaten their practice. Moreover, modern social media facilitates this manipulation. PMID:22654390

  14. How is research publishing going to progress in the next 20 years?: transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Seattle on Wednesday, 20 March 2013.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Rex Holland, G; Giannobile, William V; Hancocks, Stephen; Robinson, Peter G; Lynch, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    On March 20th 2013, a one-hour session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing was held at the IADR International Session in Seattle. Organised by Kenneth Eaton and Christopher Lynch (Chair and Secretary, respectively, of the British Dental Editors Forum), the meeting sought to bring together leading international experts in dental publishing, as well as authors, reviewers and students engaged in research. The meeting was an overwhelming success, with more than 100 attendees. A panel involving four leading dental editors led a discussion on anticipated developments in publishing dental research with much involvement and contribution from audience members. This was the third such meeting held at the IADR for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. A follow-up session will take place in Cape Town on 25 June 2014 as part of the annual IADR meeting. The transcript of the Seattle meeting is reproduced in this article. Where possible speakers are identified by name. At the first time of mention their role/position is also stated, thereafter only their name appears. We are grateful to Stephen Hancocks Ltd. for their generous sponsorship of this event. For those who were not able to attend the authors hope this article gives a flavour of the discussions and will encourage colleagues to attend future events. Involvement is open to Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. It is a very open group and all those with an interest will be welcome to join in. PMID:24440711

  15. Role of editors and journals in detecting and preventing scientific misconduct: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Ana; Katavic, Vedran; Marusic, Matko

    2007-09-01

    Scientific journals have a central place in protecting research integrity because published articles are the most visible documentation of research. We used SWOT analysis to audit (S)trengths and (W)eaknesses as internal and (O)pportunities and (T)hreats as external factors affecting journals' responsibility in addressing research integrity issues. Strengths include editorial independence, authority and expertise, power to formulate editorial policies, and responsibility for the integrity of published records. Weaknesses stem from having no mandate for legal action, reluctance to get involved, and lack of training. Opportunities for editors are new technologies for detecting misconduct, policies by editorial organization or national institutions, and greater transparency of published research. Editors face threats from the lack of legal regulation and culture of research integrity in academic communities, lack of support from stakeholders in scientific publishing, and different pressures. Journal editors cannot be the policing force of the scientific community but they should actively ensure the integrity of the scientific record. PMID:17970252

  16. Reply to B. Meunier's Letter to the Editor Re: Brewer G. J.; Nutrients 2015, 7, 10053-10064.

    PubMed

    Brewer, George J

    2016-01-01

    In a letter to the editor, Meunier [1] apparently attempts to discredit the copper-2 hypothesis for causation of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) epidemic in developed countries proposed by myself in a review in this journal [2].[...]. PMID:27556487

  17. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaqun; Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li; Li, Chaojun

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  18. 2009 Louisiana "HoCP" and "Ho" nursery and infield variety trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three years after selecting in single-stools in the seedling stage, scientists in the breeding program assign “HoCP” or “Ho” numbers to varieties advanced for further testing. These newly assigned varieties are planted in replicated nursery trials at three locations (Ardoyne Farm in Schriever, Iber...

  19. Measurement of HO2 chemical kinetics with a new detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Long C.; Suto, Masako

    1986-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of HO2+O3 were measured at various temperatures using a newly developed HO2 detection method. HO2 was detected by the OH(A-X) emission produced from photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. In order to examine the possible interference of other emitting species with the HO2 detection, the photoexcitation processes of all the chemical species existing in the discharge flow tube were also investigated. The results are summarized.

  20. Editor's Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-10-01

    In the article "Indian summer monsoon rainfall: Dancing with the tunes of the sun", published in New Astronomy 35 (2015) 8, it was omitted to state that at the time this article was submitted the author Dr. Willie Soon received funding from the Southern Company Services under agreement for SAO Proposal PS0182-9-11. We have no indication that this funding has influenced the results presented in the article.

  1. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, was founded in 1957 by Niels Bohr and Torsten Gustafsson at Blegdamsvej in Copenhagen, joint to Bohr's legendary Institute. Today, memories of Bohr and his famous visitors -- Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Lev Landau and many others -- strongly contribute to Nordita's genius loci and inspire next generations of her visitors. Nordita awards ``Nordic Project'' grants to individual Nordic physicists to help conduct a world-class research in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Island, Norway, and Sweden). Research reported here was generously supported by the Nordic Project "Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Black Hole and Neutron Star sources" awarded in 2005 to Marek Abramowicz. The Project supported the ``Nordita Workdays on QPO" (March 25 -- April 1, 2005) organized by Marek Abramowicz, Axel Brandenburg and Juri Poutanen with help of Hanne Bergen, Helle http://www.nordita.dk/positions/norproject.html

  2. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The widespread eutrophication of coastal waters has been the subject to much scientific and management effort, yet we have too few examples where there is a substantive scientific record, and sustained tracking of management actions. In this issue Greening and colleagues review the time courses of ambient conditions, describe what was done to remediate severely eutrophic water quality, and demonstrate the recovery trajectory of a number of variables useful to track ecosystem responses. In addition, a compelling aspect of the paper is that it also describes the social side of the recovery, i.e., what was needed to bring the community and political action to perceive and act upon the issues, and develop a plan to address the problems. The improvement in water quality and environmental conditions currently taking place in Tampa Bay is an excellent example of what can be achieved with the combination of basic understanding of the scientific issues, application of reasonable technological advances, and the marshaling of popular support for action.

  3. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Progress in marine sciences often follows the development of new methods. The Invited Feature Article "New Insight into Particulate Mineral and Organic Matter in Coastal Ocean Waters through Optical Inversion" by Xiaodong Zhang, Robert Hans Stavn, Alexander U. Falster, Deric J. Gray, and Richard W. Gould demonstrates a new method that uses scattering and transmissometer data to differentiate between particle size distribution of suspended mineral and that of suspended organic matter. The method helps define the particular groups of phytoplankton that may be dominant, whether organic detritus may be more significant in suspended organic matter, add insight on the dominant size classes of mineral aggregates, and helps differentiate between organic detritus-dominated systems and biogenic-dominated systems.

  4. Editors' Note.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Ellen R; Cason, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spring 2016 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) presents original and innovative work in three diverse sections: usability, intervention, and pedagogy, followed by a book review on teleaudiology. The contributors to this issue are notably multi-disciplinary and include an audiologist, computer scientists, engineers, an epidemiologist, occupational therapists, a rehabilitation counselor, a physician (physical medicine and rehabilitation), and speechlanguage pathologists. The common thread linking the Journal's authors and their manuscripts, is excellence in telerehabilitation related innovation. PMID:27563385

  5. Section Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groep, D. L.; Bonacorsi, D.

    2014-06-01

    1. Data Acquisition, Trigger and Controls Niko NeufeldCERNniko.neufeld@cern.ch Tassos BeliasDemokritosbelias@inp.demokritos.gr Andrew NormanFNALanorman@fnal.gov Vivian O'DellFNALodell@fnal.gov 2. Event Processing, Simulation and Analysis Rolf SeusterTRIUMFseuster@cern.ch Florian UhligGSIf.uhlig@gsi.de Lorenzo MonetaCERNLorenzo.Moneta@cern.ch Pete ElmerPrincetonpeter.elmer@cern.ch 3. Distributed Processing and Data Handling Nurcan OzturkU Texas Arlingtonnurcan@uta.edu Stefan RoiserCERNstefan.roiser@cern.ch Robert IllingworthFNAL Davide SalomoniINFN CNAFDavide.Salomoni@cnaf.infn.it Jeff TemplonNikheftemplon@nikhef.nl 4. Data Stores, Data Bases, and Storage Systems David LangeLLNLlange6@llnl.gov Wahid BhimjiU Edinburghwbhimji@staffmail.ed.ac.uk Dario BarberisGenovaDario.Barberis@cern.ch Patrick FuhrmannDESYpatrick.fuhrmann@desy.de Igor MandrichenkoFNALivm@fnal.gov Mark van de SandenSURF SARA sanden@sara.nl 5. Software Engineering, Parallelism & Multi-Core Solveig AlbrandLPSC/IN2P3solveig.albrand@lpsc.in2p3.fr Francesco GiacominiINFN CNAFfrancesco.giacomini@cnaf.infn.it Liz SextonFNALsexton@fnal.gov Benedikt HegnerCERNbenedikt.hegner@cern.ch Simon PattonLBNLSJPatton@lbl.gov Jim KowalkowskiFNAL jbk@fnal.gov 6. Facilities, Infrastructures, Networking and Collaborative Tools Maria GironeCERNMaria.Girone@cern.ch Ian CollierSTFC RALian.collier@stfc.ac.uk Burt HolzmanFNALburt@fnal.gov Brian Bockelman U Nebraskabbockelm@cse.unl.edu Alessandro de SalvoRoma 1Alessandro.DeSalvo@ROMA1.INFN.IT Helge MeinhardCERN Helge.Meinhard@cern.ch Ray PasetesFNAL rayp@fnal.gov Steven GoldfarbU Michigan Steven.Goldfarb@cern.ch

  6. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    In the Invited Feature Article in this issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Ruben Kosyan and Violeta Velikova describe the disastrous anthropogenic impact on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, and Ukraine over the last 100 years and its inverse correlation with economic development as exemplified by improving water quality during a downturn in the economy. This degradation is now accelerating from the renovation and construction of ports and terminals, the development of resorts, hazardous industrial development, oil and gas exploration, and unsustainable agricultural and fishing practices. There appears to be no enforcement of protected areas. In the absence of scientific research on these issues, coastal zone management appears to be based on 'learning after seeing disastrous effects'. Without recognition of the need for Integrated Coastal Zone Management, the Black Sea coast and the coastal waters will deteriorate, as was observed between the 1970s and the 1990s.

  7. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-05-01

    In this issue Fabricius, Logan, Weeks, Lewis, and Brodie report a sophisticated synthesis of remotely sensed data that reveals important features of turbidity affecting the Great Barrier Reef region. This study details sources, geographic distributions, and transport, as well as highlights some processes leading to changing turbidity regimes. It is an excellent example of incisive processing and analysis of large, existing data sets, aiming at novel discovery of important aspects of coastal conditions. The results of course beg for efforts at obtaining and examining further information, on associated nutrient deliveries, particularly of nitrogen, detailing biological effects on food webs and corals, and more on the changing baselines that appear imminent. The results of this study therefore are an impressive basis for further work on important aspects of the largest coral region in the world, and could be an example to emulate elsewhere.

  8. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We wish to draw the attention of the readers of Comptes rendus Geoscience to two thematic issues of our companion journals Comptes rendus Physique (volume 16, issue No. 1, 2015, pp. 1-138) and Comptes rendus Mecanique (volume 343, issue No. 2, 2015, pp. 75-178), respectively devoted to "Granular Physics" and to "Mechanics of granular and polycrystalline solids". In particular, the issue of snow avalanches, which is of interest to the community of geoscientists, is widely discussed in these two dossiers.

  9. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    In this issue, Scott F. Jones and colleagues at the University of Louisiana and USGS provide insight into the potential future changes in the structure of the tidal saline wetlands along the Northern Gulf of Mexico in their Invited Feature Article "Tidal Saline Wetland Regeneration of Sentinel Vegetation Types in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: An Overview". They analysed the ability, and the limits to this ability, of the dominant macrophytes to continuously recolonize and establish after disturbance due to natural and anthropogenic alterations of the hydrology. This analysis leads them to identify important knowledge gaps in the scientific literature on the topics most relevant to land managers.

  10. Editors' Note.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Ellen R; Cason, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The Fall 2015 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) presents original articles in the areas of Research; Privacy and Security; and Technology Review. As of May 2015, the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) is live on PubMed Central: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/journals/2411/. Articles from all past issues are indexed, as will be the current and future issues. PMID:27563381

  11. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Matthews, P. S.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, together known as HOx, play a vital role in atmospheric chemistry by controlling the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. The atmospheric lifetime and concentrations of many trace reactive species, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are determined by HOx radical levels. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict atmospheric HOx concentrations from a detailed knowledge of their sources and sinks is a very useful diagnostic tool to assess our current understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Several recent field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models, where HO2 loss onto aerosols was suggested as a possible missing sink [1, 2]. However, the mechanism on HO2 uptake onto aerosols and its impact on ambient HOx levels are currently not well understood. To improve our understanding of this process, we have conducted laboratory experiments to measure HO2 uptake coefficients onto submicron aerosol particles. The FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique, a highly sensitive laser induced fluorescence based detection method, was used to monitor HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube. The application of the FAGE technique allowed for kinetic experiments to be performed under low HO2 concentrations, i.e. [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour in the presence of O2 and aerosol particles were produced either by atomizing dilute salt solutions or by homogeneous nucleation. HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) have been measured for single-component solid and aqueous inorganic salt and organic aerosol particles with a wide range of hygroscopicities. HO2 uptake coefficients on solid particles were below the detection limit (γ < 0.001), whereas on aqueous aerosols uptake coefficients were somewhat larger (γ = 0.001 - 0.008). HO2 uptake coefficients were highest on aerosols

  12. Optical Characterization of the Ho^3+ Complex in HEMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Manuel, III; Sardar, Dhiraj; Nash, Kelly; Yow, Raylon; Gruber, John

    2007-10-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the Ho^3+ complex embedded in 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) are investigated. The intensities of the room temperature absorption spectra of the Ho^3+(4f^10) transitions in Ho(NO3)3.5H2O:HEMA have been analyzed using the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) model to obtain the phenomenological intensity parameters, φ2, φ4, and φ6. These parameters are used to calculate the spontaneous emission probabilities, radiative lifetimes, and branching ratios of the Ho^3+ transitions from the upper multiplet manifolds to the corresponding lower-lying multiplet manifolds of ^2S+1LJ Ho^3+(4f^10), which include ^5G4+^3K7^(2), ^5G5, ^5G6+^5F1, ^5F2+^3K8^(2), ^5F3, ^5F4+^5S2, and ^5F5. The predicted room temperature fluorescence lifetime of ^5I7 to ^5I8 is about 0.5 ms, suggesting a reasonably strong interaction between the complex and the polymer. A comparative study of Ho^3+(4f^10) ions in different host materials suggests that Ho(NO3)3.5H2O:HEMA could be an excellent candidate for certain applications such as narrow band pass filters, especially in the visible-to-near infrared region of the spectrum.

  13. Anomalous temperature dependence of the lattice parameters in HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4}: Rare earth quadrupolar effects

    SciTech Connect

    Skanthakumar, S.; Loong, C.K.; Soderholm, L.; Nipko, J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Abraham, M.M.; Boatner, L.A.

    1994-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the lattice parameters in tetragonal HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4} was measured using neutron powder-diffraction techniques. Below about 100K, the lattice parameter a of HoPO{sub 4} increases with decreasing temperature while c decreases. In HoVO{sub 4}, the above behavior is reversed, that is, a decreases with decreasing temperature while c increases. Similar measurements on nonmagnetic LUP0{sub 4} and LuVO{sub 4} do not show any anomaly. This observation indicates that the unusual temperature dependence of the lattice constants is magnetic in origin. It can be explained in terms of a Ho{sup 3+} quadrupole interaction with the crystalline lattice. In particular, the calculated electronically-generated quadrupole moment of the Ho{sup 3+} in HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4} exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that observed in the lattice parameters.

  14. Creating OGC Web Processing Service workflows using a web-based editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, J.; Walker, P.; Grant, M.

    2012-04-01

    The OGC WPS (Web Processing Service) specifies how geospatial algorithms may be accessed in an SOA (Service Oriented Architecture). Service providers can encode both simple and sophisticated algorithms as WPS processes and publish them as web services. These services are not only useful individually but may be built into complex processing chains (workflows) that can solve complex data analysis and/or scientific problems. The NETMAR project has extended the Web Processing Service (WPS) framework to provide transparent integration between it and the commonly used WSDL (Web Service Description Language) that describes the web services and its default SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) binding. The extensions allow WPS services to be orchestrated using commonly used tools (in this case Taverna Workbench, but BPEL based systems would also be an option). We have also developed a WebGUI service editor, based on HTML5 and the WireIt! Javascript API, that allows users to create these workflows using only a web browser. The editor is coded entirely in Javascript and performs all XSLT transformations needed to produce a Taverna compatible (T2FLOW) workflow description which can be exported and run on a local Taverna Workbench or uploaded to a web-based orchestration server and run there. Here we present the NETMAR WebGUI service chain editor and discuss the problems associated with the development of a WebGUI for scientific workflow editing; content transformation into the Taverna orchestration language (T2FLOW/SCUFL); final orchestration in the Taverna engine and how to deal with the large volumes of data being transferred between different WPS services (possibly running on different servers) during workflow orchestration. We will also demonstrate using the WebGUI for creating a simple workflow making use of published web processing services, showing how simple services may be chained together to produce outputs that would previously have required a GIS (Geographic

  15. Multistate Model Builder (MSMB): a flexible editor for compact biochemical models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Building models of molecular regulatory networks is challenging not just because of the intrinsic difficulty of describing complex biological processes. Writing a model is a creative effort that calls for more flexibility and interactive support than offered by many of today’s biochemical model editors. Our model editor MSMB — Multistate Model Builder — supports multistate models created using different modeling styles. Results MSMB provides two separate advances on existing network model editors. (1) A simple but powerful syntax is used to describe multistate species. This reduces the number of reactions needed to represent certain molecular systems, thereby reducing the complexity of model creation. (2) Extensive feedback is given during all stages of the model creation process on the existing state of the model. Users may activate error notifications of varying stringency on the fly, and use these messages as a guide toward a consistent, syntactically correct model. MSMB default values and behavior during model manipulation (e.g., when renaming or deleting an element) can be adapted to suit the modeler, thus supporting creativity rather than interfering with it. MSMB’s internal model representation allows saving a model with errors and inconsistencies (e.g., an undefined function argument; a syntactically malformed reaction). A consistent model can be exported to SBML or COPASI formats. We show the effectiveness of MSMB’s multistate syntax through models of the cell cycle and mRNA transcription. Conclusions Using multistate reactions reduces the number of reactions need to encode many biochemical network models. This reduces the cognitive load for a given model, thereby making it easier for modelers to build more complex models. The many interactive editing support features provided by MSMB make it easier for modelers to create syntactically valid models, thus speeding model creation. Complete information and the installation package can be

  16. Virtual reality and claustrophobia: multiple components therapy involving game editor virtual environments exposure.

    PubMed

    Malbos, E; Mestre, D R; Note, I D; Gellato, C

    2008-12-01

    The effectiveness of a multiple components therapy regarding claustrophobia and involving virtual reality (VR) will be demonstrated through a trial which immersed six claustrophobic patients in multiple context-graded enclosed virtual environments (VE) using affordable VR apparatus and software. The results of the questionnaires and behavior tests exhibited a significant reduction in fear towards the enclosed space and quality of life improvement. Such gains were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Presence score indicated the patients felt immersed and present inside the game editor VE. PMID:18954278

  17. The RDF Protune Policy Editor: Enabling Users to Protect Data in the Semantic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Fabian; de Coi, Juri Luca; Henze, Nicola; Koesling, Arne Wolf; Krause, Daniel; Olmedilla, Daniel

    A fine-grained user-aware access control to user profile data is a key requirement for sharing user profiles among applications. Policy languages like Protune can handle access restrictions very well but are too complicated to be used by non-experts. In this paper, we identify policy templates and embed them into a user interface that enables users to specify powerful access policies and makes them aware of the current and future consequences of their policies. In a user study, we proof the effectiveness of our editor.

  18. NGSView: an extensible open source editor for next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Arner, Erik; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary:High-throughput sequencing technologies introduce novel demands on tools available for data analysis. We have developed NGSView (Next Generation Sequence View), a generally applicable, flexible and extensible next-generation sequence alignment editor. The software allows for visualization and manipulation of millions of sequences simultaneously on a desktop computer, through a graphical interface. NGSView is available under an open source license and can be extended through a well documented API. Availability: http://ngsview.sourceforge.net Contact: arner@gsc.riken.jp PMID:19855106

  19. Letters to the editor of the local paper: A scientific responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Gordon

    2011-04-01

    Our local papers often contain, from the point of view of the scientist, strange letters to the editor. As part of our duty to fellow citizens, we need to take the opportunity the bad science in the letters proffers to try to explain the scientific view to readers. In many cases, the letter writers minds are already made up; however, other readers whose heads may nod in agreement to the original letter may become more informed and change their ideas in response. I will describe some of my experiences in trying to meet this responsibility.

  20. [A virtual hearing testing system based on the digital music editor software].

    PubMed

    Hao, Nai-Lan; Wang, Sha-Wei; Liu, Yu-Xia; Jin, Xing; Yuang, Qi; Yu, Hao

    2008-11-01

    The digital music editor software "Cool Edit Pro 2.0" is used to design a virtual hearing testing system. This system has following advantages. First, its signal frequency can be set at will. Second, its dynamic range of signal intensity can reach up to 80dB. Third, the measuring accuracy of decibel value may reach 0.1dB. Forth, the system can be used in single and dual channel measurements. Last but not least, it can carry on data processing and drawing along with the same computer. PMID:19253576

  1. Advanced software development workstation. Engineering scripting language graphical editor: DRAFT design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Engineering Scripting Language (ESL) is a language designed to allow nonprogramming users to write Higher Order Language (HOL) programs by drawing directed graphs to represent the program and having the system generate the corresponding program in HOL. The ESL system supports user generation of HOL programs through the manipulation of directed graphs. The components of this graphs (nodes, ports, and connectors) are objects each of which has its own properties and property values. The purpose of the ESL graphical editor is to allow the user to create or edit graph objects which represent programs.

  2. Avoiding Common Writing Mistakes That Make Your Editors and Reviewers Cringe

    PubMed Central

    Porcino, Antony; Moraska, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Writing for scientific journals is not an inherently simple task for most people. It requires purposeful effort and multiple revisions of the initial manuscript draft. While each author and article has its own individuality, writing well to address the core elements of a scientific report is necessary. As editors of the IJTMB, we often see weaknesses in the core elements of the manuscripts we receive. This editorial summarizes common recurring issues, and provides suggestions on how to avoid these pitfalls in the submission of a research article or case report to the IJTMB. PMID:26668673

  3. Review of Tm and Ho Materials; Spectroscopy and Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    A review of Tm and Ho materials is presented, covering some fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics in both single and co-doped systems. Following an introduction to 2- m lasers, applications and historical development, the physics of quasi-four level lasers, energy transfer and modeling are discussed in some detail. Recent developments in using Tm lasers to pump Ho lasers are discussed, and seen to offer some advantages over conventional Tm:Ho lasers. This article is not intended as a complete review, but as a primer for introducing concepts and a resource for further study.

  4. Towards Performance Portability with GungHo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Rupert; Glover, Matthew; Ham, David; Hobson, Mike; Maynard, Chris; Mitchell, Lawrence; Mullerworth, Steve; Pickles, Stephen; Rezny, Mike; Riley, Graham; Wood, Nigel; Ashworth, Mike

    2014-05-01

    The Met Office's numerical weather prediction and climate model code, the Unified Model (UM), is almost 25 years old. Up to the present day the UM has been able to be run efficiently on many of the worlds most powerful computers, helping to keep the Met Office at the forefront of climate prediction and weather forecasting. However, with performance increases from each new generation of computers now being primarily provided by an increase in the amount of parallelism rather than an increase in the clock-speed of the processors themselves, running higher resolutions of the UM now faces the double challenge of code scalability and numerical accuracy. The UM's atmospheric dynamical core makes use of a finite-difference scheme on a regular latitude-longitude grid. The regular latitude-longitude mesh results in an increasingly disparate grid resolution as the mesh resolution increases due to lines of longitude converging at the poles. For example, a 10km resolution at mid-latitudes would result in a 12m resolution at the poles. The difference in resolution leads to increased communication at the poles and load balance issues which are known to impair scalability; it also leads to issues with numerical accuracy and smaller time-steps due to the difference in scale. To address this problem the Met Office, NERC and STFC initiated the GungHo project. The primary aim of this project is to deliver a scalable, numerically accurate dynamical core. This dynamical core is scheduled to become operational around the year 2022. The project is currently investigating the use of quasi-uniform meshes, such as triangular, icosahedral and cubed-sphere meshes, using finite element methods. The associated GungHo software infrastructure is being developed to support multiple meshes and element types thus allowing for future model development. GungHo is also proposing a novel separation of concerns for the software implementation of the dynamical core. This approach distinguishes between

  5. 1.88 Micrometers InGaAsP Pumped, Room Temperature Ho: LuAG Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George; Leisher, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A room temperature, directly diode pumped Ho:LuAG laser oscillated for the first time. Direct pumping of the Ho upper laser manifold maximizes efficiency, minimizes heating, and eliminates Ho:Tm energy sharing. Design and performance are presented.

