Science.gov

Sample records for editorial asesor nuevos

  1. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M Lynne

    2016-03-01

    This editorial introduces the current issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Personality Processes and Individual Differences. This Journal is considered the premier outlet for empirical work in personality and individual differences. It is not only in a unique position to take a lead role in addressing these issues but also has a special responsibility to do so. With this editorial, the editor describes several changes in editorial policy and practice that will be undertaken during their term as editor, with the goal of broadening the definition of what is considered to be good science and, more long term, of increasing the "truth value" of research in the field of personality science. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963765

  2. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peter Y

    2016-01-01

    This editorial discusses the history of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (JOHP), citing the various editors and the length of their editorships, as well as the support they received from the associate editors, editorial board members, reviewers, and the contributions of the authors' high quality articles. JOHP has become an international flagship journal, which plays an important role in advancing the field of occupational health psychology. The most recent impact factor and ranking reported by the American Psychological Association (2015) further supports the quality of this journal. PMID:26752239

  3. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoly, Basile; Castañeda, Pedro Ponte; Kuhl, Ellen; Niordson, Christian; Sharma, Pradeep; Gao, Huajian

    2016-02-01

    After 12 years of distinguished service, Kaushik Bhattacharya has decided to step down as co-editor of the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids. A new editorial team, with Huajian Gao as editor and Basile Audoly, Pedro Ponte Castañeda, Ellen Kuhl, Christian Niordson and Pradeep Sharma as Associate Editors, will take over as of January 1, 2016.

  4. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1989-09-01

    In the May 15, 1989, issue of The Wall Street Journal, the lead editorial addressed an activity that is taking place in the United States but one that should send chills up the spines of scientists and engineers around the world.

  5. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianturco, F. A.; Raimond, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of EPJ D introduces a revised list of sections and subsections, designed in close collaboration with the whole editorial board. The aim of these modifications is to reflect more faithfully the wide diversity of activities covered by our journal. A new section is introduced. Entitled “Atomic and Molecular Collisions”, it covers a large range of activities, from atom/atom or atom/molecules collisions (including the very active field of ultra-cold collisions in laser-cooled atomic or molecular gases), to electron scattering and molecular reactivity. The creation of this section reflects the increased interest of the journal for molecular and collisional physics, already apparent in the recent extension of the editorial board competence in this direction. We very much hope that this community will react positively to this trend and become a major component of the journal's life. For the other sections, we have markedly revised the list of subheadings. We think it important to make it as detailed as possible, both to indicate that EPJ D aims at being a generalist journal for AMO physics and to help our authors to find easily the proper section for their submissions. There is of course no way to describe the whole field's activity in a few subheadings. They are all to be understood with the broadest meaning. This list is by no means an exclusive one. All theoretical or experimental papers connected to atomic, molecular, plasma, quantum or optical physics are welcome. This revised section list appears almost simultaneously with the new WEB portal to all EPJ journals (www.eurphysj.org), which will be online within a few weeks. It unites the material formerly presented on our publisher's WEB sites (EDP Sciences, SIF and Springer). All the journal contents are available there (and all WEB registrations are of course valid for this portal). We offer also a free access to the highlight papers (see our editorial, Eur. Phys. J. D 29, 3 (2004) and below), for at

  6. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John S., III

    2009-05-01

    The Astronomical Journal (AJ) has traditionally published papers in planetary science, especially those related to observations that use standard astronomical techniques or involve planetary dynamics. During the past decade, we have seen a great deal of growth in both of these areas, driven largely by renewed interest in the outer solar system as well as the discovery of extrasolar planets. As a result, the AJ has experienced a steady increase in the number of submitted papers that report solar system observations and theoretical studies of planetary dynamics. This component of science in the AJ has reached a point where we feel the need to increase our editorial expertise to maintain the quality of our review processes. Therefore, we are pleased to welcome Dr. Melissa A. McGrath and Professor Daniel J. Scheeres to the AJ editorial team. As Chief Scientist in Science and Mission Systems at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Dr. McGrath has developed a wide perspective on planetary astronomy and related fields. In her role as Associate Scientific Editor for the AJ, she will join Professor Margaret Hanson and me in communicating directly with authors and referees with an emphasis on observational planetary science papers. As an endowed chair in the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Professor Scheeres has a strong research presence in studies involving orbital mechanics of spacecraft as well as natural bodies. As a Consulting Scientific Editor, he will assist us in identifying referees and interpreting anonymous referee reports for papers in theoretical planetary dynamics with a secondary focus in celestial mechanics. With these additions to the AJ editorial board, we will be able to provide better service for planetary science papers, especially those that overlap with other fields of astronomy.

  7. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    The incoming editor of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Interpersonal Relations and Group Processes discusses her plans to continue to encourage submission of a broad range of research related to interpersonal and group processes. She notes other goals for the new editorial team, which include encouraging the submission of high-quality multidisciplinary experiments that create a bridge between social psychology and other areas of research, decreasing the amount of time that a manuscript spends under review by adopting a number of important new strategies, and continuing the discussion concerning good empirical practice. PMID:25603368

  8. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Toyonobu

    2013-02-01

    As the successor to Professor Teruo Kishi, the former Editor-in-Chief of Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM), I would like to share some of STAM's journal history with our readers. STAM was launched in 2000 with the financial support of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in recognition of a strong need for an international journal that would be distributed and read across the globe. Five years later, the publication of STAM was transferred to the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) under the initiative of Professor Kishi. As a result of his work, STAM is now positioned as a high-impact journal, 3.512 as listed by the ISI 2011 Science Citation Index Journal Citation Report, with a much higher and faster growth than when I was participating as a co-founder in the past. STAM is well known as a successful open-access journal since shifting from the initial subscription model in 2008. As an editor, I would like to emphasize that STAM will continue to publish with a sense of social mission as an academic journal, allowing space for researchers to contribute to the sustainable development of society and health. However, some contribution from authors would assist us in creating a sustainable journal publishing model, and further enhance services to authors and readers of STAM. With this in mind, I would like to state that STAM's editorial board is planning to introduce an article processing charge from July 2013, in addition to NIMS' continuing financial support. One of our new editorial policies is to aim for reader-oriented publishing. I believe that academic journal publishing can take the role of navigator in advancing the development of materials. Among the many other scientific journals, STAM will lead the rapid growth in materials science, inspiring research into new materials for the future and leading the next generation of materials science and technology. It is my honor to work with members of

  9. Editorial:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-02-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome the authors and readership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) to volume 17. We have enjoyed a successful 16 years of growth under the guidance of our founding Editor-in-Chief, Professor Noah Hershkowitz, resulting in PSST gaining the confidence and respect of the plasma community. PSST has established itself as the journal of choice for dissemination of research results on the fundamentals of low-temperature plasmas. It has achieved this position through its rigorous reviewing process that improves the quality of our already excellent contributions. This was accomplished with the dedicated efforts of our reviewers and cooperation of our authors, to whom I am grateful. I am hoping we can continue to count on your support. I am confident that we will build upon our past successes by continuing to improve the journal and better serve the low temperature plasma community. I am pleased to introduce Professor William G Graham (Queen's University of Belfast) and Professor M C M (Richard) van der Sanden (Eindhoven University of Technology) who have joined the leadership team as Associate Editors. I am also pleased that Professor Hershkowitz has agreed to continue to serve PSST as an Associate Editor. Bill, Richard and Noah will share the editorial duties with me in selecting referees, assessing their comments and communicating with authors. Ms Caroline Wilkinson will continue to expertly serve as our IOP Publishing contact. The Editorial Board is critically important to the continued success and growth of the journal. Their efforts in providing advice and guidance, and in suggesting (and often guest editing) special issues are greatly appreciated. As we enter our seventeenth year, it is an appropriate time to revisit the guiding principles of the journal. PSST serves a unique mission in addressing fundamental issues in the science and technology of low-temperature plasmas and so distinguishes itself from more applications

  10. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    It is both an honour and daunting to be associated with a successful, long-lived journal. An honour because the journal already enjoys a high reputation, not only for the quality of its articles but also for the manner in which it has encouraged areas to grow and develop towards their own specialized publications. Daunting because maintaining the quality of the journal is a challenge needing constant vigilance and innovation. Moreover, I am conscious of all the work which has been done by my predecessors. Jean Zinn-Justin is the most recent and I should like to take this opportunity to thank him for all he has done so generously over the past five years. The journal relies on the partnership between its authors, its referees, the Editorial Board and the publishers. Its principal purpose is to provide, selectively, an archive for the physics community and it is essential that authors are eager to submit their papers in the knowledge that they will be treated fairly and rapidly, that the referees perform their role willingly and constructively, and that the international Editorial Board encourages both in their tasks, and solicits submissions from physicists working in budding areas. Besides co-ordinating the production of the journal, the publishers are developing ways to assist the community to perform its research. For example, the online electronic version of the journal is hugely successful with over 75,000 e-accesses in 1998. HyperCite is an exciting development which is beginning to link papers together in an unprecedented manner. It will take time to perfect this service but its use is growing apace. Moreover, approximately one half of all submissions to the journal are now via electronic means. Of course, many authors place their papers on other, freely available, electronic archives and these are valuable. Nevertheless, the sifting process provided by the referees and editorial board of a journal remains an essential part of the scientific evaluation of a

  11. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Al-Deeb, Saleh M; Khan, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Neurosciences continues to be the leading journal for Neurosciences in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. In January 2007, Neurosciences was indexed by Thomson ISI in Science Citation Index Expanded online at ISI Web of KnowledgeSM and Neurosciences Citation Index. Since then a significantly increased volume of scientific articles continues to be submitted to the journal by enthusiastic authors, a fact that enriches the scientific contents of the journal. In 2008, we had a total number of website hits of 495,625 with a monthly average of 41,000. We received a total of 155 manuscripts, with a monthly average of 13 and an average rejection rate of 29%. From these, we published a total of 100 articles, totaling 523 pages for the entire volume. Forty-nine percent of these were original articles. Fifty-eight percent of published articles were from the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), with 30% from KSA, 5% from the Gulf, and 23% from other Arab and EMR countries. The remaining 42% of published articles we received from Canada, India, Japan, Malaysia, and Turkey. The average time from received to acceptance of original articles was 4 months and 4.9 months for acceptance to publication. Reasons for rejection included unrelated topics, poor contents, or duplicate publication. In addition to our 4 regular issues in 2008, we published a supplement of abstracts presented at the 16th Saudi Neuroscience Symposium. We would like to thank the Editorial and Advisory Board Members for their significant contribution to maintain the standards of Neuroscience and looking forward to their important continued role in achieving our goals for 2009. In 2009, we aim to increase the number of issues to meet the increased load of manuscripts. Our objective is to enrich the scientific Neuroscience material presented by the journal with important topic reviews and regular neuroscience quizzes to achieve PubMed indexing. We will continue to promote our new web-based manuscript submission

  12. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    This is my last issue of Plasma Sources Science and Technology in my role as Editor-in-Chief. I would like to take this opportunity to describe the origins of what has been for me a 17-year adventure. Maureen Clarke, then responsible for commissioning new journals at IOP, first conceived of a journal devoted to low-temperature plasmas. She contacted me, and, I imagine, others in the plasma community, with a set of questions about this possible new journal. Although I've lost that letter, I still have a copy of my e-mail response to her from 2 July 1990, from which the following extracts are taken: Dear Ms. Clarke, Thank you for an opportunity to comment on your new journal—Plasma Sources and Plasma Processing. I believe that there is a currently a place for a journal which is concerned with plasma source design and characteristics related to plasma processing and that this need is likely to continue for at least 10 years or more. [ . . . ] Right now there is considerable interest in the plasma processing community on the relative advantages of ECR and other microwave sources versus 13 MHz systems and a variety of different types of both sources have been invented and more seem to be coming along each day. Helicon sources are also starting to be interesting. [ . . . ] My view is that plasma processing includes all aspects of processes which employ charged particle plasmas in manufacturing processes. This runs from ion implantation out of very low pressure (<10-4 torr) plasmas to plasma sprays at atmospheric pressure. A journal which emphasizes the role of the charged particles and which covers the full spectrum of devices would be a welcome addition to other journals now available. I am interested in the subject and I would be willing to serve on the Editorial Board. At that time, the journal was tentatively named Plasma Sources and Plasma Processing. By 6 November 1990 she had offered me the position of Editor-in-Chief. I accepted, and by early 1991, IOP had

  13. Editorial:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    I am very pleased to be assuming the Editorship of Classical and Quantum Gravity for the next five years. I hope to continue the successful policies that have made this journal well known for its openness to new developments in the field, for the efficiency of its editorial process, and for the quality and importance of its articles. Classical and Quantum Gravity has truly blossomed under the guidance of its previous Editors-in-Chief, Malcolm MacCallum, Kellogg Stelle, Gary Gibbons and Hermann Nicolai. During the past 12 months, a total of 847 manuscripts have been submitted, representing an increase of nearly 50% over the past four years alone. Beginning in 2000, the frequency of publication was increased from 12 to 24 issues per year. The rate of full-text downloads is now 7200 per month, nearly a three-fold increase over four years. For regular manuscripts, the average time between receipt and first decision now stands at only 59 days, the receipt-to-acceptance time is now only 72 days, and the receipt-to-online publication time is only 116 days. The corresponding times for letters are 36 days, 44 days and 62 days, respectively. Much of the improvement in refereeing and publication times can be directly attributed to the state-of-the art Web-based refereeing system, maintained by the able administration of the IOP editorial team, consisting of Andrew Wray, Joe Tennant, Joanne Rowse and Susannah Bruce. Both the growth in journal size and the decrease in publication times have been accomplished without any decrease in quality. As one objective measure of this, the 'impact factor' index of Classical and Quantum Gravity has risen steadily over the past four years. Even more significantly, Classical and Quantum Gravity has undergone major intellectual growth since its founding. In 1984, modern string theory was in the process of being born, the subject of 'loop quantum gravity' did not exist at all, 'new inflation' truly was 'new', and the possibility of observing

  14. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This issue marks the end of an era for The Astrophysical Journal and for astronomical publishing. Helmut Abt is retiring as Editor-in-Chief after serving for 28 years, a period that saw enormous growth in the Journal and its transformation to the forefront of electronic scientific publishing. In February the ApJ office celebrated the receipt of manuscript number 40,000 under Helmut's tenure, a milestone that testifies to his impact on all of our careers. Although the names at the top of the masthead are changing, the rest of the ApJ team remains nearly unchanged, so the editorial transition should be barely noticeable. Much of the editorial work of the Journal will continue to be performed by our capable staff of Scientific Editors. I am also very fortunate to inherit Helmut's outstanding support staff in Tucson, ably headed by Janice Sexton. Our publications staff in Chicago, led by Julie Steffen, and our electronic publications staff, led by Evan Owens, are unmatched in their dedication and energy, and I have already begun working with them on further improvements to the Journal. And Helmut Abt will continue to serve the Journal over the coming months, overseeing the manuscripts that are still under review and editing the special centennial issue that will appear at the end of this year. In the coming months we will introduce several new features, most of them initiated under Helmut Abt's leadership. These will include an upgraded ApJ homepage, web tools for authors and referees, updated documentation and author instructions, and an attractive new version of the on-line journal itself. Over the longer term we are developing plans for streamlining the publication timescale and for expanding our capabilities for publishing and archiving electronic data. However my overriding priority, always, will be to uphold the Journal's reputation for scientific accuracy, impact, and integrity. I close with a personal note of thanks to Helmut Abt for his patient tutoring over

  15. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1989-04-01

    Even as I write this editorial, the Ides of March approach rapidly. This is unnerving and depressing because it signals that, in the United States, April Fool's Day is only a month away. I realize that some of you will quickly seize the opportunity to expose my error and point out that April 1st is only two weeks after March 15th-not a month. While I cannot disagree that April 1st occurs only two weeks after March 15th, I must nevertheless claim that April Fool's Day really falls on April 15,* the day we are called upon to account for our income-producing activities of the previous year. Yes, that is the day we are required by the IRS (Incentive Reduction System) to pay for our financial indiscretions of accum ulating wealth the old-fashioned way-by earning it. At least we can take comfort in knowing that the process of paying our taxes was made much simpler and more equitable when the 1986 Tax Reform Act l" went into effect.

  16. Editorial.

    PubMed

    2000-03-01

    This editorial presents an overview of the articles contained in this issue of Gender and Development, addressing the key themes of globalization and diversity. The collection of articles recalls why the project of promoting gender-equitable development continues to be critical in the 21st century, identifies some key challenges confronting those working on gender development, and takes a brief look at some examples of innovative work. This collection begins with a group of articles examining economic, political, and social changes associated with globalization, and analyzing their positive and negative impacts on different men and women. The ways in which specific aspects of globalization affect gender relations and shape the choices and chances of men and women are traced. In particular, writers highlight the failure of governments and development agencies to challenge fully the false assumptions about the nature of the role of men and women in society upon which global activity is based. Drawing on insights from academic research and feedback from practitioners, the second group of articles presents the basic concepts and terminology used in gender and development work. Lastly, the third group of articles offers innovative case studies of current gender-sensitive development work. Emphasis is placed on topical issues, including acknowledgment of sexuality as a development issue, critique on the assumption of entrepreneurship as gender neutral, and the assertion of the need for mainstream institutions, including government and development funders to work with women's organizations. PMID:12349634

  17. Editorial:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah

    2006-02-01

    operation for a few years on other IOP titles, such as Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, and has been very popular with both authors and referees. Although the tools have changed, the ethos of the review process remains the same and my role as Editor-in-Chief still encompasses the referee selection and management of the peer review on individual articles, working closely with the PSST editorial team in Bristol. I continue to see all referee reports and articles and work closely with the PSST Editorial Board, who provide support and advice when called upon - many thanks to all the Board members for their input! We would welcome any feedback you have on the new system and we would like to thank you for your patience as the old system runs down. We look forward to working with you to achieve these aims and I would like to wish you all success in 2006.

  18. Editorial.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    This editorial introduces a journal devoted to the issues surrounding women and their rights. As the development debate moves from women's need to their rights and to an understanding of the cultural roots of legal systems and the effects of the mass media in presenting alternative life styles as possibilities, the immense implications of using rights-based language in development emerge. This debate moves women from being the recipients of welfare to a state of empowerment. Women must be afforded individual rights which are linked to community rights. In addition, rights must be granted to women in their public and private domains. The dangers of using a rights-based language to assert women's claims to economic, political, and social equality in economic, political, and social life arise from the reality that the social position of men will usually place men at an advantage with the law. Legal processes which stress dichotomies may fail to improve real social situations. Also, the language of human rights may pit one set of rights (a woman's right to choose abortion) against another (the fetuses' right to live) to women's disadvantage. Areas governed by both customary and civil law pose other difficulties, especially since they require women to understand the law in order to use it. Development efforts which stress rights hope to meet immediate needs and to achieve a strategic end. Nongovernmental organizations can play an important role in asserting and enforcing the freedom of individuals and groups within groups. They can also build capacity at all levels of society and explore linkages between women's economic participation, decision-making within the home, and wider political participation. PMID:12290122

  19. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Evers, B

    1993-10-01

    This editorial introduces an issue of a journal which contains articles on the themes of 1) macroeconomic policy and gender relations and 2) income generation projects and empowerment. The opening paper dispels the myth that economic policies are gender-neutral. Another article uses the effects of structural adjustment policies in the Caribbean to illustrate how such policies increase women's burdens because of cuts in social services and pressures on women to provide cheap labor to create export goods. A third article depicts the adverse consequences of a macroeconomic policy in India which favors exports over domestic production. This theme is developed in a paper which challenges the notion that export-oriented development strategies provide a "trickle down" benefit to the poor. Specific reversals in development advances in Tanzania are linked to the adjustment experience, and the policy of debt repayment at all costs in the Philippines is shown to have an adverse effect on the poor. Other papers from Albania, India, Tanzania, Chile, and Bangladesh highlight how market-oriented reforms have created conditions which are detrimental to women's health. Further research reveals that the touted "feminization of employment" has actually turned out to be a "feminization of unemployment" as gender discrimination in the labor market continues. Papers on income-generating projects spotlight what has been learned about developing a successful income-generation project which recognizes women's "reproductive labor" time demands. Other articles explore barriers faced by women to access to finance and entrepreneurship. By looking beyond economic jargon and false assumptions, the authors of these papers explore how gender relationships are shaped by economic policies and affect policy outcomes and how women are organizing to improve their lives and the health of their communities. PMID:12320726

  20. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Plamen L; Rosen, Steven M; Gare, Arran; Noble, Denis

    2015-12-01

    Preparing this ambitious Special Issue has challenged everyone involved: authors, reviewers, and guest editors. The editors solicited contributions from many leading figures in a broad array of scientific and philosophical disciplines, with emphasis on phenomenological approaches to philosophy (see Section I). The motivating force was the conviction that if we could find a viable bridge for the gap between the "two cultures"(1) of science and philosophy, fundamental problems in each camp could be addressed more fruitfully than ever before and a new kind of science be born. We believe the unprecedented cross-fertilization of ideas from this initiative may furnish seeds from which that new, better integrated, and more effective approach to science may arise. This Special Issue consists of forty papers. For each one, multiple reviewers were solicited, with at least one reviewer from each "culture" (a scientist and a philosopher). In many cases, several rounds of revision were carried out. Needless to say, this required great patience and dedication of all participants. The editors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of our authors, and of our anonymous reviewers, who worked long and hard on the papers we sent them with no compensation for their efforts. We also wish to thank the Elsevier editorial and production team for the support they gave us in bringing this project to fruition. We would now like to offer a synoptic overview of the Special Issue, proceeding section by section and paper by paper. Our hope is that the reader will find this unique effort to marry science and philosophy both meaningful and enjoyable. PMID:26428536

  1. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Georg; Reiter, Günter

    2005-01-01

    represented in the journal, contributions from chemistry and biology are still rather sparse. Thus, one of our goal is to make the journal also more attractive for chemists and biologist interested in soft matter concepts. The future of EPJE Soft Matter In 2005, EPJE Soft Matter will see several organisational changes. First of all, the number of Editors-in-Chief will be reduced from four to two. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Athene Donald, Jean-François Joanny and Martin Möller for their enthusiastic efforts and personal engagements in setting up and raising EPJE Soft Matter to the place it takes up now. We believe that only because of their intense and excellent work EPJE Soft Matter has become a leading multidisciplinary journal. In the future, EPJE Soft Matter will continue to stimulate discussions and to publish also controversial ideas and views as long as they are based on the well-established scientific rules. EPJE Soft Matter will evolve towards a journal which is willing and capable to adapt to the needs of the involved communities. The Editors-in-Chief, together with their editorial board members, will always have an open ear for the problems colleagues may encounter in publishing their work. We will assure that requests and suggestions are treated in the most appropriate way and to the full satisfaction of authors and readers. We wish you a happy and productive New Year 2005!

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  3. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  4. EDITORIAL: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, M. J.

    2008-02-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome the authors and readership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) to volume 17. We have enjoyed a successful 16 years of growth under the guidance of our founding Editor-in-Chief, Professor Noah Hershkowitz, resulting in PSST gaining the confidence and respect of the plasma community. PSST has established itself as the journal of choice for dissemination of research results on the fundamentals of low-temperature plasmas. It has achieved this position through its rigorous reviewing process that improves the quality of our already excellent contributions. This was accomplished with the dedicated efforts of our reviewers and cooperation of our authors, to whom I am grateful. I am hoping we can continue to count on your support. I am confident that we will build upon our past successes by continuing to improve the journal and better serve the low temperature plasma community. I am pleased to introduce Professor William G Graham (Queen's University of Belfast) and Professor M C M (Richard) van der Sanden (Eindhoven University of Technology) who have joined the leadership team as Associate Editors. I am also pleased that Professor Hershkowitz has agreed to continue to serve PSST as an Associate Editor. Bill, Richard and Noah will share the editorial duties with me in selecting referees, assessing their comments and communicating with authors. Ms Caroline Wilkinson will continue to expertly serve as our IOP Publishing contact. The Editorial Board is critically important to the continued success and growth of the journal. Their efforts in providing advice and guidance, and in suggesting (and often guest editing) special issues are greatly appreciated. As we enter our seventeenth year, it is an appropriate time to revisit the guiding principles of the journal. PSST serves a unique mission in addressing fundamental issues in the science and technology of low-temperature plasmas and so distinguishes itself from more applications

  5. EDITORIAL: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, M. J.

    2009-02-01

    To open this first issue of 2009 I would like to update you on the current state of the Journal and to look ahead to our plans and goals for the year ahead. I am delighted to report that Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) is in excellent health and in 2008 enjoyed the highest number of annual submissions in its history. The number of papers downloaded from our online services increased by 25% compared with the previous year, indicating that the Journal is reaching a wider audience than ever before. Our Impact Factor (2.12) remains high and very competitive with other journals in the field. The success of the Journal is of course a reflection of the excellent research which is being conducted by the plasma physics community. I extend my thanks to our authors for continuing to choose PSST as a forum to report on for their outstanding work and to our referees, whose insightful comments and constructive criticism are instrumental in maintaining the quality of our publication. My many thanks also go to Richard van de Sanden, Bill Graham and Noah Hershkowitz and to the team at IOP Publishing who have supported me through my first full year as Editor-in-Chief. I particularly thank Caroline Wilkinson for her mentoring guidance. At the beginning of 2008 we introduced a revised Editorial Policy which emphasized the need for all papers submitted in PSST to focus on fundamental plasma properties (http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=scope/0963-0252 link to scope page). Our intention was to re-affirm the original guiding principles of the Journal and to strengthen its identity as a unique destination for research into the fundamental science of low temperature plasmas. The task of enforcing this policy---while remaining responsive to new areas of research---has proven to be quite a challenge. On occasion deciding whether a submission falls within or outside of the editorial policy comes down to a 'judgement-call' on the part of the editorial team. It is in cases like

  6. EDITORIAL: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2005-03-01

    I am delighted to be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics for the next five years. J. Phys. G is at an exciting juncture in its history, with 2005 marking the journal's 31st year of publication. In the past few years the journal has truly blossomed under the guidance of its previous Editors, Lee Schroeder and Horst Stöcker, and I look forward to building on their excellent work towards developing the journal to its full potential. Since 2001, article submissions have increased by 55% and the average time from receipt of a paper to a first decision has decreased to only 45 days. Last year J. Phys. G redrafted its scope to strengthen its support for physicists working in the interface areas where nuclear physics, particle physics and astrophysics meet, sharing common goals and language, as well as instrumentation techniques. J. Phys. G has been very successful in attracting papers in these interface areas, especially in quark matter physics by developing close relationships with this community. As Editor, I plan to continue to broaden the spectrum covered and especially to strengthen our coverage in the areas of neutrino physics and fundamental symmetries, whilst keeping the coverage of hadron physics and quark matter strong. I will work closely with our distinguished Editorial Board and excellent editorial team to ensure that we continue raising the quality of accepted papers in the journal and keep processing times to a minimum. With this team in place, I am confident that J. Phys. G will continue to go from strength to strength. Finally, a journal's success depends very much on the efforts of the volunteer referees and I thank them for all their hard work.

  7. Editorial note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, Wolfgang; Dodson-Schleich, Kathy; Kawata, Satoshi; Nomura, Sachi; Dandliker, Rene; Dainty, Chris

    2006-11-01

    In 1989, the founding editor of Optics Communications, Florian Abeles, turned over his leadership of the journal to a quadriga of editors, consisting of Neil Abraham, Chris Dainty, Lorenzo Narducci and Herbert Walther. It is with great sadness that we have to inform the readers of Optics Communications of the deaths of Lorenzo Narducci and Herbert Walther who died within a day of each other, July 21 and July 22, 2006. Herbert Walther had served the journal commendably first for five years as an editor and then up to his death as an editorial board member.

  8. QSR editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Wallace, Colin V.

    2016-06-01

    After a period of almost eight and a half years I have made the difficult decision to stand down as Editor-in-Chief of Quaternary Science Reviews. The purpose of this editorial is to introduce my successor and to provide some reflective thoughts as editor on publishing and editing Quaternary Science Reviews. The decision to stand down is based on the fundamental view that the role of Editor-in-Chief should be shared as it helps maintain a dynamic journal with fresh ideas and evolving scientific perspectives.

  9. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, F.; Ommen Kloeke, E.

    2015-07-01

    With this editorial note we would like to update you on the performance of the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (JAG) and inform you about changes that have been made to the composition of the editorial team. Our Journal publishes original papers that apply earth observation data for the management of natural resources and the environment. Environmental issues include biodiversity, land degradation, industrial pollution and natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods and landslides. As such the scope is broad and ranges from conceptual and more fundamental work on earth observation and geospatial sciences to the more problem-solving type of work. When I took over the role of Editor-in-Chief in 2012, I together with the Publisher set myself the mission to position JAG in the top-3 of the remote sensing and GIS journals. To do so we strived at attracting high quality and high impact papers to the journal and to reduce the review turnover time to make JAG a more attractive medium for publications. What has been achieved? Have we reached our ambitions? We can say that: The submissions have increased over the years with over 23% for the last 12 months. Naturally not all may lead to more papers, but at least a portion of the additional submissions should lead to a growth in journal content and quality.

  10. EDITORIAL: Metrologia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Visually, this issue of Metrologia differs markedly from those of recent years. The cover is changed and the layout of articles is not quite what it was before. Older readers, however, may notice that the colour of our new cover is that used for the original eleven volumes published in the period 1965-1975. The choice is deliberate: this combination of innovation with a respect for older forms characterizes the way Metrologia will operate under its new publisher the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. In discussion of the new Metrologia, one decision was firm: our underlying editorial policy remains fixed. Metrologia will remain a primary vehicle through which the metrological community communicates progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports original experiments and techniques, reviews work in specialist fields and disseminates the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures. This year, we plan six issues. Four will be regular research issues, one, appearing mid-Summer, will record the proceedings of the meeting held in Davos, Switzerland 20-22 September 1990 on "New Developments and Advances in Optical Radiometry III" and another, towards the end of the year, will review progress in Nanometrology. If successful, the pattern will be repeated, the intention being that the research issues continue Metrologia's historical line of interest, the conference issues expose the journal to new authors and the review issues realize a long-standing, but largely inactive, objective of editorial policy, the provision of retrospective evaluations of important topics and the assessment of likely developments in selected aspects of metrology.

  11. Editorial on Norman Borlaug

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three paragraph editorial about Norman Borlaug and his work to produce semi-dwarf wheats for improved food production on a world scale. His work in Mexico, since 1944, resulted in many developing countries, especially in the subAsian continent, becoming self sufficient in wheat production. Borla...

  12. Editorial Reviewers for 2004

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics thanks the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 2003, through June 30, 2004. We extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers in this time period.

  13. Editorial Reviewers for 2000

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics would like to thank the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 1999, through June 30, 2000. We would like to extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers during this time period.

  14. Editorial Reviewers for 2002

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics would like to thank the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 2001, through June 30, 2002. We would like to extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers in this time period.

  15. Editorial Reviewers for 2003

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics would like to thank the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 2002, through June 30, 2003. We would like to extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers in this time period.

  16. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  17. Editorial behaviors in peer review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Kong, Xiangjie; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhen; Xia, Feng; Wang, Xianwen

    2016-01-01

    Editors play a critical role in the peer review system. How do editorial behaviors affect the performance of peer review? No quantitative model to date allows us to measure the influence of editorial behaviors on different peer review stages such as, manuscript distribution and final decision making. Here, we propose an agent-based model in which the process of peer review is guided mainly by the social interactions among three kinds of agents representing authors, editors and reviewers respectively. We apply this model to analyze a number of editorial behaviors such as decision strategy, number of reviewers and editorial bias on peer review. We find out that peer review outcomes are significantly sensitive to different editorial behaviors. With a small fraction (10 %) of biased editors, the quality of accepted papers declines 11 %, which indicates that effects of editorial biased behavior is worse than that of biased reviewers (7 %). While several peer review models exist, this is the first account for the study of editorial behaviors that is validated on the basis of simulation analysis. PMID:27386349

  18. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  19. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Editorial developments Editorial developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    that make outstanding contributions to the field and we look forward to awarding the inaugural prizes in May 2009. With the help of Murray Batchelor and our distinguished Editorial Board, we will be working to further improve the quality of the journal whilst continuing to offer excellent services to our readers, authors and referees. We hope that you benefit from reading the journal. If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at jphysa@iop.org. Rebecca Gillan Publisher

  20. EDITORIAL: Happy New Year!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-ming

    2006-02-01

    As many of you are aware that Chinese science is at the crucial stage of development. We are now seeing more and more high quality works being produced by Chinese scientists working in China. However, high quality scientific works are rarely published in Chinese scientific journals so far. Therefore, the development of scientific journals publishing in China now becomes a more and more important indication of the science development in China. In the development of the chemical physics research field in China, the Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics (CJCP) has made significant contributions in the past 18 years. Since CJCP is primarily a Journal published in Chinese previously, its impact in the international scientific community has been quite limited. At this moment, we believe CJCP should increase its impact in the international community. We believe that making CJCP an English journal is a crucial step to increase its influence internationally. Therefore, upon the recommendation of senior editorial members, we now change CJCP into an full English journal from this issue on. We have also formed a high quality editorial board to help the editorial matters in CJCP, and a prestigious advisory board to advise us of the future development. I am very honored to be selected as the new Editor-in-Chief for the next four years. I hope by the end of my term, the impact of this journal is significantly improved through the efforts of our editorial team. Building a high quality scientific journal is not an easy task. I hope that every member of our chemical physics community can provide strong support to this journal by sending your high quality research papers in the future. We are also thinking about adding new sections of this journal to attract more readers. With the support of our community, I am confident that we can make this journal a more successful one. Here, I want to take this opportunity to thank the great leadership provided by the Editor-in-Chief since the

  1. Question 4: Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, K.; Blake, M.J.; Boucher, P.G.; Gordon, K.; Miller, D.J.; Monk, J.R.; Nelson, S.L.; Norling, N.M.; Sandstrom, D.V.; Urwiller, D.G.; Wilk, G.M.; Worthy, P.M.

    1990-11-08

    This article is a collection of editorials of public service commissioners addressing various issues of concern of the individual chairmen. The topics addressed include a master plan for fiber optic communications for Tennessee, the economic affects of reduced generation assets in a utilities' rate base and alternatives to traditional utility assets, competition between utilities and nonutility generators of electricity, traditional regulation as it applies to the evolving telecommunications and electrical generation industries, the managing of natural resources and energy production to meet human needs and insure our collective prosperity, reorganization and restructuring of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission, regulation as a whipping boy being blamed for economic and environmental ills, concerns about affiliate relationships, the effects of acid rain legislation on power generation in North Dakota, accountability to the public, innovative regulation of California's telecommunications utilities as an example for application to other industries, and a call for a national Telecommunications Policy.

  2. Editorial: Approaching 125.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Sherryl

    2012-02-01

    With this issue, beginning Volume 121, the editorial team shifts from the strong leadership of David Watson to a team under my direction. Approaching 125 years of publication, the Journal of Abnormal Psychology has earned its place as the preeminent outlet for research in psychopathology. With gratitude to the newly assembled team of associate editors (AEs), consulting editors, and ad hoc reviewers, I look forward to guiding the journal through this next term. Nine well-respected scholars have agreed to serve as AEs: Timothy Brown, Laurie Chassin, Jeff Epstein, Jutta Joormann, Pamela Keel, Kate Keenan, Scott Lilienfeld, Angus MacDonald, and Michael Young. The new team is dedicated to working tirelessly to maintain and enhance the journal's esteemed tradition of excellence. Given the well-established strengths of the journal, I will not suggest any fundamental changes. PMID:22329705

  3. EDITORIAL: Nanowires Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati

    2010-02-01

    Nanowires are considered as building blocks for the next generation of electronics, photonics, sensors and energy applications. One-dimensional nanostructures offer unique opportunities to control the density of states of semiconductors, and in turn their electronic and optical properties. Nanowires allow the growth of axial heterostructures without the constraints of lattice mismatch. This provides flexibility to create heterostructures of a broad range of materials and allows integration of compound semiconductor based optoelectronic devices with silicon based microelectronics. Nanowires are widely studied and the number of papers published in the field is growing exponentially with time. Already nanowire lasers, nanowire transistors, nanowire light emitting diodes, nanowire sensors and nanowire solar cells have been demonstrated. This special issue on semiconductor nanowires features 17 invited papers from leading experts in the field. In this special issue, the synthesis and growth of semiconductor nanowires of a broad range of materials have been addressed. Both axial and radial heterostructures and their structural properties have been discussed. Electrical transport properties of nanowires have been presented, as well as optical properties and carrier dynamics in a range of nanowires and nanowire heterostructures. Devices such as nanowire lasers and nanowire sensors have also been discussed. I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for suggesting this special issue and inviting me to serve as the Guest Editor. Sincere thanks are due to all the authors for their contributions to this special issue. I am grateful to the reviewers and editorial staff at Semiconductor Science and Technology and the Institute of Physics Publishing for their excellent efforts. Special thanks are due to Dr Claire Bedrock for coordinating this special issue.

  4. 15 CFR 10.12 - Editorial changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Editorial changes. 10.12 Section 10.12... PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.12 Editorial changes. The Department may, without prior notice, make such editorial or other minor changes as it deems necessary to reduce ambiguity or to improve clarity in...

  5. 15 CFR 10.12 - Editorial changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Editorial changes. 10.12 Section 10.12... PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.12 Editorial changes. The Department may, without prior notice, make such editorial or other minor changes as it deems necessary to reduce ambiguity or to improve clarity in...

  6. 15 CFR 10.12 - Editorial changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Editorial changes. 10.12 Section 10.12... PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.12 Editorial changes. The Department may, without prior notice, make such editorial or other minor changes as it deems necessary to reduce ambiguity or to improve clarity in...

  7. 15 CFR 10.12 - Editorial changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Editorial changes. 10.12 Section 10.12... PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.12 Editorial changes. The Department may, without prior notice, make such editorial or other minor changes as it deems necessary to reduce ambiguity or to improve clarity in...

  8. 15 CFR 10.12 - Editorial changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Editorial changes. 10.12 Section 10.12... PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.12 Editorial changes. The Department may, without prior notice, make such editorial or other minor changes as it deems necessary to reduce ambiguity or to improve clarity in...

  9. Editorial: In Memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1986-03-01

    At 10:30 a.m. EST on January 28, 1986, 73 seconds after liftoff from its Cape Canaveral launch pad, the space shuttle Challenger was destroyed by a catastrophic explosion and the seven crew members aboard were killed. I wish to dedicate this editorial to the memory of her crew: Francis R. Scobee-Shuttle Commander, Michael J. Smith-Shuttle Pilot, Ronald E. McNair-Mission Specialist, Ellison S. Onizuka-Mission Specialist, Judith A. Resnik-Mission Specialist, Gregory B. Jarvis-Payload Specialist, Christa McAuliffe-Space Flight Participant. I believe that I am speaking for all the officers, governors, members, and staff of SPIE in expressing our heartfelt sorrow to the families and friends of these seven dedicated space pioneers. I also trust that I am speaking for all of us in SPIE in encouraging the United States to press ahead with its space program and to ensure that the Challenger's crew did not give their lives in vain.

  10. EDITORIAL: On plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Simon; Webb, Steve; Hendee, William R.

    2008-03-01

    Plagiarism Plagiarism is, we are pleased to observe, not a common occurrence in Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB); however, like those responsible for all scientific journals, we are concerned about plagiarism, and very keen to prevent it. The Publications Committee of the International Organization of Medical Physics (IOMP) has prepared a generic editorial on plagiarism. The editorial is reproduced here (with permission of the IOMP), with slight modifications to enhance its relevance to the audience of PMB, along with our procedures for dealing with any cases of plagiarism should they ever arise. Plagiarism (from the Latin 'plagiare', 'to kidnap') is defined as 'the appropriation or imitation of the language, ideas, and thoughts of another author, and representation of them as one's original work' (the Random House Dictionary of the English Language—unabridged). Plagiarism is a serious breach of research ethics that, if committed intentionally, is considered research misconduct. Plagiarism in its most serious form is the passing off of all, or large sections, of another author's published paper as one's original work. If, following appropriate confidential investigation (see below), such a plagiarism is established, this will result in heavy sanctions including retraction of the article, up to a 5 year publication ban from PMB, and informing of employers and/or professional bodies (even after one offence). This may result in loss of research funding, loss of professional stature, and even termination of employment of the plagiarizing author(s). Plagiarism undermines the authenticity of research manuscripts and the journals in which they are published, and compromises the integrity of the scientific process and the public regard for science. Plagiarism violates the literary rights of the individuals who are plagiarized, and the property rights of copyright holders. Violation of these rights may result in legal action against the individual(s) committing

  11. Big3. Editorial

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christoph U.; Séroussi, Brigitte; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To provide an editorial introduction into the 2014 IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics with an overview of the content, the new publishing scheme, and upcoming 25th anniversary. Methods A brief overview of the 2014 special topic, Big Data - Smart Health Strategies, and an outline of the novel publishing model is provided in conjunction with a call for proposals to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Yearbook. Results ‘Big Data’ has become the latest buzzword in informatics and promise new approaches and interventions that can improve health, well-being, and quality of life. This edition of the Yearbook acknowledges the fact that we just started to explore the opportunities that ‘Big Data’ will bring. However, it will become apparent to the reader that its pervasive nature has invaded all aspects of biomedical informatics – some to a higher degree than others. It was our goal to provide a comprehensive view at the state of ‘Big Data’ today, explore its strengths and weaknesses, as well as its risks, discuss emerging trends, tools, and applications, and stimulate the development of the field through the aggregation of excellent survey papers and working group contributions to the topic. Conclusions For the first time in history will the IMIA Yearbook be published in an open access online format allowing a broader readership especially in resource poor countries. For the first time, thanks to the online format, will the IMIA Yearbook be published twice in the year, with two different tracks of papers. We anticipate that the important role of the IMIA yearbook will further increase with these changes just in time for its 25th anniversary in 2016. PMID:24853037

  12. EDITORIAL: Editor's Farewell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The completion of Volume 26, 1989, marked the end of my tenure as Editor of Metrologia. My association with the journal, its parent body the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, its host organization the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the publishers Springer-Verlag and last (but by no means least) the Editorial Board, has been a pleasant one and I trust that the subscribers will have found the product to be generally satisfactory. There have been, it is true, some disappointments along the way and I shall mention two of these while expressing the hope that the new Editor will enjoy a greater success in their regard. First is the question of circulation, which has stayed dangerously low, although the shrinkage has tapered off in the most recent years. Because of the narrow public support, the costs of production are relatively high and this, through a consequently high subscription rate, tends to enshrine the unsatisfactory state of affairs. Modest schemes to broaden the journal's appeal and bring in a wider readership have foundered upon the first step, namely, that of procuring from staff members of the national standards laboratories the hoped-for articles which would discuss the state of the art in delivering the highest-quality measurement services to the public. However, some very interesting and bolder schemes are presently under discussion. I had also hoped to leaven the journal's content a little by regularly appearing articles on the latest developments within the great national laboratories. But, as with technical review articles, it has proven very difficult to find the right authors who can also spare the time, and only a few laboratories have found it possible to collaborate. In taking my leave, it remains for me to thank all the contributors, referees and readers for their support, to express the hope of an ever brighter future for Metrologia and to wish to the new Editor, Dr D A Blackburn, a happy and successful tenure.

  13. 49 CFR Appendix - Editorial Note:

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 16084; 28 CFR § 0.66). The Assistant Attorney General, Land and Natural Resources Division, has further.... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting appendix A to part 1, see the List of CFR Sections... provision of Public Law 91-393, approved September 1, 1970, 84 Stat. 835, amending R.S. 355 (40 U.S.C....

  14. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Editorial developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    that make outstanding contributions to the field and we look forward to awarding the inaugural prizes in May 2009. With the help of Murray Batchelor and our distinguished Editorial Board, we will be working to further improve the quality of the journal whilst continuing to offer excellent services to our readers, authors and referees. We hope that you benefit from reading the journal. If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at jphysa@iop.org. Rebecca Gillan Publisher

  15. EDITORIAL: Quanta and leaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-11-01

    oscillating light `waves' had to be quantized as well. Several articles in this issue of Physics Education celebrate the first year of the quantum, 1900. I am grateful and beholden to Board Member and co-editor Gren Ireson for his contacts and nomination of the various contributors. It does seem strange, however, a full century after its discovery full of its amazing success that the essential quantum nature of practically everything is still kept hidden from school students, in the UK at least. Let's see what happens in the coming century. Now for another quantum leap. This is the last issue of Physics Education that I shall have the honour of editing. In fact, I shall leap into historical obscurity as the very last honorary editor. Great efforts by your Editorial Board - over a fair number of years! - have resulted in a radical reorganizing of both the journal and the way it is produced. It's been an interesting five years, a time of falling numbers but quite radical innovations in post-16 physics education. IoPP and the IoP are working together to revitalize what may have been seen by many as a staid if respectable and authoritative publication. We shall keep the authority and even respectability but hope to liven things up a bit. The new editor is Kerry Parker of Sheffield College. She will take on a stronger role than I and my predecessors have had, and will be working at IoPP in Bristol two days a week. There are many obvious advantages in this, and I look forward to seeing the new design and approach that will start with the January 2000 issue. So, it's goodbye from me - and also from the unsung heroine of Physics Education for even longer. Managing Editor Dr Jill Membrey has been doing the really hard work at Bristol for many years, but is now moving on to other things at IoPP. I am extremely grateful for the highly professional care and support she has provided for myself and the Editorial Board over the years. The new Managing Editor is Andrea Pomroy, who arrives at

  16. EDITORIAL: Teaching physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, Jonathan

    1998-11-01

    King's School, Canterbury, UK I'm working on the Physics joke book. So far I have only one joke.... Ah, sorry. That was the last thing I wrote for this section. It's easy to get confused. Now, let us be clear about one thing for a start. This is not some less than subtle bid to take over the Editorship of this journal (proof by induction: you write editorials, therefore you are the editor). Fear not, readers, there is no revolt in the ranks! Fans of Ken Dobson will be glad to know that he will return to this space soon. My presence on successive occasions is just an unfortunate coincidence of timing. This issue is one of our regular special features where we take a topic and dedicate the journal to its exploration. Colleagues reading this in universities or colleges of higher education will forgive (I hope) the bias of this edition to `From the Classroom'. We intend this issue to launch a column that will be regular, but not necessarily in every issue, in which ideas taken from the classroom experience of our readers are presented. With that in mind, we openly invite contributions for this column. The sort of thing we are looking for is that tip, experiment, way of explaining an idea or nice example of a principle, which may not be of your own invention but may well be new to inexperienced teachers or new recruits to the profession. It is not just limited to those at the chalk face. We will welcome contributions from Heads of Department and Heads of Science who may well have valuable advice and hints to pass on to people taking on departmental responsibilities. There are myriad problems associated with departmental budgets, examinations, management of resources and people etc that the newly promoted have to face from day one. We can all learn from the experience of others. The contributions need not be long; they can be in the form of a paper or a letter or a brief remark. The important thing is that, just because you have known about a trick of the trade for as

  17. EDITORIAL: Physical Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, Jane

    2004-06-01

    Physical Biology is a new peer-reviewed publication from Institute of Physics Publishing. Launched in 2004, the journal will foster the integration of biology with the traditionally more quantitative fields of physics, chemistry, computer science and other math-based disciplines. Its primary aim is to further the understanding of biological systems at all levels of complexity, ranging from the role of structure and dynamics of a single molecule to cellular networks and organisms. The journal encourages the development of a new biology-driven physics based on the extraordinary and increasingly rich data arising in biology, and provides research directions for those involved in the creation of novel bio-engineered systems. Physical Biology will publish a stimulating combination of full length research articles, communications, perspectives, reviews and tutorials from a wide range of disciplines covering topics such as: Single-molecule studies and nanobiotechnology Molecular interactions and protein folding Charge transfer and photobiology Ion channels; structure, function and ion regulation Molecular motors and force generation Subcellular processes Biological networks and neural systems Modeling aspects of molecular and cell biology Cell-cell signaling and interaction Biological patterns and development Evolutionary processes Novel tools and methods in physical biology Experts in the areas encompassed by the journal's scope have been appointed to the Editorial Scientific Committee and the composition of the Committee will be updated regularly to reflect the developments in this new and exciting field. Physical Biology is free online to everyone in 2004; you are invited to take advantage of this offer by visiting the journal homepage at http://physbio.iop.org This special print edition of Physical Biology is a combination of issues 1 and 2 of this electronic-only journal and it brings together an impressive range of articles in the fields covered, including a popular

  18. EDITORIAL: On plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Simon; Webb, Steve; Hendee, William R.

    2008-03-01

    Plagiarism Plagiarism is, we are pleased to observe, not a common occurrence in Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB); however, like those responsible for all scientific journals, we are concerned about plagiarism, and very keen to prevent it. The Publications Committee of the International Organization of Medical Physics (IOMP) has prepared a generic editorial on plagiarism. The editorial is reproduced here (with permission of the IOMP), with slight modifications to enhance its relevance to the audience of PMB, along with our procedures for dealing with any cases of plagiarism should they ever arise. Plagiarism (from the Latin 'plagiare', 'to kidnap') is defined as 'the appropriation or imitation of the language, ideas, and thoughts of another author, and representation of them as one's original work' (the Random House Dictionary of the English Language—unabridged). Plagiarism is a serious breach of research ethics that, if committed intentionally, is considered research misconduct. Plagiarism in its most serious form is the passing off of all, or large sections, of another author's published paper as one's original work. If, following appropriate confidential investigation (see below), such a plagiarism is established, this will result in heavy sanctions including retraction of the article, up to a 5 year publication ban from PMB, and informing of employers and/or professional bodies (even after one offence). This may result in loss of research funding, loss of professional stature, and even termination of employment of the plagiarizing author(s). Plagiarism undermines the authenticity of research manuscripts and the journals in which they are published, and compromises the integrity of the scientific process and the public regard for science. Plagiarism violates the literary rights of the individuals who are plagiarized, and the property rights of copyright holders. Violation of these rights may result in legal action against the individual(s) committing

  19. Nigerian Journalists' Perceptions of Editorial Ethics and of the Role of Editorials in National Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Cornelius B.; McLaughlin, Gerald W.

    A study examined Nigerian journalists' self-reported perceptions of editorial ethics and of the role of editorials in national development, comparing data with an earlier content analysis of the ethics of newspaper editorials. Subjects, 348 full-time, salaried Nigerian journalists on nine national newspapers in two newspaper ownership groups,…

  20. 47 CFR 76.1613 - Political editorials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Political editorials. 76.1613 Section 76.1613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1613 Political editorials. Where a cable television...

  1. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  2. The RSNA Editorial Fellows: Then and Now.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-09-01

    Since its establishment in 1998, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Editorial Fellowship has been offering unique opportunities to radiologists from around the world who have a strong interest in radiologic journalism. For the past 16 years, the selected RSNA Editorial Fellows have learned essential processes involved in the production of Radiology and RadioGraphics by working closely with the editors, associate editors, and staff. The editorial fellowship for radiology attending physicians was renamed the RSNA William R. Eyler Editorial Fellowship, in honor of the founding editor of RadioGraphics, with the first Eyler fellow selected in 2005. Additionally, several years ago, a second fellowship was created for radiology trainees, which is now named the RSNA William W. Olmsted Editorial Fellowship for Trainees, in honor of the most recent emeritus editor of RadioGraphics. For the special centennial year of the journal Radiology, several former editorial fellows were interested in knowing what the previous fellows are up to presently and how their experience and learning from the fellowship influenced and contributed to their academic career development. The invitation to share their experience of the RSNA Editorial Fellowship was sent to 19 previous RSNA Editorial Fellows. We report the findings from 16 of these fellows who responded. We found that almost all previous RSNA Editorial Fellows (15 of 16, 94%) stayed in academic radiology, and each is currently leading a successful academic career. All of them are currently actively serving in one or more positions as an editor, associate editor, reviewer, and/or editorial board member of various radiology journals and clinical journals related to their area(s) of academic expertise. Among the 16 previous editorial fellows who responded, there are four chairs and six vice-chairs of their respective radiology departments. All of them reported that the experience and knowledge they gained from the RSNA

  3. An Instrument to Aid in Assessing Editorials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhalter, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Presents a primary-trait scoring instrument intended for journalism teachers to use in assessing students' editorials by breaking down the analysis into three essential components: claims, data, and warrants. Applies the instrument to two student essays. (SR)

  4. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasthi, D. K.; Bolse, W.

    2006-03-01

    The Indo-German workshop on "Synthesis and modification of nano-structured materials by energetic ion beams" (a joint venture of Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (now renamed to Inter University Accelerator Centre, IUAC) and Stuttgart University), which was held at the auditorium of the "International Centre of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology" in New Delhi, India, from 20th until 24th of February 2005, was dedicated to the unique capabilities of energetic ions as a powerful tool in nano-science and -technology, both for generating and processing of nano-structured materials. Ions in different energy regimes play a different role in the field of nano-structure creation. A unique feature of the energetic ion is that it can excite the solid quasi-instantaneously in a nano-scale volume to very high levels and create extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure), well-localized both in space and time. By the energy dissipation into the cold ambient quenching rates of up to 1014 K/s may be achieved and structures and phases far away from equilibrium may be formed on a nanometer scale. The non-equilibrium conditions may further result in non-linear behavior and instabilities, which may drive self-assembly and nm-pattern formation on large areas. Hence, ion beams appear as an ideal tool for nano-technology. The aim of the Indo-German workshop was to summarize the on-going applications of ion beams in the nano-sciences and -technology in both countries and to explore further the perspectives of energetic ions for the preparation and processing of functional nano-structures, in order to initiate and strengthen common research in this field.

  5. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Mike

    2015-07-01

    Magmatic degassing plays a key role in the dynamics of volcanic activity and also in contributing to the carbon, water and sulphur volatile cycles on Earth. Quantifying the fluxes of magmatic gas emitted from volcanoes is therefore of fundamental importance in Earth Science. This has been recognised since the beginning of modern volcanology, with initial measurements of volcanic SO2 flux being conducted with COrrelation SPECtrometer instruments from the late seventies. While COSPEC measurements continue today, they have been largely superseded by compact grating spectrometers, which were first introduced soon after the start of the 21st Century. Since 2006, a new approach to measuring fluxes has appeared, that of quantitative imaging of the SO2 slant column amount in a volcanic plume. Quantitative imaging of volcanic plumes has created new opportunities and challenges, and in April 2013 an ESF-funded MeMoVolC workshop was held, with the objectives of bringing together the main research groups, create a vibrant, interconnected, community, and examine the current state of the art of this new research frontier. This special issue of sixteen papers within the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research is the direct result of the discussions, intercomparisons and results reported in that workshop. The papers report on the volcanological objectives of the plume imaging community, the state of the art of the technology used, intercomparisons, validations, novel methods and results from field applications. Quantitative plume imaging of volcanic plumes is achieved by using both infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths, with each wavelength offering a different trade-off of strengths and weaknesses, and the papers in this issue reflect this wavelength flexibility. Gas compositions can also be imaged, and this approach offers much promise in the quantification of chemical processing within plumes. One of the key advantages of the plume imaging approach is that we can achieve gas flux measurements at 1-10 Hz frequencies, allowing direct comparisons with geophysical measurements, opening new, interdisciplinary opportunities to deepen our understanding of volcanological processes. Several challenges still can be improved upon, such as dealing with light scattering issues and full automation of data processing. However, it is clear that quantitative plume imaging will have a lasting and profound impact on how volcano observatories operate, our ability to forecast and manage volcanic eruptions, our constraints of global volcanic gas fluxes, and on our understanding of magma dynamics.

  6. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Eberhard

    2016-06-01

    This Special Section of Acta Astronautica is a collection of selected peer reviewed papers presented at the eighth International Workshop on Satellite Constellations and Formation Flying (IWSCFF). The event was, as its predecessors, organized by the Astrodynamics Committee of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) with the objective to bring together specialists in the area of astrodynamics and space mission analysis and design and to promote discussions on lessons from past missions, to present recent results, and to address challenges for future space missions. The Workshop was held at the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering of the Delft University of Technology from June 8-10, 2015. The Workshop was coordinated by its Chairs Eberhard Gill (The Netherlands) and Alfred Ng (Canada) with support from the recently established TU Delft Space Institute, an extended International Program Committee, a Local Organizing Committee and a variety of industrial and institutional sponsors.

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Young-Chang; Kang, Phil-Hyun; Güven, Olgun

    2016-01-01

    The 11th meeting of the 'Ionizing Radiation and Polymers' symposium, IRaP2014 was held in Jeju Island, Korea between October 5 and 9, 2014. The foundations of IRaP symposium were established more than 20 years ago, and over the years it has grown to be a well established and appreciated symposium in the field of ionizing radiation and polymers. The event was organized by the concerted efforts and generous contributions of Korean Ministry of Science ICT and Future Planning, Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, Korean Society of Radiation Industry, Korea Nuclear International Cooperation Foundation and International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA. Following the traditions of previous IRaP symposia, oral presentations were collected in daily single sessions throughout the week allowing the participants to listen to every talk. Like in previous symposia entire spectrum of the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers were elaborated by oral and poster presentations. The progress and new trends in radiation chemistry, physics and processing of polymers covering nanotechnology, nanocomposites, biopolymers, membranes, natural polymers, surface modification, lithography, medical applications, packaging materials, polymers used in NPP environments were presented and discussed. This list by no means includes all the subjects covered by the symposium and a quick look at the contents of this proceedings will reveal the titles of many interesting subjects. This is another unique aspect of IRaP symposia, one can hardly find a relatively small sized meeting including such a variety of subjects. The participants of the IRaP2014 were also fortunate to learn about the new developments on the hardware of new X-ray and E-beam devices.

