Science.gov

Sample records for editors luis vzquez

  1. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Comment on `Magnetic and electric field strengths of high voltage power lines and household appliances' José Luis Giordano Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, CPSI, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Twins paradox S R Carson Norton College, Malton, North Yorkshire, UK On alternative ways of finding the ratio of specific heats of gases Tomas Ficker Physics Department, Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic

  2. New Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    It is an honour and a challenge to take up the editorship of the Messenger at this time of ESO's expanding role in European and worldwide astronomy. In order to mark the change, we have made a few adjustments to the appearance without departing from the overall style that Peter Shaver had evolved during his term as editor. I would like to thank Peter for gen-tly coaching me into the position and Jutta Boxheimer, the technical editor, for the high quality of the layout.

  3. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostowski, J.

    2013-01-01

    The journal has received a range of correspondence on this topic. The Editor-in-Chief would like to thank the contributors for their interest. However, the journal does not extend discussion on a topic beyond the initial comment and reply. As such, further comments on these articles will not be considered for publication; however, developments in this area of physics education will be welcome.

  4. MPS Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and commands that have been created.

  5. Journal Editors Celebrated at Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    At the Fall Meeting, the premiere social event for AGU's many journal editors is the annual Editors' Evening, an opportunity for members to celebrate and to recognize the efforts of retiring editors. At the event, AGU president Carol Finn welcomed all those in attendance and thanked them for volunteering their time for the benefit of AGU and the wider research community.

  6. DNA Align Editor: DNA Alignment Editor Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SNPAlignEditor is a DNA sequence alignment editor that runs on Windows platforms. The purpose of the program is to provide an intuitive, user-friendly tool for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments by providing functions for input, editing, and output of nucleotide sequence alignments....

  7. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  8. From the Incoming Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, W. Michael; Ayersman, David J.

    1999-01-01

    This note from the new editors of the "Journal of Research on Computing in Education" (JRCE) outlines their plans for JRCE during the next three years. Discussion includes the following: review board and associate editors, book reviews, early review, format templates on the JRCE Web site, and special topics and thematic issues. (AEF)

  9. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  10. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  11. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  12. Letter to the editor.

    PubMed

    Mooses, Martin; Mooses, Kerli; Haile, Diresibachew W; Durussel, Jérôme; Kaasik, Priit; Pitsiladis, Yannis P

    2016-01-01

    Santos-Concejero and Tucker argued in their letter to the editor that in our study the running economy in achieving superior performance was overlooked due to some methodological aspects. Having given the remarks of Santos-Concejero and Tucker appropriate consideration, in this letter to the editor, we argue that our paper does not downplay the influence of running economy on the determinants of the East African running phenomenon, but rather adds novel insights into the interaction between running economy, maximal oxygen uptake and performance. PMID:26652187

  13. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and Editor were released to COSMIC in 1991. Silicon Graphics, IRIS, and IRIX are trademarks of Silicon Graphics, Inc. X-Window System is a trademark of Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  14. MSSP Associate Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.

    2015-08-01

    MSSP is pleased to announce the appointment of three distinguished researchers, Professors Jerome Antoni, Spilios Fassois and Paolo Pennacchi, as Associate Editors. The broad coverage of MSSP research topics demands editorial expertise in several disciplines and the appointment of an editorial team of the highest quality is essential in maintaining and further enhancing the reputation of MSSP as a journal at the forefront of modern experimental mechanics that combines dynamic systems with measurement technology, signal processing and active control. Brief descriptions of the backgrounds and experience of the Associate Editors are provided in the following paragraphs.

  15. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  16. Forever a Yearbook Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Joline Gutierrez

    1995-01-01

    Discusses, through a first-person narrative, the life of a reporter who began her career as a high school yearbook editor. Chronicles her attempts to find a college major before committing to a journalism degree from the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque. Concludes with her opinion that her path was painful, but that it was for the best. (PA)

  17. LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our research results were cited in a letter to the editor of BioScience by Alex Avery to challenge the conclusions of a paper written by David Pimentel and colleagues. In this letter we address some of the comments made by both Avery and Pimentel and co-workers. As Avery states, we concluded that ...

  18. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It

  19. LDAP Browser/Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Gawor, Jarek; Laszewski, Gregor von

    2000-07-18

    The LDAP Browser/Editor provides a user-friendly Java-based interface to LDAP databases with tightly integrated browsing and editing capabilities. Entirely written in Java with help of the JFC (Swingset) and JNDI class libraries. It connects to any X.500, LDAP v2 and v3 servers and supports editing of multiple-value attributes.

  20. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  1. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers

  2. WRR editor Ronald Cummings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    It has been nearly a year since Ronald Cummings took over as policy sciences editor of Water Resources Research (WRR), and in that time he has worked to make the journal live up to its role as “an interdisciplinary journal integrating research in the social and natural sciences of water.” Cummings takes the “interdisciplinary” part seriously. “I'd like to see a much broader range of policy issues presented to readers,” he says. “I would hope it would then stimulate interchange between our colleagues concerning evolving issues of the '80s and '90s.”Cummings brings a solid background as a resource economist to his 4-year term as editor, which began last January and runs until December 1987. Cummings succeeds Jared Cohon as policy sciences editor. Stephen J. Burges is the WRR editor for hydrological, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Now a Professor of Economics and Director of the Program in Natural Resources Economics at the University of New Mexico, Cummings is a past president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. He has been a consultant in matters of water resources management, forestry management, and energy policy for more than a decade, working on projects in both the United States and Latin America. Since joining the faculty at New Mexico in 1975, he has, among other things, worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation'management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems.

  3. The Solid Gold Copy Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riblet, Carl, Jr.

    This book discusses the role of the newspaper copy editor on a daily newspaper and contains lessons instructing editors on how to prepare copy for print. The book is specifically designed to polish the skills of the already experienced newspaper copy editor, although a beginner will find the lessons useful and instructive. Contained in the lessons

  4. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Criticisms of hands-on pseudoscience David J Fisher 27 Elderberry Road, Cardiff CF5 3RG, UK Measuring varying fields Don Koks Adelaide University, Australia Relativity at A-level: a comment David Sang 3 Ellasdale Road, Bognor Regis, PO21 2SG, UK

  5. James Kennett: Paleceonography Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The field of paleoceanography is maturing, and scientists working in this area need a journal of their own, according to James P. Kennett, founding editor of AGU's new journal, Paleoceanography. Kennett, a professor in the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island (URI), said he is “committed to publication of top-quality papers.” He is already hard at work on the journal's first issue, planned for early 1986.

  6. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  7. 19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, IN CENTRAL PORTION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA. Leeds Hill Barnard & Jewett - Consulting Engineers, February 1942. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  8. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Science spreadsheets Richard Beare Institute of Education, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Calculating the `lost energy' Zhang Yongzhao and Zhang Shuyan Police Frontier Guard Patrol Boat Institute, Zhejiang, Ningbo 315801, People's Republic of China Cartesian diver solves the inverse sprinkler problem Boris M Valiyov and Vladimir D Yegorenkov Department of Physics, Kharkov State University, 4 Svobody sq., 310077, Kharkov, Ukraine Update excellence Karen Barker Lytham St Annes, Lancs, UK

  9. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Software teaching of modular physics: SToMP Stephen Hearn Head of Science, Charterhouse, Godalming, Surrey GU7 2DX Bridging the gap or avoiding a chasm? R W West York Strengths and weaknesses of science John Bausor Christians in Science Education, Edgware, London HA8 6RR Addressing the issues Philip Britton Head of Physics, Leeds Grammar School Modern syllabuses and old textbooks: a useful synthesis Richard Barrass St Mary's College, Doncaster DN1 2ES

  10. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Physics and history Arthur I Miller Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Physics and history: a reply David Miller Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Cathode rays, the electron and Thomson's discovery John Harris 33 Glentham Road, London SW13 9JD, UK Vectors: swallow them whole! David Wheeler Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

  11. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Heat and temperature Kevin Carlton Canterbury Christ Church University College, North Holmes Road, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU, UK James Bond's shoes J Oliver Linton Head of Physics, Wolverhampton Grammar School, Compton Road, Wolverhampton WV3 9RB, UK Of springs and strings Ronald Newburgh Extension School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Clarifying the concept Keith Atkin 14 Cortworth Road, Ecclesall, Sheffield S11 9LP, UK

  12. The Meta Sketch Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nbrega, Leonel; Nunes, Nuno Jardim; Coelho, Helder

    The Model Driven Development has its foundations on metamodeling and new tools are required in order to support users on the definition and customization of their modeling languages. The MetaSketch Editor takes advantage of the current OMG technology to provide the metamodeling mechanisms required to support the integration of some widely used human-computer interaction (HCI) notation into the UML, through precise and semantically sound metamodeling extensions. With this integration, HCI field could contribute to leverage the model-driven development paradigm and support automatic generation of interactive applications

  13. 76 FR 10945 - San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of... Corporation as sole Receiver for San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, California, (OTS No. 15051)...