  6. Should Authors Submit Previous Peer-Review Reports When Submitting Research Papers? Views of General Medical Journal Editors

    PubMed Central

    Cals, Jochen W. L.; Mallen, Christian D.; Glynn, Liam G.; Kotz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Publishing research can be time consuming, as papers are often submitted and reviewed by multiple journals before final acceptance. We hypothesized that attaching previous peer-review reports to the next submission of the paper to a different journal (possibly with point-to-point responses and amendments) could decrease the workload for both reviewers and editors and could shorten the time from final draft to actual publication. We therefore performed an online survey to assess the views of the editors-in-chief of all 100 general medical journals from the citation impact factor report category “internal & general medicine” (ISI Web of Knowledge). Of contacted editors, 61% responded. One of 4 journals do currently receive peer-review reports on occasion. Editors recognized potential advantages but also concerns on using previous peer-review reports across 3 themes: scientific community, quality of papers, and the publication process. The use of previous peer-review reports has the potential to facilitate authors, reviewers, and editors in optimizing peer review in general medical science. PMID:23508606

  7. Characteristics of highly successful orthopedic surgeons: a survey of orthopedic chairs and editors

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Guy; Hussain, Nasir; Sprague, Sheila; Mehlman, Charles T.; Dogbey, Godwin; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Background Highly successful orthopedic surgeons are a small group of individuals who exert a large influence on the orthopedic field. However, the characteristics of these leaders have not been well-described or studied. Methods Orthopedic surgeons who are departmental chairs, journal editors, editorial board members of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British edition), or current or past presidents of major orthopedic associations were invited to complete a survey designed to provide insight into their motivations, academic backgrounds and accomplishments, emotional and physical health, and job satisfaction. Results In all, 152 surgeons completed the questionnaire. We identified several characteristics of highly successful surgeons. Many have contributed prolific numbers of publications and book chapters and obtained considerable funding for research. They were often motivated by a “desire for personal development (interesting challenge, new opportunities),” whereas “relocating to a new institution, financial gain, or lack of alternative candidates” played little to no role in their decisions to take positions of leadership. Most respondents were happy with their specialty choice despite long hours and high levels of stress. Despite challenges to their time, successful orthopedic surgeons made a strong effort to maintain their health; compared with other physicians, they exercise more, are more likely to have a primary care physician and feel better physically. Conclusion Departmental chairs, journal editors and presidents of orthopedic associations cope with considerable demands of clinical, administrative, educational and research duties while maintaining a high level of health, happiness and job satisfaction. PMID:23706848

  8. High-spin yrast structure of {sup 159}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Ollier, J.; Simpson, J.; Riley, M. A.; Wang, X.; Aguilar, A.; Teal, C.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Petri, M.; Rigby, S. V.; Thomson, J.; Unsworth, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Zhu, S.; Darby, I. G.; Hartley, D. J.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-08-15

    An investigation of the yrast structure of the odd-Z {sup 159}Ho nucleus to high spin has been performed. The {sup 159}Ho nucleus was populated by the reaction {sup 116}Cd({sup 48}Ca,p4n{gamma}) at a beam energy of 215 MeV, and resulting {gamma} decays were detected by the Gammasphere spectrometer. The h{sub 11/2} yrast band has been significantly extended up to I{sup {pi}=}75/2{sup -} (tentatively 79/2{sup -}). A lower frequency limit for the second (h{sub 11/2}){sup 2} proton alignment was extracted consistent with the systematics of this alignment frequency, indicating an increased deformation with neutron number in the Ho isotopes. The energy-level splitting between the signature partners in the h{sub 11/2} structures of the Ho isotopes and the neighboring N=92 isotones is discussed.

  9. Magnetic ordering in Ho2Fe2Si2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, R. A.; Cadogan, J. M.; Cobas, R.; Hutchison, W. D.; Avdeev, M.; Campbell, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    We have used neutron diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, complemented by magnetisation and specific heat measurements, to examine the magnetic ordering of Ho2Fe2Si2C. We have established that Ho2Fe2Si2C orders antiferromagnetically below TN = 16(1) K with a magnetic structure involving ordering of the Ho sublattice along the b-axis with a propagation vector k =[0 0 1/2 ] . 57Fe Mössbauer spectra collected below TN show no evidence of a magnetic splitting, demonstrating the absence of long range magnetic ordering of the Fe sublattice. A small line broadening is observed in the 57Fe spectra below TN, which is due to a transferred hyperfine field—estimated to be around 0.3 T at 10 K—from the Ho sublattice.

  10. Flashlamp-pumped Ho:Tm:Cr:LuAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Kokta, Milan R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A room temperature solid-state laser is provided. A laser crystal is disposed in a laser cavity. The laser crystal has a LuAG host material doped with a concentration of about 0.35% Ho ions, about 5.57% Tm ions and at least about 1.01% Cr ions. A broadband energizing source such as a flashlamp is disposed transversely to the laser crystal to energize the Ho ions, Tm ions and Cr ions.

  11. Registration of 'HoCP 91-552' sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HoCP 91-552’ sugarcane was selected from progeny of the cross ‘LCP 81-10’ x ‘CP 72-356’ made at Canal Point, Florida. HoCP 91-552 was developed through cooperative research by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Sugarcane Research Unit, the Louisiana A...

  12. Rotational Spectroscopic Studies and Observational Searches for HO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna

    Interstellar chemistry is largely driven by reactions of unstable molecules that serve as reaction intermediates in terrestrial chemistry. One such class of compounds are weakly-bound clusters. These clusters could form in interstellar environments through radiative association reactions, but their identification and characterization in interstellar environments is limited by a lack of rotational spectral information. One such species is HO3, which could be formed in the interstellar medium from O2 and OH. HO3 has been studied extensively in the infrared, and there are a few microwave spectral studies that have also been reported. However, no millimeter or submillimeter spectral information is available to guide astronomical observations. In this talk, we will present the laboratory characterization of trans -HO3 and trans -DO3 from 70 to 450 GHz using our newly developed fast sweeping technique. The molecular constants have been significantly refined, and additional higher order centrifugal distortion constants have been determined. We will also present an initial observational search for HO3 in 32 star forming regions. Although no HO3 lines have been detected thus far, strict upper limits can be placed on the HO3 column density in these sources based on this analysis. Additional Authors: Luyao Zou, Brian M. Hays.

  13. On Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin

    2011-05-01

    We give a brief overview of the Hořava-Lifshitz-gravity theory, its modifications and its implications in cosmology. In particular, we discuss the various issues on the gravitational scalar mode, including its decoupling, its role as inflaton and its stability. Our analysis shows that the scalar mode could decouple naturally at λ = 1 due to the extra gauge symmetry. On the other hand, the fact that the scalar mode becomes ghost when 1/3 < λ < 1 is a real challenge to the theory. We try to overcome this problem by modifying the action such that the RG flow lies outside the problematic region. We discuss the cosmological implications of the theory.

  14. Modification to the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Visual Editor (MCNPVised) to Read in Computer Aided Design (CAD) Files

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph Schwarz; Leland L. Carter; Alysia Schwarz

    2005-08-23

    Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) is the code of choice for doing complex neutron/photon/electron transport calculations for the nuclear industry and research institutions. The Visual Editor for Monte Carlo N-Particle is internationally recognized as the best code for visually creating and graphically displaying input files for MCNP. The work performed in this grant was used to enhance the capabilities of the MCNP Visual Editor to allow it to read in both 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) files, allowing the user to electronically generate a valid MCNP input geometry.

  15. René Marcelle (December 30, 1931-December 18, 2011), the first editor-in-chief of Photosynthesis Research.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Marcelle, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    This tribute honors the first editor-in-chief of Photosynthesis Research, René Marcelle the Belgian plant physiologist who, with publishers in The Netherlands, launched the journal in 1980. Here, we present a glimpse of René Marcelle's early life, his education and research, as well as his editorial work for the journal and other conferences in plant physiology. He worked on control of photosynthesis, both the biological and environmental aspects, as well as on crassulacean acid metabolism. He is best remembered as a kind-hearted and humane editor. PMID:27052338

  16. Crystal-field excitations and magnetic properties of Ho{sup 3+} in HoVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Skanthakumar, S.; Loong, C.; Soderholm, L.; Abraham, M.M.; Boatner, L.A.

    1995-05-01

    The magnetic excitations in HoVO{sub 4} were studied by neutron scattering and susceptibility techniques. Well-defined transitions between the crystal-field-split states of the Ho{sup 3+} ions were observed at 15, 40, and 100 K. The magnetic spectra were analyzed using a single-ion crystal-field model which includes intermediate coupling of the LS states of Ho. A quantitative comparison of the observed energies and intensities with the model was made and used to refine the five crystal-field parameters needed to calculate the Ho ionic wave functions and other magnetic properties. The nonmagnetic {Gamma}{sub 1}-singlet ground state (containing about 90% pure {vert_bar}8,0{r_angle} component) of the Ho ions, in conjunction with the next higher doublet state situated at 2.5 meV, strongly influences the low-temperature magnetic behavior. The calculated magnetic susceptibility, which exhibits an easy plane coinciding with the crystallographic {ital a}-{ital b} plane at low temperatures, agrees very well with the experimental data obtained from single-crystal measurements. The magnetic properties of HoVO{sub 4} are contrasted with those of an isostructural compound HoPO{sub 4} which has a 98% pure {vert_bar}8,7{r_angle}-doublet ground state. The difference in the crystal-field-level structure between these two compounds is reflected in a sign change of the {ital B}{sub 0}{sup 2} crystal-field parameter. Despite the overall tetragonal crystal structure of HoVO{sub 4}, which predicts double degeneracy for each {Gamma}{sub 5} state, a small splitting in the first-excited doublet was clearly observed at low temperatures.

  17. Wikipedia and Medicine: Quantifying Readership, Editors, and the Significance of Natural Language

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Background Wikipedia is a collaboratively edited encyclopedia. One of the most popular websites on the Internet, it is known to be a frequently used source of health care information by both professionals and the lay public. Objective This paper quantifies the production and consumption of Wikipedia’s medical content along 4 dimensions. First, we measured the amount of medical content in both articles and bytes and, second, the citations that supported that content. Third, we analyzed the medical readership against that of other health care websites between Wikipedia’s natural language editions and its relationship with disease prevalence. Fourth, we surveyed the quantity/characteristics of Wikipedia’s medical contributors, including year-over-year participation trends and editor demographics. Methods Using a well-defined categorization infrastructure, we identified medically pertinent English-language Wikipedia articles and links to their foreign language equivalents. With these, Wikipedia can be queried to produce metadata and full texts for entire article histories. Wikipedia also makes available hourly reports that aggregate reader traffic at per-article granularity. An online survey was used to determine the background of contributors. Standard mining and visualization techniques (eg, aggregation queries, cumulative distribution functions, and/or correlation metrics) were applied to each of these datasets. Analysis focused on year-end 2013, but historical data permitted some longitudinal analysis. Results Wikipedia’s medical content (at the end of 2013) was made up of more than 155,000 articles and 1 billion bytes of text across more than 255 languages. This content was supported by more than 950,000 references. Content was viewed more than 4.88 billion times in 2013. This makes it one of if not the most viewed medical resource(s) globally. The core editor community numbered less than 300 and declined over the past 5 years. The members of this

  18. Reaction of HO2 with O3 and the effect of water vapor on HO2 kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of temperature and water vapor concentration on the ratio of the rate constant of the reaction HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2(O2) to the square root of the rate constant for the reaction HO2 + HO2 yields H2O2 + O2 are determined. Photolysis of H2-O2-O3 mixtures at 253.7 nm was carried out with H2O pressures in the range 0 to 15 torr at a temperature range of -42.5 to 61 C along with 184.9 nm photolysis of H2O-O2-O3 mixtures. It is shown that the rate of O3 photolysis is suppressed by the addition of water vapor and it is suggested that this effect is realized in the HO2 + HO2 yields H2O2 + O2 reaction. The calculated expression for the temperature dependence of the rate constant ratio is found to be in good agreement with that calculated from separate rate constants. Rate constants determined for the reaction OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 are found to be higher than those previously determined, presumably due to increased pressure, indicating that atmospheric models should take into account the possible pressure dependences of the reactions considered.

  19. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even

  20. JOSPT Experiences Tremendous Growth, Change in 14 Years With Editor-in-Chief Simoneau in Charge.

    PubMed

    Nyland, John A

    2015-12-01

    As Editor-in-Chief, Dr Guy G. Simoneau and his editorial board have taken JOSPT from an acceptable US-based journal to a highly influential worldwide force behind contemporary orthopaedic and sports physical therapy research and practice. Today, the bridge Dr Simoneau constructed spans the orthopaedic and sports physical therapy globe for the betterment of clinical practice and research. His work fully supports JOSPT's latest strategic plan to provide value-added knowledge translation, develop a broader authorship and readership, increase global marketing of the JOSPT brand, and expand current relationships to new partners and stakeholders. The bridge places JOSPT on very firm footing, tying its rich history to the promise of an exciting and successful future. PMID:26620640

  1. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  2. [Willem Kouwenaar, editor-in-chief of the Dutch Journal of Medicine 1950-1954].

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, S E

    2007-12-15

    Willem Kouwenaar (1891-1954) spent the first part of his career in the Dutch East Indies as a physician of tropical medicine and tropical hygienist. He conducted many comparative epidemiological studies. After returning to The Netherlands in 1946, he became a professor of tropical medicine. Among other accomplishments, he developed a vaccine against yellow fever. In 1950 he became editor-in-chief of the Nederlandsch Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde (Dutch Journal ofMedicine). He was of the opinion that 'everything that Dutch physicians are dealing with should also be presented for the information of the subscribers to our Journal,' which also applied to the controversial topics of birth control and contraceptive agents. He died in an airplane accident in 1954. PMID:18232201

  3. Comparison of surrogate reporter systems for enrichment of cells with mutations induced by genome editors.

    PubMed

    He, Zuyong; Shi, Xuan; Liu, Meirui; Sun, Guangjie; Proudfoot, Chris; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Lillico, Simon G; Chen, Yaosheng

    2016-03-10

    Genome editors are powerful tools that allow modification of the nuclear DNA in eukaryotic cells both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro modified cells are often phenotypically indistinguishable from unmodified cells, hampering their isolation for analysis. Episomal reporters encoding fluorescent proteins can be used for enrichment of modified cells by flow cytometry. Here we compare two surrogate reporters, RGS and SSA, for the enrichment of porcine embryonic fibroblasts containing mutations induced by ZFNs or CRISPR/Cas9. Both systems were effective for enrichment of edited porcine cells with the RGS reporter proving more effective than the SSA reporter. We noted a higher-fold enrichment when editing events were induced by Cas9 compared to those induced by ZFNs, allowing selection at frequencies as high as 70%. PMID:26778541

  4. How to write a medical original article: Advice from an Editor

    PubMed Central

    Shokeir, Ahmed A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To provide guidelines for potential authors on how to increase the chances of their manuscript being accepted, with a review focusing on writing an original medical article. Methods This review reflects the personal experience of the present author, who has extensive experience as an author, reviewer and editor. Results To write an original article successfully, there are three essential requirements, the ‘basic triad’ of an original article. These are subjects worth reporting, knowledge of the basic structure of an article, and knowledge of the essential mechanics of good writing. This review details each of the three items. Conclusions Writing, like every other art, cannot be learned wholly from books or lectures, but can be learned largely by experience. The best training is to start the task and persevere. The act of writing, like surgical techniques, must be learned the hard way, by practice and perseverance. Anyone can start writing but only a good writer can finish the task. PMID:26019929

  5. Publishing bioethics and bioethics--reflections on academic publishing by a journal editor.

    PubMed

    Schüklenk, Udo

    2011-02-01

    This article by one of the Editors of Bioethics, published in the 25th anniversary issue of the journal, describes some of the revolutionary changes academic publishing has undergone during the last decades. Many humanities journals went from typically small print-runs, counting by the hundreds, to on-line availability in thousands of university libraries worldwide. Article up-take by our subscribers can be measured efficiently. The implications of this and other changes to academic publishing are discussed. Important ethical challenges need to be addressed in areas such as the enforcement of plagiarism-related policies, the so-called 'impact factor' and its impact on academic integrity, and the question of whether on-line only publishing can currently guarantee the integrity of academic publishing histories. PMID:21175707

  6. Grammar, Punctuation, and Capitalization: a Handbook for Technical Writers and Editors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaskill, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Writing problems are addressed which are often encountered in technical documents and preferences are indicated (Langley's) when authorities do not agree. It is directed toward professional writers, editors, and proofreaders. Those whose profession lies in other areas (for example, research or management), but who have occasion to write or review others' writing will also find this information useful. A functional attitude toward grammar and punctuation is presented. Chapter 1 on grammar presents grammatical problems related to each part of speech. Chapter 2 on sentence structure concerns syntax, that is, effective arrangement of words, with emphasis on methods of revision to improve writing effectiveness. Chapter 3 addresses punctuation marks, presenting their function, situations when they are required or incorrect, and situations when they are appropriate but optional. Chapter 4 presents capitalization, which is mostly a matter of editorial style and preference rather than a matter of generally accepted rules. An index and glossary are included.

  7. Prior Publication and Redundancy in Contemporary Science: Are Authors and Editors at the Crossroads?

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Sonia Maria Ramos; Roig, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    We discuss prior publication and redundancy in contemporary science in the context of changing perceptions of originality in the communication of research results. These perceptions have been changing in the publication realm, particularly in the last 15 years. Presenting a brief overview of the literature, we address some of the conflicts that are likely to arise between authors and editors. We illustrate our approach with conference presentations that are later published as journal articles and focus on a recent retraction of an article that had been previously published as a conference proceedings. Although we do not make definitive pronouncements on the matter-as many concepts are evolving-we do argue that conference papers that contain sufficient details for others to attempt a replication and are indexed in scientific databases such as PubMed, challenge some currently held assumptions of prior publication and originality in the sciences. Our view is that these important issues are in need of further clarification and harmonization within the science publishing community. This need is more evident when we consider current notions of research integrity when it comes to communication to peers. Revisiting long-standing views about what constitutes prior publication and developing a clearer set of guidelines for authors and editors to follow should reduce conflicts in the research environment, which already exerts considerable pressure, especially on newcomers in academia. However, while clearer guidelines are timely, developing them is only part of the challenge. The present times seem to call for deeper changes in the research and publication systems. PMID:25341850

  8. Publication Criteria and Recommended Areas of Improvement within School Psychology Journals as Reported by Editors, Journal Board Members, and Manuscript Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Craig A.; Floyd, Randy G.; Fuhrmann, Melanie J.; Martinez, Rebecca S.

    2011-01-01

    Two online surveys were completed by editors, associate editors, editorial board members, and members or fellows of the Division 16 of the American Psychological Association. These surveys targeted (a) the criteria for a manuscript to be published in school psychology journals, and (b) the components of the peer-review process that should be…

  9. Is HO{sup 2 sub +} a detectable interstellar molecule?

    SciTech Connect

    Widicus Weaver, S. L.; Woon, D. E.; Ruscic, B.; McCall, B. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Illinois

    2009-05-20

    Although molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, has long been thought to be present in interstellar environments, it has only been tentatively detected toward one molecular cloud. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} determined from these observations is well below that predicted by astrochemical models. Given the difficulty of O{sub 2} observations from ground-based telescopes, identification of a molecule that could be used as a tracer of O{sub 2} in interstellar environments would be quite useful. To this end, we have undertaken a collaborative examination of HO{sub 2}{sup +} in an attempt to evaluate the feasibility of its detection in interstellar clouds. We have conducted high-level ab initio calculations of its structure to obtain its molecular parameters. The reaction responsible for the formation of HO{sub 2}{sup +} is nearly thermoneutral, and so a careful analysis of its thermochemistry was also required. Using the Active Thermochemical Tables approach, we have determined the most accurate values available to date for the proton affinities of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, and the enthalpy, Gibbs energy, and equilibrium constant for the reaction H{sub 3}{sup +} + O{sub 2} {yields} HO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}. We find that while this reaction is endothermic by 50 {+-} 9 cm{sup -1} at 0 K, its equilibrium is shifted toward HO{sub 2}{sup +} at the higher temperatures of hot cores. We have examined the potential formation and destruction pathways for HO{sub 2}{sup +} in interstellar environments. Combining this information, we estimate the HO{sub 2}{sup +} column density in dense clouds to be {approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, which corresponds to line brightness temperatures of {le} 0.2 mK. If our results prove correct, HO{sub 2}{sup +} is clearly not a detectable interstellar molecule.

  10. Serials Management in the Electronic Era: Papers in Honor of Peter Gellatly, Founding Editor of "The Serials Librarian."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jim, Ed.; Williams, James W., Ed.

    This book assesses progress and technical changes in the field of serials management and anticipates future directions and challenges for librarians. The book consists of 18 chapters: (1) "Introduction" (Jim Cole and James W. Williams); (2) "Peter Gellatly--Editor with a Deft Touch" (Ruth C. Carter); (3) "The "Deseret News" Web Edition" (Stewart…

  11. 77 FR 74175 - Solicitation of Review Editors for the Draft Report of the National Climate Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Report of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC). AGENCY: Office of... editors of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) National Climate... Research Program at email@usgcrp.gov . More information on the National Climate Assessment can be found...

  12. Editor Views of Press Role in U.S. and Europe: Differences Across Cultures, or Differences Within?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olien, Clarice N.; And Others

    To determine whether there are systematic differences in press role between nations or blocs of nations, an exploratory study examined structural differences between United States and European political systems and whether, in light of these differences, press roles may vary in some respects across continents. These editors were interviewed about…

  13. [P. I. Shatilov--original domestic clinician, scientist and teacher, one of the first editors of medical journal "Vrachebnoe Delo"].

    PubMed

    Lesovoĭ, V N; Pertseva, Zh N

    2009-01-01

    The article tells about life and activity of original domestic clinician, scientist and teacher, one of the first managing editors of medical journal "Vrachebnoe Delo". P. I. Shatilov was presented as individuality, who united in himself such moral values as humanism, disinterestedness, faithfulness to physician duty, selflessness, understanding of participation in public activity. PMID:20455462

  14. Powder Neutron Diffraction Study of HoCoGa5

    SciTech Connect

    Kabayashi, Riki; Kaneko, Koji; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Chi, Songxue; Sanada, Naoyuki; Watanuki, Ryuta; Suzuki, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    We have studied successive magnetic transitions of HoCoGa5 at TN1 = 9.6 K and TN2 = 7.5 K by using powder neutron diffraction. Apparent superlattice peaks were observed at temperatures below TN1. With further decreases temperature, the patterns exhibit a substantial change at temperatures below TN2. The observed magnetic peaks at 8 K (AntiFerromagnetic InCommensurate (AFIC) phase : TN2 < T < TN1) can be represented by the propagation vector qL = (1/2 0 ) with = 0.35(2). In contrast, the magnetic structure becomes commensurate with qC = (1/2 0 1/2) at 4 K (AntiFerromagnetic Commensurate (AFC) phase : T < TN2). The temperature dependence of magnetic intensity shows an apparent temperature hysteresis at TN2, indicates a first-order transition at TN2. Analysis of the integrated intensity at 4 K reveals that the Ho moment with a size of 8.6(2) B, oriented parallel to the c-axis in the AFC phase. While the successive transitions of HoCoGa5 are different from those of TbCoGa5, the magnetic structure in the AFC phase of HoCoGa5 is the same as the AFTb I of TbCoGa5, and may indicate an additional transition at a lower temperature in HoCoGa5.

  15. Infrared spectra of products of the reaction of H atoms with O2 trapped in solid neon: HO2, HO2(+), HOHOH(-), and H2O(HO).