  8. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäppling, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Physicists generally and our readers in particular are only too aware that the availability of scientific material on the Internet has both advantages and disadvantages. The ease with which a scientist can retrieve information from his/her office has greatly assisted the publication process since references, for example, can be searched for, checked for relevance or cross references with increasing ease. At the same time, however, it has become much easier to use materials without giving credit to the originators and this form of scientific misconduct is of growing concern to the publication process. With this in mind I would like to mention that the facility for retrieving information via the Internet is further developing so that major search engines like Google will be directly usable for retrieving, for example, a Physica Scripta article. Non-subscribers gaining access only to title and abstract whilst subscribers can access the full text in the same way as previously—through libraries and publishers. Physica Scripta has been in the vanguard of electronic development and has many thousands of accesses per day to its full on-line archive. These developments, together with some recent cases of scientific fraud, has led to an increased demand for guidelines for proper ethical conduct in the process of science publishing and, to this end, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, IUPAP, is working on a recommendation that I expect to be able to display here once adopted.

  9. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigato, Valentino; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Vittone, Ettore

    2015-04-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B is dedicated to the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Microprobe Technology and Applications (ICNMTA2014) and of the Workshop on Proton Beam Writing. ICNMTA2014, held in Padova (Italy) from 7th to 11th July 2014, follows the conferences in Lisbon (2012, Portugal), Leipzig (Germany, 2010), Debrecen (Hungary, 2008), Singapore (2006), Cavtat-Dubrovnik (Croatia, 2004), Takasaki (Japan, 2002), Bordeaux (2000, France), Spier Estate (1998, South Africa), Santa Fe (1996, NM, USA), Shanghai (1994, PRC), Uppsala (1992, Sweden), Melbourne (1990, Australia), Oxford (1987, UK) and Namur (1981, Belgium). The conference was organized by the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare), under the patronage of the Universities of Padova, Firenze, Torino and of the Comune di Padova, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). 135 delegates (∼15% women and ∼20% students) from 27 countries of the 5 continents attended ICNMTA2014: the first day of conference took place in the magnificent Aula Magna of the University of Padova, adjacent to the Galileo's desk, and proceeded in the historical building of the Centro Culturale San Gaetano in Padova.

  10. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, Mara; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Pace, Emanuele; Talamonti, Cinzia

    2015-10-01

    The 10th edition of the International Conference on Radiation Effects on Semiconductor Materials, Detectors and Devices (RESMDD) was held in Florence, at Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia on October 8-10, 2014. It has been aimed at discussing frontier research activities in several application fields as nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, medical and solid-state physics. Main topics discussed in this conference concern performance of heavily irradiated silicon detectors, developments required for the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), ultra-fast silicon detectors design and manufacturing, high-band gap semiconductor detectors, novel semiconductor-based devices for medical applications, radiation damage issues in semiconductors and related radiation-hardening technologies.

  11. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, Yoshinobu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hou, Suen; Ohsugi, Takashi; Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    The 9th International "Hiroshima" Symposium on the Development and Application of Semiconductor Tracking Detectors (HSTD9 Hiroshima) was held on September. 2-5, 2013 at the International Conference Center in Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima, Japan. The primary goal of this symposium is to bring together experts in the design, processing and applications of semiconductor tracking detectors for discussions of past experiences, lessons learned and new ideas which are still in the early stage of development. The symposium was first organized in 1993; this year's is number 9 in the series and it celebrated its 20 year anniversary.

  12. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Singh, I P; Shiva, M

    1994-06-01

    Even though India was the first country to address population, it is behind those who came later. The government of India framed population within the context of health, but it eventually shifted the approach to health and family planning. Compartmentalism and adhoc-ism removed the programs far from the people. Eventually family welfare replaced family planning. The 8 Five Year Plan document provides a framework for appropriate, positive change in addressing the population issue. Yet, contraceptive intervention, particularly tubectomy, remains the core of population issues. In fact, tubectomy increased from about 11% of total sterilizations in the late 1960s to 96% in 1994. Women remain the target of population control. In fact, female-targeted contraceptive technology has produced IUDs, oral contraceptives, tubectomy, subdermal contraceptive implants, and the injectable contraceptive. Improvement of women's health services, their status, and their economic independence has not been attempted. Before improvement can occur, female literacy; skill development; meeting of basic needs of food, water, and health care for children to survive; and safe living and working conditions are needed. Male responsibility has risen somewhat over time. India needs to work towards a shift from contraception-oriented population control to reducing births by choice (RBBC), making RBBC a grassroots movement, a holistic approach, coordination between various government agencies, addressing demographic fundamentalism (e.g., son preference and child marriage), provision of primary health care, and equitable distribution of local and global resources. Population policy must be human. PMID:12345773

  13. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-04-01

    Nonlinear models are important to rationalize and understand self-organization, pattern formation and emergent behavior in molecular and cell biological systems. This special issue focuses on recent developments, that go beyond the classical modeling ideas of biochemical reactions and diffusion processes by including several effects identified recently as being crucial, for instance: elasticity/deformablity, anisotropy, multi-phase flow and 'active' behavior.

  14. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjeltorp, A. T.; Helgesen, G.

    2014-09-01

    Soft condensed matter is characterized by the weak interactions between polyatomic constituents, by important thermal fluctuation effects, by mechanical softness and by a rich range of behavioursDefinition taken from the introduction to "Phase Transitions in Soft Condensed Matter", edited by Tormod Riste and David Sherrington, Plenum Press, 1989 (New York), the proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute held in Geilo, Norway in 1989. This may have been the first time the term "soft condensed matter" was used in an official capacity. http://www.softbio.ox.ac.uk/ . Examples include complex liquids, colloids, granular materials, foams, polymers, gels and various biological materials. These materials thus share an important common feature in that predominant physical behaviors occur at an energy scale comparable with room temperature thermal energy.

  15. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Paul A.; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The 6th Workshop of the International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG6) was held in São José dos Campos, Brazil, from 15 to 19 October 2012, at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC). It was sponsored and organized by CPTEC with the co-sponsoring of the Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT).

  16. Editorial.

    PubMed

    O'connell, H

    1993-06-01

    Human rights groups have traditionally monitored and publicized human rights abuses suffered mainly by men (e.g., torture, killings, and imprisonment) and have ignored abuses of women. Gender-sensitive research and women's groups have uncovered this oversight. Rape in the former Yugoslavia is now considered a war crime, requiring full investigation and punishment. Conflict and violence affect women in several ways related specifically to the gender division of rights, responsibilities, and roles. Class and ethnic differences conceal this gender related experience, however. Even in countries sympathetic to women's equality, women still are second class citizens. Women are always conscious of the ever-present threat or experience of physical and sexual violence, almost always inflicted by men. Perpetrators use violence to keep women down; to restrict opportunities for them to live, learn, work, and care a full human beings; to impede their potential to organize and demand their rights. Domestic violence against women occurs across all social groups, races, age groups, and religious and political persuasions. Violence against females begins before birth. Forced prostitution violates women's human rights. Patriarchy supports discriminatory treatment and backs violence as a legitimate means to preserve the status quo. Was has had a gender-related effect on women in Afghanistan, Chad, and Cambodia. The psychological and social impact of conflict (e.g., state-sponsored terrorism) on women is also examined. Physical ailments are often manifestations of psychological disorders. Common themes are women's increased vulnerability to rape and sexual abuse during conflict, rapid rise in the numbers of households dependent on women's labor, placing on them an excessive burden, and complete disruption of economic and social life. Further, this disruption provides opportunities for women to overcome some aspects of their traditional roles. More than 80% of the world's refugees are women, their dependent children, and the elderly. Women are becoming leaders in armed conflict. PMID:12345221

  17. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    In December 2002 we announced some changes to Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics: an extended scope to highlight the wide range of articles published in the journal and a new definition of Letters to the Editor. As always, comments and suggestions are welcome and should be sent to jphysb@iop.org. Extended scope of J. Phys. B J. Phys. B covers all aspects of atomic, molecular and optical physics. We publish articles on the study of atoms, ions, molecules, condensates or clusters, from their structure and interactions with particles, photons, fields and surfaces to all aspects of spectroscopy. Quantum optics, non-linear optics, laser physics, astrophysics, plasma physics, chemical physics, optical cooling and trapping and other investigations where the objects of study are the elementary atomic, ionic or molecular properties of processes are also included. With the introduction of the BEC Matters! portal and IOP Select, J. Phys. B, one of the major contributors, offers authors of articles in this research area wider visibility and more flexible publication with the opportunity to display multimedia attachments or web links to key groups and results. The recent papers listed below reflect the wide scope of J. Phys. B: Calculation of cross sections for very low-energy hydrogen-antihydrogen scattering using the Kohn variational method E A G Armour and C W Chamberlain J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 22 (28 November 2002) L489-L494 Imaging the electron transfer reaction of Ne2+ with Ar using position-sensitive coincidence spectroscopy Sarah M Harper, Wan-Ping Hu and Stephen D Price J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 21 (14 November 2002) 4409-4423 Ultraviolet-infrared wavelength scalings for strong field induced L-shell emissions from Kr and Xe clusters Alex B Borisov, Xiangyang Song, Fabrizio Frigeni, Yang Dai, Yevgeniya Koshman, W Andreas Schroeder, Jack Davis, Keith Boyer and Charles K Rhodes J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 21 (14 November 2002) L461-L467 A Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice J Hecker Denschlag, J E Simsarian, H Häffner, C McKenzie, A Browaeys, D Cho, K Helmerson, S L Rolston and W D Phillips J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 14 (28 July 2002) 3095-3110 Locality of a class of entangled states I R Senitzky J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 14 (28 July 2002) 3029-3039 Solitons and vortices in ultracold fermionic gases Tomasz Karpiuk, Miroslaw Brewczyk and Kazimierz Rzazewski J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 14 (28 July 2002) L315-L321 Stable islands in chaotic atom-optics billiards, caused by curved trajectories M F Andersen, A Kaplan, N Friedman and N Davidson J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 9 (14 May 2002) 2183-2190 Emission probability and photon statistics of a coherently driven mazer Jin Xiong and Zhi-Ming Zhang J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 9 (14 May 2002) 2159-2172 The Li+-H2 system in a rigid-rotor approximation: potential energy surface and transport coefficients I Røeggen, H R Skullerud, T H Løvaas and D K Dysthe J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 7 (14 April 2002) 1707-1725 The stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation C W Gardiner, J R Anglin and T I A Fudge J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 6 (28 March 2002) 1555-1582 Oxygen ion impurity in the TEXTOR tokamak boundary plasma observed and analysed by Zeeman spectroscopy J D Hey, C C Chu, S Brezinsek, Ph Mertens and B Unterberg J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 6 (28 March 2002) 1525-1553 Electron-hexafluoropropene (C3F6) scattering at intermediate energies Czeslaw Szmytkowski, Pawel Mozejko and Stanislaw Kwitnewski J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 5 (14 March 2002) 1267-1274 High-resolution investigations of C2 and CN optical emissions in laser-induced plasmas during graphite ablation S Acquaviva and M L De Giorgi J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 4 (28 February 2002) 795-806 New definition of a Letter to the Editor A Letter to the Editor should present new results, likely to stimulate further research and be of interest to the wider atomic, molecular and optical physics community. Above all the results should be sufficiently new and important to merit rapid publication as a Letter, which implies accelerated refereeing procedures. This should be made clear either in the body of the Letter, if appropriate, or with a supporting cover letter from the author on submission to the journal. Letters will have an upper limit of eight journal pages and, as an additional quality check, two referees instead of one will be used to review them. The Board will be asked to make a final publication decision in the event of two conflicting reports. With these measures in place it is hoped that the important new results will receive the exposure they deserve as a Letter. If you have any questions or comments on this or anything relating to J. Phys. B please contact Nicola Gulley, Publisher, J. Phys. B (E-mail: jphysb@iop.org).

  18. Editorial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes an approach for compositing digital radar data and GOES satellite data for meteorological analysis. The processing is performed on a user-oriented image processing system, and is designed to be used in the research mode. It has a capability to construct PPIs and three-dimensional CAPPIs using conventional as well as Doppler data, and to composite other types of data. In the remapping of radar data to satellite coordinates, two steps are necessary. First, PPI or CAPPI images are remapped onto a latitude-longitude projection. Then, the radar data are projected into satellite coordinates. The exact spherical trigonometric equations, and the approximations derived for simplifying the computations are given. The use of these approximations appears justified for most meteorological applications. The largest errors in the remapping procedure result from the satellite viewing angle parallax, which varies according to the cloud top height. The horizontal positional error due to this is of the order of the error in the assumed cloud height in mid-latitudes. Examples of PPI and CAPPI data composited with satellite data are given for Hurricane Frederic on 13 September 1979 and for a squall line on 2 May 1979 in Oklahoma.

  19. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English.

  20. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, N.; Mendoza Jiménez, M.; Wittel, F.

    2014-10-01

    More than 30 years of scientific endeavor have brought us from programming simple models to impressive simulations of dynamic systems. Lattice models like Potts, percolation, fuse, fiber bundle, and growth models, just to name a few, are the prototypes or godfathers of statistical mechanics. With the availability of more powerful tools it became possible to develop these models and apply them on complex topologies, finding important practical applications in socio-technological systems (e.g., opinion dynamics, traffic, communication networks) and to engineering problems (e.g., fracture phenomena, mass transport). In parallel, particle models evolved from a hand full of interacting discs to three dimensional multibillion particle simulations that successfully describe interesting fracture phenomena, granular flow, and even fluid flow for engineering applications. Prof. Dr. Hans Jürgen Herrmann has dedicated his professional life to this journey.

  1. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, Mara; Pace, Emanuele; Talamonti, Cinzia

    2013-12-01

    The 9th edition of the International Conference on Radiation Effects on Semiconductor Materials, Detectors and Devices (RESMDD), held in Florence, at Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia on October 9-12, 2012, was aimed at discussing frontier research activities in several application fields as in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, medical and solid-state physics. Main topics discussed in this conference are tracking performance of heavily irradiated silicon detectors, developments required for the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), radiation effects on semiconductor materials for medical (radiotherapy dosimeters, imaging devices), astrophysics (UV, X- and γ-ray detectors) and environmental applications, microscopic defect analysis of irradiated semiconductor materials and related radiation hardening technologies. On the first day the conference hosted a short course intended to introduce fundamentals in the development of semiconductor detectors for medical applications to graduate and PhD students, post-docs and young researchers, both engineers and physicists. Directors of the School were Prof. Marta Bucciolini of the University of Florence and INFN, Italy and Dr. Carlo Civinini, INFN Firenze, Italy. Emphasis was placed on the underlying physical principles, instrument design, factors affecting performance, and applications in both the clinical and preclinical applications. The School was attended by nearly 40 students/ young researchers. We warmly thank the Directors for organizing this interesting event and the professors and researchers who gave lessons, for sharing their experience and knowledge with the students.

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amigó, José M.; Keller, Karsten; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    Symbolic dynamics is a powerful tool in the study of dynamical systems. The purpose of symbolic dynamics is to provide a simplified picture of complicated dynamics, that gives some insight into its complexity. To this end, the state space of the system is partitioned in a finite number of pieces, and the exact trajectories of individual points are traded off by the trajectory relative to that partition. These so-called coarse-grained trajectories turn out to be realisations of a stationary random process with a finite alphabet. In particular, the entropy of a dynamical system can be approximated by the Shannon entropy of any of its symbolic dynamics (the finer the partition, the better the approximation). Today, symbolic dynamics is an independent field of theoretical physics and applied mathematics with applications to such important disciplines as cryptology, time series analysis, and data-compression.

  3. Editorial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    The long-term mean climatology obtained from integrations conducted with different resolutions of the GFDL `SKYHI' finite-difference general circulation model is examined. A number of improvements that have been made recently in the model are also described. The versions considered have 3° × 3.6°, 2° × 2.4°, and 1° × 1.2° latitude-longitude resolution, and in each case the model is run with 40 levels from the ground to 0.0096 mb. The integrations all employ a fixed climatological cycle of sea surface temperature. Over 25 years of integration with the 3° model and shorter integrations with the higher-resolution versions are analyzed. Attention is focused on the December-February and June-August periods.The model does a reasonable job of representing the atmospheric flow in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The simulated tropospheric climatology has an interesting sensitivity to horizontal resolution. In common with several spectral GCMs that have been examined earlier, the surface zonal-mean westerlies in the SKYHI extratropics become stronger with increasing horizontal resolution. However, this `zonalization' of the flow with resolution is not as prominent in the upper troposphere of SKYHI as it is in some spectral models. It is noteworthy that-without parameterized gravity wave drag-the SKYHI model at all three resolutions can simulate a realistic separation of the subtropical and polar night jet streams and a fairly realistic strength of the lower-stratospheric winter polar vortex.The geographical distribution of the annual-mean and seasonal precipitation are reasonably well simulated. When compared against observations in an objective manner, the SKYHI global precipitation simulation is found to be as good or better than that obtained by other state-of-the-art general circulation models. However, some significant shortcomings remain, most notably in the summer extratropical land areas and in the tropical summer monsoon regions. The time-mean precipitation simulation is remarkably insensitive to the horizontal model resolution employed. The other tropospheric feature examined in detail is the tropopause temperature. The whole troposphere suffers from a cold bias of the order of a few degrees Celcius, but in the 3° SKYHI model this grows to about 6°C at 100 mb. Interestingly, the upper-tropospheric bias is reduced with increasing horizontal resolution, despite that the cloud parameters in the radiation code are specified identically in each version.The simulated polar vortex in the Northern Hemisphere winter in the upper stratosphere is unrealistically confined to high latitudes, although the maximum zonal-mean zonal wind is close to observed values. Near the stratopause the June-August mean temperatures at the South Pole are colder than observations by 65°C, 50°C, and 30°C in the 3°, 2°, and 1° simulations, respectively. The corresponding zonal-mean zonal wind patterns display an unrealistically strong polar vortex. The extratropical stratosphere stationary wave field in the Northern Hemisphere winter is examined in some detail using the multiyear averages available from the 3° SKYHI integration. Comparison with comparable long-term mean observations suggests that the model captures the amplitude and phase of the stationary waves rather well.The SKYHI model simulates the reversed equator-pole temperature gradient near the summer mesopause. The simulated summer polar mesopause temperatures decrease with increasing, horizontal resolution, although even at 1° resolution the predicted temperatures are still warmer than observed. The increasing resolution is accompanied by increased westerly driving of the mean flow in the summer mesosphere by dissipating gravity waves. The present results suggest that the SKYHI model does explicitly resolve a significant component of the gravity waves required to produce the observed summer mesopause structure.The semiannual oscillation near the tropical stratopause is reasonably well simulated in the 3° version. The main deficiency is in the westerly phase, which is not as strong as observed. There is also a second peak in the amplitude of the semiannual wind oscillation at the top model level (0.0096 mb) corresponding to the observed mesopause semiannual oscillation. This simulated mesopause oscillation is weaker (by a factor of 3) than that observed. The simulation in the tropical stratopause and mesosphere changes quite significantly with increasing resolution, however. In the tropical lower stratosphere of the 3° model the zonal-mean zonal wind displays a very weak (3 m s1 peak to peak) interannual variation, which-while rather irregular-does display a roughly biennial period and the downward phase propagation that is characteristic of the observed quasi-biennial oscillation.

  4. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, A A; Ismail, M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a multifaceted disease and research over decades has sequentially broadened our understanding of the mechanisms which underlie its development, progression and resistance against wide ranging molecular therapeutics. Data obtained through in-vitro studies and xenografted mice based investigations clearly suggested that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, overexpression of oncogenes, imbalance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, loss of apoptosis, dysregulation of spatio-temporally controlled intracellular signaling cascades, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, intra-tumor heterogeneity are significantly involved in regulation of different steps of cancer. Recently emerging information is also shedding light on considerable role of microRNAs in cancer and we have seen an exponential growth in the list of tumor suppressor and oncogenic miRNAs. Amirkhah et al, described how miRNAs regulated resistance mechanisms against different therapeutics in colorectal cancer. Nosheen Masood and Muhammad Zahid Qureshi emphasized on intricate interplay between Notch signaling and different miRNAs in head and neck cancer. Gasparri et al discussed new frontiers in therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer with spotlight on PARP inhibitors. Notch mediated intracellular signaling in esophageal cancer was comprehensively explained by Wang et al. Resistance mechanisms against TRAIL based therapeutics were described in detail by Limami et al. The authors gave opinion about different approaches which have been tested in preclinical trials to overcome resistance against TRAIL. Mansoor et al reported that GG genotype in death receptor 4 played protective role however, CC genotype had a causative role in colorectal cancer in Pakistani population. Larger pool of patients, sporadic mutations, expression studies will further demystify the association. Hsu et al, extensively described various strategies focusing on how post-translationally modifiable histones can be targeted for cancer treatment. Attar et al provided detailed information related to Viscum album against different cancers. Ahmadi et al studied network structure information and biological data on miRNA-and transcription factor-based gene regulation. Apoptotic cell death is a key mechanism frequently inactivated in cancer cells and different strategies have been used to re-activate/functionalize apoptotic pathway in drug resistant phenotype. We have attempted to present most recent landmarks set in cancer biology and therapeutics. Sarkar et al review summarized multifunctional roles of ASPP (apoptosis stimulating proteins of p53) family in cancer. Smina et al reported that Hesperetin, a flavonoid effectively induced apoptosis in skin cancer cell line. Chong et al experimentally verified that lipid accumulation may not only induce pro-inflammatory responses in hepatocytes but also activate CSC-like properties of hepatoma cells through NFκB activation. The present thematic issue brings to limelight most recent advancements in constantly developing field of molecular oncology. PMID:26520390

  5. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2016-06-01

    Ground based radiation research facilities are indispensable for a better understanding of the biological principles governing the responses of living organisms to space radiation and for advancing our knowledge in space radiation dosimetry and protection. 2015 marked the 20th anniversary of the first acquisition of space radiation biology and physics data at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. Use of the BNL AGS was the product of a collaborative agreement between NASA and BNL to promote the goals of NASA to "expand human presence in the solar system and to the surface of Mars and to advance exploration, science, innovation and benefits to humanity and international collaboration". This collaborative agreement signed on April 8th, 1994 built on previous work at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Bevalac and paved the way for the approval and construction of a dedicated space radiation laboratory at BNL, the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). In this volume we present three review articles: on the history of the creation of the NSRL, by Walter Schimmerling; on the physics-related research at the AGS and NSRL, by Jack Miller and Cary Zeitlin; and on the identification and evaluation of biomarkers for modeling cancer risk after exposure to space radiation, by Janice Pluth and her colleagues. It is the hope of the editors that our readers, and especially those relatively new to the field, will find these articles to be informative and interesting and that they will foster an appreciation of the importance of ground based radiation research in protecting the health of crew members as they venture out into the solar system in the coming decades.

  6. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.; Ferrini-Mundy, Joan

    1997-01-01

    Recalls the launch of Sputnik in the history of science and mathematics education. Discusses whether anything has changed or any progress in science and mathematics education has been made. (Author/ASK)

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerma, Dirk O.; Climent-Font, Aurelio; Respaldiza, Miguel Ángel

    2006-08-01

    The IBA conference has taken place in different countries from all over the world. It started in the United States in 1973, and since then has been held biennially without interruption, becoming the reference meeting on ion beam analysis and related methods and techniques. In its 17th edition, two Spanish laboratories, one from the Universidad de Sevilla and one from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid had the honour and responsibility of organizing the conference. These two laboratories are, so far, the only ones in the country equipped with accelerators dedicated to ion beam analysis; the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Seville and the Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM) in Madrid. We took up this task enthusiastically, conscious that Spain has only very recently been equipped with IBA techniques and that this event would highlight to the scientific community of our country the importance and involvement of IBA techniques in new scientific and technological developments. The conference was held at the Melia Sevilla Hotel in Seville, Spain from 26 June-1 July 2005. This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the published proceedings of the conference.

  8. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Gerstorf, Denis; Bertram, Lars; Lindenberger, Ulman; Pawelec, Graham; Demuth, Ilja; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gert G

    2016-01-01

    Human aging is characterized by large differences between and within older adults. Numerous factors are known to contribute to these differences, including genetic and immunological, somatic and medical, cognitive and behavioral, psychosocial and experiential, as well as socioeconomic and geospatial conditions. Continuing and expanding the scientific objectives of the Berlin Aging Study, the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II) seeks to comprehensively describe phenomena associated with aging and old age and to better understand the multiple different underlying factors and their interactions. To this end, BASE-II was established as a multi-institutional project combining and integrating interdisciplinary perspectives ranging from molecular genetics and immunology, geriatric medicine and psychology, to sociology and economics. In this Special Issue, we have compiled seven empirical analyses that feature examples of interdisciplinary insights that BASE-II provides by linking data across multiple levels of analyses at which human functioning and development occur in old age. Here, we provide an overview of the study, note commonalities between BASE-II and earlier studies, and highlight some of its unique qualities. PMID:26820471

  9. Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Leach, Martin J.

    2007-12-01

    To address the need for additional high-resolution urban dispersion data sets, the U.S. Departments of Defense, Energy and Homeland Security joined together to fund the Joint Urban 2003 (JU03) atmospheric dispersion study. This major urban study was conducted from June 28 through July 31, 2003, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, with the participation of over 150 scientists and engineers from over 20 U.S. and foreign institutions. Through mid-2006 over 125 papers and presentations have been given on scientific findings and model evaluations based on the field study results. The official JU03 data archive is accessible through the internet by requesting an account at https://ju2003-dpg.dpg.army.mil/. The JU03 study included several integrated scientific components necessary to describe and understand the physical processes governing dispersion within and surrounding an urban area and into and within building environments. These components included characterizing: 1) the urban boundary layer; 2) flows within a street canyon, including the effects of traffic on turbulence; 3) flows within and downwind of the tall-building core; 4) the surface energy balance within an urban area; 5) dispersion of tracer into, out of, and within buildings; and 6) dispersion of tracer throughout the downtown core and out to four kilometers downwind from the release. The scientific elements of the study were accomplished using state-of-the-art meteorological and tracer instruments, including lidars, sodars, radars, sonic anemometers, airplane-based meteorological sensors, fast-response tracer analyzers, and helicopter-based remote tracer detectors. Winds and other meteorological quantities were measured continuously at nearly 100 locations in and around downtown OKC. Tracer was released on 10 days during the experiment period and included both puff and continuous releases. The tracer was sampled using over 200 integrated samplers and 25 fast response analyzers. Vertical measurements of tracer were made by placing samplers on the tops of nearly 20 buildings and by sampling tracer at seven levels on a 90-m crane. The twelve papers in this special issue provide a cross-section of the scientific investigations pursued using JU03 data. Half the papers focus on using observations to characterize winds, turbulence and dispersion in the boundary layer above the city and into a downtown Oklahoma City street canyon (Park Avenue). The remaining papers discuss model evaluations using JU03 data and our improved understanding of processes governing dispersion in urban areas using models and observations. The combination of a dense network of measurements with state-of-the-art instruments allowed for an unparalleled investigation of transport and diffusion in an urban environment. We expect the Joint Urban 2003 data set will be used for many years for model development and validation efforts, and for refining our understanding of flow and dispersion in urban areas including the exchange of contaminants between outdoor and indoor and environments.

  10. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, Rémi

    2016-02-01

    On September 1st, 2015, I assumed the role of the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Computational Physics, when Gretar Tryggvason, Professor at the University of Notre Dame, stepped down after 13 years of service.

  11. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzig, J.; Zivin, J. Graff; Abarbanel, H. D. I.; Kocarev, L.; Kurths, J.

    2016-05-01

    This topical issue collects contributions to the interdisciplinary study of the interacting global systems of public health, energy production, and climate change, in order to provide physicists with an opportunity to explore these fields of application of great societal importance.

  12. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, D.; Trautmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The Eighteenth International Conference on Radiation Effects in Insulators (REI-18) was held during October 26-31, 2015 in Jaipur, India. The conference was organized jointly by Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, Malviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, Vivekanand Global University, Jaipur in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Vienna and was supported by the Ion Beam Society of India.

  13. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, Károly; Bereczky, Réka Judit; Rajta, István; Valastyán, Iván

    2015-07-01

    The present issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms contains the Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids (ICACS) held from 13 to 18 July 2014 in Debrecen, Hungary. Debrecen is the second largest city of Hungary, one of the most important educational, research and cultural hubs in Central Europe. The host institute was the Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  14. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, Károly; Nagy, Ladislau

    2009-01-01

    The present issue of the Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B contains the Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Elementary Processes in Atomic Systems (CEPAS) held in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, on June 18-20, 2008. The conference was jointly organized by the Faculty of Physics of the Babeş-Bolyai University and the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI) Debrecen, Hungary. The conference focused on all aspects of processes and phenomena stimulated by interactions of electrons, positrons, ions, atoms, molecules, photons and other constituents of matter with gaseous, liquid and condensed matter at low and intermediate energy.

  15. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Grassi, Marco; Incagli, Marco; Paoletti, Riccardo; Signorelli, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The 13th edition of Frontier Detectors for Frontier Physics was held in La Biodola, Isola d'Elba, Italy, on May 24-30, 2015. In 36 years of activity, the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors became a traditional gathering event for people involved in the design, construction and operation of particle detectors all over the world. The number of participants has been steadily increasing from about 100 of the first (1980) edition to more than 300. In parallel the Conference topics followed the trends of the field, in fact detectors and techniques originally developed for High Energy Physics experiments are now used in astro-particle physics, medical physics, archeological research and in countless, different fields.

  16. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, Volker

    2015-05-01

    The year 2015 will likely have a unique place in the history books for the optics and photonics community, since it is paired with various events that are exciting for this field. For one it is the 125th birthday of the Optical Society (OSA), and in addition, the United Nations declared 2015 to be the Year Of Light. The first special issue of this year is dedicated to the topic of "Emerging Materials on Nanophotonics". While the field of nanophotonics has seen tremendous momentum through the support of plasmonics, opto-mechanics, and quantum photonics, it often are both the breakthroughs and continuing developments of materials that bring enabling opportunities for this field. For instance, the area of 2D materials has grown out of its infancy being focused on Graphene into a crossdisciplinary subject area. Here, both scientific and engineering potential are seen in a) novel physical effects, b) higher functionality, and c) smaller form factors all found in one material option. Coincidentally, theUSNational Science Foundation recently held a path findingworkshop on 2D materials Beyond Graphene, and followed through with a dedicated two-year program to fund engineering innovations of the same. Here, the bandgap tunability of trimetal Dichalcogenides (TMD) has found to bear rich bandgap tunability via composition, alloying, and altering design options such as substrate choices or stress, thus providing a large variety of functions. In this context it is interesting to note, that with the many material choices for TMDs, the importance of targeted approaches towards accelerated material-to-marketwas raised in theMaterial Genome Initiative by the US White House. However, with the fundamental challenge of nanophotonics - weak interactions between light and matter - the choice of materials as both device building block and functionality delivery option needs to be synergistically considered. In this regard metal optics is seen as an emerging field that is able to contribute to this design evolution of devices and systems with ever growing constrains. However, materials with new functionalities and *Corresponding Author: Volker Sorger: E-mail: sorger@email.gwu.edu form factors allow utilizing field enhancement techniques in an unprecedented way. This, for instance, enables subwavelength scale photonic and opto-electronic devices with performance improvements such as utilized by the Purcell effect in light emitters, detectors, or electro-optic switching devices. On the other hand, certain novel materials are able to clearly outperform any existing option; for instance transparent-conductive-oxides (TCO) have been found to be able to alter its refractive index by unity. Lastly, with the maturing of silicon photonics as an on-chip optics platform, higher integration options are considered in this special issue; passive devices such as waveguides made out of the electro-optically active Lithium Niobate aid highfunctionality systems on-chip. However, these novel materials and subsequent devices and systems need to be compared and benchmarked in order to be a guide for the next phase of opto-electronic integration and other technologies as carried out by some contributions of this special issue.As the festivities around this Year Of Light continue, this special issue summarizes some of the interesting work around the emerging materials for nanophotonics. Concluding, I would like to thank for the input and help of the fellow Guest Editors, Jenifer Dionne, Alexandra Boltasseva, and Luke Sweatlock along with the Nanophotonics staff, Dennis Couwenberg and Tara Dorrian. Sincerely

  17. Editorial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemp, Joe; Commissioner, Publications

    2002-06-01

    As part of the joint National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NOAA-NASA) Pathfinder program, the NOAA/National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) has created a research-quality atmospheric, climate-scale dataset through the reprocessing of archived Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations from four afternoon satellites, in orbit since 1981. The raw observations were recalibrated using a vicarious calibration technique for the AVHRR reflectance channels and an improved treatment of the nonlinearity of the three infrared emittance channels. State-of-the-art algorithms are used in the Pathfinder Atmosphere (PATMOS) project to process global AVHRR datasets into statistics of channel radiances, total cloud amount, components of the earth's radiation budget, and aerosol optical thickness over oceans. The radiances and earth radiation budget components are determined for clear-sky and all-sky conditions. The output products are generated on a quasi-equal-area grid with a spatial resolution of approximately 110 km, with twice-a-day temporal resolution, and averaged over 5-day (pentad) and monthly time periods. The quality of the products is assessed relative to independent surface or satellite observations of these parameters. This analysis shows that the PATMOS data are sufficiently accurate for studies of the interaction of clouds and aerosol with solar and terrestrial radiation, and of climatic phenomena with large signals, for example, the annual cycle, monsoons, and the four ENSOs and two major volcanic eruptions that occurred during the 19-yr PATMOS period. Analysis also indicates that smaller climate signals, such as those associated with longer-term trends in surface temperature, may be difficult to detect due to the presence of artifacts in the time series that result from the drift of each satellite's observation time over its mission. However, a simple statistical method is employed to remove much of the effect caused by orbital drift. The uncorrected PATMOS dataset is accessible electronically.

  18. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, A A

    2016-01-01

    To optimize treatment, we need to understand biology of different diseases in much more detail with emphasis on morphological, proteomic, genetic and epigenetic grounds. Keeping in view the facts and stimulating developments in molecular pathology, it is worthwhile to present an up-date on this topic.It is becoming progressively more understandable that exciting fields of pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics have revolutionized field of medicine. Better understanding of underlying mechanisms of different diseases has provided us with better ways to treat illnesses. There cannot be a distinct definition of 'discipline' of pathology, mainly because investigation of human disease encompasses all the scientific disciplines of biomedical research. Sen et al reported that hyperbarıc oxygen (HBO) administration affected the endocrinological functions of fat tissue. Observation of significant increases in leptin, visfatin and IL-10 levels, leads to the consideration that in near future HBO administration may be applied as treatment for obesity, DM, eating disorders and obesity related diseases... PMID:27188861

  19. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Webb, Paul

    2016-03-01

    This Special Issue on the topic of "Orphan Nuclear Receptors" should help to cement the long held view that orphan members of the Nuclear Receptor superfamily play crucial roles in development, physiology and multiple pathologies and that some are attractive druggable targets. Focusing on selected orphans, this issue highlights recent developments in orphan receptor action and addresses questions about function, ligand recognition, strategies for drug development and applications for such drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Orphan Nuclear Receptors". PMID:26791250

  20. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Sérgio P.; de Pinho Guimarães, Ignez; de Oliveira, Elson Paiva

    2015-03-01

    The Borborema Province is part of a large orogenic realm that extends from northeastern Brazil to western Africa in reconstructions of the supercontinent Pangea. As such, understanding its tectonic evolution is crucial to place constraints on the history of growth and amalgamation of West Gondwana. In 1995, a special issue of the Journal of South American Earth Sciences was dedicated to the Borborema Province (vol. 8, nos 8/9) and the current issue encompasses several papers that provide a state-of-the-art assessment of several themes pertaining to its geological evolution. These papers highlight the large increase in the geological knowledge of this region attained in the last 20 years. The papers collected in this special issue originate from talks presented at the 3rd Borborema Symposium, held together with the 25th Symposium of Geology of the Northeast at the city of Gravatá in November 2013. The symposia were sponsored by the northeastern branch of the Brazilian Geological Society.

  1. Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J; Brown, T; Buchholz, B; Finkel, B; Guilderson, T; Kashgarian, M; Nimz, G; Ognibene, T; Tumey, S; Vogel, J

    2007-08-13

    The Tenth International Conference on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS-10) was held from September 5-10 at the University of California, Berkeley campus. The conference attracted 305 attendees from 26 countries who gave 144 platform presentations and presented a total of 170 posters. The conference opened with a special tribute to the late Roy Middleton, which was followed by a companion session on 'ion sourcery'. A plenary talk by Wally Broecker on his '53 years in the Radiocarbon Trenches', provided thought-provoking challenges to commonly accepted paradigms. A workshop on issues in the estimation of isotopic ratios and evaluations of activities from AMS measurements preceded the conference and a workshop on AMS in low-dose bioscience concluded it. Conference attendees had ample opportunity to sample local sights and mid-week excursions to the Napa Valley wine region and the Monterey Bay Aquarium were well attended. The social highlight of the conference was a dinner cruise on San Francisco Bay aboard the San Francisco Belle, which toured the bay on a clear evening and afforded spectacular views of the city front as well as the Bay and Golden Gate bridges. The proceedings of AMS-10 contain 140 peer-reviewed papers that detail recent developments in AMS technology and a broad range of scientific applications. The editors worked to ensure that these contributions represent original research that has not been published elsewhere. We are grateful to the many outside reviewers who provided thoughtful consideration and suggestions in their reviews of these manuscripts. The staff of the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory wishes to thank the many members of the international AMS community in allowing us to organize this conference. We are particularly grateful to the University of California's Toxic Substances Research Program, which provided key assistance with conference administration.

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-12-01

    Graphene displays a unique combination of properties that could make it suitable for many products, generating new technologies or novel graphene structures and devices for variety of applications including composites, electronics and optoelectronics. After more than 10 years from its first isolation where minuscule flakes of graphene were used for basic physics experiments and the first graphene-based devices, today we have a reached a stage where graphene can be produced in high volumes for a number of applications with properties approaching the needed performance requirements.

  3. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Dominika; Sobański, Jerzy A; Klasa, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Dear Readers, In no time, we are almost halfway through 2015. Currently many issues concern psychiatrists, and does not fill them with optimism: an uncertain future implementation of the National Mental Health Protection Programme, or the recent amendment of criminal law, entering into force on 01.07.2015, on the significant enlargement of implementation of treatment and precautionary measures in psychiatric institutions. Prof. J.K. Gierowski [1] wrote in Psychiatria Polska about the misunderstanding and even conflict in this matter, between politicians, lawyers and psychiatric community, almost one and a half year ago. Several tragic, dramatic events (German Wings plane crash, the recent murder in Tworki) creates a bad social attitude towards the mentally ill. Our environment does not remain indifferent and is actively involved in the discussion - it is expressed by Letters to Editor, written by Elwira Marszałkowska-Krześ and Andrzej Brodziak, published in the current issue of the magazine. We are all aware of our responsibility - on the one hand for a safe environment for patients while ensuring adequate treatment to the ill, and on the other for creating the image of psychiatry and psychiatrists [2, 3]. (...). PMID:26276911

  4. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1989-11-01

    On Friday, October 16, 1987, the Dow Jones industrial average fell a record 108 points for a single day. Only three days later, on "Black Monday," the Dow fell an incredible 508 points, followed by yet another huge loss of 157 points just one week later, on Monday, October 26, 1987. What was going on? The event that was alleged to have triggered all of this downside activity was "the report of a larger-than-expected trade deficit." However, certain usually reliable but unnamed sources suggested that there may have been a connection between these record-setting plunges and the optics community; after all, they occurred on the Friday prior to, during the week of, and on the Monday following the annual meeting of the Optical Society of America. This suggestion was summarily dismissed, because there simply couldn't be any way for a meeting of a few thousand optical scientists and engineers to influence the stock market. Impossible! Ridiculous! No way!

  5. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, T.

    2011-03-01

    The two articles in this issue of the European Physical Journal Special Topics cover topics in Econophysics and GPU computing in the last years. In the first article [1], the formation of market prices for financial assets is described which can be understood as superposition of individual actions of market participants, in which they provide cumulative supply and demand. This concept of macroscopic properties emerging from microscopic interactions among the various subcomponents of the overall system is also well-known in statistical physics. The distribution of price changes in financial markets is clearly non-Gaussian leading to distinct features of the price process, such as scaling behavior, non-trivial correlation functions and clustered volatility. This article focuses on the analysis of financial time series and their correlations. A method is used for quantifying pattern based correlations of a time series. With this methodology, evidence is found that typical behavioral patterns of financial market participants manifest over short time scales, i.e., that reactions to given price patterns are not entirely random, but that similar price patterns also cause similar reactions. Based on the investigation of the complex correlations in financial time series, the question arises, which properties change when switching from a positive trend to a negative trend. An empirical quantification by rescaling provides the result that new price extrema coincide with a significant increase in transaction volume and a significant decrease in the length of corresponding time intervals between transactions. These findings are independent of the time scale over 9 orders of magnitude, and they exhibit characteristics which one can also find in other complex systems in nature (and in physical systems in particular). These properties are independent of the markets analyzed. Trends that exist only for a few seconds show the same characteristics as trends on time scales of several months. Thus, it is possible to study financial bubbles and their collapses in more detail, because trend switching processes occur with higher frequency on small time scales. In addition, a Monte Carlo based simulation of financial markets is analyzed and extended in order to reproduce empirical features and to gain insight into their causes. These causes include both financial market microstructure and the risk aversion of market participants.

  6. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dran, Jean-Claude; Calligaro, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    The eighth European Conference on Accelerators in Applied Research and Technology (ECAART-8) was held at the National Museum for Folk Arts and Traditions in Paris, on September 20-24, 2004. This conference series, initiated in 1989 by Prof. Klaus Bethge from Frankfurt University, Germany, has gained the status of a major international forum which covers all aspects of accelerator developments and applications. The milestones have been the successive ECAART conferences, held in Frankfurt (September 1989 and September 1991), Orléans (September 1993), Zürich (September 1995), Eindhoven (August 1997), Dresden (July 1999), where, for the first time, ECAART was associated with the Ion Beam Analysis conference, and Gildford (August 2001). Among other accelerator-related conference series, such as IBA or IBMM, ECAART is probably the one that has the broader scope, since it encompasses topics on ion beam analysis, ion beam modification of materials and accelerator mass spectrometry as well. However it is quite understandable that the organizing institution emphasises its own research field. This year the conference was organised under the chairmanship of the accelerator group from the Centre for Research and Restoration of the Museums of France, who has been operating for more than 15 years a small tandem accelerator, labelled AGLAE ("Accélérateur Grand Louvre d'Analyse Elémentaire"), fully dedicated to the study of art works and archaeological artefacts. Moreover, two successive European COST actions (G1 and G8) have given birth to a network of about 30 laboratories using accelerator-based techniques for the knowledge and preservation of cultural heritage. Together with the choice of a museum as the conference venue, these facts explain the exceptional importance given to accelerator applications in the field of cultural heritage.

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, J. H.

    1997-07-01

    This first issue of Optics Express is the beginning of a new venture (and adventure) for the Optical Society of America, its members, and the readers of its journals world-wide, and for optics publishing generally. With the enthusiastic and steady support of the OSA Board of Directors, a small group of volunteers dedicated themselves over the past 12 months to the design and development of a new publishing vehicle for scientists and engineers in all areas of optical science and technology. The volunteers, who constituted an informal Development Consortium for Optics Express, were OSA members and non-members from many US institutions and at least half a dozen other countries. They are recognized today on the masthead page, where their names will be published for the coming two months.

  8. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, José

    2015-11-01

    The Ninth International Topical Meeting on Industrial Radiation and Radioisotope Measurement Applications (IRRMA-9) was organized by the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia (UPV) and held at the Paraninfo of the UPV, on the Vera Campus, Valencia (Spain) from 6 to 11 July 2014. IRRMA is a triennial event organized with the purpose of bringing together scientists and engineers, teachers and students from universities, research centres, industry, hospitals and other institutions from all over the world, who share an interest in radiation and radioisotope measurement applications. The first meeting of this series took place in Pinehurst, North Carolina, USA, in 1988. The following three conferences were organized also in North Carolina in 1992, 1996, and 1999. The fifth meeting was held in Bologna (Italy) in 2002, organized by the Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna. The McMaster University in Hamilton (Canada) organized IRRMA-6, in 2005. The Czech Technical University in Prague organized IRRMA-7, in 2008. Back to America, IRRMA-8 was organized by the Kansas State University and held in Kansas City (Missouri), in 2011.

  9. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villain, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    This issue of the C. R. Physique is thin, but should attract readers, since it gathers articles written by laureates of the prizes of the French Academy of Sciences in the last three years. In these articles they explain their work to non-specialists, as Nobel laureates do in their Nobel lectures.

  10. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezovich, John; Brown, Tom; Buchholz, Bruce; Finkel, Bob; Guilderson, Tom; Kashgarian, Michaele; Nimz, Greg; Ognibene, Ted; Tumey, Scott; Vogel, John

    2007-06-01

    The Tenth International Conference on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS-10) was held from 5-10 September 2005 at the University of California, Berkeley campus. The conference attracted 305 attendees from 26 countries who gave 144 platform presentations and presented a total of 170 posters. The conference opened with a special tribute to the late Roy Middleton, which was followed by a companion session on "ion sourcery". A plenary talk by Wally Broecker on his "53 years in the Radiocarbon Trenches" provided thought-provoking challenges to commonly accepted paradigms. A workshop on issues in the estimation of isotopic ratios and evaluations of activities from AMS measurements preceded the conference and a workshop on AMS in low-dose bioscience concluded it.

  11. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jim

    2000-11-01

    The readers of the Journal may not be aware that the Joint Editors act independently in making decisions on accepting papers for publication. This means that as an Editor I am just as intrigued as any other reader when I see a new issue of the Journal since it is likely that I will have been responsible for selecting only one third of the papers in that issue. In reading the material in this present issue I was struck by the conceptual and methodological links between a sub-set of papers that were concerned with adverse events and circumstances and their long-term sequelae; moreover, that these papers had between them some important implications for clinical practice. The first of these papers is by Dunn et al. and investigates the transmission within families of qualities of relationships. They found that father-child and mother-child relationships in stepfamilies, single-parent, and non-stepfamilies were found to be related to a number of factors. These included the parents' own earlier life course experiences, current family circumstances, and how a partner and child were getting along. The links with life course experiences meant that children were at risk of a "double dose" of less affectionate relationships in families in which parents had experienced early adversities. They found evidence for both selection effects (similarities in the early experience of both partners) and co-parenting effects (effects of one parent's relationship with a child on the other parent) and effects of biological relatedness. PMID:11260832

  12. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Nikhil

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing pressure on postdoctoral students and teachers to write or coauthor scientific publications which govern their postdoctoral opportunities, grants and even employment. PMID:25206212

  13. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caturla, M. J.; Abril, I.; Denton, C.; Martín-Bragado, I.

    2015-06-01

    The 12th edition of the International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids (COSIRES2014) was held in Alicante (Alacant), Spain on June 8-13, organized by the University of Alacant. This conference series, which started in 1992 in Berlin, Germany, and that is held every two years, is now a well-established meeting where the latest developments in computer modeling of all forms of irradiation of materials are discussed.

  14. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, John W.; Gaddis, Lisa; Petro, Noah E.

    2016-07-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission has forever changed our understanding of the Moon, Earth's nearest neighbor in space. By returning a comprehensive data set focused on supporting the extension of a human presence in the Solar System, LRO helps identify and characterize sites with high scientific and exploration value, favorable terrain, and an environment suitable for supporting future lunar missions. As seen in this special issue, LRO data are invaluable for improving our knowledge of fundamental aspects of the Moon and the Solar System, and paving the way for a safe human and robotic return to the Moon.

  15. Understanding and Creating Editorial Cartoons. A Resource Guide: Using Editorial Cartoons to Teach Social Studies Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This resource guide contains lessons, suggested activities, and 54 individual student activity sheets for using editorial cartoons in the classroom. Editorial cartoons, at their best, are well-thought out arguments about important issues in the news. They are meant to provoke thought, not merely assert a position and, as such, they engage the…

  16. Note from the Editorial Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-09-01

    The Editorial Board of Classical and Quantum Gravity recently met to discuss the state of the journal and of the subjects covered. They continue to be impressed by the vigour and vitality of the general area. New topics continue to arise and old ones to mature and deepen. In some areas techniques and understanding have reached a fairly refined level and questions which once seemed out of reach no longer seem beyond our grasp. At the same time there is the ever present need to maintain standards if this progress is to continue and not stall. These general trends in the field have been reflected in our submissions and the reponses of our referees to these submissions. In the light of those comments and as a result of our discussions the Board have decided to draw up a set of guidelines additional to IOP Publishing's standard guidelines to referees. These are reprinted below. Gary Gibbons Honorary Editor Instructions to Referees from the Editorial Board Referees are asked to bear in mind the following points: (1) The problem considered should have a sound motivation (a statement that the problem has been previously considered by X, Y and Z is not adequate motivation). (2) A paper should contain a carefully written conclusion, summarising what has been learned and why it is interesting and useful. In addition, referees are asked to take into account that classical relativity has developed into a mature discipline, which has led to changes in the standards concerning what is significant and worthy of publication, in particular in the area of exact solutions. (3) The discovery of a new exact solution does not justify publication simply for its own sake. Justification for publishing a new solution would be provided by showing, for example, that it has an interesting physical application or unusual geometrical properties, or that it illustrates an important mathematical point. The onus is on the author to provide convincing evidence that the solution is in fact new. (4

  17. Curiosity --El nuevo robot explorador de Marte

    NASA Video Gallery

    El nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte llamado Curiosity tiene grandes preguntas que responder una vez que llegue a Marte. Infórmese sobre la misión con el analista de trayectoria de la NASA Fern...

  18. Editorial-A brief journal status update.

    PubMed

    Lynch, James F

    2016-05-01

    In this editorial, the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America gives a brief overview of the present status of the Journal, emphasizing the events that have occurred over the past one and one half years. Topics addressed include: (1) The recent transition to the Editorial Manager peer review system, (2) new features that have been implemented in the Journal, (3) the incoming Managing Editor, (4) the publications component of the Acoustical Society's Strategic Plan, (5) new and revived article types, (6) open access, and (7) Journal metrics and statistics. PMID:27250160

  19. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüller, F. C.

    2005-01-01

    The group of 25 articles published in this special issue of Nuclear Fusion aims to monitor the progress made with experiments on fusion physics that have been conducted worldwide up to the end of 2004. These articles are based on overview reports from the various experimental teams presented at the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2004). This conference was organized by the IAEA together with the Portuguese host organization CFN-IST and was held in Vilamoura, Portugal, in early November 2004. The overviews presented at the conference have been rewritten and extended for the purpose of this special issue and submitted to the standard double-referee peer-review of Nuclear Fusion. Most teams have made use of this opportunity. Therefore this issue, which also includes four conference summaries, presents a reasonably complete picture of the progress made since FEC 2002 in Lyon. The articles are placed in the following sequence: Conference summaries Theory of magnetic confinement Experimental confinement, plasma-material interactions and innovative concepts Experiments on stability, energetic particles, waves and current drive Inertial confinement fusion Tokamaks Performance: JT-60U, JET, DIII-D, ASDEX-U, C-MOD Steady state/long pulse operation: Tore Supra, HT-7, TRIAM Spherical tokamaks: MAST, NSTX Tritium experiments: JET Diagnostics and heating methods: JET (diagnostics), T-10 (ECRH and diagnostics) and FTU (LHH + ECRH) New devices: HL-2A Small devices Alternative magnetic confinement concepts Stellarators: LHD, TJ-II Reversed field pinches: MST Inertial confinement Direct drive Heavy ion beam fusion Readers will also notice the supplementary issue of the journal (volume 45, issue 10A). This extra issue contains the 15-year overview report on progress in fusion research as written by the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) under the editorial responsibility of the IFRC. Both issues together will give the interested reader a state-of-the-art picture of the

  20. EDITORIAL: 50th anniversary issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddoe, Alun H.

    2006-07-01

    In July 1956, 50 years ago, the first issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) was published. It was subtitled The Journal of the Hospital Physicists' Association and published in association with the Philosophical Magazine by Taylor and Francis. Subscriptions were £1 per part or £3 10s for an annual subscription. The Editor, Professor J E Roberts, prefaced the first issue with a cautious editorial noting: The appearance of a new journal is usually greeted with mixed feelings by scientific workers, a common response being that there are far too many journals already. Justification for a new publication is only possible if there is a clearly defined gap in the publishing facilities available to workers in a particular scientific field.... Professor Roberts ended by seeking support from the scientific community for the new venture. He certainly got it! From a tentative few hundred pages in four issues a year for the first few years, the journal is now issued twice monthly with nearly 8000 pages expected in volume 51. In this anniversary issue we have invited some 28 senior authors to submit papers on a range of subjects spanning the discipline. We decided that to be an author one had to be old, but age was not to be the only criterion! Indeed readers will recognize all names as major contributors to both the development of medical physics and the success of PMB. Authors were not asked to write formal topical reviews of the state-of-the-art of the sub-disciplines which make up medical physics, but rather to present short historical reviews, didactic in style, perhaps highlighting the role of PMB in the development of their fields. Nevertheless, other than a page limit (which many subsequently ignored!) no formal format was imposed on authors, so what follows is a range of contributions from the almost conversational, personal statement to the more formal and familiar scientific paper. Whatever the writing style we are confident that readers will gain some

  1. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included

  2. On the map: Nature and Science editorials.

    PubMed

    Waaijer, Cathelijn J F; van Bochove, Cornelis A; van Eck, Nees Jan

    2011-01-01

    Bibliometric mapping of scientific articles based on keywords and technical terms in abstracts is now frequently used to chart scientific fields. In contrast, no significant mapping has been applied to the full texts of non-specialist documents. Editorials in Nature and Science are such non-specialist documents, reflecting the views of the two most read scientific journals on science, technology and policy issues. We use the VOSviewer mapping software to chart the topics of these editorials. A term map and a document map are constructed and clusters are distinguished in both of them. The validity of the document clustering is verified by a manual analysis of a sample of the editorials. This analysis confirms the homogeneity of the clusters obtained by mapping and augments the latter with further detail. As a result, the analysis provides reliable information on the distribution of the editorials over topics, and on differences between the journals. The most striking difference is that Nature devotes more attention to internal science policy issues and Science more to the political influence of scientists. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11192-010-0205-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21212822

  3. Farewell editorial from the founding editors.

    PubMed

    Izatt, Joseph A; Faris, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The retiring Editor-in-Chief and Deputy Editor provide a brief retrospective of the first six volumes of Biomedical Optics Express, thank the Editorial Board and OSA professional staff, and endorse the new journal leadership and the continued support of the journal by the biomedical optics community. PMID:26819829

  4. The Return of the Sun. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogl, Robert; Vogl, Sonia

    1994-01-01

    Editorializes briefly upon general progress in solar energy with a focus on electricity generated by a range of solar technologies. Suggests a major educational effort is essential to increase public's awareness of benefits and limitations of solar electricity. Briefly describes a multidisciplinary solar energy education kit for grade levels from…

  5. Popularizing Features in English Journal Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannoni, Davide Simone

    2008-01-01

    Journal editorials allow readers to select the most deserving contributions in the literature and adopt approaches or procedures endorsed by an authority in the field; they act as gatekeepers to the community of practice and at the same time allow editors to connect directly with their readership. Following a number of studies on the structure and…

  6. Editorial Advertising and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeske, Milan D.

    The fast-growing practice of buying paid "editorial advertisements" in the mass media by individuals and citizens groups wishing to express opinions oncontroversial issues, and the media by individuals and citizens groups wishing to express opinions on controversial issues, and the reluctance and refusal of some licensees and publishers to comply…

  7. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  8. EDITORIAL: Cluster issue on microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chih C.; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Chang, Juu-En

    2008-10-01

    -phase discharges in liquid capillaries (P Bruggeman et al) and biomedical applications by antibacterial treatment (K D Weltmann et al). Industrial applications include on-chip microplasma reactors (A Agiral et al), miniaturized atmospheric pressure plasma jets (J Schäfer et al and A V Pipa et al) and microplasma stamps (N Lucas et al). All of these represent important findings and advances in microplasma research and applications. We would like to thank the Publisher of the journal, Sarah Quin, and the editorial staff for their support and management of the publication. It is sincerely hoped that the contents of this Cluster Issue will promote understanding of microplasmas and microdischarges, and inspire further research towards industrial applications.