  14. From the editors.

    PubMed

    Kuhse, Helga; Singer, Peter

    1990-07-01

    Kuhse and Singer, the editors of this special issue of Bioethics, introduce seven articles on conflicting concepts, public policies, and standards for the determination of cardiorespiratory and brain death and the relationship of brain death to the beginning of "brain life" and to organ donation, especially from anencephalic infants. The articles are "Consciousness, the brain and what matters," by Grant Gillett; "Brain death and the anencephalic newborn," by Robert D. Truog and John C. Fletcher; "Brain death and brain life: rethinking the connection," by Jocelyn Downie; "A plea for the heart," by Martyn Evans; "The importance of knowledge and trust in the definition of death," by Bo Andreassen Rix; "Death, democracy and public ethical choice," by Reid Cushman and Soren Holm; and "Misunderstanding death on a respirator," by Tom Tomlinson. PMID:11651991

  15. Editors in the Electronic Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Robert M., Ed.

    Intended for newspaper writers and editors, this collection of articles includes the following titles and authors: "VDTs, TV Haven't Shocked Editors" by Jay Rogers; "Opinions Vary on Electronics' Effect" by Bob Nordyke; "A Few Kind Words for the Censors" by Hugh A. Mulligan; "Those Awards Have Their Limitations" by Larry Fortner; "Obituaries Are

  16. Editors in the Electronic Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Robert M., Ed.

    Intended for newspaper writers and editors, this collection of articles includes the following titles and authors: "VDTs, TV Haven't Shocked Editors" by Jay Rogers; "Opinions Vary on Electronics' Effect" by Bob Nordyke; "A Few Kind Words for the Censors" by Hugh A. Mulligan; "Those Awards Have Their Limitations" by Larry Fortner; "Obituaries Are…

  17. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  18. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict. The effect of this is two fold: reviewers are drawn from the metrological community and know that a high standard is required, while authors know that good work dealing with fine measurements will be read and appreciated by those who know the field. Articles in the third category have appeared regularly in Metrologia. The continuing association with the CIPM is well exemplified, in this issue, by the article from Dr Hugh Preston-Thomas - President of the CCT, Vice-President of the CIPM and a former editor - on The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) and by "News from the BIPM". Last year, a major article described the new international electrical reference standards. Only the fourth category of article presents problems: with honourable exceptions - the 1987 supplement by Prof. George Gillies on the Newtonian Gravitational Constant, for example - the reviews promised in 1965 are absent. As the new editor my thoughts have come to centre on the matter of reviews. This, I find, is not a unique consideration, for my predecessor raised the matter in his own introductory editorial some years ago. The intention of the original Editorial Board was: 'Review articles will be published . . . in order that both the specialist and the nonspecialist may have a convenient and readily available means of surveying the rapidly changing situation in fundamental metrology'. This seems a wholly admirable intention and one that should not be forgotten. I ask potential authors to think about reviews on topics of current interest and to contact me or any member of the Editorial Board to discuss possibilities. I'd also be interested to have the names of individuals I could approach in the name of Metrologia with a view to asking them to write on a particular topic. Intending authors will have all the support - moral rather than financial, I fear - that the editorial office can provide. Finally, I ask readers to note that the pages of Metrologia are open to all. "Letters to the Editor" provides a forum for debate on metrological matters and, within the constraints of a quarterly journal, offers rapid publication for short items of topical interest. Letters may take the form of comments on articles published, short descriptions of original work, brief notes on matters of wide interest, new issues in the field of metrology or new views on old ones. Particularly welcome will be new possibilities for the improvement of scientific measurement and the exchange of views thereon. The possibilities are not circumscribed, so long as they are likely to be of interest to those whose concern is to advance understanding in the field of fine measurement.

  19. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans, General Atomics, USA A. Hassanein, Purdue University, USA Y.-M. Jeon, National Fusion Research Institute, Spain S. Kajita, Nagoya University, Japan T.P. Kiviniemi, Aalto University, Finland R.M. More, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA F. Sattin, Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CNR, Italy J.A. Snipes, ITER Organization, France W. Suttrop, Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics-Garching, Germany F.L. Tabares, Energy Environment and Technology Research Centre, Spain Y. Ueda, Osaka University, Japan V.S. Voitsenya, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine G. Xu, Chinese Academy of Sciences-Hefei Institutes of Physical Sciences, People's Republic of China In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion . At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2013. Our thanks to them! We also wish to express our thanks to Paul Thomas, who served as Guest Editor for the special issue of the overview and summary reports from the 24th Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego, October 2012. This issue is of great value as a summary of the major developments worldwide in fusion research in the last two years. Authors The winner of the 2013 Nuclear Fusion Award is D.G. Whyte for the paper: I-mode: an H-mode energy confinement regime with L-mode particle transport in Alcator C-Mod [1], and we congratulate him and coauthors on this achievement. We also note special topic papers published in 2013: Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendestein 7-X by H.S. Bosch et al [2], Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER by I.T. Chapman et al [3] and IFMIF: overview of the validation activities by J. Knaster et al [4]. The Board of Editors The Board of Editors has had a substantial turnover in members. For their great service to the journal, we wish to thank the following outgoing Board Members whose term of service was reached at the end of 2012: Keith Burrell, Atsushi Fukuyama, Guenter Janeschitz, Myeun Kwon, Alberto Loarte, Derek Stork, Tony Taylor and Kazuo Toi. We welcome the new Board Members who have joined the Board from the start of 2013: Pietro Barabaschi, Riccardo Betti, Rich Callis, Wonho Choi, Yasuaki Kishimoto, Joaquin Sánchez, Paul Thomas, Mickey Wade, Howard Wilson, Hiroshi Yamada and Steve Zinkle. We look forward to working with the Board to maintain the high standing of Nuclear Fusion . The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors, referees, and Board of Editors, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the IAEA Nuclear Fusion office in Vienna and IOP Publishing in Bristol. I would like to express my personal thanks to the team for the support that they have given to me, the authors and the referees. Season's greetings I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees, Board of Editors, and Vienna and Bristol office staff season's greetings and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2013. References [1] Whyte D.G. et al 2010 I-mode: an H-mode energy confinement regime with L-mode particle transport in Alcator C-Mod Nucl. Fusion 50 105005 [2] Bosch H.-S. et al 2013 Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendelstein 7-X Nucl. Fusion 53 126001 [3] Chapman I.T. et al 2013 Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER Nucl. Fusion 53 066001 [4] Knaster J. et al 2013 IFMIF: overview of the validation activities Nucl. Fusion 53 116001

  20. Rio Grande, San Luis Hills, and Blanca Peak in San Luis Basin

    Photo captures the Rio Grande, volcanic San Luis Hills, and Blanca Peak massif in the San Luis Basin, part of the Rio Grande rift.  The basin - currently being studied by the USGS - is of interest for groundwater, petroleum, and mineral resources. ...