    PubMed

    Jacox, Marilyn E; Thompson, Warren E

    2013-10-01

    When a Ne/O2 mixture is codeposited at 4.3 K with a Ne/H2 mixture that has been passed through a microwave discharge, the infrared spectrum of the resulting deposit includes prominent absorptions of the three vibrational fundamentals of HO2 and seven relatively weak absorptions in the infrared and near-infrared, only one of them previously reported, that can be assigned to overtones and combination bands of that product. Similar assignments are made for DO2. A new, broad absorption at 702.9 cm(-1) appears close to the gas-phase absorption of HOHOH(-) at 697 cm(-1). Isotopic substitution experiments support that assignment. Evidence is also presented for the stabilization of HOHO(-). Absorptions near the vibrational fundamentals of H2O and an absorption at 3472.4 cm(-1) grow on exposure of the deposit to radiation of wavelength shorter than 345 nm. These absorptions are assigned to the H2O(HO) complex, in agreement with the results of an earlier argon-matrix study. In both studies, photodestruction of HO2 molecules that have H2O trapped in a nearby site results in formation of the complex. Because the discharge through Ne/H2 supports ion production, photodetachment of the resulting HOHOH(-) is an additional source of the complex. Other absorptions may be contributed by the bending fundamental of HO2(+) and by a cation complex with H2. PMID:23215001

  16. New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The Institute of Physics is delighted to announce that the new Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics will be Professor Giorgio Margaritondo of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. Giorgio will, with the help of his world-class Editorial Board, maintain standards of scientific rigour whilst ensuring that research published is of the highest quality. 'I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth.' said Professor Margaritondo. 'Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging!' Professor Margaritondo received the Laurea Summa cum Laude from the University of Rome in 1969. He has been a full professor of Applied Physics at the EPFL since 1990. In 2001, he became Dean of the EPFL Faculty of Basic Sciences. In 2004, he was nominated Provost and he served until 2010, when he became Dean of Continuing Education. He previously worked at the Italian National Research Council, at Bell Laboratories and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research activity concerns the physics of semiconductors and superconductors (electronic states, surfaces and interfaces) and of biological systems; his main experimental techniques are electron spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy, x-ray imaging and scanning near-field microscopy, including experiments with synchrotron light and with free electron lasers. Author of more than 650 scientific publications and 9 books, he was also coordinator in 1995-98 of the scientific division of the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste. In 1997-2003 he was coordinator of the European Commission Round Table on synchrotron radiation. He is the president of the Council of the European Commission Integrated Initiative on Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser Science (IA-SFS and then ELISA), the largest network in the world in this domain. He is Fellow of the American Physical

  17. Visualization of 2-μm radiation by BiF3:Ho3+ and BiF3:Ho3+/Yb3+ ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikin, A. P.; Egorov, A. S.; Budruev, A. V.; Grishin, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    A series of ceramic samples of the compositions BiF3:1%Ho3+, BiF3:4%Ho3+, BiF3:1%Ho3+ + 1%Yb3+, and BiF3:1%Ho3+ + 3%Yb3+ is synthesized and the conversion of Tm:YLF laser radiation (λ = 1908 nm) is studied. The luminescence spectra exhibit bands in the regions of 490, 545, and 650 nm. The kinetic measurements of the afterglow of the green and red bands show that the population of the 5 S 2 and 5 F 4 states in the BiF3:1%Ho3+ samples occurs due to successive absorption of excitation photons, while the 5 F 5 level of Ho3+ is populated due to the ion-ion interaction. Codoping with Yb3+ leads to a decrease in the visualization threshold power density to 2 W/cm2.

  18. Proton Radioactivity Measurements at HRIBF: Ho, Lu, and Tm Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Akovali, Y.; Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Davinson, T.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J.H.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Kim, S.H.; MacDonald, B.D.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Piechaczek, A.; Ressler, J.J.; Rykaczewski, K.; Slinger, R.C.; Szerypo, J.; Toth, K.S.; Weintraub, W.; Woods, P.J.; Yu, C.-H.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1998-11-13

    Two new isotopes, {sup 145}Tm and {sup 140}Ho and three isomers in previously known isotopes, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu have been discovered and studied via their decay by proton emission. These proton emitters were produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) by heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions, separated in A/Q with a recoil mass spectrometer (RMS), and detected in a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD). The decay energy and half-life was measured for each new emitter. An analysis in terms of a spherical shell model is applied to the Tm and Lu nuclei, but Ho is considerably deformed and requires a collective model interpretation.

  19. Spectroscopy of {sup 144}Ho using recoil-isomer tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, P. J. R; Cullen, D. M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sorri, J.; Saren, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Xu, F. R.

    2010-02-15

    Excited states in the proton-unbound odd-odd nucleus {sup 144}Ho have been populated using the {sup 92}Mo({sup 54}Fe,pn){sup 144}Ho reaction and studied using the recoil-isomer-tagging technique. The alignment properties and signature splitting of the rotational band above the I{sup p}i=(8{sup +}){sup 144m}Ho isomer have been analyzed and the isomer confirmed to have a pih{sub 11/2} x nuh{sub 11/2} two-quasiparticle configuration. The configuration-constrained blocking method has been used to calculate the shapes of the ground and isomeric states, which are both predicted to have triaxial nuclear shapes with |gamma|approx =24 deg.

  20. HO(x) Measurements in PEM Tropics B with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of PEM Tropics B was to study the processes responsible for the production and loss of tropospheric ozone over the tropical Pacific. This region of the globe contains very clean air as well as aged, polluted air that was advected from both the Asian and American continents. Understanding ozone requires understanding of HO(x) (HO(x) = OH + HO2) chemistry, since the reaction between H02 and NO leads to ozone production and the production of OH often requires ozone loss. In addition, OH is the atmosphere's primary oxidant. Since most atmospheric oxidation is thought to occur in the tropical lower troposphere, measurements during PEM Tropics B should provide an important test of the OH abundances and distributions. Thus, understanding and thoroughly testing HO(x) processes was an important objective of PEM Tropics B. Several issues need to be tested, One is HO, production rates and sources, since HO,, production directly affects ozone production and loss. Another is HO(x) behavior in and around clouds, since HO(x) is lost to cloud particles, but convection may bring HO(x) precursors from near the surface to the upper troposphere. A third is the rise and fall of HO(x) at sunrise and sunset, since these variations give strong indications of the important sources and sinks of HO(x). Making and interpreting high-quality OH and H02 measurements from the NASA DC-8 during PEM Tropics B is the objective of this research effort.

  1. Lattice effects in HoVo 3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, M.; Marquina, C.; Ibarra, M. R.; Nugroho, A. A.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2007-09-01

    We report the study of lattice effects in the Mott insulator HoVO 3 performed by means of linear thermal expansion on a single crystal in the temperature range 10-290 K. The holmium orthovanadate HoVO 3 reveals gradual orbital ordering (OO) below TOO=200 K and orders antiferromagnetically at TN=113 K. A first-order structural phase transition takes place at TS˜38 K, which is probably accompanied by change of the OO type and hence the type of antiferromagnetic spin ordering.

  2. Electronic transitions of Ho in Pb2Sr2HoCu3O8 observed by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderholm, L.; Loong, C.-K.; Xue, J. S.; Hammonds, J. P.; Greedan, J. E.; Maric, M.

    1993-05-01

    The electronic behavior of the 5I8 Russell Saunders ground multiplet of Ho3+ in Pb2Sr2HoCu3O8 has been investigated using inelastic neutron scattering. We observe ten peaks in the excitation spectra that are associated with crystal field transitions. The peaks are only slightly broader than expected from instrument resolution, indicating that there are no strong interactions between the local Ho f states and the CuO conduction states. Comparing the energies and intensities of the experimental peaks with those expected from modeling convinces us that there are at least three states populated at the temperature of our experiment (15 K), making the assignments of transitions very difficult in the absence of further data.

  3. Letters to the Editor of the AAS Newsletter: A Personal Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1987 the American Astronomical Society Newsletter has published some 142 Letters to the Editor that provide the personal statements and concerns of astronomers about the policies, priorities, and experiences of being an astronomer. While these Letters do not provide a scientific sampling of the issues, they do provide an illuminating picture of the astronomical scene as seen from the perspectives of our colleagues. I describe the history and policies of the Letters section, then summarize the issues presented and debated in these Letters. The topics (in order of numbers of Letters published) are: (1) publishing and refereeing, (2) how the AAS and IAU conduct their business, (3) jobs and how to get them, (4) support for astronomy, (5) scientific units and time, (6) public policy issues, (7) planning for telescopes and space missions, (8) how astronomers do their work, (9) women in astronomy, (10) the work environment, and (11) other issues. A chronological list of the Letters by title and author is included.

  4. Getting published well requires fulfilling editors' and reviewers' needs and desires.

    PubMed

    Schoenwolf, Gary C

    2013-12-01

    Publication in international scientific journals provides an unparalleled opportunity for authors to showcase their work. Where authors publish affects how the community values the work. This value directly determines the impact of the work on the field-papers must be read and cited to advance the field, and because the scientific literature is vast, only a subset of the literature is widely read and cited. Moreover, the value placed on the work also affects the authors' scientific reputation and career advancement. Consequently, it is essential that manuscripts receive the recognition they deserve by being published in one of the "best" journals that the scientific findings allow. Several factors determine where a paper is published: how well the topic of the paper fits the scope of the journal, the quality of the study and the manuscript describing it, the advance the paper makes in its field, the importance of the advance, and the extent to which the paper impacts the broader community of science. As scientists, we assume that our papers will be assessed objectively using only well defined scientific standards, but editors and reviewers also view papers subjectively, having biases of what defines a high-quality publication based on Western standards. Therefore, scientists trained in other parts of the world can be significantly disadvantaged in getting their papers published in the best journals. Here, I present concrete suggestions for improving the perception of a paper in the reader's minds, increasing the likelihood that it will get published well. PMID:24131034

  5. Representing Nature of Science in a Science Textbook: Exploring author-editor-publisher interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGiuseppe, Maurice

    2014-05-01

    Current reforms in elementary and secondary science education call for students and teachers to develop more informed views of the nature of science (NOS)-a process in which science textbooks play a significant role. This paper reports on a case study of the development of representations of the NOS in a senior high school chemistry textbook by the book's author, editor, and publisher. The study examines the multiple discourses that arose as the developers reflected on their personal and shared understandings of NOS; squared these with mandated curricula, the educational needs of chemistry students and teachers, and the exigencies of large-scale commercial textbook publishing. As a result, the team developed and incorporated, in the textbook, representations of NOS they believed were the most pedagogically suitable. Analysis of the data in this study indicates that a number of factors significantly influenced the development of representations of NOS, including representational accuracy (the degree to which representations of NOS conformed to informed views of the NOS), representational consistency (the degree to which representations of NOS in different parts of the book conveyed the same meaning), representational appropriateness (the age-, grade-, and reading-level appropriateness of the NOS representations), representational alignment (the degree to which NOS representations aligned with mandated curriculum), representational marketability (the degree to which NOS representations would affect sales of the textbook), and 'Workplace Resources' factors including availability of time, relevant expertise, and opportunities for professional development.

  6. The CROWN Initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women’s health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a "core outcomes set" - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women's health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN's health) Initiative. PMID:25050130

  7. The CROWN Initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women’s health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a “core outcomes set” - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women’s health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN’s health) Initiative. PMID:24993666

  8. The CROWN initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women’s health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a "core outcomes set" - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women's health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN's health) Initiative. PMID:25048583

  9. The CROWN initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women’s health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a “core outcomes set” - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women’s health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN’s health) Initiative. PMID:24957208

  10. The art and science of publishing: reflections from editors of surgery journals.

    PubMed

    Kibbe, Melina R; Sarr, Michael G; Livingston, Edward H; Freischlag, Julie A; Lillemoe, Keith D; McFadden, David W

    2014-01-01

    During the 8th Annual Academic Surgical Congress held in New Orleans, Louisiana, on February 5-7, 2013, the Association for Academic Surgery (AAS) Presidential Session was dedicated to the topic of publishing. A survey consisting of 37 questions on issues related to publishing was administered to the AAS membership 1 mo before the meeting. The results of the survey were then presented during the 2013 AAS Presidential Session. In addition, a panel of five editors from surgery journals relevant to the membership of the AAS was convened to discuss topics addressed in the results of the survey. These topics included: (1) how to publish in high-impact factor journals; (2) top five reasons why manuscripts get rejected; (3) the do's and don'ts of publishing (i.e., ethics of publishing); (4) how to get on an editorial board; and (5) the future of publishing. This review summarizes the contents of this AAS Presidential Session and provides information relevant for any academician, investigator, or scientist. PMID:24035228

  11. Seven decades of history of science: I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), second editor of Isis.

    PubMed

    Dauben, Joseph W; Gleason, Mary Louise; Smith, George E

    2009-03-01

    I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), the first American to receive a Ph.D. in history of science, was a Harvard undergraduate ('37) and then a Ph.D. student and protégé of George Sarton, founder of Isis and the History of Science Society. He went on to succeed Sarton as editor of Isis (1952-1958) and, later, president of the Society (1961-1962); he was also a president of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. Cohen was an internationally recognized Newton scholar; his interests were encyclopedic, ranging from science and public policy to the history of computers, with several decades as a special consultant for history of computing with IBM. Among his hundreds of publications were such major books as Franklin and Newton (1956), The Birth of a New Physics (1959; rpt., 1985), The Newtonian Revolution (1980), Revolution in Science (1985), Science and the Founding Fathers (1995), Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer (1999), and his last book, The Triumph of Numbers (2005), not to mention two jointly authored contributions, the variorum edition and new English translation of Newton's Principia, which will surely still be read a century from now. PMID:19554868

  12. Macedonian journal of chemistry and chemical engineering: open journal systems--editor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Zdravkovski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The development and availability of personal computers and software as well as printing techniques in the last twenty years have made a profound change in the publication of scientific journals. Additionally, the Internet in the last decade has revolutionized the publication process to the point of changing the basic paradigm of printed journals. The Macedonian Journal of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering in its 40-year history has adopted and adapted to all these transformations. In order to keep up with the inevitable changes, as editor-in-chief I felt my responsibility was to introduce an electronic editorial managing of the journal. The choice was between commercial and open source platforms, and because of the limited funding of the journal we chose the latter. We decided on Open Journal Systems, which provided online submission and management of all content, had flexible configuration--requirements, sections, review process, etc., had options for comprehensive indexing, offered various reading tools, had email notification and commenting ability for readers, had an option for thesis abstracts and was installed locally. However, since there is limited support it requires a moderate computer knowledge/skills and effort in order to set up. Overall, it is an excellent editorial platform and a convenient solution for journals with a low budget or journals that do not want to spend their resources on commercial platforms or simply support the idea of open source software. PMID:25711222

  13. Optical transitions of Ho(3+) in oxyfluoride glasses and upconversion luminescence of Ho(3+)/Yb(3+)-codoped oxyfluoride glasses.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Wu, Yinsu

    2015-05-01

    Optical properties of Ho(3+)-doped SiO2-BaF2-ZnF2 glasses have been investigated on the basis of the Judd-Ofelt theory. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, radiative transition probabilities, fluorescence branching ratios and radiative lifetimes have been calculated for different glass compositions. Upconversion emissions were observed in Ho(3+)/Yb(3+)-codoped SiO2-BaF2-ZnF2 glasses under 980nm excitation. The effects of composition, concentration of the doping ions, and excitation pump power on the upconversion emissions were also systematically studied. PMID:25703369

  14. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for the reaction H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael; Melius, Carl F.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The potential energy surface for the H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O reaction has been investigated in the region of the minimum energy path using CASSCF/contracted CI (CCI) calculations with a large basis set. The results show no barrier for the addition of an H atom to O2, in agreement with previous studies. A crossing between the surface for electrostatic (OH dipole-O quadrupole) interaction and that for the formation of an O-O chemical bond, at r(infinity) of about 5.5 a(0), results in a small (about 0.5 kcal/mol) barrier.

  15. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors at the Forefront of Improving the Quality and Indexing Chances of its Member Journals

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Chang-Ok; Oh, Se Jeong

    2013-01-01

    The article overviews some achievements and problems of Korean medical journals published in the highly competitive journal environment. Activities of Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors (KAMJE) are viewed as instrumental for improving the quality of Korean articles, indexing large number of local journals in prestigious bibliographic databases and launching new abstract and citation tracking databases or platforms (eg KoreaMed, KoreaMed Synapse, the Western Pacific Regional Index Medicus [WPRIM]). KAMJE encourages its member journals to upgrade science editing standards and to legitimately increase citation rates, primarily by publishing more great articles with global influence. Experience gained by KAMJE and problems faced by Korean editors may have global implications. PMID:23678253

  16. [Letters to the editor published in Peruvian biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru 2006-2013].

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Mejía-Dolores, Jhon William; Chalco-Huamán, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    This bibliometric study describes the characteristics of letters to the editor published between 2006-2013 in biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru.253 letters (10.3% of total publications) were collected. Most letters (139) were in the Peruvian Journal of Experimental Medicine and Public Health, with marked increase throughout those years. 25% of letters submitted included medical student participation. 14% of authors presented with international affiliations and 27% with endogenous affiliation - common in university journals (Anales de la Facultad de Medicina, Revista Médica Herediana).The usual criteria justifying the publication of letters were: opinion of medical fact or public domain (35.6%) and discussion of results, methodological flaws or interpretation (22.9%). In biomedical journals indexed in SciELO Peru the letters to the editor comprise a percentage of publications that has increased in recent years, with low publication of letters of findings or primary data, compared with opinion or criticism. PMID:26102113

  17. Nuclear spectroscopy above isomers in {sub 67}{sup 148}Ho{sub 81} and {sub 67}{sup 149}Ho{sub 82} nuclei: Search for core-excited states in {sup 149}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Kownacki, J.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Zielinska, M.; Kordyasz, A.; Srebrny, J.; Droste, Ch.; Morek, T.; Grodner, E.; Ruchowska, E.; Korman, A.; Czarnacki, W.; Kisielinski, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Hadynska-KlePk, K.; Mierzejewski, J.; Lieder, R. M.; Perkowski, J.; Andrzejewski, J.; Krol, A.

    2010-04-15

    The excited states of {sup 148}Ho and {sup 149}Ho isotopes are studied using gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy in off-beam and in-beam modes following {sup 112,114}Sn({sup 40}Ar,xnyp) reactions. Experiments include measurements of single gamma-rays and conversion electron spectra as well as gamma-gamma, electron-gamma, gamma-t, and gamma-gamma-t coincidences with the use of the OSIRIS-II 12-HPGe array and conversion electron spectrometer. Based on the present results, the level schemes of {sup 148}Ho and {sup 149}Ho are revised and significantly extended, up to about 4 and 5 MeV of excitation energy, respectively. Spin and parity of 5{sup -} are assigned to the 9.59-s isomer in {sup 148}Ho based on conversion electron results. Previously unobserved gamma rays feeding the 10{sup +} isomer in {sup 148}Ho and the 27/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 149}Ho nuclei are proposed. Shell-model calculations are performed. Possible core-excited states in {sup 149}Ho are discussed.

  18. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process

    PubMed Central

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M.; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,750 were sent for peer review, using R and Python to perform the statistical analysis. Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and 5 days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). There was no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates for published articles where the Reviewing Editor served as one of the peer reviewers. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife’s peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach. PMID:27508056

  19. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process.

    PubMed

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,750 were sent for peer review, using R and Python to perform the statistical analysis. Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and 5 days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). There was no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates for published articles where the Reviewing Editor served as one of the peer reviewers. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife's peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach. PMID:27508056

  20. Registration of ‘Ho 02-113’ Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ho 02-113’ sugarcane was released by the USDA-ARS Sugarcane Research Unit working cooperatively with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugarcane League of the U.S.A. This high-fiber sugarcane variety was released for use as a biofuel feedstock to fill the rising i...

  1. P8 deficiency increases cellular ROS and induces HO-1.

    PubMed

    Weis, Sebastian; Bielow, Tobias; Sommerer, Ines; Iovanna, Juan; Malicet, Cédric; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    The gene p8 encodes for a small cytoprotective protein with no apparent enzymatic activity being proposed to act as co-transcription factor whose expression is increased during inflammation. Recent data from astrocytes demonstrates that p8 suppression leads to induction of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Here, we assessed the cross-talk between p8 and HO-1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) observing an increased expression of HO-1 in p8-deficient (p8(-/-)) MEFs in non-treated and treated conditions. This effect was independent of the cell cycle. Our findings revealed that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was higher in p8(-/-) MEFs. Mitochondria and NADPH oxidases were not the origin of ROS. This observation was not restricted to MEF as suppression of p8 gene transcription in MiaPaCa-2 cells also led to increased intracellular ROS. Additionally, p8 deficiency did not affect the Rac1 dependant NADPH oxidase complex. Our data shows that p8 deficiency increases ROS and subsequently the expression of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as HO-1, suggesting an involvement in the anti-oxidative defense. Moreover, we suggest that the severity of AP observed in p8(-/-) mice is induced by an impaired anti oxidative capacity of the pancreas, which is caused by increased generation of ROS. PMID:25475530

  2. Conductively Cooled Ho:Tm:LuLiF Laser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Petros, M.; Petzar, Paul; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2008-01-01

    A conductively-cooled Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser head can amplify 80mJ/340ns probe pulses into 400mJ when the pump pulse energy is close to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) threshold, 5.6J. For a small signal, the double-pass amplification exceeds 25.

  3. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  4. 2008 Louisiana "HoCP" Nursery and Infield Variety Trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three years after selection in single-stools at the seedling stage, scientists in the breeding program assign permanent “HoCP” or “Ho” numbers to experimental varieties advanced for further testing. These newly assigned varieties are planted in replicated nursery trials at three locations (Ardoyne ...

  5. Programme Note: Realities and Opportunities in Ho Chi Minh City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchet, Chi Nguyen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of street children in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is characterized by marginalization from society through street vending, begging, theft, and prostitution. Evaluation of a drop-in center serving children without family linkages indicates need for needs assessments, follow-up activities, measurement of individual child progress,…

  6. Single-frequency lasing of monolithic Ho,Tm:YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Deyst, John P.; Storm, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    Single-frequency lasing in monolithic crystals of holmium-thulium-doped YLF (Ho,Tm:YLF) is reported. A maximum single-frequency output power of 6 mW at a wavelength of 2.05 microns is demonstrated. Frequency tuning is also described.

  7. Performance of Ho:YAG as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Gettemy, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of two multiply doped Ho:YAG lasers has been characterized as a function of the laser rod temperature. From the experimental results, the dependence of the slope efficiency and threshold on temperature has been extracted. Threshold can be correlated with the occupation of the lower laser level. Implications on the optimum operating temperature are discussed.

  8. 2012 Louisiana "Ho" nursery and infield variety trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three years after selection in the seedling stage of the USDA variety program, superior experimental varieties are assigned permanent “HoCP” or “Ho” numbers. These varieties are then planted in replicated yield trials at SRU’s Ardoyne Farm in Schriever and at the LSU AgCenter’s Iberia Research Stati...

  9. Low temperature magnetic transitions of single crystal HoBi

    SciTech Connect

    Fente, A.; Suderow, H.; Vieira, S.; Nemes, N. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Budko, Sergei L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2013-09-04

    We present resistivity, specific heat and magnetization measurements in high quality single crystals of HoBi, with a residual resistivity ratio of 126. We find, from the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, an antiferromagnetic transition at 5.7 K, which evolves, under magnetic fields, into a series of up to five metamagnetic phases.

  10. The prosecution of Taiwan sexuality researcher and activist Josephine Ho.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping

    2004-05-01

    In April 2003, following a newspaper report of a hyperlink to a website on bestiality on the Sexuality Databank website of the Center for the Study of Sexualities, National Central University, Taipei, Taiwan, 14 conservative NGOs filed charges against the Center's founder, Josephine Ho, for "propagating obscenities that corrupt traditional values." Ho has been researching sexuality and supporting freedom for marginalised sexual minorities for ten years. In a public statement in response to the charges, she said that the work of scholarly research must not be dictated by prejudice and that differences in sexual values should not be arbitrated by law and should be open for public discussion. As the legal process began in January 2004, Ho's supporters in Taiwan have called for the preservation of the Taiwan Constitutional decree on integrity and autonomy of academic research and freedom of expression on the internet, for the University to resist calls to dismiss Ho from her post, and for respect for freedom of speech and expression and the right to create spaces to educate people about non-normative sexualities. PMID:15242216

  11. Registration of ‘Ho 00-961’ sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ho 00-961’ (Reg. No., PI) sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum officinarum L., S. spontaneum L., S. barberi Jeswiet, and S. sinense Roxb. amend. Jeswiet) was selected by the USDA-ARS Sugarcane Research Unit, and evaluated cooperatively with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, an...

  12. 2010 Louisiana "Ho" nursery and infield variety trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three years after selecting in single-stools in the seedling stage, scientists in the SRU’s sugarcane breeding program assign “HoCP” or “Ho” numbers to varieties advanced for further testing. These newly assigned varieties are planted in replicated nursery trials at the SRU’s Ardoyne Farm in Schrie...