  9. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The end of 2008 cannot pass without remarking that the economic news has repeatedly strengthened the case for nuclear fusion; not perhaps to solve the immediate crises but to offer long-term security of energy supply. Although temporary, the passage of the price of oil through 100 per barrel is a portent of things to come and should bolster our collective determination to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. It is with great pride, therefore, that I can highlight the contributions that the Nuclear Fusion journal has made to the research programme and the consolidation of its position as the lead journal in the field. Of course, the journal would be nothing without its authors and referees and I would like to pass on my sincere thanks to them all for their work in 2008 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2009. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most loyal referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least two different manuscripts during the period from November 2007 to November 2008 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! T. Hino (Hokkaido University, Japan) M. Sugihara (ITER Cadarache, France) M. Dreval (Saskatchewan University, Canada) M. Fenstermacher (General Atomics, USA) V.S. Marchenko (Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine) G.V. Pereverzev (Max-Planck-Institut fuer

  10. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The jet engine is the prime flight controller in post-stall flight domains where conventional flight control fails, or when the engine prevents catastrophes in training, combat, loss of all airframe hydraulics (the engine retains its own hydraulics), loss of one engine, pilot errors, icing on the wings, landing gear and runway issues in takeoff and landing and in bad-whether recoveries. The scientific term for this revolutionary technology is "jet-steering", and in engineering practice - "thrust vectoring", or "TV". Jet-Steering in advanced fighter aircraft designs is integrated with stealth technology. The resulting classified Thrust-Vectoring-Stealth ("TVS") technology has generated a second jet-revolution by which all Air-&-Sea-Propulsion Science and R&D are now being reassessed. Classified F-22, X-47B/C and RQ-180 TVS-vehicles stand at the front of this revolution. But recent transfers of such sensitive technologies to South Korea and Japan [1-5], have raised various fundamental issues that are evaluated by this editorial-review. One, and perhaps a key conclusion presented here, means that both South Korea and Japan may have missed one of their air-&-sea defenses: To develop and field low-cost unmanned fleets of jet-drones, some for use with expensive, TVS-fighter aircraft in highly congested areas. In turn, the U.S., EU, Russia and China, are currently developing such fleets at various TVS levels and sizes. China, for instance, operates at least 15,000 drones ("UAVs") by 2014 in the civilian sector alone. All Chinese drones have been developed by at least 230 developers/manufacturers [1-16]. Mobile telecommunication of safe links between flyers and combat drones ("UCAVs") at increasingly deep penetrations into remote, congested areas, can gradually be purchased-developed-deployed and then operated by extant cader of tens of thousands "National Champion Flyers" who have already mastered the operation of mini-drones in free-to-all sport clubs under national

  11. EDITORIAL: New developments for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welland, Mark

    2007-01-01

    In this first issue of Nanotechnology for 2007 the journal has taken another step forward in its extraordinary growth and development of the past 5 years. The reader will notice two important changes that have been introduced primarily in response to the exponential rise in submissions to the journal: the contents have been restructured into sections and publication will now be weekly. These latest changes, however, are not the only ones that have been made to the journal and its service to authors and readers. A modern journal has many tools at its disposal that journals of even 10 years ago simply did not. Electronic submission and refereeing, web-based publication, author services such as free electronic reprints and an email alerting service, to name but a few. Published by a learned society, Nanotechnology has constantly responded to the needs of authors and readers alike drawing upon the extensive experience and tools of IOP Publishing. Nanotechnology is of course an exploding field and it is therefore perhaps unsurprising to see a growth in the number of submissions to the journal. However, an inspection of the data surrounding submissions over the past 4 years reveals a disproportionate growth in the success of the journal itself. In 2002 there were 419 submitted papers of which 208 were accepted and published in 6 issues. In 2005 we received 75% more submissions over 2002, had a reduced acceptance rate of 44% and published 12 issues. 2006 showed, in just one year, a growth over 2005 of greater than 50% in the number of submissions. This growth of course does present challenges. The paper issues of the journal have been increasing in mass, hence a move to weekly publishing, and the sheer number of papers means that finding an article on a specific topic can be difficult for readers and authors, hence the move to sections. Sections will also help the Editorial Board in ensuring that the journal has a balanced portfolio of papers reflecting the broad

  12. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Marella de Angelis and her colleagues on precision gravimetry using atomic sensors and from Dr Peter Becker on determination of the Avogadro constant via enriched silicon-28. I recommend setting up a free e-mail alert so that you can read them as soon as they are published! As many of you are already aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen again to 1.297. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Of course the publication of high quality articles in the journal is dependent both on you the authors who trust us with the publication of your best work and on our referees and Editorial Board Members who we depend on to maintain the high standards you have grown to expect. I must also thank our referees for their rapid response when asked to review papers for Measurement Science and Technology. On average, authors receive a decision on their article in 45 days. Therefore I would like to end this message by saying thank you again to all those who have contributed to our success in the past year, and wish you all the best for a successful 2009!

  13. EDITORIAL: Permanent revolution - or evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1998-03-01

    Honorary Editor It was that temporary Bolshevik Leon Trotsky who developed the principle of `permanent revolution', a principle that perhaps characterizes the recent history of education in (south) Britain more than does, say, principles traditionally associated with the Conservative or Labour parties. As this editorial is being written, changes are being made to primary school education, and the long-awaited details of the post-Dearing reorganizing of post-16 education are yet to hit the overful bookshelves and filing cabinets of school heads and examination board officials. But something unique has happened recently which might have surprised even Trotsky. The Secretary of State for Education has set up targets for primary school pupils' attainment and threatened (or promised) to resign if they are not met within the lifetime of our newly elected parliament. Of course, if Mr Blunkett is still in a position to resign at that stage he will have been the longest serving Secretary of State since time immemorial. But we should not carp: this is truly a revolutionary idea. Not the promise to resign - although this idea is not so fashionable now as it once was. The revolutionary idea is that a major change to an educational process is actually being made that carries with it a predicted and testable outcome. By contrast, when school physics was refreshed a generation ago by the introduction of Nuffield courses at both pre- and post-16 stages, no `targets' were set. I and many other physics teachers certainly preferred teaching these to teaching their predecessor syllabuses, and might even dare to assert that the pupils liked them too. But we still don't really know whether or not they learned more - or even better - physics. Very little happened as far as the outside world was concerned: the usual fraction of students gave up physics at the usual ages, and those who were examined didn't really get a better reward for their more up-to-date and more enjoyably learned

  14. New Editors, Editorial Advisory Board for Eos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2010-11-01

    Eos has two new editors and, with this issue, a revitalized Editorial Advisory Board. Christina M. S. Cohen, of the California Institute of Technology, is the new editor for space sciences. She succeeds Manuel Grande, who had served since 2006. Carol A. Stein, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, is the new editor for solid Earth. She succeeds John W. Geissman, who has been solid Earth editor since 2001; he will continue through the end of 2010.

  15. Innovations in healthcare and medicine editorial.

    PubMed

    Graña, Manuel; Chyzhyk, Darya; Toro, Carlos; Rios, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    This special issue editorial begins with a brief discussion on the current trends of innovations in healthcare and medicine driven by the evolution of sensing devices as well as the information processing techniques, and the social media revolution. This discussion aims to set the stage for the actual papers accepted for the special issue which are extensions of the papers presented at the InMed 2014 conference held in San Sebastian, Spain, in July 2014. PMID:27000205

  16. Tutorials: an introduction from the Editorial Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Board, Editorial

    2013-06-01

    The Editorial Board of Laser Physics is very pleased to announce that we have started publishing our new tutorial paper series. The first tutorial, 'Theory of atoms: basics of quantum statistics' by V I Yukalov (2013 Laser Phys. 23 062001), presents the basic techniques of quantum statistics that are necessary for the correct description of cold atomic systems. This introductory article is intended to be followed by further tutorials on the same topic, where general techniques will be illustrated by practical applications to finite quantum systems with Bose-Einstein condensate and applications to degenerate Fermi systems with pairing. Special attention will be paid to the description of cold trapped atoms. We hope that this tutorial will be interesting and useful to all scholars, researchers, postdoctoral fellows and students involved in research dealing with the physics of cold trapped atoms and molecules, the theory of finite quantum systems and various related applications. The Editorial Board would like to encourage our readers to provide us with your feedback and requests for future tutorials in areas of your particular interest. Please forward all your comments, suggestions and requests to editor@lasphys.com. With our best wishes, The Editorial Board

  17. EDITORIAL: The present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2006-09-01

    Neural engineering has grown substantially in the last few years and it is time to review the progress of the first journal in this field. Journal of Neural Engineering (JNE) is a quarterly publication that started in 2004. The journal is now in its third volume and eleven issues, consisting of 114 articles in total, have been published since its launch. The editorial processing times have been kept to a minimum, the receipt to first decision time is 41 days, on average, and the time from receipt to publication has been maintained below three months. It is also worth noting that it is free to publish in Journal of Neural Engineering—there are no author fees—and once published the articles are free online for the first month. The journal has been listed in Pubmed® since 2005 and has been accepted by ISI® in 2006. Who is reading Journal of Neural Engineering? The number of readers of JNE has increased significantly from 8050 full-text downloads in 2004 to 14 900 in 2005 and the first seven months of 2006 have already seen 12 800 downloads. The top users in 2005 were the Microsoft Corporation, Stanford University and the University of Michigan. The list of top ten users also includes non-US institutions: University of Toronto, University of Tokyo, Hong Kong Polytechnic, National Library of China and University College London, reflecting the international flavor of the journal. What are the hot topics in neural engineering? Based on the number of downloads and citations for 2004-2005, the top three topics are: (1) Brain-computer interfaces (2) Visual prostheses (3) Neural modelling Several other topics such as microelectrode arrays, neural signal processing, neural dynamics and neural circuit engineering are also in the top ten. Where are Journal of Neural Engineering articles cited? JNE articles have reached a wide audience and have been cited in of some of the best journals in physiology and neuroscience such as Nature Neuroscience, Journal of Neuroscience

  18. EDITORIAL: Crisis management - and creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-11-01

    yet more unknown persons. But we live in a democracy, and the new core will be put out for consultation. This will take place between November 1st and 20th, and so will be over, more or less, by the time you read this Editorial. Ordinary teachers of physics are unlikely to be asked for opinions. However, the Institute's informal rapid response team will do their best to represent the interests not only of its members but of the wider physics community. The question remains, however, as to why such rapid reactions are necessary. Surely now is the time to reflect upon the consequences of the rushed initiatives of the past eight years or so in education, and indeed undertake a professional, independent evaluation of them. But our rulers seem incapable of doing other than create crises, and then managing the crises they create by creating even more. There are of course alternatives to this, as could easily be discovered by looking north of Hadrian's Wall, where change is taking placed in a managed, courteous fashion, and where the numbers of students studying physics post-16 is gently increasing. The Scottish Office Education Department has recently taken part in an OECD study of curriculum innovation in 13 countries. The department reports some key findings in the Scottish initiative which are in fact common to all the successful initiatives reported [1, 2]. The message is clear: curriculum change will fail - either completely or at least in reaching the anticipated outcome fully - if certain requirements are not met. The most significant of these, reported in the OECD study, are: Teachers will respond to challenges to become involved in curriculum innovation and to acquire new skills and competences if they are given encouragement and reassurance that they will be well supported in their efforts. Innovation must be systemic, i.e. showing an awareness that many aspects of education are interrelated (so that a change in one affects others). Teacher involvement is vital

  19. EDITORIAL: Crisis management - and creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-11-01

    yet more unknown persons. But we live in a democracy, and the new core will be put out for consultation. This will take place between November 1st and 20th, and so will be over, more or less, by the time you read this Editorial. Ordinary teachers of physics are unlikely to be asked for opinions. However, the Institute's informal rapid response team will do their best to represent the interests not only of its members but of the wider physics community. The question remains, however, as to why such rapid reactions are necessary. Surely now is the time to reflect upon the consequences of the rushed initiatives of the past eight years or so in education, and indeed undertake a professional, independent evaluation of them. But our rulers seem incapable of doing other than create crises, and then managing the crises they create by creating even more. There are of course alternatives to this, as could easily be discovered by looking north of Hadrian's Wall, where change is taking placed in a managed, courteous fashion, and where the numbers of students studying physics post-16 is gently increasing. The Scottish Office Education Department has recently taken part in an OECD study of curriculum innovation in 13 countries. The department reports some key findings in the Scottish initiative which are in fact common to all the successful initiatives reported [1, 2]. The message is clear: curriculum change will fail - either completely or at least in reaching the anticipated outcome fully - if certain requirements are not met. The most significant of these, reported in the OECD study, are: Teachers will respond to challenges to become involved in curriculum innovation and to acquire new skills and competences if they are given encouragement and reassurance that they will be well supported in their efforts. Innovation must be systemic, i.e. showing an awareness that many aspects of education are interrelated (so that a change in one affects others). Teacher involvement is vital

  20. EDITORIAL: The present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2006-09-01

    Neural engineering has grown substantially in the last few years and it is time to review the progress of the first journal in this field. Journal of Neural Engineering (JNE) is a quarterly publication that started in 2004. The journal is now in its third volume and eleven issues, consisting of 114 articles in total, have been published since its launch. The editorial processing times have been kept to a minimum, the receipt to first decision time is 41 days, on average, and the time from receipt to publication has been maintained below three months. It is also worth noting that it is free to publish in Journal of Neural Engineering—there are no author fees—and once published the articles are free online for the first month. The journal has been listed in Pubmed® since 2005 and has been accepted by ISI® in 2006. Who is reading Journal of Neural Engineering? The number of readers of JNE has increased significantly from 8050 full-text downloads in 2004 to 14 900 in 2005 and the first seven months of 2006 have already seen 12 800 downloads. The top users in 2005 were the Microsoft Corporation, Stanford University and the University of Michigan. The list of top ten users also includes non-US institutions: University of Toronto, University of Tokyo, Hong Kong Polytechnic, National Library of China and University College London, reflecting the international flavor of the journal. What are the hot topics in neural engineering? Based on the number of downloads and citations for 2004-2005, the top three topics are: (1) Brain-computer interfaces (2) Visual prostheses (3) Neural modelling Several other topics such as microelectrode arrays, neural signal processing, neural dynamics and neural circuit engineering are also in the top ten. Where are Journal of Neural Engineering articles cited? JNE articles have reached a wide audience and have been cited in of some of the best journals in physiology and neuroscience such as Nature Neuroscience, Journal of Neuroscience

  1. Nuevos Destinos: A CD-ROM for Advanced Beginning Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Provides a description of the Nuevos Destinos CD-ROM, a joint production for students learning Spanish at the advanced-beginning, intermediate-low, or native-speaker level. Nuevos Destinos involves students in meaningful ways by asking them to solve real-world problems encountered in law offices. (Author/VWL)

  2. Under-Representation of Women on Dental Journal Editorial Boards

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Effie; Rosania, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Each journal’s editorial and advisory board plays a critical role in resolving gender bias in the peer-review and publication process. Thus, this study aimed to quantify women’s participation in editorial and advisory boards of major dental journals. Gender data on editorial and advisory boards were extracted from major dental journals, which were then categorized by journal specialty focus. The gender of the editor-in-chief and associate editor-in-chief was noted to assess the effect of journal leadership on women’s participation in journal boards. For comparison purposes, data were also obtained regarding the percentage of women faculty for each dental specialty. Results Overall, in the major 69 dental journals, 14.8% of editorial board members were women. An one-way ANOVA analysis revealed statistically significant gender differences between journal specialty categories (p = 0.003) with some dental specialties’ journals demonstrating a relatively high participation of women as editorial board members. There was a significant positive correlation for various dental specialties between women’s representation in editorial and advisory boards and women in similar dental academic specialties (p = 0.02, r2 = 0.55). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the presence of women in journal editorial leadership and the percentage of women serving as advisory board members (p = 0.03). Our results confirmed that the under-representation of women on dental journal editorial boards was significantly different between dental science specialties. When there were more women in journal editorial leadership positions, there was a higher participation of women as editorial and advisory board members. Journals should increase the numbers of women on editorial boards in order to secure diversity, improve publication quality and recognize women’s contribution to dental science. PMID:25635691

  3. Editorializing in L2: The Case of Philippine English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayag, Danilo T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the discourse structure of newspaper editorials in Philippine English in terms of their macrostructure and their lexico-grammatical features. Data were taken from three leading English-language newspapers in the Philippines. Toulmin's framework is used in analyzing the macrostructure of the editorials. The study posits that the…

  4. Dogmatism, Intelligence, and the Understanding/Appreciation of Editorial Satire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Charles R.

    In a study of satire as persuasion, two experiments were conducted--one to determine whether dogmatism affected the understanding and appreciation of editorial satire, the second to determine the same about intelligence as measured by the Scholastic Aptitude Test. In the first experiment, 116 college students read three satirical editorials. After…

  5. Teaching of Editorial Writing Uses Claims-Based Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Urges the use of claims-based analysis in editorial writing instruction. Explains the use of five hierarchical claim types (factual, definitional, causal, value, and policy) to teach students to analyze and formulate arguments, thus teaching editorial writing by focusing more on the process than on the product. (SR)

  6. The Composition of the Editorial Boards of General Marketing Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Yue; Zhang, Jason Q.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the diversity issues in corporate governance, the diversity in top academic positions (e.g., editorial boards of academic journals in business) is rather underresearched. The editorial boards of academic marketing journals are important gatekeepers and trendsetters in the creation and dissemination of marketing knowledge. Membership on…

  7. Editorial challenges of the Revista de Saúde Pública.

    PubMed

    Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira; França Júnior, Ivan; de Andrade, Maria Teresinha Dias; Barata, Rita de Cássia Barradas; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2015-07-01

    The editors of the Revista de Saúde Pública describe the journal's editorial profile and discuss the challenges of scientific publication in the area. A historical overview of almost 50 years of the journal is reported, with the temporal projection of their bibliometric indicators. Qualitative and quantitative parameters of its editorial profile and indexes are also reported. Budget constraints and the actions being taken to address them are discussed. The difficulty in allocating reviewers for manuscripts submitted to the editorial process is also discussed; an issue that affects scientific publication in many areas of knowledge. In particular, we sought to reflect on the proposal of measures to boost the editorial process by alleviating the shortage of reviewers and their possible harmful consequences for the editorial process. PMID:26132238

  8. Editorial "The Interdisciplinary Nature of SOIL"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, E. C.; Cerdá, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Pereg, L.; Quinton, J. N.; Six, J.; Van Oost, K.

    2014-09-01

    The holistic study of soils requires an interdisciplinary approach involving biologists, chemists, geologists, and physicists amongst others, something that has been true from the earliest days of the field. This approach has been strengthened and reinforced as current research continues to use experts trained in both soil science and related fields and by the wide array of issues impacting the world's biosphere that require an in-depth understanding of soils. Of fundamental importance amongst these issues are biodiversity, biofuels/energy security, climate change, ecosystem services, food security, human health, land degradation, and water security, each representing a critical challenge for research. In order to establish a benchmark for the type of research we seek to highlight in each issue of SOIL, here in this editorial, we outline the interdisciplinary nature of soil science research that we are seeking for in SOIL, with a focus on the myriad ways soil science can be used to expand investigation into a more holistic and therefore richer approach to soil research. In addition, we provide a selection of invited review papers in the first issue of SOIL that address the study of soils and the ways in which soil investigations are essential to other related fields. We hope that both this editorial and the first issue will serve as examples of the kinds of topics we would like to see published in SOIL and will stimulate excitement among our readers and authors to participate in this new venture.

  9. Biochemia Medica's editorial policy on authorship.

    PubMed

    Supak-Smolcic, Vesna; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings of authorship criteria violations in the manuscripts submitted to Biochemia Medica show that almost 40% of authors do not meet necessary criteria for authorship and thus indicate the need for better dissemination of editorial policy on authorship in our journal. We believe that such cases are mostly due to the authors' unawareness or the lack of understanding of the authorship criteria. With this article we therefore wish to declare our editorial policy on authorship and authorship criteria. Biochemia Medica endorses the authorship policy provided by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). Information on authorship is assessed by self-reported authorship claims during on-line manuscript submission. Those who meet ICMJE criteria shall be listed as authors, and all listed authors shall fulfill ICMJE criteria. All authors should be responsible for content of the article and have to know other authors' contributions to the study. Biochemia Medica will follow recommendations provided by Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) flowcharts for possible disputes. By adhering to this procedure we hope to raise awareness about the importance of compliance with ICMJE authorship recommendations. PMID:26525911

  10. EDITORIAL: Five years of development and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-02-01

    The last issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics under my editorship has recently been published. During the last five years, since its change of title, the journal has significantly modified its targets. Starting from a balanced mix of quantum optics and semiclassical optics, new topics have been brought within the scope of the journal, such as atom optics, degenerate quantum gases, quantum computation and quantum information, representing the growing role played by lasers within our technologically oriented society. Furthermore, the journal has greatly expanded the number of Special Issues and has introduced PhD Tutorials. While many authors do not have time to invest in preparing review articles, we have found the review-style PhD Tutorials to be very popular. Looking back over the evolution of the journal, the most obvious criterion of its development, at least from the point of view of the prospective contributing author, has been the gratifying increase in the impact factor measured by ISI, reflecting the leading position of Journal of Optics B as a European journal devoted exclusively to optics research. It is most rewarding to report that the number of printed pages has increased by 77% since 1999 and by more than 20% in the last year, far above the target planned by the publisher. Furthermore, from an Editorial point of view, the high standing of the journal is demonstrated by the very high quality ratings given by referees to the top fraction of submitted manuscripts and by the large number of full text web downloads reported for those papers. Special Issues also attract high numbers of web downloads, demonstrating the special attention these issues attract within the scientific community. Such results have been achieved only through teamwork, and I wish to express my gratitude to all those who contributed to this result over the years: Françoise Chavel from the European Optical Society secretariat in Paris, John Haynes, Tom Spicer

  11. [The editorial process for Radiología].

    PubMed

    Corral de la Calle, M A

    2011-01-01

    Radiología is the official journal of the Spanish Society of Diagnostic Imaging. It aims to contribute to the education of Spanish-speaking radiologists and to disseminate radiological research and knowledge in Spanish. The journal has an Editorial Board organized into areas or sections, and material published in the journal is chosen and improved through peer review. This article discusses the model of the scientific journal Radiología and the characteristics of its Editorial Board, comparing Radiología with official general radiology journals of other scientific societies. Moreover, the details of the journal's editorial process are revealed, including the editorial circuit, the reviewers' work, and the technical aspects of the final edition process. Finally, the article lists qualitative and quantitative data about the material that Radiología receives and publishes. PMID:21696794

  12. Editorial. Bicycle injuries and injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Pless, I B

    2014-07-01

    In 1989, long before this journal added injuries to its title, it published two papers on childhood injuries and I was asked to write an editorial for this occasion. I chose the title "Challenges for Injury Prevention: Two Neglected Aspects" because I thought the papers neglected to mention the inadequacy of injury statistics (at the time there were no emergency department data) and also failed to emphasize the public health importance of childhood injuries. It is instructive, therefore, to compare this issue's offerings with how matters stood nearly 25 years ago and see what progress we've made. Papers in this and the previous issue of this journal discuss bicycle safety in general and helmet use in particular. Although this is a somewhat narrow focus, it serves as one indicator of how the field has evolved and what remains to be done to improve both the science and policy in this domain. PMID:24991769

  13. Guest editorial. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Ge, Ri-Li; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Valerdi, Ricardo

    2012-07-01

    The use of integrated information systems for healthcare has been started more than a decade ago. In recent years, rapid advances in information integration methods have spurred tremendous growth in the use of integrated information systems in healthcare delivery. Various techniques have been used for probing such integrated systems. These techniques include service-oriented architecture (SOA), EAI, workflow management, grid computing, and others. Many applications require a combination of these techniques, which gives rise to the emergence of enterprise systems in healthcare. Development of the techniques originated from different disciplines has the potential to significantly improve the performance of enterprise systems in healthcare. This editorial paper briefly introduces the enterprise systems in the perspective of healthcare informatics. PMID:22760931

  14. Editorial: A Note on Good Research Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-07-01

    Good scientific practice and research misconduct have been concerns of mine for more than a decade (Dooley and Kerch, 2000) and in my role as an editor of the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, I feel it is time to speak up and at the very least share my concerns and suggestions as they relate to the integrity of the research published in this journal. Rather than wait to write an editorial on good research practices in response to a major incident, I thought it might be best to be proactive and address some of the trends we see in submissions to this peer reviewed journal and to offer some suggestions for improvement improving the level of scholarship in some – but by no means all – of the papers submitted.

  15. Editorial Independence in the Electronic Age: New Threats, Old Owners?

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, John

    2008-01-01

    Editorial independence is crucial for the intellectual life of a scientific journal. A journal exists only as an idea created by authors and readers, with some editorial orchestration. Editorial independence can be compromised by pressure put on editors by their owners–whether commercial publishers or professional organizations. Both types of owners rely heavily on income from paid advertising in their print journals. Yet, the massive expansion of journal readership that has resulted due to the development of the Web has effected a marked shift in the readership of the journal, both geographically and intellectually, producing a new community of users who see only electronic versions of the journal. Commercial pressures on owners to satisfy the interests of the (mainly national and professional) print readership conflict with the editorial independence needed to respond to the vast Web constituency. This is a major source for compromise of editorial independence. Reduction of commercial pressures by transferring editorial costs to authors and by other cost-reducing models are discussed in this article. PMID:22013360

  16. EDITORIAL: The end of an era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. W.

    2003-12-01

    December 2003 marks the end of an era in the world of metrology with the retirement of Terry Quinn FRS, Director of the BIPM since 1988. Terry's contribution to the field of metrology has been long and distinguished, both as a physicist and administrator; a long list of awards and honours bears testimony to the fact. From the standpoint of physics, his contributions have been numerous and important: in the field of thermometry he pioneered the use of cryogenic radiometers, instruments that are now employed as standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) worldwide; his experiments to measure the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, the least well known of the fundamental constants, are characterized by elegant techniques and novel approaches; and as an example from the field of mass measurement, a definitive experiment at the BIPM ruled out the existence of the so-called 'fifth force'. As Director of the BIPM, Terry Quinn has been the driving force behind many of the initiatives undertaken in metrology in recent years. As any delegate to conferences or meetings at the BIPM will testify, his knowledge and grasp of complex issues are formidable, abilities that are particularly demonstrated at meetings of the Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures (CGPM), where many questions of a technical or diplomatic nature are often raised. The signing of the Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) at the CGPM in Paris in 1999 by the directors of the NMIs of the industrialized states of the world was largely due to his efforts. In paying tribute to Terry, it would be remiss not to mention the part played by his charming wife, Renée. She has graciously hosted innumerable functions at the Quinn home over these years and has always made visitors to the BIPM feel most welcome. On behalf of Metrologia, its readers and Editorial Board, I take this opportunity to wish the Quinns a long and happy retirement. At the same time our best wishes go to Terry's successor, Professor Andrew

  17. EDITORIAL: MST Best Paper Award for 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    For the last 12 years, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of the journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. An Editorial Board working party, comprising Patrick Gill (Chairman), Ralph Tatam and David Birch, was convened to determine a single contributed paper describing new and significant work, well aligned with the measurement scope of the journal, and presented in clear and rigorous form. They received a number of recommendations from the Editorial and International Advisory Board Members, and they would like to record their thanks to the Members for these recommendations, as they form an all-important first stage in the assessment process. There were responses from some 12 Board Members. In total, there were 31 papers nominated. To aid the process, additional information in the form of the 2003 MST papers top rated by referees, and the top papers ranked by most electronic accesses, was accessed. Reviews, and papers which included a Board Member as an author, were automatically excluded. From the totality of nominations and working party deliberations, there emerged a clear winner. Thus the paper recommended by the working party for the MST Best Paper Award for 2003 is: 'Extension of the torsional crystal viscometer to measurements in the time domain' by Richard F Hafer and Arno Laesecke, 14 663-673 (2003) This paper describes a significant advance in viscosity measurement using torsional vibration in piezoelectric rods. The method reported here demonstrates the use of free-decay time-domain measurements as opposed to the more established steady-state forced-mode resonance technique. The time domain technique is faster and more sensitive, with the potential for improved accuracy due to the lack of large time constants necessary for the interpretation of forced mode data. It offers

  18. EDITORIAL: MST Best Paper Award for 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    For the last 13 years, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of the journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. An Editorial Board working party, comprising Patrick Gill (Chairman), David Birch and Ralph Tatam undertook the task of selecting as Best Paper 2004 a single contributed paper describing new and significant work, well aligned with the measurement scope of the journal, and presented in clear and rigorous form. They received a number of recommendations from the Editorial and International Advisory Board Members, and they would like to record their thanks to the Members for these recommendations, as they form an all-important first stage in the assessment process. There were responses from some five Board Members. In total, there were 16 papers nominated, plus another six from the working party. All these papers had quality ratings of 2 or higher from the referees, and note was also taken of the total electronic accesses for those papers subsequently short-listed. Review Articles, and papers that included a Board Member as an author, were automatically excluded. From the submitted nominations and working party deliberations, a short list of two papers was drawn up. The winning paper was then selected on the totality of criteria. Thus the paper recommended by the working party for the MST Best Paper Award for 2004 is: 'Adsorptive pressure-sensitive coatings on porous anodised aluminium' by Masaharu Kameda, Norikazu Tezuka, Tomohiro Hangai, Keisuke Asai, Kazuyuki Nakakita and Yutaka Amao, 15 489-500 (2004) This paper describes a novel pressure sensor based on a luminescent coating applied to a porous anodized aluminium layer, with application to the measurement of fluctuating pressures on short timescales with high spatial resolution. The research has particular application to

  19. EDITORIAL: Computational materials science Computational materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Kresse, Georg

    2011-10-01

    Special issue in honour of Jürgen Hafner On 30 September 2010, Jürgen Hafner, one of the most prominent and influential members within the solid state community, retired. His remarkably broad scientific oeuvre has made him one of the founding fathers of modern computational materials science: more than 600 scientific publications, numerous contributions to books, and a highly cited monograph, which has become a standard reference in the theory of metals, witness not only the remarkable productivity of Jürgen Hafner but also his impact in theoretical solid state physics. In an effort to duly acknowledge Jürgen Hafner's lasting impact in this field, a Festsymposium was held on 27-29 September 2010 at the Universität Wien. The organizers of this symposium (and authors of this editorial) are proud to say that a large number of highly renowned scientists in theoretical condensed matter theory—co-workers, friends and students—accepted the invitation to this celebration of Hafner's jubilee. Some of these speakers also followed our invitation to submit their contribution to this Festschrift, published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, a journal which Jürgen Hafner served in 2000-2003 and 2003-2006 as a member of the Advisory Editorial Board and member of the Executive Board, respectively. In the subsequent article, Volker Heine, friend and co-worker of Jürgen Hafner over many decades, gives an account of Hafner's impact in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics. Computational materials science contents Theoretical study of structural, mechanical and spectroscopic properties of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) D Tunega, H Pašalić, M H Gerzabek and H Lischka Ethylene epoxidation catalyzed by chlorine-promoted silver oxide M O Ozbek, I Onal and R A Van Santen First-principles study of Cu2ZnSnS4 and the related band offsets for photovoltaic applicationsA Nagoya, R Asahi and G Kresse Renormalization group study of random quantum magnetsIstván A Kovács and

  20. Composition and origin of Nuevo Laredo Trend eucrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.; Jerde, E. A.

    1987-03-01

    The new bulk-rock analyses reported for the ALHA81001, Lakangaon and Nuevo Laredo eucritic meteorites indicate that the first of these resembles Ibitira in possessing lower Na concentrations than any other eucrite, while the other two are the lowest-Mg/Fe of all eucrites. The present data and those seen in the literature suggest that most of the ostensible Main Group eucrites actually belong to the Nuevo Laredo Trend, which is characterized by limited variations of incompatible element contents despite considerable variations in Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio and V content.

  1. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the... DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.132 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by...

  2. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the... (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by any...

  3. Editorial review: pediatric 3D ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound is an established diagnostic imaging technique in many specialties. However, in neonates, infants and children three-dimensional ultrasound still is underutilized, partially due to time constraints for post-processing and restricted availability, of devices as well as dedicated pediatric transducers. Also reimbursement issues still need to be addressed. This editorial review presents more or less established pediatric three-dimensional ultrasound applications with proven diagnostic benefit as well as potential future applications of three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound in infants and children, aiming at enhancing research and promoting practical use of three-dimensional ultrasound in relevant pediatric conditions. Particularly, applications in neonatal neurosonography, ultrasound of the urogenital tract as well as some other small part and miscellaneous queries are highlighted. Additional other potential and future indications are discussed briefly, also mentioning restrictions and potential future developments. In summary, three-dimensional ultrasound holds some potential to widen sonographic diagnostic capabilities throughout childhood and hopefully will be increasingly investigated and introduced into clinical practice provided respective equipment and pediatric three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound transducers become available. PMID:26676068

  4. NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) editorial style guide

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, J.F.; Calure, B.A.; Gable, D.; Lesar, M.T.; Mejac, M.F.; Sanders, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Editorial style refers to the choices that writers, editors, and secretaries make to eliminate inconsistencies in their documents. These choices apply to the recurrent features of a document such as abbreviations, capitalization, compound words, numbers, symbols, and punctuation, as well as to references and footnotes. Making these choices is sometimes difficult because usage changes as the language evolves. Consider the use of hyphens, for example. Do we write non-power reactor or nonpower reactor Is it on-site incident or onsite incident Although usage is moving away from the use of hyphens with prefixes, the authorities who compile style guides do not always agree about which choice to use at a given time. Moreover, each discipline -- law, physics, mathematics -- has specific standards that apply to the publications for that discipline. Even in an area as seemingly certain as spelling, overlapping usage exists. Reputable dictionaries show both align'' and aline'' as correct spellings. Likewise, disc, disk, and diskette'' currently coexist as equally valid choices.

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of West Nile Virus, Nuevo Leon State, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Blitvich, Bradley J.; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Contreras-Cordero, Juan F.; Loroño-Pino, María A.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Díaz, Francisco J.; González-Rojas, José I.; Obregón-Martínez, Nelson; Chiu-García, Jorge A.; Black, William C.

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus RNA was detected in brain tissue from a horse that died in June 2003 in Nuevo Leon State, Mexico. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the premembrane and envelope genes showed that the virus was most closely related to West Nile virus isolates collected in Texas in 2002. PMID:15324558

  6. Project Nuevos Horizontes, 1988-89. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; And Others

    In its fourth year, Project Nuevos Horizontes served 315 limited-English-speaking, native Spanish-speaking students in fall 1988 and 300 in spring 1989. The majority of participants came from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. The program's goal was to provide students with the academic and support services needed to ensure completion of…

  7. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  8. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2015-06-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  9. Editorial commentary revisited and the spin move refined.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T; Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    First, editorial commentary: editorial commentary may be educational and may be controversial, but above all else, authors come first. Second, The Spin Move: The Spin Move is effective, cost-effective, and ubiquitous because, while many techniques are specific to a single joint, The Spin Move can be performed as a part of any arthroscopic and related procedure. However, like many advanced procedures, The Spin Move, when poorly executed, entails substantial risk. Preoperative planning is essential, and The Spin Move must be reviewed by inexperienced practitioners, in detailed text, figures tables, and video, at www.arthroscopytechniques.org. Practice makes perfect. PMID:25842226

  10. Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

    2011-02-01

    This editorial introduces readers and contributors to a new online journal. Through the publication of articles ranging from peer-reviewed research papers and short communications, to editorials and interviews on greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this journal will disseminate research results and information that address the global crisis of anthropogenic climate change. The scope of the journal includes the full spectrum of research areas from capture and separation of greenhouse gases from flue gases and ambient air, to beneficial utilization, and to sequestration in deep geologic formations and terrestrial (plant and soil) systems, as well as policy and technoeconomic analyses of these approaches.

  11. A Road Less Traveled: An Editorial Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2008-03-01

    It has been said that no life is completed the way one had planned for it, and mine is no exception to that rule so far. When I was graduating with a BSc I was convinced I'd be doing physics research for the rest of my life -- and when I was getting my PhD I was sure I'd be teaching high school physics and helping others learn for the foreseeable future. Yet, 9 years later, I am not doing either of these as a full time job, and I've changed my mind a couple more times as to what career path (and broader lifestyle) would work best for me. In the intervening years, I've learnt to embrace change as a tool for carving my own path, and to be wary of the certainties that can tie oneself to a ``safe'' but uninspiring future. I studied at the University of Thessaloniki, Greece, and at Royal Holloway University of London (BSc); also at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (MSc) and at Imperial College London (PhD). After my PhD (and the national military service in Greece), I taught at high-school level for a couple of years in Crete, Greece. At the same time, I was science editor for Crete University Press, Greece's major university press. From there, I jumped onto the APS editorial boat: First to PRB (2003), then to PRL (2007), where I am now an Assistant Editor. I also have an adjunct research position at Columbia University.

  12. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens’ access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit “crowd-sourced” information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world’s most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit’s survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active. PMID:26331611

  13. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Joshua L; Aronow, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens' access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit "crowd-sourced" information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world's most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit's survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active. PMID:26331611

  14. EDITORIAL INTRODUCTION [TO FEMALE GERM CELLS: BIOLOGY AND GENETIC RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an editorial introduction to the special issue of utation Research, titled, emale Germ Cells: Biology and Genetic isk, which is an attempt to present a collection of papers that emphasize the distinct properties of female germ cells and their characteristic response to mu...

  15. Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems - Editorial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The special issue of Ecological complexity journal on Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems contains representative examples of the status and evolution of data-driven research into fractals and scaling in complex natural systems. The editorial discusses contributions to understanding rela...

  16. Some Editorial Games for the Magazine Editing or Writing Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Hugh; Scott, Byron T.

    Two exercises that can be used with journalism students to help them clarify and think through the editorial process are the repertory grid and the coorientation model. A technique developed in England by the followers of psychologist George Kelly, the repertory grid asks students to rank ten or twelve authors on criteria such as social…

  17. The Description and Indexing of Editorial Cartoons: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landbeck, Christopher Ryan

    2013-01-01

    While access to images in general has improved in the last 20 years, due to both advances in electronic storage and dissemination and to improvements in the intellectual provisions of them, access to editorial cartoons lags behind access to other types of images. While there have been piecemeal or ad hoc efforts to organize large cartoon…

  18. A Contrastive Analysis of the American and Persian Newspaper Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homayounzadeh, Maryam; Mehrpour, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Based on the principles of critical discourse analysis this contrastive study sought to investigate the effect of culture on the journalistic style and the strategies used to report news in the American and Persian newspaper editorials. To this end, articles were selected from the New York Times, the Washington Post, Kayhan and Ettelaat,…

  19. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  20. Editorial: Letter from the Board of Directors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandqvist, Aage

    2004-10-01

    New policy concerning expanded European and non-European A&A memberships: It is now thirty-five years since the scientific journal Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) was founded by the merging of six national journals from four European nations, namely France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden; Belgium and the other Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland and Norway, also participated. They were subsequently joined by five other western European nations, namely Austria, Greece, Italy, Spain and Switzerland (Norway later withdrew). A&A has no international legal status as such but is represented by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which also manages its financial transactions. In the early nineteen-nineties, A&A with great foresight took an important step - which the European Union would follow more than a decade later - by incorporating eastern European countries into its sponsoring membership: the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and the Slovak Republic; Estonia became a full member in 1998. A&A was now truly ``A European Journal", as then stated on the front cover. In the meantime, A&A grew in importance as a vehicle for world-wide dissemination of astronomical research and an ever-increasing number of high-quality papers began streaming into the A&A Editorial offices from non-European countries, as well as from other European non-member countries. It became obvious to us that A&A no longer was merely a European Journal and in 2001 we removed the ``A European Journal'' from the front cover. Eventually, some of these non-European countries began approaching us with queries about potential membership in A&A and in 2002 we admitted the first such country, Argentina, with an observer status. Meanwhile, the Board intensified its study of the financial and administrative consequences of a wider expansion including the admission of member countries beyond Europe - a special subcommittee was appointed. The Board of Directors, at its meeting in Tartu, Estonia on 8 May

  1. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    processes. Summarizing, this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology reflects the rapidly growing interest in the ALD growth method and demonstrates the wide range of possible practical applications of ALD-grown materials, not only of high-k dielectrics, but also of a range of different materials (e.g. ZnO). Finally, I would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support and efforts in making this special issue possible.

  2. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the 2008 volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puers, R.

    2008-01-01

    It is my pleasure to address these few lines to you all on the occasion of the start of the 2008 volume of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, the journal's eighteenth year, and my eleventh year of service as Editor-in-Chief. As in previous years, I would like to take the opportunity to reflect on the achievements of the past year. The number of submissions to the journal continues to grow, to almost 800 in 2007. Importantly, the journal's ISI® impact factor remains at a solid 2.321. This is an achievement we can all be proud of. In 2007, an incredible 350 000 papers were downloaded, which clearly reflects the visibility and appreciation of our research work. These excellent results are entirely due to the fact that more of you are choosing to submit your high-quality work to the journal, and because more of you are also choosing to cite recent papers published within the journal. I would like to take this opportunity to thank each one of you: readers, authors and referees alike. To cope with the steadily increasing number of incoming papers, the review process had to be expanded. In 2007, more than 700 experts selected from 35 countries agreed to our requests to referee. In the name of the entire team, I would like to express my thanks to all our referees for their careful and well constructed reports, which are of paramount importance in maintaining the quality standards of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. The average time to produce an individual report is a mere 19 days, contributing towards a very favourable overall processing time which is an attractive feature of the journal. Of course all this would not be possible without the constant hard work of the publishing, production and marketing staff in Bristol. In the name of the Editorial Board, contributing authors and readers, I wish to thank them for their support. Finally, I believe we have established a clear and distinct profile in the broad spectrum of journals in our field

  3. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    surfaces and interfaces, which are often the limiting factor in device performance. This issue provides concrete examples of how the techniques of nanoscience and nanotechnology can be used to understand, control and optimize the performance of novel photovoltaic devices. We are grateful to the contributors for submitting high-quality papers around a common theme, even though they may not normally consider their work to fall under the banner of 'nanotechnology'. We would also like to thank the editorial and production staff at Nanotechnology for their efficient and speedy work in putting this issue together.

  4. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  5. The readability of editorials in popular Indian medical journals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. V. S. Hari; Aravinda, K; Varadarajulu, Rachel Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The essence of communication is to convey a message, and readability tests have been developed to quantify this aspect of language. There is limited research on the readability tests of journal contents from India. In this study, we performed readability tests on the editorials of four popular Indian medical journals. Materials and Methods: The readability tests (Flesch score, Flesch grade, and text statistics) were calculated from the following journals: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism (IJEM), Journal of Association of Physicians of India (JAPI), Journal of Indian Medical Association (JIMA), and International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries (IJDDC). The editorials published in these journals over the last 2 tears were included in this analysis. Results: A total of 64 editorials (IJEM – 19, JAPI – 18, JIMA – 16, IJDDC – 11) were analyzed in this study. The mean readability score was (IJEM 34.8 ± 9.5; JAPI 31.4 ± 11.4; JIMA 29.6 ± 10.1; IJDDC 26.1 ± 17.7) not different between the journals (P = 0.2666). Flesch score was less variable in IJEM an d JIMA than in JAPI and IJDDC (P = 0.0167). The editorials from IJEM and JAPI had a lower Flesch grade than the remaining two journals (P = 0.0253). The readability score was directly proportional to the sentence count and inversely proportional to the words per sentence (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our results suggest that the editorials from all the medical journals have equal readability scores. The sentence count and words per sentence are important to achieve a high readability score while writing for a journal. PMID:24251216

  6. Nuevos sistemas de frecuencia intermedia para el IAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalde, J. C.; Perilli, D.; Larrarte, J. J.

    Se presenta el diagrama en bloques de los nuevos sistemas de Frecuencia Intermedia para los dos radiómetros instalados en el IAR. Entre las características más importantes del sistema podemos mencionar la posibilidad de conectar cualquiera de las dos antenas a los ``backend" disponibles: analizador espectral de alta resolución (META II) de 0,05 Hz, autocorrelador de 1008 canales y contínuo. Se incorporan al sistema nuevos sintetizadores de frecuencia implementados con PLL y la moderna técnica de síntesis digital directa. Por último, el conjunto del sistema es susceptible de ser configurado por las computadoras de adquisición de datos, supervisadas por otra, que entrega el estado de funcionamiento actual y evita la selección de configuraciones incorrectas por parte del usuario.

  7. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  8. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the New Year!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampshire, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    of all journals specialising in superconductivity. Further improvements, implemented from this January issue onwards, include: The introduction of article numbering which will speed up the publication process. Papers in different issues can be published online as soon as they are ready, without having to wait for a whole issue or section to be allocated page numbers. This will improve submission to publication times. Bringing the journal into line with other IOP journals so that reports from two referees are required for each paper prior to an acceptance/rejection decision. Refreshing the design of SuST's cover, modernising the typography and creating a consistent look and feel across the range of journals. Naturally we have also been asking how SuST and IOP Publishing can help the superconductivity community meet the challenges of the future and maintain the broad international readership that supports SuST. Clearly a specialist journal like SuST has a very different role in our community from general science journals such as Science and Nature. However the superconductivity community would benefit if publication in SuST brought with it the prestige of a yet higher impact factor, comparable to the very best physics, chemistry and engineering journals. In this context, I have identified the following aims for the Editorial Board: To increase the impact factor of SuST; To broaden the scope and size of the journal by increasing its profile and publishing the best papers in superconductivity— both in basic science and in technology; To improve the refereeing process by eliminating the tail of low impact papers submitted to SuST and reducing the time from submission to online availability; To make SuST the natural place to publish invited papers from the best of the community's pure and applied conferences and workshops; To improve the effectiveness of the Editorial Board; To improve the services that IOP Publishing provides for the superconductivity community. I am

  9. EDITORIAL: Special issue on Rydberg physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Robin; Pattard, Thomas; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    great response to the 'Rydberg physics' conference we thought that it would be timely and appropriate to recognize the importance of Rydberg physics with a special issue of a scientific journal. The 'unbureaucratic' and highly efficient editorial and publishing team of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) allowed this to become a reality; it was a real pleasure for us to serve as guest editors. Unlike a conventional conference proceedings, this special issue has not been restricted to participants of the 'Rydberg physics' conference, and all the original papers contained in it have been peer-reviewed to the usual high standards of J. Phys. B. The variety and integrated discussion on the physics of Rydberg systems during the 'Rydberg physics' conference is reflected in the papers presented here. We have tried to group the papers according to the subject areas which are addressed. The first part of this special issue is devoted to high-resolution spectroscopy revealing deeper insights into the structure of Rydberg atoms and molecules as well as electronic interaction processes. The second part contains experimental and theoretical investigations on the influence of external static and oscillatory fields on Rydberg atoms. The third part takes account of the newly established field of ultracold Rydberg gases and plasmas with special emphasis on the appearance of ultralong-range interactions in these systems. Finally, the issue is concluded by articles on new developments including 'exotic' Rydberg systems. We would like to thank all of the participants of the 'Rydberg physics' workshop and seminar, and, in particular, the contributors to this special collection of papers, for their involvement. We are deeply indebted to the J. Phys. B editorial and publishing team both for making its realization possible in an extremely efficient way, and for the journal's commitment to the physics of Rydberg systems. We are impressed by the continuing

  10. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  11. EDITORIAL: Tropical deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Holly K.; Herold, Martin

    2007-10-01

    's tropical forests that can provide key consistency and prioritization for national-level efforts. Gibbs et al calculate a range of national-level forest carbon stock estimates that can be used immediately, and also review ground-based and remote sensing approaches to estimate national-level tropical carbon stocks with increased accuracy. These papers help illustrate that methodologies and tools are indeed available to estimate emissions from deforestation. Clearly, important technical challenges remain (e.g. quantifying degradation, assessing uncertainty, verification procedures, capacity building, and Landsat data continuity) but we now have a sufficient technical base to support REDD early actions and readiness mechanisms for building national monitoring systems. Thus, we enter the COP 13 in Bali, Indonesia with great hope for a more inclusive climate policy encompassing all countries and emissions sources from both land-use and energy sectors. Our understanding of tropical deforestation and carbon emissions is improving and with that, opportunities to conserve tropical forests and the host of ecosystem services they provide while also increasing revenue streams in developing countries through economic incentives to avoid deforestation and degradation. References Gullison R E et al 2007 Tropical forests and climate policy Science 316 985 6 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007 Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis: Summary for Policymakers http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar4/wg1/ar4-wg1-spm.pdf Santilli M et al 2005 Tropical deforestation and the Kyoto Protocol: an editorial essay Clim. Change 71 267 76 Focus on Tropical Deforestation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Pan-tropical monitoring of deforestation F Achard, R DeFries, H Eva, M Hansen, P Mayaux and H-J Stibig Monitoring and estimating tropical forest carbon

  12. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    meeting were asked if they were interested in rewriting and extending their contributions as a submission to Nuclear Fusion. Technology papers were accepted because of the very nature of the subject. The submissions underwent the regular double-referee peer-review process, and the accepted articles are grouped together in this special issue with a sequence given by the following subjects: Beam line and large source development Small sources and source modelling Source diagnostics development ITER N-NBI design and development I hope that this special issue will document in sufficient detail the present state of the art of negative ion based neutral beam injection systems. Message from the Editor, F.C. Schüller Now that the construction of ITER has become a reality the consequence is that fusion research will gradually shift in its focus from plasma physics alone to more technological issues.The Editorial Board of Nuclear Fusion has recognized this trend and therefore wants to give more prominence in the journal to heating methods and related techniques. Therefore we are happy to bring negative ion based neutral beam injection to the foreground with this special issue. We have found a dedicated Guest Editor in the person of Ron Hemsworth.

  13. Gender Representation on Journal Editorial Boards in the Mathematical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; Sen, Shilad

    2016-01-01

    We study gender representation on the editorial boards of 435 journals in the mathematical sciences. Women are known to comprise approximately 15% of tenure-stream faculty positions in doctoral-granting mathematical sciences departments in the United States. Compared to this group, we find that 8.9% of the 13067 editorships in our study are held by women. We describe group variations within the editorships by identifying specific journals, subfields, publishers, and countries that significantly exceed or fall short of this average. To enable our study, we develop a semi-automated method for inferring gender that has an estimated accuracy of 97.5%. Our findings provide the first measure of gender distribution on editorial boards in the mathematical sciences, offer insights that suggest future studies in the mathematical sciences, and introduce new methods that enable large-scale studies of gender distribution in other fields. PMID:27536970

  14. Gender Representation on Journal Editorial Boards in the Mathematical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We study gender representation on the editorial boards of 435 journals in the mathematical sciences. Women are known to comprise approximately 15% of tenure-stream faculty positions in doctoral-granting mathematical sciences departments in the United States. Compared to this group, we find that 8.9% of the 13067 editorships in our study are held by women. We describe group variations within the editorships by identifying specific journals, subfields, publishers, and countries that significantly exceed or fall short of this average. To enable our study, we develop a semi-automated method for inferring gender that has an estimated accuracy of 97.5%. Our findings provide the first measure of gender distribution on editorial boards in the mathematical sciences, offer insights that suggest future studies in the mathematical sciences, and introduce new methods that enable large-scale studies of gender distribution in other fields. PMID:27536970

  15. Opening editorial 2016: Changes in scope and structure.

    PubMed

    Kazak, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    This issue of American Psychologist (AP) marks historic changes in the editorial structure and leadership of AP and related shifts in the refinement of the mission of AP and the types of papers AP will publish. As the new editor-in-chief (EIC) of AP, I am enthusiastic about psychology and the many ways that psychological knowledge can improve our lives and the societies in which we live. AP will continue to reflect the whole of psychology and welcomes the input and involvement of individuals from all areas of the field. In this editorial, I offer readers a brief overview of current journal activities and procedures for the flagship journal of the American Psychological Association (APA). (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26766761

  16. Women on professional society and journal editorial boards.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Melinda J.; Sonnad, Seema S.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Membership on a professional medical society or journal editorial board is a marker of influence and prestige for those in academic medicine. This study presents the first comprehensive quantification of women on these boards and the implications for women in medicine. METHODS: The numbers of women and men on professional society and journal editorial boards across 28 specialties (March 2004) were counted. The number of women holding multiple roles on these boards and the number of women holding top leadership positions on these boards were counted, and these proportions were compared. RESULTS: Three-thousand-four-hundred-seventy-three individuals on 39 professional medical society boards and 54 journal editorial boards were included. Eighty-three percent (2,884) of board members were male. Men occupied > 80% of top leadership positions on these boards. Thirty-five of the 589 women in the study held multiple roles. Anesthesiology (p < 0.0025), pediatrics (p < 0.0001), dermatology (p = 0.0001), obstetrics/ gynecology (p = 0.05), medical genetics (p < 0.015) and rehabilitation medicine (p < 0.03) had significantly lower proportions of women on boards in comparison to the total women in the specialty. Internal medicine, plastic surgery, cardiology and general surgery had nearly equivalent proportions; in otolaryngology and family medicine, female board members slightly exceeded the proportion of women in the field. CONCLUSION: Women's representation on society and editorial boards does not always reflect their presence in medical specialties, and it is critically lacking in certain specialties. Efforts should be made to attain parity of women leaders on these boards. Further efforts should be made to eliminate barriers to women's leadership in medicine. PMID:17668642

  17. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on Physical Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, David

    1994-01-01

    the base and derived units of physics still being open to debate. Giving weight and coherence to this issue is the collective experience of the authors. Individually, they have made important contributions to measurement, have taken part in the operations of national standards laboratories and in the work in which such laboratories collaborate. They are members of the committees which negotiate terms for the use and recognition, at national, regional and international level, of the units which industrial laboratories maintain. Just under half of them are members of the Comité Consultatif des Unites (CCU), the committee to which the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM), itself turns when it looks for advice on issues affecting the use of units. This issue deals with topics which are central to the decisions of the CIPM. This is an appropriate place, therefore, to mention the close interest which two members of the Comité International have taken in Metrologia and the unfailing support they have given it: Professor Dieter Kind and Professor Jan de Boer. As President of the Comité International, Professor Kind greatly influenced the decision that the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures should purchase Metrologia and did much to create the spirit of independent commentary in which the journal operates. Now that his retirement from his principal post as President of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, approaches, I take this opportunity, on behalf of Metrologia, its readers and its Editorial Board, to wish him a happy retirement and hope that in the future he will still find time to take an interest in the affairs of the journal. Professor de Boer's contribution to measurement is long and distinguished. His membership of the CIPM began in 1954 and he was its Secretary from 1962 to 1989. He thus took part in the debate which resulted in the decision to launch Metrologia in 1965. As the sole person to hold office as President of the

  18. EDITORIAL: Special Issue: CAMOP MOLEC XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    upon genetic algorithms and its performance is demonstrated on the example of dense spectra of (complexed) aromatic species. Interaction potential surface calculations of rare gasses with halogens in van der Waals complexes are described by Delgado-Barrio and co-workers, and Tennyson discusses new theoretical techniques based on the use of the variational principle to guide the spectral assignment of complicated water spectra, e.g. at very high temperatures. Finally, Okumura and co-workers present NIR spectra of NO3 and in combination with new calculations these shed light on how to interpret vibronic couplings in this interesting system. The last section of this issue comprises fragmentation and photo-dissociation studies. Rubio-Lago et al discuss methods to produce high-density spin polarized hydrogen following photodissociation experiments. The photodissociation of HCl and Cl2 is taken as an example by Balint-Kurti et al to demonstrate how amplitudes and phases of the photofragmentation matrix elements are derived from experimental measurements. Directional dynamics in photodissociation processes and the derivation of molecular frame properties are discussed in detail by Van den Brom et al using laboratory oriented molecules. And the issue closes with a contribution by Chambreau et al on different reaction mechanisms in the photodissociation of formaldehyde into H2 and CO. Coming to the end of this editorial, we wish to thank all the authors who participated with their contributions in this issue. It shows what is possible nowadays in the field of molecular dynamics and where things are heading in the near future. We thank Physica Scripta for providing us with the platform for this Special Issue, and we wish you, dear reader, many new insights! Steven Solte, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands Harold Linnartz, Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands

  19. Dogmatism: A Factor in the Understanding and Appreciation of Editorial Satire?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Charles R.

    In order to test the hypothesis that dogmatism is related to the understanding and appreciation of editorial satires, 116 University of Georgia speech students read and reacted to three editorial satires (two by Art Hoppe and one by Art Buchwald) arranged in booklets in three different orders. Students were asked to choose from a list of five…

  20. An Analysis of Eye Movement and Cognitive Load about the Editorial Design in Elementary Science Textbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seong-un; Lim, Sung-man; Kim, Eun-ae; Yang, Il-ho

    2016-01-01

    This study is for the implication of editorial design in science textbooks which are designed for student-centered instruction, when the elements of the editorial design are different, we focus on how the students' eye movement and cognitive load change. For this, we produced a new book for 5th grade students in elementary school that is modified…

  1. Philosophic Thinking in Social Work: An Analysis of 30 Years of "Social Work" Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Brawley, Emilia E.; Zorita, Paz M-B

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at 30 years of editorial perspectives and trends in social work as a profession through the analysis of editorials from the journal "Social Work." It identifies the wax and wane of philosophic (intellectual or scholarly) questions in social work thinking in the past three decades. It defines what philosophic thinking…

  2. Arguing in L2: Discourse Structure and Textual Metadiscourse in Philippine Newspaper Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrayo, Veronico N.; Duque, Marie Claire T.

    2011-01-01

    This study described the discourse structure and textual metadiscourse in newspaper editorials in the Philippines where English is used as a second language or L2. Specifically, it sought answers to the following questions: (1) What discourse features characterize the structure of the following parts of Philippine newspaper editorials--orientation…

  3. A Thematic Analysis of Edwin L. Godkin's Editorials in the "Nation," 1865-1899.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Richard W.