  1. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    Quality of Service (QoS) has emerged in the last few years as a topical and challenging research area in distributed systems. For a broad definition of QoS we refer to the ISO's Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (ISO/IEC IS 10746-2): `The notion of QoS is a system or object property, and consists of a set of quality requirements on the collective behaviour of one or more objects . . .'. In the context of this special issue, QoS is primarily associated with systems such as distributed multimedia application platforms or distributed simulations. The QoS requirements of such systems typically relate to measures of rate and latency of information transfer, probability of a communication being disrupted, probability of system failure, probability of storage failure, etc. The role of QoS management is thus to ensure that applications are able to specify and obtain the quality of service that they require for their correct execution. In general, the functions of QoS management may be subsumed under the following headings: (i) QoS specification and mapping, (ii) QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control and (iii) QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation. QoS specification defines the QoS required by an application in terms of both timeliness constraints and guarantees. QoS mapping then translates between QoS representations at different system levels, relieving the user of the necessity of thinking in terms of low-level QoS representations. For example, a user may express a jitter requirement by manipulating a slider in a GUI, and this could be mapped at the lower layers into a requirement for an absolute bound on ATM cell jitter and a jitter smoothing buffer of a certain size. QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control are collectively responsible for configuring a system in preparation for the execution of a QoS requiring application. QoS negotiation provides a framework in which the QoS levels supported by individual system components (e.g. file server, operating system and network) are composed to build the required end-to-end service. Providing such a service may well require explicit resource allocation (e.g. of network bandwidth or CPU cycles); admission control may also be required to ensure that requested QoS levels can be met. QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation are concerned with supporting QoS during the run time of an application. QoS monitoring and QoS adaptation are conceptually related in a feedback loop in which current QoS levels are observed and fine grained reconfiguration is triggered as necessary to ensure that the required levels are maintained. An example of such a loop is to be found in Internet tools such as vic or vat which monitor network delay and adapt by adjusting the size of an elastic playout buffer. QoS renegotiation is a coarser grained adaptation, often explicitly initiated by the user, in which required QoS levels are revised at run time. An example could be a user scaling a video display from colour to monochrome so that sufficient resources can be freed to support an additional connection. The papers in this special issue were selected from the fourth QoS Workshop held in Paris in March 1996. To understand the overall evolution of QoS research it is useful to know some background on the series of workshops of which the Paris workshop was a part. The first workshop to be dedicated exclusively to QoS issues was organized in Canada by the European RACE project R2088 (TOPIC) in cooperation with the University of Montreal in June 1994. A European counterpart of this initiating event occurred in the same year in September 1994 in Aachen, Germany. This latter event was held in cooperation with the European Conference on Intelligence in Broadband Services and Networks (IS&N94). A third workshop was then held in conjunction with the IFIP conference on Open Distributed Processing (ICODP95) in Brisbane, Australia in March 1995. By 1996 more independence, and also more recognition of QoS as an independent research area, was achieved in the above mentioned Paris workshop. This workshop was aligned with the IFIP conference on Formal Methods for Open Object-based Distributed Systems (FMOODS96), but was also independently recognised by IFIP. A fifth workshop is due to take place in May 1997 in New York. This event will be the first not to be organized under the umbrella of another big event. This is indicative of the fact that the community interested in QoS issues has now become large enough to maintain its own independent forum of discussion and exchange of expertise. The five papers in this special issue cover a wide range of QoS research issues and fall broadly into three categories. First we have a paper that addresses a very specific but nevertheless crucial aspect of QoS provision: supporting the QoS of variable bit rate (VBR) traffic in networks with deterministic guarantees. `On the effects of smoothing for deterministic QoS' by Edward Knightly and Paola Rossaro examines the impact of rate smoothing of VBR sources such as MPEG video. The impact of such smoothing on both the QoS as perceived by the user and on resource utilization in the network are considered. Experimental evidence is presented which shows quantitatively how reducing burstiness through source smoothing techniques can significantly reduce the resource utilization of VBR streams while maintaining deterministic QoS for the user (at the cost of some increase in the end-to-end delay bound). It is also shown that a richer traffic characterisation model (D-BIND) can produce better network utilization and user QoS than the usual models based only on peak rate, average rate and burst length. Next we have two papers concerned with broader issues of QoS management. These papers explore approaches to QoS monitoring and adaptation which are intended to be generic and applicable in a range of implementation environments. `Some principles for quality of service management' by Gregor v Bochmann and Abdelhakim Hafid offers lessons in QoS management learned during the implementation of a prototype News-on-Demand application. Some general principles are extracted from this experience. In particular, a novel QoS adaptation technique is highlighted: transparent automatic reconfiguration of the components involved in a communication (e.g. choice of an alternative network or server at run time). An algorithm which attempts to choose optimal configurations is discussed. `Quality of service management using generic modelling and monitoring techniques', by Leonard Franken and Boudewijn Haverkort investigates the use of Petri nets as the basis of generic QoS monitoring of distributed applications. A distributed application is exploded into finegrained component parts and interactions between these parts are instrumented. The paper offers a case study of the instrumentation of a videophone application using this technique. Simulation is used to evaluate the scheme. The final two papers in the special issue are more focused and pragmatic in nature. These papers explore QoS provision in particular environments (the World Wide Web and ATM networks respectively) through reported implementation experience. `QoS management in a World Wide Web environment which supports continuous media' by Michael Fry, Aruna Seneviratne, Andreas Vogel and Varuni Witana looks at the practical provision of end to end QoS management in the World Wide Web. The paper looks beyond currently available tools such as RealAudio and StreamWorks and presents a QoS managed RTP based solution featuring an adjunct QoS management protocol. This work offers QoS management functions (e.g. QoS negotiation, adaptation and control of QoS degradation paths) directly to the user via the usual Web GUI. `A QoS adaptive multimedia transport system: design, implementation and experiences' by Andrew Campbell and Geoff Coulson offers further practical experience of QoS management. Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  2. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are contained within a single PostScript or PDF document available at the bottom of this page. Contents On the determination of a period of oscillation P Glaister Department of Mathematics, University of Reading Finding the ratio of the specific heats of gases G Millar 75 Morningside Rd, Edinburgh EH10 4AY Moving frame and the Doppler effect in mechanical waves Murshed Hossain Department of Chemistry and Physics, Rowan College of New Jersey, Glassboro, and Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, USA . The fly and train paradox Don Koks Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Australia Easier A-levels? P C Clark Head of Physics, Oundle School Centripetal acceleration Telford Moore Depute Rector, Hawick High School Curriculum development at 16-19 Bryan R Chapman 16-19 Curriculum Development Officer, Institute of Physics, London A fly on the wall P Litchfield Rochdale, Lancs Motion revealed by a laser Frank Munley Raonoke College, Salem, VA 24153, USA

  3. From the Editor's Desk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the admirable aspects of science is that its practitioners accept that advancing the field is an ongoing process. There is always more to be discovered. I view scientific publishing in a similar light. Last month, we instituted several changes to the journal, and I look forward to receiving your feedback. I anticipate some of the changes will be welcomed while others will not. ToxSci relies on the feedback from our readers, authors, and reviewers to assure that we are serving the research community to the highest degree. The editorial staff is dedicated to producing a high-quality journal that features outstanding science like that seen in this issue. In their Forum article, Wu and coworkers describe how increasing dietary diversity can reduce exposure to foodborne toxins. This is an important public health observation that can help mitigate many of the toxic effects described in the pages of the ToxSci. You will also note that we are using a new format for our Letters to the Editor. Rather than appearing at the end of the journal they immediately follow the highlights below. In this issue, the formulation of caroboxyfullerenes is the topic of discussion. I invite you to Look Inside ToxSci for the best original research in the field of toxicology. —Gary W. Miller PMID:25288704

  4. STE - The Software Tools Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Software tools is an excellent book written by B. W. Kernighan and P. J. Plauger, published by Addison-Wesley. In it the authors discuss how to write programs that make good tools, and how to program well in the process. One of the tools they develop is a fairly powerful editor, written in Ratfor (a structured form of FORTRAN IV). This program has been implemented on the UCL Starlink VAX (with a few modifications and extensions) and is recommended as the editor to use on the VAX. This note gives a brief introduction to, and description of, the editor which has been abstracted from the book (which you are recommended to buy). There are some short command summary sections at the end of this note. After reading this note you may like to print these short files and use them for reference when using the editor.

  5. Remarks from a retiring Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, Louis K.

    2015-10-01

    At the end of 2015 I plan to step down as Chairman of Editors for the Journal of Nuclear Materials. I use the opportunity to express thoughts that have recurred to me but were muted in comparison with the day to day priorities of editorial work. The most important is that I hold the deepest gratitude for your enduring support-- authors, reviewers, readers, the Advisory Editorial Board, and my fellow Editors.

  6. PREFACE: Scientific and Publishing Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    1.Scientific Editors Section 1: Particle physics Mikhail Skorohvatov - NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia Section 2: Nuclear physics Mikhail Danilov - ITEP NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia Section 3: Cosmic rays Arkady Galper - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Anatoly Petrukhin - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Section 4: Methods of experimental physics Valery Dmitrenko - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia 2.Publishing Editors Irene Arkhangelskaja - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Pavel Buzhan - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia

  7. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  8. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  9. [Semblance of Dr. Luis Bentez Bribiesca].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gmez, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    La actividad editorial mdica est de luto. Un rgido y doloroso manto luctuoso cubre algunas de las ms importantes revistas biomdicas y clnicas del mbito de Amrica Latina. Desafortunadamente, el Dr. Luis Bentez Bribiesca, destacado colega que dedic gran parte de su vida como investigador y acadmico a la difusin del conocimiento cientfico, falleci el 30 de noviembre de 2015. PMID:26927656

  10. Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-03-01

    Special Issue on Performance Modelling Distributed systems are now accepted as a cost-effective alternative to mainframe computer systems in most commercial environments. Their usage continues to become ever more widespread whilst their complexity is increasing rapidly. The essential advantage of client - server systems in particular is the splitting of an application into a client part, which comprises tasks that are executed locally on workstations such as PCs, and a server part, which executes larger scale computations on a remote mainframe or parallel computer. In this way the end-user is offered great flexibility, using a workstation for its specialist capabilities and user interface which is tailored to use by non-technical staff. However, large calculations, for example access to a large central database, can be hived off, via a network, to a central mainframe which has superior performance and is also most appropriate for managing large volumes of shared data. In short, client - server systems can effectively integrate workstations, and perhaps mid-range systems, with mainframes and supercomputers in a cost-effective and user-friendly way. Many other distributed configurations are also used, for example clusters of networked workstations. Whilst this type of partitioning offers tremendous flexibility to users in a cost-effective way, large distributed systems are highly complex, involving large numbers of components performing tasks concurrently, some of which interact. The choice of components, interconnects and software algorithms is therefore critical and the scale of the problem - often many hundreds of clients, possibly many servers which may be parallel computers themselves and several choices of interconnect - demands a design backed up by formal quantitative performance modelling. This special issue is concerned with the performance evaluation of such distributed systems, many of them client - server systems. A system may be considered as comprising three subsystems: the client workstations or user front-ends, interconnection networks and servers, i.e. computers providing high power and mass storage. The corresponding performance issues are then, broadly, workload characterization, network behaviour (e.g. protocols) and execution of synchronized processes on a server. The first paper, by Woodside and Schramm, develops a controlled environment for experimentation with synthetic workloads on a layered configuration of processing nodes. This is followed by Peterson and Chamberlain's study of the performance of two iterative algorithms in the presence of background load on a heterogeneous network of workstations. The particular application of parallel simulation in a distributed environment is then addressed by Teo and Tay. The fourth paper by Foxon, Garth and Harrison discusses the use of formal capacity planning techniques in specifically client - server systems, estimating end-user response time distributions and including a commercial case study. The next two papers address interconnection networks. The first of these, by Malhis, Sanders and Schlichting, provides a joint performance and dependability analysis of a multicast protocol using an extension of the stochastic Petri net formalism. The second, by Heijenk and Haverkort, uses Markov methods and matrix-geometric solution techniques to analyse the performance of a connectionless service implemented with ATM (connection-oriented) technology. The final paper is by Born and concerns the performance of a server node executing synchronized tasks - typically a database server. The critical issue here is the distributed lock management mechanism which implements the synchronization and preserves consistency in a database. Many high quality papers were submitted for this special issue and not all of these could be accommodated. Some of their authors have been invited to resubmit revisions to a future regular issue of the journal, so watch this space! It has been a pleasure to be Guest Editor and I look forward to future developments in this growing research area and expositions in Distributed Systems Engineering. Peter G Harrison Imperial College, London

  11. GRL editors: 1986”1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The leading rapid publication journal in the geophysical sciences is seeking candidates to succeed James C.G. Walker, whose term as editor-in-chief ends December 1985. AGU also seeks candidates to succeed the five regional editors: Rob Van der Voo, North America; Gaston J. Kockarts and William Lowrie, Europe; Tetsuya Sato, Asia; and Kurt Lambeck, Australia.AGU President Charles L. Drake has appointed a committee to recommend candidates for the 1986-1988 term. Resumes of those interested in serving in these influential and prestigious posts or letters of recommendation from those who wish to suggest candidates should be sent by February 15, 1985, to GRL Editor Search Committee, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20009.