  13. Living with ghosts in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanov, S.; Arroja, F.; Celoria, M.; Matarrese, S.; Pilo, L.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the branch of the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz model which exhibits ghost instabilities in the low energy limit. It turns out that, due to the Lorentz violating structure of the model and to the presence of a finite strong coupling scale, the vacuum decay rate into photons is tiny in a wide range of phenomenologically acceptable parameters. The strong coupling scale, understood as a cutoff on ghosts' spatial momenta, can be raised up to Λ ˜ 10 TeV. At lower momenta, the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is equivalent to General Relativity supplemented by a fluid with a small positive sound speed squared (10-42 ≲) c s 2 ≲ 10-20, that could be a promising candidate for the Dark Matter. Despite these advantages, the unavoidable presence of the strong coupling obscures the implementation of the original Hořava's proposal on quantum gravity. Apart from the Hořava-Lifshitz model, conclusions of the present work hold also for the mimetic matter scenario, where the analogue of the projectability condition is achieved by a non-invertible conformal transformation of the metric.

  14. Production and characterization of 166Ho polylactic acid microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Kamal; Yeganeh, Ehsan; Abolghasemi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Microsphere and particle technology with selective transport of radiation represents a new generation of therapeutics. Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) microspheres loaded with holmium-166 acetylacetonate ((166)Ho-PLLA-MS) are novel microdevices. In this research, (165)HoAcAc-PLLA microparticles were prepared by the solvent evaporation technique. Microspheres were irradiated at Tehran Research Reactor. The diameter and surface morphologies were characterized by particle sizer and scanning electron microscopy before and after irradiation. The complex stability, radiochemical purity, and in vivo biodistribiotion were checked in the final solution up to 3 days. In this study, (166)Ho-PLLA spherical particles with a smooth surface and diameter of 20-40 µm were obtained, which were stable in vitro and in vivo studies. Neutron irradiation did not damage the particles. The ease with which the PLLA spheres could be made in the optimal size range for later irradiation and their ability to retain the (166)Ho provided good evidence for their potential use in radioembolization. PMID:26691104

  15. 2014 Louisiana "Ho" nursery and infield variety trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the USDA sugarcane variety program, superior experimental varieties are assigned permanent “HoCP” or “Ho” numbers three years after selection in the seedling stage. These varieties are then planted in replicated yield trials at the Sugarcane Research Unit's (SRU) Ardoyne Farm in Schriever and at ...

  16. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MSmore » to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.« less

  17. Reversal of HO-1 related cytoprotection with increased expression is due to reactive iron.

    PubMed

    Suttner, D M; Dennery, P A

    1999-10-01

    It is often postulated that the cytoprotective nature of heme oxygenase (HO-1) explains the inducible nature of this enzyme. However, the mechanisms by which protection occurs are not verified by systematic evaluation of the physiological effects of HO. To explain how induction of HO-1 results in protection against oxygen toxicity, hamster fibroblasts (HA-1) were stably transfected with a tetracycline response plasmid containing the full-length rat HO-1 cDNA construct to allow for regulation of gene expression by varying concentrations of doxycycline (Dox). Transfected cells were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O(2)/5% CO2) for 24 h and several markers of oxidative injury were measured. With varying concentrations of Dox, HO activity was regulated between 3- and 17-fold. Despite cytoprotection with low (less than fivefold) HO activity, high levels of HO-1 expression (greater than 15-fold) were associated with significant oxygen cytotoxicity. Levels of non-heme reactive iron correlated with cellular injury in hyperoxia whereas lower levels of heme were associated with cytoprotection. Cellular levels of cyclic GMP and bilirubin were not significantly altered by modification of HO activity, precluding a substantial role for activation of guanylate cyclase by carbon monoxide or for accumulation of bile pigments in the physiological consequences of HO-1 overexpression. Inhibition of HO activity or chelation of cellular iron prior to hyperoxic exposure decreased reactive iron levels in the samples and significantly reduced oxygen toxicity. We conclude that there is a beneficial threshold of HO-1 overexpression related to the accumulation of reactive iron released in the degradation of heme. Therefore, despite the ready induction of HO-1 in oxidant stress, accumulation of reactive iron formed makes it unlikely that exaggerated expression of HO-1 is a cytoprotective response. PMID:10506583

  18. Representing the nature of science in a science textbook: Exploring author-editor-publisher interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiuseppe, Maurizio

    Current reforms in elementary and secondary science education call for students and teachers to develop more informed views of the nature of science---a process in which learning materials like science textbooks play a significant role. This dissertation reports on a case study of the development of representations of the nature of science in one unit of a senior high school chemistry textbook by the book's author, editor, and publisher. The study examines the multiple discourses that arose as the developers reflected on their personal and shared understandings of the nature of science; squared these understandings with mandated curricula, the educational needs of chemistry students and teachers, and the exigencies of large-scale commercial textbook publishing; and developed and incorporated into the textbook representations of the nature of science they believed were the most suitable. Analyses of the data in this study indicate that a number of factors significantly influenced the development of representations of the nature of science, including representational accuracy (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science conformed to what the developers believed were contemporary understandings of the nature of science), representational consistency (the degree to which similar representations of the nature of science in different parts of the textbook conveyed the same meaning), representational appropriateness (the age-, grade-, and reading-level suitability of the suggested nature of science representations), representational alignment (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science addressed the requirements of mandated curricula), representational marketability (the degree to which textbook developers believed suggested representations of the nature of science would affect sales of the textbook in the marketplace), and a number of "Workplace Resources" factors such as the availability of time, relevant expertise

  19. Simultaneous, in situ measurements of OH, HO2, O3, and H2O - A test of modeled stratospheric HO(x) chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Weinstock, E. M.; Dessler, A. E.; Lloyd, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous, in situ measurements of OH, HO2, H2O, and O3 from 37-23 km are reported. The partitioning between OH and HO2 and the total HO(x) concentration are compared with expected steady-state values. The ratio of HO2 to OH varies from less than 2 at 36 km to more than 3 at 25 km; in the lower stratosphere this ratio is nearly a factor of two less than predicted. The data are used to calculate HO(x) production and loss rates. The measured HO(x) mixing ratio is consistent with production dominated by the reaction of O(1D) with H2O, and loss controlled by NOy below 28 km and HO(x) above 30 km. The steady-state concentration of H2O2 is inferred from the measured HO2 concentration and calculated photolysis rate. The maximum H2O2 mixing ratio (at 33 km) is predicted to be less than 0.2 ppb.

  20. Registration of Three High Fiber Sugar Cane Varieties, L 79-1002, HoCP 91-552 AND Ho 00-961, for Biofuels Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High fiber sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) varieties, or energy canes, have been shown to be a viable feedstock for biofuel applications. Three high fiber sugarcane varieties, L 79-1002, HoCP 91-552 and Ho 00-961, were released in April 2007 for commercial biofuel production. L 79-1002 averaged 2...

  1. Degradation of poly(3-hydroxyoctanoic acid) [P(3HO)] by bacteria: Purification and properties of a P(3HO) depolymerase from Pseudomonas fluorescens GK13

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, A.; Jendrossek, D.; Schlegel, H.G. )

    1993-04-01

    Poly(3-hydroxyoctanoic acid)[P(3HO)] and other poly(hydroxyalkanoic acids) PHA are widespread bacterial storage compounds of carbon and reducing power. They are biodegradable to carbon dioxide and water, and both aerobic and anaerobic P(3HB)-degradable bacteria are widely distributed in various ecosytems: soil, activated sludge, lake water and air, sea water, estuarine sediment, and anaerobic sewage sludge. This study describes the isolation and characterization of P(3HO) degrading bacteria: Alcaligenes eutrophus, Comamonas violaceum, Pseudomonas citronellolis, and P. fluorescenes (2 strains). The authors also describe purified P(3HO) depolymerase and compared it to PHB and PHA deploymerases. P(3HO) depolymerase activity was found not only in the sulture supernatant but also in the soluble fraction and membrane fractions of P(3HO) grown cells.39 refs.,5 figs.,3 tabs.

  2. NSAIDs inhibit neovascularization of choroid through HO-1-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Narimasa; Arimura, Noboru; Otsuka, Hiroki; Kawahara, Ko-Ichi; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2011-09-01

    Intraocular neovascularization is the leading cause of severe visual loss and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy is currently performed for choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Despite its potent anti-angiogenic effect, there are concerns about its long-term safety. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common therapeutic agents used for treating inflammatory diseases, and their anti-stress effects are attracting attention now. We studied the effects of topical NSAIDs on CNV, focusing on anti-stress proteins. Cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were treated with NSAIDs: bromfenac, indomethacin, or vehicle control. Transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its downstream anti-oxidant protein heme oxygenase (HO)-1 were assessed using western blot and immunohistochemistry. As a result, NSAIDs induced translocation of Nrf2 into the nucleus and the robust expression of HO-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that bromfenac inhibited H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in cultured RPE cells. Next, we studied the effects of topical bromfenac on laser-induced CNV model in rat. The expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1, infiltrations of ED-1-positive macrophages at CNV lesions and size were analyzed. VEGF in the ocular fluid of these rats was also measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Rats administered an inhibitor of HO-1 stannic mesoporphyrin (SnMP) were also studied. The results showed that topical bromfenac led to translocation of Nrf2 and induction of HO-1 in CNV lesions and that the number of infiltrating macrophages at the CNV lesion decreased. The sizes of CNV lesions were significantly smaller in bromfenac-treated rats than control CNV, and the effects were diminished by SnMP. VEGF increased in the ocular fluid after laser treatment and was inhibited by bromfenac and SnMP canceling these effects. NSAIDs inhibit CNV through the novel anti-stress protein HO-1-dependent pathway

  3. Over-expression of HO-1 on mesenchymal stem cells promotes angiogenesis and improves myocardial function in infarcted myocardium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible enzyme with diverse cytoprotective effects, and reported to have an important role in angiogenesis recently. Here we investigated whether HO-1 transduced by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can induce angiogenic effects in infarcted myocardium. HO-1 was transfected into cultured MSCs using an adenoviral vector. 1 × 106 Ad-HO-1-transfected MSCs (HO-1-MSCs) or Ad-Null-transfected MSCs (Null-MSCs) or PBS was respectively injected into rat hearts intramyocardially at 1 h post-myocardial infarction. The results showed that HO-1-MSCs were able to induce stable expression of HO-1 in vitro and in vivo. The capillary density and expression of angiogenic growth factors, VEGF and FGF2 were significantly enhanced in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts compared with Null-MSCs-treated and PBS-treated hearts. However, the angiogenic effects of HO-1 were abolished by treating the animals with HO inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin. The myocardial apoptosis was marked reduced with significantly reduced fibrotic area in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts; Furthermore, the cardiac function and remodeling were also significantly improved in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts. Our current findings support the premise that HO-1 transduced by MSCs can induce angiogenic effects and improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:20925964

  4. Measurements of HO2 chemical kinetics with a new detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Suto, M.

    1986-01-01

    Research for the period from December 1, 1985 to May 31, 1986 is discussed, i.e., the reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 has been measured with a discharge-flow-tube apparatus. The HO2 radical was detected by the OH(A-X) photofragment emission produced from photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. In the meantime, the optical emissions produced by the vacuum ultraviolet excitation of chemical species in the flow tube were investigated and used to examine the possibility for their interference with the HO2 detection. The research results are summarized below.

  5. [hHO-1 structure prediction and its mutant construct, expression, purification and activity analysis].

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen Wei; Cui, Wen Jun; Zhou, Wen Pu; Zhang, Xue Hong; Shen, Qing Xiang; Li, Yun Zhu; Yu, Shan Chang

    2004-10-01

    Human Heme Oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism reaction of heme, which directly regulates the concentration of bilirubin in human body. The mutant structure was simulated by Swiss-pdbviewer procedure, which showed that the structure of active pocket was changed distinctly after Ala25 substituted for His25 in active domain, but the mutated enzyme still binded with heme. On the basis of the results, the expression vectors, pBHO-1 and pBHO-1(M), were constructed, induced by IPTG and expressed in E. coli DH5alpha strain. The expression products were purified with 30%-60% saturation (NH4)2SO4 and Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography. The concentration of hHO-1 in 30%-60% saturation (NH4)2SO4 components and in fractions through twice column chromatography was 3.6-fold and 30-fold higher than that in initial product, respectively. The activity of wild hHO-1 (whHO-1) and mutant hHO-1 (deltahHO-1) showed that the activity of deltahHO-1 was reduced 91.21% compared with that of whHO-1. The study shows that His25 is of importance for the mechanism of hHO-1, and provides the possibility for effectively regulating the activity to exert biological function. PMID:15636365

  6. NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2008-10-01

    The Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods are now standard routines in various data analyses, irrespective of ones own preference to the more conventional approach based on so-called frequentists understanding of the notion of the probability. It is not the purpose of the Editor to show all achievements of these methods in various branches of science, technology and medicine. In the case of condensed matter physics most of the oldest examples of Bayesian analysis can be found in the excellent tutorial textbooks by Sivia and Skilling [1], and Bretthorst [2], while the application of the Maximum Entropy Methods were described in `Maximum Entropy in Action' [3]. On the list of questions addressed one finds such problems as deconvolution and reconstruction of the complicated spectra, e.g. counting the number of lines hidden within the spectrum observed with always finite resolution, reconstruction of charge, spin and momentum density distribution from an incomplete sets of data, etc. On the theoretical side one might find problems like estimation of interatomic potentials [4], application of the MEM to quantum Monte Carlo data [5], Bayesian approach to inverse quantum statistics [6], very general to statistical mechanics [7] etc. Obviously, in spite of the power of the Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods, it is not possible for everything to be solved in a unique way by application of these particular methods of analysis, and one of the problems which is often raised is connected not only with a uniqueness of a reconstruction of a given distribution (map) but also with its accuracy (error maps). In this `Comments' section we present a few papers showing more recent advances and views, and highlighting some of the aforementioned problems. References [1] Sivia D S and Skilling J 2006 Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial 2nd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press) [2] Bretthorst G L 1988 Bayesian Spectruim Analysis and Parameter Estimation (Berlin: Springer) [3] Buck B and

  7. A survey of the awareness, knowledge, policies and views of veterinary journal Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines for publication of research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wider adoption of reporting guidelines by veterinary journals could improve the quality of published veterinary research. The aims of this study were to assess the knowledge and views of veterinary Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines, identify the policies of their journals, and determine their information needs. Editors-in-Chief of 185 journals on the contact list for the International Association of Veterinary Editors (IAVE) were surveyed in April 2012 using an online questionnaire which contained both closed and open questions. Results The response rate was 36.8% (68/185). Thirty-six of 68 editors (52.9%) stated they knew what a reporting guideline was before receiving the questionnaire. Editors said they had found out about reporting guidelines primarily through articles in other journals, via the Internet and through their own journal. Twenty of 57 respondents (35.1%) said their journal referred to reporting guidelines in its instructions to authors. CONSORT, REFLECT, and ARRIVE were the most frequently cited. Forty-four of 68 respondents (68.2%) believed that reporting guidelines should be adopted by all refereed veterinary journals. Qualitative analysis of the open questions revealed that lack of knowledge, fear, resistance to change, and difficulty in implementation were perceived as barriers to the adoption of reporting guidelines by journals. Editors suggested that reporting guidelines be promoted through communication and education of the veterinary community, with roles for the IAVE and universities. Many respondents believed a consensus policy on guideline implementation was needed for veterinary journals. Conclusions Further communication and education about reporting guidelines for editors, authors and reviewers has the potential to increase their adoption by veterinary journals in the future. PMID:24410882

  8. Solar-pumped Er,Tm,Ho:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Benmair, R.M.J.; Kagan, J.; Kalisky, Y.; Noter, Y.; Oron, M.; Shimony, Y.; Yogev, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Direct solar illumination was used to pump a 5-mm-diameter 62-mm exposed-length rod of Er,Tm,Ho:YAG to achieve a quasi-cw lasing of the Ho ion at an average power of 12 W. The solar radiation was chopped at a 20% duty cycle to avoid overloading of the cooling system. The peak power output was more than 65 W during the chopper's open times. The slope efficiency is 3.8%, and the threshold input energy is approximately 100 W. The laser was operated for long times (up to hours) while maintaining its performance. This is, to our knowledge, the first directly solar-pumped laser operating at 77 K.

  9. Cathodoluminescence of GaN implanted with Sm and Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Lozykowski, H.J.; Jadwisienczak, W.M.; Brown, I.

    1999-04-01

    We report the first observation of visible cathodoluminescence of the rare earth (RE) elements Sm, Ho implanted in GaN. The implanted samples were given isochronal thermal annealing treatments at a temperature of 1100 degrees C in N2, at atmospheric pressure to recover implantation damages and activate the RE ions. The sharp characteristic emission lines corresponding to Sm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} intra-4f{sup n}-shell transitions are resolved in the spectral range from 400 to 1000 nm, and observed over the temperature range of 11-411 K. The cathodoluminescence emission is only weakly temperature dependent. The results indicate that RE doped GaN epilayers are suitable as a material for visible optoelectronic devices.

  10. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho.

    PubMed

    Rettig, L; Dornes, C; Thielemann-Kühn, N; Pontius, N; Zabel, H; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Chollet, M; Robert, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Glownia, J M; Schüßler-Langeheine, C; Johnson, S L; Staub, U

    2016-06-24

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L_{3} absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p→5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p→4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3-τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f-5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak. PMID:27391747

  11. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kühn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Glownia, J. M.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2016-06-01

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E 1 , 2 p →5 d ) or quadrupole (E 2 , 2 p →4 f ) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5 d and localized 4 f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3 -τ ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4 f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4 f -5 d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  12. Holographic superconductors with Hořava-Lifshitz black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the phase transition of planar black holes in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity by introducing a Maxwell field and a complex scalar field. We calculate the condensate of the charged operators in the dual conformal field theories when the mass square of the complex scalar field is m2=-2/L2 and m2=0, respectively. We compute the electrical conductivity of the Hořava-Lifshitz superconductor in the probe approximation. In particular, it is found that there exists a spike in the conductivity for the case of the operator with scaling dimension one. These results are quite similar to those in the case of Schwarzschild-AdS black holes, which demonstrates that the holographic superconductivity is a robust phenomenon associated with asymptotic AdS black holes.

  13. Thermochemical stability of the HO 2-HOCl complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, A. F.; Li, X. H.; Solimannejad, M.

    2006-03-01

    The Van der Waals complex between hydroperoxy radical (HO 2) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) has been studied using the B3LYP density functional theory method, the second-order Moller-Plessett level of theory, as well as the coupled-cluster method (CCSD(T)) with basis sets as large as 6-311++G(3df, 3pd). Our calculations show stabilization energies for HO 2-HOCl of 4.83, 5.03, 4.64, and 5.28 kcal/mol at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df, 3pd), MP2/6-311++G(3df, 3pd), CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) and G2 levels of theory, respectively.

  14. The reactions of HO2 with CO and NO and the reaction of O(1D) with H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1973-01-01

    HO2 radicals were generated by the photolysis of N2O at 2139 A in the presence of excess H2O or H2 and smaller amounts of CO and O2. The O(1D) atoms produced from the photolysis of N2O to give HO radicals or H2 to give HO + H. With H2O two HO radicals are produced for each O(1D) removed low pressures (i.e. approximately 20 torr H2O), but the HO yield drops as the pressure is raised. This drop is attributed to the insertion reaction: O(1D) + H2O + M yields H2O2 +M. The HO radicals generated can react with either CO or H2 to produce H atoms which then add to O2 to produce HO2. Two reactions are given for the reactions of the HO radicals, in the absence of NO.

  15. Identical gamma-vibrational bands in {sup 165}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Janzen, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    The structure of {sup 165}Ho at moderate spins has been investigated by means of Coulomb excitation. Two {gamma}-vibrational bands (K{sup {pi}} = 11/2{sup {minus}} and K{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup {minus}}) are observed, with very nearly identical in-band {gamma}-ray energies. Gamma-ray branching ratios are analyzed to extract information on Coriolis mixing, and the role of the K quantum number in identical bands is discussed.

  16. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  17. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  18. [Observational study on urinary status following HoLEP].

    PubMed

    Kono, Yuka; Matsumoto, Keiyu; Masuda, Norihiko; Shiraishi, Yusuke; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Utsunomiya, Noriaki; Tsunemori, Hiroyuki; Okubo, Kazutoshi; Okada, Takuya; Segawa, Takehiko; Muguruma, Koei; Kawakita, Mutsushi

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the safety, and postoperative urinary status of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Of the initial 117 patients who underwent HoLEP from November 2004 to March 2011, 49 were followed up for two yearsor longer. These 49 patients were evaluated once preoperatively, and at the 3rd, 6th, 12th, 24th, 48th, and 60th month postoperatively using International Prostate Symptom Scores (I-PSS) total and sub-score, quality of life score (QOL), maximum flow rate (Qmax), and post-voiding residual urine volume (PVR). The median estimated transition zone and enucleated volume were 45. 1 and 47. 9 g, respectively. Evaluation scores showed significant improvementsthroughout the follow-up. I-PSS total scoresimproved from 21 points(before surgery) to 6 points(12 monthsafter surgery), QOL scoresimproved from 5 pointsto 2 points, Qmax improved from 6.8 ml/s to 17.4 ml/s, and PVR improved from 101 ml to 26 ml, respectively. Transient urinary incontinence was noted in 14 patients (28.5%). One case showed a Clavien grade 3 complication of postoperative bleeding. No blood transfusion or re-surgery for BPH was required. In conclusion, HoLEP proved to be a safe and effective therapy, with potential to become a new gold standard for treating BPH. PMID:24755814

  19. Non-coding RNA derived from the region adjacent to the human HO-1 E2 enhancer selectively regulates HO-1 gene induction by modulating Pol II binding

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Mimura, Junsei; Itoh, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have disclosed the function of enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), which are long non-coding RNAs transcribed from gene enhancer regions, in transcriptional regulation. However, it remains unclear whether eRNAs are involved in the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) induction. Here, we report that multiple nuclear-enriched eRNAs are transcribed from the regions adjacent to two human HO-1 enhancers (i.e. the distal E2 and proximal E1 enhancers), and some of these eRNAs are induced by the oxidative stress-causing reagent diethyl maleate (DEM). We demonstrated that the expression of one forward direction (5′ to 3′) eRNA transcribed from the human HO-1 E2 enhancer region (named human HO-1enhancer RNA E2-3; hereafter called eRNA E2-3) was induced by DEM in an NRF2-dependent manner in HeLa cells. Conversely, knockdown of BACH1, a repressor of HO-1 transcription, further increased DEM-inducible eRNA E2-3 transcription as well as HO-1 expression. In addition, we showed that knockdown of eRNA E2-3 selectively down-regulated DEM-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, eRNA E2-3 knockdown attenuated DEM-induced Pol II binding to the promoter and E2 enhancer regions of HO-1 without affecting NRF2 recruitment to the E2 enhancer. These findings indicate that eRNAE2-3 is functional and is required for HO-1 induction. PMID:25404134

  20. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  1. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  2. Methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (HO-PBDEs) and hydroxylated PCBs (HO-PCBs) in the liver of harbor seals from the northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Shaw, Susan D; Berger, Michelle L; Neels, Hugo; Blust, Ronny; Covaci, Adrian

    2014-09-15

    Metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs are shown to influence the thyroid hormone homeostasis and therefore, could have an influence on the growth of newborn or young animals. We have investigated the occurrence of hydroxylated PCBs (HO-PCBs), hydroxylated PBDEs (HO-PBDEs), and methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs) in the liver (48 pups; 6 adults) and blubber (4 pups; 1 adult) of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) from the northwest Atlantic. The sum of HO-PCBs in the liver ranged from 90 to 22,450 pg/g wet weight (ww) for pups and from 410 to 5290 pg/g ww for adults. Congener 4-HO-CB 107 was predominant in almost all samples regardless of age or gender, except in one adult male. Sum HO-PCB concentrations were highly correlated with the sum of precursor PCBs in the liver of harbor seals (r(2) = 0.79; p<0.0001). Concentrations of sum HO-PBDEs in the liver ranged from 70 to 1850 pg/g ww for pups and from 90 to 230 pg/g ww for adults. HO-PBDEs were also correlated with PBDEs (r(2) = 0.58; p<0.0001). Sum MeO-PBDE concentrations in the liver ranged from 20 to 1460 pg/g ww in pups and from 10 to 270 pg/g ww in adults. HO-PCBs and HO-PBDEs were not detected in the blubber. Levels of MeO-PBDEs in the blubber ranged from 1500 to 4400 pg/g ww. In all blubber samples, 6-MeO-BDE 47 was the predominant MeO-PBDE congener, followed by 2'-MeO-BDE 68 and 5-MeO-BDE 47, respectively. The presence of HO-metabolites in pup liver suggests that young harbor seals may have some, yet limited, metabolic capacity for PCBs and PBDEs, which can lead to an excessive accumulation of these chemicals in the body. Moreover, the presence of HO-PCB and HO-PBDE metabolites may pose an additional stress for young harbor seals due to their influence on the thyroid hormone system and could have consequences for the entire population. PMID:24982026