    This thematic analysis of Edward L. Godkin's editorials appearing in the "Nation" seeks to reveal the major themes on which he wrote and then, by quantitative analysis, to provide some order to the themes and to study the interaction of the themes. Five hundred and twelve editorials, written over a period of 35 years and representing one-third of…

  4. Conceptual Commitments of AGI Systems: Editorial, Commentaries, and Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-06-01

    Editorial: Conceptual Commitments of AGI Systems Haris Dindo / James Marshall / Giovanni Pezzulo 23 General Problems of Unified Theories of Cognition, and Another Conceptual Commitment of LIDA Benjamin Angerer / Stefan Schneider 26 LIDA, Committed to Consciousness Antonio Chella 28 The Radical Interactionism Conceptual Commitment Olivier L. Georgeon / David W. Aha 31 Commitments of the Soar Cognitive Architecture John E. Laird 36 Conceptual Commitments of AGI Projects Pei Wang 39 Will (dis)Embodied LIDA Agents be Socially Interactive? Travis J. Wiltshire / Emilio J. C. Lobato / Florian G. Jentsch / Stephen M. Fiore 42 Author's Response to Commentaries Steve Strain / Stan Franklin 48

  5. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    I am honoured to take on the leadership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) as the successor to Professor Mark J Kushner, with whom I have had the pleasure to work on the journal for many years. Under Mark's insightful and energetic leadership over the last six years, PSST has cemented its position as the journal of choice within its subject area and is now one of the most successful journals in the field. In this first issue of 2014, I would like to reflect on some of the events and achievements of 2013. At the start of the year the PSST Editorial Board, recognizing the vital importance of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) data to low-temperature plasma physics, agreed that PSST would accept papers reporting such new data, generated through both experiment and theory. Jonathan Tennyson joined the Editorial Board to represent this area. In March Anne Bourdon joined the Associate Editor team and has since then played a key part in the journal's review process alongside our other Editors. During the autumn, PSST moved to a new editorial management system. In December Deborah O'Connell was awarded the 2013 Hershkowitz Early Career Award and Review and joins the Editorial Board as of 2014. I would also like to thank Miles Turner for his work in leading the drafting of a guide on the details necessary in the reporting of the results of computer simulations; the main conclusions of this report have been incorporated into the journal policy. Overall 2013 has been another successful year for PSST; paper submissions were up by 8% on the previous year and there was the highest ever number of downloads of PSST papers in one year. Another noteworthy feature of 2013 was the continuing improvement in publication times while maintaining our high standards for acceptance and providing expert feedback coupled with encouragement particularly to younger researchers and groups. Largely as a result of the hard work of our referees and Associate Editors, the average time

  6. Biochemia Medica’s editorial policy on authorship

    PubMed Central

    Supak-Smolcic, Vesna; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings of authorship criteria violations in the manuscripts submitted to Biochemia Medica show that almost 40% of authors do not meet necessary criteria for authorship and thus indicate the need for better dissemination of editorial policy on authorship in our journal. We believe that such cases are mostly due to the authors’ unawareness or the lack of understanding of the authorship criteria. With this article we therefore wish to declare our editorial policy on authorship and authorship criteria. Biochemia Medica endorses the authorship policy provided by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). Information on authorship is assessed by self-reported authorship claims during on-line manuscript submission. Those who meet ICMJE criteria shall be listed as authors, and all listed authors shall fulfill ICMJE criteria. All authors should be responsible for content of the article and have to know other authors’ contributions to the study. Biochemia Medica will follow recommendations provided by Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) flowcharts for possible disputes. By adhering to this procedure we hope to raise awareness about the importance of compliance with ICMJE authorship recommendations. PMID:26525911

  7. Editorial independence at medical journals owned by professional associations: a survey of editors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald M; Müllner, Marcus

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of editorial independence at a sample of medical journals and the relationship between the journals and their owners. We surveyed the editors of 33 medical journals owned by not-for-profit organizations ("associations"), including 10 journals represented on the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (nine of which are general medical journals) and a random sample of 23 specialist journals with high impact factors that are indexed by the Institute for Scientific Information. The main outcome measures were the authority to hire, fire, and oversee the work of the editor; the editor's tenure and financial compensation; control of the journal's budget; publication of material about the association; and the editor's perceptions about editorial independence and pressure over editorial content. Of the 33 editors, 23 (70%) reported having complete editorial freedom, and the remainder reported a high level of freedom (a score of > or = 8, where 10 equals complete editorial freedom and 1 equals no editorial freedom). Nevertheless, a substantial minority of editors reported having received at least some pressure in recent years over editorial content from the association's leadership (42%), senior staff (30%), or rank-and-file members (39%). The association's board of directors has the authority to hire (48%) or fire (55%) the editor for about half of the journals, and the editor reports to the board for 10 journals (30%). Twenty-three editors (70%) are appointed for a specific term (median term = 5 years). Three-fifths of the journals have no control over their profit, and the majority of journals use the association's legal counsel and/or media relations staff. Stronger safeguards are needed to give editors protection against pressure over editorial content, including written guarantees of editorial freedom and governance structures that support those guarantees. Strong safeguards are also needed because editors

  8. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    On 1 January, 2004, I assumed the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics. I will start by saying that I will do my best to justify the confidence of the journal management and publishing staff in my abilities. I was fortunate to have been able to work, as an Editorial Board member, with my predecessor, the previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Allister Ferguson. Allister has provided a high degree of intellectual stewardship for the journal in the last five years. He has made the job appear a worthy challenge for me. I therefore take this opportunity to thank Allister on behalf of the Editorial Board and publishing staff of the journal. Several other factors contributed to my decision to accept this position. The first is the group of people who actually go about the business of publishing. The Senior Publisher, Nicola Gulley (and her predecessor Sophy Le Masurier); the Managing Editor, Jill Membrey; the Publishing Administrators, Nina Blakesley and Sarah Towell; the Production Editor, Katie Gerrard and their office staff form an amazing group and have managed to make the operation of the journal incredibly efficient. An index of this is the speed with which incoming manuscripts are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and its web publication, if accepted, is 130 days. This is three to five times shorter than for most other journals. A factor that contributes to this success is a responsive pool of referees that the publishing staff have as a valuable resource. Ultimately, the standard bearers of any journal are the referees. Therefore, a grateful `thank you' is due from all of us at J. Phys. D to all our referees, who diligently perform this honourable task. The Associate Editors of the journal, Professors Lawler, Margaritondo and O'Grady, also provide immense scientific leadership. They help in defining new directions for the journal and in the publishing process. Last, but not least, a remarkable asset of

  9. Las características más fascinantes del nuevo Robot

    NASA Video Gallery

    impresionante es la palabra que describe perfectamente al nuevo robot Curiosity por su tamaño, sus instrumentos científicos y la manera en que la NASA planifica hacerlo aterrizar en Marte de forma ...

  10. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  11. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media... station (including a cable television operator, programmer or producer), Web site, newspaper, magazine,...

  12. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.132 News story, commentary, or editorial by the... broadcasting station (including a cable television operator, programmer or producer), Web site,...

  13. Editorial: Citation of the Serbian Astronomical Journal in the Period 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbutina, B.

    2010-06-01

    This editorial provides results of research on the Serbian Astronomical Journal citation. We give full information on citation for the last three years, and the impact factors calculated for the period 2003-2009.

  14. Rankings of Economics Faculties and Representation on Editorial Boards of Top Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Jean D.; Fish, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Presents rankings of U.S., university, economics departments. Explains the rankings are based upon representation of the departments on the editorial boards of leading economics journals. Reports that results are similar to rankings based upon other criteria. (DK)

  15. Student Press Responds with Barrage of Stories Ranging from Tearjerkers to Editorials about the Gulf Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricchiardi, Sherry

    1991-01-01

    Describes how the student press across the United States responded to the Gulf war with a barrage of stories ranging from tearjerkers about alumni who died to editorials condemning anti-Arab sentiment. (SR)

  16. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.132 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying...

  17. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying...

  18. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying...

  19. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.132 News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying...

  20. Potential Conflicts of Interest of Editorial Board Members from Five Leading Spine Journals

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Stein J.; Bredenoord, Annelien L.; Dhert, Wouter; de Kleuver, Marinus; Oner, F. Cumhur; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts of interest arising from ties between pharmaceutical industry and physicians are common and may bias research. The extent to which these ties exist among editorial board members of medical journals is not known. This study aims to determine the prevalence and financial magnitude of potential conflicts of interest among editorial board members of five leading spine journals. The editorial boards of: The Spine Journal; Spine; European Spine Journal; Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine; and Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques were extracted on January 2013 from the journals’ websites. Disclosure statements were retrieved from the 2013 disclosure index of the North American Spine Society; the program of the 20th International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques; the program of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Scoliosis Research Society; the program of the AOSpine global spine congress; the presentations of the 2013 Annual Eurospine meeting; and the disclosure index of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Names of the editorial board members were compared with the individuals who completed a disclosure for one of these indexes. Disclosures were extracted when full names matched. Two hundred and ten (29%) of the 716 identified editorial board members reported a potential conflict of interest and 154 (22%) reported nothing to disclose. The remaining 352 (49%) editorial board members had no disclosure statement listed for one of the indexes. Eighty-nine (42%) of the 210 editorial board members with a potential conflict of interest reported a financial relationship of more than $10,000 during the prior year. This finding confirms that potential conflicts of interest exist in editorial boards which might influence the peer review process and can result in bias. Academia and medical journals in particular should be aware of this and strive to improve transparency of the review process. We emphasize recommendations that contribute to achieving this goal

  1. Potential conflicts of interest of editorial board members from five leading spine journals.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stein J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Dhert, Wouter; de Kleuver, Marinus; Oner, F Cumhur; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts of interest arising from ties between pharmaceutical industry and physicians are common and may bias research. The extent to which these ties exist among editorial board members of medical journals is not known. This study aims to determine the prevalence and financial magnitude of potential conflicts of interest among editorial board members of five leading spine journals. The editorial boards of: The Spine Journal; Spine; European Spine Journal; Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine; and Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques were extracted on January 2013 from the journals' websites. Disclosure statements were retrieved from the 2013 disclosure index of the North American Spine Society; the program of the 20th International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques; the program of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Scoliosis Research Society; the program of the AOSpine global spine congress; the presentations of the 2013 Annual Eurospine meeting; and the disclosure index of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Names of the editorial board members were compared with the individuals who completed a disclosure for one of these indexes. Disclosures were extracted when full names matched. Two hundred and ten (29%) of the 716 identified editorial board members reported a potential conflict of interest and 154 (22%) reported nothing to disclose. The remaining 352 (49%) editorial board members had no disclosure statement listed for one of the indexes. Eighty-nine (42%) of the 210 editorial board members with a potential conflict of interest reported a financial relationship of more than $10,000 during the prior year. This finding confirms that potential conflicts of interest exist in editorial boards which might influence the peer review process and can result in bias. Academia and medical journals in particular should be aware of this and strive to improve transparency of the review process. We emphasize recommendations that contribute to achieving this goal. PMID

  2. Guest editorial. Body sensor networks: from theory to emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Jovanov, Emil; Poon, Carmen C Y; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Zhang, Y T

    2009-11-01

    The use of sensor networks for healthcare, well-being, and working in extreme environments has long roots in the engineering sector in medicine and biology community. With the maturity of wireless sensor networks, body area networks (BANs), and wireless BANs (WBANs), recent efforts in promoting the concept of body sensor networks (BSNs) aim to move beyond sensor connectivity to adopt a system-level approach to address issues related to biosensor design, interfacing, and embodiment, as well as ultralow-power processing/communication, power scavenging, autonomic sensing, data mining, inferencing, and integrated wireless sensor microsystems. As a result, the system architecture based on WBAN and BSN is becoming a widely accepted method of organization for ambulatory and ubiquitous monitoring systems. This editorial paper presents a snapshot of the current research and emerging applications and addresses some of the challenges and implementation issues. PMID:19887307

  3. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (c) 3/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international

  4. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi. Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international

  5. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international

  6. Data base development and research and editorial support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Life Sciences Bibliographic Data Base was created in 1981 and subsequently expanded. A systematic, professional system was developed to collect, organize, and disseminate information about scientific publications resulting from research. The data base consists of bibliographic information and hard copies of all research papers published by Life Sciences-supported investigators. Technical improvements were instituted in the database. To minimize costs, take advantage of advances in personal computer technology, and achieve maximum flexibility and control, the data base was transferred from the JSC computer to personal computers at George Washington University (GWU). GWU also performed a range of related activities such as conducting in-depth searches on a variety of subjects, retrieving scientific literature, preparing presentations, summarizing research progress, answering correspondence requiring reference support, and providing writing and editorial support.

  7. Mathematical Psychology: Prospects For The 21 Century: A Guest Editorial.

    PubMed

    Townsend, James T

    2008-10-01

    The twenty-first century is certainly in progress by now, but hardly well underway. Therefore, I will take that modest elasticity in concept as a frame for this essay. This frame will serve as background for some of my hopes and gripes about contemporary psychology and mathematical psychology's place therein. It will also act as platform for earnest, if wistful thoughts about what might have (and perhaps can still) aid us in forwarding our agenda and what I see as some of the promising avenues for the future. I loosely structure the essay into a section about mathematical psychology in the context of psychology at large and then a section devoted to prospects within mathematical psychology proper. The essay can perhaps be considered as in a similar spirit, although differing in content, to previous editorial-like reviews of general or specific aspects of mathematical psychology such as Estes (1975), Falmagne (2005), Luce (1997) that have appeared in this journal. PMID:19802342

  8. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A.; Smith, Geoffrey R.; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed. PMID:27408562

  9. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A; Smith, Geoffrey R; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed. PMID:27408562

  10. Editorial: Special issue on resources for the computer security and information assurance curriculum: Issue 1Curriculum Editorial Comments, Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Frincke, Deb; Ouderkirk, Steven J.; Popovsky, Barbara

    2006-12-28

    This is a pair of articles to be used as the cover editorials for a special edition of the Journal of Educational Resources in Computing (JERIC) Special Edition on Resources for the Computer Security and Information Assurance Curriculum, volumes 1 and 2.

  11. EDITORIAL: Changes to the journal Changes to the journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2010-01-01

    It is a privilege to be Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Optics at this exciting time when the use of light spearheads the development of new technologies in telecommunications, green energy, manufacturing, medicine and defence, just to mention a few. These technological advances, seen by many as the next photonic technological revolution, are underpinned by fundamental and applied research in the following key directions: Nanophotonics and plasmonics Metamaterials and structured photonic materials Nonlinear and ultrafast optics Photonics at the life science interface Information and communication optics Integrated optics systems and devices Material processing with light Propagation, diffraction and scattering This is where Journal of Optics focuses its attention. This editorial marks the first issue of the journal published under the abbreviated name (shortened from Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics). The name change is just one of a series of changes introduced in the last year, along with the 8 subject sections listed above and the appointment of Section Editors. With the name change, we will also update the look of the journal by introducing colour cover images which will feature some of the most exciting research in the journal. We have retained many of the journal's original selling points: we are found in thousands of libraries around the world, and will continue our policy of free web access to all papers for 30 days after publication, ensuring broad and unrestricted dissemination of your research results. We will also continue our strong and well respected special issue and topical review programmes and we are always grateful to receive new suggestions for special issues or review articles. Along with the Editorial Board, I would like to thank the authors, referees and readers who have contributed to the success of Journal of Optics. The increasing quality and visibility of the journal, as demonstrated by the dramatic increase in its impact factor

  12. Editorial: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Behar, Joachim; Johnson, Alistair; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D.; Moody, George B.

    2015-01-01

    This editorial reviews the background issues, the design, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology (CinC) 2014 Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Our major focus was to accelerate the development and facilitate the comparison of robust methods for locating heart beats in long-term multi-channel recordings. A public (training) database consisting of 151,032 annotated beats was compiled from records that contained ECGs as well as pulsatile signals that directly reflect cardiac activity, and other signals that may have few or no observable markers of heart beats. A separate hidden test data set (consisting of 152,478 beats) is permanently stored at PhysioNet, and a public framework has been developed to provide researchers the ability to continue to automatically score and compare the performance of their algorithms. A scoring criteria based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity is proposed. The top three scores (as of March 2015) on the hidden test data set were 93.64%, 91.50%, and 90.70%. PMID:26217894

  13. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard

    2007-01-01

    From January 2007, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) is introducing a new category of paper: Brief Communications. Limited to four published pages, Brief Communications will enable the publication of significant new results for which a full-length article may not be necessary or appropriate. They should be of interest to the journal's specialist readership and meet the usual high scientific standard for Papers in the journal, but do not have to be of general interest. Standard review procedures, involving the use of two referees, will apply. Brief Communications will be free to read online. In a parallel development, the Letters category is being phased out. While some of us retain an attachment to this category (including myself, for example, partly because my first paper in this journal was a Letter published in 1984), its continued existence is becoming problematic. Importantly, the average time to publication of Letters in PPCF is no longer significantly faster than that of standard Papers. Technological advances have played a role in this. Additionally, some of the special criteria for publication as a Letter are sufficiently subjective that challenges on these credentials, as distinct from scientific content, sometimes create undue delay. I hope that the new category will meet a clear need and enhance the standing of the journal. The Editorial Board will review the working of the system as it develops, and we welcome comments and suggestions.

  14. EDITORIAL: 'Key issues' articles in Reports on Progress in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Laura H.

    2007-03-01

    The Editorial Board of Reports on Progress in Physics has commissioned a series of short articles from world leaders on key physics issues in their field. These essays may raise the key issues, or ask open questions or may even suggest wild ideas. Basically, they give world leading physicists the opportunity to write what they think about the key issues in their field, free from the usual requirement to provide the fair and balanced presentations of the subject normally found in articles in Reports on Progress in Physics. We believe that the readers of the journal will be interested to learn about these exciting ideas. Just as Hilbert's famous paper of 1900 set the agenda for the next century or more in mathematics, so we hope that this series of papers will define the key issues and open questions in physics for the 21st Century and that the articles will be widely cited and downloaded. The first of these articles—'Insights from simulations of star formation' by Richard B Larson (Yale University, USA)—is published in the current issue. We trust that readers will find this article and its successors in the series to appear through 2007 and beyond entertaining and stimulating.

  15. "Vogue," 1892-1928: An Historical Look at the Evolution of One Magazine's Editorial-Advertising-Design Mix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Marcia R.

    The careful integration of editorial content, graphic design, and advertising to create a successful magazine package is not a phenomenon of the last half of the twentieth century. As early as the 1890s, the first publishers of "Vogue" magazine had established an editorial-advertising-design mix in the fashion magazine that was calculated to…

  16. Genre Variations and the Interpersonal Features: An SFL Study of the Indian and the British Editorials and News-Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Charanjit; Singh, Sukhdev

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors present a discussion on the genre of editorial as distinct from that of news-reports in that its language is more loaded with attitudes and more indeterminate and hedged than that in the genre of news-report. Another distinctiveness the authors point out is that the genre of editorial is not only concerned with the…

  17. Future Directions in Computer Graphics and Visualization: From CG&A's Editorial Board

    SciTech Connect

    Encarnacao, L. M.; Chuang, Yung-Yu; Stork, Andre; Kasik, David; Rhyne, Theresa-Marie; Avila, Lisa; Kohlhammer, Jorn; LaViola, Joseph; Tory, Melanie; Dill, John; Domik, Gitta; Owen, G. Scott; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-01

    With many new members joining the CG&A editorial board over the past year, and with a renewed commitment to not only document the state of the art in computer graphics research and applications but to anticipate and where possible foster future areas of scientific discourse and industrial practice, we asked editorial and advisory council members about where they see their fields of expertise going. The answers compiled here aren’t meant to be all encompassing or deterministic when it comes to the opportunities computer graphics and interactive visualization hold for the future. Instead, we aim to accomplish two things: give a more in-depth introduction of members of the editorial board to the CG&A readership and encourage cross-disciplinary discourse toward approaching, complementing, or disputing the visions laid out in this compilation.

  18. EDITORIAL: Is it a bird? Is it a plane...?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1997-11-01

    Honorary Editor Neither. But what exactly is Physics Education? What is its role? Such questions exercised the combined wit and wisdom of the Editorial Board at its recent meeting in October. Some facts. Among the core readership of the journal are teachers of physics in UK secondary schools, nearly all of whom teach A-level physics. Many of these who are not already Institute of Physics members benefit from a reduced subscription via membership of the Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges Affiliation Scheme or the Association for Science Education. But some readers worldwide subscribe at the full annual individual rate. In addition the journal is bought by over a thousand institutions (colleges, universities, schools) - and most of these are abroad, in North America especially. A typical issue shows a broad geographical spread of authors. Less than half of the papers submitted for publication come from the UK, the rest come from our foreign readership, with the USA in the lead. Each issue contains about eleven papers - currently we receive an average of ten articles a month, of which about 60% are ultimately published. This creditable figure hides the fact that 90% of UK submissions are accepted, whilst two thirds of 'foreign' articles are rejected by the referees. Linguistic fluency is significant here, of course. But some are rejected because they are seen as too limited in their appeal to our readers; often there is too much physics and not enough education. These decisions are made by the referees, who are all members of the Editorial Board. The main topic of discussion at the October Board meeting was whether the journal does satisfy the needs of its readership. It was generally agreed that the main question referees and editors should ask themselves is: Will this article/issue help to improve the teaching and learning of physics? We were worried that there is not enough in the journal that teachers can use in their everyday tasks of planning or

  19. EDITORIAL: Message from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R.

    2005-01-01

    On 1 January 2005 I become Editor-in-Chief of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. I look forward to assisting contributors, referees and the Board in maintaining the high standards of this international journal, whose bibliometric impact factor has consistently matched or exceeded that of other journals in the field. The robust, good health of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion reflects that of its user communities. With a decision to proceed to the construction of ITER apparently imminent, magnetic confinement fusion research is preparing to take a major step forwards. A new generation of laser-plasma interaction facilities for inertial fusion research is also rising at key sites around the world. Technical progress in our field is underpinned by scientific excellence, and the publication of results in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion will, I hope, continue to play its part. The journal will continue to offer the benefits of refereeing by two experts, combined with the rapid turnaround achieved by the highly efficient editorial office at the Institute of Physics Publishing in Bristol. Looking elsewhere, there may be opportunities for gentle incremental broadening of the scientific scope of the journal, in the medium term. One looks in particular to those branches of plasma physics that, in recent years, have become more strongly represented in the series of conferences organized by the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society. The recent special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) B1--592) provides an indication. Finally, it is a pleasure to thank my predecessor, Professor Ian Hutchinson of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for handing on his role with the journal in such promising condition.

  20. EDITORIAL: Bio-dielectrics: theories, mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethig, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    This special cluster in Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics comprises papers submitted by participants at the 2006 conference of the Institute of Physics Dielectrics Group, held at the University of Leicester during 10-12 April 2006. The conference focused on the interaction of non-ionizing electromagnetic (EM) fields with biological materials at all scales (tissues down to molecules) and at all frequencies. The use of dielectric techniques and theories in biological studies and in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries is increasing, and we hope that this conference helped to facilitate this trend and to further an understanding of the value of dielectric studies in biology—both in science and in applications in industry and medicine. An important policy of the Dielectrics Group is to promote the multidisciplinary nature of dielectric studies, and so we welcomed and received papers and posters from biologists, chemists, engineers, industrialists, medical professionals and physicists in the biotechnology and health care fields. The programme comprised 32 oral presentations, including the keynote opening address `Bio-dielectrics and bio-impedance' by Dr Ø G Martinson of the University of Oslo, and 7 papers given by invited speakers. 27 high-quality posters were also exhibited. The Mansel Davies Award, for the best presentation by a young researcher under the age of 30, was bestowed on Mr Sun Tao from the University of Southampton. His work, describing time domain analysis applied to dielectric spectroscopy of single cells, forms the subject matter of the first paper in this cluster. The remaining papers are presented in order of the session themes, namely Dielectric Spectroscopy and Techniques, Theory and Modelling, and Electrokinetics. On behalf of the Dielectrics Group, I thank the authors for their contributions, and the Institute of Physics for excellent administrative and editorial assistance.

  1. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    This year Nuclear Fusion celebrates its fiftieth anniversary. This has been marked by the January special edition, containing papers presented at the plenary and celebratory evening session of the 22nd Fusion Energy Conference at Geneva. These papers underline the enormous progress that has been made in the last 50 years both in experiment and theory. Whilst the technical challenges that we face are still formidable, they are largely concerned with engineering a fusion reactor rather than fundamental plasma physics. In my editorial of a year ago, I remarked on the price of oil and the incentive that it gives to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. This last year, attention has shifted somewhat from the markets to the environment and the Copenhagen climate summit in particular. The timescale for action on the environment is much shorter than we can possibly match and so we can only play our part towards developing long term solutions. Our responsibility is to present a programme that has the clear goal in developing a sustainable source of energy and, as the next step, make an unambiguous success of ITER. The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2009 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2010. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, seven of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2008 to

  2. EDITORIAL: The Nuclear Fusion Award The Nuclear Fusion Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Award ceremony for 2009 and 2010 award winners was held during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. This time, both 2009 and 2010 award winners were celebrated by the IAEA and the participants of the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. The Nuclear Fusion Award is a paper prize to acknowledge the best distinguished paper among the published papers in a particular volume of the Nuclear Fusion journal. Among the top-cited and highly-recommended papers chosen by the Editorial Board, excluding overview and review papers, and by analyzing self-citation and non-self-citation with an emphasis on non-self-citation, the Editorial Board confidentially selects ten distinguished papers as nominees for the Nuclear Fusion Award. Certificates are given to the leading authors of the Nuclear Fusion Award nominees. The final winner is selected among the ten nominees by the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board voting confidentially. 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2009 award, the papers published in the 2006 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, most of which are magnetic confinement experiments, theory and modeling, while one addresses inertial confinement. Sabbagh S.A. et al 2006 Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 635-44 La Haye R.J. et al 2006 Cross-machine benchmarking for ITER of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by electron cyclotron current drive Nucl. Fusion 46 451-61 Honrubia J.J. et al 2006 Three-dimensional fast electron transport for ignition-scale inertial fusion capsules Nucl. Fusion 46 L25-8 Ido T. et al 2006 Observation of the interaction between the geodesic acoustic mode and ambient fluctuation in the JFT-2M tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 512-20 Plyusnin V.V. et al 2006 Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 277-84 Pitts R.A. et al 2006 Far SOL ELM ion energies in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 82-98 Berk H.L. et al 2006

  3. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support for ITER. Such political visibility is good news, of course, but it brings with it the obligation to perform. Fortunately, good performance was much in evidence in the papers presented at the conference, of which a significant proportion contain 'ITER' in the title. Given this importance of ITER and the undertaking by the Nuclear Fusion journal to publish papers associated with Fusion Energy Conference presentations, the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board has decided to adopt a simplified journal scope that encompasses technology papers more naturally. The scope is available from http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Journal%20information but is reproduced here for clarity: Nuclear Fusion publishes articles making significant advances to the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The journal scope includes: the production, heating and confinement of high temperature plasmas; the physical properties of such plasmas; the experimental or theoretical methods of exploring or explaining them; fusion reactor physics; reactor concepts; fusion technologies. The key to scope acceptability is now '....significant advances....' rather than any particular area of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is hoped that this will make scope decisions easier for the Nuclear Fusion office, the referees and the Editor.The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. This is underlined by the fact that Nuclear Fusion has received an impact factor of 4.270, as listed in ISI's 2009 Science Citation

  4. EDITORIAL: Celebrating one year of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2008-03-01

    The one-year anniversary is a critical milestone for a new journal. At that point there are enough articles published to begin to define the scope and readership, yet generally not enough of a track-record for the full community to regard the new entrant as a fixture and a source of 'must read' material. Environmental Research Letters (ERL) has set itself a particularly large and interesting challenge: to help connect the vast community of environmental researchers, practitioners, activists, and interested informed observers. ERL and its partner online resource base and community website, environmentalresearchweb, fills a major void: a single locus for rapid publication of peer-reviewed and highly interdisciplinary material spanning literally every aspect of environmental research and thought. The wide range of material that falls squarely into the purview of ERL—from restoration ecology to global change science and politics, to toxicology and environmental justice, to environmental and social impacts of energy conversion—illustrate just how diverse a 'community' we hope to serve. Thanks to an exceptional editorial staff and board, and a diverse range of fascinating contributed papers, ERL is off to a particularly fast start. ERL has both a small advisory board and a larger editorial board. The board serves several functions, beginning with the traditional one of taking the lead on reviews of papers in such a dizzying array of areas. This task alone is a challenge because of the commitment ERL has made to exceptionally rapid publication: a goal of 90 days from submission to online publication for accepted papers. This goal, which we have generally met, includes the publication of complementary (but not always complimentary) 500 1000 word commentaries on a number of papers. To accomplish this alone the editorial board, and the reviewers, have been heroic, and deserve a huge round of applause. IOP Publishing too, has been truly wonderful in making this happen

  5. Nuevos Horizontes, James Monroe High School, 1987-1988. Evaluation Section Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Lista, Carlos

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) at James Monroe High School (New York City) served 328 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in grades 9-12 during the final year of a 3-year funding cycle. The project's purpose was to build on the strengths of the school's extensive computer-assisted instructional program in order to…

  6. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, a 3-year Title VII-funded bilingual education program, serves 287 Spanish speaking students at James Monroe High School (Bronx, New York). This report evaluates the project's first year of operation, 1985-86. The report contains an introduction describing the school and project goals; information on student…

  7. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its second year of Title VII funding, James Monroe High Schools's Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) served 344 limited-English-speaking recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean, in grades 9 through 12. The program has built on the strengths of the high school's extensive computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program,…

  8. Exploración del Nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte

    NASA Video Gallery

    Únase a Fernando Abilleira, un analista de trayectoria de la NASA para la Oficina de Exploración de Marte, y conozca las nuevas tecnologías que el nuevo robot Curiosity del Laboratorio Científico d...

  9. Un Dia Nuevo for Schools. 2000 & Beyond: The Changing Face of American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2000-01-01

    This issue, the third in a series on the demographic forces shaping public education in the United States, examines the effect of the influx of Hispanic American and Indian immigrants. The first section, "Una Dia Nuevo for Schools," discusses how schools must adjust as Hispanic immigrants fan out to areas beyond those where they have traditionally…

  10. Comprehensive Education Bolivarian-Style: The Alternative School in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Mike

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author traces revolutionary developments in an alternative school in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Mérida, in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, a school that caters for students between 4 and 14. He begins by recounting some fieldwork done at the school on his behalf by Edward Ellis in 2010. He goes on to discuss a video made at…

  11. The Effect of Changing American Social Values on the Editorial Content, Style and Management of Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Donna Roman

    An examination of the "Los Angeles Times," the "Long Beach Independent Press-Telegram," the "Register," and the "Herald Examiner" as well as personal interviews conducted at the editorial and management levels reveal the effect of changing American social values. Changing values can be marked by such broad indicators as graphic renovation,…

  12. Intelligence: A Factor in the Understanding and Appreciation of Editorial Satire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Charles R.

    A study involving 59 undergraduate speech communication students investigated relationships between intelligence, understanding of editorial satire, and appreciation of satire. The students were asked to read three satirical essays and then to pick one of five statements that best described the thesis as intended by the author. Then each satire…

  13. Thoughts concerning the BMJ editorial "Kitemarking the west wind" and the WHO dot-health proposal

    PubMed Central

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2000-01-01

    Tony Delamothe has recently written a BMJ editorial [1], which was partly inspired by the MedCERTAIN workshop in Heidelberg. As the initiator and co-ordinator of an EU project, which could be misunderstood as a "kitemarking" project, I feel obliged to clarify what we want to achieve and how and why our approach differs from what is being described by Tony.

  14. "New York Times" Editorial Position and the U.S. Foreign Policy: The Case of Iran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malek, Abbas

    A study examined the similarity or dissimilarity between the "New York Times'" editorial position on Iran and Iranian affairs and the official United States foreign policy towards Iran as reflected in the "Department of State Bulletin" for the period of 1968-1981. Each piece was categorized by major category and sub-category by three coders who…

  15. 47 CFR 76.209 - Fairness doctrine; personal attacks; political editorials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fairness doctrine; personal attacks; political...; personal attacks; political editorials. A cable television system operator engaging in origination cablecasting shall afford reasonable opportunity for the discussion of conflicting views on issues of...

  16. Editorial: On Behalf of Children. Gentling versus Breaking: Understanding the Languages of Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    1998-01-01

    Using a story of horse training versus horse breaking and referring to Monty Roberts (the "horse whisperer"), this editorial draws three lessons: (1) resist the temptation to act out of fear and mistrust toward children; (2) focus on relationship building, allying with children rather than controlling them; and (3) recognize and admire those who…

  17. Representative Form and the Visual Ideograph: The Iwo Jima Image in Editorial Cartoons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janis L.; Winkler, Carol K.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the rhetorical function of the 1945 photograph of the flag raising at Iwo Jima as it is appropriated in a number of recent editorial cartoons. Builds upon rhetorical theory addressing repetitive form and visual metaphor to propose a concept of representative form. Argues that the parodied Iwo Jima image operates as an instance of…

  18. A Comparison of Career Attitudes of News-Editorial and Ad-PR Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ron F.

    1987-01-01

    Assesses the attitudes that news-editorial students have toward careers in public relations and advertising and the attitudes that public relations-advertising students have toward news careers. Finds that news-ed students saw careers in public relations as being less useful to society and having less prestige in the community than their careers.…

  19. Editorial Peer Review for Electronic Journals: Current Issues and Emerging Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Anne C.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution and growth of electronic journals, and describes the various emerging models of editorial peer review in an electronic environment. Studies to date have focused on attitudes toward electronic journals and citation patterns of electronic journals. Future trends and levels of acceptance of the new models are…

  20. Editorial: The urgent need to recommend an intake of vitamin D that is effective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This editorial makes the point that there is now strong evidence that increasing vitamin D intake will lower risk of falling and lower fracture risk in older men and women. There is also strong evidence that higher vitamin D intakes are safe. Currently recommended intakes of vitamin D are insuffici...

  1. The Relationship Between Editorial and Advertising Content about Tobacco and Alcohol in United States Newspapers

    PubMed Central

    Rouner, Donna; Slater, Michael; Long, Marilee; Stapel, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Using a nationally representative sample, this study examined the relationship between amount of alcohol and tobacco advertising and related news-editorial content. This study found less tobacco and alcohol advertising in newspapers than did previous research and no relationship between coverage and number of advertisements. PMID:21499450

  2. Structural Pluralism, Corporate Newspaper Structure, and News Source Perceptions: Another Test of the Editorial Vigor Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demers, David K.

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to journalism scholarship investigating the editorial vigor hypothesis using a national probability survey of mainstream news sources (mayors and police chiefs). Argues that newspapers with a corporate structure are more critical because they are more likely to be located in pluralistic communities and because they are more insulated…

  3. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by any broadcasting station (including a cable television operator, programmer or producer), Web site, newspaper, magazine, or... publication of general circulation or on a licensed broadcasting facility; and (b) That is part of a...

  4. Why Science? Members of PSR Editorial Board Explain What Drew Them to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primary Science Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Members of "Primary Science Review" Editorial Board explain what drew them to science. Alan Peacock, "PSR" Editor, emphasises the need to preserve children's sense of wonderment about the world. Robert Collins, a science educator in the Faculty of Education, University of Strathclyde, thinks people are "secret science superstars" and reminds one…

  5. [2015 through the eyes of the Bulletin of Cancer editorial board].

    PubMed

    Magné, Nicolas; Massard, Christophe; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; André, Thierry; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Orbach, Daniel; Wislez, Marie; Thariat, Juliette; Penel, Nicolas; Rancoule, Chloé; Vignot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Congresses in oncology took place worldwide. A selection by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer of the best-rated abstracts and published papers was presented including diverse oncology topics by organ location specificity. These highlights are a summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the major meetings dedicated in oncology. PMID:26782079

  6. Editorial: Social Support and Coping Strategies as Mediators of the Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David P. H.

    1997-01-01

    This editorial discusses two studies in this journal issue that explore mediating functions of coping strategies and social support in long-term outcomes of child abuse and neglect. It is argued that these studies provide empirical evidence of interest to social workers and mental health practitioners by identifying specific factors and strategies…

  7. Editorial: Assessment Issues and Long-Term Effects of Childhood Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David P. H.

    1997-01-01

    This editorial reviews and comments on three recent studies: two on assessment issues or areas of diagnostic difficulty for pediatricians concerned with child abuse and neglect, and one on the long-term effects of childhood abuse and experiences of early attachment. (DB)

  8. Un nuevo estudio del cúmulo abierto Tr 14 en la región de Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, B.; Malaroda, S.; Levato, H.; Morrell, N.

    Presentamos nuevos datos espectroscópicos de 9 objetos entre los miembros más brillantes de Tr 14. Hemos medido un total de 80 nuevos espectrogramas para contribuir a la determinación de la real naturaleza de estos objetos desde el punto de vista de la duplicidad. Del nuevo material debemos concluir que la mayoría de las estrellas en la muestra son simples. Sin embargo existen algunos objetos cuyo seguimiento debe continuar ya que no nos es posible efectuar conclusiones definitivas con el presente material.

  9. Effect of channelization of Rio Puerto Nuevo on ground-water levels in the San Juan metropolitan area, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Padilla, Ingrid

    1991-01-01

    Channelization and concrete lining of the Rio Puerto Nuevo and its tributaries in the San Juan Metropolitan area has been proposed to control flooding in low lying areas adjacent to the stream. Concern about the effect of these channel modifications on the ground-water system prompted the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to conduct an investigation of surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Rio Puerto Nuevo basin in 1988. A principal objective of this investigation was to determine the potential effect of channelization of the Rio Puerto Nuevo on ground-water levels.

  10. What are the qualifications and selection criteria for women to be appointed to society journal editorial boards?

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2014-02-01

    Japan ranks extremely low in global ranking of gender equality. It is not easy for female doctors to acquire leadership positions in member societies of the Japanese Association of Medical Science (JAMS). Very few women are included on editorial boards of English medical journals in Japan. Furthermore, until last year, there had been no female editors in English language journals of surgical societies. The qualifications and criteria for selecting editorial board members of medical journals should be clarified. Medical journals in Japan would gain diversity by including women on editorial boards in the same proportion as women membership in the corresponding medical societies. PMID:24293272

  11. EDITORIAL: Thank you and farewell from the Founding Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskes, Mike

    2005-07-01

    I have been involved with Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering (MSMSE) from the very beginning when it was merely an idea, over 14 years ago, to the current journal that is well supported by the community. During my time as Editor there have been many changes in the journal, including the introduction of electronic submissions, web-based services and free printed colour where it is essential to the article, as well as completely free colour online. The journal has seen excellent growth in the number and quality of submissions and the number of articles published continues to rise, enabling us to expand the journal to eight issues in 2005. Web accesses and downloads have greatly surpassed even my wildest dreams. In my opinion, the emergence of MSMSE as a top materials modelling journal has confirmed the vision of Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) and the Executive Board that this area of science and engineering was ripe for a specialized journal. I feel that, having seen the journal through the early years and watched it grow into a successful arena for multidisciplinary materials research, it is now an appropriate time for me to hand over the reins. The journal has a great foundation for future growth and development and is supported by an excellent Editorial Board, who have given me a great deal of help and advice over the years. I feel sure that they will continue to support the journal when Bill Curtin, Brown University, takes over on 1 July 2005. Bill has the diverse experience in modelling at the atomic, dislocation, and continuum levels to lead the journal to new heights. Finally I would like to thank all of the readers, authors and referees who have greatly contributed to MSMSE over the years. Thank you for your support and help, and I hope you will continue to support the journal. Last, but not least, I would like to thank the staff at IOPP. Without their expert assistance, the journal could not have been as successful as it is

  12. EDITORIAL: Celebrating one year of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2008-03-01

    The one-year anniversary is a critical milestone for a new journal. At that point there are enough articles published to begin to define the scope and readership, yet generally not enough of a track-record for the full community to regard the new entrant as a fixture and a source of 'must read' material. Environmental Research Letters (ERL) has set itself a particularly large and interesting challenge: to help connect the vast community of environmental researchers, practitioners, activists, and interested informed observers. ERL and its partner online resource base and community website, environmentalresearchweb, fills a major void: a single locus for rapid publication of peer-reviewed and highly interdisciplinary material spanning literally every aspect of environmental research and thought. The wide range of material that falls squarely into the purview of ERL—from restoration ecology to global change science and politics, to toxicology and environmental justice, to environmental and social impacts of energy conversion—illustrate just how diverse a 'community' we hope to serve. Thanks to an exceptional editorial staff and board, and a diverse range of fascinating contributed papers, ERL is off to a particularly fast start. ERL has both a small advisory board and a larger editorial board. The board serves several functions, beginning with the traditional one of taking the lead on reviews of papers in such a dizzying array of areas. This task alone is a challenge because of the commitment ERL has made to exceptionally rapid publication: a goal of 90 days from submission to online publication for accepted papers. This goal, which we have generally met, includes the publication of complementary (but not always complimentary) 500 1000 word commentaries on a number of papers. To accomplish this alone the editorial board, and the reviewers, have been heroic, and deserve a huge round of applause. IOP Publishing too, has been truly wonderful in making this happen

  13. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    At the time of writing, the construction of ITER is making, quite literally, visible progress; buildings have gone up, the tokamak pit has been equipped with the seismic pads and pylons have been put in place for the high tension input to the power supplies. Most of the main procurement arrangements have been let and we will see an increasing volume of deliveries to the ITER site over the coming years. In addition, the National Ignition Facility has started full operation and will undoubtedly see important results coming from it in 2012. These projects are important reminders of what a monumental endeavour we are all engaged in and the potential of nuclear fusion to improve the long-term condition of the human race. We can be proud, therefore, that the Nuclear Fusion journal makes such an important contribution to controlled fusion programmes and is maintaining its position as the leading journal in the field. More than 350 articles are submitted each year from over 40 countries. Nuclear Fusion continues to be the most highly cited journal in the field, with an impact factor of 3.303, as listed in the ISI 2010 Science Citation Index. The journal depends on its authors and referees for its success and so I would like to thank them all for their hard work in 2011, which should maintain the level of readership and the citation indices for years to come. I sincerely hope that 2012 will be as good. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, three of the top referees have reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2010 to November 2011 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our

  14. EDITORIAL: Northern Hemisphere high latitude climate and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber

    2007-10-01

    funded projects (always with international participation) in the United States, Russian Federation, China, European Union, Japan, and Canada have been mutually united to explore the scientifically significant Northern Eurasian region. NEESPI scientists have been quite productive during the past two years (2005 2006) publishing more than 200 books, book chapters, and papers in refereed journals. NEESPI sessions at international conferences are open to everyone who works on environmental and climate change problems in Northern Eurasia and the circumpolar boreal zone. This thematic issue brings together articles from the authors who presented their latest results at the Annual Fall American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco (December 2006). The research letters in this issue are preceded by two editorial papers (Leptoukh et al and Sherstyukov et al) devoted to informational support of research in the NEESPI domain that is critical to the success of the Initiative. The following papers are quite diverse and are assembled into five groups devoted to studies of climate and hydrology, land cover and land use, the biogeochemical cycle and its feedbacks, the cryosphere, and human dimensions in the NEESPI domain and the circumpolar boreal zone. Focus on Northern Hemisphere High Latitude Climate and Environmental Change Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Editorials NASA NEESPI Data and Services Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Information Gregory Leptoukh, Ivan Csiszar, Peter Romanov, Suhung Shen, Tatiana Loboda and Irina Gerasimov NEESPI Science and Data Support Center for Hydrometeorological Information in Obninsk, Russia B G Sherstyukov, V N Razuvaev, O N Bulygina and P Ya Groisman Climate and hydrology Changes in the fabric of the Arctic's greenhouse blanket Jennifer A Francis and Elias Hunter Spatial variations of summer precipitation trends in South Korea, 1973 2005 Heejun

  15. Ano Nuevo to Santa Cruz, California : a photographic tour of the coastline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chezar, Henry; Wong, Florence L.

    2000-01-01

    This interactive CD ROM contains over 500 overlapping photographic images of the California coastline from A?o Nuevo to Santa Cruz. The images were taken from the R/V David Johnston to illustrate the coastal geology adjacent to part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The introductory home page starts a series of links to a regional map, more detailed area maps, and finally the individual photographic images.

  16. EDITORIAL: Imaging Systems and Techniques Imaging Systems and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George; Yang, Wuqiang; Petrou, M.; Nikita, K. S.; Pastorino, M.; Amanatiadis, A.; Zentai, G.

    2011-10-01

    wide spectrum of technological areas, such as medical imaging, pharmaceutical industry, analytical instrumentation, aerospace, remote sensing, lidars and ladars, surveillance, national defense, corrosion imaging and monitoring, sub-terrestrial and marine imaging. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios, and demanding design parameters such as speed, signal-to-noise ratio, high specificity, high contrast and spatial resolution, high-scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environment, necessitate the development of a multifunctional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, operating on diverse detection and imaging principles. Finally, pattern recognition and image processing algorithms can significantly contribute to enhanced detection and imaging, including object classification, clustering, feature selection, texture analysis, segmentation, image compression and color representation under complex imaging scenarios, with applications in medical imaging, remote sensing, aerospace, radars, defense and homeland security. We feel confident that the exciting new contributions of this special feature on Imaging Systems and Techniques will appeal to the technical community. We would like to thank all authors as well as all anonymous reviewers and the MST Editorial Board, Publisher and staff for their tremendous efforts and invaluable support to enhance the quality of this significant endeavor.

  17. EDITORIAL: 15th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puers, Bob

    2005-07-01

    so, without doubt, such a selection was not an easy task to perform. A careful choice was made by the Programme Committee of the MME Workshop at first, followed by the regular reviewing procedure at the heart of IOP Publishing. I am proud to be able to present to you this collection of 23 papers. We decided also to include papers dealing with non-lithography based manufacturing techniques in this special issue, in an attempt to widen the scope. With this special issue we hope to give you a good overview of the topics dealt with in this workshop. It goes without saying that all the above was not possible without the individual contributions of all the authors. I owe them much gratitude. Gathered here are contributions of an excellent scientific quality, reflecting a clear up-to-date image of what is going on in Europe in this field. I also wish to extend my thanks to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. Collaboration with them turns work into pleasure. I wish you a pleasant reading.

  18. EDITORIAL: Modelling and simulation in polymer and composites processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Josè M.

    2004-05-01

    compromises. The exergy approach used by Srinivasagupta and Kardos to evaluate the ecological impact has shown great potential for measuring the effect of processes in the environment. The process they discuss is an environmentally friendly alternative to the standard pultrusion process. The sixth paper, by Chensong Dong and collaborators, focuses on modelling and optimizing dimensional variation in composites, and offers a good complement to Advani's papers. Papers seven by Lilly et al, and eight by Lyytikainen et al, focus on thermoplastic moulding. The last paper, by Chen et al, discusses the modelling of a technology that has the potential to be the environmentally friendly alternative to painting. I would like to thank Dr Mauricio Cabrera Rios, who obtained his PhD under my supervision and is now a professor at the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Mexico, for his help in coordinating the paper reviews. Also, the willingness of the authors to go through several review iterations where needed is greatly appreciated. Finally I would like to thank Ms Judith Adams (editor), without whose help this issue would not have been possible. She was instrumental in securing some papers and in obtaining the proper evaluations of others.

  19. Editorial - A Matter of Continuity, of People, of Ethics, of Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Andre

    2012-08-01

    This editorial presents the book as a continuation, with more emphasis on people, of the earlier prize-winning series "Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (OSA)", the seven volumes of which described how astronomy research lives: how it is planned, funded and organized, how it interacts with other disciplines and the rest of the world, how it communicates, etc. All those books are a unique medium for scientists and non-scientists (sometimes from outside astronomy) to describe their experience, often for the first time at such a level, on non-purely scientific matters, many of them of fundamental importance for the efficient conduct astronomy-related activities. The editorial tackles also issues regarding ethics and management of people, stressing the need for managers with ad hoc training and a long-term vision of the role of astronomers towards the society at large.

  20. Strategies for a successful PhD program: words of wisdom from the WJNR Editorial Board.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Rawl, Susan; Wyman, Jean F; Larson, Janet L; Anderson, Cindy M; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Benefield, Lazelle E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Smith, Carol E; Topp, Robert; Markis, Natalie E

    2014-01-01

    Nursing doctoral programs prepare students for research-focused careers within academic settings. The purpose of this Editorial Board Special Article is to provide PhD students and advisors with suggestions for making the most of their doctoral experience. Editorial Board members provide their individual insights on the skills and attributes students must acquire during the course of their doctoral education in order to succeed. The authors provide practical tips and advice on how to excel in a PhD program, including how to select an advisor and a dissertation committee, the importance of attending conferences to increase visibility and develop a network of colleagues, presenting and publishing research while still a student, and balancing work and personal life. Students who take full advantage of the opportunities available to them during the course of their doctoral programs will graduate well prepared to take on the multiple responsibilities of research, teaching, and leadership. PMID:23797100

  1. Another quasi-experimental study of understanding/appreciation of editorial satire.

    PubMed

    Gruner, C R; Gruner, M W; Travillion, L J

    1991-12-01

    College students completed a 17-item scale measuring the "propensity to argue controversial topics" and 7 other nominal-scale independent variables. They then read three editorial satires and checked which of five statements was the intended thesis of each satire's author. They also rated each satire on interestingness and funniness. Analysis indicated dependence between understanding of satire and sex and regular readership of "The Far Side." PMID:1784656

  2. Dear Readers, Authors, Reviewers and Editorial Board Members of Advances in Cognitive Psychology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this first newsletter of 2016 we first wanted to wish all our readers, authors, reviewers, and editorial board members a happy, healthy, inspiring, but also peaceful new year. Recently, the fourth issue of Advances in Cognitive Psychology of 2015 was completed, which is of course freely available on our website. The current newsletter will also be included in the first issue of 2016. PMID:27152125

  3. The Code of Ethics and Editorial Code of Practice of the Royal Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Whilst the Royal Astronomical Society has got by for more than 100 years without a written code of ethics, modern standards of governance suggested that such a code could be useful in the resolution of disputes. In 2005, the RAS adopted the Universal Code of Ethics for Science that had been formulated by the Royal Society of London. At the same time and for similar reasons the RAS adopted an Editorial Code of Practice.

  4. Editorial: New Publishing Information for The Astrophysical Journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishniac, Ethan; Sneden, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    reader requests rather than in bulk. As part of this transformation, Letters will be posted as they become ready, rather than waiting for an entire issue to ready. This allows us to shorten the lag between acceptance and publication. Both of these changes are meant to point the way for the main journal, which will adopt these measures in the near future if they prove successful and if the different nature of the main journal does not pose a problem for these changes. This has ramifications for ApJ Letters in regard to the ways that submitted content is measured. Criteria for Letters will continue to be scientific immediacy and brevity. However, with the emphasis on electronic ApJ Letters delivery, the traditional 4.00 printed page limit has become obsolete. We will instead impose a content-counting system that is intended to follow the spirit of the 4 page limit, while being more transparent to authors. A similar system will be implemented for page charges in the main journal if we move to a print-on-demand publishing model there as well. In the midst of such rapid evolution we must rely heavily on our readers and authors to let us know which changes are welcome and where problems have arisen. We hope that everyone feels free to write to us with their concerns. SPECIFIC ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERS The new length limits for ApJ Letters manuscripts will be as follows; these criteria will apply to all submissions beginning 2008 October 15. Manuscript SectionMaximum Abstract length250 words Manuscript length3500 words References50 Figures and tables5 total Machine-readable tables1 These length metrics have been designed to try to mimic as closely as possible the spirit of the 4 page limit. The specific new limits have been set up with AASTeX-using authors in mind (thus covering about 95% of ApJ Letters submissions). Editorial judgment will be exercised in individual cases that do not easily match the criteria given here. Additionally, the

  5. EDITORIAL: Why we need a new journal in neural engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2004-03-01

    laboratory but also in the publication of scientific papers. We do, therefore, need a new journal that provides a platform for this emerging interdisciplinary field of neural engineering where neuroscientists, neurobiologists and engineers can publish their work in one periodical that spans the disciplines. Journal of Neural Engineering will provide this platform. The new journal will publish full-length articles of the highest quality and importance in the field of neural engineering at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. The scope of Journal of Neural Engineering encompasses experimental, computational and theoretical aspects of neural interfacing, neuroelectronics, neuromechanical systems, neuroinformatics, neuroimaging, neural prostheses, artificial and biological neural circuits, neural control, neural tissue regeneration, neural signal processing, neural modeling and neuro-computation. The scope of the journal has both depth and breadth in areas relevant to the interface between neuroscience and engineering. There will be two Editors-in-Chief, with expertise covering both engineering and neuroscience. Experts in the areas encompassed by the journal's scope have been identified for the Editorial Board and the composition of the board will be continually updated to address the developments in this new and exciting field. The first issue of this new journal covers a variety of topics that combine neuroscience and engineering: mental state recognition from EEG signals, analysis of body motion in Parkinson's patients, non-linear dynamics of the respiratory system, automatic identification of saccade-related visual evoked potentials, multiple electrode stimulators, algorithms to estimate the causal relationship between brain sources, diffusion tensor imaging in the brain and phase synchronization of neural activity in vitro. This broad array of manuscripts focusing on neural imaging, neurophysiology, neural signal processing, neuroelectronics and neuro-dynamics can

  6. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    This editorial serves as the preface to a special issue of New Journal of Physics, which collects together solicited papers on a common subject, x-ray beams with high coherence. We summarize the issue's content, and explain why there is so much current interest both in the sources themselves and in the applications to the study of the structure of matter and its fluctuations (both spontaneous and driven). As this collection demonstrates, the field brings together accelerator physics in the design of new sources, particle physics in the design of detectors, and chemical and materials scientists who make use of the coherent beams produced. Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence Contents Femtosecond pulse x-ray imaging with a large field of view B Pfau, C M Günther, S Schaffert, R Mitzner, B Siemer, S Roling, H Zacharias, O Kutz, I Rudolph, R Treusch and S Eisebitt The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent x-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system and applications E Allaria, C Callegari, D Cocco, W M Fawley, M Kiskinova, C Masciovecchio and F Parmigiani Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Anders Madsen, Robert L Leheny, Hongyu Guo, Michael Sprung and Orsolya Czakkel The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Sébastien Boutet and Garth J Williams Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Andrei Fluerasu, Pawel Kwasniewski, Chiara Caronna, Fanny Destremaut, Jean-Baptiste Salmon and Anders Madsen Exploration of crystal strains using coherent x-ray diffraction Wonsuk Cha, Sanghoon Song, Nak Cheon Jeong, Ross Harder, Kyung Byung Yoon, Ian K Robinson and Hyunjung Kim Coherence properties of the European XFEL G Geloni, E Saldin, L Samoylova, E Schneidmiller, H Sinn, Th Tschentscher and M Yurkov Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging: treatment and analysis of data G J

  7. Editorial: The publication of geoscientific model developments v1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Executive Editors, GMD

    2015-10-01

    Version 1.0 of the editorial of the EGU (European Geosciences Union) journal, Geoscientific Model Development (GMD), was published in 2013. In that editorial an assessment was made of the progress the journal had made since it started, and some revisions to the editorial policy were introduced. After 2 years of experience with this revised editorial policy there are a few required updates, refinements and clarifications, so here we present version 1.1 of the editorial. The most significant amendments relate to the peer-review criteria as presented in the Framework for GMD manuscript types, which is published as an appendix to this paper and also available on the GMD manuscript types webpage. We also slightly refine and update the Publication guide and introduce a self-contained code and data policy. The changes are summarised as follows: - All manuscript types are now required to include code or data availability paragraphs, and model code must always be made available (in the case of copyright or other legal issues, to the editor at a minimum). - The role of evaluation in GMD papers is clarified, and a separate evaluation paper type is introduced. Model descriptions must already be published or in peer review when separate evaluation papers are submitted. - Observationally derived data should normally be published in a data journal rather than in GMD. Syntheses of data which were specifically designed for tasks such as model boundary conditions or direct evaluation of model output may, however, be published in GMD. - GMD publishes a broad range of different kinds of models, and this fact is now more explicitly acknowledged. - The main changes to the Publication guide are the addition of guidelines for editors when assessing papers at the initial review stage. Before sending papers for peer review, editors are required to make sure that papers comply with the Framework for GMD paper types and to carefully consider the topic of plagiarism. - A new appendix, the GMD

  8. EDITORIAL: The need and challenge for Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2006-11-01

    will make it a truly unique resource for scholars in developed and developing nations, as well as for environmental non-governmental groups, public servants, businesses and industry groups, and anyone who would not normally find their way, or have the financial means, to access an academic journal. Our goal to remain open-access will require that ERL secure a commitment of financial support—ideally from a foundation, individual, or a national or international research agency—so that the journal can publish in this fashion without the support of significant article publication charges. In this area we call on you to consider supporting, or to direct our editorial staff to groups who want to support, this venture. Exceptionally fast publication. As it gears up for regular publication, ERL is committed to a 90 day turn-around from article submission through to online publication for accepted Letters. Outstandingly high article visibility. ERL's open-access publishing model will guarantee its authors high article visibility, capturing a wide audience that includes both specialists and the wider community. The journal will serve its broad readership by publishing Perspectives that put disciplinary papers in a wider context, and explore the intellectual and policy impacts of broader, cross-disciplinary papers. A significant fraction of the research articles published in ERL will appear with 500 1000 word commentary pieces—solicited from not only leading scholars, but also leading political, business, legal, and community leaders—that extend and expand the dialog of the papers. Several articles published in the inaugural issue of the journal will be accompanied by such Perspectives. ERL will also link academic to professional development. In addition to primary research, the journal and its forthcoming accompanying community website will include: Special issues, focusing on fast-changing environmental issues. For 2007, we already have issues planned on 'Environmental

  9. Characterization of the dengue outbreak in Nuevo Leon state, Mexico, 2010.

    PubMed

    Leduc-Galindo, D; Gloria-Herrera, U; Rincón-Herrera, U; Ramos-Jiménez, J; Garcia-Luna, S; Arellanos-Soto, D; Mendoza-Tavera, N; Tavitas-Aguilar, I; Garcia-Garcia, E; Galindo-Galindo, E; Villarreal-Perez, J; Fernandez-Salas, I; Santiago, G A; Muñoz-Jordan, J; Rivas-Estilla, A M

    2015-04-01

    We studied serotypes circulating dengue virus (DENV) cases, entomological Breteau index, rain-fall index and epidemiology of groups affected during the 2010 outbreak in Nuevo Leon, Mexico. From 2,271 positive cases, 94% were dengue classic and 6% dengue hemorrhagic fever; DENV1 was mainly isolated (99%) (Central-American lineage of American-African-genotype). We found correlation between two environmental phenomena (Increment of rainfall and vector-indexes) (p ≤ 0.05) with epidemiological, clinical and risk of DENV-1 ongoing transmission. PMID:25573274

  10. An Analysis of Editorial Freedom and Administrative Control of the Student Newspaper in the Four-Year Colleges and Universities in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howells, Ronald Frederick

    The study was designed to investigate judicial decisions of state and federal courts concerning editorial freedom of the college and university student press to determine emerging legal rules, precedents, and trends in judicial decisions and to analyze the extent of editorial freedom and administrative control of the student press as perceived by…

  11. EDITORIAL: 80 Years of Plasma 80 Years of Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, R. N.; Braithwaite, N. St J.