  12. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    The journal Nuclear Fusion has played a key role in the development of the physics basis for fusion energy. That physics basis has been sufficiently advanced to enable construction of such major facilities as ITER along the tokamak line in magnetic fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in laser-driven fusion. In the coming decade, while ITER is being constructed and brought into deuterium-tritium (DT) operation, this physics basis will be significantly deepened and extended, with particular key remaining issues addressed. Indeed such a focus was already evident with about 19% of the papers submitted to the 24th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego, USA appearing in the directly labelled ITER and IFE categories. Of course many of the papers in the other research categories were aimed at issues relevant to these major fusion directions. About 17% of the papers submitted in the 'Experiment and Theory' categories dealt with the highly ITER relevant and inter-related issues of edge-localized modes, non-axisymmetric fields and plasma rotation. It is gratifying indeed to see how the international community is able to make such a concerted effort, facilitated by the ITPA and the ITER-IO, around such a major issue for ITER. In addition to deepening and extending the physics bases for the mainline approaches to fusion energy, the coming decade should see significant progress in the physics basis for additional fusion concepts. The stellarator concept should reach a high level of maturity with such facilities as LHD operating in Japan and already producing significant results and the W7-X in the EU coming online soon. Physics issues that require pulses of hundreds of seconds to investigate can be confronted in the new superconducting tokamaks coming online in Asia and in the major stellarators. The basis for steady-state operation of a tokamak may be further developed in the upper half of the tokamak operating space—the wall stabilized regime. New divertor geometries are already being investigated. Progress should continue on additional driver approaches in inertial fusion. Nuclear Fusion will continue to play a major role in documenting the significant advances in fusion plasma science on the way to fusion energy. Successful outcomes in projects like ITER and NIF will bring sharply into focus the remaining significant issues in fusion materials science and fusion nuclear science and technology needed to move from the scientific feasibility of fusion to the actual realization of fusion power production. These issues are largely common to magnetic and inertial fusion. Progress in these areas has been limited by the lack of suitable major research facilities. Hopefully the coming decade will see progress along these lines. Nuclear Fusion will play its part with increased papers reporting significant advances in fusion materials and nuclear science and technology. The reputation and status of the journal remains high; paper submissions are increasing and the Impact Factor for the journal remains high at 4.09 for 2011. We look forward in the coming months to publishing expanded versions of many of the outstanding papers presented at the IAEA FEC in San Diego. We congratulate Dr Patrick Diamond of the University of California at San Diego for winning the 2012 Nuclear Fusion Prize for his paper [1] and Dr Hajime Urano of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency for winning the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Prize for his paper [2]. Papers of such quality by our many authors enable the high standard of the journal to be maintained. The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required by our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering ten of the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, three of the top referees have reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in recent years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA-Cadarache, France Jiaqui Dong, Southwestern Institute of Physics, China Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Ambrogio Fasoli, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland Eric Fredrickson, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Manuel Garcia-Munoz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany William Heidbrink, California University, USA Katsumi Ida, National Inst. For Fusion Science, Japan Peter Stangeby, Toronto University, Canada James Strachan, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Victor Yavorskij, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2012. Our thanks to them!

  13. MOKE "Mark's Own Kanji Editor."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaskey, Michael; O'Neill, Patricia A.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of MOKE, a basic IBM-compatible Japanese language word processor with a built in Japanese-to-English dictionary that functions as a text editor and also as a preparer and reader of electronic mail in Japanese. (CB)

  14. Magnetotelluric Data, Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The population of the San Luis Valley region is growing rapidly. The shallow unconfined and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin is the main sources of municipal water for the region. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey, called magnetotellurics (MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifer systems. The primary goal of the MT survey is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock type. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers in the region. This report does not include any interpretation of the data. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at the 22 stations shown in figure 1.

  15. Magnetotelluric Data, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2008-01-01

    The San Luis Valley region population is growing. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region?s ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The shallow unconfined aquifer and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey (called magnetotellurics, or MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. The MT survey primary goal is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock types. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers. This report does not include any data interpretation. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at 24 stations. Two of the stations were collected near Santa Fe, New Mexico, near deep wildcat wells. Well logs from those wells will help tie future interpretations of this data with geologic units from the Santa Fe Group sediments to Precambrian basement.

  16. Meet the APS Editors Coffee Break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    The APS Journal Editors invite you to join them for conversation and light refreshments. The Editors will be available to answer questions, discuss your ideas, and listen to your comments about the journals. All are welcome to attend.

  17. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  18. New Editors, Editorial Advisory Board for Eos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2010-11-01

    Eos has two new editors and, with this issue, a revitalized Editorial Advisory Board. Christina M. S. Cohen, of the California Institute of Technology, is the new editor for space sciences. She succeeds Manuel Grande, who had served since 2006. Carol A. Stein, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, is the new editor for solid Earth. She succeeds John W. Geissman, who has been solid Earth editor since 2001; he will continue through the end of 2010.

  19. SIERRA Editor v. 1.2.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-24

    The SIERRA Editor is a syntax editor for text-based input decks for the SIERRA modeling and simulations codes. The SIERRA Editor provides color coded syntax, error checking, hyperlink navigation to referenced entities (e.g. functions and materials), and visual verification of mesh entity references (blocks, sidesets, and nodesets). The SIERRA Editor helps modeling and simulation analysts who use the SIERRA codes to produce syntactically correct input decks.

  20. Learning To Use a Text Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Carole R.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.

    Designed to determine how quickly elementary school children can learn to use a text editor and what editing concepts are difficult for them to master, this study presents preliminary data on children's acquisition of text editor skills and on the kinds of revisions they accomplished with the text editor. Observations were made on a total of 25…

  1. Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

  2. Line-Editor Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

  3. New editors for JGR-Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AGU has selected new editors for the Journal of Geophysical Research—Atmospheres. The new editors are James Dye (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), physical meteorology, and Kenneth Gage (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Aeronomy Laboratory, Boulder, Colo.), dynamic meteorology. Shaw Liu (NOAA, Aeronomy Laboratory, Boulder, Colo.), the editor for atmospheric chemistry, will continue as editor in chief.Authors are invited to send papers to any of the three editors. In practice, Dye will edit papers in atmospheric electricity, cloud physics, and meteorological instrumentation. Gage will be editor for papers in atmospheric dynamics, radiation and climate, and remote sensing. Liu will edit papers on atmospheric chemistry. Interdisciplinary papers that fall within more than one of the above areas can be sent to any appropriate editor.

  4. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    This year Nuclear Fusion celebrates its fiftieth anniversary. This has been marked by the January special edition, containing papers presented at the plenary and celebratory evening session of the 22nd Fusion Energy Conference at Geneva. These papers underline the enormous progress that has been made in the last 50 years both in experiment and theory. Whilst the technical challenges that we face are still formidable, they are largely concerned with engineering a fusion reactor rather than fundamental plasma physics. In my editorial of a year ago, I remarked on the price of oil and the incentive that it gives to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. This last year, attention has shifted somewhat from the markets to the environment and the Copenhagen climate summit in particular. The timescale for action on the environment is much shorter than we can possibly match and so we can only play our part towards developing long term solutions. Our responsibility is to present a programme that has the clear goal in developing a sustainable source of energy and, as the next step, make an unambiguous success of ITER. The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2009 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2010. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, seven of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2008 to November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion award was Steven A. Sabbagh et al for the paper entitled 'Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 46 635-644). Reviews Last year I announced a revival of Nuclear Fusion Reviews, following a decision by the Board of Editors. 'A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa was the first fruit of this. In 2010, we are expecting to publish further review articles, the first of which is entitled 'Gyrokinetic simulations of turbulent transport' by Xavier Garbet, Yasuhiro Idomura, Laurent Villard and Tomo-Hiko Watanabe. Letters At the 2009 Board of Editors Meeting in Atlanta, the current letters procedure was summarized and it was noted that the peer review time for Letters is quite variable. Some are accepted within a month of submission, others take longer. Since the purpose of Letters is to provide a route for rapid communication, this is quite an important matter. It was agreed that the Board of Editors would play a more active role in the Letter approval process. If a reviewer asks for a second revision the Editor or a Board of Editors member will be queried as to whether the submission should still be treated as a Letter rather than a regular Paper. The Board of Editors The following Board of Editors members reached the end of their term in 2009: Amanda Hubbard, Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Kunioki Mima, Boris Sharkov and Michael Ulrickson. On behalf of the Nuclear Fusion Office and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, I would like to thank them for their efforts in support of the journal. At the same time, we welcomed: Hiroshi Azechi, Xuru Duan, Richard Hawryluk, Sergey Konovalov, Bruce Lipschultz, Peter Norreys, Francesco Romanelli, Tony Taylor and Hartmut Zohm. I am sure that such an illustrious group does not need any introduction to the readers of Nuclear Fusion and I am confident that the new members can only further the success of the journal. It is with great sadness that I have to note the passing away of the following former members of the Board of Editors: Ravindra Sudan (1975 to 1984), Joe Di Marco (1984 to 1991) and Roy Bickerton (1975 to 1986). The Nuclear Fusion Office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the Nuclear Fusion Office in Vienna and IOP Publishing in Bristol. I would like to express my personal thanks to Maria Bergamini-Roedler, Katja Haslinger, Sophy Le Masurier, Yasmin McGlashan, Caroline Wilkinson, Sarah Ryder, Rachael Kriefman and Katie Gerrard for the support that they have given to me, the authors and the referees. Season's Greetings The January special edition delayed this editorial for a month. Nevertheless, I would like belatedly to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors the season's greetings and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2009.