  3. Increased HO-1 Levels Ameliorate Fatty Liver Development Through a Reduction of Heme and Recruitment of FGF21

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Terry D.; Sodhi, Komal; Meadows, Charles; Fedorova, Larisa; Puri, Nitin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Peterson, Stephen J.; Shapiro, Joseph; Abraham, Nader G.; Kappas, Attallah

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obese leptin deficient (ob/ob) mice are a model of adiposity that displays increased levels of fat, glucose and liver lipids. Our hypothesis is that HO-1 overexpression ameliorates fatty liver development. Design and Methods Obese mice were administered cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and stannic mesoporphyrin (SnMP) for 6 weeks. Heme, HO-1, HO activity, PGC1α, FGF21, glycogen content and lipogenesis were assessed. Results CoPP administration increased hepatic HO-1 protein levels and HO activity, decreased hepatic heme, body weight gain, glucose levels and resulted in decreased steatosis. Increased levels of HO-1 produced a decrease in lipid droplet size, FAS levels involving recruitment of FGF21, PPARα and Glut 1. These beneficial effects were reversed by inhibition of HO activity. Conclusion Increased levels of HO-1 and HO activity reduced the levels of obesity by reducing hepatic heme and lipid accumulation. These changes were manifested by decreases in cellular heme, increases in FGF21, glycogen content and fatty liver. The beneficial effect of HO-1 induction results from an increase in PPARα and FGF21 levels and a decrease in PGC1α, levels they were reversed by SnMP. Low levels of HO-1 and HO activity are responsible for fatty liver. PMID:23839791

  4. Letter to the Editor: Use of some inappropriate terms in Spanish in Oral Medicine and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Urizar, J-M; Mosqueda-Taylor, A

    2016-01-01

    Dear Editor: According to the Dictionary of the Spanish Language of the Royal Spanish Academy (DLERAE) (1) anglicism refers to those words or terms of English language that are used in another. The Spanish language has acquired and uses numerous anglicisms, especially for words that have no option to be translated into Spanish, such as those absent in this language like internet, wifi, whisky, etc. In Medicine there is a lot of anglicisms are inevitably used today in the medical language, such as: stress, test, distress, gold standard, score, shunt, level, etc. Dentistry also commonly uses many anglicisms, such as forceps, bonding, inlays, composite, etc. that would be justified in most cases due to the absence of a fully equivalent word in Spanish. However, in some instances this is debatable, and their use only represents a linguistic simplification. Our intention by sending this letter is to draw attention of the readers of this journal over temptation of giving a Spanish style to certain English words employed in Oral Medicine and Pathology. To illustrate this we present three examples of this inadequate circumstance. The first refers to "disorder", a term widely used in recent years in connection with oral precancer (oral potentially malignant disorders). This word is usually translated as "desorden" ,a word which although may sound very similar in Spanish, does not means exactly the same and it is not justified to use it. According DLERAE (1) when we say "desorden" we mean: 1) confusion and disorderly or 2) disturbance of order and discipline of a group, a meeting, a community of people, or 3) disturbance that alters the tranquility of public, or 4) excess or abuse. Therefore, we consider more appropriate to translate it as "trastorno", whose meanings in DLERAE (1) are: 1) action and effect of modify the permanent features of something or the development of a process, and 2) mild impairment of health. The word "trastornar" has, among others, the meanings: 1

  5. The editor, the publisher, and his mother: the representation of lesbians and gays in the New York Times.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Daniel; Barclay, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The attention and prominence given to issues in media outlets may affect the importance citizens attribute to them, so the actors who influence mass media coverage decisions may have political power in society generally. This article seeks to measure the relative influence of journalists, social trends, events, government officials, editors, and owners on the New York Times coverage of lesbians and gays from 1960 to 1995. Although many factors affected the nature and frequency of such coverage, the findings of this article show that the owners of the Times exerted decisive influence. Documentary evidence reveals that the Times' owners actively intervened to suppress coverage of lesbians and gays until 1987, even as reporters and editors recognized that increased social visibility made them newsworthy. Statistical analysis confirms that, although some actual events and statements of officials attracted attention from the newspaper throughout the period, they were more likely to generate prominent coverage after 1987 when the stories were consistent with the enthusiasms of the owners. PMID:24059965

  6. "Anti-smoking data are exaggerated" versus "the data are clear and indisputable": examining letters to the editor about tobacco.

    PubMed

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Harris, Jenine K; Israel, Kendre; Schell, Sarah; Mohr, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Media advocacy plays a unique role in tobacco control policy development. Letters to the editor in particular are an interesting form of media advocacy because they reflect community sentiment regarding the policy agenda and provide insight into the public debate. The authors used ethnographic context analysis to examine the techniques used by writers of 262 tobacco-related letters to the editor published in 61 newspapers across Missouri over a 2-year period when tobacco tax and smoke-free indoor air initiatives were occurring across the state. The authors found that pro-tobacco control letter writers often used didactic strategies, citing numbers and reports, to convey information and presented their training or experience as a health professional (e.g., M.D., Ph.D.) to add legitimacy to their arguments. Anti-tobacco control letter writers, in contrast, used narrative strategies to support their stance, claimed authority as a smoker or small business owner to legitimize their claims by relating to the audience, and used collectivity to capture the attention of policymakers. These results present the importance of strategic media advocacy in tobacco control. Tobacco control advocates should increase their use of narrative strategies and collectivity in order to better connect with the public and policymakers. PMID:22376195

  7. Letter to the Editor: Appropriate selection of dose coefficients in radiological assessments: C-14 and Cl-36

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harrison, Dr John; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This letter to the editor of Journal of Radiological Protection is in response to a letter to the editor from G. M. Smith and M. C. Thorne of Great Britain concerning the appropriate selection of dose coefficients for ingested carbon-14 and chlorine-36, two of the most important long-lived components of radioactive wastes. Smith and Thorne argue that current biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for carbon and chlorine are overly cautious models from the standpoint of radiation dose estimates for C-14 and Cl-36, and that more realistic models are needed for evaluation of the hazards ofmore » these radionuclides in nuclear wastes. We (Harrison and Leggett) point out that new biokinetic models for these and other elements (developed at ORNL) will soon appear in ICRP Publications. These new models generally are considerably more realistic than current ICRP models. Examples are given for C-14 inhaled as carbon dioxide or ingested in water as bicarbonate, carbonate, or carbon dioxide.« less

  8. Telegram from Ho Chi Minh to Harry S. Truman. Teaching with Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann; Schamel, Wynell

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on a telegram sent from Hanoi, Vietnam, by Ho Chi Minh through the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) station in Kunming, China, to President Truman in which Ho asked for support of Vietnam's independence from France. Provides background information, a reproduction of the telegram, and ideas for teaching activities. (CMK)

  9. Ho 07-613 – A potential new sugarcane variety for Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clone Ho 07-613 will be up for release to Louisiana sugarcane farmers in May of 2014. This potential new variety is a joint release of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugar Cane League of the U.S.A., Inc. Ho 07-613...

  10. HO x budgets in a deciduous forest: Results from the PROPHET summer 1998 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.; Faloona, I.; Simpas, J. B.; Brune, W.; Shepson, P. B.; Couch, T. L.; Sumner, A. L.; Carroll, M. A.; Thornberry, T.; Apel, E.; Riemer, D.; Stockwell, W.

    2001-10-01

    Results from a tightly constrained photochemical point model for OH and HO2 are compared to OH and HO2 data collected during the Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport (PROPHET) summer 1998 intensive campaign held in northern Michigan. The PROPHET campaign was located in a deciduous forest marked by relatively low NOx levels and high isoprene emissions. Detailed HOx budgets are presented. The model is generally unable to match the measured OH, with the observations 2.7 times greater than the model on average. The model HO2, however, is in good agreement with the measured HO2. Even with an additional postulated OH source from the ozonolysis of unmeasured terpenes, the measured OH is 1.5 times greater than the model; the model HO2 with this added source is 15% to 30% higher than the measured HO2. Moreover, the HO2/OH ratios as modeled are 2.5 to 4 times higher than the measured ratios, indicating that the cycling between OH and HO2 is poorly described by the model. We discuss possible reasons for the discrepancies.

  11. HoCP 04-838 – A new sugarcane variety for Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HoCP 04-838 was released to the Louisiana sugar industry on May 3, 2011 by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugar Cane League of the U.S.A., Inc. HoCP 04-838 re...

  12. Lentivirus mediated HO-1 gene transfer enhances myogenic precursor cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig.

    PubMed

    Laumonier, Thomas; Yang, Sheng; Konig, Stephane; Chauveau, Christine; Anegon, Ignacio; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Cell therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other muscle diseases is limited by a massive early cell death following injections. In this study, we explored the potential benefit of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in the survival of porcine myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) transplanted in pig skeletal muscle. Increased HO-1 expression was assessed either by transient hyperthermia or by HO-1 lentiviral infection. One day after the thermic shock, we observed a fourfold and a threefold increase in HSP70/72 and HO-1 levels, respectively. This treatment protected 30% of cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis in vitro. When porcine MPC were heat-shocked prior to grafting, we improved cell survival by threefold at 5 days after autologous transplantation (26.3 +/- 5.5% surviving cells). After HO-1 lentiviral transduction, almost 60% of cells expressed the transgene and kept their myogenic properties to proliferate and fuse in vitro. Apoptosis of HO-1 transduced cells was reduced by 50% in vitro after staurosporine induction. Finally, a fivefold enhancement in cell survival was observed after transplantation of HO-1-group (47.5 +/- 9.1% surviving cells) as compared to the nls-LacZ-group or control group. These results identify HO-1 as a protective gene against early MPC death post-transplantation. PMID:18026170

  13. Paracrine action of HO-1-modified mesenchymal stem cells mediates cardiac protection and functional improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Ren, Xiaofeng; Lin, Guosheng; Zhu, Chengang; Chen, Honglei; Yin, Jiechao; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Bo; Ding, Danhua

    2008-10-01

    The aim has been to determine whether the supernatants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with adenovirus carrying human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. We have found that hHO-1 infected MSCs (hHO-1-MSCs) increased expression of hHO-1 protein. Apoptosis of cultured hHO-1-MSCs exposed to hypoxia was suppressed. Several cytokines, including HGF, bFGF, TGF-beta, VEGF and IL-1beta, were produced by hHO-1-MSCs, some being significantly enhanced under hypoxia stimulation. Meanwhile, those cytokines reduced caspase-3 level and activity in cultured adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (ARVCs) exposed to hypoxia. Supernatants obtained from hHO-1-MSCs improved left ventricular function, limited myocardial infarct size, increased microvessel density, and inhibited apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in rat myocardial infarction. It can be concluded hHO-1-modified MSCs prevent myocardial cell injury via secretion of paracrine-acting mediators. PMID:18692581

  14. HO-1-mediated macroautophagy: a mechanism for unregulated iron deposition in aging and degenerating neural tissues.

    PubMed

    Zukor, Hillel; Song, Wei; Liberman, Adrienne; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Fillebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas; Wu, Ting-Di; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Schipper, Hyman M

    2009-05-01

    Oxidative stress, deposition of non-transferrin iron, and mitochondrial insufficiency occur in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). We previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is up-regulated in AD and PD brain and promotes the accumulation of non-transferrin iron in astroglial mitochondria. Herein, dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and other techniques were employed to ascertain (i) the impact of HO-1 over-expression on astroglial mitochondrial morphology in vitro, (ii) the topography of aberrant iron sequestration in astrocytes over-expressing HO-1, and (iii) the role of iron regulatory proteins (IRP) in HO-1-mediated iron deposition. Astroglial hHO-1 over-expression induced cytoplasmic vacuolation, mitochondrial membrane damage, and macroautophagy. HO-1 promoted trapping of redox-active iron and sulfur within many cytopathological profiles without impacting ferroportin, transferrin receptor, ferritin, and IRP2 protein levels or IRP1 activity. Thus, HO-1 activity promotes mitochondrial macroautophagy and sequestration of redox-active iron in astroglia independently of classical iron mobilization pathways. Glial HO-1 may be a rational therapeutic target in AD, PD, and other human CNS conditions characterized by the unregulated deposition of brain iron. PMID:19250338

  15. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  16. Magnetic properties of Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabáni, S.; Gaz̆o, E.; Pristás̆, G.; Takác̆ová, I.; Flachbart, K.; Shitsevalova, N.; Siemensmeyer, K.; Sluchanko, N.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic properties of the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet HoB12 (with T N = 7.4 K) modified by substitution of magnetic Ho atoms through non-magnetic Lu ones are presented and discussed. In this case, in Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions, both chemical pressure resulting from different Lu3+ and Ho3+ radii and magnetic dilution take place with increasing Lu content ( x) that change properties of the system. The received results show strong indication for the existence of a quantum critical point near x = 0.9, which separates the region of magnetic order (starting with HoB12 for x = 0) and the nonmagnetic region (ending with superconducting LuB12 for x = 1).

  17. Preparation and bioevaluation of 166Ho labelled hydroxyapatite (HA) particles for radiosynovectomy.

    PubMed

    Unni, P R; Chaudhari, P R; Venkatesh, Meera; Ramamoorthy, N; Pillai, M R A

    2002-02-01

    The preparation of 166Ho labeled hydroxy apatite (HA) particles for radiosynovectomy applications is described in this paper. 166Ho was prepared by the irradiation of Ho2O3 at a flux of 1.8 x 10(13) neutrons/cm2/s for about 7 days. The irradiation resulted in the production of approximately 17 GBq of 166Ho activity at the end of six hours post end of bombardment and the corresponding specific activity was approximately 3-4 GBq/mg of Ho. The irradiated target was dissolved in 0.1 N HCl solution. Radionuclidic purity was ascertained by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. HA particles were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffractometry. Labeling studies were carried out with and without citric acid as a transchelating agent. Radiochemical yield and purity of the 166Ho-HA particles were ascertained by paper chromatography and by paper electrophoresis techniques. Labeling yield of >98% could be achieved at pH 7, with 40 mg of HA particles and 8.6 microg of Ho. 166Ho-HA particles prepared were stable for 72 h. Bio-evaluation of the 166Ho -HA particles were carried out by injecting approximately 74 MBq dose in 200 microL (approximately 8 mg of 166Ho-HA particles) directly into the arthritis induced knee joints as well as into the healthy knee joints of white New Zealand rabbits. Images of the injected joints of the animals recorded using a gamma camera at regular intervals showed good retention. Blood samples were collected from the animals and activity assayed in a scintillation detector. Experiments were also carried out under identical conditions in normal rabbits. In both the cases, it was observed that there was no significant extra articular leakage of the injected activity over the study period of 96 h post injection. PMID:11823125

  18. Kinetics of hydroperoxy radical reactions with acetone/HO2 adduct and with acetonylperoxy radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieman, F. J.; VanDerGeest, K.; Newenhouse, E.; Watkins, K.; Noell, A. C.; Hui, A.; Sander, S. P.; Okumura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions of hydroperoxy radical, HO2, with acetone and with acetonylperoxy radical, CH3C(O)CH2OO, may play an important role in the oxidation chemistry of the troposphere. Using a temperature-controlled slow-flow tube cell and laser flash photolysis of Cl2 to produce HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2OO from methanol and acetone, respectively, we studied the chemical kinetics involved over the temperature range of 215 to 298 K at 100 Torr. Rates of chemical reactions were determined by monitoring the HO2 concentration as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. (See Fig.1.) The primary reactions are rapid (<100 μsec) reactions to form the adducts HO2-CH3OH and HO2-CH3C(O)CH3 followed by HO2 reactions with itself, the adducts (chaperone mechanisms), and acetonylperoxy radical. The equilibrium constants for adduct formation were determined in previous work.1,2 In this work, rate coefficients were determined for the acetone chaperone mechanism over the entire temperature range. (E.g., see Fig. 2.) The rate coefficients and energies obtained are very similar to those found for the methanol case.1 Rate coefficients for the CH3C(O)CH2OO/HO2 reaction were also determined over a smaller temperature range, extending the measured value beyond room temperature, and yielding an activation energy. 1. Christensen et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 6948-6959. 2. Grieman et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 10527-10538. Fig.1. HO2 decay for HO2/Acetone chemistry at T = 298 K. Fig.2. Determining rate coefficient (k") for HO2/acetone chaperone effect at T = 222.5 K.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits postmyocardial infarct remodeling and restores ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Pachori, Alok S; Ward, Christopher A; Davis, J Paul; Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Kong, Deling; Zhang, Lunan; Murduck, Jared; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Perrella, Mark A; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J; Melo, Luis G

    2006-02-01

    We reported previously that predelivery of the anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) to the heart by adeno associated virus (AAV) markedly reduces injury after acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, the effect of HO-1 gene delivery on postinfarction recovery has not been investigated. In the current study, we assessed the effect of HO-1 gene delivery on post-MI left ventricle (LV) remodeling and function using echocardiographic imaging and histomorphometric approaches. Two groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 4 x 10(11) particles of AAV-LacZ (control) or AAV-hHO-1 in the LV wall. Eight wk after gene transfer, the animals were subjected to 30 min of ischemia by ligation of left anterior descending artery (LAD) followed by reperfusion. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained in a blinded fashion prior and at 1.5 and 3 months after I/R. Ejection fraction (EF) was reduced by 13% and 40% in the HO-1 and LacZ groups, respectively at 1.5 months after MI. Three months after MI, EF recovered fully in the HO-1, but only partially in the LacZ-treated animals. Post-MI LV dimensions were markedly increased and the anterior wall was markedly thinned in the LacZ-treated animals compared with the HO-1-treated animals. Significant myocardial scarring and fibrosis were observed in the LacZ-group in association with elevated levels of interstitial collagen I and III and MMP-2 activity. Post-MI myofibroblast accumulation was reduced in the HO-1-treated animals, and retroviral overexpression of HO-1 reduced proliferation of isolated cardiac fibroblasts. Our data indicate that rAAV-HO-1 gene transfer markedly reduces fibrosis and ventricular remodeling and restores LV function and chamber dimensions after myocardial infarction. PMID:16449792

  20. From the Editor's Desk, Editor's Highlights, Letters to the Editor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This issue of Toxicological Sciences features several exciting changes: a redesigned cover, revised category subheadings, and this “Look Inside ToxSci” feature. Together with my esteemed colleagues in the field of green chemistry, we have outlined some exciting opportunities for the field of toxicology in the editorial on green chemistry and toxicology. There are insightful articles on the regulatory challenges regarding mixtures that are being addressed by the European Union and on risk assessment of carbon nanotubes. In the past, we have highlighted a single article from each issue. It has become increasingly difficult to select just one article from the volume of high quality work, so beginning this month we will highlight multiple articles in each issue here in “Look Inside ToxSci.” From solvents, pesticides, and nanoparticles to the microbiome, the highlighted articles span the breadth of our field. Of course, this issue contains something that will never change; our raison d'etre …the best original research in the field of toxicology. —Gary W. Miller PMID:25232149

  1. Historical model for editor and Office of Research Integrity cooperation in handling allegations, investigation, and retraction in a contentious (Abbs) case of research misconduct.

    PubMed

    Price, Alan R; Daroff, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation between a journal editor and the federal Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in addressing investigations of research misconduct, each performing their own responsibilities while keeping each other informed of events and evidence, can be critical to the professional and regulatory resolution of a case. This paper describes the history of one of ORI's most contentious investigations that involved falsification of research on Parkinson's disease patients by James Abbs, Professor of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, published in the journal Neurology, which was handled cooperatively by the authors, who were the chief ORI investigator and the Editor-in-Chief of Neurology, respectively. PMID:25397599

  2. Dynamics of the Ho+3 magnetism in the multiferroic compound HoMnO3 investigated via time domain terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, N. P.; Laurita, N. J.; Hu, Rongwei; Cheong, S.-W.

    The multiferroic insulator HoMnO3 possesses a diverse array of magnetism due to both magnetically active Mn+3 and Ho+3 moments, the latter of which sit at two distinct sites within its non-inversion symmetric hexagonal crystal structure. While previous studies have focused on the ordering of the Mn+3 moments, little is known about the magnetic structure below 5K where it is believed that there is at least partial ordering of the Ho+3 ions. In principle, magnetic exchange interactions exist between both distinct Ho+3 and Mn+3 ions, resulting in an complex phase diagram with as many as five distinct phases found below T = 5 K and H = 3 T. While previous infrared studies have focused on the Ho+3 crystal field levels, the spin excitations in the low frequency end of the far infrared remain unknown. We report the finding of new infrared absorptions via time domain terahertz spectroscopy which we attribute to the Ho+3 moments. The corresponding field dependence is studied.

  3. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys. PMID:27553403

  4. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys. PMID:27553403

  5. Hyperfine structure in the X8, A[19.1]9 and B[21.68]8 states of HoF and X8 and A[15.6]9 state of HoCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, M. J.; Linton, C.; Adam, A. G.

    2015-02-01

    High resolution spectra of holmium monofluoride, HoF and holmium monochloride, HoCl, prepared in a laser ablation source, have been obtained using laser induced fluorescence. Spectra of the A[19.1]9-X8 0-0 and 1-0 and B[21.68]8-X8 0-0 bands of HoF and the A[15.6]9-X8 0-0 band of HoCl all show resolved hyperfine structure. Analysis of the spectra yielded magnetic hyperfine parameters, h = 0.2240(5), 0.2210(6), 0.2177(6) and 0.2488(5) cm-1 for the X (v = 0), A (v = 0 and 1) and B (v = 0) states of HoF and 0.2355(32) and 0.2448(29) cm-1 for the X (v = 0) and A (v = 0) states of HoCl, respectively. The following quadrupole coupling constants were obtained for the above six states; eQq0(HoF) = -0.0874(67), -0.0586(44), -0.0579(56), -0.0840(64) cm-1 and eQq0(HoCl) = -0.082(11), -0.060(11) cm-1. Comparison with previously determined values for HoO and HoS show that the ground state magnetic hyperfine structure in HoF and HoCl is entirely due to the Ho 4f electron and is consistent with the ground state, X8, configuration of Ho+{4f10(5I8)6s2}X- (X = F, Cl). Calculations of the ground state magnetic, h(X8), and quadrupole, eQq0(X8) hyperfine parameters from atomic hyperfine parameters are found to be consistent with the observed values for both molecules.