    2009-02-01

    of all 12 volumes in a library so that they may be accessible to future scholars on request. As Appendix II shows, those of interest to modern day plasma physicists are contained in volumes 3, 4 and 5. Postscript (added December 2008) Following the October 2008 online publication of our Editorial, we are grateful to Professor Manfred Hellberg of the University of KwaZulu-Natal (Durban, South Africa) for drawing our attention to a letter by H M Mott-Smith, one of Langmuir's co-workers, published in 1971 (Nature 233 219). In this letter Mott-Smith makes clear his recollection that Langmuir was struck by the analogy between 'the way blood plasma carries around red and white corpuscles and germs' and the way that the ' . . . "equilibrium" part of the discharge acted as a sort of sub-stratum carrying particles of special kinds, like high-velocity electrons from thermionic filaments, molecules and ions of gas impurities'. We thus conclude that this now settles the origin of the term.

  12. PSYCHOLOGY IN FRENCH ACADEMIC PUBLISHING IN THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY: ALFRED BINET, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR AT THE SCHLEICHER PUBLISHING HOUSE.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge

    2015-01-01

    To date, historians of psychology have largely ignored the role of academic publishing and the editorial policies of the late nineteenth century. This paper analyzes the role played by academic publishing in the history of psychology in the specific case of France, a country that provides a very interesting and unique model. Up until the middle of the 1890s, there was no collection specifically dedicated to psychology. Alfred Binet was the first to found, in 1897, a collection of works specifically dedicated to scientific psychology. He chose to work with Reinwald-Schleicher. However, Binet was soon confronted with (1) competition from other French publishing houses, and (2) Schleicher's management and editorial problems that were to sound the death knell for Binet's emerging editorial ambitions. The intention of this paper is to encourage the efforts of the pioneers of modern psychology to have their work published and disseminated. PMID:25975358

  13. Assessing biodiversity in Nuevo Leon, Mexico: Are nature reserves the answer?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cantu, C.; Wright, R.G.; Scott, J.M.; Strand, Espen

    2004-01-01

    The Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, located in the northeastern portion of the country, currently has 26 state and three federal nature reserves covering approximately 4.5% of its land area. These reserves were established for a variety of reasons not necessarily related to conservation purposes. In 2000 in response to a growing concern about the lack of organized conservation reserve planning to protect the important biological and physical features of Mexico, the Mexican Commission for Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity proposed 12 new terrestrial reserves for Nuevo Leon. The new reserves, if established, would increase the proportion of protected lands in the state to almost 24% of the state's land area. We compiled a Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis using digital thematic maps of physical and ecological features to examine how well the existing and proposed reserves incorporated the major biological and physical features of the state. The existing reserves are located primarily in regions with elevations > 1,000-1,500 m, on less productive soils, and are dominated by pine and oak forest cover types. As a result, the state's dominant biotic region - low elevation coastal plain with xeric scrub vegetation - is disproportionately under represented in the current reserve system. The new reserves would expand the protection of biophysical resources throughout the state. However, the inclusion of important resources in the low elevation coastal lands would still be limited.

  14. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  15. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    contributions and the referees for their time and their thoroughness. Our sincerest thanks go to Solange Guéhot in the EPJ D editorial office for very efficiently taking care of all administrative matters. Jürgen Eschner, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria Alessandra Gatti, Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unitá di Como, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como, Italy Agnàs Maītre, Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France Giovanna Morigi, Abteilung Quantenphysik, Universitát Ulm, Albert-Einstein Allee 11, 89069 Ulm, Germany

  16. Do Editorial Policies Support Ethical Research? A Thematic Text Analysis of Author Instructions in Psychiatry Journals

    PubMed Central

    Strech, Daniel; Metz, Courtney; Knüppel, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Introduction According to the Declaration of Helsinki and other guidelines, clinical studies should be approved by a research ethics committee and seek valid informed consent from the participants. Editors of medical journals are encouraged by the ICMJE and COPE to include requirements for these principles in the journal’s instructions for authors. This study assessed the editorial policies of psychiatry journals regarding ethics review and informed consent. Methods and Findings The information given on ethics review and informed consent and the mentioning of the ICMJE and COPE recommendations were assessed within author’s instructions and online submission procedures of all 123 eligible psychiatry journals. While 54% and 58% of editorial policies required ethics review and informed consent, only 14% and 19% demanded the reporting of these issues in the manuscript. The TOP-10 psychiatry journals (ranked by impact factor) performed similarly in this regard. Conclusions Only every second psychiatry journal adheres to the ICMJE’s recommendation to inform authors about requirements for informed consent and ethics review. Furthermore, we argue that even the ICMJE’s recommendations in this regard are insufficient, at least for ethically challenging clinical trials. At the same time, ideal scientific design sometimes even needs to be compromised for ethical reasons. We suggest that features of clinical studies that make them morally controversial, but not necessarily unethical, are analogous to methodological limitations and should thus be reported explicitly. Editorial policies as well as reporting guidelines such as CONSORT should be extended to support a meaningful reporting of ethical research. PMID:24901366

  17. Editorial: The search for core symptoms - will this help clinical decision-making?

    PubMed

    Frazier Norbury, Courtenay

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosis is an important component of our clinical roles, and should also lead to particular treatment pathways. The diagnostic process may be challenged by co-occurring deficits that are neither specific nor universal to the diagnosis under consideration and may well be evident across a range of other clinical conditions. How important is it to refine our instruments so that they measure unique symptoms? Will this alter or improve intervention choices? This Editorial focuses on the extent to which fine tuning diagnostic instruments improves our decisions about treatment, in the context of articles published in this issue of JCPP. PMID:27445109

  18. Learning Styles and Attitudes toward Online Education in Four Universities in the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez de Monarrez, Patricia; Korniejczuk, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to find the relation-ship between the predominant learning styles among university online students and their attitude toward online education. Data were collected from 385 students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs from four universities in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Significant effects of…

  19. Thermal response to the surface heat flux in a macrotidal coastal region (Nuevo Gulf, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Andrés L.; Pisoni, Juan P.; Dellatorre, Fernando G.

    2016-07-01

    At mid-latitudes, sea water temperature shows a strong seasonal cycle forced by the incident surface heat flux. As depth decreases, the heat flux incidence is damped by the horizontal flux, which prevents the indefinite growth of the seasonal temperature range. In the present work, cross-shore transport in the west coast of Nuevo Gulf (Argentina) was analyzed. Processes tending to cool the coastal waters in summer and to warm the coastal waters in winter, were identified through temperature measurements, surface heat flux and tidal height. The simplified models proposed here provide a feedback mechanism that links changes in surface heat flux with changes in the horizontal heat flux during both seasons. On shorter time scales, tide produces significant variations in the height of the water column, therefore influencing temperature fluctuations and the direction of the horizontal flow.

  20. A Cross-Cultural Approach to the Negotiation of Individual and Group Identities: Parliamentary Debates and Editorial Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on interactional pragmatics and a cross-cultural approach (UK, France, Spain) to investigate the negotiation of individual and group identities in two different speech events, parliamentary debates and editorial meetings. The cross-cultural examination of the use of linguistic resources for signalling "social role, boundaries…

  1. "I Wouldn't Have Said It that Way": Mediating Professional Editorial Comments in a Secondary School Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohnen, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of a videotaped lecture from a secondary school science classroom. The students in this class had drafted science journalism articles and submitted them for professional editorial review and possible publication in a science newsmagazine for a teenage audience. Before allowing her students to see the editorial…

  2. Editorial independence and the editor-owner relationship: good editors never die, they just cross the line.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, J F

    2009-12-01

    The concept of editorial freedom or independence is examined in the light of the editor-owner relationship. Like individual and national freedom or independence, it is a rhetorical concept whose realisation flows from internal achievement as much as it depends on external validation. This freedom entails roles and responsibilities embodied in specific codes of practice for editors, such as the guidelines espoused by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Association of Medical Editors. The calling to embody these guidelines makes editing a vocation that demands isolation and distancing, separation and solitude. It involves bracketing one's biases, prejudgments and preconceptions. With such detachment comes real freedom; one that requires a moral fibre and trustworthiness that uphold truth and right, whether in full view of public scrutiny, or in the aloneness of private secrecy. The stereotypical tension between academic and commercial concerns highlights the editor-owner relationship, and bears directly on editorial independence. In practice, journal owners overstep their prerogatives. The absence of clear contracts defining editorial independence and the lack of established mechanisms governing the editor-owner relationship affect many small- to medium-sized journals in developing countries. Even large journals in developed and democratic nations or totalitarian states and societies are not spared. At the end of the day, editorial freedom exists only insofar as it is tolerated, or until editors cross the line. PMID:20087545

  3. Trends in Female Authorships, Editorial Board Memberships, and Editorships in Educational Psychology Journals from 2003 to 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Carlton J.; Yoo, Julia H.; Jones, Sara J.; Torres, Laura G.; Decker, Mark Lowry

    2009-01-01

    Robinson, McKay, Katayama, and Fan ("Contemporary Educational Psychology," 23, 331-343, 1998) reported that women were underrepresented in terms of authorships, editorial board memberships, and editorships in the field of educational psychology based on membership trends. More recently, Evans, Hsieh, and Robinson ("Educational Psychology Review,"…

  4. History and the Study of "Administration" (LAMPS) in Education: A Reflection on an Editorial for a Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbins, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The special edition of JEAH published in August 2006 on "Administration and Leadership in Education: A Case for History?" argued that history has been seriously undervalued in the study of administration and leadership in education. My introductory editorial explained why this mattered and outlined the framework in which the papers it contained…

  5. Editorial on Behavior Analytic Licensure: General Historical Issues of Why People Oppose Licensing and the Common Replies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautilli, Joseph; Dziewolska, Halina

    2008-01-01

    A recent survey by the new PIBA SIG suggests strong support for licensure among behavior analysts. This editorial will explore some of the common arguments against licensure and present some factual information to support or counter those arguments. The four common arguments are (1) licensure will hurt the science of behavior analysis (2)…

  6. Exploring the APA Fifth Edition "Publication Manual"'s Impact on the Analytic Preferences of Journal Editorial Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capraro, Mary Margaret; Capraro, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Studied the reporting preferences of editorial board members of four scholarly journals in education and psychology with regard to analytic practices in the fifth edition of the American Psychological Association "Publication Manual." Responses of 106 board members show the movement toward reform in research reporting practices. (SLD)

  7. Ethnobotany in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Eduardo; Villarreal, José A; Cantú, César; Cabral, Ismael; Scott, Laura; Yen, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Background An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years old or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Methods Ninety five inhabitants 35 years old and oldest were interviewed to know what are the main plant uses in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park. Results and discussion Two hundred and forty species, 170 genera, and 69 families of useful plants and 146 different uses were recorded. We found most of the uses to be medicinal (98), while the rest (48) represent various purposes. Herbaceous plants are the most used, followed by shrubs and trees. PMID:17263889

  8. Medical Hypotheses 2006 impact factor rises to 1.3--a vindication of the 'editorial review' system for revolutionary science.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Thomson Scientific Impact Factor (IF) for Medical Hypotheses has risen to 1.299 for 2006. This means that the IF has more than doubled since 2004, when it stood at 0.607. Using Elsevier's Scopus database; in 2004 there were 437 citations to Medical Hypotheses papers published in the previous two years--by 2006 this had trebled to 1216 citations. Monthly internet usage of Medical Hypotheses run at an average of about 26000 papers downloaded per month. An IF of 1.3 means that Medical Hypotheses has now entered the mainstream level of 'respectable' medical journals, in terms of its usage by other scientists. This is particularly pleasing given the aim of the journal is to publish radical and speculative ideas. A healthy IF is important to Medical Hypotheses because the journal deploys a system of editorial review, rather than peer review, for evaluation and selection of papers. Editorial review involves selection of a journal's content primarily by an editor who has broad experience and competence in the field, assisted by a relatively small editorial advisory board. The great advantage of editorial review is that it is able, by policy, to favour the publication of revolutionary science. But since editorial review relies on hard-to-quantify and non-transparent individual judgments, it is important for its outcomes to be open to objective evaluations. Scientometric measures of usage such as citations, impact factors and downloads constitute objective evidence concerning a journal's usefulness. Since Medical Hypotheses is performing adequately by such criteria, this provides a powerful answer to those who fetishize peer review and regard any other system of evaluation as suspect. Journal review procedures are merely a means to the end, and the end is a journal that serves a useful function in the dynamic process of science. Medical Hypotheses can now claim to perform such a role. PMID:17706892

  9. Editorial policies and background in editing Macedonian Medical Review and BANTAO journal.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce

    2014-01-01

    Even in as small a country as R. Macedonia with limited resources allocated for science, there are many journals trying to establish good editorial practices and policies in publishing the scientific work achieved. Among the currently existing medical journals Macedonian Medical Review (MMR), ISSN 0025-1097, deserves to be elaborated as the oldest journal with continuous publication since its first appearance as the journal of the Macedonian Medical Association (MMA). Since its first issue, published in 1946, there has been an opus of some 4500 peer-reviewed published papers in more than 210 issues and some 80 supplements from various congresses and meetings. In this regard, great respect should be paid not only to the editorial boards, but also to the collaborators who have contributed to its successful continuity in all previous years. In line with the needs for further development of the journal and possibilities for access to world databases, the Editorial Board of MMR has made every effort to improve and modernize its work as well as the technical quality of the journal. Hence, MMA has signed a contract with De Gruyter Open as leading publisher of Open Access academic content for further improvement and promotion of the journal and facilitation of the Medline application, so we do hope for the further success of the journal. BANTAO Journal is published on behalf of the Balkan Cities Association of Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation and Artificial Organs (BANTAO), ISSN 1312-2517. The first issue was published in 2003, ten years after BANTAO was born. Its appearance was an extremely important event in the existence of BANTAO. The first official editor of the journal was Dimitar Nenov, Varna (2003-2005), followed by Ali Basci (Izmir, Turkey) and Goce Spasovski (Skopje, Macedonia) as editor-in-chief since 2009. Over the years, the Journal has been included in the EBSCO, DOAJ and SCOPUS/SCIMAGO databases. The journal is published biannually. Until now, 345

  10. Editorial and Introduction of the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Benson, Sally M.; Karimjee, Anhar; Rubin, Edward S.

    2010-03-01

    Short one page editorial to introduce the +30 peer reviewed papers contained within the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

  11. Joint editorial: Fostering innovation and improving impact assessment for journal publications in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Blöschl, Günter; Bárdossy, András.; Cudennec, Christophe; Hughes, Denis; Montanari, Alberto; Neuweiler, Insa; Savenije, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Editors of several journals in the field of hydrology met during the Assembly of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences—IAHS (within the Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics—IUGG) in Prague in June 2015. This event was a follow-up of a similar meeting held in July 2013 in Gothenburg (as reported by Blöschl et al. [2014]). These meetings enable the group of editors to review the current status of the journals and the publication process, and share thoughts on future strategies. Journals were represented in the 2015 meeting through their editors, as shown in the list of authors. The main points on fostering innovation and improving impact assessment in journal publications in hydrology are communicated in this joint editorial published in the above journals.

  12. Joint editorial - Fostering innovation and improving impact assessment for journal publications in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Blöschl, Günter; Bárdossy, András; Cudennec, Christophe; Hughes, Denis; Montanari, Alberto; Neuweiler, Insa; Savenije, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Editors from several journals in the field of hydrology met during the Assembly of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences-IAHS (within the Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics-IUGG) in Prague in June 2015. This event was a follow-up of a similar meeting in July 2013 in Gothenburg (as reported by Blöschl et al. (2014)). In these meetings the group of editors reviewed the current status of the journals and the publication process, and shared thoughts on future strategies. Journals were represented in the meeting through their editors, as shown in the list of authors. The main points on fostering innovation and improving impact assessment in journal publications in hydrology are communicated in this joint editorial published in journals that participated in the meeting.

  13. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the 2013 volume Welcome to the 2013 volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2013-01-01

    Welcome to 2013; another great year for technology in our journal, Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Last year, SMS grew by some 11% while maintaining a high Impact Factor above 2 and a rejection rate of 60%. The Editorial Board and I are pleased with this outcome, as it's indicative of the relevance and vibrancy of SMS to our research community. SMS continues to have a leading role within our community of researchers in the field of smart materials and smart systems technology. As always the quality of SMS is something that the Editorial Board takes very seriously. I have instructed the Editorial Board and our reviewers to scrutinize manuscripts, not only for originality and contributions to the field of smart materials and structures, but to consider the potential impact on the technology. In addition, we are doing more to architect the content of our issues, creating a conduit for exciting developments, developing review topics, and publishing focus issues that cover current technological trends. We would like to promote SMS as a medium to accelerate the promotion of the latest technology. Toward this end, SMS has instituted the Fast Track Communication (FTC). FTCs are short, urgent announcements reporting new and timely developments in the field. They benefit from extra post-publication promotion and accelerated peer review. SMS also has a strong program of topical review articles. Many of us are professors, involved with the training of new researchers to our field, and the value of review articles to education and training cannot be overstated. Such articles allow a reader to 'get up to speed' quickly in a new area, whether they be new graduate students or seasoned technologists deciphering what smart materials has to offer a particular application. Review topics are considered by me and the Editorial Board for content. If approved, SMS will commission a writer to prepare the article for which they will receive a fee in appreciation for the service they

  14. [Metamorphoses of commentary. Editorial projects and formation of anatomical knowledge in the 16th century].

    PubMed

    Mandressi, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    The new anatomical knowledge, which began to come into existence in the first half of the 16th century, generated intellectual and material tools for the acquisition and transmission of knowledge on the basis of a methodological program which reworked the relationship between the written word of the authorities and sensorial observations. The reception and critical evaluation of inherited texts was carried out through the adoption and transformation of modes of writing and editorial devices put into the service of the new relationships to the past history of the discipline in the formation of knowledge of the body. The traditional form of commentary and the techniques which are associated with it, initially adopted by Berengario da Carpi and which are then to be found at the base of Andreas Vesalius' work, played a central role in this sense. PMID:16689078

  15. Editorial: new thoughts on the association between diverticulosis and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2014-12-01

    As our population ages it is increasingly common to encounter patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms and diverticulosis, but the nature of the association is obscure. This Editorial discusses the paper from Japan showing an association between IBS-like symptoms and left-sided but not right-sided diverticulosis. The left colon with its higher motor activity is more likely to be associated with complications of diverticulosis, including perforation and abscess formation. The underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome of post-diverticulitis IBS is discussed and clinical markers of centrally driven symptoms suggested as a means to avoid ineffective colonic resections in those with IBS-like diverticular disease. PMID:25470583

  16. Editorial: The publication of geoscientific model developments v1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Executive Editors, GMD

    2013-08-01

    In 2008, the first volume of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) was published. GMD was founded because we perceived there to be a need for a space to publish comprehensive descriptions of numerical models in the geosciences. The journal is now well established, with the submission rate increasing over time. However, there are several aspects of model publication that we believe could be further improved. In this editorial we assess the lessons learned over the first few years of the journal's life, and describe some changes to GMD's editorial policy, which will ensure that the models and model developments are published in such a way that they are of maximum value to the community. These changes to editorial policy mostly focus on improving the rigour of the review process through a stricter requirement for access to the materials necessary to test the behaviour of the models. Throughout this editorial, "must" means that the stated actions are required, and the paper cannot be published without them; "strongly encouraged" means that we encourage the action, but papers can still be published if the criteria are not met; "may" means that the action may be carried out by the authors or referees, if they so wish. We have reviewed and rationalised the manuscript types into five new categories. For all papers which are primarily based on a specific numerical model, the changes are as follows: - The paper must be accompanied by the code, or means of accessing the code, for the purpose of peer-review. If the code is normally distributed in a way which could compromise the anonymity of the referees, then the code must be made available to the editor. The referee/editor is not required to review the code in any way, but they may do so if they so wish. - All papers must include a section at the end of the paper entitled "Code availability". In this section, instructions for obtaining the code (e.g. from a supplement, or from a

  17. Misconduct, Marginality and Editorial Practices in Management, Business and Economics Journals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The paper presents data on the two problems of misconduct and marginality in management, business and economics (MBE) journals and their practices to combat these problems. Design Data was collected in three phases. First, all publicly retracted papers in MBE journals were identified through keywords searches in 7 major databases (n = 1329 journals). Second, a focused survey was distributed to editors involved in such retractions (n = 64; response rate = 28%). Finally, a survey was administered to all active journals in the seven databases to collect data on editors’ perceptions and practices related to the two problems (n = 937, response rate = 31.8%). Frequency analyses, cross tabulations, and qualitative analyses of open answers were used to examine the data. Results 184 retracted papers in MBE journals were identified in 2005–2015 (no retraction was found before 2005). From 2005–2007 to 2012–2015, the number of retractions increased by a factor ten with an all-time high in 2015. The survey to journals with reported retractions illustrates how already a few cases of suspected misconduct put a strain on the editorial workload. The survey to all active journals revealed that 42% of the respondents had started to use software to screen all submitted papers, and that a majority recognized the problem of marginality, as indicated by salami-style submissions. According to some editors, reviewers easily spot such submissions whereas others argued that authors may submit thinly sliced papers in parallel to several journals, which means that this practice is only discovered post-publication. The survey question on ways to support creative contributions stimulated a rich response of ideas regarding editorial vision, engaged boards and developmental approaches. The study uses data from three specialized fields, but its findings may be highly relevant to many journals in the social sciences. PMID:27454761

  18. [The editorial handling of manuscripts submitted to Revista Médica de Chile].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Humberto; Palma, Joaquín; Andresen, Max

    2004-01-01

    This Editorial describes the steps followed by a manuscript when it is submitted to Revista Médica de Chile: its reception, format checking as requested in Instructions to Authors, and the editors' decision whether it is considered suitable for the purposes of this journal or not; the selection of peer reviewers, a direct contact with them to ask for their willingness to review this particular manuscript; an analysis by the editors of the reviewers' criticisms leading them to the decision of whether to accept it in the current version, or to return it to the authors with a request to prepare a new corrected version, or a definitive rejection; the editors' review of a corrected version (that may require again the opinion of the external reviewers) and the final decision to accept it or not; printing of the manuscript, two successive galley proofs reviewed by authors and editors; and the final printing of the journal with its simultaneous reproduction in the web page www.scielo.cl. Roughly 70% of the manuscripts are returned to the authors offering them the opportunity to resubmit a corrected version, 12% are definitively rejected and 20% are accepted in their first version. The mean time taken for an accepted manuscript since its first submission until it appears printed is currently 7.6 months. Having only part time editors and a time-limited secretarial staff efforts to shorten this time are difficult to implement, although electronic mail and fax are increasingly being used in this editorial process. PMID:15379046

  19. Ethnobotany in Rayones, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trough collections of plants and interviews with 110 individuals, an ethnobotanical study was conducted in order to determine the knowledge and use plant species in Rayones, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The aim of this study was to record all useful plants and their uses, to know whether differences exist in the knowledge about the number of species and uses between women and men, and to know if there is a correlation between the age of individuals and knowledge of species and their uses. Methods A total of 110 persons were interviewed (56 men, 56 women). Semistructured interviews were carried out. The data were analyzed by means of Student t test and the Pearson Correlation Coeficient. Results A total of 252 species, 228 genera and 91 families of vascular plants were recorded. Astraceae, Fabaceae and are the most important families with useful species and Agave and Opuntia are the genera with the highest number of useful species. One hundred and thirty six species are considered as medicinal. Agave, Acacia and Citrus are the genera with the highest number of medicinal species. Other uses includes edible, spiritual rituals, construction and ornamentals. There was a non-significant correlation between the person’s age and number of species, but a significant very low negative correlation between the person’s age and number of uses was found. Conclusions Knowing their medicinal uses is an important issue for the people of Rayones. Boiling and preparing infusions are the main ways of using plants by residents. The leaves, the branches, and the fruits are the most commonly used parts. Almost 18% of the flora is used for wood and construction purposes. Several uses such as cosmetic, shampoo, firming skin tonics and health hair products recorded in Rayones has not been reported for other areas in the state of Nuevo León. In Rayones, women have a greater knowledge about plants and their uses than men, particularly, medicinal plants, but, men have a greater

  20. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    As from January 2016, Dr. Andrew Barry and Dr. Andrea Rinaldo have retired as Editors of Advances in Water Resources. Dr Barry has been a long serving Editor for 14 years, beginning this role on January 1, 2002. During this time he has served the science community with dedication, commitment, and diligence while bringing to the journal a strong vision and a wealth of knowledge that has tremendously improved the visibility and impact of Advances in Water Resources. Throughout this period he has also broadened the scope of the journal by adapting to the new emerging needs of the field through proactively seeking and promoting numerous special issues, which have now become a hallmark of the journal. The importance of obtaining high quality reviews and timeliness in decision-making, have always been a priority under Dr Barry's Editorship. It is clear that Advances in Water Resources and the community which it serves, has benefited enormously under Andrew's tenure and we will miss his energy, enthusiasm and passion for hydrologic science.

  1. Guest Editorial

    PubMed Central

    Gugnani, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the advancements in dentistry, dental caries still remains the most common disease of the oral cavity. A major reason for this scenario is because the dental professionals are still clinging to the outdated surgical model of dental caries. This traditional approach of caries management forces the tooth to enter into the ‘restoration cycle’ which usually involves several lifetime replacement procedures, resulting in increased restoration size, even more invasive procedures and finally a prosthesis. We need to acknowledge that, by simply drilling and filling the carious lesions, this disease cannot be controlled. Like other infectious diseases of the human body, if the etiological factors are not identified and managed appropriately, the disease will continue. PMID:26124589

  2. [The nutritional status of the child entering the Nuevo Hospital Civil de Guadalajara].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Garibay, E M; Sandoval-Galindo, D M; Kumazawa-Ichikawa, M R; Romero-Velarde, E; Nápoles-Rodríguez, F

    1993-06-01

    With the purpose to evaluate the nutritional status of children hospitalized in the Nuevo Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, they were included 278 subjects that entered in the infant, preschool, schoolchildren and infectious disease clinical ward of the Division of Pediatrics. There were chosen two subjects every day during one year. It was obtained information about family and sociodemographic background. In addition, there were undertaken anthropometric measurements; weight/age, weight/height and height/age indices were also calculated. It was obtained the parameters of median, percentiles and Z-score. Undernutrition was determined by the Gómez and Waterlow classifications. Is was also compared the reference pattern of Ramos-Galván and National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Blood was drawn for total protein and hemoglobin. Mean of height/age was 95.74% (NCHS), weight/age 84.04% and weight/height 89.7%. It was not difference on weight/age between Ramos-Galván and NCHS. Weight/height and height/age had little difference. The median system identified more cases with deficit than Z-score, which seems to be more specific and conservative. There is a high prevalence of acute and chronic malnutrition identified with the median system, and maybe reflects the poor quality of life and major morbidity in this population. PMID:8517933

  3. [Diagnosis of health needs of the elderly population of a community of Puerto Nuevo].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Cordero, B M; Figueroa Negrón, C; Pérez Vigo, M C; Anadón Vázquez, D; Oliver Vázquez, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the health needs of the non-institutionalized population, 65 years and over, residing in a sector of the community of Puerto Nuevo. This was the first urbanization established in Puerto Rico in the early 50's. The "snowball" technique was use to identify all the residents 65 year and over of the mentioned sector. Eighty five elderly persons were interviewed to gather data of the following variables: demographics, health conditions, preventive measures, activities of daily living (ADLs, IADLs), health services utilization, psychosocial aspects and use of programs and services available for the elderly population. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures and chi-square. Results revealed a population with a higher education and economic level than the average for this age group in Puerto Rico. People over 75 years over reported more functional limitations than the 65-74 years interviewees did. In comparison with men, women were less educated and presented a higher percent of widows, persons living alone and functional limitations. In almost all the interviewees, help was available in case of need. The majority expressed satisfaction with their family and social lives. Very few utilized programs and services available for elderly persons. It is concluded that in order to improve their quality of life, this population needs to be managed in an holistic mode to address their biopsychosocial needs and to be educated in health promotion issues to prevent further functional limitations. They also need education about the available services for elderly persons. PMID:10909709

  4. Analysis of the dispersion of air pollutants from a factory Asphalt in Nuevo Vallarta, Nay., Mex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Gonzalez, F. M.; Gaitán-Rodríguez, M.; Cornejo-López, V. M.; Morales-Hernández, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    An asphalt factory has operated intermittently near the urban area of Nuevo Vallarta on Banderas Bay, Nayarit, Mex. This factory has emissions that can affect the health of people living in the colonies nearest are Valle Dorado and San Vicente. The dispersion of emissions depends on the wind (sea breeze-land breeze) and the roof of the inversion, these phenomena determined by the density and temperature of the lower layers of the atmosphere. Asphalts are dark colored binder materials, formed by a complex non-volatile hydrocarbon chains and high molecular weight. Asphalts are produced from petroleum, but by a process of evaporation of the volatiles, leaving the asphalt alone. Therefore, the material emitted by the fireplace are mainly low molecular weight hydrocarbons known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Emergency Response Guide 2008 developed by various agencies in Canada, U.S. and Mexico mentions that the hydrocarbon gas can have health effects. Animal studies have shown that PAHs can cause harmful effects to the skin, body fluids and some PAHs are carcinogenic. An analysis of the wind field, monthly and seasonal averages for the years 2010 and 2011, recorded in AWS administered by the CEMCO and other stations located near the study area.

  5. Editorial - A Matter of Quality of Life, of DOBEs and MEEPs, of Appropriate Recognition, of Targeted Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Andre

    2013-01-01

    This editorial presents the book as a continuation of the first volume, both OPSA volumes being themselves in the line, with more emphasis on people, of the earlier prize-winning series "Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (OSA)", the seven volumes of which described how astronomy research lives: how it is planned, funded and organized, how it interacts with other disciplines and the rest of the world, how it communicates, etc. All those books are a unique medium for scientists and non-scientists (sometimes from outside astronomy) to describe their experience, often for the first time at such a level, on non-purely scientific matters, many of them of fundamental importance for the efficient conduct astronomy-related activities. The editorial tackles also issues regarding ethics and management of people, stressing the need for managers with ad hoc training and a long-term vision of the role of astronomers towards the society at large.

  6. Representations of people with HIV and hepatitis C in editorials of medical journals: discourses and interdiscursive relations.

    PubMed

    Körner, Henrike; Treloar, Carla

    2006-01-01

    HIV and hepatitis C are blood-borne viruses that cause chronic diseases and affect (in parts of the developed world) predominantly groups that are marginalized and discriminated against: gay men and injecting drug users, respectively. This paper compares the representation of people with HIV and hepatitis C in editorials of medical journals between 1989 and 2001. Analysis is informed by critical discourse analysis and systemic functional linguistics. Hepatitis C editorials draw almost exclusively on the discourse of biomedicine, and patients are either absent or objects in medical procedures. In HIV editorials, a variety of other discourses are integrated into the discourse of biomedicine, thereby creating multidimensional representations of people with HIV as patients and agents in medical procedures, involved in decision making, affected by economic factors, social and cultural issues. The paper discusses the role of the gay community in discursive change and argues that discursive diversity in the representation of people infected with HIV and hepatitis C in medical journals is necessary for health policy, the professional development of healthcare providers, and media reporting to the general public. PMID:16808422

  7. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2006 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2006 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics The article 'Molecular tagging velocimetry and thermometry and its application to the wake of a heated circular cylinder' by Hui Hu and Manoochehr Koochesfahani, published in volume 17, issue 6, pp 1269-1281, was selected by the cognizant Editorial Board Members as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2006. This consensus selection was accompanied by the collective judgment that a number of other very strong contributions were published in 2006. These other papers have been added to the 2006 Highlights in the electronic version of the journal. The paper by Hu and Koochesfahani is recognized for its contribution to the use of molecular tagging techniques in the service of velocity and temperature measurements. The paper clearly articulates the prior state-of-the-art in this area and it communicates the required equipment and procedures to utilize this experimental tool. The capabilities of their technique are made apparent by the simultaneous (u,v,T) observations in the wake of a circular cylinder. The normalized heat flux vectors, (\\overline{u_j'T'})/U\\Delta T, demonstrate one of the beneficial results of obtaining a whole-field view of the velocity and temperature distributions. The authors also have carefully noted the intrinsic limitations of their technique. 2006 Award Winners—Measurement Science The

  8. Estudio del comportamiento tribologico y de las interacciones de superficie de nuevos nanofluidos ionicos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Rodriguez, Tulia

    tribocorrosion processes. The formation of a coating layer on magnesium alloys from phosphonate imidazolium ionic liquids by immersion and by chronoamperometry has been described. The new coatings reduce the abrasive wear in the magnesium-aluminium alloy but they are not effective in the magnesium-zinc alloy, which prevent the formation of continuous coatings. Los liquidos ionicos son sales liquidas a temperatura ambiente o bajas temperaturas que presentan excelentes propiedades fisico-quimicas. En el presente trabajo se estudian como lubricantes en problemas tribologicos complejos como la lubricacion de metales contra si mismos, el desarrollo de lubricantes base agua y de nuevas superficies autolubricadas. Cuando no es posible reducir la friccion y desgaste mediante lubricacion, como en las aleaciones de magnesio, los liquidos ionicos se han estudiado como precursores de recubrimientos protectores. Se han determinado las interacciones superficiales y los procesos de corrosion sobre cobre y sobre acero con diferentes liquidos ionicos proticos y aproticos para desarrollar nuevos lubricantes y aditivos. En el contacto cobre/cobre, excepto el liquido ionico protico derivado del oleato, todos los liquidos ionicos estudiados presentan mejor comportamiento tribologico que el lubricante comercial Polialfaolefina 6. En el contacto acero/zafiro, los nuevos liquidos ionicos proticos son buenos lubricantes cuando se utilizan en estado puro, y, como aditivos en agua, generan peliculas adsorbidas sobre la superficie del metal reduciendo la friccion y el desgaste tras la evaporacion del agua. Para evitar el periodo de alta friccion inicial en presencia de agua, se han generado peliculas superficiales de liquido ionico sobre el acero en condiciones estaticas. El mejor comportamiento lubricante tanto en el contacto cobre/cobre como en el contacto acero/zafiro se obtiene para el liquido ionico protico derivado del anion adipato, con dos grupos carboxilicos. Las interacciones de los grupos

  9. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  10. EDITORIAL: STAM celebrates its 10th anniversary STAM celebrates its 10th anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, Sukekatsu

    2010-02-01

    I would like to extend my warmest greetings to the readers and staff of Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM), on the occasion of its 10th anniversary. Launched in 2000, STAM marks this year an important milestone in its history. This is a great occasion to celebrate. STAM was founded by Tsuyoshi Masumoto in collaboration with Teruo Kishi and Toyonobu Yoshida as a world-class resource for the materials science community. It was initially supported by several materials research societies and was published as a regular peer-reviewed journal. Significant changes occurred in 2008, when the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) became solely responsible for all the costs of maintaining the journal. STAM was transformed into an open-access journal published by NIMS in partnership with IOP Publishing. As a result, the publication charges were waived and the entire STAM content, including all back issues, became freely accessible through the IOP Publishing website. The transition has made STAM more competitive and successful in global publication communities, with innovative ideas and approaches. The journal has also changed its publication strategy, aiming to publish a limited number of high-quality articles covering the frontiers of materials science. Special emphasis has been placed on reviews and focus issues, providing recent summaries of hot materials science topics. Publication has become electronic only; however, selected issues are printed and freely distributed at major international scientific events. The Editorial Board has been expanded to include leading experts from all over the world and, together with the Editorial Office, the board members are doing their best to transform STAM into a leading materials science journal. These efforts are paying off, as shown by the rapidly increasing number of article downloads and citations in 2009. I believe that the STAM audience can not only deepen their knowledge in their own specialties but

  11. Editorial political cartoons in Australia: social representations & and the visual depiction of essentialism.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Gail; Holtz, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Six million migrants from over 170 countries have resettled in Australia since 1945 ensuring religious diversity is now a hallmark of Australia's population. However, not all religious groups are perceived in the same way. In this paper, we explore how representational processes differentially essentialise religious groups, in particular how some groups are ascribed an underlying nature that irrevocably defines who they are and how they will behave, whilst other groups are conveyed merely as coherent entities with similarity in goals and structure. We elucidate this through an analysis of the depiction of religious markers in Australian Editorial political cartoons. We mirror the near-exclusive focus on the Muslim and Christian religions, in the religious cartoons we sampled, to present an analysis of 6 exemplar cartoons. Drawing from visual analysis techniques (van Leeuwen 2001) and social representations theory (Moscovici 1984) we highlight how essentialist perceptions of religious groups are unwittingly fostered in everyday media communications. We discuss the implications of our analysis for the transnationalisation of religion. PMID:23640070

  12. Mathematical Psychology: Prospects For The 21st Century1: A Guest Editorial

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The twenty-first century is certainly in progress by now, but hardly well underway. Therefore, I will take that modest elasticity in concept as a frame for this essay. This frame will serve as background for some of my hopes and gripes about contemporary psychology and mathematical psychology’s place therein. It will also act as platform for earnest, if wistful thoughts about what might have (and perhaps can still) aid us in forwarding our agenda and what I see as some of the promising avenues for the future. I loosely structure the essay into a section about mathematical psychology in the context of psychology at large and then a section devoted to prospects within mathematical psychology proper. The essay can perhaps be considered as in a similar spirit, although differing in content, to previous editorial-like reviews of general or specific aspects of mathematical psychology such as Estes (1975), Falmagne (2005), Luce (1997) that have appeared in this journal. PMID:19802342

  13. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  14. Editorial Perspective: Pathological social withdrawal during in adolescence: a culture-specific or a global phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Li, Tim M H; Wong, Paul W C

    2015-10-01

    Impairing patterns of long-term adolescent social withdrawal and self-exclusion, including nonattendance at school or work, and minimal social contact, have been identified as a significant clinical and social problem in Japan since the late 1990s, where it is termed hikikomori. As well clinical impairment for the withdrawn youths and burden for the families, hikikomori has brought societal and health service costs in Japan. Since its first identification, similar cases have been reported in other countries. Socially withdrawn youths, unfortunately, are difficult to identify and their risks can be 'invisible' because of their withdrawn nature and the traditional perspective of what is perceived as at-risk youth. Understanding of the issue including its causes, risks, and outcomes is very limited. In this editorial perspective, we highlight how youth social withdrawal is becoming a clinical and social concern in some parts of the world and respond to the lack of research on this issue by synthesizing some of the basic research findings, and suggesting future directions for research and practice relating to this emerging youth phenomenon in middle-and-high-income countries in the hope of bringing more attention to this issue. PMID:26076984

  15. Peer review versus editorial review and their role in innovative science.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Georg; Adlassnig, Wolfram; Risch, Jesaka Ahau; Anderlini, Serena; Arguriou, Petros; Armendariz, Aaron Zolen; Bains, William; Baker, Clark; Barnes, Martin; Barnett, Jonathan; Baumgartner, Michael; Baumgartner, Thomas; Bendall, Charles A; Bender, Yvonne S; Bichler, Max; Biermann, Teresa; Bini, Ronaldo; Blanco, Eduardo; Bleau, John; Brink, Anthony; Brown, Darin; Burghuber, Christopher; Calne, Roy; Carter, Brian; Castaño, Cesar; Celec, Peter; Celis, Maria Eugenia; Clarke, Nicky; Cockrell, David; Collins, David; Coogan, Brian; Craig, Jennifer; Crilly, Cal; Crowe, David; Csoka, Antonei B; Darwich, Chaza; Del Kebos, Topiciprin; Derinaldi, Michele; Dlamini, Bongani; Drewa, Tomasz; Dwyer, Michael; Eder, Fabienne; de Palma, Raúl Ehrichs; Esmay, Dean; Rött, Catherine Evans; Exley, Christopher; Falkov, Robin; Farber, Celia Ingrid; Fearn, William; Felsmann, Sophie; Flensmark, Jarl; Fletcher, Andrew K; Foster, Michaela; Fountoulakis, Kostas N; Fouratt, Jim; Blanca, Jesus Garcia; Sotelo, Manuel Garrido; Gittler, Florian; Gittler, Georg; Gomez, Juan; Gomez, Juan F; Polar, Maria Grazia Gonzales; Gonzalez, Jossina; Gösselsberger, Christoph; Habermacher, Lynn; Hajek, Michael; Hakala, Faith; Haliburton, Mary-Sue; Hankins, John Robert; Hart, Jason; Hasslberger, Sepp; Hennessey, Donalyn; Herrmann, Andrea; Hersee, Mike; Howard, Connie; Humphries, Suzanne; Isharc, Laeeth; Ivanovski, Petar; Jenuth, Stephen; Jerndal, Jens; Johnson, Christine; Keleta, Yonas; Kenny, Anna; Kidd, Billie; Kohle, Fritz; Kolahi, Jafar; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Kostova, Lyubov; Kumar, Arunachalam; Kurosawa, Alejandro; Lance, Tony; Lechermann, Michael; Lendl, Bernhard; Leuchters, Michael; Lewis, Evan; Lieb, Edward; Lloyd, Gloria; Losek, Angelika; Lu, Yao; Maestracci, Saadia; Mangan, Dennis; Mares, Alberto W; Barnett, Juan Mazar; McClain, Valerie; McNair, John Sydney; Michael, Terry; Miller, Lloyd; Monzani, Partizia; Moran, Belen; Morris, Mike; Mößmer, Georg; Mountain, Johny; Phuthe, Onnie Mary Moyo; Muñoz, Marcos; Nakken, Sheri; Wambui, Anne Nduta; Neunteufl, Bettina; Nikolić, Dimitrije; Oberoi, Devesh V; Obmode, Gregory; Ogar, Laura; Ohara, Jo; Rybine, Naion Olej; Owen, Bryan; Owen, Kim Wilson; Parikh, Rakesh; Pearce, Nicholas J G; Pemmer, Bernhard; Piper, Chris; Prince, Ian; Reid, Terence; Rindermann, Heiner; Risch, Stefan; Robbins, Josh; Roberts, Seth; Romero, Ajeandro; Rothe, Michael Thaddäus; Ruiz, Sergio; Sacher, Juliane; Sackl, Wolfgang; Salletmaier, Markus; Sanand, Jairaj; Sauerzopf, Clemens; Schwarzgruber, Thomas; Scott, David; Seegers, Laura; Seppi, David; Shields, Kyle; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Singh, Beldeu; Sithole, Sibusio; Six, Florian; Skoyles, John R; Slofstra, Jildou; Sole, Daphne Anne; Sommer, Werner F; Sonko, Mels; Starr-Casanova, Chrislie J; Steakley, Marjorie Elizabeth; Steinhauser, Wolfgang; Steinhoff, Konstantin; Sterba, Johannes H; Steppan, Martin; Stindl, Reinhard; Stokely, Joe; Stokely, Karri; St-Pierre, Gilles; Stratford, James; Streli, Christina; Stryg, Carl; Sullivan, Mike; Summhammer, Johann; Tadesse, Amhayes; Tavares, David; Thompson, Laura; Tomlinson, Alison; Tozer, Jack; Trevisanato, Siro I; Trimmel, Michaela; Turner, Nicole; Vahur, Paul; van der Byl, Jennie; van der Maas, Tine; Varela, Leo; Vega, Carlos A; Vermaak, Shiloh; Villasenor, Alex; Vogel, Matt; von Wintzigerode, Georg; Wagner, Christoph; Weinberger, Manuel; Weinberger, Peter; Wilson, Nick; Wolfe, Jennifer Finocchio; Woodley, Michael A; Young, Ian; Zuraw, Glenn; Zwiren, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    Peer review is a widely accepted instrument for raising the quality of science. Peer review limits the enormous unstructured influx of information and the sheer amount of dubious data, which in its absence would plunge science into chaos. In particular, peer review offers the benefit of eliminating papers that suffer from poor craftsmanship or methodological shortcomings, especially in the experimental sciences. However, we believe that peer review is not always appropriate for the evaluation of controversial hypothetical science. We argue that the process of peer review can be prone to bias towards ideas that affirm the prior convictions of reviewers and against innovation and radical new ideas. Innovative hypotheses are thus highly vulnerable to being "filtered out" or made to accord with conventional wisdom by the peer review process. Consequently, having introduced peer review, the Elsevier journal Medical Hypotheses may be unable to continue its tradition as a radical journal allowing discussion of improbable or unconventional ideas. Hence we conclude by asking the publisher to consider re-introducing the system of editorial review to Medical Hypotheses. PMID:23054375

  16. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the 2013 volume Welcome to the 2013 volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2013-01-01

    Welcome to 2013; another great year for technology in our journal, Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Last year, SMS grew by some 11% while maintaining a high Impact Factor above 2 and a rejection rate of 60%. The Editorial Board and I are pleased with this outcome, as it's indicative of the relevance and vibrancy of SMS to our research community. SMS continues to have a leading role within our community of researchers in the field of smart materials and smart systems technology. As always the quality of SMS is something that the Editorial Board takes very seriously. I have instructed the Editorial Board and our reviewers to scrutinize manuscripts, not only for originality and contributions to the field of smart materials and structures, but to consider the potential impact on the technology. In addition, we are doing more to architect the content of our issues, creating a conduit for exciting developments, developing review topics, and publishing focus issues that cover current technological trends. We would like to promote SMS as a medium to accelerate the promotion of the latest technology. Toward this end, SMS has instituted the Fast Track Communication (FTC). FTCs are short, urgent announcements reporting new and timely developments in the field. They benefit from extra post-publication promotion and accelerated peer review. SMS also has a strong program of topical review articles. Many of us are professors, involved with the training of new researchers to our field, and the value of review articles to education and training cannot be overstated. Such articles allow a reader to 'get up to speed' quickly in a new area, whether they be new graduate students or seasoned technologists deciphering what smart materials has to offer a particular application. Review topics are considered by me and the Editorial Board for content. If approved, SMS will commission a writer to prepare the article for which they will receive a fee in appreciation for the service they

  17. The relationship between manuscript title structure and success: editorial decisions and citation performance for an ecological journal.

    PubMed

    Fox, Charles W; Burns, C Sean

    2015-05-01

    A poorly chosen article title may make a paper difficult to discover or discourage readership when discovered, reducing an article's impact. Yet, it is unclear how the structure of a manuscript's title influences readership and impact. We used manuscript tracking data for all manuscripts submitted to the journal Functional Ecology from 2004 to 2013 and citation data for papers published in this journal from 1987 to 2011 to examine how title features changed and whether a manuscript's title structure was predictive of success during the manuscript review process and/or impact (citation) after publication. Titles of manuscripts submitted to Functional Ecology became marginally longer (after controlling for other variables), broader in focus (less frequent inclusion of genus and species names), and included more humor and subtitles over the period of the study. Papers with subtitles were less likely to be rejected by editors both pre- and post-peer review, although both effects were small and the presence of subtitles in published papers was not predictive of citations. Papers with specific names of study organisms in their titles fared poorly during editorial (but not peer) review and, if published, were less well cited than papers whose titles did not include specific names. Papers with intermediate length titles were more successful during editorial review, although the effect was small and title word count was not predictive of citations. No features of titles were predictive of reviewer willingness to review papers or the length of time a paper was in peer review. We conclude that titles have changed in structure over time, but features of title structure have only small or no relationship with success during editorial review and post-publication impact. The title feature that was most predictive of manuscript success: papers whose titles emphasize broader conceptual or comparative issues fare better both pre- and post-publication than do papers with organism

  18. The relationship between manuscript title structure and success: editorial decisions and citation performance for an ecological journal

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Charles W; Burns, C Sean

    2015-01-01

    A poorly chosen article title may make a paper difficult to discover or discourage readership when discovered, reducing an article's impact. Yet, it is unclear how the structure of a manuscript's title influences readership and impact. We used manuscript tracking data for all manuscripts submitted to the journal Functional Ecology from 2004 to 2013 and citation data for papers published in this journal from 1987 to 2011 to examine how title features changed and whether a manuscript's title structure was predictive of success during the manuscript review process and/or impact (citation) after publication. Titles of manuscripts submitted to Functional Ecology became marginally longer (after controlling for other variables), broader in focus (less frequent inclusion of genus and species names), and included more humor and subtitles over the period of the study. Papers with subtitles were less likely to be rejected by editors both pre- and post-peer review, although both effects were small and the presence of subtitles in published papers was not predictive of citations. Papers with specific names of study organisms in their titles fared poorly during editorial (but not peer) review and, if published, were less well cited than papers whose titles did not include specific names. Papers with intermediate length titles were more successful during editorial review, although the effect was small and title word count was not predictive of citations. No features of titles were predictive of reviewer willingness to review papers or the length of time a paper was in peer review. We conclude that titles have changed in structure over time, but features of title structure have only small or no relationship with success during editorial review and post-publication impact. The title feature that was most predictive of manuscript success: papers whose titles emphasize broader conceptual or comparative issues fare better both pre- and post-publication than do papers with organism

  19. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2007 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2007 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics An adaptive sampling and windowing interrogation method in PIV R Theunissen, F Scarano and M L Riethmuller von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Sint-Genesius Rode, Belgium and Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, PO Box 5058, 2600 GB Delft, The Netherlands The co-authored paper [1] has been selected as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2007. This paper provides a strategy whereby the placement and the size of the interrogation regions are adapted to the image signal strength (seeding density) and the spatial variations of the velocity magnitudes. Two, quite distinct, test cases demonstrate the efficacy of their method: a shockwave- boundary layer interaction and an aircraft vortex wake. The Selection Committee—Drs T Fansler, J Foss, I Marusic, S Morris, K Okamoto and M Wernet—selected this paper from a strongly competitive shortlist of four candidates. Their selection process was influenced by the perceived utility of the contribution to the numerous investigators who utilize PIV methods. 2007 Award Winners—Measurement Science Broadband single cell impedance spectroscopy using maximum length sequences: theoretical analysis and practical considerations Tao Sun, Shady Gawad, Catia Bernabini, Nicolas G Green and Hywel Morgan

  20. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    A brief overview of the ongoing climatic and environmental changes in Northern Eurasia serves as an editorial introduction to this, the second, special Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Climatic changes in Northern Eurasia over the last hundred years are reflected in numerous atmospheric and terrestrial variables. Many of these are noticeably significant above the confidence level for 'weather' or other (fire regime, ecosystem change) noise and thus should be further investigated in order to adapt to their impacts. In this focus issue, we introduce assorted studies of different aspects of contemporary change in Northern Eurasia. Most of these have been presented at one of the NEESPI workshops (for more information see neespi.org) and/or American Geophysical Union and European Geosciences Union NEESPI open sessions during the past year. These studies are diverse, representing the diversity of climates and ecosystems across Northern Eurasia. Some of these are focused on smaller spatial scales and/or address only specific aspects of the global change implications across the subcontinent. But the feeling (and observational evidence) that these changes have already been quite rapid and can have global implications inspires us to bring this suite of papers to the readers' attention. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climatic and Environmental Change in Northern Eurasia Contents Preface Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative Pavel Groisman and Amber J Soja Editorial Siberia integrated regional study: Multidisciplinary investigations of interrelation between Siberia environment dynamics and global climate change E P Gordov and E A Vaganov Studies of the energy and water cycles in Northern Eurasia Comparison and evaluation of gridded radiation products across northern Eurasia T J Troy and E F Wood Reanalysis data underestimate significant changes in growing

  1. IJBNPA in 2016: Strategy for advancing the science of behavior change in nutrition and physical activity, and associated editorial priorities.

    PubMed

    Jago, Russell; Wood, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (IJBNPA) is to be the leading diet and physical activity journal. To achieve this aim we embrace and publish a number of different research designs from small, but in depth, qualitative studies to large scale cohort studies. IJBNPA prioritises research based on randomised controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews (with or without meta-analyses, as appropriate), and well conducted observational studies that expand knowledge and understanding of the area. IJBNPA will also consider and publish other study designs that are of sufficient quality such as strong or ground-breaking methodological papers, rigorous qualitative studies, debate papers and commentaries. However, due to the demands on the journal, we publish pilot studies only in exceptional circumstances and we do not publish protocol papers or letters to the editors. The goal of this editorial is to highlight to our readers and authors the process by which we identify which papers to review and publish along with our editorial priorities. PMID:27396235

  2. Weighing women down: messages on weight loss and body shaping in editorial content in popular women's health and fitness magazines.