  5. Neuroimaging Features of San Luis Valley Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Lee, Bonmyong

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old Hispanic female with a history of double-outlet right ventricle and developmental delay in the setting of recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome was referred for neurologic imaging. Brain MR revealed multiple abnormalities primarily affecting midline structures, including commissural dysgenesis, vermian and brainstem hypoplasia/dysplasia, an interhypothalamic adhesion, and an epidermoid between the frontal lobes that enlarged over time. Spine MR demonstrated hypoplastic C1 and C2 posterior elements, scoliosis, and a borderline low conus medullaris position. Presented herein is the first illustration of neuroimaging findings from a patient with San Luis Valley syndrome. PMID:26425383

  6. Reconstructing a Spanish Mission: San Luis de Talimali.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Bonnie G.; Hann, John H.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the reconstruction of the San Luis de Talimali, which was among the largest and most important missions in Spanish Florida with the Apalachee Indians as their parishioners. Describes the various structures found at San Luis: (1) the council house; (2) the chief's house; and (3) the church. (CMK)

  7. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  9. Tule Elk at San Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    Tule elk are shown here in their natural habitat at San Luis National Wildlife Refuge; Recovery Act funding will enable the refuge to build a Visitor Center to better serve the public. Related to the R8AF — Construct Headquarters Visitor Building — San Luis NWR project....

  10. Familiarizing with science editors' associations

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The number of science editors' associations is growing to resolve a variety of professional problems. The main objective of the associations is to educate their members by facilitating dissemination of information, publishing scholarly journals, books, networking of experts, and regular meetings. There are many science editing associations – general and specialized, traditional, and new. The article presents activities of some of these associations, which include upholding standards of science writing, editing, indexing, research reporting, peer review, editorial independence, and other editorial policies. PMID:22180273

  11. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support for ITER. Such political visibility is good news, of course, but it brings with it the obligation to perform. Fortunately, good performance was much in evidence in the papers presented at the conference, of which a significant proportion contain 'ITER' in the title. Given this importance of ITER and the undertaking by the Nuclear Fusion journal to publish papers associated with Fusion Energy Conference presentations, the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board has decided to adopt a simplified journal scope that encompasses technology papers more naturally. The scope is available from http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Journal%20information but is reproduced here for clarity: Nuclear Fusion publishes articles making significant advances to the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The journal scope includes: the production, heating and confinement of high temperature plasmas; the physical properties of such plasmas; the experimental or theoretical methods of exploring or explaining them; fusion reactor physics; reactor concepts; fusion technologies. The key to scope acceptability is now '....significant advances....' rather than any particular area of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is hoped that this will make scope decisions easier for the Nuclear Fusion office, the referees and the Editor.The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. This is underlined by the fact that Nuclear Fusion has received an impact factor of 4.270, as listed in ISI's 2009 Science Citation Index. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2010 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2011. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, two of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2009 to November 2010 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their special issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Osamu Naito, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Japan Masahiro Kobayashi, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan Duccio Testa, Lausanne Federal Polytechnic University, Switzerland Vladimir Pustovitov, Russian Research Centre, Kurchatov Insitute, Russia Christopher Holland, University of California at San Diego, USA Yuri Gribov, ITER International Organisation, Cadarache, France Eriko Jotaki, Kyushu University, Japan Sven Wiesen, Jülich Research Centre, Germany Viktor S. Marchenko, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine Richard Stephens, General Atomics, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2010. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award was J.E. Rice et al for the paper entitled 'Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks' (2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 1618-24). The prize was awarded at the Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon, together with the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award to Steve Sabbagh. The Board of Editors Roger Weynants retired as a member of the Board of Editors in 2010. On behalf of the Nuclear Fusion office and the Chairman of the Board, Mitsuru Kikuchi, I would like to thank him for his effort in support of the journal; Roger was one of the most active members of the Board and his balanced and competent advice was extremely valuable on many difficult decisions. At the same time we welcome Tony Donne whom I am sure does not need any introduction to the readers of Nuclear Fusion; I am confident he can only further the success of the journal. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the Nuclear Fusion office in Vienna and IOP Publishing in Bristol. I would like to express my personal thanks to Maria Bergamini-Roedler, Katja Haslinger, Sophy Le Masurier, Yasmin McGlashan, Caroline Wilkinson, Sarah Ryder, Katie Gerrard and Stephanie Kent for the support that they have given to me, the authors and the referees. Season's greetings I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors season's greetings and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2010.

  12. Examining Editor-Author Ethics: Real-World Scenarios from Interviews with Three Journal Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amare, Nicole; Manning, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Those who submit manuscripts to academic journals may benefit from a better understanding of how editors weigh ethics in their interactions with authors. In an attempt to ascertain and to understand editors' ethics, we interviewed 3 current academic journal editors of technical and/or business communication journals. We asked them about the…

  13. Farewell editorial from the founding editors.

    PubMed

    Izatt, Joseph A; Faris, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The retiring Editor-in-Chief and Deputy Editor provide a brief retrospective of the first six volumes of Biomedical Optics Express, thank the Editorial Board and OSA professional staff, and endorse the new journal leadership and the continued support of the journal by the biomedical optics community. PMID:26819829

  14. Professional Editing Strategies Used by Six Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisaillon, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    Identifying the approach used by those revision experts par excellence--that is, professional editors--should enable researchers to better grasp the revision process. To further explore this hypothesis, the author conducted research among professional editors, six of whom she filmed as they engaged in their practice. An analysis of their work

  15. Letter to Editor - "Reply to RP Heaney"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A letter to the editor was submitted in reply to a letter written to the editor of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition regarding a recent publication (Hunt, CD. and Johnson, LK. Calcium requirements: new estimations for men and women by cross-sectional statistical analyses of calcium balance...

  16. A Synonym for Editor Must Be Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that in scholastic journalism, the editor might not be the best writer, designer, or photographer, but he or she must have a vision of what the final publication should be. Lists the following desirable traits of an editor: strong work ethic; motivation; organization; background knowledge; and responsibility. (PM)

  17. Linguistic Prescriptivism in Letters to the Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukac, Morana

    2016-01-01

    The public's concern with the fate of the standard language has been well documented in the history of the complaint tradition. The print media have for centuries featured letters to the editor on questions of language use. This study examines a corpus of 258 language-related letters to the editor published in the English-speaking print media. By…

  18. LETTER TO THE EDITOR (AGRONOMY JOURNAL)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We served as symposium organizers and guest editors for set of papers published in 2002 that described the application of soil quality concepts in different agricultural systems. Following the publication of these articles a Letter to the Editor was submitted that was critical of statements that we...

  19. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The end of 2008 cannot pass without remarking that the economic news has repeatedly strengthened the case for nuclear fusion; not perhaps to solve the immediate crises but to offer long-term security of energy supply. Although temporary, the passage of the price of oil through 100 per barrel is a portent of things to come and should bolster our collective determination to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. It is with great pride, therefore, that I can highlight the contributions that the Nuclear Fusion journal has made to the research programme and the consolidation of its position as the lead journal in the field. Of course, the journal would be nothing without its authors and referees and I would like to pass on my sincere thanks to them all for their work in 2008 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2009. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most loyal referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least two different manuscripts during the period from November 2007 to November 2008 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! T. Hino (Hokkaido University, Japan) M. Sugihara (ITER Cadarache, France) M. Dreval (Saskatchewan University, Canada) M. Fenstermacher (General Atomics, USA) V.S. Marchenko (Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine) G.V. Pereverzev (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany) V. Philipps (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany) S. Zweben (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA) Y. Hirano (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan) Y. Takase (Tokyo University, Japan) In addition there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2008. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2007 award was Clemente Angioni for the paper entitled `Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade' (Nucl. Fusion 44 8277-845). The winner of the 2008 Nuclear Fusion award is Todd Evans et al for the paper `Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 45 595-607). The awards were presented by the IAEA Deputy Director General, Werner Burkart, and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, on 16 October 2008 at the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. Given the topicality of these papers for the ITER design, it is a matter of pride to the journal that the work should be published in Nuclear Fusion. Reviews Like many who have worked for a long time in the field, I still make use of Nuclear Fusion Reviews that go back 20 or 30 years. It is particularly useful, therefore, that the Board of Editors has been working to re-activate the review programme. The first fruits will appear in this issue, in the form of `A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa. The special procedures for Reviews should be noted: most specifically that they should normally be commissioned by the Board of Editors. However, not only is the Board of Editors working on a programme but I am sure that they would be pleased to consider suggestions for review subjects. Letters The reputation of Nuclear Fusion is based on high quality full length articles. However, in the words of the journal home page, `Nuclear Fusion welcomes Letters as a means to quickly communicate new, maybe preliminary, results which make a significant advancement of the knowledge in the field. Letters should be comprehensive and short, aiming for four printed pages including figures.' I would like to take the opportunity to reiterate this message and to say that, as Editor, I would welcome the submission of high quality Letters. Publishing procedures In-house, Nuclear Fusion's publishing procedures are subject to continuous scrutiny for potential improvements. Of particular note from 2008 are faster than ever peer review and publishing times that have been achieved despite the very rigorous processing to which submissions are subject. Readers may have noticed the implementation of the new article numbering system, announced by the Publisher, Yasmin McGlashan in 2008 Nucl. Fusion 48 010101. This new scheme gives us more flexibilty and has led to faster online publication. The Nuclear Fusion Office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the Nuclear Fusion Office in Vienna and IOP Publishing in Bristol. I would like to express my personal thanks to Maria, Katja, Sophy, Sarah, Rachael and Yasmin for the support that they have given to me, the authors and the referees. Season's Greetings I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors a successful and happy 2009 and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2008.