  6. Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet: Letter to the Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Thomas P; Wenzel, Thomas P; Ross, Marc

    2008-05-01

    Letter to the Editors from Leonard Evans, Bloomfield Hills, MI: Single-vehicle crashes, which account for half of occupant fatalities, are not mentioned in 'Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet', by Thomas P. Wenzel and Marc Ross (March-April). Simple physics shows that in such crashes risk declines as vehicle mass increases. The authors write 'driving imported luxury cars carries extremely low risk, for reasons that are not obvious'. The reasons are obvious--the cars are purchased by low-risk drivers. If they swapped vehicles with drivers of sports cars (which have high risk), the risks would stick with the drivers, not the vehicles. The article reflects the American belief that death on our roads can be substantially reduced by making vehicles in which it is safer to crash. From 1979 through 2002, Great Britain, Canada and Australia reduced fatalities by an average of 49 percent, compared with 16 percent in the U.S. Accumulating the differences over this time shows that by merely matching the safety performance of these other countries, about 200,000 fewer Americans would have died. These trends continue. In 2006 the U.S. recorded 42,642 traffic deaths, a modest 22 percent decline from our all-time high. Sweden recorded 445, a reduction of 66 percent from their all-time high. The obsessive focus on vehicles rather than on countermeasures that scientific research shows substantially reduce risk is at the core of our dramatic safety failure. The only way to substantially reduce deaths is to reduce the risk of crashing, not to make it safer to crash. The response from Drs. Wenzel and Ross: Of course Dr. Evans is correct in stating that driver behavior influences crash risk. In our article we made clear that our estimates of risk include how well a vehicle/driver combination avoids a crash, as well as how crash-worthy a vehicle (and robust a driver) is once a crash occurs. We also analyzed two variables that can account for driver behavior: the fraction of all

  7. Upconverted photoluminescence in Ho3+ and Yb3+ codoped Gd2O3 nanocrystals with and without Li+ ions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yutao; Song, Yinglin; Bai, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuxiao

    2011-01-01

    The upconversion photoluminescence of Ho(3+) ion sensitized by Yb(3+) ion in Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped Gd(2)O(3) nanocrystals with and without Li(+) is investigated in this paper. Strong fluorescence in the green (534-570 nm) and red (635-674 nm) regions of the spectrum has been observed, arising from the (5)F(4)/(5)S(2) → (5)I(8) and (5)F(5) → (5)I(8) transitions of Ho(3+) ion, respectively. Yb(3+) ion is considered to be a better sensitizer for catching enough pumping energy and transferring considerable energy to Ho(3+) in the Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) system. The upconversion intensity emitted by Ho(3+) is greatly enhanced when Li(+) is added to the Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped Gd(2)O(3) nanocrystals. PMID:20839377

  8. Superdeformation studies in {sup 150}Tb and {sup 153}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Crowell, B.

    1995-08-01

    There are now over 40 superdeformed (SD) bands known in the A {approximately} 150 region and in most cases the properties of these bands are understood in terms of single-particle excitations in the absence of pairing. By continuing the search for new SD bands we hope to gain insight into (1) the ordering of the proton and neutron orbitals near the Fermi surface in the SD well, (2) the effects that the alignment of those orbitals has on the moments of inertia, and (3) the collective excitations in the SD well. For {sup 150}Tb, which is one proton and one neutron away from the SD doubly-magic nucleus {sup 152}Dy, it should be possible to study SD bands based on both proton and neutron hole excitations. By adding one proton to the {sup 152}Dy nucleus (i.e. {sup 153}Ho) proton excitations above the Z = 66 shell gap can be studied. These excitations are important as calculations suggested that the proton intruder orbital N = 7 might become occupied. Interactions between this orbital and a N = 5 level may result in softness towards octupole vibrations. High spin states in {sup 150}Th and {sup 153}Ho were populated using the {sup 124}Sn({sup 31}P,5n) and {sup 120}Sn({sup 37}Cl,4n) reactions, respectively. In both cases the early implementation phase of Gammasphere was used to detect the decay gamma rays and over 1 x 10{sup 9} triple and higher fold coincidence events were recorded. In {sup 150}Tb, the data analysis is complete and two new SD bands were identified. The fact that Im{sup (2)} moments of inertia are sensitive to the specific high-N intruder content of the SD bands was used to suggest configurations for the two new bands. A paper reporting these results is being prepared. For {sup 153}Ho, data analysis is still in its early stages.

  9. 60W Ho:YLF oscillator-amplifier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koen, Wayne; Jacobs, Cobus; Wu, Lorinda; Strauss, Hencharl J.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a compact Ho:YLF oscillator-amplifier system end-pumped by two 54 W unpolarised Tm:fibre lasers, and produced 60.2 W of output power at 2064 nm. The oscillator consisted of a flat input coupler mirror, a 50 mm long 0.5 % doped Ho:YLF crystal rod, a 45 degree folding mirror, an AOM, and a concave output coupler mirror. The oscillator operated vertically polarised on the holmium crystal's σ-polarisation, ensuring good beam quality from the weak thermal lens. The concave output coupler had a radius of 300 mm and a reflectivity of 82 % at 2064 nm. The oscillator gave a maximum output of 24 W with an M2 of 1.06. The single-pass amplifier consisted of two 40 mm long, 0.5 % doped, Ho:YLF crystal rods and four folding mirrors. While the seed laser was pumped by a single fibre laser, the amplifier utilized the transmitted pump light from the seed laser in addition to the second fibre laser. With the first crystal amplifying on the σ-polarisation and the second crystal on the π-polarisation, the amplifier delivered 60.2 W with an M2 of 1.09, representing a gain of 2.5 while achieving an optical-to-optical efficiency of 55.5 %. When Q-switched with the AOM, the system delivered pulse lengths of between 43 and 113 ns at repetition rates from 15 to 40 kHz.

  10. Lifshitz holographic superconductor in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Cheng-Jian; Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Shu, Fu-Wen

    2016-08-01

    We study the holographic phase transition of superconductor dual to a Lifshitz black brane probed by an anisotropic scalar field in the probe limit in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. With the use of numerical and analytical method, we investigate how the critical temperature of the condensation is affected by the Lifshitz exponent z, α-correction term in the action as well as the dimensions of the gravity. We also numerically explore the condensation of the dual operator and optical conductivity of the holographic system. Various interesting properties of the holographic condensation affected by the parameters of model are discussed.

  11. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  12. Lasing characteristics of Ho:YAG single crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Miller, Keith; Johnson, Eric G; Nie, Craig D; Bera, Subhabrata; Harrington, James A; Shori, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Lasing was demonstrated for the first time at 2.09 μm in 0.5% Holmium (Ho) doped YAG single crystal fiber (SCF) fabricated using the Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) method. Output power of 23.5 W with 67.5% optical-to-optical slope efficiency is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest output power achieved at 2 µm from a SCF fabricated using LHPG. With continued improvement in the quality of the SCF and better thermal management, output power of few 100s W and higher, especially in the 2 µm spectral region, is realizable in the very near future. PMID:27137589

  13. Detailed course of the O + HO2 reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, U. C.; Klein, F. S.; Kaufman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The elementary radical-radical reactions that are of such importance in laser, astrophysical, atmospheric, and combustion processes are increasingly open to direct rate measurement. Attention is presently given to the O + HO2 reaction, which has only one exothermic product channel: OH + O2. Isotopic product analysis was conducted spectroscopically using laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It is found that the simple atom-radical reaction takes place by way of the rapid formation and breakup of an unexpected radical intermediate, thereby raising questions as to the formation, thermochemistry, and decomposition of poorly known products in many other radical-radical reaction systems.

  14. [Johannes Jacobus van Loghem, editor-in-chief of the Dutch Journal of Medicine 1947-1949 and 1954].

    PubMed

    van't Hof, S E

    2007-12-01

    Johannes Jacobus van Loghem (1878-1968) had a multifaceted career in which he combined microbiology, immunology, genetics, epidemiology and hygiene. He first became a professor of Tropical Hygiene and later a professor of Hygiene and Medical Enforcement. He discovered the role of house rats in the dissemination of the plague, which contributed to the fight against an epidemic on Java, then the Netherlands' East Indies, in 1911. He was rector of the University of Amsterdam at the outbreak of the Second World War and was fired because of his anti-German stance. From the offices of the Nederlandsch Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde (Dutch Journal of Medicine), he developed plans for reconstructing the university after the war; he later became the university's first post-war rector. Van Loghem contributed to columns in this journal for over 40 years and twice acted as interim editor-in-chief. PMID:18225796

  15. Rika-Shoshi, the First Physics Experiment Textbook Published in Japanese and its Editor, Jun'ichi Udagawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Akabane, Akira; Shozawa, Jun; Tamaki, Toyomi

    The aim of this study is to examine the teaching of physics experiment at elementary and secondary school levels at the time when Japanese science education commenced. In this report, we focused on the first Japanese textbook of physics experiment, Rika-Shoshi, published in 1882 and the editor of the book, Udagawa Jun'ichi. Many experiments in Rika-Shoshi can be performed using low-cost everyday materials. We compare Rika-Shoshi with the original English textbooks and describe Udagawa's physics teaching in the Gunma Normal School based on the documents in the Gunma University archives. We discuss how we can learn from physics education as taught about 130 years ago.

  16. A Medieval Irish Treatise on Astronomy Recalled, with a Memoir of its Translator and Editor, Maura Power (1887-1916)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck, M. T.; Conway-Piskorski, M.

    1998-01-01

    A 15th century treatise on astronomy in Irish, an adaptation of a Latin translation of an older Arabic text, was transcribed and published together with an English translation and commentaries under the title An Irish Astronomical Tract in 1914. This work is familiar to Celtic language scholars but is little known among astronomers. Here we briefly describe the text, and include a memoir of its editor and translator Maura Power, a young woman who combined a specialist knowledge of the Irish language with an understanding of medieval science. We also recall two other Irish scholars - the geologist Maxwell Close and the astronomer John Ellard Gore - who played their part in recognizing the value of this early Irish scientific text.

  17. Challenges in implementing a knowledge editor for the Arden Syntax: knowledge base maintenance and standardization of database linkages.

    PubMed Central

    Jenders, Robert A.; Dasgupta, Balendu

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT: Incorporation of research findings into clinical practice lags behind their dissemination in the medical literature. Arden Syntax is a standard that could be used to encode evidence in a clinical decision support system (CDSS). However, dissemination of knowledge is hampered by lack of standard linkages to clinical databases. OBJECTIVE: To create a knowledge editor that facilitates transfer of knowledge from the medical literature to clinical practice via a CDSS. METHODS: Using a Web browser-based application, we implemented linkages to MEDLINE to permit queries on demand and registration of queries to be executed periodically, with results copied into Arden Medical Logic Modules (MLMs). To facilitate standardization of MLMs, database linkages are encoded using emerging HL7 standards such as a data model (virtual medical record). CONCLUSIONS: A Web-based application can facilitate transfer of knowledge into clinical practice and knowledge base maintenance through periodic queries and deployment of standards for knowledge representation. PMID:12463846

  18. [Book review] Ecological Scale - Theory and Applications by D.L. Peterson and V. Thomas Parker, editors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, A.F., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Covering the complexity of the scale topic, this volume represents an important compilation of information on a topic that is often misunderstood, and one for which little attention is paid (although, thankfully, this seems to be on the decline). Although technical, this book provides full exposure to the scale issue in ecology and is an important reference for researchers and resource managers who are working to understand and preserve ecological function in parks. The authors and editors have combined to provide a needed examination of a very important topic. In summary, why purchase all those books on scale when just one will do? The mountain of information alone stuffed into this one book should prompt all parks to get a copy and have it on hand as a quick and ready reference.

  19. Low temperature specific heat of frustrated antiferromagnet HoInCu4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weickert, Franziska; Fritsch, Veronika; Bambaugh, Ryan; Sarrao, John; Thompson, Joe D.; Movshovich, Roman

    2014-03-01

    We present low temperature specific heat measurements of single crystal HoInCu4, down to 35 mK and in magnetic field up to 12 Tesla. Ho atoms are arranged in an FCC lattice of the edge-sharing tetrahedra, and undergo an antiferromagnetic ordering at TN = 0.76 K, with the frustration parameter f = -ΘCW /TN of 14.3. Magnetic AF order is suppressed in field H0 ~ 4 T. The low temperature Schottky anomaly due to Ho evolves smoothly as a function of field through H0 and TN. The peak value of the anomaly remains roughly constant from 0 T to 12 T. The temperature of the anomaly's peak remains constant at TSch ~ 170 mK for HHo spins in zero field as well as an increasing moment on Ho once the AF order is suppressed. The measured entropy of HoInCu4 at 12 T and 2K is 17.32 J/mol-K ~ Rln8 expected for an I =7/2 nuclear spin of Ho. Work at LANL was performed under the auspices of the US DOE, OBES, MSE division.

  20. Photocatalytic activity of Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide coated magnetite.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongliang; Xiang, Yongfang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yao, Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    A composite photocatalyst (Ho/TiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4)) with Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide (Ho/TiO(2)) shell and a magnetite core was prepared by coating photoactive Ho/TiO(2) onto a magnetic Fe(3)O(4) core through the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate (Ti(OBu)(4), TBT) in water/oil (w/o) microemulsion with precursors of Ho(NO(3))(3) and TBT in the presence of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The morphological, structural and optical properties of the prepared samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Vis diffusive reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). The effect of Ho ion content on the photocatalytic activity was studied. The photodegradation behavior of the prepared photocatalyst under UV and visible light was investigated in aqueous solution using methyl orange (MO) as target pollutant. The results showed that the prepared photocatalyst was activated by visible light and used as effective catalyst in photo-oxidation reactions. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of the prepared photocatalyst was also confirmed. Moreover, Ho/TiO(2) was tightly bound to Fe(3)O(4) and could be easily recovered from the medium by a simple magnetic process. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants. PMID:21208216

  1. HO-1 Upregulation Attenuates Adipocyte Dysfunction, Obesity, and Isoprostane Levels in Mice Fed High Fructose Diets

    PubMed Central

    Harsh, Mohit; Sodhi, Komal; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fructose metabolism is an unregulated metabolic pathway and excessive fructose consumption is known to activate ROS. HO-1 is a potent antioxidant gene that plays a key role in decreasing ROS and isoprostanes. We examined whether the fructose-mediated increase in adipocyte dysfunction involves an increase in isoprostanes and that pharmacological induction of HO-1 would decrease both isoprostane levels and adipogenesis. Methods and Results. We examined the effect of fructose, on adipogenesis in human MSCs in the presence and absence of CoPP, an inducer of HO-1. Fructose increased adipogenesis and the number of large lipid droplets while decreasing the number of small lipid droplets (P < 0.05). Levels of heme and isoprostane in fructose treated MSC-derived adipocytes were increased. CoPP reversed these effects and markedly increased HO-1 and the Wnt signaling pathway. The high fructose diet increased heme levels in adipose tissue and increased circulating isoprostane levels (P < 0.05 versus control). Fructose diets decreased HO-1 and adiponectin levels in adipose tissue. Induction of HO-1 by CoPP decreased isoprostane synthesis (P < 0.05 versus fructose). Conclusion. Fructose treatment resulted in increased isoprostane production and adipocyte dysfunction, which was reversed by the increased expression of HO-1. PMID:25295182

  2. Development of a Chemiluminescence Method for Gas-Phase HO2 Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Lloyd, J.; Springston, S.

    2003-12-01

    Hydroperoxyl Radical (HO2) is a highly reactive intermediate species that participates in photochemical processes in the troposphere. Accurate measurement of HO2 will facilitate the verification of the ozone production mechanism used by the atmospheric chemistry community. HO2 is also the major source of H2O2, which is responsible for the oxidation of SO2 in droplets. Here, we describe a new HO2 detection method based on flow injection analysis (FIA) with a chemiluminescence detector. Gas-phase HO2 is first scrubbed into a pH 9 borax buffer solution, then injected into a chemiluminescence detector, where HO2 and its conjugate base O2- react with MCLA, a synthetic analog of the luciferin from the crustacean Cypridina, to emit light at 465 nm. This technique shows high sensitivity (DL = 0.1 nM in liquid phase or 1 pptv in gas phase) and selectivity for the HO2 / O2- system. A unique feature of our technique is the calibration with a radiolytic method that uses a 60Co gamma ray source to quantitatively produce stable aqueous HO2 / O2- standards. This calibration method is highly reproducible, producing an instrument response that varies less than 5% from day to day. We tested our instrument in the meteorology field at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is considered a clean remote rural site with background ozone levels about 30 ppbv. On July 17, 2003, a clear sunny day, with a steady NW wind, HO2 started to build up after sunrise and reached a maximum of 9 pptv at about 3 pm local time, approximately two hours after the maximum solar intensity. Our technique has the advantages of simplicity, low cost and ease of operation. It is especially suitable for field measurements, where space and energy resources are usually limited.

  3. Downregulation of Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO-1) Activity in Hematopoietic Cells Enhances Their Engraftment After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Moore, Joseph B; Zhao, John; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Grubczak, Kamil; Rzeszotek, Sylwia; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-response enzyme that not only catalyzes the degradation of heme (e.g., released from erythrocytes) but also has an important function in various physiological and pathophysiological states associated with cellular stress, such as ischemic/reperfusion injury. HO-1 has a well-documented anti-inflammatory potential, and HO-1 has been reported to have a negative effect on adhesion and migration of neutrophils in acute inflammation in a model of peritonitis. This finding is supported by our recent observation that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) from HO-1 KO mice are easy mobilizers, since they respond better to peripheral blood chemotactic gradients than wild-type littermates. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that transient inhibition of HO-1 by nontoxic small-molecule inhibitors would enhance migration of HSPCs in response to bone marrow chemoattractants and thereby facilitate their homing. To directly address this issue, we generated several human hematopoietic cell lines in which HO-1 was upregulated or downregulated. We also exposed murine and human BM-derived cells to small-molecule activators and inhibitors of HO-1. Our results indicate that HO-1 is an inhibitor of hematopoietic cell migration in response to crucial BM homing chemoattractants such as stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Most importantly, our in vitro and in vivo animal experiments demonstrate for the first time that transiently inhibiting HO-1 activity in HSPCs by small-molecule inhibitors improves HSPC engraftment. We propose that this simple and inexpensive strategy could be employed in the clinical setting to improve engraftment of HSPCs, particularly in those situations in which the number of HSPCs available for transplant is limited (e.g., when transplanting umbilical cord blood). PMID:27412411

  4. Mechanical Stress Changes the Complex Interplay Between HO-1, Inflammation and Fibrosis, During Excisional Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Suttorp, Maarten; Gerritsen, Marlous M.; Wong, Ronald J.; van Run-van Breda, Coby; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Brouwer, Katrien M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Carels, Carine E. L.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress following surgery or injury can promote pathological wound healing and fibrosis, and lead to functional loss and esthetic problems. Splinted excisional wounds can be used as a model for inducing mechanical stress. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to orchestrate the defense against inflammatory and oxidative insults that drive fibrosis. Here, we investigated the activation of the HO-1 system in a splinted and non-splinted full-thickness excisional wound model using HO-1-luc transgenic mice. Effects of splinting on wound closure, HO-1 promoter activity, and markers of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed. After seven days, splinted wounds were more than three times larger than non-splinted wounds, demonstrating a delay in wound closure. HO-1 promoter activity rapidly decreased following removal of the (epi)dermis, but was induced in both splinted and non-splinted wounds during skin repair. Splinting induced more HO-1 gene expression in 7-day wounds; however, HO-1 protein expression remained lower in the epidermis, likely due to lower numbers of keratinocytes in the re-epithelialization tissue. Higher numbers of F4/80-positive macrophages, αSMA-positive myofibroblasts, and increased levels of the inflammatory genes IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 were present in 7-day splinted wounds. Surprisingly, mRNA expression of newly formed collagen (type III) was lower in 7-day wounds after splinting, whereas, VEGF and MMP-9 were increased. In summary, these data demonstrate that splinting delays cutaneous wound closure and HO-1 protein induction. The pro-inflammatory environment following splinting may facilitate higher myofibroblast numbers and increase the risk of fibrosis and scar formation. Therefore, inducing HO-1 activity against mechanical stress-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be an interesting strategy to prevent negative effects of surgery on growth and function in patients with orofacial clefts or in patients with

  5. A Reevaluation of Airborne HO(x) Observations from NASA Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Jennifer; Crawford, James H.; Chen, Gao; Brune, William H.; Faloona, Ian C.; Tan, David; Harder, Hartwig; Martinez, Monica

    2006-01-01

    In-situ observations of tropospheric HO(x) (OH and HO2) obtained during four NASA airborne campaigns (SUCCESS, SONEX, PEM-Tropics B and TRACE-P) are reevaluated using the NASA Langley time-dependent photochemical box model. Special attention is given to previously diagnosed discrepancies between observed and predicted HO2 which increase with higher NO(x) levels and at high solar zenith angles. This analysis shows that much of the model discrepancy at high NO(x) during SUCCESS can be attributed to modeling observations at time-scales too long to capture the nonlinearity of HO(x) chemistry under highly variable conditions for NO(x). Discrepancies at high NO(x) during SONEX can be moderated to a large extent by complete use of all available precursor observations. Differences in kinetic rate coefficients and photolysis frequencies available for previous studies versus current recommendations also explain some of the disparity. Each of these causes is shown to exert greater influence with increasing NO(x) due to both the chemical nonlinearity between HO(x) and NO(x) and the increased sensitivity of HO(x) to changes in sources at high NO(x). In contrast, discrepancies at high solar zenith angles will persist until an adequate nighttime source of HO(x) can be identified. It is important to note that this analysis falls short of fully eliminating the issue of discrepancies between observed and predicted HO(x) for high NO(x) environments. These discrepancies are not resolved with the above causes in other data sets from ground-based field studies. Nevertheless, these results highlight important considerations in the application of box models to observationally based predictions of HO(x) radicals.

  6. On Paper or Hypermedia? The Effect of Procedural Information in Digital Video Format in the Learning of a Music Score Editor Program by Novice Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gimenez, Jesus Tejada; Saenz de Jubera, Magdalena

    This study, by means of an experimental design, examines whether the use of an electronic manual is more effective and efficient than a print manual for the training of novice users with a music score editor program. Differences in access to the two types of manuals were looked for, and information on users' perceptions regarding the materials…

  7. Erratum: Letter to the Editor: Exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma (buphthalmos) from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} is the reprint of a corrected table from a previous paper about the exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11.

  8. Problems of Journalism; Proceedings of the 1975 Annual Convention of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (Washington, D.C., April 16-18, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society of Newspaper Editors, Easton, PA.

    This document reports the 1975 proceedings of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) convention held in Washington, D.C., April 16-18. The contents include a list of officers and directors, past presidents of the society, and a copy of the ASNE Code of Ethics. Also contained in the document are reports on such individual sessions as…

  9. Response to the Letter to the Editor of Crop Science from Donald R. Davis regarding our research article published in Crop Science (2011: 51:2721-2727)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This letter serves as a response to the Letter to the Editor submitted by Donald R. Davis regarding our research article entitled “Mineral Concentration of Broccoli Florets in Relation to Year of Cultivar Release” published in Crop Science (2011, 51:2721-2727). In our manuscript, we clearly stated ...

  10. Sylvia Taylor Johnson, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of "The Journal of Negro Education" (1994-2001): A World-Class Champion Runner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Gerunda B.; Wallace, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    With characteristic crystal clarity and advanced, sharply honed research skills, Dr. Sylvia T. Johnson was able to take full advantage of holding the position of Editor-in-Chief of "The Journal of Negro Education" from 1994 to 2001. This article summarizes her accomplishments through the many hats she wore.

  11. Letter to The Editor: Setting the record straight: a rebuttal to an erroneous analysis on transgenic insecticidal crops and natural enemies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A letter to the editor was submitted in reply to an article published in Environmental Entomology by Lovei, Andow and Arpaia entitled “ Transgenic Insecticidal Crops and Natural Enemies: A Detailed Review of Laboratory Studies”. The non-target effects of transgenic insecticidal crops has been a topi...

  12. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation of the critical organizational/business processes. In particular, this paper examines the issues of execution atomicity and failure atomicity, differentiating between correctness requirements of system failures and logical failures, and surveys techniques that can be used to ensure data consistency in workflow management systems. While the first paper is concerned with correctness assuming transactional workflows in which selective transactional properties are associated with individual tasks or the entire workflow, the second paper, `Scheduling workflows by enforcing intertask dependencies' by Attie et al, assumes that the tasks can be either transactions or other activities involving legacy systems. This second paper describes the modelling and specification of conditions involving events and dependencies among tasks within a workflow using temporal logic and finite state automata. It also presents a scheduling algorithm that enforces all stated dependencies by executing at any given time only those events that are allowed by all the dependency automata and in an order as specified by the dependencies. In any system with decentralized control, there is a need to effectively cope with the tension that exists between autonomy and consistency requirements. In `A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems', Ben-Shaul and Heineman focus on the specific requirement of enforcing failure atomicity in decentralized, autonomous and interacting workflow management systems. Their paper describes a model in which each workflow manager must be able to specify the sequence of tasks that comprise an atomic unit for the purposes of correctness, and the degrees of local and global atomicity for the purpose of cooperation with other workflow managers. The paper also discusses a realization of this model in which treaties and summits provide an agreement mechanism, while underlying transaction managers are responsible for maintaining failure atomicity. The fourth and fifth papers are experience papers describing a workflow management system and a large scale workflow application, respectively. Schill and Mittasch, in `Workflow management systems on top of OSF DCE and OMG CORBA', describe a decentralized workflow management system and discuss its implementation using two standardized middleware platforms, namely, OSF DCE and OMG CORBA. The system supports a new approach to workflow management, introducing several new concepts such as data type management for integrating various types of data and quality of service for various services provided by servers. A problem common to both database applications and workflows is the handling of missing and incomplete information. This is particularly pervasive in an `electronic market' with a huge number of retail outlets producing and exchanging volumes of data, the application discussed in `Information flow in the DAMA project beyond database managers: information flow managers'. Motivated by the need for a method that allows a task to proceed in a timely manner if not all data produced by other tasks are available by its deadline, Russell et al propose an architectural framework and a language that can be used to detect, approximate and, later on, to adjust missing data if necessary. The final paper, `The evolution towards flexible workflow systems' by Nutt, is complementary to the other papers and is a survey of issues and of work related to both workflow and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) areas. In particular, the paper provides a model and a categorization of the dimensions which workflow management and CSCW systems share. Besides summarizing the recent advancements towards efficient workflow management, the papers in this special issue suggest areas open to investigation and it is our hope that they will also provide the stimulus for further research and development in the area of workflow management systems.