    PubMed

    Willis, Laura E; Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to idealized body images has been shown to lower women's body satisfaction. Yet some studies found the opposite, possibly because real-life media (as opposed to image-only stimuli) often embed such imagery in messages that suggest thinness is attainable. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the current content analysis investigated editorial body-shaping and weight-loss messages in popular women's health and fitness magazines. About five thousand magazine pages published in top-selling U.S. women's health and fitness magazines in 2010 were examined. The findings suggest that body shaping and weight loss are a major topic in these magazines, contributing to roughly one-fifth of all editorial content. Assessing standards of motivation and conduct, as well as behaviors promoted by the messages, the findings reflect overemphasis on appearance over health and on exercise-related behaviors over caloric reduction behaviors and the combination of both behaviors. These accentuations are at odds with public health recommendations. PMID:23844558

  3. You've Come a Long Way, Baby--Or Have You? Women's Magazines, Cigarette Advertisements, Health Articles and Editorial Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesterman, Vicki

    A study examined how three major women's magazines handled cigarette advertisements and editorial copy about smoking-related health problems. Examined were issues of "Ms.,""Good Housekeeping," and "Seventeen" magazines from 1972, one year after the ban on television advertisements and the year "Ms." began publication, through 1979, when cigarette…

  4. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2005 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, in 2005 the Editorial Board decided to present 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2005 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics The Fluid Mechanics working group, chaired by Professor John Foss, was unanimous in its recommendation for the paper authored by J Chen and J Katz (Johns Hopkins University, USA) 'Elimination of peak-locking error in PIV analysis using the correlation mapping method', published in volume 16, issue 8, pp 1605 1618. The essence of the following citation was provided by Board Member Dr Mark Wernet: The paper of Chen and Katz describes a technique for eliminating the 'peak locking' bias error endemic to estimating the PIV correlation peak location. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used widely in both fundamental and applied fluid mechanics. In essence, a two-dimensional velocity map is extracted from two successive high-resolution images of light scattered by minute tracer particles. The incident light is derived from two laser beams which have been expanded into sheets. A precise time delay is imposed between the two laser light sheets. The cross-correlation of the scattered light intensity within corresponding small interrogation regions in the two images gives the displacement of the particles and hence the local velocity. Typically, in PIV processing, the correlation peak location is determined by fitting a curve through the correlation peak. This process is known to suffer from a bias error where the estimated

  5. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    A brief overview of the ongoing climatic and environmental changes in Northern Eurasia serves as an editorial introduction to this, the second, special Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Climatic changes in Northern Eurasia over the last hundred years are reflected in numerous atmospheric and terrestrial variables. Many of these are noticeably significant above the confidence level for 'weather' or other (fire regime, ecosystem change) noise and thus should be further investigated in order to adapt to their impacts. In this focus issue, we introduce assorted studies of different aspects of contemporary change in Northern Eurasia. Most of these have been presented at one of the NEESPI workshops (for more information see neespi.org) and/or American Geophysical Union and European Geosciences Union NEESPI open sessions during the past year. These studies are diverse, representing the diversity of climates and ecosystems across Northern Eurasia. Some of these are focused on smaller spatial scales and/or address only specific aspects of the global change implications across the subcontinent. But the feeling (and observational evidence) that these changes have already been quite rapid and can have global implications inspires us to bring this suite of papers to the readers' attention. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climatic and Environmental Change in Northern Eurasia Contents Preface Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative Pavel Groisman and Amber J Soja Editorial Siberia integrated regional study: Multidisciplinary investigations of interrelation between Siberia environment dynamics and global climate change E P Gordov and E A Vaganov Studies of the energy and water cycles in Northern Eurasia Comparison and evaluation of gridded radiation products across northern Eurasia T J Troy and E F Wood Reanalysis data underestimate significant changes in growing

  6. Medicinal plants in the southern region of the State of Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the flora of the State of Nuevo León is well known, there are few records of ethnobotancial information. An ethnobotanical study was undertaken in order to know the medicinal plants used by people living at the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas in the southern Nuevo León. Collection of plants specimens and interviews were carried out among the people of the municipalities of Aramberri, Galeana, and Zaragoza. Since former studies in the region are scarce, the aim of this work was to record the medicinal species and their uses in the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas, of southern Nuevo León, Mexico, and also to know if there are differences in the number of species and number of uses knowledge by people. Methods Field work was carried out over a 2 years period; useful plants were collected and a total of 105 people from 46 different villages were interviewed. A database was compiled using data collected by means of semi structured interviews. The data were analyzed by means of non-parametric statistics, using goodness-of-fit test (Chi-squared) (number of species known by people of each municipality, number of uses known by people of each municipality), Chi-squared modified to incorporate the Yates Correction (number of species known by people living at scrublands and oak-pine forest); the Kruskall-Wallis test (number of species known by women and men of the three municipalities), and the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (age and number of species known, and age and number of uses). Results A total of 163 medicinal plant species were recorded in the study area, comprising 108 wild and 55 cultivated plants. A total of 117 species were recorded in the oak-pine forest, and 111 in the scrublands area, a total of 68 were recorded in both areas; 68 medicinal species are used in all three municipalities, 40 wild and 28 cultivated. We documented 235 different medicinal uses. The most common plant parts used for medicinal purposes were

  7. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2007 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2007 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics An adaptive sampling and windowing interrogation method in PIV R Theunissen, F Scarano and M L Riethmuller von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Sint-Genesius Rode, Belgium and Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, PO Box 5058, 2600 GB Delft, The Netherlands The co-authored paper [1] has been selected as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2007. This paper provides a strategy whereby the placement and the size of the interrogation regions are adapted to the image signal strength (seeding density) and the spatial variations of the velocity magnitudes. Two, quite distinct, test cases demonstrate the efficacy of their method: a shockwave- boundary layer interaction and an aircraft vortex wake. The Selection Committee—Drs T Fansler, J Foss, I Marusic, S Morris, K Okamoto and M Wernet—selected this paper from a strongly competitive shortlist of four candidates. Their selection process was influenced by the perceived utility of the contribution to the numerous investigators who utilize PIV methods. 2007 Award Winners—Measurement Science Broadband single cell impedance spectroscopy using maximum length sequences: theoretical analysis and practical considerations Tao Sun, Shady Gawad, Catia Bernabini, Nicolas G Green and Hywel Morgan

  8. EDITORIAL: Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    2009 is Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication. In this quarter-century, the journal has established itself as the premier publication venue for inverse problems research. It has matured from its beginnings as a niche journal serving the emerging field of inverse and ill-posed problems to a monthly publication in 2009 covering all aspects of a well-established, vibrant and still-expanding subject. Along with its core readership of pure and applied mathematicians and physicists, Inverse Problems has become widely known across a broad range of researchers in areas such as geophysics, optics, radar, acoustics, communication theory, signal processing and medical imaging, amongst others. The journal's appeal to the inverse problems community and those researchers from the varied fields that encounter such problems can be attributed to our commitment to publishing only the very best papers, and to offering unique services to the community. Besides our regular research papers, which average a remarkably short five months from submission to electronic publication, we regularly publish heavily cited topical review papers and topic-specific special sections, which first appeared in 2004. These highly-downloaded invited articles focus on the latest developments and hot topics in all areas of inverse problems. No other journal in the field offers these features. I am very pleased to take Inverse Problems into its 25th year as Editor-in-Chief. The journal has an impressive tradition of scholarship, established at its inception by the founder and first Editor-in-Chief, Professor Pierre Sabatier. Professor Sabatier envisioned the journal in 1985 as providing a medium for publication of exemplary research in our intrinsically interdisciplinary field. I am glad to say that the support of our authors, readers, referees, Editors-in-Chief, Editorial Boards and Advisory Panels over the years, has resulted in Inverse Problems becoming the top publication in this field, publishing

  9. EDITORIAL: New criteria for Letters in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneham, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    Today, the median time from receipt to publication for regular articles in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is about four months. Letters can be reviewed, possibly revised, and on the Web in little more than a week in favourable circumstances, and the median time is six weeks. When the Journal of Physics series was started, over thirty years ago, Letters took typically three months from receipt to print, and articles took substantially longer. Now that publication times for regular papers are of a similar order to those of Letters in the past, it makes sense to review the types of submission we accept as Letters and put a higher premium on urgency. In the past, Letters have been of several different types. There have been Letters giving a first announcement of some important new result, and these have a justifiable urgency and need for priority. In addition, there have been what one might call short papers, self-contained pieces of work, but with no requirement for rapid publication. The Editorial Board of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has decided that in future all Letters published will have to satisfy criteria of significant importance and urgency. To achieve this, all manuscripts submitted as Letters will be processed as follows. First, the Letter will be looked at by a Board Member, who will decide whether or not the proposed Letter has the right level of importance, urgency, and interest to appear as a Letter. The Board Member will not usually act as referee, unless the Letter is in a field in which they normally referee. If their decision is yes, then the manuscript will go to a regular referee. Special efforts will be made to ensure rapid treatment, both by the referee and in processing at Bristol. The ideal Letter would address a significant topic in condensed matter physics. It would be recognized as important by a large number of condensed matter physicists, including those whose research area is a different one. So it is crucial that the

  10. Editorial: subjective perceptions of memory functioning in old age - nature, correlates, and developmental trajectories.

    PubMed

    Hülür, Gizem; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints are often used as diagnostic criteria for several neurocognitive disorders. Although a number of studies have examined subjective memory and its associations with memory functioning in adulthood and old age, it is still an open question whether subjective perceptions of one's memory indicate actual memory functioning or whether they are rather derived from factors other than memory, such as depressive symptoms. The studies in this special section examine subjective perceptions of memory functioning and their associations with objectively measured memory performance in general and in clinical populations. The four articles adopt cross-sectional and longitudinal methodologies and offer key insights into the nature, correlates, and developmental trajectories of subjective memory. To begin with, the studies compiled in this special section demonstrate that changes in subjective memory perceptions are indeed associated with changes in memory performance [Zimprich and Kurtz, this issue, pp. 223-231], but the size of associations between levels of and changes in subjective memory and memory performance is in part modulated by personality characteristics and depressive symptoms [Hülür et al., this issue, pp. 232-240]. Second, the studies compiled here show that factors other than memory are also closely associated with memory perceptions, including functional health as well as domain-general and health-specific control beliefs [Luszcz et al., this issue, pp. 241-250]. Third, the study by Thompson et al. [this issue, pp. 251-257] shows that self- and informant-reports of retrospective and prospective memory difficulties are not associated with performance-based measures and does not sufficiently differentiate between healthy controls and patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or dementia. In our editorial, we put these findings in perspective and discuss implications for research and practice. To extend our knowledge, we conclude by

  11. Persistent Organic Pollutants and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Soil from the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Carrizalez-Yáñez, Leticia; Varela-Silva, José Antonio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia Guadalupe; Torres-Dosal, Arturo; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, and lead) in outdoor surface soils (50 samples) collected from the metropolitan area of Monterrey in Mexico. Total PBDEs levels ranged from 1.80 to 127 µg/kg, with mean total PBDEs level of 14.2 ± 21.5 µg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the mean total level in the studied soils was 23.5 ± 20.2 µg/kg (range 4.0-65.5 µg/kg). An important finding in our study was that all soil samples (100%) had detectable levels of the metabolite p,p'-DDE. Moreover, the mean total DDT level (∑p'p-DDT and p'p-DDE) was approximately 132 ± 175 µg/kg. The mean levels for arsenic, cadmium, and lead in soil were 5.30 ± 1.35 (range 1.55-7.85) mg/kg, 2.20 ± 1.20 (range 0.65-6.40) mg/kg, and 455 ± 204 (range 224-1230) mg/kg, respectively. Our study has several limitations, the most notable of which is the small sample of soils evaluated. However, this screening study provided concentration data for the occurrence of POPs and four heavy metals in soil from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and taking into consideration that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon is deemed necessary. PMID:26577448

  12. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As a journal that reports advances in atomic, molecular and optical science (AMO), Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) provides the AMO research community with three unique fora: topical reviews, tutorials and special issues. Developed under the leadership of editor Jan Michael Rost and his Editorial Board, these sections have cemented J. Phys. B's reputation as a major journal showcasing the AMO community's advances. For me, an AMO scientist, it is therefore a special pleasure to be entrusted with continuing the tradition of excellence established by Jan Michael and the Editorial Board. I intend to build on this foundation by ensuring that the journal makes full use of these tools. Topical reviews: a unique focus When J. Phys. B becomes the first journal you turn to for initial reviews about important emerging areas in your field, we as an Editorial Board will have succeeded. To us, a topical review is different from a traditional review—a topical review focuses on emerging sub-fields of AMO physics. Its function is to alert and educate our readers about emerging opportunities. Topical reviews can also serve a closely related function for readers: keeping us up-to-date with critical technologies that lie slightly outside our own fields, such as advances in free-electron lasers science, (which will surely affect our field). Our overall goal is to make your research more productive because of the topical reviews you read within the journal. Tutorials J. Phys. B tutorials are aimed at graduate students or researchers venturing into a new field. Just as in my own research group I encourage all graduate students to write their theses in a way that will be useful to both future graduate students and the larger community beyond my group, J. Phys. B has designed tutorials to fill this function on the journal scale. Thus, tutorial authors are able to write in greater depth than can be included in a paper in nature, science or in the

  13. EDITORIAL: (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanni, Alberta

    2011-06-01

    The latest impressive advancements in the epitaxial fabrication of semiconductors and in the refinement of characterization techniques have the potential to allow insight into the deep relation between materials' structural properties and their physical and chemical functionalities. Furthermore, while the comprehensive (nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures is becoming more and more necessary, a compendium of the currently available techniques is lacking. We are positive that an overview of the hurdles related to the specific methods, often leading to deceptive interpretations, will be most informative for the broad community working on semiconductors, and will help in shining some light onto a plethora of controversial reports found in the literature. From this perspective, with this special issue we address and highlight the challenges and misinterpretations related to complementary local (nanoscale) and more global experimental methods for the characterization of semiconductors. The six topical reviews and the three invited papers by leading experts in the specific fields collected in here are intended to provide the required broad overview on the possibilities of actual (nano)characterization methods, from the microscopy of single quantum structures, over the synchrotron-based absorption and diffraction of nano-objects, to the contentious detection of tiny magnetic signals by quantum interference and resonance techniques. We are grateful to all the authors for their valuable contributions. Moreover, I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for supporting the realization of this special issue and for inviting me to serve as Guest Editor. We greatly appreciate the work of the reviewers, of the editorial staff of Semiconductor Science and Technology and of IOP Publishing. In particular, the efforts of Alice Malhador in coordinating this special issue are acknowledged.

  14. EDITORIAL: The 28th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simek, Milan; Sunka, Pavel

    2008-05-01

    -equilibrium Plasmas and Micro-plasmas at High Pressures', reflecting new trends in the field. Important parts of the conference were two workshops focused on specific themes. The workshop 'Pulsed electrical discharges in water: fundamentals and applications', organized by Professor Pavel Sunka, reviewed the scientific challenges related to fundamentals of pulsed discharges initiated in slightly conductive liquid water solutions. The workshop 'Physics and applications of pulsed high-current capillary discharges', organized by Dr Karel Kolácek, addressed scientific challenges and technological applications of high-current capillary discharges pinching into a nearly uni-dimensional dense plasma column composed of a quasi-neutral mixture of very hot electrons and multiply charged ions. All ICPIG speakers were invited to prepare peer-reviewed articles based on their conference lectures for the journal Plasma Sources Sciences and Technology (PSST) in the form of either reviews or original works. A selection of invited papers is published in this special issue. We would like to thank all authors for their effort in preparing interesting articles for the readers of PSST. We would like to thank once more all members of the International Scientific Committee chaired by Professor Jerzy Mizeraczyk as well as the members of the Local Organizing Committee and the National Advisory Board for their considerable contributions to the success of the conference. We are particularly grateful to the Editorial Board of Plasma Sources Science and Technology for the opportunity to bring the 28th ICPIG to a wider audience.

  15. EDITORIAL: Are higher quality papers cited more often? Are higher quality papers cited more often?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael S.; Harris, Simon

    2009-09-01

    retrospectively by dividing the papers published in each year into five citation quintiles. A paper of the highest quality (Q1) was about ten times more likely to be found in the most-cited quintile than in the least-cited. While it is reassuring to find that the best papers in PMB are, indeed, cited more often on average, we cannot discount the hypothesis that both measures might be influenced by an extrinsic factor, such as the reputation of the authors. We suggest that a study similar to ours be performed for a journal that utilizes a system of double-blind peer review. Michael S Patterson Editorial Board Member Simon Harris Publisher References West R and McIlwaine A 2002 What do citation counts count for in the field of addiction? An empirical evaluation of citation counts and their link with peer ratings of quality Addiction 97 501-4 Patterson M S and Harris S 2009 The relationship between reviewers' quality-scores and number of citations for papers published in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology from 2003-2005 Scientometrics 80 343-9

  16. EDITORIAL: The Earth radiation balance as driver of the global hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Liepert, Beate

    2010-06-01

    absorbed solar and net thermal radiative exchanges at the Earth's surface. Globally averaged, this surface radiation balance is positive, since radiative absorption, scattering and emission in the climate system act to generate an energy surplus at the surface and an energy deficit in the atmosphere (Liepert 2010). Evaporation, or more precisely its energy equivalent, the latent heat flux, is the main process that compensates for this imbalance between surface and atmosphere, since the latent heat dominates the convective energy flux over sensible heating. The radiative energy surplus at the surface is thus mainly consumed by evaporation and moist convection and subsequently released in the atmosphere through condensation. This implies that any alterations in the available radiative energy will induce changes in the water fluxes. Our focus in this editorial is therefore on the surface radiation balance as the principal driver of the global hydrological cycle. Note that this energetic view is in agreement with that of Richter and Xie (2008) who argue that the spatial and temporal behaviour of the process of evaporation is controlled by surface and atmospheric properties such as atmospheric stability, wind speed, moisture deficit and moisture availability. From radiation theory it is expected that with increasing radiative absorption due to abundance of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and consequent warming, the emission of thermal energy from the atmosphere towards the surface is increasing (known as downward thermal radiation). This enhances the radiative energy surplus at the surface, and, where surface water is not limited, fuels evaporation besides warming the Earth's surface. The enhanced greenhouse effect therefore tends to accelerate the hydrological cycle, as also shown in many climate model simulations with increasing levels of greenhouse gases (e.g., IPCC 2007, but also see Yang et al 2003, Andrews et al 2009). We can assume that the increase in

  17. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  18. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Nature Mat. 8 229 [9] Tsuruoka T, Terabe K, Hasegawa T, and Aono M 2010 Nanotechnology 21 425205 [10] Waser R and Aono M 2007 Nature Mat. 6 833 [11] Sawa A 2008 Materials Today 11 28 [12] Strukov D B, Snider G S, Stewart D R and Williams R S 2008 Nature 453 80 Changes were made to this Editorial on 16 May 2011. An author was added to the Editorial.

  19. Bioaccumulation of lead, copper, iron, and zinc by fish in a transect of the Santa Catarina River in Cadereyta Jimenez, Nuevo Leon, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Changes have been observed in the ichthyic species community, upriver in the San Juan River in Nuevo Leon, Mexico. A disappearance of Notropis amabilis, Notropis stramineus, Dionda episcopa and Campostoma anomalum and an increased mortality of Astyanax mexicanus, Lepomis macrochirus and Cichlasoma cyanoguttatum have been found. These changes were probably due to industrial and domestic discharges which produced high levels of lead, copper, iron and detergents in the water. The investigation reported here was done in order to detect the possible presence of lead, copper, iron and zinc in the river waters and also, to determine a probable bioaccumulation of these metals in fish species of the Santa Catarina River in the state of Nuevo Leon in northeastern Mexico, since this river transports domestic and industrial wastes of urban and suburban zones.

  20. Parasitological examination for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.) in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) at Año Nuevo State Reserve, California (2012).

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Kuzmina, T A; Spraker, T R; Jaggi, N; Costa, D P; Crocker, D E; Tolliver, S C; Tift, M S

    2012-10-01

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris Gill, 1866), inhabiting rookeries on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve in central California, were investigated in 2012 for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.). Material collected and examined for hookworms included: blubber (n = 15), stomach and intestines (n = 21) from dead pups; feces from the rectum of weaned pups (n = 23); sand containing apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 28) and sand without apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 54); milk from females (n =23) at 5 days and about 23 to 26 days postpartum; and placenta from one female. Evidence of hookworm presence was not detected in any of the samples examined. Possible reasons why hookworms were not found in northern elephant seals on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve are discussed. PMID:22543700

  1. Swath Bathymetry Surveys of the Monterey Bay Area from Point Ano Nuevo to Moss Landing, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes swath bathymetry and backscatter data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the continental shelf within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary between Point A?o Nuevo and Moss Landing, in San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, Calif. The survey was done for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), in field activities S-7-09-MB and S-10-09-MB, by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data were aquired in two seperate surveys: (1) between August 13, 2009 and September 3, 2009, personnel from WCMG completed field activity S-7-09-MB, from Point A?o Nuevo south to Table Rock, as well as a block west of Soquel Canyon; (2) between October 12 and December 16, 2009, WCMG conducted field activity S-10-09-MB, surveying between Table Rock and Moss Landing.

  2. [The processes of manuscript evaluation and publication in Medicina Clínica. The editorial committee of Medicina Clínica].

    PubMed

    Ribera, Josep M; Cardellach, Francesc; Selva, Albert

    2005-12-01

    The decision-making process includes a series of activities undertaken in biomedical journals from the moment a manuscript is received until it is accepted or rejected. Firstly, the manuscript is evaluated by the members of the Editorial Board, who analyze both its suitability for the journal and its scientific quality. After this initial evaluation, the article is evaluated by peer reviewers, an essential process to guarantee its scientific validity. Both the Editorial Board and the peer reviewers usually use checklists which are of enormous help in this task. Once the biomedical article has been accepted, the publication process is started, which in turn includes a series of steps, beginning with technical and medical review of the article's contents and ending with the article's publication in the journal. The present article provides a detailed description of the main technical and ethical issues involved in the processes of decision-making and publication of biomedical articles. PMID:16464420

  3. EDITORIAL: The Fifth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing The Fifth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemenman, Ilya; Gnanakaran, S.; Hlavacek, William S.; Jiang, Yi; Munsky, Brian; Wall, Michael E.; Faeder, James R.

    2012-10-01

    The full text of the Editorial is given in the PDF file. References [1] Wang R-S et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 055001 [2] Zuk P J et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 055002 [3] Tiwari A and Igoshin O A 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 055003 [4] Drocco J A et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 055004 [5] Seamster P E et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 055005

  4. Editorial for the Special Issue 100 Years of Chronogeometrodynamics: The Status of the Einstein's Theory of Gravitation in Its Centennial Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    The present Editorial introduces the Special Issue dedicated by the journal Universe to the General Theory of Relativity, the beautiful theory of gravitation of Einstein, a century after its birth. It reviews some of its key features in a historical perspective, and, in welcoming distinguished researchers from all over the world to contribute it, some of the main topics at the forefront of the current research are outlined.

  5. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  6. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world's population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  7. Antibody detection against Borrelia burgdorferi in horses located in the suburban areas of Monterrey, Nuevo León.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Mélendez, J A; Galván de la Garza, S; Riojas-Valdés, V M; Wong González, A; Avalos-Ramírez, R

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in horses from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo León, México. Blood serum was obtained from a total of 100 horses residing at different counties in the area. From each animal data was obtained on age, sex, county of residence, presence of ectoparasites and clinical signs. All sera samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluoresence and the sera that resulted positive to this test was analyzed by Western blot. The serological test yielded 34 positive sera at 1:64 dilution, and from them 6 were positive at 1:128 dilution, 3 at 1:256, and only one at 1:512. Confirmation of the infection by Western blot was obtained only in the sample positive at the 1:512 dilution. These results shown a low frequency of seropositivity to B. burgdorferi of the horses in the area, confirming previous studies indicating that in northeast Mexico Lyme disease is present in different animal species. PMID:17061503

  8. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    -nitride-based laser diodes is compared. Leung et al discuss the optical emission characteristics of semipolar (1122) GaN light-emitting diodes on m-sapphire and stripe-etched r-sapphire, and Jung et al present results on high brightness non-polar a-plane GaN light-emitting diodes. Finally, in a review Konar et al discuss the charge transport in non- and semipolar III-V nitride heterostructures, and Ishida et al present the latest results on non-polar AlGaN/GaN HFETs with a normally-off operation. Overall, we think that this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art in the field on non-polar and semipolar nitride materials and devices. In view of the rapidly growing interest in this field, the demonstrated enhanced device performance and the wide range of applications, this special issue can be considered a very timely contribution. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Jarlath McKenna, for their support, and we would also like to thank all contributors for their efforts in making this special issue possible.

  9. EDITORIAL: New scope for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics New scope for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Olivia; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-10-01

    After five years of significant growth and development, and with the Impact Factor (IF) now firmly placed over 2.0, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics (JPhysD) has seen a double change at the helm in the last 12 months. Giorgio Margaritondo from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland took over as Editor-in-Chief from Pallab Bhattacharya, while Olivia Roche took over as Publisher from Sarah Quin. We inherited a strong, successful journal. With its IF of 2.105, excellent publication times and flexible, responsive management, JPhysD has established itself as the place to publish high-quality research papers in applied physics. Having introduced Fast Track Communications (FTCs) in 2008, we also became an outlet for short, high-impact letter-like articles. FTCs, with their particularly strict refereeing, add an extra mark of quality to the content. We are keen to continue developing and strengthening the journal to make it the first choice for authors and readers. We are lucky to be working in the exciting, rapidly-changing field of applied physics. The pace of development can sometimes be breathtaking. One of our first actions on taking over the journal was to look again at its scope. We felt it was time to respond to all the recent developments, to ensure that our scope encompasses the latest, cutting-edge research topics—so that it matches the reality of applied physics today. The first issue of the journal that will see this new scope implemented will be issue 41 of this volume. We would like to thank the entire Editorial Board for their hard work during this scope review. The greatest change during this review has been the merging of two sections, 'Functional surfaces and interfaces' and 'Structure and properties of matter', into a new section entitled 'Condensed matter, interfaces and related nanostructures'. This change reflects the significant developments in these connected fields in recent years, particularly the natural evolution of

  10. A Participatory Modeling Application of a Distributed Hydrologic Model in Nuevo Leon, Mexico for the 2010 Hurricane Alex Flood Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baish, A. S.; Vivoni, E. R.; Payan, J. G.; Robles-Morua, A.; Basile, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    A distributed hydrologic model can help bring consensus among diverse stakeholders in regional flood planning by producing quantifiable sets of alternative futures. This value is acute in areas with high uncertainties in hydrologic conditions and sparse observations. In this study, we conduct an application of the Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN)-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) in the Santa Catarina basin of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, where Hurricane Alex in July 2010 led to catastrophic flooding of the capital city of Monterrey. Distributed model simulations utilize best-available information on the regional topography, land cover, and soils obtained from Mexican government agencies or analysis of remotely-sensed imagery from MODIS and ASTER. Furthermore, we developed meteorological forcing for the flood event based on multiple data sources, including three local gauge networks, satellite-based estimates from TRMM and PERSIANN, and the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Remotely-sensed data allowed us to quantify rainfall distributions in the upland, rural portions of the Santa Catarina that are sparsely populated and ungauged. Rural areas had significant contributions to the flood event and as a result were considered by stakeholders for flood control measures, including new reservoirs and upland vegetation management. Participatory modeling workshops with the stakeholders revealed a disconnect between urban and rural populations in regard to understanding the hydrologic conditions of the flood event and the effectiveness of existing and potential flood control measures. Despite these challenges, the use of the distributed flood forecasts developed within this participatory framework facilitated building consensus among diverse stakeholders and exploring alternative futures in the basin.

  11. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon Magnetic Anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Corrigan, D.J.; Wilt, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I power plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3-3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 x 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analysed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed them to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. The suite of igneous rocks was probably emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by en echelon strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotiticgabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6-11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  12. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon magnetic anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Wilt, M.J.; Corrigan, D.J.

    1982-10-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed tham to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. the suite of igneous rocks was probably passively emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotitic-gabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6 to 11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  13. Guest editorial. Introduction to the special section: 4G Health--the long-term evolution of m-Health.

    PubMed

    Istepanaian, Robert S H; Zhang, Y-T

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the seminal term and concept of "m-health" were first defined and introduced in this transactions as "mobile computing, medical sensor, and communications technologies for healthcare." Since that special section, the m-health concept has become one of the key technological domains that reflected the key advances in remote healthcare and e-health systems. The m-health is currently bringing together major academic research and industry disciplines worldwide to achieve innovative solutions in the areas of healthcare delivery and technology sectors. From the wireless communications perspective, the current decade is expected to bring the introduction of new wireless standards and network systems with true mobile broadband and fast internet access healthcare services. These will be developed around what is currently called the fourth-generation (4G) mobile communication systems. In this editorial paper, we will introduce the new and novel concept of 4G health that represents the long-term evolution of m-health since the introduction of the concept in 2004. The special section also presents a snapshot of the recent advances in these areas and addresses some of the challenges and future implementation issues from the evolved m-health perspective. It will also present some of the concepts that can go beyond the traditional "m-health ecosystem" of the existing systems. The contributions presented in this special section represent some of these developments and illustrate the multidisciplinary nature of this important and emerging healthcare delivery concept. PMID:22271836

  14. TH-D-16A-01: Medical Physics Workshop: Editorial Vision and Guidance On Writing and Reviewing Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J; Das, S; Goodsitt, M

    2014-06-15

    On January 1, 2014, editorial leadership of Medical Physics passed from esteemed long-time Editor Bill Hendee to a collective editorial group composed of the three presenters listed above. In this presentation, we would like to outline our vision for the future of Medical Physics and review recent work-in-progress initiatives to implement this vision. Finally, we will close with guidance to authors on how to write a good Medical Physics paper. Vision for Medical Physics and current initiatives: Jeff Williamson, Editor-in-Chief We cannot improve on Dr. Hendee's succinct vision statement “to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the very best science that propels our discipline forward and improves our contribution to patient care.” More concretely, the Journal should be s the preeminent forum for electronic exchange of cutting edge medical physics science. We seek to identify the best contributions in (a) high impact clinical physics innovations; (b) clinical translation and validation of basic science innovations; or (c) cutting edge basic science developments with potential for patient care improvements. Among the challenges and opportunities we face are: are electronic-only and open access publishing; trends towards more interactive, social-media based scientific communities; and diversification of the medical physics research, authorship, and readership domains, including clinical applications quite foreign to core ABR clinical competencies. To address these issues over the next 3 years, we have reduced the size of our Editorial Board and focused its efforts on improving the Journal's impact through 4 working groups (WGs): WG-1: Review process quality and selectivity Creation of 120 member Board of Associate Editors to improve review uniformity by placing Ms. management in fewer hands New reviewer guidelines and templates Answer: “what is the scope of medical physics research?” Recursive taxonomy for tagging review expertise and article contents

  15. Editorial: Early detection of mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders: the ethical challenges of a field in its infancy.

    PubMed

    Ozonoff, Sally

    2015-09-01

    The signs of many mental health and neurodevelopmental conditions first appear in childhood and diagnosis can reliably be made by school age for most. Such conditions can be chronically disabling and confer significant long-term impairment. Determining early risk signs and first emerging symptoms of disorder is imperative to enhance early detection and to identify targets and ideal time points for prevention and intervention efforts. This Special Issue of JCPP focuses on the prospect of earlier identification of conditions that are traditionally diagnosed later in childhood. Ten invited empirical articles cover topics related to the science of early detection. Several are focused on prediction of later diagnosis, of functional impairment, and of future service utilization, while others cover instrument development and topics related to screening. The papers span the conditions of ADHD, ASD, dyslexia, mood dysregulation, disruptive behavior disorders, and anxiety disorders. This Editorial provides an overview of the invited contributions and the perspectives they provide on the ethical challenges and choices of a field still in its infancy. PMID:26257104

  16. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    2011-12-01

    At the end of 2011 I will retire as Editor-in-Chief of Semiconductor Science and Technology, and I am very pleased to announce that the job will be taken over by Professor Kornelius Nielsch. In the ten years I have held this position, I have seen many new topics entering the journal: spintronics, organic semiconductors, and Dirac fermion physics, to name just a few. The journal has also witnessed a strong internationalization of the authorship, with an especially strong increase in contributions from the Far East—a growth that is likely to continue in the coming years. I am certain that Kornelius will do an excellent job in guiding the journal through the developments of the coming decade. I would like to thank the publishing team of SST, or rather the three consecutive teams I witnessed during my tenure at the journal, for the help and support they have given me. The people at IOP Publishing are doing a great job in running the journal, and have made it possible to considerably reduce the time to publication for our submissions. I much enjoyed the collaboration with the other members of the Editorial Board; our annual meetings have always been a source of inspiration. Last, but certainly not least, I would like to thank you, the scientific community, authors, referees and readers, for your continuing support of the journal.

  17. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    technological solution in the early to late 1990s of confining atmospheric plasmas in a small volume of plasma generation (i.e. with a small volume-to-surface ratio) and then extending it towards a downstream sample [7]-[9]. These are among the first low-temperature atmospheric plasmas aimed particularly at the exploitation of their ability to invoke the active and rich reactive chemistry close to ambient temperature. The main applications of these early devices are precision surface modification of low-temperature dielectric materials, for example thin film deposition and etching [7]-[9]. Variations of the early plasma jets include atmospheric plasma sheet jets [10] for the treatment of largely planar objects (e.g. polymeric sheets) as well as large arrays of many plasma jets for the treatment of complex-structured objects (e.g. surgical tools and open human wounds) [11]. As a material processing technology, the sub-100oC atmospheric-pressure plasma jet has benefited over the years from many innovations. Whilst a detailed account and analysis of these is clearly outside the scope of this Editorial, it is worth stating that there are different avenues with which to maintain a moderate electron density at the plasma core so as to keep the gas temperature at the sample point below a ceiling level. Most of the early studies employed excitation at radio frequencies above 10 MHz, at which electrons are largely confined in the plasma generation region, and this limits the current flow to and gas heating in the plume region of the plasma jet. Other techniques of current limitation have since been shown to be effective, including the use of dielectric barriers across a very large frequency range of 1 kHz--50 MHz, sub-microsecond pulses sustained at kHz frequencies, pulse-modulated radio frequencies and dual-frequency excitation [12]-[15]. These and other techniques have considerably advanced the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet technology. The period of some 15 years since the above

  18. Geology and geochemistry of high-grade, volcanic rock-hosted, mercury mineralisation in the Nuevo Entredicho deposit, Almadén district, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jébrak, Michel; Higueras, Pablo L.; Marcoux, Éric; Lorenzo, Saturnino

    2002-06-01

    The Nuevo Entredicho deposit contains the richest concentration of mercury in the Almadén district, locally grading as much as 45% Hg. This ore deposit is hosted within an alkaline, conically shaped diatreme, about 150 m in diameter, which was subsequently filled with phreatomagmatic breccias. The diatreme cuts an Ordovician to Silurian clastic sedimentary rock sequence that is intercalated with basaltic sills. Structural analysis reveals a complex tectonic history with three main phases of Hercynian deformation. Mineralisation occurs as cinnabar replacements in volcanic tuffs and breccias and as recrystallised veins in tensions cracks associated with pyrophyllite and hydrothermal pyrite, which is strongly enriched in Cu, Pb and Hg. Lead isotopes in pyrite are characterised by high 207Pb/204Pb ratios (15.70-15.75), suggesting a contribution of ancient upper continental crust remobilised by Silurian-Devonian volcanism, with no mantle involvement. Sulphur isotopes of epigenetic cinnabar and pyrite range from +10.3 to +10.8‰ and from +10.6 to +11.9‰ respectively, suggesting a uniform sulphur source or a constant mixing ratio in the ore fluids. These isotopic compositions differ from those measured in the syngenetic deposits of the Almadén district; they suggest a higher temperature of ore formation of about 300 °C, and a genesis related to a distinct hydrothermal flow path at the Nuevo Entredicho deposit. Deposition of anomalously high-grade mercury ore at Nuevo Entredicho is related to a combination of (1) an abundance of black shale that provided sulphur and increasingly reducing conditions with high sulphide/sulphate ratios, (2) explosive Silurian-Devonian mafic magmatism that provided an initial source of mercury, (3) tectonic activity that lead to structurally favourable sites for ore deposition, and (4) replacement of secondary, carbonate-rich volcanic rocks.

  19. Population data of 24 STRs in Mexican-Mestizo population from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Northeast, Mexico) based on Powerplex(®) Fusion and GlobalFiler(®) kits.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Benito; Aguilar-Velázquez, José Alonso; Chávez-Briones, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Chavarría, Juan Ramón; Alfaro-Lopez, Elizabeth; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    The STR loci included into new commercial human identification kits compels geneticists estimating forensic parameters for interpretation purposes in forensic casework. Therefore, we studied for the first time in Mexico the GlobalFiler(®) and Powerplex(®) Fusion systems in 326 and 682 unrelated individuals, respectively. These individuals are resident of the Monterrey City of the Nuevo Leon state (Northeast, Mexico). Population data from 23 autosomal STRs and the Y-STR locus DYS391 are reported and compared against available STR data from American ethnic groups and the unique Mexican population studied with Powerplex(®) Fusion. PMID:26747399

  20. EDITORIAL: New materials with high spin polarization: half-metallic Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felser, Claudia; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2007-03-01

    thin film Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 262503 [6] Thomas A, Meyners D, Ebke D, Liu N-N, Sacher M D, Schmalhorst J, Reiss G, Ebert H, and Hütten A 2006 Inverted spin polarization of Heusler alloys for spintronic devices Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 012502 [7] Hillebrands B and Felser C 2006 Editorial: High-spin polarization of Heusler alloys J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 issue 5 http://stacks.iop.org/0022-3727/39/i=5 [8] Galanakis I, Mavropoulos Ph and Dederichs P H 2006 Electronic structure and Slater-Pauling behaviour in half-metallic Heusler alloys calculated from first principles J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 765 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 765 [9] Kandpal H C, Felser C and Seshadri R 2006 Covalent bonding and the nature of band gaps in some half-Heusler compounds J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 776 [10] Kallmayer M, Elmers H J, Balke B, Wurmehl S, Emmerling F, Fecher G H and Felser C 2006 Magnetic properties of Co2Mn1-xFexSi Heusler alloys J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 786 [11] Attema J J, de Wijs G A and de Groot R A 2006 The continuing drama of the half-metal/semiconductor interface J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 793 [12] Leziac M, Mavropoulos Ph, Bihlmayer G and Blügel S 2006 Scanning tunnelling microscopy of surfaces of half-metals: an ab-initio study on NiMnSb(001) J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 797 [13] Wurmehl S, Fecher G H, Kroth K, Kronast F, Dürr H A, Takeda Y, Saitoh Y, Kobayashi K, Lin H-J, Schönhense G and Felser C 2006 Electronic structure and spectroscopy of the quaternary Heusler alloy Co2Cr1-xFexAl J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 803 [14] Inomata K, Okamura S, Miyazaki A, Kikuchi M, Tezuka N, Wojcik M and Jedryka E 2006 Structural and magnetic properties and tunnel magnetoresistance for Co2(Cr,Fe)Al and Co2FeSi full-Heusler alloys J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 816 [15] Yamamoto M, Marukame T, Ishikawa T, Matsuda K, Uemura T and Arita M 2006 Fabrication of fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions using cobalt-based full-Heusler alloy thin film and their tunnel magnetoresistance

  1. EDITORIAL: Progress in applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine Progress in applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Grady, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    within their own areas of the field. Because that field is moving rapidly and has now become a major subject of study, we believe that a collection of updated reviews would be highly appropriate and beneficial to the community. We have been fortunate in getting the same authors to provide six-year updates of their original works. This offers continuity and also allows those who may be new to this area to refer back to the original reviews for a full description of the basic science. In the interests of economy and to avoid repetition, this new set of reviews should be read in conjunction with the original works. The Editorial Board of J. Phys D is particularly grateful to the authors for agreeing to write a second work for our journal. We are aware that the production of reviews is an onerous task and acknowledge their efforts in making available such clear and high quality papers. We trust these new works will prove as beneficial to readers and as successful for their authors as were their original reviews.

  2. EDITORIAL: Theory of Quantum Gases and Quantum Coherence: The Cortona BEC Workshop, 29 October-2 November 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzi, Pablo; Chitra, R.; Menotti, Chiara; Minguzz, Anna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2006-05-01

    opportunity to thank all the participants of ICOMP-X, and in particular the contributors to this issue, for the high quality of science presented at the conference and in this journal. The success of the conference would not have been possible without the program committee which included D Charalambidis, L Cocke, R Freeman, Y Fujimura, S Goreslavsky, A L'Huillier, F Krausz, R Levis, S H Lin, A Maquet, J Marangos, K Midorikawa, G Mourou, P Salieres, W Sandner, K Schafer, A Scrinzi, A M Sergeev, H Stapelfeldt, A Starace, J Ullrich, M Vrakking, and K Yamanouchi. A particularly lively atmosphere in the discussions was ensured by many students who were able to participate in the conference, in part due to generous support of the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations (CIPI) to the Canadian, and of the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences to the American students. Additional support to the conference was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), Pfeiffer Vacuum, Femtolasers Produktions GmbH, Roentdek Handels GmbH, Coherent Laser Products, and Amplitude Technologies. Last but not least, the guest editors of this special issue would like to acknowledge the tremendous amount of work done by the staff of J. Phys. B in handling all aspects of the publication process. In particular, we would like to thank Isabelle Auffret-Babak, Alice Malhador and Joanna Dingley from the editorial team, Katie Gerrard in production and the Editor-in-Chief, Professor J-M Rost.

  3. Editorial: Reducing adolescent suicide.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Michael H

    2016-07-01

    Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death in young people ages 10-19 (CDC, 2015). Current statistics suggest that in the US one in every seven youths has seriously considered or made a plan to commit suicide and one in every 13 youths has attempted suicide in the previous year (CDC, 2015). Suicide represents a - if not the - major public health problem in adolescents. PMID:27320365

  4. EDITORIAL: Wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Morthorst, Poul-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also addressed within the issue is how much conventional power production can be replaced by the ceaseless wind, with the question of how Greece's target of 29% renewables by 2020 is to be met efficiently. Other topics include an innovative way to determine the power curve of a turbine experimentally more accurately, the use of fluid dynamics tools to investigate the implications of placing vortex generators on wind turbine blades (thereby possibly improving their efficiency) and a study of the perception of wind turbine noise. It turns out that a small but significant fraction of wind turbine neighbours feel that turbine generated noise impairs their ability to rest. The annoyance is correlated with a negative attitude towards the visual impact on the landscape, but what is cause and effect is too early to say. As mentioned there is a rush for wind turbines in many countries. However, this positive development for the global climate is currently limited by practical barriers. One bottleneck is the difficulties for the sub-suppliers of gears and other parts to meet the demand. Another is the difficulties to meet the demand for engineers specialized in wind. For that reason the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) recently launched the world's first Wind Energy Masters Program. Here and elsewhere in the world of wind education and research we should really speed up now, as our chances of contributing to emission free energy production and a healthier global climate have never been better. Focus on Wind Energy Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Wind turbines—low level noise sources interfering with restoration? Eja Pedersen and Kerstin Persson Waye On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit in Greece George Caralis, Yiannis Perivolaris, Konstantinos Rados and Arthouros Zervos Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake A Jimenez, A Crespo, E Migoya and J Garcia How to improve the estimation of power curves fo

  5. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  6. EDITORIAL: Perspectives Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, Richard

    2011-05-01

    In this issue, we are delighted to publish the second in a series of articles under the banner of Perspectives. The series commenced in late 2008, when Udo Kaatze [1] published an article about the powerful technique of dielectric spectrometry for liquid measurements. In addition to examining the very wide frequency range from 10-6 Hz to 10-13 Hz, an outline of possible future developments was presented. Some challenging tasks for the future were briefly outlined. The format of the article was different to the usual style of a contributed paper or review article. Instead, it represented a short summary of recent work in the field and offered a viewpoint of an expert in the area. Its commentary noted several milestones that had been recently achieved, and then looked to the future. The Perspective format allowed the author to provide some opinion about the challenges of the future not normally permitted in a Topical Review. The journal now intends to publish several more Perspectives. For example, in this issue David Birch [2] presents a Perspective about another important measurement science, namely fluorescence detections and their future directions. These are based on an old technique which provided the basis for detecting the presence of molecular species. Successful research led to an understanding and description of the phenomenon of molecular fluorescence in terms of excited state energies, transitions, symmetries and rate parameters. More recently, using fluorescence as a probe, and with the exploitation of new technologies, new applications have included the study of protein, vision, photosynthesis, membranes and DNA. Indeed nowhere has fluorescence had more impact than in the biosciences. Once again, the intention of the Perspective article has been to highlight recent milestones within the field. Importantly, it also indicates some of the future challenges. Such Perspectives are an occasional series. They are not intended to deflect from the balance of MST, where about 20% of papers involve special features, special issues and review articles. The remaining 80% of papers are original, contributed, papers. Nevertheless, we hope readers will find that these new Perspectives are both useful commentaries and also provide an insight into the future of topical fields of research. References [1] Kaatze U 2008 Perspectives in dielectric measurement techniques for liquids Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 112001 [2] Birch D J S 2011 Fluorescence detections and directions Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 052002

  7. Children and Parents. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childhood: A Global Journal of Child Research, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Questions whether the vocabulary of social sciences has contributed to a shallow understanding of modern family forms and childhood. Examines the impact of increasing numbers of single-parent families and increasing levels of women's education on childhood. Maintains that fathers' changing role and educated, career-oriented mothers illustrate a…

  8. EDITORIAL: Interesting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-01-01

    `May you live in interesting times' - old Chinese curse. First, many thanks to John Avison, the retiring Honorary Editor, for his hard work over the last five years, and the steady development in style and content under his stewardship. I can only hope to live up to the standards that he set. The next five years will take us into a new millenium, an event preceded - in England and Wales at least - by a period of stability, reflection and consolidation in education. Or so we are told - but whether such a self-denying ordinance will actually be maintained by the Government both before and after an election in 1997 remains to be seen. Nevertheless, we shall be thankful for any mercies, however small, that permit forward thinking rather than instant response. One of the things that readers of a journal called Physics Education should be thinking about is the continued decline in the numbers of students studying physics post-16. This is not a purely local phenomenon; most European countries are finding a similar decline. There are exceptions, of course: in Scotland numbers studying physics for Highers are increasing. Is such a decline a good thing or a bad thing? Only a minority of post-16 physics students go on to use the bulk of what they have learned in further studies or vocations. Does a knowledge and understanding of physics contribute to the mental well-being and cultural level - let alone material comfort - of any except those who use physics professionally? Is physics defensible as a contribution to the mental armoury of the educated citizen - compared with chemistry, biology - or Latin, say? Or should one rephrase that last question as `Is physics as we teach it today defensible...?' Such questions, and many others no doubt, may well be in the mind of the new Curriculum Officer appointed by the Institute of Physics `to engage in a wide-ranging consultation throughout the entire physics community on the nature and style of post-16 physics programmes, with a view to establishing a major curriculum development exercise on the scale of the Nuffield programmes of the 1960s'. The person appointed in this challenging role is the redoubtable Bryan Chapman (see his letter on page 14). I feel that readers of this journal constitute a well-informed section of the physics community and should be able to make a significant contribution to his work. I intend to use part of the July issue of Physics Education as a forum for views on the nature and style of post-16 (and even relevant pre-l6) physics programmes, both as they are and as they should be. The aim of the forum is not to provide solutions presented in lengthy, fully researched and well-argued articles but to raise ideas (and even expectations), to stimulate debate and set physics educators thinking creatively and radically about what might be an appropriate education in physics for the 2lst century. So send in your views - brief and to the point, trenchant and opinionated (all the more likely to be appreciated by Bryan C), anecdotal and theoretical, but preferably impregnated with the smell of chalk, wet blackboards, the sounds of wobbly-wheeled mechanics trolleys, quietly sizzling resistors and where necessary the heat of close encounters with the National Curriculum (version X) and/or GNVQs and the Subject Core for A-levels. Overseas readers - and Scots - may like to proffer advice based on their own, possibly less rebarbative, experiences. Don't hesitate: there is not a moment to be lost!

  9. EDITORIAL: SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A foremost goal in biology is understanding the molecular basis of single cell behavior, as well as cell interactions that result in functioning tissues. Accomplishing this goal requires quantitative analysis of multiple, specific macromolecules (e.g. proteins, ligands and enzyme...

  10. EDITORIAL: Materially speaking!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Malcolm G.

    1997-05-01

    We live in a highly materialistic age. This is true not only for our spiritual outlook - or lack of it - but undeniably so for the physical world in which we live. Materials, which are the feature of this special issue, provide literally the fabric on which the modern world is built. Materials science is the systematic study of the physical properties and behaviour of solids with practical applications and importance (if the utility of the material is not explicit or important we are probably in the realm of solid state physics!). Materials in this sense are the stuff of which cars and computers, jet aircraft and washing machines, tower blocks and saucepans, bridges and golf clubs are made. The science of materials therefore encompasses most of the things that form the infrastructure of modern life. But perhaps it is its very ubiquity that removes the mystique, the glamour, the 'zing' from the subject. In contrast, anything cosmological, astronomical or 'fundamental' (as in 'particle'), i.e. of little or no practical significance to our day-to-day lives, excites the curiosity of many able young people. Witness the profusion of books about galaxies and black holes, and quarks and GUTs which strain the popular science shelves of the bookshops. I'm probably being heretical, but perhaps the over-hyping of the very large and the very small has indeed attracted the able few into the serious study of physics, but because of its inherent mathematical complexity and esoteric remoteness maybe it has put off the average youngster who would nevertheless enjoy and succeed in physics-based higher education (and, not incidentally, help fill the seriously depleted lecture theatres in many university physics - and engineering - departments). Materials science on the other hand deals with an intermediate range of things which, give or take an order of magnitude or three, are person-sized as well as person useful. It is - therefore? - undoubtedly one of the less glamorous of the areas of physics-based science and technology. Can materials science be made intellectually more exciting and mind-stretching for our students? In this special issue we present several articles by researchers in less-than-familiar but important areas of materials science and technology. Following a review by Mathew Philip of some of the basic atomic theory which underlies materials science, Jose Silva looks at how artificial diamonds can be made and at how we can apply this exotic material (other than on fingers and around necks). Alan Piercy reviews the field of giant magnetostrictive materials, which, when magnetized, change dimensions hundreds or even thousands of times more than traditional ferromagnetics. David Pettifor provides a nicely interdisciplinary overview of how computer simulations, from the subatomic to the macroscopic level, can be used to help in the design of new materials for such things as turbine blades. Adrian Rennie offers a much-requested written version of the entertaining 1995/6 IOP Schools Lecture on the physics of polymers. (We had hoped to include an article by Professor Colin Gough of Birmingham University on High Temperatue Superconductors, but for technical reasons this has had to be postponed until a future issue.) Finally, there are two articles describing an initiative which will have a direct practical impact on the teaching and learning of `Materials' in the UK. Karen Davies describes the exciting new Materials Gallery due to be opened at the Science Museum as this issue goes to press in May 1997 (no coincidence!), and David Sang provides details of how the new gallery has been linked directly with the GNVQ curriculum, and can certainly be exploited more widely in our physics and technology teaching. Perhaps this can help provide the missing 'zing' that materials science at present seems to lack.

  11. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  12. EDITORIAL: Politically correct physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople Deputy Editor, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    If you were a caring, thinking, liberally minded person in the 1960s, you marched against the bomb, against the Vietnam war, and for civil rights. By the 1980s, your voice was raised about the destruction of the rainforests and the threat to our whole planetary environment. At the same time, you opposed discrimination against any group because of race, sex or sexual orientation. You reasoned that people who spoke or acted in a discriminatory manner should be discriminated against. In other words, you became politically correct. Despite its oft-quoted excesses, the political correctness movement sprang from well-founded concerns about injustices in our society. So, on balance, I am all for it. Or, at least, I was until it started to invade science. Biologists were the first to feel the impact. No longer could they refer to 'higher' and 'lower' orders, or 'primitive' forms of life. To the list of undesirable 'isms' - sexism, racism, ageism - had been added a new one: speciesism. Chemists remained immune to the PC invasion, but what else could you expect from a group of people so steeped in tradition that their principal unit, the mole, requires the use of the thoroughly unreconstructed gram? Now it is the turn of the physicists. This time, the offenders are not those who talk disparagingly about other people or animals, but those who refer to 'forms of energy' and 'heat'. Political correctness has evolved into physical correctness. I was always rather fond of the various forms of energy: potential, kinetic, chemical, electrical, sound and so on. My students might merge heat and internal energy into a single, fuzzy concept loosely associated with moving molecules. They might be a little confused at a whole new crop of energies - hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal and tidal - but they could tell me what devices turned chemical energy into electrical energy, even if they couldn't quite appreciate that turning tidal energy into geothermal energy wasn't part of the same game. In today's PC physics, no such complications arise because all forms of energy are equal and unlabelled. I accept the reasoning behind this - that understanding processes is more important than attaching labels - but what am I supposed to call ½mv2, mgh and mcΔθ? On which subject.... What am I allowed to say about heat? It seems that objects can be heated up. I can switch on the central heating. But I cannot get heat from a Bunsen burner. In PC physics, heat is banned - at least as a noun. Instead, I have to talk about 'energy transferred because of a temperature difference'. And I must stop saying 'transferred' in circumstances where I really mean 'transformed'. I find it difficult to argue with the logic behind the new approach to energy, but the loss of such an elegantly simple word as 'heat' is proving a severe restriction on my use of language. The loss is especially galling because engineers will go on talking about heat engines, heat pumps and heat sinks. In primary schools, saucepans will still conduct heat, and the Sun will continue to give off heat and light. Moreover, I suspect that most teachers will be using 'heat' in the privacy of the classroom, even if they won't admit to it in public. We shall all become closet heatists. Before PC physics takes over by stealth, we need a full and open debate on what is or isn't conceptually acceptable for students at different stages. Perhaps we need a conference. If so, I will be there at the back with my banner. But this time, it won't read 'Save the whale' or 'Save the rainforests'. It will read 'Save heat', or maybe 'Save all forms of energy'.

  13. EDITORIAL: Dearing strikes again!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-05-01

    Extra-territorial readers of this journal must surely hover between amazement and boredom at the periodic references to the time and energy spent in England in reviewing, changing, re-reviewing and re-changing its educational programmes from ages 5-18. (Scotland has its own educational system and seems to be doing quite well, thank you.) Recently, Sir Ron Dearing, the Government's educational trouble-shooter, who in a few short months managed to sort out the 5-16 curriculum to the satisfaction (more or less) of both Establishment and politicians, was given the task of redefining the principles underlying the education of 16-19 year-olds. In March 1996 he produced a report that has been greeted, initially at least, with the universal approval of the press and politicians of all parties. The main and century-old problem with the English educational system is the deep divide between academic (pre-university) and vocational education. This may reflect the broad division between `gentlemen' and players (artisans) that seems to be a feature of English society, and which may be too wide for a mere education system to bridge. A second problem has been the perceived narrowness, due to overspecialization into just three subjects, of pre-university courses, which has tended to produce yet another divide - between arts graduates (interesting, lively, well-read, cultured) and science graduates (boring, uncouth, illiterate). However, the rather boringly titled Review of Qualifications for 16-19 Year Olds, Summary ReportFootnote is at least clear in its intentions of bridging both gaps. It reviews the continuing decline in the popularity of mathematics and science subjects as pre-university (A-level) courses, and records that the parallel vocational courses (GNVQ) in science do not yet match their status and their acceptance by employers, and people in general. It accepts the failure of Advanced Supplementary courses to provide a broadening of the 16-19 curriculum. It makes many recommendations which will need very careful and intelligent management if they are to be both workable and beneficial; unfortunately recent history tells us that the Government's agencies responsible for educational management are insensitive to the advice of practitioners and work to hidden political agendas based on prejudgement if not downright prejudice. The Report's recommendations certainly provide a challenge for post-16 physics, especially for A-level. It is to be hoped that the new structures and initiatives of the Institute of Physics will be able to play a full part in ensuring that changes are beneficial and workable. Firstly, Sir Ron wants A-levels to provide opportunities and contexts for the development of some general skills, identified as communication (both written and oral), numeracy and in information technology, with a less clear reference to an ability to work as part of a team. Challenge 1: find good contexts in physics for these - and a valid assessment system. Secondly, the curriculum should be broadened by a kind of two-phase approach to post-16 studies. Potential A-level students would spend a year studying as many as six Advanced Subsidiary level subjects, chosen from four main areas: science, maths and technology; modern languages; arts and humanities; `the way the community works' (business, economics, law, psychology etc). Each new-style AS would be the first half of an A-level course. The second phase would allow specialization into, say, three A-levels as at present, or to a combination of A and AS courses. Challenge 2: design a half course that makes sense, and is as useful to potential lawyers as to potential physicists. Thirdly, there should be an increase in the size of the A-level subject cores. Challenge 3: design such an extended core that is less boringly old-fashioned than the current one (not too difficult, that) and is capable of useful fission (see Challenge 2). This is a good opportunity to consider the nature of a `core' in physics for such a wide variety of intended learners. A sheer increase in content would be

  14. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton Johansen, Geir; Wang, Mi

    2008-09-01

    There has been tremendous development within measurement science and technology over the past couple of decades. New sensor technologies and compact versatile signal recovery electronics are continuously expanding the limits of what can be measured and the accuracy with which this can be done. Miniaturization of sensors and the use of nanotechnology push these limits further. Also, thanks to powerful and cost-effective computer systems, sophisticated measurement and reconstruction algorithms previously only accessible in advanced laboratories are now available for in situ online measurement systems. The process industries increasingly require more process-related information, motivated by key issues such as improved process control, process utilization and process yields, ultimately driven by cost-effectiveness, quality assurance, environmental and safety demands. Industrial process tomography methods have taken advantage of the general progress in measurement science, and aim at providing more information, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on multiphase systems and their dynamics. The typical approach for such systems has been to carry out one local or bulk measurement and assume that this is representative of the whole system. In some cases, this is sufficient. However, there are many complex systems where the component distribution varies continuously and often unpredictably in space and time. The foundation of industrial tomography is to conduct several measurements around the periphery of a multiphase process, and use these measurements to unravel the cross-sectional distribution of the process components in time and space. This information is used in the design and optimization of industrial processes and process equipment, and also to improve the accuracy of multiphase system measurements in general. In this issue we are proud to present a selection of the 145 papers presented at the 5th World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography in Bergen, September 2007. Interestingly, x-ray technologies, one of the first imaging modalities available, keep on moving the limits on both spatial and temporal measurement resolution; experimental results of less than 100 nm and several thousand frames/s are reported, respectively. Important progress is demonstrated in research and development on sensor technologies and algorithms for data processing and image reconstruction, including unconventional sensor design and adaptation of the sensors to the application in question. The number of applications to which tomographic methods are applied is steadily increasing, and results obtained in a representative selection of applications are included. As guest editors we would like express our appreciation and thanks to all authors who have contributed and to IOP staff for excellent collaboration in the process of finalizing this special feature.

  15. Guest Editorial: Laser Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

    2012-12-01

    Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

  16. Problem Based Learning: Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. B.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that if students are to study enzyme kinetics they should do more than just gloss over the surface. Adequate time should be given for the student to thoroughly study the mechanisms to development a complete understanding. (MVL)

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Ribeiro, Ricardo M.