  20. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.

    2013-01-01

    Dear readers, contributors, and members of the world laser physics community. It is a great honour for us to introduce to you our new publishing partner, IOP Publishing, a subsidiary of the Institute of Physics, United Kingdom. IOP Publishing is a world renowned authority in producing journals, magazines, websites and services that enable researchers and research organizations to present their work to a world-wide audience. Laser Physics, the first English-language scientific journal in Russia, was founded in 1990 on the initiative of Alexander M Prokhorov, a pioneer and leader in laser physics research. Professor Prokhorov served as the first Editor-in-Chief of the journal until 2002. We are proud that it is our 23rd year of publishing Laser Physics and our 10th year of publishing Laser Physics Letters. We would like to honour the memory of our friend, late Professor Igor Yevseyev, whose enthusiasm and unwavering dedication to our journals contributed most significantly to their success. It was initially his idea in 2011 to approach IOP with a partnership proposal. We deeply regret that he is no longer with us as we enter this productive alliance. Now, in partnership with IOP, we are turning a new page in providing world-wide access to the cutting-edge research results in our journals, serving our well established global audience. We see new horizons opening for our journals for years to come and hope that our readers share our enthusiasm and aspirations. Please accept our best wishes for all your new scientific endeavors in the exciting field of laser physics.

  1. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland. PMID:26969455

  2. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  3. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    At the time of writing, the construction of ITER is making, quite literally, visible progress; buildings have gone up, the tokamak pit has been equipped with the seismic pads and pylons have been put in place for the high tension input to the power supplies. Most of the main procurement arrangements have been let and we will see an increasing volume of deliveries to the ITER site over the coming years. In addition, the National Ignition Facility has started full operation and will undoubtedly see important results coming from it in 2012. These projects are important reminders of what a monumental endeavour we are all engaged in and the potential of nuclear fusion to improve the long-term condition of the human race. We can be proud, therefore, that the Nuclear Fusion journal makes such an important contribution to controlled fusion programmes and is maintaining its position as the leading journal in the field. More than 350 articles are submitted each year from over 40 countries. Nuclear Fusion continues to be the most highly cited journal in the field, with an impact factor of 3.303, as listed in the ISI 2010 Science Citation Index. The journal depends on its authors and referees for its success and so I would like to thank them all for their hard work in 2011, which should maintain the level of readership and the citation indices for years to come. I sincerely hope that 2012 will be as good. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, three of the top referees have reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2010 to November 2011 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA Cadarache, France Russell Doerner, University of California - San Diego, USA Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany Akihide Fujisawa, Kyushi University, Japan Gerardo Giruzzi, CEA Cadarache, France Grigory Kagan, LANL, USA Morten Lennholm, CCFE, UK Akinobu Matsuyama, NIFS, Japan Peter Stangeby, University of Toronto, Canada Leonid Zakharov, PPPL, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2011. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Award is H. Urano, for the paper 'Dimensionless parameter dependence of H-mode pedestal width using hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in JT-60U' (Nucl. Fusion 48 045008). The award was presented at the Plasma Conference 2011 (Joint meeting of 28th JSPF Annual Meeting, The 29th Symposium on Plasma Processing, and Division of Plasma Physics, 2011 Autumn Meeting of The Physical Society of Japan). This is the sixth year that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has awarded an annual prize to honour exceptional work published in Nuclear Fusion. IOP Publishing has generously made a contribution of $2500 to the award. The Nuclear Fusion Electronic Archive The journal's electronic archive has been online since the beginning of the year. The archive has been a roaring success and has contributed to the nearly 300 000 downloads of journal papers in 2011. The archive can be accessed via http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Archive. It has direct links to 16 landmark papers, from authors such as Artsimovich and Mercier. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the Nuclear Fusion office in Vienna and IOP Publishing in Bristol. I would like to express my personal thanks to Maria Bergamini-Roedler, Katja Haslinger, Stephanie Kent, Sophy Le Masurier, Yasmin McGlashan, Sarah Ryder and Dina Yarullina for the support that they have given to me, the authors and the referees. Maria Bergamini-Roedler retired from the journal after many years of capital service to the Nuclear Fusion journal. Her attachment to the journal and the people associated with it will be sorely missed. I am sure that the readership will join me in wishing her many years of happy retirement, pursuing her many activities. Season's greetings I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors the best for 2012 and thank them for all their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2011.

  4. [Report of the editors, 2013].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) objectives and attainments, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2014. In 2013 the most relevant modification concerning the editorial activity has been the translation into English of the 5 manuscripts with abstract contained in each issue (http://www.revclinesp.es/). From the first January to the 30th September 2013 we received 458 manuscripts (50.9 manuscripts per month), a similar figure to that obtained in 2012 (51.1 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 443 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 23.7% (originals, 11.8%). We asked for 253 revisions to 186 reviewers and we received 74.4% revisions in less than 2 weeks (10.9 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 20,3 (half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56.6 days in 2009 to 22.5 days in 2013. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 94.8 days in 2013 (110.5 in 2012 and 155.8 in 2011). In 2013 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation has reported 17 published manuscripts. In 2013 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports excluded Rev Clin Esp from its impact factor journal list due to its elevated self-citations. We have taken a number of actions to reduce self-citations and we expect to be a minority in 2014. Some other data concerning the editorial policy are encouraging. In this sense, manuscript citation to Rev Clin Esp published articles has seen a substantial increase from 19% in 2008 to 29% in 2012. We work to achieve the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000). The continuous renewal of the journal sections and the working groups collaboration are necessary elements to make our journal, each day, better. PMID:24365754

  5. Report of the editors, 2014.

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2015-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) Objectives and attainments in 2014, (b) Editorial activity, 2014, and (c) 2013 impact factor. In 2014 we achieved the 5 planned objectives. We have published the 9 programmed issues and 103% of the planned papers according to the usual fixed sections. We emphasize the publication of 29 editorials, 21 of which are signed by prestigious foreign authors. From the first January to the 30th September 2014 we received 421 manuscripts (46.8 manuscripts per month), a slight lower figure to that obtained in 2013 (50.9 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 404 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 32.3% (originals, 22.4%). We asked for 315 revisions to 240 reviewers and we received 53.3% revisions in less than two weeks (10.4 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 18,3 (less than half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56,6 days in 2009 to 26.6 days in 2014. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 103 days. In 2014 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation (FEMI) has reported 11 published manuscripts. In July 2014 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports gave Rev Clin Esp an Impact Factor of 1,314 (year 2013). This Impact Factor without self-citations would have been 0.705 (in 2009 the global impact factor was 0,584). With the Editorial Committee farewell we welcome the new editorial team and we sincerely thank the SEMI Steering Committee, our colleagues, journal officers, reviewers, readers and authors that since 2009 have trusted on our editorial work. PMID:25441406

  6. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2010, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal and look ahead to 2011. As many of you are no doubt aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) is currently 1.317. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Measurement Science and Technology is a journal with a broad scope covering new measurement techniques in all fields of science and engineering. I therefore find it particularly enjoyable to read summaries of recent research in our strong topical review programme as these cover many varied topics of interest. In 2010 several interesting articles by international leaders in their field were published, for example: Single-photon generation and detection, by G S Buller and R J Collins of Heriot-Watt University [1]. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in life sciences, by Jan Willem Borst and Antonie J W G Visser, from the Microspectroscopy Centre of Wageningen University [2]. Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis, by Elfriede Simon of Siemens AG [3]. I hope that these articles, and the others published in 2010 and now in 2011, will provide a useful overview for our readers, and be helpful to new researchers. When speaking to young researchers I am particularly aware that having their articles published in a timely fashion is important, and I am pleased that our publication times are highly competitive, with most authors receiving a publication decision within 7 weeks and most articles being published a month after acceptance. Looking forward to 2011, we will continue to rely on you, our esteemed reviewers, for your help in determining which articles make a significant contribution to the field of measurements. Your work is highly valued, not only by those of us who work directly on the journal, but also by the readers who can continue to refer to MST knowing that only work of a high standard is published here. There simply remains for me to say thank you again for your contribution to Measurement Science and Technology in 2010, and I wish you all the best for a successful 2011! References [1] Buller G S and Collins R J 2010 Single-photon generation and detection Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 012002 [2] Borst J W and Visser A J W G 2010 Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in life sciences Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 102002 [3] Simon E 2010 Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 112002

  7. AGU Publications Volunteers Feted At Elegant Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting Editors' Evening, held at the City Club of San Francisco, was hosted by the Publications Committee and is the premier social event for editors and associate editors attending the Fall Meeting. The evening commenced with a welcome from Carol Finn, incoming AGU president, in which she expressed her thanks to the editors and associate editors for volunteering their time to benefit AGU.

  8. 40 CFR 81.176 - San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.176 Section 81.176 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Quality Control Regions § 81.176 San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San Luis...

  9. 40 CFR 81.176 - San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.176 Section 81.176 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Quality Control Regions § 81.176 San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San Luis...