  13. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation of the critical organizational/business processes. In particular, this paper examines the issues of execution atomicity and failure atomicity, differentiating between correctness requirements of system failures and logical failures, and surveys techniques that can be used to ensure data consistency in workflow management systems. While the first paper is concerned with correctness assuming transactional workflows in which selective transactional properties are associated with individual tasks or the entire workflow, the second paper, `Scheduling workflows by enforcing intertask dependencies' by Attie et al, assumes that the tasks can be either transactions or other activities involving legacy systems. This second paper describes the modelling and specification of conditions involving events and dependencies among tasks within a workflow using temporal logic and finite state automata. It also presents a scheduling algorithm that enforces all stated dependencies by executing at any given time only those events that are allowed by all the dependency automata and in an order as specified by the dependencies. In any system with decentralized control, there is a need to effectively cope with the tension that exists between autonomy and consistency requirements. In `A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems', Ben-Shaul and Heineman focus on the specific requirement of enforcing failure atomicity in decentralized, autonomous and interacting workflow management systems. Their paper describes a model in which each workflow manager must be able to specify the sequence of tasks that comprise an atomic unit for the purposes of correctness, and the degrees of local and global atomicity for the purpose of cooperation with other workflow managers. The paper also discusses a realization of this model in which treaties and summits provide an agreement mechanism, while underlying transaction managers are responsible for maintaining failure atomicity. The fourth and fifth papers are experience papers describing a workflow management system and a l

  14. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    The organization of a distributed system can have a tremendous impact on its capabilities, its performance, and its ability to evolve to meet changing requirements. For example, the client - server organization model has proven to be adequate for organizing a distributed system as a number of distributed servers that offer various functions to client processes across the network. However, it lacks peer-to-peer capabilities, and experience with the model has been predominantly in the context of local networks. To achieve peer-to-peer cooperation in a more global context, systems issues of scale, heterogeneity, configuration management, accounting and sharing are crucial, and the complexity of migrating from locally distributed to more global systems demands new tools and techniques. An emphasis on interfaces and modules leads to the modelling of a complex distributed system as a collection of interacting objects that communicate with each other only using requests sent to well defined interfaces. Although object granularity typically varies at different levels of a system architecture, the same object abstraction can be applied to various levels of a computing architecture. Since 1989, the Object Management Group (OMG), an international software consortium, has been defining an architecture for distributed object systems called the Object Management Architecture (OMA). At the core of the OMA is a `software bus' called an Object Request Broker (ORB), which is specified by the OMG Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification. The OMA distributed object model fits the structure of heterogeneous distributed applications, and is applied in all layers of the OMA. For example, each of the OMG Object Services, such as the OMG Naming Service, is structured as a set of distributed objects that communicate using the ORB. Similarly, higher-level OMA components such as Common Facilities and Domain Interfaces are also organized as distributed objects that can be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S Rahkila and S Stenberg, discusses the application of CORBA to telecommunication management networks. In the second paper, P Narasimhan, L E Moser and P M Melliar-Smith present a fault-tolerant extension of an ORB. The third paper, by J Liang, S Sédillot and B Traverson, provides an overview of the CORBA Transaction Service and its integration with the ISO Distributed Transaction Processing protocol. In the fourth paper, D Sherer, T Murer and A Würtz discuss the evolution of a cooperative software engineering infrastructure to a CORBA-based framework. The fifth paper, by R Fatoohi, evaluates the communication performance of a commercially-available Object Request Broker (Orbix from IONA Technologies) on several networks, and compares the performance with that of more traditional communication primitives (e.g., BSD UNIX sockets and PVM). We wish to thank both the referees and the authors of these papers, as their cooperation was fundamental in ensuring timely publication.

  15. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    Quality of Service (QoS) has emerged in the last few years as a topical and challenging research area in distributed systems. For a broad definition of QoS we refer to the ISO's Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (ISO/IEC IS 10746-2): `The notion of QoS is a system or object property, and consists of a set of quality requirements on the collective behaviour of one or more objects . . .'. In the context of this special issue, QoS is primarily associated with systems such as distributed multimedia application platforms or distributed simulations. The QoS requirements of such systems typically relate to measures of rate and latency of information transfer, probability of a communication being disrupted, probability of system failure, probability of storage failure, etc. The role of QoS management is thus to ensure that applications are able to specify and obtain the quality of service that they require for their correct execution. In general, the functions of QoS management may be subsumed under the following headings: (i) QoS specification and mapping, (ii) QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control and (iii) QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation. QoS specification defines the QoS required by an application in terms of both timeliness constraints and guarantees. QoS mapping then translates between QoS representations at different system levels, relieving the user of the necessity of thinking in terms of low-level QoS representations. For example, a user may express a jitter requirement by manipulating a slider in a GUI, and this could be mapped at the lower layers into a requirement for an absolute bound on ATM cell jitter and a jitter smoothing buffer of a certain size. QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control are collectively responsible for configuring a system in preparation for the execution of a QoS requiring application. QoS negotiation provides a framework in which the QoS levels supported by individual system components (e.g. file server, operating system and network) are composed to build the required end-to-end service. Providing such a service may well require explicit resource allocation (e.g. of network bandwidth or CPU cycles); admission control may also be required to ensure that requested QoS levels can be met. QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation are concerned with supporting QoS during the run time of an application. QoS monitoring and QoS adaptation are conceptually related in a feedback loop in which current QoS levels are observed and fine grained reconfiguration is triggered as necessary to ensure that the required levels are maintained. An example of such a loop is to be found in Internet tools such as vic or vat which monitor network delay and adapt by adjusting the size of an elastic playout buffer. QoS renegotiation is a coarser grained adaptation, often explicitly initiated by the user, in which required QoS levels are revised at run time. An example could be a user scaling a video display from colour to monochrome so that sufficient resources can be freed to support an additional connection. The papers in this special issue were selected from the fourth QoS Workshop held in Paris in March 1996. To understand the overall evolution of QoS research it is useful to know some background on the series of workshops of which the Paris workshop was a part. The first workshop to be dedicated exclusively to QoS issues was organized in Canada by the European RACE project R2088 (TOPIC) in cooperation with the University of Montreal in June 1994. A European counterpart of this initiating event occurred in the same year in September 1994 in Aachen, Germany. This latter event was held in cooperation with the European Conference on Intelligence in Broadband Services and Networks (IS&N94). A third workshop was then held in conjunction with the IFIP conference on Open Distributed Processing (ICODP95) in Brisbane, Australia in March 1995. By 1996 more independence, and also more recognition of QoS as an independent research area, was achieved in the

  16. Measurements of HO2 chemical kinetics with a new detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Manzanares, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    In this research program, HO2 was detected by the OH(A-X) photofragment from dissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. This detection method was applied to measure the reaction rate constant of HO2 + O3. This reaction rate constant is needed for the understanding of stratospheric chemistry. Since C12 was used in the flow system, photoexcitation of C12 may produce fluorescence to interfere with the measurements. Thus, the photoexcitation process of C12 in the vacuum ultraviolet region was also examined in this research period using synchrotron radiation as a light source. The research results are summarized.

  17. Resistivity of the HoIn 3 and ErIn 3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletowski, Z.; Sławiński, P.

    1990-11-01

    We report results of the resistivity measurements of HoIn 3 and ErIn 3 in temperature range 4.2-300 K. A comparison of these data with that for the nonmagnetic LuIn 3 indicates a big similarity of these three temperature dependences of the resistivity. An appearance of the spin disorder resistivity for the HoIn 3 and ErIn 3 is noticed. The resistivity results confirm the existence of an anomaly observed before for the HoIn 3 in the ordered phase.

  18. Thermomechanical properties of Cr:Tm:Ho:Y sub 3 Al sub 5 O sub 12

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, J.E.

    1990-05-15

    The thermomechanical properties of Cr:Ho:Tm:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} have been measured and compared to similar measurements on Nd:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}. We find that, in general, the properties are similar, with the single exception being thermal diffusivity. Nd:YAG has substantially higher thermal diffusivity than Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG. Consequently, the intrinsic thermal stress resistance figure of merit which governs a materials resistance to fracture in the presence of a steady thermal gradient is lower in Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG than in Nd:YAG. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Single-longitudinal-mode Ho:LuAG laser at 2.1 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Ju, Y. L.; Dai, T. Y.; Cui, Z.; Wu, J.; Yao, B. Q.; Duan, X. M.; Shen, Y. J.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2016-02-01

    In this letter we report a continuous wave Ho:LuAG laser running on single-longitudinal-mode operation. Two Fabry-Perot etalons were used to narrow the laser line-width. By regulating the angle of the etalons, single-longitudinal-mode lasing was achieved at a wavelength of 2100.65 nm. The maximum power and the slope efficiency of single-longitudinal-mode Ho:LuAG output are 264 mW and 14.5%, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first time a Ho:LuAG laser with single-longitudinal-mode operation has been obtained.

  20. Measurement of atmospheric HO by a chemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, R. Subramonia; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    1986-12-01

    The parameters for a chemical technique can be outlined from the following set of desirable goals: (1) sufficient conversion of tracer species A to product B that B can be measured quantitatively in the presence of A and a great excess of air; (2) specificity of reaction such that A is converted to B only by reaction with HO; and (3) sufficient sensitivity for detection that the ambient concentration of HO is not seriously perturbed by the presence of A and B. This proposed study involves finding a chemical reaction specific enough for OH, and a measurement of the product formed. What one wants is a rate constant of about 10 to the -10th power cu cm/s, so that 0.1 percent of the OH will be converted in 100 s. Laboratory studies are needed to find a reaction which will fill this bill, yielding a product in quantity sufficient for precise measurement. This is an extremely fast constant and the search may be difficult. Again there is a question of perturbing the local environment, while still providing a sensitive measurement. Also the temperature and pressure dependence of the reaction rate is a complicated function for many of these species (that is, one must use a RRKM or Troe-based picture), and must be taken into account.

  1. Minimally invasive scoliosis treatment with a Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, Christian G.; Lang, Robert D.; Goetz, Marcus H.

    2000-11-01

    Today most surgical treatment of spinal deformations is concentrated on invasive mechanical techniques with long operation times and major effects on the patient's mobility. The proposed minimally invasive technique using laser light for tissue ablation offers a possibility of gentle scoliosis treatment. It is thought that an early removal of the epiphysial growth zone on the convex side over several vertebrae results in a straightening of the spine. In a first evaluation, four different laser systems including argon ion, Nd:YAG (Q-switched), Nd:YAG (cw), and Ho:YAG laser were compared with respect to thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ablation rates, efficiency and laser handling. For in-vivo investigation, fresh lamb spine was used. Comparison showed that the Ho:YAG laser is the most appropriate laser for the given goal, providing efficient photoablation with moderate thermal effects on the adjacent tissue. In a second step the proposed minimally invasive operation technique was performed in in-vivo experiments on young foxhounds using 3D- thoracoscopic operation techniques. During these operations temperature mapping was done using fiber-optic fluorescent probes. After 12 months of normal growth the animals were sacrificed and x-ray as well as MRI was performed on the spine. First results show a positive effect of scoliotic growth in two cases. Being able to produce a scoliosis by hemiepiphysiodesis on the vertebra, It is thought that this technique is successful for a straightening of the spine on patients with scoliosis.

  2. Gravitational collapse in Hořava-Lifshitz theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Jared; Lenells, Jonatan; Satheeshkumar, V. H.; Wang, Anzhong

    2013-07-01

    We study gravitational collapse of a spherical fluid in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ, where |λ-1| characterizes the deviation of the theory from general relativity in the infrared limit. The junction conditions across the surface of a collapsing star are derived under the (minimal) assumption that the junctions be mathematically meaningful in terms of distribution theory. When the collapsing star is made of a homogeneous and isotropic perfect fluid, and the external region is described by a stationary spacetime, the problem reduces to the matching of six independent conditions. If the perfect fluid is pressureless (a dust fluid), it is found that the matching is also possible. In particular, in the case λ=1, the external spacetime is described by the Sch-(anti-)de Sitter solution written in Painlevé-Gullstrand coordinates. In the case λ≠1, the external spacetime is static but not asymptotically flat. Our treatment can be easily generalized to other versions of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity or, more generally, to any theory of higher-order derivative gravity.

  3. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; et al

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flipmore » process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.« less

  4. Measurement of atmospheric HO by a chemical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, R. Subramonia; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    1986-01-01

    The parameters for a chemical technique can be outlined from the following set of desirable goals: (1) sufficient conversion of tracer species A to product B that B can be measured quantitatively in the presence of A and a great excess of air; (2) specificity of reaction such that A is converted to B only by reaction with HO; and (3) sufficient sensitivity for detection that the ambient concentration of HO is not seriously perturbed by the presence of A and B. This proposed study involves finding a chemical reaction specific enough for OH, and a measurement of the product formed. What one wants is a rate constant of about 10 to the -10th power cu cm/s, so that 0.1 percent of the OH will be converted in 100 s. Laboratory studies are needed to find a reaction which will fill this bill, yielding a product in quantity sufficient for precise measurement. This is an extremely fast constant and the search may be difficult. Again there is a question of perturbing the local environment, while still providing a sensitive measurement. Also the temperature and pressure dependence of the reaction rate is a complicated function for many of these species (that is, one must use a RRKM or Troe-based picture), and must be taken into account.

  5. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  6. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Ge; Sauler, Maor; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    The lung endothelium is a major target for inflammatory and oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction is a crucial defense mechanism during oxidant challenges, such as hyperoxia. The role of lung endothelial HO-1during hyperoxia in vivo is not well defined. We engineered lentiviral vectors with microRNA (miRNA) sequences controlled by vascular endothelium cadherin (VE-cad) to study the specific role of lung endothelial HO-1. Wild-type (WT) murine lung endothelial cells (MLECs) or WT mice were treated with lentivirus and exposed to hyperoxia (95% oxygen). We detected HO-1 knockdown (∼55%) specifically in the lung endothelium. MLECs and lungs showed approximately a 2-fold increase in apoptosis and ROS generation after HO-1 silencing. We also demonstrate for the first time that silencing endothelial HO-1 has the same effect on lung injury and survival as silencing HO-1 in multiple lung cell types and that HO-1 regulates caspase 3 activation and autophagy in endothelium during hyperoxia. These studies demonstrate the utility of endothelial-targeted gene silencing in vivo using lentiviral miRNA constructs to assess gene function and that endothelial HO-1 is an important determinant of survival during hyperoxia.—Zhang, Y., Jiang, G., Sauler, M., Lee, P. J. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury. PMID:23771928

  7. Distinct photoproducts of hydroxylated polybromodiphenyl ethers from different photodegradation pathways: a case study of 2'-HO-BDE-68.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing; Chen, Jingwen; Zhao, Hongxia; Wang, Xingbao; Xie, Hong-Bin

    2015-02-01

    Hydroxylated polyhalodiphenyl ethers (HO-PXDEs) are emerging aquatic pollutants. Previous studies have shown that HO-PXDEs can photogenerate dioxins and phenolic compounds. However, it is unclear which photochemical pathways are responsible for the various photoproducts. This study investigates the direct photolysis and photooxidation initiated by (1)O2 and ˙OH that can be formed by photosensitization, taking 2'-HO-2,3',4,5'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2'-HO-BDE-68) as a case study. The results show that 1,3,8-tribromodibenzo-p-dioxin can only be produced during direct photolysis. By mass spectrum analysis, four dihydroxylated polybromodiphenyl ethers, generated from both direct and indirect photodegradation were confirmed. Among them, di-HO-tribromodiphenyl ether (di-HO-TBDE) was the main product generated from direct photohydrolysis. Most probably, the di-HO-TBDE is 2',5'-HO-2,3',4-tribromodiphenyl ether, as was suggested by density functional theory calculations. Ether bond cleavage is a dominant pathway for the direct photolysis and photooxidation reactions leading to 2,4-dibromophenol as the dominant product. The yields of the products, which are irrespective of reaction time and can be employed to compare the ability of different HO-PXDEs to photogenerate a given product, were reported. This study indicates that for accurate ecological risk assessment of HO-PXDEs, their different photodegradation pathways that may lead to different photoproducts should be considered. PMID:25569145

  8. Determination of the K absorption edge energy of Ho in element and its compounds using the bremsstrahlung technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjana, K. M.; Badiger, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The K shell binding energies of Ho in element and in compounds Ho2O3 and HoF3 have been measured for the first time by adopting a novel method. The method involves a weak beta source, an external bremsstrahlung (EB) converter, element and compound targets and a high-resolution HPGe detector coupled to a 16K multichannel analyser. A spectrum of continuous EB photons, produced by the interaction of beta particles from a 90Sr-90Y radioactive source with an iron foil, is allowed to pass through the element and compound targets of Ho. The spectrum of transmitted EB photons is measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector spectrometer. The transmitted spectrum shows a sudden drop in intensity at K shell binding energy of the target. Such a sudden drop, which is essentially due to the onset of the K shell photoelectric effect, has been used to determine the K shell binding energy of Ho in element. The K shell binding energies of Ho in Ho2O3 and HoF3 compounds have also been determined using the same technique. From these data, the chemical shift in the K shell binding energy has been measured. It is found to be positive for Ho2O3 and negative for HoF3, indicating the dependence of the chemical shift on the crystal structure.

  9. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of Ho3+ doped LaAlO3 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hong Ha Thi; Atabaev, Timur S; Kim, Hyung-Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2012-07-01

    Nanosized particles with different Ho3+ concentrations were synthesized in LaAlO3 lattices using a simple Pechini-type sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction measurements were used to investigate the structural composition and the effects of holmium dopant concentration on LaAlO3:Ho3+ crystal formation. Field-emission scanning-electron microscopy images confirm the formation of approximately spherical particles with an average size about 100 nm. The photoluminescence results yielded optimal holmium ion concentration in LaAlO3 host matrices was about 3% in mol equivalent. The mechanism that are responsible for the photoluminescence emission processes discussed with the help of Ho3+-ion Dieke energy level diagram. Power dependent slope measurements were performed to identify up-conversion photoluminescence process involved in LaAlO3:Ho3+. PMID:22966668

  10. Raman scattering of rare earth sesquioxide Ho2O3: A pressure and temperature dependent study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sugandha Dogra; Samanta, K.; Singh, Jasveer; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.

    2014-10-01

    Pressure and temperature dependent Raman scattering studies on Ho2O3 have been carried out to investigate the structural transition and the anharmonic behavior of the phonons. Ho2O3 undergoes a transition from cubic to monoclinic phase above 15.5 GPa, which is partially reversible on decompression. The anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of Ho2O3 from 80 K to 440 K has been investigated. We find an anomalous line-width change with temperature. The mode Grüneisen parameter of bulk Ho2O3 was estimated from high pressure Raman investigation up to 29 GPa. Furthermore, the anharmonic components were calculated from the temperature dependent Raman scattering.

  11. Injection-seeded operation of a Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Single-frequency Tm,Ho:YAG lasers operating near 2 microns are attractive sources for several applications including eye-safe laser radar (lidar) and pumping of AgGaSe2 parametric oscillators for efficient generation of longer wavelengths. As part of a program to develop a coherent lidar system using Tm,Ho:YAG lasers, a diode laser-pumped tunable CW single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser and a flashlamp-pumped single-transverse-mode Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser were developed. The CW laser was used to injection-seed the flashlamp-pumped laser, resulting in SLM Q-switched output. Operational characteristics of the CW and Q-switched lasers and injection-seeding results are reported.

  12. Low energy spin dynamics in the spin ice, Ho2Sn2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Huq, Ashfia; Diallo, Souleymane Omar; Adriano, Cris; Rule, K; Cornelius, A. L.; Fouquet, Peter; Pagliuso, P G; Gardner, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic properties of Ho{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been investigated and compared to other spin ice compounds. Although the lattice has expanded by 3% relative to the better studied Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} spin ice, no significant changes were observed in the high temperature properties, T {approx}> 20 K. As the temperature is lowered and correlations develop, Ho{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7} enters its quantum phase at a slightly higher temperature than Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and is more antiferromagnetic in character. Below 80 K a weak inelastic mode associated with the holmium nuclear spin system has been measured. The hyperfine field at the holmium nucleus was found to be {approx}700 T.

  13. Relative rate constants for the reactions of atomic oxygen with HO2 anad OH radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Relative rate constants for the reactions O + HO2 - OH + O2 (1) and O + OH - H + O2 (2) were obtained by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at 2 torr total pressure and 299 K. HO2 radicals were generated by reacting atomic hydrogen with an excess of O2. Quasi-steady-state concentrations of OH and HO2 were established in the presence of excess atomic oxygen. Observed concentration ratios, namely the ratio of the OH concentration to the HO2 concentration, resulted in a value of 1.7 + or 0.2 for k1/k2. The error limits are twice the standard deviation obtained from the data analysis. Overall experimental error is estimated to be + or - 25 percent. This result confirms earlier direct measurements of k1 and k2 which required knowledge of absolute radical or atomic oxygen concentrations.

  14. Spectral and lasing characteristics of 1% Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Bagayev, S N; Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F; Osipov, V V; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Luk'yashin, K E; Pavlyuk, A A

    2015-01-31

    High-transparency 1% Ho:YAG ceramics with the transmission coefficient of 82% in the IR range at the sample thickness of 1 mm are synthesised from a mixture of the Ho:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders obtained by the laser method. Results of investigations of spectral and lasing characteristics of 1 % Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping by radiation of a 5% Tm:KLuW disk element are presented. Based on spectral intensity analysis of generation in the 1.8 – 2.1 mm range and on cavity parameters, the estimated lasing slope efficiency for 1% Ho:YAG ceramics is about 40%. (lasers)

  15. Observation of hydroperoxy radical HO2 in the upper atmosphere by SMILES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Lehmann, Ralph; Kuribayashi, Kouta; Sato, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    The HO_{2} radicals have an important role to control the oxidation capacity in the Earth and planetary atmosphere. We provide a first diurnal photo-chemical behavior of HO_{2} in the wide vertical range between stratosphere and lower thermosphere of the Earth by spectroscopic observation using a instrument optimized for the detection of minor atmospheric radical species, named Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES), from International Space Station (ISS). An unexpected behavior of HO_{2} was detected above mesopause (about 80 km) with a peak abundance after the sunset time, which was completely different from known diurnal behavior in the stratosphere and the mesosphere. We will report the photo-chemical behavior of HO_{2} in the upper atmosphere.

  16. Collective γ-vibrational bands in 165Ho and 167Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, G.; Radford, D. C.; Shimizu, Y. R.; Cromaz, M.; DeGraaf, J.; Drake, T. E.; Flibotte, S.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Haslip, D. S.; Janzen, V. P.; Matsuzaki, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Nieminen, J. M.; Svensson, C. E.; Waddington, J. C.; Ward, D.; Wilson, J. N.

    1997-02-01

    The nuclear structures of 165Ho and 167Er have been investigated by means of Coulomb excitation. These nuclei excited at moderate spins exhibit γ-vibrational bands with K π = {11}/{2}-, {3}/{2}- in 165Ho and K π = {11}/{2}+ in 167Er. The γ-vibrational bands in 165Ho are found to be isospectral; heaving very nearly identical in-band γ-ray energies. Gamma-ray branching ratios are analysed to extract information on collectivity and Coriolis mixing. Experimental results are compared with calculations performed with the Cranked Shell Moedl + RPA + particle-vibration coupling and by invoking the generalized intensity relations (GIR) in the unified model scheme. Although this model explains many features of the data, puzzling aspects such as identical transition energies for the bands in 165Ho remain unexplained. The role of the K quantum number in identical bands is discussed.

  17. New Magnetic confirguration in paramagnetic phase of HoCo2

    SciTech Connect

    Bonilla, C.M.; Calvo, I.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Figueroa, A.I.; Castan-Guerrero, C.; Bertolome, J.; Rodriguez-Velamazan, J.A.; Schmitz, D.; Weschke, E.; Paudyal, Durga; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Gschneidner Jr, Karl; Bartolome, F.; Garcia, D.

    2012-02-23

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements on HoCo2 reveal the inversion of Co moment at temperatures higher than the critical temperature, Tc, showing that the net magnetization under a field of the Ho and Co sublattices remain antiparallel even above Tc. The Ho moment also changes its orientation to align antiparallel to the applied field at high temperature giving rise to a new magnetic configuration in the paramagnetic regime. Transverse susceptibility (TS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements performed above Tc indicate the existence of sizable magnetic short-range correlated regions in HoCo2. First principles calculations based on spin polarized local-density approximation, LSDA+U havebeen performed to obtain insights on the origin of the short-range correlated volume.