    2009-09-01

    Graphene physics is currently one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics. Countless theoretical and experimental studies have already been performed, targeting electronic, magnetic, thermal, optical, structural and vibrational properties. Also, studies that modify pristine graphene, aiming at finding new physics and possible new applications, have been considered. These include patterning nanoribbons and quantum dots, exposing graphene's surface to different chemical species, studying multilayer systems, and inducing strain and curvature (modifying in this way graphene's electronic properties). This focus issue includes many of the latest developments on graphene research. Focus on Graphene Contents Electronic properties of graphene and graphene nanoribbons with 'pseudo-Rashba' spin-orbit coupling Tobias Stauber and John Schliemann Strained graphene: tight-binding and density functional calculations R M Ribeiro, Vitor M Pereira, N M R Peres, P R Briddon and A H Castro Neto The effect of sublattice symmetry breaking on the electronic properties of doped graphene A Qaiumzadeh and R Asgari Interfaces within graphene nanoribbons J Wurm, M Wimmer, I Adagideli, K Richter and H U Baranger Weak localization and transport gap in graphene antidot lattices J Eroms and D Weiss Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices J A Fürst, J G Pedersen, C Flindt, N A Mortensen, M Brandbyge, T G Pedersen and A-P Jauho Splitting of critical energies in the n=0 Landau level of graphene Ana L C Pereira Double-gated graphene-based devices S Russo, M F Craciun, M Yamamoto, S Tarucha and A F Morpurgo Pinning and switching of magnetic moments in bilayer graphene Eduardo V Castro, M P López-Sancho and M A H Vozmediano Electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons Katsunori Wakabayashi, Yositake Takane, Masayuki Yamamoto and Manfred Sigrist Many-body effects on out-of-plane phonons in graphene J González and E Perfetto Graphene zigzag ribbons, square lattice models and quantum spin chains Mahdi Zarea and Nancy Sandler On the universal ac optical background in graphene V P Gusynin, S G Sharapov and J P Carbotte Heat conduction in graphene: experimental study and theoretical interpretation S Ghosh, D L Nika, E P Pokatilov and A A Balandin Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities D M Basko Electronic transport in bilayer graphene Mikito Koshino Magnetic Kronig-Penney model for Dirac electrons in single-layer graphene M Ramezani Masir, P Vasilopoulos and F M Peeters Electrical transport in high-quality graphene pnp junctions Jairo Velasco Jr, Gang Liu, Wenzhong Bao and Chun Ning Lau Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene N M R Peres, Ling Yang and Shan-Wen Tsai Gaps and tails in graphene and graphane B Dóra and K Ziegler Quasi-ferromagnet spintronics in the graphene nanodisc-lead system Motohiko Ezawa Range and correlation effects in edge disordered graphene nanoribbons Alessandro Cresti and Stephan Roche Remarks on the tight-binding model of graphene Cristina Bena and Gilles Montambaux

  18. EDITORIAL: Dearing strikes again!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-05-01

    Extra-territorial readers of this journal must surely hover between amazement and boredom at the periodic references to the time and energy spent in England in reviewing, changing, re-reviewing and re-changing its educational programmes from ages 5-18. (Scotland has its own educational system and seems to be doing quite well, thank you.) Recently, Sir Ron Dearing, the Government's educational trouble-shooter, who in a few short months managed to sort out the 5-16 curriculum to the satisfaction (more or less) of both Establishment and politicians, was given the task of redefining the principles underlying the education of 16-19 year-olds. In March 1996 he produced a report that has been greeted, initially at least, with the universal approval of the press and politicians of all parties. The main and century-old problem with the English educational system is the deep divide between academic (pre-university) and vocational education. This may reflect the broad division between `gentlemen' and players (artisans) that seems to be a feature of English society, and which may be too wide for a mere education system to bridge. A second problem has been the perceived narrowness, due to overspecialization into just three subjects, of pre-university courses, which has tended to produce yet another divide - between arts graduates (interesting, lively, well-read, cultured) and science graduates (boring, uncouth, illiterate). However, the rather boringly titled Review of Qualifications for 16-19 Year Olds, Summary ReportFootnote is at least clear in its intentions of bridging both gaps. It reviews the continuing decline in the popularity of mathematics and science subjects as pre-university (A-level) courses, and records that the parallel vocational courses (GNVQ) in science do not yet match their status and their acceptance by employers, and people in general. It accepts the failure of Advanced Supplementary courses to provide a broadening of the 16-19 curriculum. It makes many recommendations which will need very careful and intelligent management if they are to be both workable and beneficial; unfortunately recent history tells us that the Government's agencies responsible for educational management are insensitive to the advice of practitioners and work to hidden political agendas based on prejudgement if not downright prejudice. The Report's recommendations certainly provide a challenge for post-16 physics, especially for A-level. It is to be hoped that the new structures and initiatives of the Institute of Physics will be able to play a full part in ensuring that changes are beneficial and workable. Firstly, Sir Ron wants A-levels to provide opportunities and contexts for the development of some general skills, identified as communication (both written and oral), numeracy and in information technology, with a less clear reference to an ability to work as part of a team. Challenge 1: find good contexts in physics for these - and a valid assessment system. Secondly, the curriculum should be broadened by a kind of two-phase approach to post-16 studies. Potential A-level students would spend a year studying as many as six Advanced Subsidiary level subjects, chosen from four main areas: science, maths and technology; modern languages; arts and humanities; `the way the community works' (business, economics, law, psychology etc). Each new-style AS would be the first half of an A-level course. The second phase would allow specialization into, say, three A-levels as at present, or to a combination of A and AS courses. Challenge 2: design a half course that makes sense, and is as useful to potential lawyers as to potential physicists. Thirdly, there should be an increase in the size of the A-level subject cores. Challenge 3: design such an extended core that is less boringly old-fashioned than the current one (not too difficult, that) and is capable of useful fission (see Challenge 2). This is a good opportunity to consider the nature of a `core' in physics for such a wide variety of intended learners. A sheer increase in content would be a primitive and profoundly unsmart response. A fourth recommendation is that the number of physics syllabuses should be reduced. Challenge 4: design criteria for the selection of syllabuses thought worthy to survive. There are in fact quite a few other interesting recommendations, in particular dealing with mathematics and mathematics for physics, and a whole set of recommendations for a new national award system, recognizing achievement at all levels from sub-GCSE to A-level/GNVQ/NVQ Level 3. It's all very interesting and might indeed be very good. But can the bureaucrats manage it? ...Report ISBN 1 85838 1029, SCAA Publications, PO Box 235, Hayes, Middlesex UB3 1HF.

  19. Editorial: Biodegradable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Schaschke, Carl; Audic, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue “Biodegradable Materials” features research and review papers concerning recent advances on the development, synthesis, testing and characterisation of biomaterials. These biomaterials, derived from natural and renewable sources, offer a potential alternative to existing non-biodegradable materials with application to the food and biomedical industries amongst many others. In this Special Issue, the work is expanded to include the combined use of fillers that can enhance the properties of biomaterials prepared as films. The future application of these biomaterials could have an impact not only at the economic level, but also for the improvement of the environment. PMID:25421242

  20. Plant Systems Biology (editorial)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2003, Plant Physiology published an Arabidopsis special issue devoted to plant systems biology. The intention of Natasha Raikhel and Gloria Coruzzi, the two editors of this first-of-its-kind issue, was ‘‘to help nucleate this new effort within the plant community’’ as they considered that ‘‘...

  1. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    Blue or ultraviolet semiconducting light-emitting diodes have the potential to revolutionize illumination systems in the near-future. Such industrial need has propelled the investigation of several wide-gap semiconducting materials in recent years. Commercial applications include blue lasers for DVD memory and laser printers, while military applications are also expected. Most of the material development has so far been focused on GaN (band gap 3.5 eV at 2 K), and ZnSe (2.9 eV) because these two representative direct transition semiconductors are known to be bright emitting sources. GaN and GaN-based alloys are emerging as the winners in this field because ZnSe is subject to defect formation under high current drive. On the other hand, another II-VI compound, ZnO, has also excited substantial interest in the optoelectronics-oriented research communities because it is the brightest emitter of all, owing to the fact that its excitons have a 60 meV binding energy. This is compared with 26 meV for GaN and 20 meV for ZnSe. The stable excitons could lead to laser action based on their recombination even at temperatures well above room temperature. ZnO has additional major properties that are more advantageous than other wide-gap materials: availability of large area substrates, higher energy radiation stability, environmentally-friendly ingredients, and amenability to wet chemical etching. However, ZnO is not new to the semiconductor field as exemplified by several studies made during the 1960s on structural, vibrational, optical and electrical properties (Mollwo E 1982 Landolt-Boernstein New Series vol 17 (Berlin: Springer) p 35). In terms of devices, the luminescence from light-emitting diode structures was demonstrated in which Cu2O was used as the p-type material (Drapak I T 1968 Semiconductors 2 624). The main obstacle to the development of ZnO has been the lack of reproducible p-type ZnO. The possibility of achieving epitaxial p-type layers with the aid of thermal non-equilibrium growth has rekindled the recent extensive investigation and progress in the field of ZnO epitaxy. In this special issue, Ohtomo and Tsukazaki, Cho et al, and Yi et al, respectively, describe the various fabrication processes such as pulsed laser deposition, molecular-beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. It should be noted that the last work among the above-mentioned papers has the potential to pave the way to nano-technology based on ZnO. This material has found other important applications as well, such as transparent conducting oxides (TCO). This field has a long research history, as is reviewed by Minami. Relatively speaking, ZnO was one of the earliest crystals (after Si, Ge, and InSb) to be prepared in a pure form, and the resultant long research history has given rise to the availability of large-area substrates. Recent progress in this topic is explained by two representative groups of authors in this field: Nause and Nemeth at Cermet Inc., and Maeda et al at Tokyo Denpa Co. Ltd. In order to overcome the bottleneck of p-type conduction and control the material's properties, a clear understanding of the physical processes in ZnO is necessary. Look et al are known as the first group to report on the growth and properties of p-type ZnO layers with a valid and reasonable set of experimental data (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 1830). Here, Look contributes a more comprehensive review to this issue. Optical studies on single crystals were conducted and are reviewed here by Meyer et al and Chichibu et al. Band-gap engineering and fabrication of heterojunction or quantum structures are important technological issues. It should be emphasized that by choosing an appropriate set of concentrations (x and y), perfect lattice-matching between MgxZn1-xO and CdyZn1-yO can be attained (Makino T et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 1237). Exciton properties of multiple quantum well structures are reported by Makino et al in this issue. Other than growth of p-type layers, ferromagnetic behaviour in transition-metal doped oxide is also fuelling renewed interest from the spintronic point of view. Since some of the related reports remain controversial, a critical discussion of the magnetic properties of these doped oxides is made by Fukumura et al. Before the observation of electro-luminescence from the ZnO p-n homojunction reported by Tsukazaki et al (2005 Nature Mater. 4 42), the afore-mentioned advantages have been explored and exploited by alternative methods, such as heteroepitaxy in which p-n heterostructures can be obtained by depositing n-type ZnO films on other p-type oxides while still utilizing ZnO as their active layer. Researchers in Hosono's group observed the high-intensity band-edge emission from such heterostructures for the first time (Ohta H et al 2000 Appl. Phys. Lett. 77 475). They have also successfully extended their research fields to the development of a transparent oxide transistor based on homologous compounds, which is reviewed by Kamiya and Hosono in this special issue. As can be seen from these demonstrations, the advantage of oxides is, of course, based on the fact that many elements in the periodic table can form compounds with oxygen. Since the discovery of high-temperature superconductors, these multi-component oxides have exploited the new field known as the science of strongly correlated-electron materials, whose recent progress is reviewed by Inoue. Although the collection of papers included in this special issue covers a good cross-section of the development of oxide semiconductors and correlated-electron oxides to date, this is not meant to be exhaustive. There are a number of unavoidable omissions, such as theoretical studies except for some theoretical predictions on the room-temperature Bose-Einstein condensation of exciton-polaritons found in the article by Chichibu et al. We hope this issue promotes further development of this exciting field. The guest editors would like to thank the publishing team of Semiconductor Science and Technology at IoPP (Claire Bedrock, Barbara Bostock, Chris Hall, and Julie Stott).

  2. EDITORIAL: Photonic terahertz technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisauskas, Alvydas; Löffler, Torsten; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, when reading newspapers and journals or watching TV, one has been able to find feature presentations dealing with the prospects of terahertz (THz) technology and its potential impact on market applications. THz technology aims to fill the THz gap in the electro-magnetic spectrum in order to make the THz frequency regime, which spans the two orders of magnitude from 100 GHz to 10 THz, accessible for applications. From the lower-frequency side, electronics keeps pushing upwards, while photonic approaches gradually improve our technological options at higher frequencies. The popular interest reflects the considerable advances in research in the THz field, and it is mainly advances in the photonic branch, with the highlight being the development of the THz quantum cascade laser, which in recent years have caught the imagination of the public, and of potential users and investors. This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides an overview of key scientific developments which currently represent the cutting edge of THz photonic technology. In order to be clear about the implications, we should define exactly what we mean by 'THz photonic technology', or synonymously 'THz photonics'. It is characterized by the way in which THz radiation (or a guided THz wave) is generated, namely by the use of lasers. This may be done in one of two fundamentally different schemes: (i) by laser action in the terahertz frequency range itself (THz lasers), or (ii) by down-conversion processes (photomixing) involving the radiation of lasers which operate in the visible, near-infrared or infrared spectral ranges, either in pulsed or continuous-wave mode. The field of THz photonics has grown so considerably that it is out of the question to cover all its aspects in a single special issue of a journal. We have elected, instead, to focus our attention on two types of development with a potentially strong impact on the THz field: first, on significant advances of the technology itself, and second, on specific applications considered capable of fostering the transmutation of THz technology as a whole into a market technology. We decided for reasons of conciseness to leave out technologies which require more than table-top equipment (free-electron lasers, THz sources based on electrons accelerated to relativistic speed, etc) as well as fairly mature techniques (such as backward-wave oscillators which, although they are not strictly lasers, also exhibit gain). More difficult was the decision not to consider fascinating ideas for novel sources and detectors which until now have existed only on paper or have just entered the process of fundamental investigation. As we ourselves are working on such a concept (the Bloch-gain laser), we are fully aware of the fact that some of these ideas may have a strong impact on the field of THz photonics in the near future. After selection of the topics we wanted to cover, we contacted colleagues who are prominent in their respective fields of research and are grateful that most of them responded positively, expressing their willingness to share their knowledge with the readers of this journal. They took care not only to describe their own work but to give ample reference to the status of their respective specialized field of work. Before summarizing the contributions, we want to address all colleagues in the field who feel that they should have been asked to contribute but were not. To you we want to apologize. We can only hope for your understanding of the constraints of this endeavour. The collection of invited contributions is grouped into five topics. The first is entitled 'Pulsed THz Systems' and contains four papers dealing with the state of the art in source and detector development of measurement systems employing femtosecond Ti:sapphire lasers. The first paper, by Planken et al, describes the state of the art of the most common types of optoelectronic THz systems, namely those with femtosecond lasers operating at high repetition rate (~100 MHz). The system described by Planke

  3. Editorial: Which Wei Wang?

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2007-12-01

    The APS journals receive manuscripts from scientists all over the world. For authors whose names cannot be expressed in Latin characters, their names in the byline must be transliterated, a process that is not necessarily bidirectionally unique. For example, the eight Chinese names all transliterate as Wei Wang. To remove some of the ambiguity arising from this unfortunate degeneracy of names, APS will allow some authors the option to include their names in their own language in parentheses after the transliterated name, such as Wei Wang. The option to present names in the article byline in this manner is an experiment initially offered to Chinese, Japanese, and Korean authors, whose names can be expressed in Unicode characters. An example of a Japanese name is Tadanori Minamisono and a Korean name is Chang Kee Jung. In the English text the given name precedes the family name, while the reverse is true for the characters. As we gain experience, we may be able to broaden this offer to other languages. Authors who wish to try this option will need to prepare their manuscripts by following the special instructions at http://authors.aps.org/names.html.

  4. NIMB 2014 Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breese, Mark; Rehn, Lynn; Trautmann, Christina; Vickridge, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year we have continued and intensified our efforts to make NIMB an even more attractive journal for publishing articles on all aspects of beam interactions with materials and atoms, of service to a wide community of researchers. In particular, we have made stronger demands on authors for their papers to be accepted, and have pushed hard to improve citation practices amongst authors. Average time from submission to publication of accepted articles has also been reduced. These efforts have been underway for several years now, and we are satisfied to see that the NIMB impact factor has once again increased, from 1.21 in 2011 to 1.27 in 2012.

  5. Differentiation of Childhood. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childhood: A Global Journal of Child Research, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Argues that the social structure of postindustrial society represents a structural integration of all children but this institutionalization constructs divergent local structures, marginalization, and cultural and social differentiation. Suggests that childhood research requires an elaboration of the acting subject and the framework of structures…

  6. EDITORIAL: Presentation of Manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    We wish to draw the attention of authors to two points concerning the presentation of manuscripts. First, some changes have been made recently in our Instructions to Authors. We have reduced from two to one the number of duplicate copies of the manuscript required, asked for corrected proofs to be returned to the Editor rather than directly to the publishers, clarified that a single set of illustration-photographs will suffice, removed a specific suggestion for a style manual that we had offered for general guidance only, and added an instruction on conventions in spelling and hyphenation. Secondly, authors are required, of course, to present a thorough analysis of their experimental data and to include an estimate of their uncertainty. For this purpose, however, we strongly encourage the authors to follow the recommendations put forward by an international working group [1] to the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) and endorsed by that body in its Recommandation 1 (CI-1981). This recommendation has been published by the CIPM [2] and was also summarized recently in this journal [3]. [1] 1981 Metrologia 17 69-74, in particular, see pp 73-74 [2] 1981 ProcA~¨s-Verbaux CIPM 10th Session 49, A1 A12. An English language version is available on application to the Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. [3] 1982 Metrologia 18 41-44, in particular, see p 44.

  7. EDITORIAL: Wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Morthorst, Poul-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also addressed within the issue is how much conventional power production can be replaced by the ceaseless wind, with the question of how Greece's target of 29% renewables by 2020 is to be met efficiently. Other topics include an innovative way to determine the power curve of a turbine experimentally more accurately, the use of fluid dynamics tools to investigate the implications of placing vortex generators on wind turbine blades (thereby possibly improving their efficiency) and a study of the perception of wind turbine noise. It turns out that a small but significant fraction of wind turbine neighbours feel that turbine generated noise impairs their ability to rest. The annoyance is correlated with a negative attitude towards the visual impact on the landscape, but what is cause and effect is too early to say. As mentioned there is a rush for wind turbines in many countries. However, this positive development for the global climate is currently limited by practical barriers. One bottleneck is the difficulties for the sub-suppliers of gears and other parts to meet the demand. Another is the difficulties to meet the demand for engineers specialized in wind. For that reason the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) recently launched the world's first Wind Energy Masters Program. Here and elsewhere in the world of wind education and research we should really speed up now, as our chances of contributing to emission free energy production and a healthier global climate have never been better. Focus on Wind Energy Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Wind turbines—low level noise sources interfering with restoration? Eja Pedersen and Kerstin Persson Waye On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit in Greece George Caralis, Yiannis Perivolaris, Konstantinos Rados and Arthouros Zervos Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake A Jimenez, A Crespo, E Migoya and J Garcia How to improve the estimation of power curves for wind turbines Julia Gottschall and Joachim Peinke

  8. EDITORIAL: Publisher's Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlashan, Yasmin

    2006-12-01

    In addition to offering an excellent service to authors, referees and readers of the journal, one of the goals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) is to support the plasma community. We sponsor a number of prizes each year, usually focused on students' contributions to conferences. The poster prize winners from the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be found in Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 48 B1-B506 along with the invited talks from the conference. Other prizes include: A poster prize at the CCLRC-organised High Power Laser Science Christmas meeting, held in Abingdon, UK, in December 2005. The winning poster was: `Implicit Vlasov Fokker Planck simulations including hydrodynamic ion motion' Christopher Ridgers (Imperial College London). The second prize went to C Cecchitti (Queens University of Belfast), and the third prize to John Howe (University of York). For the first time in 2006 PPCF also sponsored a prize for the best poster presented at the International Workshop on Frontiers of Plasma Physics, held from 21 August-1 September 2006 at the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy. The winner of this prize was Dr Bhaskar Chaudhury (Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, India), for his work on `Plasma stealth technology: reduction of radar cross section of plasma shrouded objects'. Thank you to everyone who participated in these prizes, and congratulations to the winners and runners-up. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the authors and referees of PPCF for all their hard work and support in making the journal a success in 2006 and to wish you all a successful 2007.

  9. EDITORIAL: Nanometrology Nanometrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mitsuru; Baba, Tetsuya; Postek, Michael T.

    2011-02-01

    Nanomanufacturing is an essential bridge between the discoveries of nanoscience and real-world nanotech products and is the vehicle by which the world will realize the promise of major technological innovation across a spectrum of products that will affect virtually every industrial sector. For micro and nanotech products to achieve the broad impacts envisioned, they must be manufactured in market-appropriate quantities in a reliable, repeatable, economical and commercially viable manner. In addition, they must be manufactured so that environmental and human health concerns are met, worker safety issues are appropriately assessed and handled, and liability issues are addressed. Critical to this realization of robust manufacturing at the nanoscale is the development of the necessary instrumentation, metrology and standards, i.e. nanometrology. The National Measurement Laboratories are committed to developing the required metrology. Integration of the instruments, their interoperability and appropriate information management are also critical elements that must be considered for viable micro and nanomanufacturing. Advanced instrumentation, metrology and standards will allow the physical dimensions, properties, functionality and purity of the materials, processes, tools, systems, products and emissions that will constitute micro and nanomanufacturing to be measured and characterized. This will in turn enable production to be scalable, controllable, predictable and repeatable to meet market needs. If a product cannot be measured it cannot be manufactured; if that product cannot be made safely it should not be manufactured, and finally, if the metrology is not in place how would you know? The articles in this special feature can be classified into three categories: dimensional metrology (8 papers and one technical design note), density of particles (2 papers) and metrology of thermal properties (3 papers). The articles on dimensional metrology include scanning probe microscope dimensional metrology, the through focus scanning optical (TSOM) imaging method, scatterfield optical microscopy, helium ion microscopy, metrology and combinations of these microscopy and imaging techniques applied to nanostructures and particles such as cellulose nanocrystals, and targeted liposome-based delivery systems. Dimensional metrology covers grating pitch measurement by optical diffraction, measurement of the thickness of silicon oxide by synchrotron radiation x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) analysis and determination of pore size distribution of porous low-dielectric-constant films by x-ray scattering. The two papers on particle density present number concentration standards for aerosol nanoparticles of larger diameter than about 10 nm and liquid-borne particles in the range of 10-20 µm diameter, respectively. The three papers on metrology of thermal properties present recent innovative progress in thermophysical metrology of thin films by the ultrafast laser flash methods required for understanding of the thermal science at nanoscales and thermal design of nanodevices. The first paper improves the technology applicable under high pressures in a diamond anvil cell. The second extends this technology to thin films on silicon substrates. The third reports the first observation of non-diffusive heat transfer across thin films at low temperatures. In order to guarantee reliability and traceability of developed measurement methods for nanomaterials, a technical infrastructure for nanomaterials such as metrological standards, reference materials and document standards for measurement methods is important. We hope this special feature will be the first step in a collaboration towards a global harmonization of nanometrology.

  10. EDITORIAL: Electroactive polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Kim, Kwang J.; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Madden, John D. W.

    2007-04-01

    Imitating nature's mechanisms offers enormous potential for the improvement of our lives and the tools we use. This field of the study and imitation of, and inspiration from, nature's methods, designs and processes is known as biomimetics. Artificial muscles, i.e. electroactive polymers (EAPs), are one of the emerging technologies enabling biomimetics. Polymers that can be stimulated to change shape or size have been known for many years. The activation mechanisms of such polymers include electrical, chemical, pneumatic, optical and magnetic. Electrical excitation is one of the most attractive stimulators able to produce elastic deformation in polymers. The convenience and practicality of electrical stimulation and the continual improvement in capabilities make EAP materials some of the most attractive among activatable polymers (Bar-Cohen Y (ed) 2004 Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Actuators as Artificial Muscles—Reality, Potential and Challenges 2nd edn, vol PM136 (Bellingham, WA: SPIE Press) pp 1-765). As polymers, EAP materials offer many appealing characteristics that include low weight, fracture tolerance and pliability. Furthermore, they can be configured into almost any conceivable shape and their properties can be tailored to suit a broad range of requirements. These capabilities and the significant change of shape or size under electrical stimulation while being able to endure many cycles of actuation are inspiring many potential possibilities for EAP materials among engineers and scientists in many different disciplines. Practitioners in biomimetics are particularly excited about these materials since they can be used to mimic the movements of animals and insects. Potentially, mechanisms actuated by EAPs will enable engineers to create devices previously imaginable only in science fiction. For many years EAP materials received relatively little attention due to their poor actuation capability and the small number of available materials. In the last fifteen years, a series of new materials have emerged that exhibit large displacement in response to electrical stimulation. This capability is making them highly attractive as actuators for their operational similarity to biological muscles, particularly their resilience, quiet operation, damage tolerance and ability to induce large actuation strains (stretching, contracting or bending). The application of these materials as actuators involves multi-disciplines including materials, electromechanics, chemistry, computers and electronics. Even though the force of actuation of existing EAP materials and their robustness requires further improvement, there has already been a series of reported successes in the development of EAP-actuated mechanisms. Using EAP to replace existing actuators may be a difficult challenge and therefore it is highly desirable to identify a niche application where EAP materials would not need to compete with existing technologies. EAP materials can be divided into two major groups based on their activation mechanism: ionic or electronic. Electronic EAPs, such as electrostrictive, electrostatic, piezoelectric and ferroelectric, are driven by Coulomb forces. These types of EAP material can be made to hold the induced displacement while activated under a DC voltage, allowing them to be considered for robotic applications. These materials have high mechanical energy density and they can be operated in air with no major constraints. However, electronic EAPs require high activation fields (>10 V/μm) that are close to the breakdown level. In contrast to electronic EAPs, ionic EAPs are materials that involve the transport of ions and they consist of two electrodes and an electrolyte. The activation of ionic EAPs can be achieved by voltages as low as 1-2 volts. Examples of ionic EAPs include gels, polymer-metal composites, conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes. Their disadvantages are a need to maintain wetness and their low electromechanical coupling. Turning EAP materials into actuators-of-choice requires a well established infrastructure. Thi

  11. Non-editorial Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, John

    1974-01-01

    In his position as retiring chief of the Workers' Education Branch of the International Labour Office (ILO), Paul B. J. Chu is interviewed on worker education, the ILO organization and tole, personal disappointments and satisfactions, future educational developments in which the ILO will be involved, and problems facing workers' education. (AG)

  12. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert M.

    2004-07-01

    Industrial process tomography remains a multidisciplinary field with considerable interest for many varied participants. Indeed this adds greatly to its appeal. It is a pleasure and a privilege to once again act as guest editor for a special feature issue of Measurement Science and Technology on industrial process tomography, the last being in December 2002. Those involved in the subject appreciate the efforts of Measurement Science and Technology in producing another issue and I thank the journal on their behalf. It can be seen that there are considerable differences in the composition of material covered in this issue compared with previous publications. The dominance of electrical impedance and electrical capacitance techniques is reduced and there is increased emphasis on general utility of tomographic methods. This is encompassed in the papers of Hoyle and Jia (visualization) and Dierick et al (Octopus). Electrical capacitance tomography has been a core modality for industrial applications. This issue includes new work in two very interesting aspects of image reconstruction: pattern matching (Takei and Saito) and simulated annealing (Ortiz-Aleman et al). It is important to take advantage of knowledge of the process such as the presence of only two components, and then to have robust reconstruction methods provided by pattern matching and by simulated annealing. Although crude reconstruction methods such as approximation by linear back projection were utilized for initial work on electrical impedance tomography, the techniques published here are much more advanced. The paper by Kim et al includes modelling of a two-component system permitting an adaption-related approach; the paper by Tossavainen et al models free surface boundaries to enable the estimation of shapes of objects within the target. There are clear improvements on the previous crude and blurred reconstructions where boundaries were merely inferred rather than estimated as in these new developments. Interest in magnetic induction tomography has evolved recently and I am pleased to note the inclusion of new work in that modality by Casanova et al. Note that this work also makes full use of prior information to improve reconstruction results. A modality that is relatively new to industrial applications is featured by Holstein et al, namely acoustic tomography. The novelty is provided by using measurements of the speed of sound in gas (air) to identify temperature distributions. Two well chosen applications illustrate the technique. Hard-field tomography, that is the modalities of x-ray and gamma-ray tomography, has always been of interest for some industrial applications. Often this has been for the high resolution of reconstructions available with these techniques, but there application has been restricted due to concerns about use of ionizing radiation. Cattle et al include an application to a process where the material to be imaged is a gamma emitter, i.e. only passive sources are used. The novelty here is that both source and attenuation information is used concurrently to obtain reconstructions. I thank the authors for a fascinating collection of papers that reflect current interest in the subject of industrial process tomography.

  13. Tails and Ties. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, A.; Kaniadakis, G.; Scarfone, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    The study of behavioural and social phenomena has experienced a surge of interest over the last decade. One reason for this great attention is the huge amount of high quality data made available by the internet technologies. The many studies spanning concepts and problems belonging to economics, biology, ecology, physics and computer science, clearly indicates increasing interdisciplinary cross-fertilization, commonalities in the different approaches and communication across these disciplines. This issue of The European Physical Journal B is devoted to the interdisciplinary field of Sociophysics. The papers have been selected from the contributions presented at the 5th International Conference on “Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis" (APFA5) held in Torino from June 29th to July 1st 2006 ( http://www.polito.it/apfa5). The synergy and richness of results obtained from the investigation of problems belonging to the area of complexity science from different perspectives clearly indicates future directions and research methodologies in this field.

  14. EDITORIAL: Microwave Moisture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, Udo; Kupfer, Klaus; Hübner, Christof

    2007-04-01

    Microwave moisture measurements refer to a methodology by which the water content of materials is non-invasively determined using electromagnetic fields of radio and microwave frequencies. Being the omnipresent liquid on our planet, water occurs as a component in most materials and often exercises a significant influence on their properties. Precise measurements of the water content are thus extremely useful in pure sciences, particularly in biochemistry and biophysics. They are likewise important in many agricultural, technical and industrial fields. Applications are broad and diverse, and include the quality assessment of foodstuffs, the determination of water content in paper, cardboard and textile production, the monitoring of moisture in sands, gravels, soils and constructions, as well as the measurement of water admixtures to coal and crude oil in reservoirs and in pipelines. Microwave moisture measurements and evaluations require insights in various disciplines, such as materials science, dielectrics, the physical chemistry of water, electrodynamics and microwave techniques. The cooperation of experts from the different fields of science is thus necessary for the efficient development of this complex discipline. In order to advance cooperation the Workshop on Electromagnetic Wave Interaction with Water and Moist Substances was held in 1993 in Atlanta. It initiated a series of international conferences, of which the last one was held in 2005 in Weimar. The meeting brought together 130 scientists and engineers from all over the world. This special issue presents a collection of some selected papers that were given at the event. The papers cover most topics of the conference, featuring dielectric properties of aqueous materials, electromagnetic wave interactions, measurement methods and sensors, and various applications. The special issue is dedicated to Dr Andrzej W Kraszewski, who died in July 2006 after a distinguished career of 48 years in the research of microwave applications. Dr Kraszewski was a pioneer in moisture content sensing and the founder of microwave aquametry. He organized the first conferences on electromagnetic wave interactions with water and moist substances and helped to maintain the progress of microwave aquametry research internationally. Andrzej Kraszewski is missed by the microwave moisture measurement community who appreciated both his unusual technical ability and his pleasant and endearing character. Andrzej W Kraszewski, 1933-2006 We hope you will enjoy reading these papers and will extend your scientific curiosity to this field. Finally, we would like to thank all the authors, referees and the staff of Measurement Science and Technology for their contributions and support which have made the publication of this special issue possible.

  15. EDITORIAL: Ultrafast magnetization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrands, Burkard

    2008-09-01

    This Cluster Issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is devoted to ultrafast magnetization processes. It reports on the scientific yield of the Priority Programme 1133 'Ultrafast Magnetization Processes' which was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the period 2002-2008 in three successive two-year funding periods, supporting research of 17-18 groups in Germany. Now, at the end of this Priority Programme, the members feel that the achievements made in the course of the programme merit communication to the international scientific community in a concerted way. Therefore, each of the projects of the last funding period presents a key result in a published contribution to this Cluster Issue. The purpose of the funding by a Priority Programme is to advance knowledge in an emerging field of research through collaborative networked support over several locations. Priority Programmes are characterized by their enhanced quality of research through the use of new methods and forms of collaboration in emerging fields, by added value through interdisciplinary cooperation, and by networking. The aim of the Priority Programme 1133 'Ultrafast Magnetization Processes' may be well characterized by the call for projects in June 2001 after the programme was approved by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft: 'The aim of the priority programme is the achievement of a basic understanding of the temporal evolution of fast magnetization processes in magnetically ordered films, multilayers and micro-structured systems. The challenge lies in the advancement of the field of ultrafast magnetization processes into the regime of a few femtoseconds to nanoseconds, a topic not yet well explored. A general aim is to understand the fundamental mechanisms needed for applications in ultrafast magneto-electronic devices. The fundamental topic to be addressed is the response of the magnetization of small structures upon the application of pulsed magnetic fields, laser pulses or injected spin-polarized electron pulses on short time scales, ranging from a small disturbance of the system up to the reversal of the magnetization direction.' Now, seven years later, the subject of ultrafast magnetization processes has grown into a mainstream research direction in modern magnetism. The major international conferences on magnetism, such as the Annual Conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (MMM), the INTERMAG, the International Conference of Magnetism, as well as many regional conferences, schedule dedicated sessions to ultrafast magnetization processes, very often several of them. The large share in research in this field from German scientists has been made possible by this Priority Programme. Since its beginning, new developments have been picked up by the Priority Programme 1133 and addressed by projects. Spin torque phenomena in spin dynamics, although foreseen at the time of establishing the Priority Programme, have been taken up. The field of dissipation has been addressed and extended by several groups, with contributions both from theoretical and experimental groups. A first set of contributions addresses ultrafast dynamics and materials. T Roth et al [article 164001] in this issue] study the dynamics of coercivity in ultrafast pump-probe experiments on the femtosecond time scale. They show that an all optical pump-probe technique is, in general, not suitable for gaining access to the time-dependent behaviour of the coercivity, since the switching in a fixed external field is an irreversible process. They comment on the possible mechanisms leading to the observed reduction of the coercivity with increasing pump power and propose a potential solution to clarify the origin of such a behaviour. B Heitkamp et al [164002] discuss the femtosecond spin dynamics of ferromagnetic CoPt thin films and nanodots, which they probe using spin-polarized photoemission electron microscopy. They show by photoelectron spin analysis, that enhanced optical near fields can be used to induce a local demagnetization of the sample following femtosecond laser excitation. A B Schmidt et al [164003] report a new access to the surface electronic structure of fcc Co films combining spin-resolved one- and two-photon photoemission. The knowledge of surface states is important for interpreting time-resolved measurements of ultrafast magnetization dynamics in this material. An extension of ultrafast dynamics has been made by several groups. A Melnikov et al [164004] report on the ultrafast dynamics at lanthanide surfaces such as Gd(0001) and Tb(0001) using time-resolved second-harmonic generation and photoelectron spectroscopy. These surfaces exhibit a rich dynamics including a collective response of the crystal lattice and the magnetization. Effects of phonon-magnon scattering are discussed. M Fiebig et al [164005] report on experiments of ultrafast magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic compounds, and show that the magnetization dynamics in these systems differs noticeably from that of ferromagnetic compounds. They use optical second-harmonic generation and linear reflection to monitor the evolution of the antiferromagnetic order parameter subsequent to an intense optical excitation. In a theory paper, the local light-induced spin manipulation in two-magnetic-centre metallic chains is studied by T Hardenstein et al [164006] using highly correlational ab initio calculations. They show that, as an example of local spin manipulation, the spin on the iron side of a Co-Na-Fe cluster can be switched. S Halm et al [164007] present evidence to manipulate spin states in a diluted magnetic semiconductor on a submicrometer length scale via the magnetic fringe fields of micro-structured magnets. By optically switching the magnetization of the ferromagnet, the magnetization in the semiconductor is manipulated and the limits of a dynamical interaction between the spin states in the ferromagnet and the magnetic semiconductor are discussed. A second set of contributions addresses the field of spin waves and dynamic spin torque phenomena. C W Sandweg et al [164008] discuss the modification of the thermal spin wave spectrum by a domain wall in a narrow stripe and report the observation of a localized mode near the domain wall using the new technique of Brillouin light scattering microscopy. Time-resolved measurements are often made using a stroboscopic approach, thus missing non-periodic responses. P Möhrke et al [164009] report single-shot Kerr magnetometer measurements to observe the real time-domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires. The dynamics in magnetic disks is studied by I Neudecker et al [164010] using in-plane magnetic microwave fields for excitation. The effect of current-induced magnetization dynamics in single and double layer magnetic nanopillars is reported by N Müsgens et al [164011]. A spin-polarized charge current can modify the damping properties of spin waves in magnetic nanostructures. This is reported by V E Demidov et al [164012] using space-resolved Brillouin light scattering. They also present results regarding nonlinear spin-wave propagation and mode coupling in magnetic stripes and squares. D V Berkov and N L Gorn [164013] report on their results of nonlinear magnetization dynamics in nanodevices induced by a spin-polarized current using micromagnetic simulation. A third set of contributions focuses on dissipation phenomena ranging from a phenomenological description to the investigation of the microscopic origin(s). In a theory paper, M Fähnle et al [164014] revisit the Gilbert equation and discuss anisotropic and non-local damping of the magnetization dynamics. They derive their results by a combination of the breathing Fermi surface model with a variant of the ab initio density functional electron theory given by the magnetic force theorem. On the experimental side, S Serrano-Guisan et al [164015] address Gilbert damping in Ni81Fe19 thin films and microstructures using anisotropic magnetoresistance and pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry to measure the time-resolved precessional magnetization dynamics. The intrinsic and non-local Gilbert damping in polycrystalline Ni films is also addressed by J Walowski et al [164016] using femtosecond laser pulses. Several spin-wave modes are observed and their dissipation is studied. Non-local damping by spin currents emitted into a non-magnetic metallic layer of either vanadium, palladium or dysprosium is studied. Dissipation in small magnetic Ni81Fe19 rings is studied using Brillouin light scattering microscopy by H Schultheiss et al [164017]. They investigate the spatial profiles and the decay constants of spin-wave quasi-eigenmodes. We hope that this cluster of papers will help to stimulate and advance a better understanding of this very interesting field of ultrafast magnetization processes.

  16. EDITORIAL: Polarization Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Jari; Friesem, Asher A.; Friberg, Ari T.

    2004-03-01

    This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which are based on presentations at the International Commission for Optics Topical Meeting on Polarization Optics, held in Polvijärvi, Finland, between 30 June and 3 July 2003. While this issue should not in any sense be considered as a `proceedings' of this meeting, the possibility of submitting papers to it was widely advertised during the meeting, which was attended by a large fraction of prominent scientists in the field of polarization optics. Thus the quality of papers in this special issue is high. In announcing both the meeting and this special issue, we emphasized that the concept of `polarization optics' should be understood in a wide sense. In fact, all contributions dealing with the vectorial nature of light were welcome. As a result, the papers included here cover a wide range of different aspects of linear and nonlinear polarization optics. Both theoretical and experimental features are discussed. We are pleased to see that the conference and this special issue both reflect the wide diversity of important and novel polarization phenomena in optics. The papers in this special issue, and other recently published works, demonstrate that even though polarization is a fundamental property of electromagnetic fields, interest in it is rapidly increasing. The fundamental relations between partial coherence and partial polarization are currently under vigorous research in electromagnetic coherence theory. In diffractive optics it has been found that the exploitation of the vectorial nature of light can be of great benefit. Fabrication of sophisticated, spatially variable polarization-control elements is becoming possible with the aid of nanolithography. Polarization singularities and the interplay of bulk properties and topology in nanoscale systems have created much enthusiasm. In nonlinear optics, the second harmonic waves generated on reflection and transmission of intense light enable research into the chirality of nanogratings. Pump-probe techniques allow one to visualize the effects of the nanostructure topology on the surface mode excitation. In quantum optics the coherent control of polarization may lead to new and fascinating applications. Some authors of invited papers at the conference have written review-type introductory sections—they were encouraged to do so—but all contributions are genuine research papers with original results, and were judged according to the normal publication criteria of the journal. It is our pleasure to thank all authors for making this a splendid special issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics.

  17. Randomized Controlled Trial of Nuevo Amanecer: A Peer-delivered Stress Management Intervention for Spanish-speaking Latinas with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nápoles, Anna María; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Ortiz, Carmen; Gregorich, Steven; Lee, Howard E.; Duron, Ysabel; Graves, Kristi; Luce, Judith A.; McGuire, Peggy; Díaz-Méndez, Marynieves; Stewart, Anita L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Latinas with breast cancer suffer symptom and psychosocial health disparities. Effective interventions have not been developed for or tested in this population. Purpose We describe community-based participatory research methods used to develop and implement the Nuevo Amanecer program, a culturally tailored, peer-delivered cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention for low-income Spanish-speaking Latinas with breast cancer, and unique considerations in implementing a randomized controlled trial to test the program in community settings. Methods We applied an implementation science framework to delineate the methodological phases used to develop and implement the Nuevo Amanecer program and trial, emphasizing community engagement processes. Results In phase 1, we established project infrastructure: academic and community Co-Principal Investigators, community partners, community advisory board, steering committee, and funding. In phase 2, we identified three program inputs: formative research, a community best practices model, and an evidence-based intervention tested in non-Latinas. In phase 3, we created the new program by integrating and adapting intervention components from the three sources, making adaptations to accommodate low-literacy, Spanish language, cultural factors, community context, and population needs. In phase 4, we built community capacity for the program and trial by training field staff (recruiters and interventionists embedded in community sites), compensating field staff, and creating a system for identifying potential participants. In phase 5, we implemented and monitored the program and trial. Engaging community partners in all phases has resulted in a new, culturally tailored program that is suitable for newly diagnosed Latinas with breast cancer and a trial that is acceptable and supported by community and clinical partners. Lessons Learned Engagement of community-based organizations and cancer survivors as research

  18. EDITORIAL: The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Soto, Luis L.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2012-02-01

    to the proceedings of the 15th CEWQO (Physica Scripta 2009 T135 011005). The 18th edition of CEWQO (CEWQO11) was held in Madrid in 2011. There were about 250 participants, from practically every European country. Many colleagues from other continents also joined the event, including well-established researchers in the field. This is a clear demonstration that these meetings provide an excellent chance to hear about the latest results and new directions of research. The organization of CEWQO11 was carried out by a committee consisting of members active in this topic in Madrid. From Universidad Complutense, Alberto Galindo and Luis L Sánchez-Soto from Universidad Autónoma, Jose Calleja and Carlos Tejedor; from Universidad Politécnica, Enrique Calleja; from Universidad Carlos III, Alberto Ibort; and from the National Research Council (CSIC), Juan León and Juan J García-Ripoll. Special thanks go to the Spanish Ministry for Science and Innovation, Universidad Complutense and the Quitemad Consortium for financial support. The proceedings of the 16th CEWQO held at the University of Turku, Finland and the 17th CEWQO held at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK are also available (Physica Scripta 2010 T140 and Physica Scripta 2011 T143). The present Topical Issue is a collection of papers presented in Madrid; they represent an illustrative sample of the major achievements and trends in this area. In turn, they reflect the wide range of interests in this rapidly evolving field. Some collaborators from different scientific centres who could not, due to different reasons, come to Madrid, but participated in previous CEWQOs and plan to participate in future CEWQOs, also contributed to this issue. The papers are arranged alphabetically by the name of the first author. Special thanks goes to Roger Wäppling, the Managing Editor of Physica Scripta, and Graeme Watt, the Publisher, for the opportunity to publish CEWQO11. From a Physica Scripta Editorial Board meeting it was

  19. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2012-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 is awarded to Matthew Hough et al from the University of Florida, the Francis Marion University and the National Cancer Institute, USA for their paper on a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of skeletal tissues in the adult male: An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male—internal electron sources 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309 Matthew Hough1, Perry Johnson1, Didier Rajon2, Derek Jokisch3, Choonsik Lee4 and Wesley Bolch1,5 1Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC, USA 4Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Bone marrow is one of the more radiosensitive tissues in the human body and is housed within a complex structure of bone. This paper describes a comprehensive model of energy deposition by internal electron or beta particle emitters for the ICRP reference adult male based upon ex vivo CT and microCT images of

  20. Distribution of ixodid ticks on dogs in Nuevo León, Mexico, and their association with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Galaviz-Silva, Lucio; Pérez-Treviño, Karla Carmelita; Molina-Garza, Zinnia J

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to document the geographic distribution of Ixodes tick species in dogs and the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. in adult ticks and blood samples by amplification of the ospA region of the B. burgdorferi genome. The study area included nine localities in Nuevo León state. DNA amplification was performed on pools of ticks to calculate the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), and the community composition (prevalence, abundance, and intensity of infestation) was recorded. A total of 2,543 adult ticks, representing four species, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Dermacentor variabilis, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus, and Amblyomma cajennense, were recorded from 338 infested dogs. Statistically significant correlations were observed between female dogs and infestation (P = 0.0003) and between R. sanguineus and locality (P = 0.0001). Dogs sampled in Guadalupe and Estanzuela were positive by PCR (0.9 %) for B. burgdorferi. Rhipicephalus sanguineus had the highest abundance, intensity, and prevalence (10.57, 7.12 and 94.6, respectively). PCR results from 256 pools showed that four pools were positive for D. variabilis (1.6 %), with an MLE of 9.2 %; nevertheless, it is important to consider that in the area under examination probably other reservoir hosts for D. variabilis and B. burgdorferi are present that, very likely, play a much more important role in the ecology of Lyme borreliosis than dogs, which could be considered in future studies. PMID:23749032

  1. Percepcion de los profesores universitarios acerca del concepto cultura cientifica y de sus implicaciones en el nuevo bachillerato del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Pastrana, Nilsa

    El Senado Academico del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico aprobo en el ano academico 2005-2006 la Certificacion 46, que contiene los lineamientos de un nuevo bachillerato. Este nuevo bachillerato introdujo cambios significativos en el curriculo tradicional. Entre ellos se encuentra la reduccion del componente de educacion general y el de Ciencias Biologicas en particular. La reduccion de creditos en el componente de Ciencias Biologicas ha obligado a reevaluar el concepto de cultura cientifica que desarrollan esos cursos. El proposito del estudio consistio en auscultar las percepciones de los profesores de las Facultades de Administracion de Empresas, Humanidades, Ciencias Sociales, Ciencias Naturales, Educacion y Estudios Generales del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico en torno al concepto de cultura cientifica, los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas y la reduccion de creditos en el nuevo bachillerato. Las preguntas que guiaron la investigacion fueron: ¿cuales son las percepciones que tienen los profesores de las Facultades de Administracion de Empresas, Ciencias Sociales, Estudios Generales, Ciencias Naturales, Humanidades y Educacion, en torno al concepto de cultura cientifica y los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas? ¿cuales son las percepciones que tienen los profesores de Ciencias Biologicas en torno al concepto cultura cientifica y los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas? ¿existen diferencias significativas por facultad, genero, experiencia, rango y nombramiento en las percepciones que tienen los profesores del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico sobre los elementos que caracterizan la cultura cientifica y los contenidos biologicos que deben tener los egresados del Recinto? ¿que implicaciones curriculares tienen estos testimonios en el desarrollo del concepto de cultura cientifica en el nuevo bachillerato? Para realizar la

  2. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2011 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2011 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul; Tatam, Ralph

    2012-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believe that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards'. This year awards were presented in the areas of 'Measurement Science', 'Fluid Mechanics' and 'Precision Measurement'. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. 2011 Award Winners—Measurement Science Simultaneous measurement of internal and surrounding flows of a moving droplet using multicolour confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) M Oishi, H Kinoshita, T Fujii and M Oshima Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan Whilst the award last year [1] was concerned with the application of microscopy to ultra-high vacuum dynamic force measurements, this year's award [2] goes to another micro-measurement technique, one concerned with measurements related to particle image velocimetry. The technique relates to multiphase flow in microfluidic devices, and offers a non-contact methodology for examining simultaneous dynamic interactions between flows having different phases. There are several features which make this an excellent paper. It introduces its subject with a clear and concise description of previous advances in related measurement methods, before introducing the additional feature of two-colour fluorescent monitoring of flow in two independent optical channels. By adapting a

  3. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2012 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2012 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Yacoot, Andrew; Regtien, Paul; Peters, Kara

    2013-07-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards'. This year awards were presented in the areas of 'Measurement Science' and 'Fluid Mechanics'. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. 2012 Award Winners—Measurement Science Physical characterization and performance evaluation of an x-ray micro-computed tomography system for dimensional metrology applications J Hiller1, M Maisl2 and L M Reindl3 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Produktionstorvet, Building 425, 2800 Kgs Lyngby, Denmark 2 Development Center for X-Ray Technology (EZRT), Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (IZFP), Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany 3 Laboratory for Electrical Instrumentation, Institute for Microsystem Technology (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg, Germany This year's award goes to another paper [1] dealing with micro-measurements, using a scientific measurement technique that is both old and traditional. However, it is the advent of modern technology with computational techniques that have offered new insights into the capability of the measurement method. The paper describes an x-ray computed tomography (CT) system. Such systems are increasingly used in production engineering, where non-destructive measurements of the internal geometries of workpieces can be made with high information density. CT offers important alternatives to tactile

  4. EDITORIAL: Instrumentation and Methods for Neutron Scattering—papers from the 4th European Conference on Neutron Scattering in Lund, Sweden, June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Adrian R.

    2008-03-01

    components such as detectors, polarizers, focusing devices and sample environments. The organizers and participants are extremely grateful to numerous sponsors that helped to make the conference a great success. An equal debt of gratitude is due to the Institute of Physics and the editorial and publishing staff for agreeing to publish these papers and organizing the refereeing and editorial process efficiently and promptly in a friendly way.

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit FOCUS ON MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AT THE QUANTUM LIMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Schwab, Keith

    2008-09-01

    The last five years have witnessed an amazing development in the field of nano- and micromechanics. What was widely considered fantasy ten years ago is about to become an experimental reality: the quantum regime of mechanical systems is within reach of current experiments. Two factors (among many) have contributed significantly to this situation. As part of the widespread effort into nanoscience and nanofabrication, it is now possible to produce high-quality nanomechanical and micromechanical resonators, spanning length scales of millimetres to nanometres, and frequencies from kilohertz to gigahertz. Researchers coupled these mechanical elements to high-sensitivity actuation and readout systems such as single-electron transistors, quantum dots, atomic point contacts, SQUID loops, high-finesse optical or microwave-cavities etc. Some of these ultra-sensitive readout schemes are in principle capable of detection at the quantum limit and a large part of the experimental effort is at present devoted to achieving this. On the other hand, the fact that the groups working in the field come from various different physics backgrounds—the authors of this editorial are a representative sample—has been a constant source of inspiration for helpful theoretical and experimental tools that have been adapted from other fields to the mechanical realm. To name just one example: ideas from quantum optics have led to the recent demonstration (both in theory and experiment) that coupling a mechanical resonator to a high-finesse optical cavity can be fully analogous to the well-known sideband-resolved laser cooling of ions and hence is capable in principle of cooling a mechanical mode into its quantum ground state. There is no doubt that such interdisciplinarity has been a crucial element for the development of the field. It is interesting to note that a very similar sociological phenomenon occurred earlier in the quantum information community, an area which is deeply enriched by the

  6. Near Surface Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault, Point Año Nuevo, San Mateo County, California, from Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, L.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Weber, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The San Gregorio Fault Zone (SGFZ) is one of the major faults of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in the San Francisco Bay region of California. The SGFZ is nearly 200 km long, trends subparallel to the SAF, and is located primarily offshore with two exceptions- between Point Año Nuevo and San Gregorio Beach and between Pillar Point and Moss Beach. It has a total width of 2 to 3 km and is comprised of seven known fault strands with Quaternary activity, five of which also demonstrate late Holocene activity. The fault is clearly a potential source of significant earthquakes and has been assigned a maximum likely magnitude of 7.3. To better understand the structure, geometry, and shallow-depth P-wave velocities associated with the SGFZ, we acquired a 585-m-long, high-resolution, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across the Frijoles strand of the SGFZ at Point Año Nuevo State Park. Both P- and S-wave data were acquired, but here we present only the P-wave data. We used two 60-channel Geometrics RX60 seismographs and 120 40-Hz single-element geophones connected via cable to record Betsy Seisgun seismic sources (shots). Both shots and geophones were approximately co-located and spaced at 5-m intervals along the profile, with the shots offset laterally from the geophones by 1 m. We measured first-arrival refractions from all shots and geophones to develop a seismic refraction tomography velocity model of the upper 70 m. P-wave velocities range from about 600 m/s near the surface to more than 2400 m/s at 70 m depth. We used the refraction tomography image to infer the depth to the top of the groundwater table on the basis of the 1500 m/s velocity contour. The image suggests that the depth, along the profile, to the top of groundwater varies by about 18 m, with greater depth on the west side of the fault. At about 46 m depth, a 60- to 80-m-wide, low-velocity zone, which is consistent with faulting, is observed southwest of the Frijoles strand of the

  7. Antibody profile to Borrelia burgdorferi in veterinarians from Nuevo León, Mexico, a non-endemic area of this zoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner-Taylor, Cassandra M.; Salinas, José A.; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Galán-Wong, Luis J.; Maldonado, Guadalupe; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease caused by infections with Borrelia. Persons infected with Borrelia can be asymptomatic or can develop disseminated disease. Diagnosis and recognition of groups at risk of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is of great interest to contemporary rheumatology. There are a few reports about Borrelia infection in Mexico, including lymphocytoma cases positive to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto by PCR and a patient with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Veterinarians have an occupational risk due to high rates of tick contact. The aim of this work was to investigate antibodies to Borrelia in students at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Zootechnics, at Nuevo León, Mexico, and determine the antibody profile to B. burgdorferi antigens. Material and methods Sera were screened using a C6 ELISA, IgG and IgM ELISA using recombinant proteins from B. burgdorferi, B. garinii and B. afzelii. Sera with positive or grey-zone values were tested by IgG Western blot to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. Results All volunteers reported tick exposures and 72.5% remembered tick bites. Only nine persons described mild Lyme disease related symptoms, including headaches, paresthesias, myalgias and arthralgias. None of the volunteers reported erythema migrans. Nine samples were confirmed by IgG Western blot. The profile showed 89% reactivity to OspA, 67% to p83, and 45% to BmpA. Conclusions Positive sera samples shared antibody reactivity to the markers of late immune response p83 and BmpA, even if individuals did not present symptoms of Lyme arthritis or post-Lyme disease. The best criterion to diagnose Lyme disease in our country remains to be established, because it is probable that different strains coexist in Mexico. This is the first report of antibodies to B. burgdorferi in Latin American veterinarians. Veterinarians and high-risk people should be alert to take precautionary measures to prevent tick-borne diseases. PMID:27504018

  8. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverlag, Marco; Kroesen, Gerrit; Ferguson, Ian

    2011-06-01

    -based light sources. However, the progress in the last few years in LED and OLED sources has been even greater. In the editorial for the LS-11 conference by previous guest editor David Wharmby, it was stated that most LED lighting was still mostly used for signalling and decorative sources. In the three years that have passed, things have changed considerably and we now see LED light sources entering every application, ranging from street lighting and parking lots to shop lighting and even greenhouses. Currently LED prices for traditional lighting applications are high, but they are dropping rapidly. The papers published in this special issue give some indications of things to come. The paper by Jamil et al deals with the possibility of using silicon wafers as substrate material instead of the now commonly used (but more expensive) sapphire substrates. This is attractive from a cost price point of view, but leads to an increased lattice mismatch and therefore strain-induced defects. In this paper it is shown that when using intermediate matching layers it is possible to retain the same electrical and optical properties as with structures on sapphire. Another aspect that directly relates to cost is efficiency and droop in green InGaN devices, which is addressed in the paper by Lee et al. They show that by providing a flow of trymethylindium prior to the growth of the quantum wells it is possible to significantly increase the internal quantum efficiency of green LEDs. Improvement of the optical out-coupling of InGaN LEDs is discussed by Mak et al, and it is found that localized plasmon resonance of metallic nanoparticles (and especially silver) can help to increase the optical out-coupling in the wavelength region of interest. Nanoparticles in the form of ZnO nanorods are described by Willander et al as a possibility for phosphor-free wavelength conversion on polymer (O)LEDs. More advanced functions besides light emission can be achieved with OLEDs and this is demonstrated in

  9. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2009 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2009 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. This year also saw the introduction of a new category—Optical and Laser-based Techniques. 2009 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) robust phase correlation Adric Eckstein and Pavlos P Vlachos Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA This paper [1] represents a valuable improvement to the phase-only correlation technique (first proposed by Wernet in this journal in 2005 (Wernet M 2005 Symmetric phase-only filtering: a new paradigm for DPIV data processing Meas. Sci. Technol. 16 601-18) for particle-image-velocimetry (PIV) measurements of fluid flow. The authors establish a sound theoretical foundation and clearly describe the working principle of their robust phase correlation method. The methodology for assessing performance is excellent. Detailed results on several internationally recognized PIV test cases are presented. The robust phase correlation method is of general applicability and therefore can be expected to have substantial impact in this very active area of fluid-mechanics measurements. 2009 Award Winner—Precision Measurement A nanonewton force facility and a novel method for measurements of the air and vacuum permittivity at zero frequencies V Nesterov Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany This paper [2] describes a

  10. EDITORIAL: Richard Palmer: celebrating 37 years with Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter Richard Palmer: celebrating 37 years with Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, David

    2009-01-01

    It is with a great deal of both happiness and sadness that I have to announce that we are losing one of the real strengths of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM). Dr Richard Palmer, our Senior Publisher, announced his retirement, and this issue marks the first without his involvement. Of course, we are happy that he will get to enjoy his retirement, but we are sad to lose such a valuable member of our team. Richard first started work at IOP Publishing in March 1971 as an Editorial Assistant with Journal of Physics B: Atomic and Molecular Physics. After a few months, he transferred to Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics. During his first year, he was sent on a residential publishing training course and asked to sign an undertaking to stay at IOP Publishing for at least two years. Although Richard refused to sign, as he did not want to commit himself, he has remained with the journal since then. The following year, the Assistant Editor of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, Malcolm Haines, walked out without notice in order to work on his family vineyard in France, and Richard stepped into the breach. In those days, external editors had a much more hands-on role in IOP Publishing and he had to travel to Harwell to be interviewed by Alan Lidiard, the Honorary Editor of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, before being given the job of Assistant Editor permanently. I am told that in those days the job consisted mainly of editing and proofreading and peer review. There was no journal development work. At some point in the early 1980s, production and peer review were split into separate departments and Richard then headed a group of journals consisting of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics and Journal of Physics F: Metal Physics, Semiconductor Science and Technology, Superconductor Science and Technology, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, and later Nanotechnology and Modelling and Simulation

  11. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even

  12. EDITORIAL: Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manske, E.; Froehlich, T.

    2012-07-01

    Editorial Board of Measurement Science and Technology for their support.