  10. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2008, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. This year we see the introduction of a new subject section 'Measurement techniques for bio-medical and life science applications' to facilitate browsing by readers from this community who may be less familiar with Measurement Science and Technology. We anticipate that articles falling within this section will broaden the strengths of the journal to the biological and medical arena by comprising imaging techniques for biology and medicine including tomography, microscopy, ultrasonic imaging and MRI; spectroscopic techniques in biological and medical physics; sensors for measuring biological, biochemical and medical processes and quantities; new instrumentation for measurement in biology and medicine. To highlight this section in the journal we have commissioned a review article from Professor Gerald Urban of Albert Ludwigs Universität Freiburg, on micro- and nanobiosensors which appears as the first article in this issue. This topical review covers the state of the art of microsensors for physical and chemical parameters in medical science, as well as biosensors and microtransducers. I believe it is a valuable addition to the literature and a very useful starting point for researchers. As regular readers will know, Measurement Science and Technology has a long tradition of publishing topical review articles, and this year will be no exception. As well as the article from Professor Urban, in the same issue we have an article from Professor Roy Olsson III of Sandia National Laboratories on microfabricated phononic crystal devices and applications. In future issues readers can look forward to topical reviews from Dr Marella de Angelis and her colleagues on precision gravimetry using atomic sensors and from Dr Peter Becker on determination of the Avogadro constant via enriched silicon-28. I recommend setting up a free e-mail alert so that you can read them as soon as they are published! As many of you are already aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen again to 1.297. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Of course the publication of high quality articles in the journal is dependent both on you the authors who trust us with the publication of your best work and on our referees and Editorial Board Members who we depend on to maintain the high standards you have grown to expect. I must also thank our referees for their rapid response when asked to review papers for Measurement Science and Technology. On average, authors receive a decision on their article in 45 days. Therefore I would like to end this message by saying thank you again to all those who have contributed to our success in the past year, and wish you all the best for a successful 2009!

  11. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. As many of you are no doubt aware, our latest impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen to 1.228. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. The popularity of the journal amongst authors and readers has prompted us to introduce a new subject classification for articles, to make it easier for readers to find articles of interest. The eight subject categories are: Measurement theory and practical developments (e.g. precision measurements, metrology, new measurement principles, signal processing techniques, theory of measurement, calibration); Sensors and sensing systems (based on physical, chemical or biological principles; micro- and nano-scale systems; sensors for physical, chemical and biological quantities); Optical and laser based techniques (e.g. fibre optics, interferometry, etc); Fluid mechanics measurements (e.g. fluid flow, velocimetry, particle sizing, etc); Imaging techniques (e.g. tomography, microscopy, holography, THz, etc); Spectroscopy (e.g. optical, acoustic, dielectric, MS, NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS, fluorescence, PCS, x-ray, etc); New and improved techniques for materials evaluation (e.g. non-destructive testing and evaluation, structural measurements); Novel instrumentation. We kindly ask you to assign your paper to a category when you send it to the journal. In order to maintain our rapid publication times (currently authors can expect a decision 53 days after submitting their article, and once accepted, articles are published in an average of 40 days), we are adopting an article numbering scheme. This will enable us to continue to publish articles as soon as they are ready, and to classify them according to subject and type. Details can be found on our website at www.iop.org/journals/mst. Another change will be to the names of some of our articles. Design Notes will now be called Technical Design Notes to clarify that these are short descriptive articles giving readers a practical and useful 'how to' guide to a new piece of equipment or a technique. Review Articles will change their name to Topical Reviews to reflect the fact that these provide a review of a topic of current interest. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. Last year's topics included inverse problems in engineering, nanoscale metrology, microwave moisture measurements, metrology for high energy physics experiments and accelerometers, and optical fibre sensors among others. Remember to set up a free e-mail alert so you can be e-mailed as soon as articles in your field are published! There simply remains for me to say thank you again for your contribution to Measurement Science and Technology, and I wish you all the best for a successful 2008!

  12. Maurice Campbell: first editor of Heart

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, M E

    2003-01-01

    Maurice Campbell was the first editor of the British Heart Journal, now Heart, and was called the journal’s progenitor and formative influence, an untiring editor who virtually produced each issue single handedly. Campbell was also valued for his scholarly opinions, organisational and editorial skills, and for his careful statistical work which was advanced for its time and of great importance in the early understanding and treatment of congenital heart disease and arrhythmias. In addition, his collaboration with Russell Brock was instrumental in developing surgery for rheumatic and congenital heart disease at Guy’s Hospital. PMID:14617535

  13. Panel Discussion With PR/PRL Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Panelists: Peter Adams, Physical Review B Irwin Oppenheim, Physical Review E & Massachsetts Institute of Technology Jack Sandweiss, Physical Review Letters & Yale University Reinhardt Schuhmann, Physical Review Letters The panel will include Editors from Physical Review Letters, Physical Review B, and Physical Review E. They will briefly discuss some current issues facing the journals, such as raising the standards for PRL acceptance and the role of electronic media attachments (e.g., movies) to journal articles. Opinions on these issues from the audience will be solicited. The Editors will also respond to questions and comments from the audience.

  14. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Luis Obispo County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Luis Obispo County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  15. Social Integration and Health Behavioral Change in San Luis, Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuestion, Michael J.; Calle, Ana Quijano; Drasbek, Christopher; Harkins, Thomas; Sagastume, Lourdes J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the effects of social integration on behavioral change in the course of an intensive, community-based public health intervention. The intervention trained volunteers and mobilized local organizations to promote 16 key family health practices in rural San Luis, Honduras, during 2004 to 2006. A mixed methods approach is used.…

  16. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included particle image velocimetry; optoelectronic, electronic and optical fibre sensors; and density metrology among others, and next year we will publish a special issue on nanoscale metrology which I'm sure will be of interest to many of you. Remember to set up a free e-mail alert so you can be e-mailed as soon as articles in your field are published! The Editorial Board invites topical review articles and this year several interesting topics were covered by international leaders in their field. For example, Paul Lambeck (Univ. Twente, Netherlands) has written about integrated optical sensors in the chemical domain; Bernd Fellmuth, Christof Gaiser and Joachim Fischer of PTB, Germany have contributed an interesting article on the determination of the Boltzmann constant; Juergen Czarske (TU Dresden, Germany) has published an article on laser Doppler velocimetry; while Adrian Dobroiu, Chiko Otani and Kodo Kawase (RIKEN, Japan) have written about terahertz wave sources and imaging applications. We were also pleased to publish a review by Brian Culshaw (Univ. Strathclyde, UK) on the optical fibre Sagnac interferometer. We hope that these articles and the others published this year will provide a useful overview for our readers, and be helpful to new researchers. In June 2005 we introduced the second phase of our author and referee homepages. Many of you already have your own referee homepages set up, and we have now introduced an authors section where authors can submit their manuscript, access referee reports, collect proofs, and track the progress of their article from submission, through the peer-review process, to decision and publication. Of course we still understand that some people prefer to receive things by e-mail or post so we will do our best to be flexible for both authors and referees. Our author and referee web pages have proved extremely popular, and partly as a result of our innovation in this area, most authors can expect to receive a first decision on their paper within 55 days. Once accepted, papers are published within 40 days (on average), and although this means that on average papers are published less than 6 months after first being received, we will continue to work to improve the service we provide. There simply remains for me to say thank you again for your contribution to Measurement Science and Technology this year, and I wish you all the best for a successful 2007!

  17. A Microsoft Windows version of the MCNP visual editor

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.A.; Carter, L.L.; Pfohl, J.

    1999-07-01

    Work has started on a Microsoft Windows version of the MCNP visual editor. The MCNP visual editor provides a graphical user interface for displaying and creating MCNP geometries. The visual editor is currently available from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) as software package PSR-358. It currently runs on the major UNIX platforms (IBM, SGI, HP, SUN) and Linux. Work has started on converting the visual editor to work in a Microsoft Windows environment. This initial work focuses on converting the display capabilities of the visual editor; the geometry creation capability of the visual editor may be included in future upgrades.

  18. Copyright Tips for Editors and Publishers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polansky, Barbara Friedman

    1985-01-01

    Expands on three main copyright tips as they apply to editors and publishers: (1) know copyright basics (copyright notice, copyright registration, fair use); (2) know whom to contact if you have copyright questions or if you need to obtain copyright permission; and (3) communicate questions, intentions, and policies clearly and fully. (EJS)

  19. Rhetorical Patterns in Letters to the Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shishin, Alexander

    1985-01-01

    A study examined the linearity of discourse in letters to the editor written in English by native Japanese speakers and native English speakers. The objective was to examine the linear and non-linear patterns of Japanese and English speakers' letters, respectively. It is concluded that cultures are not limited to one rhetorical pattern, and linear…

  20. Are Editors Out of the Tenure Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    University presses have complained for years that tenure committees unfairly expect their editors to be arbiters of what counts as tenure-worthy work. At the same time, the presses have been caught in a business-side squeeze between dwindling sales (and shrinking subsidies) and the ever-greater pressure on scholars to publish. In this article, the

  1. OPM Scheme Editor 2: A graphical editor for specifying object-protocol structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min A.; Markowitz, V.M.; Pang, F.; Ben-Shachar, O.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes an X-window based Schema Editor for the Object-Protocol Model (OPM). OPM is a data model that supports the specification of complex object and protocol classes. objects and protocols are qualified in OPM by attributes that are defined over (associated with) value classes. Connections of object and protocol classes are expressed in OPM via attributes. OPM supports the specification (expansion) of protocols in terms of alternative and sequences of component (sub) protocols. The OPM Schema Editor allows specifying, displaying, modifying, and browsing through OPM schemas. The OPM Schema Editor generates an output file that can be used as input to an OPM schema translation tool that maps OPM schemas into definitions for relational database management systems. The OPM Schema Editor was implemented using C++ and the X11 based Motif toolkit, on Sun SPARCstation under Sun Unix OS 4.1. This document consists of the following parts: (1) A tutorial consisting of seven introductory lessons for the OPM Schema Editor. (2) A reference manual describing all the windows and functions of the OPM Schema Editor. (3) An appendix with an overview of OPM.