  18. Sticking of HO2 on fatty acids aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanega, Delphine; Briquez, Stéphane; Duflot, Denis; Monnerville, Maurice; Toubin, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Models of atmospheric chemistry are widely used to perform projections of future changes in the chemical composition of the global troposphere, including changes in climate related greenhouse gases and aerosol particles. However, large uncertainties are still associated with the chemistry implemented in these models, which in turn can lead to inaccurate long-term predictions. The proposed work seeks to improve our understanding of the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, which drives the lifetime of trace gases, and therefore atmospheric composition. Recent measurements [1] of free radicals made in forested environments characterized by low levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO and NO2) indicate that current models of atmospheric chemistry tend to overestimate the concentration of peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2). An overestimation of peroxy radicals is an important issue since these radicals are the main precursors of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the most important atmospheric oxidant during daytime. This issue could lead to a significant overestimation of the oxidative capacity of the global atmosphere since more than 86% of the Earth surface is covered by forests, oceans, and polar regions. An analysis of this dataset indicates that the missing sink could be due to an underestimation of the rates of RO2+HO2 reactions, and/or the uptake of peroxy radicals onto aerosol particles. A thorough evaluation of scientific studies published in the literature shows that there is a lack of kinetic and mechanistic data to correctly assess the contribution of these two loss pathways of peroxy radicals in low NOx environments. Classical molecular dynamics simulations, using the Gromacs package [2], are performed to study the interaction of HO2 with organic (carboxylic acid) aerosols. The effect of the presence of water molecules on the surface are also be investigated. These calculations provide theoretical values for observable quantities such as uptake and mass accommodation

  19. Investigation of spectroscopic properties of LiNbO3:Ho3+ crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkhanyan, Hasmik G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the Stark problem for Ho3+ ion (4f10 electronic configuration) in LiNbO3 crystal is solved. Main spectroscopic parameters induced by inter-Stark transitions are determined. Based on analysis of experimental and theoretical data of the main spectroscopic characteristics of LiNbO3:Ho3+ crystals, it's perceptiveness as a material for optical cooling devices is shown.

  20. The H+/O ratio of proton translocation linked to the oxidation of succinate by mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Krab, K; Soos, J; Wikström, M

    1984-12-10

    In a recent communication Lehninger and co-workers (Costa, L.E., Reynaferje, B., and Lehninger, A.L. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4802-4811) reported values approaching 8 for the H+/O ratio of vectorial proton ejection from rat liver mitochondria respiring with succinate. Here we present a rigorous analysis of these measurements which reveals that they may significantly overestimate the true H+/O stoicheiometry. PMID:6096164

  1. Raman and infrared study of 4f electron-phonon coupling in HoVO3.

    PubMed

    Roberge, B; Balli, M; Jandl, S; Fournier, P; Palstra, T T M; Nugroho, A A

    2016-11-01

    First-order Raman scattering and multiphonons are studied in RVO3 (R  =  Ho and Y) as a function of temperature in the orthorhombic and monoclinic phases. Raman spectra of HoVO3 and YVO3 unveil similar features since both compounds have nearly identical R-radii. However, the most important difference lies in the transition temperature involving the V(3+) orbitals, the V(3+) magnetic moments as well as the crystallographic structure. Particularly, the magnetic and orbital reorientations occur at T N2  =  40 K for HoVO3 instead T N2  =77 K in the case of YVO3. For both systems, anomalous phonon shifts which are related to spin-phonon coupling are observed below the V(3+) magnetic ordering temperature (T N1  ≈  110 K) while additional phonon anomalies are exclusively observed in HoVO3 around T (*)  ≈  15 K. On the other hand, infrared (IR) transmittance measurements as a function of temperature reveal Ho(3+5)I8  →  (5)I7 excitations and additional excitations assigned as vibronics. These latter combined with drastic changes in Ho(3+5)I8  →  (5)I7 excitations at T N2, are indicative of a strong coupling between the Ho(3+) ions and the ligand field. This could explain the large magnetocaloric capacity shown by HoVO3. PMID:27603503

  2. The growth of Ho:YAG single crystals by Czochralski method and investigating the formed cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hasani Barbaran, J. Ghani Aragi, M. R.; Javaheri, I.; Baharvand, B.; Tabasi, M.; Layegh Ahan, R.; Jangjo, E.

    2015-12-15

    Ho:YAG single crystals were grown by Czochralski technique, and investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical methods. The crystals were cut and polished in order to observe and analyze their cores. It was found that the deviation of the cores formed in the Czochralski grown Ho:YAG single crystals are resulted from non-symmetrical status of thermal insulation around the Iridium crucible.

  3. TRACE-P OH and HO2 Measurements with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) on the DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.; Martinez-Harder, Monica; Harder, Hartwig

    2004-01-01

    The Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) measures OH and HO2 from the NASA DC-8. This instrument detects OH by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in detection chambers at low pressure and detects HO2 by chemical conversion with NO followed by LIF detection. The demonstrated detection limit (S/N=2, 5 min.) for OH is about 0.005 pptv (1x10(exp 6)/cu cm at 2 km altitude) and for HO2 is 0.05 pptv (1x10(exp 6)/cu cm at 2 km altitude). We will use ATHOS to measure OH, HO2, and HO2/OH during TRACE- P, analyze these results by comparing them against fundamental relationships and computer models, and publish the analyses. TRACE-P HO(x), measurements will help develop a clearer picture of the atmospheric oxidation and 0 3 production that occur as Asian pollution spreads across the Pacific Ocean.

  4. Kinetics of the reactions of HBr with O3 and HO2: The yield of HBr from HO2 + BrO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Howard, Carleton J.

    1994-01-01

    An upper limit on the yield of HBr from reaction (R1) (HO2 + BrO yields products) has been determined by measuring an upper limit for the rate coefficient of the reverse reaction (R1') (HBr + O3 yields HO2 + BrO). The limits measured at 300 and 441 K were extrapolated to low temperatures to determine that the yield of HBr from reaction (R1) is negligible throughout the stratosphere (less than 0.01% of k(sub 1)). An upper limit for the rate coefficient of the reaction of HO2 with HBr was also determined to be very low less than or equal to 3 x 10(exp -17) cu cm/molecule/sec at 300 K and less than or equal to 3 x 10(exp -16) cu cm/molecule/sec at 400 K. The implications of these results to stratospheric chemistry are discussed.

  5. Comparative studies of microwave absorption in the singlet paramagnets HoVO{sub 4} and HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} in strong pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kazei, Z. A. Snegirev, V. V.; Goaran, M.; Kozeeva, L. P.; Kameneva, M. Yu.

    2008-03-15

    Microwave absorption in the tetragonal singlet paramagnets HoVO{sub 4} (zircon structure) and HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (x {approx} 6, layered perovskite structure) is studied and compared in pulsed magnetic fields up to 40 T at low temperatures. These paramagnets are characterized by a singlet-doublet scheme of the low-lying levels of the Ho{sup 3+} ion in a crystal field. In a magnetic field directed along the tetragonal axis, HoVO{sub 4} exhibits resonance absorption lines at wavelengths of 871, 406, and 305 {mu}m, which correspond to electron transitions between the low-lying levels of the Ho{sup 3+} ion in the crystal field. The positions and intensities of these absorption lines in HoVO{sub 4} are well described in terms of the crystal-field formalism with the well-known interaction parameters. The absorption spectra of HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} at a wavelength of 871 {mu}m exhibit broad resonance absorption lines against the background of strong nonresonance absorption. The effects of low-symmetry (orthorhombic, monoclinic) crystal-field components, the deviation of a magnetic field from a symmetry axis, and various pair interactions on the absorption spectra of the HoVO{sub 4} and HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} crystals are discussed.

  6. Comparison of urinary calculus fragmentation during Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Teichman, Joel H.; Welch, A. J.

    2005-04-01

    We compared urinary calculus fragmentation with long pulsed Ho:YAG (λ= 2.12 μm) versus Er:YAG (λ = 2.94 μm) lasers. We measured the ablation width, depth, volume and efficiency as a function of pulse energy from calculus threshold energy to clinical energy typically used for Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. Ablation effects were evaluated for three types of urinary calculi (calcium oxalate monohydrate, cystine, and uric acid), for single and multiple pulses applied at various optical energy levels. By means of comparing laser-induced crater topography and ablation volume for each stone type, the feasibility of Er:YAG laser lithotripsy was appraised. The Er:YAG laser pulse energy generated deeper and narrower crater shapes with relatively smooth contours whereas the Ho:YAG laser produced shallower and wider craters with irregular shapes. In terms of multiple pulses ablation, the Er:YAG produced larger ablation volume than Ho:YAG. The deeper crater induced by the Er:YAG was attributed to the higher absorption coefficient of stones at the 2.94 μm wavelength, and widening of crater by Ho:YAG was perhaps caused by lateral expansion of ablated material. Comparing the ablation efficiency, Er:YAG was superior to Ho:YAG for both single and five-pulses.

  7. Nd(3+)-Sensitized Ho(3+) Single-Band Red Upconversion Luminescence in Core-Shell Nanoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqin; Liu, Lu; Huang, Ping; Ding, Mingye; Zhong, Jiasong; Ji, Zhenguo

    2015-07-16

    A strategy to achieve 808 nm excited single-band red upconversion luminescence of Ho(3+) via the core-shell nanoarchitecture design was provided. Specifically, the synthesized Yb/Ho/Ce: NaGdF4@Yb/Nd: NaYF4 active-core@active-shell nanoparticles were evidenced to enable high-content doping of Nd(3+) (∼10 mol %) in the shell layer and, thus, markedly enhance red upconversion emission from Ho(3+) activators in the core with the assistance of spatially confined doping of Nd(3+) ions and efficient energy transfer of Nd(3+) → Yb(3+)(shell) → Yb(3+)(core) → Ho(3+). Importantly, introducing Ce(3+) into the core was beneficial to the competition of radiation transitions from the two intermediate excited states of Ho(3+): (5)S2,(5)F4 (green-emitting) and Ho(3+): (5)F5 (red-emitting), which induced great enhancement in the red to green intensity ratio and ultimately intense single-band red upconversion emission. We believe that this preliminary study will provide an important advance in developing luminescent markers suitable for biolabeling applications. PMID:26266869

  8. HoBi-like viruses--the typical 'atypical bovine pestivirus'.

    PubMed

    Bauermann, Fernando V; Ridpath, Julia F

    2015-06-01

    HoBi-like viruses, also referred to as bovine viral diarrhea virus 3 (BVDV-3) and atypical pestivirus, have been proposed as a new putative bovine pestivirus species. These viruses were first identified in the last decade and are currently distributed in at least three continents. Published findings suggest that these viruses may be endemic at least in parts of South America and Asia. The clinical presentations in cattle, described in field outbreaks and controlled studies, are similar to those associated with BVDV and range from subclinical to mild clinical signs, sporadically associated with reproductive losses, respiratory illness and hemorrhagic syndrome. The complete host range of HoBi-like virus is unknown, but data suggest higher adaptation of HoBi-like viruses to ruminants than swine. Acute infections, characterized by mild clinical signs, such as low-grade pyrexia and leukopenia, have been observed in both cattle and sheep. Virus has been isolated from nasal swabs indicating that virus was being shed. While seroconversion has been observed in pigs, no clinical presentation or viral shedding was evident following inoculation. While some commercial BVDV diagnostic tests may detect HoBi-like viruses, these tests do not differentiate between BVDV and HoBi-like viruses. The differentiation of BVDV and HoBi-like viruses is critical to the design of surveillance programs for these viruses. PMID:26050574

  9. First evidence of middle atmospheric HO2 response to 27 day solar cycles from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuhui; Zhang, Qiong; Millán, Luis; Li, King-Fai; Yung, Yuk L.; Sander, Stanley P.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

    2015-11-01

    HO2 and OH, also known as HOx, play an important role in controlling middle atmospheric O3. Due to their photochemical production and short chemical lifetimes, HOx are expected to respond rapidly to solar irradiance changes, resulting in O3 variability. While OH solar cycle signals have been investigated, HO2 studies have been limited by the lack of reliable observations. Here we present the first evidence of HO2 variability during solar 27 day cycles by investigating the recently developed HO2 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). We focus on 2012-2015, when solar variability is strong near the peak of Solar Cycle 24. The features of HO2 variability, with the strongest signals at 0.01-0.068 hPa, correlate well with those of solar Lyman α. When continuous MLS OH observations are not available, the new HO2 data could be a promising alternative for investigating HOx variability and the corresponding impacts on O3 and the climate.

  10. Nonsuperconductivity and magnetic features of the intermetallic borocarbide HoCo2B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. E.; Massalami, M. El

    1999-08-01

    Intrigued by the exotic features of the low-temperature superconducting and magnetic phase diagram of HoNi2B2C, this work searched for similar features in the isomorphous HoCo2B2C [LuNi2B2C-type structure, a=3.500(3) Å, c=10.590(9) Å]. In contrast to the former, no superconductivity is observed down to 30 mK, indicative of a relative lattice stiffening and a reduction in N(EF). The magnetic ordering of the Ho sublattice sets in at TN=5.4(1) K (Co-sublattice carries no magnetic moment). The magnetic entropy up to 10 K is suggestive of an electronic ground-state doublet. No field-induced cascade of magnetic phase transitions was observed in the range 1.8 KHo3+ nuclear Schottky-type contribution: the derived hyperfine parameters are comparable to that of those of HoNi2B2C and Ho metal. The T1 event, evident also in χac(T), is probably a manifestation of an order-to-order magnetic phase transition.

  11. GEC-targeted HO-1 expression reduces proteinuria in glomerular immune injury.

    PubMed

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2009-09-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a key defense mechanism against oxidative stress. Compared with tubules, glomeruli are refractory to HO-1 upregulation in response to injury. This can be a disadvantage as it may be associated with insufficient production of cytoprotective heme-degradation metabolites. We, therefore, explored whether 1) targeted HO-1 expression can be achieved in glomeruli without altering their physiological integrity and 2) this expression reduces proteinuria in immune injury induced by an anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody (Ab). We employed a 4.125-kb fragment of a mouse nephrin promoter downstream to which a FLAG-tagged hHO-1 cDNA sequence was inserted and subsequently generated transgenic mice from the FVB/N parental strain. There was a 16-fold higher transgene expression in the kidney than nonspecific background (liver) while the transprotein immunolocalized in glomerular epithelial cells (GEC). There was no change in urinary protein excretion, indicating that GEC-targeted HO-1 expression had no effect on glomerular protein permeability. Urinary protein excretion in transgenic mice with anti-GBM Ab injury (days 3 and 6) was significantly lower compared with wild-type controls. There was no significant change in renal expression levels of profibrotic (TGF-beta1) or anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in transgenic mice with anti-GBM Ab injury. These observations indicate that GEC-targeted HO-1 expression does not alter glomerular physiological integrity and reduces proteinuria in glomerular immune injury. PMID:19587144

  12. A Note on Friedmann Equation of FRW Universe in Deformed Hořava—Lifshitz Gravity from Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Wang, Yong-Qiang

    2011-09-01

    With entropic interpretation of gravity proposed by Verlinde, we obtain the Friedmann equation of the Friedmann—Robertson—Walker universe for the deformed Hořava—Lifshitz gravity. It is shown that, when the parameter of Hořava—Lifshitz gravity ω → ∞, the modified Friedmann equation will go back to the one in Einstein gravity. This results may imply that the entropic interpretation of gravity is effective for the deformed Hořava—Lifshitz gravity.

  13. Resonantly pumped high efficiency Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying-Jie; Yao, Bao-Quan; Duan, Xiao-Ming; Dai, Tong-Yu; Ju, You-Lun; Wang, Yue-Zhu

    2012-11-20

    High-efficient CW and Q-switched Ho:YAG lasers resonantly dual-end-pumped by two diode-pumped Tm:YLF lasers at 1908 nm were investigated. A maximum slope efficiency of 74.8% in CW operation as well as a maximum output power of 58.7 W at 83.2 W incident pump power was achieved, which corresponded to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 70.6%. The maximum pulse energy of 2.94 mJ was achieved, with a 31 ns FWHM pulse width and a peak power of approximately 94.7 kW. PMID:23207298

  14. Ho:YAG laser arthroscopy of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, Domenick J.; Blazina, Martin E.; Hirsh, Linda C.

    1994-09-01

    The HO:YAG laser is a near-contact laser with a capacity to ablate or cut tissues. The ablation function allows the surgeon to remove meniscal tissue, lyse and resect adhesions, melt loose bodies, and dissolve inflamed synovium. The cutting function of the laser is utilized to perform a lateral release or resect torn menisci. The laser can also be utilized to drill holes in Grade IV chondromalacic lesions to initiate a healing response. The laser has been embraced by orthopaedic surgeons because of its shape and versatility. The tip is only 2 mm wide and can be delivered into the tight posterior compartments of the knee with no damaging contact with the articular surfaces. The laser coagulates as it works and bleeding is minimized. The laser can function both as a cutting and ablating tool. The laser can also drill holes into subchondral bone to, hopefully, initiate a healing response.

  15. BRIEF REVIEW Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2010-11-01

    Here we review the basic construction and cosmological implications of a power-counting renormalizable theory of gravitation, recently proposed by Hořava. We explain that (i) at low energy this theory does not exactly recover general relativity but instead mimics general relativity plus dark matter; (ii) higher spatial curvature terms allow bouncing and cyclic universes as regular solutions; (iii) the anisotropic scaling with the dynamical critical exponent z = 3 solves the horizon problem and leads to scale-invariant cosmological perturbations even without inflation. We also comment on issues related to an extra scalar degree of freedom called scalar graviton. In particular, for spherically-symmetric, static, vacuum configurations we prove non-perturbative continuity of the λ → 1 + 0 limit, where λ is a parameter in the kinetic action and general relativity has the value λ = 1. We also derive the condition under which linear instability of the scalar graviton does not show up.

  16. Measurement of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) with I-·H2O as the reagent ions: instrumentation and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Ng, N. L.; Li, J.; Dibb, J. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) is formed by the association reaction of HO2 and NO2, which couples both the HOx (HO2+OH) and NOx (=NO2+NO) families. The thermal decomposition at higher temperatures is sufficiently fast that HO2NO2 is in steady state with HO2 and NO2. This allows HO2 levels to be inferred from HO2NO2 observations. In Polar Regions and higher altitudes, significant levels of HO2NO2 can build up and influences local HOx and NOx photochemistry. Here, we present an in situ measurement technique of HO2NO2 based on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) using the reagent ion I- and its hydrated form I-·H2O, together with our calibration technique for HO2NO2 measurements. We will also present observations of HO2NO2: (1) in a polar boundary layer on top of the Greenland Ice Sheet during summer 2011, and (2) in an urban boundary layer in metropolitan Atlanta during winter 2014. The local chemistry of HO2NO2 at Summit will be evaluated. The local HO2 in Atlanta will be inferred and assessed with models.

  17. New technique for prostatectomy using Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daidoh, Yuichiro; Arai, Tsunenori; Murai, Masaru; Nakajima, Akio; Tsuji, Akira; Odajima, Kunio; Nakajima, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1994-05-01

    To develop a new transperineal laser prostatectomy through a biopsy needle, we determined the efficiency of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation for canine prostate. The Ho:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometers ) may induced stress-wave to destroy the small vessels in prostate. After the exposure of the canine prostate, it was punctured by the needle. A quartz fiber of which core-diameter was 200 or 400 micrometers was inserted into the 18 G needle. The irradiation fluence was set to 150 - 600 J/cm2 and repetition rate was kept at 2 Hz. The cross-section of the irradiated portion of the prostate extracted immediately after the irradiation showed dark-colored hemorrhage layer around the ablation tract with 1 - 2 mm thickness. Some hemorrhage was histologically seen in stoma and gland in the irradiated prostate. In the case of 150 - 175 J/cm2 in the irradiation fluence, the irradiated portion of the prostate was found in the wedge-shaped area with brown color at one week after the irradiation. The lymphocytes infiltrating into the wedge-shaped zone were found. The wedge- shaped zone spread over the prostate and the change of urethral mucosa was minimum at one month after the irradiation. In the case of 500 - 600 J/cm2 irradiation, the paraurethral cavity was made at one month after the irradiation. The histological examination showed that the hemorrhage and subsequent histological changes may be caused by the laser induced stress-wave rather than thermal effect. Our results suggest that transperineal irradiation of pulsed Ho:YAG might offer an effective treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with the minimal damage to the urethral mucosa.

  18. Migration and employment in Ho Chi Minh City.

    PubMed

    Truong Si Anh; Gubry, P; Vu Thi Hong; Huguet, J W

    1996-06-01

    This article presents findings from a survey of migrants conducted during September 1994 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The sample includes 19,019 households in 34 residence blocks selected from the 17 districts that comprise the most populated areas of the city. 704 migrants and 296 nonmigrant households completed the basic demographic and socioeconomic questionnaire. One migrant and one nonmigrant completed a detailed questionnaire. Migrants are identified as those who migrated to the city after April 1984. Migrants are divided into those moving during 1984-89 and during 1990-94. The average annual rate of growth in population during the census years 1979-89 was 1.87% and during 1989-94 was 3.5%. Growth during 1989-94 was 1.6% due to natural increase and 1.9% due to net migration. 43% of population growth was due to natural increase and 57% was from net migration. Migration to large cities, such as Ho Chi Minh City, was stimulated by employment opportunities in the private sector. There were more female migrants in both study periods, and the proportion of females increased in the more recent past. About 15% of female migrants aged over 13 years were students and 58% were in the labor force. Most migrants were aged 15-29 years (41% during 1984-89 and 53% during 1990-94). Only 31% of nonmigrants were aged 15-29 years. About 33% of migrants originated from the Mekong River Delta in the south; 20% originated from the Red River Delta and Hanoi region; and 20% came from the Central Coast. Over time, the proportion of migrants from the coast increased and that from the Red River Delta decreased. Migrants and nonmigrants shared similar unemployment and economic activity rates. However, twice the proportion of migrants aged over 13 years were attending school. The author presents the evidence for the influence of urban economic policies on migration, specifically female migration. PMID:12347640

  19. Production, Quality Control and Biological Evaluation of 166Ho-PDTMP as a Possible Bone Palliation Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Naseri, Zohreh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Bahrami-Samani, Ali; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad; Afarideh, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, 166Ho-1,2-propylene di-amino tetra(methy1enephosphonicAcid) (166Ho-PDTMP) complex was prepared as a bone palliation agent. Materials and Methods: The complex was successfully prepared using an in-house synthesized EDTMP ligand and 166HoCl3. Ho-166 chloride was obtained by thermal neutron irradiation (1 × 1013 n.cm-2.s-1) of natural Ho(NO3)3 samples followed by radiolabeling and stability studies. Biodistribution in wild type rats was also peformed. Results: The complex was prepared with the specific activity of 278 GBq/mg and high radiochemical purity (>99%, checked by ITLC). 166Ho-PDTMP complex was stabilized in the final preparation and in the presence of human serum (>90%) up to 72 hr. The biodistribution of 166Ho-PDTMP in wild-type rats demonstrated significant bone uptake was up to 48 hr compared to 166HoCl3. Conclusion: The produced 166Ho-PDTMP properties suggest a possible new bone palliative therapeutic to overcome the metastatic bone pains. PMID:23826495

  20. Preparation and spectroscopic characterization of two HoCl 3-galactitol complexes and one ErCl 3-galactitol complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Xiaohui; Pan, Qinghua; Yu, Lei; Xue, Junhui; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Li, Weihong; Wang, Zheming; Wu, Jinguang; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er

    2011-07-01

    The interactions between metal ions and hydroxyl groups of carbohydrates are important for their possible biological activities. Here two HoCl 3-galactitol complexes ([Ho(galac)(H 2O) 3)]Cl 3·0.5galac) (HoG(I)) and ([Ho 2(galac)(H 2O) 12)]Cl 6·2H 2O) (HoG(II))) and one ErCl 3-galactitol complex ([Er(galac)(H 2O) 3)]Cl 3·0.5galac)(ErG)) were prepared and characterized. The possible structures of HoG(I) and ErG were deduced from FTIR, elemental analysis, ESI-MS, FIR, THz and TGA results. It is suggested that Ho 3+ or Er 3+ is 9-coordinated with six hydroxyl groups from two galactitol molecules and three water molecules, and another galactitol molecule is hydrogen-bonded in HoG(I) and ErG and the ratio of metal to ligand is 1:1.5. The structure of HoG(II) was determined by FTIR and X-ray diffraction analyses. The results demonstrate that lanthanide ions with galactitol may form two compounds in a system and different topological structures can be obtained.