  13. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2010 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2010 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. This year, for example, the winning article of the Outstanding Paper Award in Sensors and Sensing Systems was an article published in the 'Novel Instrumentation' section. 2010 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics Assessment of pressure field calculations from particle image velocimetry measurements John J Charonko, Cameron V King, Barton L Smith and Pavlos P Vlachos Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA VT-WFU School of Biomedical Engineering & Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Utah State University, UMC4130, Logan, UT 84322, USA Measuring p(t) in the interior of a flow field is one of the most challenging measurements in our field of study. An accurate knowledge of these interior pressures is of considerable value for fundamental studies. Since the gradient of the pressure appears in the Navier-Stokes equations, a knowledge of the pressure at a bounding surface followed by operations on the measured velocity components within the flow field can be analytically related to the pressure at an interior location. Bringing this long-recognized possibility to operational status has been greatly aided by the advent of

  14. EDITORIAL: Siberia Integrated Regional Study: multidisciplinary investigations of the dynamic relationship between the Siberian environment and global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Vaganov, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    This is an editorial overview of the Siberia Integrated Regional Study (SIRS), which is a large-scale investigation of ongoing and future environmental change in Siberia and its relationship to global processes, approaches, existing challenges and future direction. Introduction The SIRS is a mega-project within the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), which coordinates interdisciplinary, national and international activities in Northern Eurasia that follow the Earth System Science Program (ESSP) approach. Under the direction of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP), SIRS is one of the Integrated Regional Studies (IRS) that aims to investigate environmental change in Siberia under the current environment of global change, and the potential impact on Earth system dynamics [1]. The regions of interest are those that may function as 'choke or switch points' for the global Earth system, where changes in regional biophysical, biogeochemical and anthropogenic components may have significant consequences for the Earth system at the global scale. Siberia is a large and significant region that may compel change [2]. Regional consequences of global warming (e.g. anomalous increases in cold season temperatures) have already been documented for Siberia [3]. This result is also supported by climate modeling results for the 20th-22nd centuries [4]. Future climatic change threatens Siberia with the shift of permafrost boundaries northward, dramatic changes in land cover (redistribution among boreal forest, wetlands, tundra, and steppe zones often precipitated by fire regime change) and the entire hydrological regime of the territory [5-8]. These processes feed back to and influence climate dynamics through the exchange of energy, water, greenhouse gases and aerosols [9]. Even though there have been a handful of national and international projects focused on the Siberian environment, scientists have minimal knowledge about the processes

  15. EDITORIAL: Challenges for first-principles based properties of defects in semiconductors and oxides Challenges for first-principles based properties of defects in semiconductors and oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    ]. One contribution discusses the challenges of translating the results at the microscale into the macroscopic response of the material in a multiscale approach [Makov et al], and the issue closes with a discussion of neglected gaps in the first-principles modelling of defects, important problems that are commonly overlooked and perhaps deserving greater attention [Stoneham]. All papers were peer-reviewed following the standard procedure established by the Editorial Board of Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering. Peter A Schultz Sandia National Laboratories, USA Guest Editor

  16. EDITORIAL: The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jack Jiqui; Fang, Fengzhou

    2009-05-01

    would like to express our sincere thanks to Dr Ian Forbes and the other members of editorial board of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering of the Institute of Physics for their help and support in making this special section. The conference was a success. We found there is a great demand for continuation of the conference, and it has been agreed by the conference committee to hold the conference biannually from now on. The 2nd International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2010) is to be held in Tianjin, China in 2010. On behalf of the committee we would like to take this opportunity to welcome everybody to NanoMan2010.

  17. EDITORIAL: The interaction of radio-frequency fields with fusion plasmas: the JET experience The interaction of radio-frequency fields with fusion plasmas: the JET experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, Jef

    2012-07-01

    The JET Task Force Heating is proud to present this special issue. It is the result of hard and dedicated work by everybody participating in the Task Force over the last four years and gives an overview of the experimental and theoretical results obtained in the period 2008-2010 with radio frequency heating of JET fusion plasmas. Topics studied and reported in this issue are: investigations into the operation of lower hybrid heating accompanied by new modeling results; new experimental results and insights into the physics of various ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating scenarios; progress in studies of intrinsic and ion cyclotron wave-induced plasma rotation and flows; a summary of the developments over the last years in designing an ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRH) system that can cope with the presence of fast load variations in the edge, as e.g. caused by pellets or edge localized modes (ELMs) during H-Mode operation; an overview of the results obtained with the ITER-like antenna operating in H-Mode with a packed array of straps and power densities close to those of the projected ITER ICRH antenna; and, finally, a summary of the results obtained in applying ion cyclotron waves for wall conditioning of the tokamak. This issue would not have been possible without the strong motivation and efforts (sometimes truly heroic) of all colleagues of the JET Task Force Heating. A sincere word of thanks, therefore, to all authors and co-authors involved in the experiments, analysis and compilation of the papers. It was a special privilege to work with all of them during the past very intense years. Thanks also to all other European and non-European scientists who contributed to the JET scientific programme, the operations team of JET and the colleagues of the Close Support Unit in Culham. Thanks also to the editors, Editorial Board and referees of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, together with the publishing staff of IOPP, who have not only

  18. EDITORIAL: The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS--> Nader Sadeghi,

  1. EDITORIAL: Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    the symposium. We particularly express our appreciation to the Editorial Board of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics for publication of the special issue.

  2. EDITORIAL: Attosecond and x-ray free-electron laser physics Attosecond and x-ray free-electron laser physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2009-07-01

    investigated bridging the gap from atoms and molecules to solids introduced to intense FEL radiation. Beyond the basic interest in many-particle dynamics in finite systems, these studies are of enormous practical relevance for upcoming research at X-ray FELs. Here, realizing the dream of coherent imaging of the structure of single bio-molecules in the gas phase with atomic resolution is critically dependent on ultra-fast dynamics initiated by the pulse. In other words, it is reduced to the simple question of whether the molecule is first imaged and then destroyed or vice versa! During the preparation of this Editorial, the first lasing at the Stanford Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) was achieved at a photon energy of about 8 keV - a further milestone in this exciting revolution in the science related to light.

  3. Guest Editorial: Pressure Injury Brexit?

    PubMed

    Milne, Catherine T

    2016-07-01

    Christopher Columbus initially was scorned because he believed an alternative trade route to the East existed. Like most groundbreaking exploration, Columbus' came with unintended consequences. His serendipitous findings: a new land. The consequence? Transmitting devastating illnesses with massive population loss to indigenous people. PMID:27428562

  4. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    All matter is more or less hygroscopic. The moisture content varies with vapour concentration of the surrounding air and, as a consequence, most material properties change with humidity. Mechanical and thermal properties of many materials, such as the tensile strength of adhesives, stiffness of plastics, stoutness of building and packaging materials or the thermal resistivity of isolation materials, all decrease with increasing environmental humidity or cyclic humidity changes. The presence of water vapour may have a detrimental influence on many electrical constructions and systems exposed to humid air, from high-power systems to microcircuits. Water vapour penetrates through coatings, cable insulations and integrated-circuit packages, exerting a fatal influence on the performance of the enclosed systems. For these and many other applications, knowledge of the relationship between moisture content or humidity and material properties or system behaviour is indispensable. This requires hygrometers for process control or test and calibration chambers with high accuracy in the appropriate temperature and humidity range. Humidity measurement methods can roughly be categorized into four groups: water vapour removal (the mass before and after removal is measured); saturation (the air is brought to saturation and the `effort' to reach that state is measured); humidity-dependent parameters (measurement of properties of humid air with a known relation between a specific property and the vapour content, for instance the refractive index, electromagnetic spectrum and acoustic velocity); and absorption (based on the known relation between characteristic properties of non-hydrophobic materials and the amount of absorbed water from the gas to which these materials are exposed). The many basic principles to measure air humidity are described in, for instance, the extensive compilations by Wexler [1] and Sonntag [2]. Absorption-type hygrometers have small dimensions and can be produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate, since it uses the accurately known relation between temperature and saturation vapour pressure in air. When an object exposed to humid air is cooled down below the dew-point water vapour condenses as drops on its cold surface. The temperature can be kept exactly at the dew point by controlling the amount of dew (equilibrium between evaporation and condensation). In most dew-point hygrometers dew is detected with optical or capacitive means. In the former the dew drops on a reflective surface (chilled mirror) scatter incident light, and the capacitive method uses the change in capacitance due to the large dielectric constant of liquid water (80) compared to air (1). Kunze et al, in the fourth paper of this special feature, use another property of water to detect dew: the relatively high value of the thermal capacitance of liquid water. In traditional technology this method would not be sensitive enough, but with MEMS technology a sufficient detectivity of dew can be achieved, which is demonstrated in this paper. A control system keeps the temperature of the substrate just at the dew-point temperature, the latter being measured by an on-chip diode. The accuracy achieved is comparable with traditional dew-point hygrometers. These four papers in this issue are nice examples of research leading to significant advances in hygrometry. References [1] Wexler A (ed) 1965 Humidity and Moisture. Vol. I: Principles and Methods of Measuring Humidity in Gases; Vol. II: Applications; Vol. III: Fundamentals and Standards; Vol. IV: Principles and Methods of Measuring Moisture in Liquids and Solids (New York: Reinhold) [2] Sonntag D 1966-1968 Hygrometrie (Berlin: Akademie Verlag)

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    Gravitational lensing emerged as an observational field following the 1979 discovery of a doubly imaged quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy. In the 1980s and '90s dozens of other multiply imaged systems were observed, as well as time delay measurements, weak and strong lensing by galaxies and galaxy clusters, and the discovery of microlensing in our galaxy. The rapid pace of advances has continued into the new century. Lensing is currently one of best techniques for finding and mapping dark matter over a wide range of scales, and also addresses broader cosmological questions such as understanding the nature of dark energy. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics presents a snapshot of current research in some of the exciting areas of lensing. It provides an occasion to look back at the advances of the last decade and ahead to the potential of the coming years. Just about a decade ago, microlensing was discovered through the magnification of stars in our galaxy by invisible objects with masses between that of Jupiter and a tenth the mass of the Sun. Thus a new component of the mass of our galaxy, dubbed MACHOs, was established (though a diffuse, cold dark matter-like component is still needed to make up most of the galaxy mass). More recently, microlensing led to another exciting discovery—of extra-solar planets with masses ranging from about five times that of Earth to that of Neptune. We can expect many more planets to be discovered through ongoing surveys. Microlensing is the best technique for finding Earth mass planets, though it is not as productive overall as other methods and does not allow for follow up observations. Beyond planet hunting, microlensing has enabled us to observe previously inaccessible systems, ranging from the surfaces of other stars to the accretion disks around the black holes powering distant quasars. Galaxies and galaxy clusters at cosmological distances can produce dramatic lensing effects: multiple images of background galaxies or quasars which are strongly magnified and sheared. In the last decade, double and quadruply imaged systems due to galactic lenses have been studied with optical and radio observations. An interesting result obtained from the flux ratio 'anomalies' of quadruply imaged systems is the statistical detection of dark sub-clumps in galaxy halos. More broadly, while we have learned a lot about the mass distribution in lens galaxies and improved time delay constraints on the Hubble constant, the limitations of cosmological studies with strong lensing due to uncertainties in lens mass models have also come to be appreciated. That said, progress will no doubt continue with qualitative advances in observations such as astrometric counterparts to the flux anomalies, clever ideas such as the use of spectroscopic signatures to assemble the SLACS lens sample, and combining optical imaging, spectroscopy and radio data to continue the quest for a set of golden lenses to measure the Hubble constant. Galaxy clusters are a fascinating arena for studying the distribution of dark and baryonic matter. Weak and strong lensing information can be combined with dynamical information from the spectroscopic measurements of member galaxies and x-ray/Sunyaev Zeldovich measurements of the hot ionized gas. Hubble Space Telescope observations have yielded spectacular images of clusters, such as Abell 1689, which has over a hundred multiply imaged arcs. Mass measurements have progressed to the level of 10 percent accuracy for several clusters. Unfortunately, it is unclear if one can do much better for individual clusters given inherent limitations such as unknown projection effects. The statistical study of clusters is likely to remain a promising way to study dark matter, gravity theories, and cosmology. Techniques to combine weak and strong lensing information to obtain the mass distribution of clusters have also advanced, and work continues on parameter-free techniques that are agnostic to the relation of cluster light and mass. An interesting twist in cluster lensing was provided by the pos

  6. Editorial: Of Past And Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1985-06-01

    To John Conant for six hard years of behind-the-scenes work, and To his staff (Barbara DeNapoli, Ann Lear, Ruth Azevedo, and Irene (Breen) for supporting him; To two successive managing editors (Marybeth Manning and Eric Pepper), who maintained the high standards of quality set by their predecessor, Elaine Cherry, Director of Publications 'for the Society; To my predecessor, John DeVelis, for continued encouragement; To my friend, Joe 'aver, Executive Director of SPIE, for his unfailing support; To Aerodyne Research, Inc., and especially to Chuck Kolb and Jim Draper, for six years of support not necessarily visible to anyone but me; To Joe Horner and Winn Gaynor for making "SPIE Reports" exciting and valuable; To the best executive secretary I have ever known, Shirley Fedukowski, for trying so valiantly to keep me organized; To the many contributors, special issue editors, reviewers, and readers of Optical Engineering-Thank you. I have truly appreciated your help.

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Attosecond Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Krausz, Ferenc; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    Investigations of light-matter interactions and motion in the microcosm have entered a new temporal regime, the regime of attosecond physics. It is a main 'spin-off' of strong field (i.e., intense laser) physics, in which nonperturbative effects are fundamental. Attosecond pulses open up new avenues for time-domain studies of multi-electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas, and solids on their natural, quantum mechanical time scale and at dimensions shorter than molecular and even atomic scales. These capabilities promise a revolution in our microscopic knowledge and understanding of matter. The recent development of intense, phase-stabilized femtosecond (10-15 s) lasers has allowed unparalleled temporal control of electrons from ionizing atoms, permitting for the first time the generation and measurement of isolated light pulses as well as trains of pulses on the attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) time scale, the natural time scale of the electron itself (e.g., the orbital period of an electron in the ground state of the H atom is 152 as). This development is facilitating (and even catalyzing) a new class of ultrashort time domain studies in photobiology, photochemistry, and photophysics. These new coherent, sub-fs pulses carried at frequencies in the extreme ultraviolet and soft-x-ray spectral regions, along with their intense, synchronized near-infrared driver waveforms and novel metrology based on sub-fs control of electron-light interactions, are spawning the new science of attosecond physics, whose aims are to monitor, to visualize, and, ultimately, to control electrons on their own time and spatial scales, i.e., the attosecond time scale and the sub-nanometre (Ångstrom) spatial scale typical of atoms and molecules. Additional goals for experiment are to advance the enabling technologies for producing attosecond pulses at higher intensities and shorter durations. According to theoretical predictions, novel methods for intense attosecond pulse generation may in future involve using overdense plasmas. Electronic processes on sub-atomic spatio-temporal scales are the basis of chemical physics, atomic, molecular, and optical physics, materials science, and even some life science processes. Research in these areas using the new attosecond tools will advance together with the ability to control electrons themselves. Indeed, we expect that developments will advance in a way that is similar to advances that have occurred on the femtosecond time scale, in which much previous experimental and theoretical work on the interaction of coherent light sources has led to the development of means for 'coherent control' of nuclear motion in molecules. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is centered on experimental and theoretical advances in the development of new methodologies and tools for electron control on the attosecond time scale. Topics such as the efficient generation of harmonics; the generation of attosecond pulses, including those having only a few cycles and those produced from overdense plasmas; the description of various nonlinear, nonperturbative laser-matter interactions, including many-electron effects and few-cycle pulse effects; the analysis of ultrashort propagation effects in atomic and molecular media; and the development of inversion methods for electron tomography, as well as many other topics, are addressed in the current focus issue dedicated to the new field of 'Attosecond Physics'. Focus on Attosecond Physics Contents Observing the attosecond dynamics of nuclear wavepackets in molecules by using high harmonic generation in mixed gases Tsuneto Kanai, Eiji J Takahashi, Yasuo Nabekawa and Katsumi Midorikawa Core-polarization effects in molecular high harmonic generation G Jordan and A Scrinzi Interferometric autocorrelation of an attosecond pulse train calculated using feasible formulae Y Nabekawa and K Midorikawa Attosecond pulse generation from aligned molecules—dynamics and propagation in H2+ E Lorin, S Chelkowski and A D Bandrauk Broadband generation in a Raman crystal driven by a pair of time-de

  8. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates back to 1967, when the first Olympiad was organized in Warsaw, Poland. Today this Olympiad is a worldwide enterprise, and in the 2008 competition in Hanoi, Vietnam, students from 82 countries took part. An overview of the problems and a summary of the results of this Olympiad are given in the first paper, prepared by the organizers of the competition [3]. The students work on four or five different problems, three theoretical ones on one day, and one or two experimental tasks on another. On each day, they have five hours to accomplish their tasks. The problems are prepared by the local organizer, usually a team of physicists from universities in the home country. The level is set by an international syllabus, and the content and wording of the problems have to be agreed by a majority of the supervisors (one from each participating country) in an initial meeting. Afterwards the tasks are translated into the various languages of the competitors; the students also write their results in their own language. The number of awards (gold, silver and bronze, as well as honorable mentions) varies from competition to competition, since it depends on the number of participants. A team consists of at most five students, but they do not act as a team—they work independantly. The selection process in individual countries varies, but is usually executed in several steps, starting from school competitions and going on to regional and national ones. Training courses are often organized on the same levels. Big differences can be seen in training courses at the highest level, the duration ranging from one week to several months. The International Young Physicists Tournament (IYPT) is completely different in spirit [4]. Whereas the students work individually in the Olympiad, IYPT is a competition between teams. In addition, the 17 tasks are known almost a year in advance. The problems are very open, allow for different approaches and include experimental as well as theoretical work. The students are allowed to use any method they like, are coached by teachers, and are encouraged

  9. Editorial, Forum and Book Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1982-04-01

    I address myself to one of the greatest joys that befalls an editor and also to one of the greatest sadnesses. One of my great joys is the privilege of sharing my concerns as editor with my colleagues who edit other journals (John Howard of Applied Optics, Joe Goodman of the Journal of the Optical Society of America, etc.). Unfortunately, one of the concerns we have to share is a source of my greatest sadness as editor. For lack of a suitably comprehensive term, I use the term "journal gamesmanship." Journal gamesmanship is the fine and well-developed art of seeking inappropriate credit for oneself via publication in a technical or scientific journal. This can mean anything from overt plagiarism to deliberately inaccurate citations. If you are shocked that such things occur, III am pleased with your innocence. Even if you are not shocked, I hope to make you, aware of the many forms in which this unfortunate and ugly game can be and is played.

  10. EDITORIAL: Sensors and sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, Richard; Tian, Gui Yun

    2008-02-01

    Sensors are very important for measurement science and technology. They serve as a vital component in new measurement techniques and instrumentation systems. Key qualities of a good sensor system are high resolution, high reliability, low cost, appropriate output for a given input (good sensitivity), rapid response time, small random error in results, and small systematic error. Linearity is also useful, but with the advent of lookup tables and software, it is not as important as it used to be. In the last several years, considerable effort around the world has been devoted to a wide range of sensors from nanoscale sensors to sensor networks. Collectively, these vast and multidisciplinary efforts are developing important technological roadmaps to futuristic sensors with new modalities, significantly enhanced effectiveness and integrated functionality (data processing, computation, decision making and communications). When properly organized, they will have important relevance to life science and security applications, e.g. the sensing and monitoring of chemical, biological, radiological and explosive threats. A special feature in this issue takes a snapshot of some recent developments that were first presented at an international conference, the 2007 IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control (ICNSC). The conference discussed recent developments, from which a few papers have since been brought together in this special feature. Gas sensing for environmental monitoring remains a topical subject, and two papers deal with this issue. One is concerned with the exploitation of nanostructured Au-doped cobalt oxyhydroxide-based carbon monoxide sensors for fire detection at its earlier stages (Zhuiykov and Dowling), whilst another examines the role of oxygen in high temperature hydrogen sulfide detection using MISiC sensors (Weng et al). Again for environmental monitoring, another paper deals with accurate sound source localization in a reverberant environment using multiple acoustic sensors (Atmoko et al). Not only is gaseous monitoring important, there are particular difficulties when it comes to the continuous monitoring of solids by non-destructive evaluation techniques. Examples of potential solutions for specialist applications are sensors for the detection and measurement of thin dielectric layers using reflection of frequency-scanned millimetre electromagnetic waves (Bowring et al), and an electrostatic sensor for velocity measurements of pneumatically conveyed solid particles (Xu et al). For potential medical applications, position measurement of internal organs is an on-going challenge. Tracking of internal organ motion with a six degree-of-freedom MEMS sensor is discussed by Bandala and Joyce. We hope that these papers provide an insight into exciting developments that continue to take place in the field of sensors and control.

  11. Editorial: Insight from the unexpected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Jones, A. P.; Brownlee, D. E.

    2009-11-01

    The NASA Stardust mission returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2, an active Jupiter-family comet that is believed to have formed at a heliocentric distance beyond the orbit of Neptune. The study of the samples has provided a critical first look at the micrometer and larger solid materials that were at the edge of the solar system at the time that Kuiper Belt comets formed. Analysis of the samples has involved a number of challenges and surprises. These issues and the full implications of the information that the samples provide were intently discussed at the Timber Cove II meeting October 26-28, 2008. The meeting was sponsored by the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) and it was held at a ruggedly beautiful and remote location on the Sonoma coast of northern California once protected by a Russian fort. Seventeen of the papers presented at the meeting are presented in this volume.

  12. EDITORIAL: Sensors based on interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassel, Jean; Soukiassian, Patrick G.

    2007-12-01

    Sensors are specific analog devices that convert a physical quantity, like the temperature or external pressure or concentration of carbon monoxide in a confined atmosphere, into an electrical signal. Considered in this way, every sensor is then a part of the artificial interface, which connects the human world to the world of machines. The other side of the interface is represented by actuators. Most often, after processing the data they are used to convert the out-coming electrical power into counteracting physical action. In the last few years, thanks to inexpensive silicon technology, enormous capability for data processing has been developed and the world of machines has become increasingly invasive. The world of sensors has become increasingly complex too. Applications range from classical measurements of the temperature, vibrations, shocks and acceleration to more recent chemical and bio-sensing technologies. Chemical sensors are used to detect the presence of specific, generally toxic, chemical species. To measure their concentration, one uses some specific property, generally a physical one, like the intensity of infrared absorption bands. Bio-sensors are new, more complex, devices that combine a bio-receptor with a physical transducer. The bio-receptor is a molecule (for instance, an enzyme like glucose oxidase) that can recognize a specific target (glucose molecules in the case of glucose oxidase). The enzyme must be fixed on the transducer and, as a consequence of recognition, the transducer must convert the event into a measurable analytical signal. A common feature of many chemical and bio-sensors is that they require a large surface of interaction with the outside world. For that reason and in order to increase efficiency, either nanoparticles or pores or a combination of both, made from various materials including (but not limited to) porous silicon, are often used as the functional transducer interface. The reviews in this Cluster Issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics describe some recent advances in this field and the very different approaches and/or techniques that can be used for the sensors' implementation. They include the use of molecularly modified metal nanoparticles in or as chemical sensors, especially for high sensitivity hydrogen sensors. Hydrogen sensing can also be achieved by performing galvanic measurements on a thin layer of perovskite oxide covered with platinum. In this case, one mixes an ionic (proton) transport in the oxide with an electronic one in the metal. Another focus is on optical and electrical read-out techniques, like surface-plasmon resonance (SPR), such as for immuno-sensor applications or piezo-electrical and electro-chemical detection. Toward this end, the preparation, structure and application of functional interfacial surfaces are described and discussed. A totally different approach based on the use of Hall effect measurements performed on a granular metal-oxide-semiconductor layer and different experimental solutions is also presented. Finally, optical sensors are addressed through the photonic modulation of surface properties or transmission interferometric absorption sensors. Mixed electrical and optical chemical sensors are also examined.

  13. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01

    Radioecology is the study of the fate and transport and potential effects of radionuclides and associated contaminants in the environment. In short, it is the science that describes the fundamental connection between environmental health and human health risks. As such, radioecology can and has provided the credible, consistent and defensible basis for the successful and cost-effective environmental cleanup and closure of nuclear production and waste sites. In addition, radioecology also provides the technical basis for making timely and reliable decisions on cleanup in the aftermath of nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident resulted in catastrophic health, social, and economic consequences in many countries, predominantly, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. The extent of radioactive contamination, levels and forms of contamination, and diversity of the ecosystems affected by the accident did not have any precedent and provided unique opportunities for environmental scientists around the world. Following the natural course of their development, populations of species and their communities found themselves in conditions of chronic radiation exposure that exceeded the natural background by factors of hundreds and thousands. Anything similar would have been extremely difficult if not impossible to recreate in a scientific laboratory. Consequently, since the first few years after the accident, many teams of scientists have visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The knowledge gained by studying the consequences of this accident has tremendous importance. The concept of an international research and technical center to address the problems involving nuclear and radiological accidents became a reality with the establishment of the International Chernobyl Center (ICC). In May 1995, the US and Ukraine signed a Protocol of Intent on establishment of the ICC, and the government of Ukraine appealed to the international scientific community to support ICC and join its activities (Chernobyl Center 2006). In December 1995, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on the ChNPP closure was signed by the government of Ukraine, all of the G7 governments, and the European Commission. The ICC foundation was considered critical to ensure the safe decommissioning of the ChNPP reactor units and improvement of the safety of the Chernobyl Containment Shelter. On the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident (26 April 1996), Mr. Viktor Yushchenko, the President of Ukraine, issued a decree to establish the Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology (Chernobyl Center). On the same day, a MOU involving the US participation in Chernobyl Center activities was signed by the US and Ukraine (Chernobyl Center 2006). In July 1998, the US and Ukraine signed an agreement to establish the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) as part of the Chernobyl Center. The creation of IRL was a logical continuation of previous programs to conduct scientific research in radioecology and provide Ukraine and the rest of the world with the necessary infrastructure and scientific basis to conduct research in radioecology, radiobiology, dosimetry, and environmental protection in the ChEZ (Chernobyl Center 2006). A recent collaborative effort with IRL has been implemented through a project titled 'Long-term impacts from radiation/contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone' (Farfan et al. 2008; Gerdes et al. 2009; Marra et al. 2010). This collaboration had the following objectives: (1) Assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure within the ChEZ; (2) Provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories based on the results of long-term field monitoring, analytical measurements, and numerical modeling of soils and groundwater radioactive contamination; and (3) Recommend the development and testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based o

  14. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Research into slow light began theoretically in 1880 with the paper [1] of H A Lorentz, who is best known for his work on relativity and the speed of light. Experimental work started some 60 years later with the work of S L McCall and E L Hahn [2] who explored non-linear self-induced transparency in ruby. This field of research has burgeoned in the last 10 years, starting with the work of L Vestergaard Hau and coworkers on slow light via electromagnetically induced transparency in a Bose-Einstein condensate [3]. Many groups are now able to slow light down to a few metres per second or even stop the motion of light entirely [4]. Today, slow light - or more often `slow and fast light' - has become its own vibrant field with a strongly increasing number of publications. In broad scope, slow light research can be categorized in terms of the sort of physical mechanism used to slow down the light. One sort of slow light makes use of material dispersion. This dispersion can be the natural dispersion of the ordinary refractive index or can be the frequency dependence of some nonlinear optical process, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, coherent population oscillations, stimulated light scattering, or four-wave mixing processes. The second sort of slow light makes use of the wavelength dependence of artificially structured materials, such as photonic crystals, optical waveguides, and collections of microresonators. Material systems in which slow light has been observed include metal vapours, rare-earth-doped materials, Raman and Brillioun gain media, photonic crystals, microresonators and, more recently, metamaterials. A common feature of all of these schemes is the presence of a sharp single resonance or multiple resonances produced by an atomic transition, a resonance in a photonic structure, or in a nonlinear optical process. Current applications of slow light include a series of attractive topics in optical information processing, such as optical data storage, optical memories, quantum information devices, and optical communication systems in which the use of slow light will allow all-optical processing with less wasted heat. To implement these applications, devices such as buffers, memories, interferometers and switches that utilize slow light need to be developed. Future challenges include the need for improved coupling of light into slow light modes, overcoming propagation losses, and mitigating the influence of large dispersion of the group velocity. The collection of papers in this special issue of Journal of Optics features a broad spectrum of articles that highlight actual developments in many of the material types and schemes described above. It represents therefore an excellent up to date snapshot of the current state of the field of slow light research. References [1] Lorentz H A 1880 Uber die Beziehung zwischen der Fortpflanzung des Lichtes und der Körperdichte Wiedemann Ann. 9 641-64 [2] McCall S L and Hahn E L 1967 Self-induced transparency by pulsed coherent light Phys. Rev. Lett. 18 908-11 [3] Vestergaard Hau L, Harris S E, Dutton Z and Behroozi C H 1999 Nature 397 594 [4] Philips D F, Fleischhauer A, Mair A, Walsworth R L and Lukin M D 2001 Storage of light in atomic vapor Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 783-6

  15. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Advanced jet engines do not operate in an application vacuum. Their optimal use in advanced military applications drives much of their basic innovative research and development, especially when new needs arise in the rapidly changing domains of stealth-agile, fighter aircraft and tailless-stealth, Jet-Steered, Unmanned Air Vehicles (JS-UAV). For these reasons we periodically update this Journal with new trends that affect, and sometimes control, research and development of future jet-engines. One relevant example is the recently unmasked RQ-180 stealth-tailless drone, which is an improved version of the smaller, RQ-170 captured by Iran. Most important, with the new X-47B/C tailless-stealth JS-UAV, it is to dominate future uses of fuel-efficient jet-engines, especially for operating in dusty environments. The RQ-180 has been secretly designed and funded since 2008. It is based on a classified, 1986, parent Israeli Patents 78402, which protect hundreds design and testing trade secrets taken from 1986 to 1997 by the United States Government (USG) via classified contracts with USG-Contractors Boeing, Lockheed, General Dynamics and General Electric, as revealed by a December 6, 2013 Aviation Week [1-3] and U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Case 2014-5028, Docket 12 [4]. The new RQ-180 design explains the recent U.S. Air Force ISR shift away from "permissive" environments - such as Iraq and Afghanistan, where non-stealthy Global Hawk and General Atomics' Reaper operate - toward new missions in highly "contested" or strongly "denied" enemy airspaces.

  16. EDITORIAL: Nanostructures + Light = 'New Optics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2005-02-01

    Suddenly, at the end of the last century, classical optics and classical electrodynamics became fashionable again. Fields that several generations of researchers thought were comprehensively covered by the famous Born and Wolf textbook and were essentially dead as research subjects were generating new excitement. In accordance with Richard Feynman’s famous quotation on nano-science, the optical community suddenly discovered that 'there is plenty of room at the bottom'—mixing light with small, meso- and nano-structures could generate new physics and new mind-blowing applications. This renaissance began when the concept of band structure was imported from electronics into the domain of optics and led to the development of what is now a massive research field dedicated to two- and three-dimensional photonic bandgap structures. The field was soon awash with bright new ideas and discoveries that consolidated the birth of the 'new optics'. A revision of some of the basic equations of electrodynamics led to the suspicion that we had overlooked the possibility that the triad of wave vector, electric field and magnetic field, characterizing propagating waves, do not necessarily form a right-handed set. This brought up the astonishing possibilities of sub-wavelength microscopy and telescopy where resolution is not limited by diffraction. The notion of meta-materials, i.e. artificial materials with properties not available in nature, originated in the microwave community but has been widely adopted in the domain of optical research, thanks to rapidly improving nanofabrication capabilities and the development of sub-wavelength scanning imaging techniques. Photonic meta-materials are expected to open a gateway to unprecedented electromagnetic properties and functionality unattainable from naturally occurring materials. The structural units of meta-materials can be tailored in shape and size; their composition and morphology can be artificially tuned, and inclusions can be designed and placed at desired locations to achieve new functionality. Among important developments in the new optics was the discovery that a metal film with arrays of small holes in it could be transparent to light beyond any intuitive expectations and that a properly designed metallic structure could be made completely 'invisible' at certain wavelengths. A strong technological drive towards device miniaturization (or, perhaps we should say 'nanoturization'?) has breathed new life into plasmonics—a field many thought had matured some time ago. Surface plasmon polarition waves have come to be seen as potential broadband information carriers for highly integrated photonic devices with research now concentrating on routing and controlling plasmon-polariton signals. Among other new topics in optical electrodynamics are frequency selective surfaces, optical effects of low-dimensional chirality and electrodynamics of toroidal structures. This Special Issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics on 'Nanostructured Optical Meta-Materials: Beyond Photonic Bandgap Effects' is a very representative cross-section of research in 'new optics', with papers covering essential issues in meta-materials research, surface plasmons, nanostructured surfaces, sub-wavelength imaging, nanostructured and random laser media and nonlinearities in nanostructured films. As the Guest Editors of this Special Issue, we are deeply grateful to all contributing authors for their efforts and their willingness to share recent results within the framework of what promises to be a landmark collection of papers in the field of 'new optics'. We are especially proud that the authorship includes pioneers and newcomers to this intriguing and fertile field of research.

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Marco; Nahata, Ajay; Akalin, Tahsin; Beruete, Miguel; Sorolla, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics is one of the growing fields in modern photonics that has garnered increasing interest over the last few years. In this focus issue, the specific challenges concerning terahertz plasmonics have been addressed and most recent advances in this specific field have been highlighted. The articles demonstrate the diversity and the opportunities of this rich field by covering a variety of topics ranging from the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on artificially structures surfaces, 2D manipulation of surface plasmons and SPPs, plasmonic focusing, plasmonic high-Q resonators for sensing applications, plasmonically enhanced terahertz antennas to terahertz field manipulation by use of plasmonic structures. The articles substantiate the impact of plasmonics and its great innovative potential for terahertz technology. In memory of Professor Mario Sorolla Ayza.

  18. Editorial, Forum and Book Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1984-04-01

    In common usage the words "child's play" often indicate something extremely simple. Your IEdIitor has been impressed by his recent readings of the pioneer child psychologist Piaget Piaget suggests that child's play ceases abruptly when the task is no longer challenging. Our usual connotation therefore slanders the child. Piaget further suggests that what interests the child is the idea of a problem known to be challenging yet suspected of being solvable. Great joy and elation come from the satisfactory solution of such a problem. Clearly, science is child's play.

  19. Guest Editorial Atmospheric Optical Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warde, Cardinal

    1981-02-01

    Fiber optic communication generally comes to mind first when one thinks or speaks of optical communication. In fact, the two terms are often used synonymously. Indeed, the fiber optic communication technology is maturing rapidly and it offers enor-mous advantages over unguided atmospheric optical propagation systems. However, there is a variety of applications for which fiber systems are impractical and for which atmospheric optical systems may be preferred. For example, short-haul, over-the-horizon links in areas where cable real estate rights are unobtain-able, or where an optical broadcast mode is desired, or for space-to-earth optical links.

  20. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    Boris Petrovitch Zakharchenya (1928-2005) This issue is dedicated to the memory of Boris Petrovich Zakharchenya, who died at the age of 77 in April 2005. He was an eminent scientist and a remarkable man. After studying physics at Leningrad University he joined the Physico-Technical Institute (now the A F Ioffe Institute) in 1952 and became the co-worker of Evgeny Feodorovich Gross, shortly after the exciton was discovered in his laboratory. The experiments on cuprous oxide crystals in the visible spectral range showed a hydrogen-like spectrum, which was interpreted as excitonic absorption. The concept of the exciton had been conceived some years earlier by Jacov Frenkel at the Physico-Technical Institute. Immediately after joining Gross, Zakharchenya succeeded in producing spectra of unprecedented quality. Subsequently the heavy and the light hole series were found. Also, Landau splitting was discovered when a magnetic field was applied. The interpretation of the discovery was thrown into doubt by Russian colleagues and it took some time, before the correct interpretation prevailed. Shortly before his death, Boris wrote the history of the discovery of the exciton, which has recently been published in Russian in a book celebrating the 80th anniversary of his birth [1]. The book also contains essays by Boris on various themes, not only on physics, but also on literature. Boris was a man of unusually wide interests, he was not only fascinated by physics, but also loved literature, art and music. This can be seen in the first article of this issue The Play of Light in Crystals which is an abbreviated version of his more complete history of the discovery of the exciton. It also gives a good impression of the personality of Boris. One of us (GL) had the privilege to become closely acquainted with him, while he was a guest professor at the University of Würzburg. During that time we had many discussions, and I recall his continuing rage on the wrong attribution of the priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination radiation. The major results of the systematic work on optical orientation, both experimental and theoretical, at the Ioffe Institute and the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris are documented in the book Optical Orientation, edited by F Meier and B P Zakharchenya in the series Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences [4], in which the foundations of optical orientation are comprehensively presented by renowned authors. This book is still the unsurpassed standard work in the field. If one asks what has become new since that publication in 1984 it is obviously the arrival of low-dimensional structures, two-dimensional heterostructures and zero-dimensional quantum dots. It has turned out that the quantum confinement can significantly modify the spin lifetime and the spin relaxation. The experimental work on spin alignment was done by a relative small number of researchers. However, the situation has substantially changed during the last decade. Research on spin-related phenomena has become very popular and the word 'spintronics' was coined. Spin research is no longer considered to be somewhat esoteric, since the replacement of silicon microelectronics based on the electron charge by spin-based electronics is being discussed. Whether these proposals can be realized remains to be seen. But one consequence has been a worldwide increase of high level basic research in spin phenomena. Another line of current research which has contributed to the popularity of spin-related research is quantum computing, based on spin-qubits. To be useful, solid state systems require long spin relaxation times and weak interaction with the environment. This is indispensable for low error rates. The difficulties in achieving these goals have been extensively discussed in the literature. Nowadays, because of the volume and diversity of spin-related work worldwide, a book on optical orientation like that edited by Meyer and Zakharchenya does not seem possible, so in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology we try, with examples, to give an impression of that current state of research. The articles will not be discussed individually but their titles reveal that most deal with low-dimensional systems. The study of spin relaxation plays a major role. Interface effects at the ferromagnet/semiconductor boundary are subtle and important for spin injection from a ferromagnet. Each of the contributions is a combination of review and recent results and stands by itself. The affiliations of the authors reveal that the majority come from St Petersburg, clearly indicating that the heritage of Boris Zakharchenya is alive and thriving. We would like to thank all authors for their cooperation, especially for delivering their manuscripts in a reasonable time. Claire Bedrock and Adam Day of the IOP Publishing deserve thanks for their support in the publication process. We are much indebted to Ruslana Zakharchenya for making the manuscript on the discovery of the exciton available and especially to Nina Nikolaevna Vasil'eva for her translation. References [1] Zakharchenya B P 2008 The Happiness of Creativity (St Petersburg, in Russian) [2] Rashba E I and Landwehr G (ed) 1991 Landau Level Spectroscopy (Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences vol 27) (Amsterdam: Elsevier) [3] Seisyan R B and Zakharchenya B P 1991 Landau Level Spectroscopy ed E I Rashba and G Landwehr (Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences vol 27) (Amsterdam: Elsevier) p 345 [4] Meier F and Zakharchenya B P (ed) 1984 Optical Orientation (Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences vol 8) (Amsterdam: Elsevier) An obituary of Boris Petrovich Zakharchenyia, contributed to Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk by his Russian colleagues, is available at http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/1063-7869/49/8/M09

  1. EDITORIAL: Whither nanomaterials? Whither nanomaterials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-10-01

    As the journal Nanotechnology enters its third decade it is interesting to look back on the field and to think about where it may be headed in the future. The growth of the journal over the past twenty years mirrors that of the field, with exponentially rising numbers of citations and a widening diversity of topics that we identify as nanotechnology. In the early 1990s, Nanotechnology was focused primarily on nanoscale electronics and on scanning probe tools for fabricating and characterizing nanostructures. The synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials was already an active area in chemical research; however, it did not yet intersect strongly with the activities of the physics community, which was interested primarily in new phenomena that emerged on the nanoscale and on the devices that derived from them. In the 1990s there were several key advances that began to bridge this gap. Techniques were developed for making nanocrystals of compound semiconductors, oxides, and metals with very fine control over shape and superstructure. Carbon nanotubes were discovered and their unique electronic properties were demonstrated. Research on the self-assembly of organic molecules on surfaces led to the development of soft lithography and layer-by- layer assembly of materials. The potential to use DNA and then proteins as building blocks of precise assemblies of nanoparticles was explored. These bottom-up structures could not be made by top-down techniques, and their unique properties as components of sensors, electronic devices, biological imaging agents, and drug delivery vehicles began to change the definition of the field. Ten years ago, Inelke Malsch published a study on the scientific trends and organizational dynamics of nanotechology in Europe (1999 Nanotechnology 10 1-7). Scientists from a variety of disciplines were asked which areas of research they would include in the definition of nanotechnology. Although the article concluded with forward-looking thoughts in the direction of emerging solar energy, environmental, and biological research, the survey revealed a narrower perspective among scientists. Nano and quantum electronics, nanostructured materials, scanning probe techniques, and mesoscopic physics were all identified strongly with nanotechnology, but many of the most active areas of today's research—solar cell materials, biosensors and therapeutic agents, photonics, plasmonics, optical metamaterials, displays and nanomachines—were not mentioned. Indeed, there are also quite a few areas that were under the radar in 1999, such as superhydrophobic cloth, electronic ink, antibacterial silver, and catalytic nanoparticles, which have now developed into practical technologies. While we could sense a decade ago that nanotechnology was an exciting field that was poised for explosive growth, we had no way to tell how the science was going to evolve or what new discoveries would emerge. Today the synthesis of new materials and societal needs in energy, health, security, and other areas drive the field, much as new scanning probe tools and Moore's law did in the 1990s. We can clearly see that the boundaries of traditional disciplines have dissolved and that the scope of nanotechnology has grown. The original problems of nanoelectronics and mesoscopic phenomena remain interesting and important today, but the field is also so much more. It seems likely that when we look back again ten years from now, we will continue to see key discoveries, unanticipated today, that will have reshaped the field of nanotechnology.

  2. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates back to 1967, when the first Olympiad was organized in Warsaw, Poland. Today this Olympiad is a worldwide enterprise, and in the 2008 competition in Hanoi, Vietnam, students from 82 countries took part. An overview of the problems and a summary of the results of this Olympiad are given in the first paper, prepared by the organizers of the competition [3]. The students work on four or five different problems, three theoretical ones on one day, and one or two experimental tasks on another. On each day, they have five hours to accomplish their tasks. The problems are prepared by the local organizer, usually a team of physicists from universities in the home country. The level is set by an international syllabus, and the content and wording of the problems have to be agreed by a majority of the supervisors (one from each participating country) in an initial meeting. Afterwards the tasks are translated into the various languages of the competitors; the students also write their results in their own language. The number of awards (gold, silver and bronze, as well as honorable mentions) varies from competition to competition, since it depends on the number of participants. A team consists of at most five students, but they do not act as a team—they work independantly. The selection process in individual countries varies, but is usually executed in several steps, starting from school competitions and going on to regional and national ones. Training courses are often organized on the same levels. Big differences can be seen in training courses at the highest level, the duration ranging from one week to several months. The International Young Physicists Tournament (IYPT) is completely different in spirit [4]. Whereas the students work individually in the Olympiad, IYPT is a competition between teams. In addition, the 17 tasks are known almost a year in advance. The problems are very open, allow for different approaches and include experimental as well as theoretical work. The students are allowed to use any method they like, are coached by teachers, and are encouraged to ask for help from experts at research centres or universities. Finally, they must prepare a 12-minute presentation. A tournament consists of different contests. In each contest, three teams are involved: the reporting team is challenged by an opponent team to present a task. This presentation is then criticized by the opponent, pointing out merits and possible weak parts. The discussion between the two representatives of the teams is a central element of a contest. The third team acts as reviewer, giving final comments on the performances of the contesting teams. At the end, a jury grades the performances of all three teams. Then, the different roles of the teams rotate, and the students also rotate roles within the teams. The competition started in the former Soviet Union in 1988 and became international for the first time in 1994 when it was organized in Groningen, The Netherlands. In the 2008 tournament in Trogir, Croatia, teams from 24 countries participated [5]. Since this tournament is younger and less known, the national pre-selections are not as well established and numerous as for the Olympiad. Also, the training is different: in addition to developing experimental skills and physical understanding of the problems, the students must organize their performances, share work and responsibilities, and must train in the techniques of presentation and debate (in English). The winner of the tournament in Croatia was the team from Germany. Their presentation in the finals was an experimental and theoretical investigation into the Kaye effect. The students wrote up their presentation, and it is reproduced here as the second paper in this special section. Again, different in spirit and aim is 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics' [6]. This competition started in 1991 in Poland and encourages students to take their first steps in physics research. Students of 20 years old or less are invited to present their research and results as a paper, in the style typically published by scientific journals. The student is allowed to choose a topic within the broad scope of physics, including cross-over fields such as astro- or biophysics. In 2008 over 2000 papers were submitted and 25 awards were given. In line with 'First Step' is the International Conference for Young Scientists (ICYS) [7]. The conference started in 1994 in Viségrad, Hungary. Here too, the participants present the results of their research, not by submitting a research paper but by giving a presentation to an audience of peers and a jury of specialists. The subjects of the presentations are in physics, mathematics, computer science, environmental sciences, engineering or life sciences. The jury awards the presentations according to the level of the content and the presentation. The last three competitions presented here are younger and did not start within Eastern European countries. The International Olympics of Astrophysics and Astronomy (IOAA) was organized for the second time in Bandung, Indonesia in 2008 and 24 countries participated [8]. As the title of the competition indicates, problems are directed towards theoretical and experimental aspects of astronomy. A little bit older is the European Union Science Olympiad (EUSO) [9]. This started in 2001, but the first competition took place in Dublin, Ireland, in 2003. The last competition was organized in March-April 2009 in Murcia, Spain. This competition addresses younger students, aged 17 years or less. It tries to combine biology, chemistry and physics. Although the problems are formulated in an interdisciplinary way, the students remain specialists, one in physics and the others in biology and chemistry. For even younger students, there is the International Junior Science Olympiad (IJSO) [10]. This competition started in December 2004 on the initiative of Professor Masno Ginting from Indonesia. The last competition took place in Changwon, South Korea, where over 50 countries were represented. The aim of this Olympiad is similar to EUSO, but on top of teamwork, members also have to participate in an individual test. Because of the importance of these international competitions for physics education, and also because of their growing number, it was seen as useful to found an umbrella organization, the World Federation of Physics Competitions (WFPhC), which would undertake tasks common to most of the competitions [11]. These are: To stimulate talent for physics by means of physics competitions in secondary schools; To stimulate meetings and conferences where people interested in physics competitions can develop and interchange their ideas within their home country; To afford the opportunity to, in particular by means of the foundation's periodical, exchange publications in the field of physics teaching; To acknowledge the merits of people who have contributed greatly to the goals of the Federation, through a WFPhC award; To afford assistance and support to countries that wish to organize physics competitions by putting them in contact with experienced countries; To promote physics and to encourage youngsters interested in physics. The WFPhC was founded in 1999 and the first and acting president is Hans Jordens, one of the authors of this article. The Federation edits a publication twice a year with an extensive collection of former or recent tasks and solutions, as well as organizational matters. It organizes every other year a Congress during which an award is giving to a person who has contributed greatly to the goals of the Federation. So far this award has been given to three people: Gunter Lind (Germany), Gunnar Tibell (Sweden) and posthumously to Waldemar Gorzkowski (Poland). 2. Physics competitions and European Journal of Physics The aim of European Journal of Physics is 'to assist in maintaining and improving the standard of taught physics in universities and other institutes of higher education'. One point, among others, is to publish 'descriptions of successful and original student projects, experimental, theoretical or computational'. This comes close to the tasks and student work carried out in physics competitions. Physics educators at university level are usually aware of the existence of such competitions, but the majority, with the few exceptions of those involved in these competitions, lack knowledge of what is actually going on, and how high levelled the performances are. Therefore, it is not obvious to them that these competitions could be useful for university teaching, and could be sources of interesting and novel examples for labs and theoretical exercises. Each physics department wants to attract good students or, in other words, wants talented students to choose physics as their first subject of study. Experience has shown that physics competitions can assist in meeting this demand. Not only do students involved in the competitions beoome more inclined to study physics, their experimental and theoretical knowledge is far beyond that of typical students. Therefore it would be of mutual interest to intensify the bonds between physics competitions and universities. The publication of tasks and solutions to problems from physics competitions may serve several purposes: Competitions and especially their high quality can be communicated to a very broad audience of physicists. University teachers could be encouraged to implement these problems in their lectures, exercises and labs, mainly at the undergraduate level, theoretically as well as experimentally. The previous point is even more important for the education of physics teachers. Ongoing physics teachers should know in detail the different competitions and their specific goals and problems. The winners of the competitions get greater publicity, which in turn could create additional attraction to future participants. As an example of the second point, the successful application of competition tasks has been implemented at the University Ljubljana, Slovenia: in the final paper of the set, Gorazd Planinsic reports on the adoption of IYPT problems in introductory labs. 3. Outlook This collection of papers gives information about physics competitions and can provide physics teachers, in particular at university level, with ideas, examples and exercises to implement in their teaching. Since this combined presentation is a first for European Journal of Physics (and perhaps for other journals, at least to our knowledge), it would be very helpful to get feedback. In particular, we would be interested to receive answers to the following questions: Did you find these papers interesting and/or useful and should European Journal of Physics continue publishing annotated examples of physics competitions on an annual basis? Which parts were of special interest to you and which parts were not adequate or useful at all? Should we extend these projects including examples from other competitions (for example, the Olympiad on Astrophysics and Astronomy)? Do you know of other examples, where physics competitions were included in university teaching? If yes, please inform us and give references. Please send your feedback to h.jordens@rug.nl or leopold.mathelitsch@uni-graz.at. References [1] Tibnell G 2008 Student's skills developed by participation in international physics competitions GIREP/MPTL Conference: Physics Curriculum Design, Development and Validation, Nicosia, Cyprus, 2008 [2] http://www.jyu.fi/ipho [3] http://ipho2008.hnue.edu.vn/ [4] http://www.iypt.org [5] http://www.hfd.hr/iypt2008/ [6] http://www.ifpan.edu.pl/firststep/ [7] http://metal.elte.hu/~icys/ [8] http://ioaa.info/ioaa2007/ [9] http://www.euso.dcu.ie/euso/home/index.htm [10] http://www.ijso-official.org/ [11] http://info.ifpan.edu.pl/wfphc/

  3. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene nanostructured without patterning the graphene itself. This method produces graphene nanostructures with atomically smooth edges that ultimately determine the transport properties of these structures. The coherent collection of papers in this special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics provides a snapshot of the current state of the art, presented by leading experts, highlighting various aspects of the science and technology of epitaxial graphene. This collection systematically addresses the production of epitaxial graphene on the two polar faces of silicon carbide, as well as the structural and electronic properties of the graphene films. Special attention is paid to the rapidly emerging field of chemically modified graphene, which promises to introduce a bandgap into the electronic structure of graphene, which is critical for many electronic applications. Also presented are methods to incorporate properties of the silicon carbide itself, as well as advanced methods to produce high-quality graphene and graphene nanostructures using structured growth methods.

  4. EDITORIAL: J J Thomson's Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Steve

    1997-07-01

    Westminster School, London, UK A few weeks ago David Thomson, J J Thomson's grandson, presented a Friday evening discourse at the Royal Institution. In it he traced the development of JJT's life from his early studies at Owen's College in Manchester, on to Trinity College Cambridge, his work under Rayleigh at the Cavendish, and his succession as Professor of Experimental Physics in 1884 (a post he passed on to Rutherford in 1919). These were years of heroic discoveries that shaped 20th century physics. Looking around the lecture theatre at all the bow-ties and dinner jackets, it must have been rather similar on 30 April 1897 when JJT delivered his famous discourse on 'Cathode Rays' in which he cautiously but confidently announced that his own results together with those of other experimenters (Lenard in particular):

    `....seem to favour the hypothesis that the carriers of the charges are smaller than the atoms of hydrogen.'
    In this issue articles by Leif Gerward and Christopher Cousins, and by Isobel Falconer explore the historical and philosophical context of that discovery. The sound-bites to history in many A-level courses have JJT as both the hero who single-handedly discovered the electron and the rather naive Victorian scientist who thought the atom was a plum pudding. It is valuable to see how Thomson's work pulled the threads of many experiments together and to realize that he may have been first to the post because of a difference in the philosophical approach to cathode rays in Britain compared to Europe. Experimental data must always be interpreted, and divergent philosophies can lead to quite different conclusions. The electron was, of course, the first subatomic particle to be identified. Christine Sutton's article looks at how 20th century discoveries reveal Nature's mysterious habit of repeating successful patterns---electrons for example have very close relations, the muon and the tau---but why? Perhaps the answer will come from the theoreticians. One of the greatest of these was Paul Dirac, a marvellously reticent man with an eye for mathematical beauty. David Miller, one of the winners of William Waldegrave's 'Higgs Challenge' in 1993, shows how Dirac constructed his famous equation, and how it describes the behaviour of the electron and its neutrino and led to the prediction of antimatter and the explanation of spin. He draws an interesting parallel between Dirac's negative energy electrons and the contemporary development of solid state physics. G P Thomson, JJ's son, also got in on the act: father got the Nobel Prize (1906) for showing the electron is a particle and son (1937) won it for showing it also behaves like a wave! This has had a profound impact both on the interpretation and experimental testing of quantum theory and in the way we use electrons. Electron waves are essential to understand solid state physics and wave-like properties are fundamental to the behaviour of many electronic devices. But it is not just in physics and electronics that the electron has been revolutionary, and John Squire's article reviews the use of the electron microscope in biology. Having crossed the border into biology (as so many physicists have done this century) it should be pointed out that electron physics also caused a paradigm shift in chemistry. Electronic structure made the Periodic Table comprehensible and led to a theory of bonding that accounts for the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of many materials. This is described in Peter Hughes's article. Which brings me back to JJT and those sound-bites, and the Royal Institution for that matter.... On 10 March 1905 JJT gave another of his Friday Evening Discourses. This one was called 'The Structure of the Atom'. In it he developed a model suggested by Lord Kelvin, in which negative corpuscles arrange themselves in a stable configuration within a sphere of positively charged fluid. This is the infamous `plum pudding'. There is not room to go into detail here, but he showed mathematically and using a 2D m

  5. EDITORIAL: The Internet and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Paul

    1998-05-01

    Feature Issue Editor The World Wide Web has been described as a `distributed heterogeneous collaborative multimedia information system'. It began as a networked information project at CERN, where Tim Berners-Lee, now Director of the World Wide Web Consortium [W3C], developed a vision of the project. The Web has a body of software and a set of protocols and conventions. Through the use of hypertext and multimedia techniques, the Web is easy for anyone to roam, browse and contribute to. It was developed by physicists at CERN to fulfil a communication need, and is one of the fastest growing resources worldwide. The number of available sites increases hourly, the ability to find information becomes easier, and contacting anyone with an e-mail address is as easy as picking up the telephone and talking to them. A pupil researching a project on say `alternative energy' simply launches a web browser with the relevant search criteria. Some 13 500 references later they cut and paste sections together and, hey presto, they have their article. The teacher, on the other hand, has to discern what input to this work the pupil has made! What credit should be given for such an attempt? I believe we are going to have to teach how to value a site, by comparing it with other similar sites and exercising some judgement on what we find. Using a search with `physics' as my only keyword found more than 3.5 million references! Clearly the researcher has to become discerning, being judge and jury as it were. Will the Internet catch on? I fear so, is the simple answer. However, I am concerned that with so much information available the ability to discern quality sites from inferior ones and fact from fiction will become a major issue for educationalists. Pupils are going to have to be taught how to assess a site, how to judge its validity and learn to give correct references in their reports. Because Internet sites are ephemeral, a reference given today may not be active next week. Indeed, it is true for this edition of Physics Education: all the sites given were checked before publication. However, we cannot be held responsible for non-availability of a site, should the service provider decide to remove or archive that particular page. Any user surfing the net must be prepared for the message File Not Found. The requested URL was not found on this server. Why is looking for information on the Internet referred to as surfing? It has been suggested that you are looking for the ultimate wave/site - the one that answers your questions or gives you that special information. It is certainly addictive, and when a good site is found it is very rewarding. I find the analogy with surfing particularly accurate, as most of my time is spent in the water splashing around! When you do get on the board, the thought of jumping from country to country as you click on each hypertext link is quite exhilarating. The wealth of information you have access to is awesome, defying comprehension. Finding a good book, article, reference or person to help you, makes it more than justify its existence. Looking for fellow teachers of physics could not be easier. PEERS (Physics Encyclopaedia of E-mail Records), the database of physicists maintained by IOP, should be a wonderful resource for teachers, industrialists or anyone linked with physics. I decided to find out how many schools had registered themselves with PEERS. I constructed a search of Type of Institution: School and found 113 records, but then refined my search to Country: UK and Subject: Physics and was amazed to find only 23 records. Rest of the world 90, UK 23! I suggest the moment you put this journal down you go and register with PEERS (http://www.iop.org/cgi-bin/PEERS/main); it is FREE! At a recent IOP update course in Oxford, I was pleased to see most lecturers using laptops linked to video projectors to give their presentations, and references were made to sources of information on the WWW. With the availability of lecture notes, worksheets, examination courses, databases and virtual libraries all on the Internet, a new breed of education is being spawned. If previous generations have remembered the coming of the motor car, flight and the steam engine, clearly the 1990s must be attributed to the World Wide Web. So, what of the future? Clearly the Internet is not going to go away, and we as educators are going to have to tame the beast. I hope books will still be valued and often ask myself how we teach such appreciation. With the availability of complete Sc1's on the Internet, or essays for the Nuffield Research & Analysis ready for downloading, our present examination structure will need some rethinking .... ... an