  2. [Luis Cifuentes Delatte: a scientist at the service of urology].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes de Castro, Luis

    2008-12-01

    Biographical Sketch of Dr. Luis Cifuentes Delatte (1907-2005), focusing on the years of his school and university education, his intense surgical activity during Spanish Civil War and his specialized urologic training in Germany and U.S.A., as well as his fruitful work in the Hospitals La Princesa and Fundacion Jimenez Diaz in Madrid. We cover other extraprofessional features of his life. PMID:19166102

  3. Millard coffin is appointed Eos Tectonophysics editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard F. Coffin, of the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), has been named the Tectonophysics Editor of Eos for a term extending through 1998. He succeeds Louise Kellogg of the University of California-Davis.Recently, Coffin completed a term as associate editor for the solid Earth section of the Journal of Geophysical Research, and is looking forward to the move from a monthly to a weekly publication. His goal is are to serve the entire tectonophysics community, encompassing marine, terrestrial, and planetary research, through timely and frequent news items, a vigorous idea and results forum, and occasional review articles. He believes that the communication among field workers, experimentalists, and modelers afforded by Eos will benefit tectonophysicists strongly as well as effectively convey tectonophysics results to a broader audience.

  4. Evolutionary theory in letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Orion; Lowe, Clayton Cory

    2015-05-01

    This research note presents the results of a content analysis of 234 letters to the editors that discuss evolutionary theory and were published in American newspapers. We find that letters to the editor both support and hinder the cause of teaching evolutionary theory in American secondary schools. On the one hand, anti-evolutionary theory messages are marginalized in the letters section. This marginalization signals a low level of legitimacy for creationism. It might also contribute to the sense of tension that sustains creationist identities. On the other hand, relatively few letters explicitly note the fact that scientists or the scientific community accept evolution. Interestingly, the obscuration of the scientific community's support for evolutionary theory occurs both in letters supporting and opposing evolutionary theory. PMID:25540333

  5. Meet the Editors: Water Resources Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2006-02-01

    On 1 January 2005, a five-member team assumed editorial responsibility for Water Resources Research (WRR). A year later the team of Brian Berkowitz, Amilcare Porporato, Thomas Torgersen, Scott Tyler, and Editor-in-Chief Marc Parlange are pleased with the successes of several changes to the journal. ``WRR is the international stage where new and emerging ideas are discussed and where the directions for scientific research in all aspects of hydrology are charted,'' explained Porporato. ``This is the reason why we have worked hard with our associate editors to attract `opinion papers,' `inspired reviews,' and, more recently, `rapid communications.''' The aim of these new paper types is to encourage discussion of water resource issues relevant to society and to quickly present new results that advance theoretical, mathematical, technological, and experimental observations, Porporato said.

  6. Geothermal resource assessment of western San Luis Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard; Ringrose, Charles D.

    1983-01-01

    The Colorado Geological Survey initiated and carried out a fully integrated assessment program of the geothermal resource potential of the western San Luis Valley during 1979 and 1980. The San Luis Valley is a large intermontane basin located in southcentral Colorado. While thermal springs and wells are found throughout the Valley, the only thermal waters found along the western part of the Valley are found at Shaw Warm Springs which is a relatively unused spring located approximately 6 miles (9.66 km) north of Del Norte, Colorado. The waters at Shaws Warm Spring have a temperature of 86 F (30 C), a discharge of 40 gallons per minute and contain approximately 408 mg/l of total dissolved solids. The assessment program carried out din the western San Luis Valley consisted of: soil mercury geochemical surveys; geothermal gradient drilling; and dipole-dipole electrical resistivity traverses, Schlumberger soundings, Audio-magnetotelluric surveys, telluric surveys, and time-domain electro-magnetic soundings and seismic surveys. Shaw Warm Springs appears to be the only source of thermal waters along the western side of the Valley. From the various investigations conducted the springs appear to be fault controlled and is very limited in extent. Based on best evidence presently available estimates are presented on the size and extent of Shaw Warm Springs thermal system. It is estimated that this could have an areal extent of 0.63 sq. miles (1.62 sq. km) and contain 0.0148 Q's of heat energy.

  7. The editor-referee system and publication an editor's view of the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, S. N.

    2011-07-01

    This chapter explains the functioning of scientific journals from the editorial side of the process. Both the history and current functioning of scientific journals are reviewed with a particular emphasis on the evolution of the referee's role. In its current form, the evaluation of a submission is interactive between the three parties - the author(s), editors, and reviewers. The editors serve as the mediators and final evaluators, seeking advice from one or more contacted experts who are in the special position of evaluating the science, presentation, and significance of the work. The chapter explains how this proceeds, and its advantages, pitfalls, and criteria - scientific, archival, and ethical - and how these have evolved historically and consensually. Since referees and editors are also authors, the symbiosis of the process is one of its strengths, since all participants exchange roles.

  8. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content of one's own in the same or different journals. Self-plagiarism causes duplicate papers in the scientific literature, violates copyright agreements, and unduly burdens reviewers, editors, and the scientific publishing enterprise. Plagiarism from others' works constitutes the most offensive form of plagiarism. Effectively, it is using someone else's work as if it is your own. Any text, equations, ideas, or figures taken from another paper or work must be specifically acknowledged as they occur in that paper or work. Figures, tables, or other images reproduced from another source normally require permission from the publisher. Text or concepts can, for example, be quoted as follows: "As stated by xxx (name of lead author), "text" [reference]." Action on Notification of Allegations of Plagiarism: OSA identifies an act of plagiarism in a published document to be the substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. OSA has implemented a process for dealing with cases of plagiarism. When the Editor-in-Chief of a journal is notified of an instance of either of the two possible forms of plagiarism discussed above, he or she will make a preliminary investigation of the allegations, including a request for the accused authors to explain the situation. If further action is justified, then the Editor-in-Chief will convene a panel consisting of the Editor-in-Chief of the OSA journal involved, the Chair of the Board of Editors, and the Senior Director of Publications. Their unanimous decision confirming that an act of plagiarism has occurred requires the insertion of the following statement in the official OSA electronic record of the plagiarizing article:
    "It has come to the attention of the Optical Society of America that this article should not have been submitted owing to its substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements found in the following previously published material: [citation data-including the authors, journal title, full citation of the earlier published material.]"
    The same statement shall be added to the next available print run of the journal in an appropriate location such as a "Notice to Readers." The OSA Board of Editors

  9. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  10. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content of one's own in the same or different journals. Self-plagiarism causes duplicate papers in the scientific literature, violates copyright agreements, and unduly burdens reviewers, editors, and the scientific publishing enterprise. Plagiarism from others' works constitutes the most offensive form of plagiarism. Effectively, it is using someone else's work as if it is your own. Any text, equations, ideas, or figures taken from another paper or work must be specifically acknowledged as they occur in that paper or work. Figures, tables, or other images reproduced from another source normally require permission from the publisher. Text or concepts can, for example, be quoted as follows: "As stated by xxx (name of lead author), "text" [reference]." Action on Notification of Allegations of Plagiarism: OSA identifies an act of plagiarism in a published document to be the substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. OSA has implemented a process for dealing with cases of plagiarism. When the Editor-in-Chief of a journal is notified of an instance of either of the two possible forms of plagiarism discussed above, he or she will make a preliminary investigation of the allegations, including a request for the accused authors to explain the situation. If further action is justified, then the Editor-in-Chief will convene a panel consisting of the Editor-in-Chief of the OSA journal involved, the Chair of the Board of Editors, and the Senior Director of Publications. Their unanimous decision confirming that an act of plagiarism has occurred requires the insertion of the following statement in the official OSA electronic record of the plagiarizing article: "It has come to the attention of the Optical Society of America that this article should not have been submitted owing to its substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements found in the following previously published material: [citation data-including the authors, journal title, full citation of the earlier published material.]" The same statement shall be added to the next available print run of the journal in an appropriate location such as a "Notice to Readers." The OSA Board of Editors

  11. Vital statistics, demography, and schizophrenia: editor's introduction.

    PubMed

    Gottesman, I I

    1989-01-01

    The Guest Editor introduces this Theme Issue of the Schizophrenia Bulletin with an overview of the kinds of subject matters appropriate for a comprehensive understanding of the vital statistics and demography relating to schizophrenia and schizophrenic patients--births, deaths, marriages, divorces, fertility, age, sex, race, occupation, place of residence, season of birth, class mobility, homelessness, criminality, industrialization, and suicide. Major sources of the statistics relating to schizophrenia are listed. He calls for a national case register and the use of a unique identifier with linkage across data bases in various branches of government so as to inform a descriptive as well as an experimental (hypothesis-testing) epidemiology. PMID:2785712

  12. A Tisket, A Tasket--Out of the Editor's Basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2001-05-01

    In September 1940, the Journal introduced Out of the Editor's Basket for short items of interest: excerpts from letters, pamphlets, newspapers, and periodicals. By 1950, however, the Editor's Basket had evolved into a bulletin board for descriptions of new products and services, and it now contains almost exclusively press releases about recently marketed items. Now over 60 years old, the Editor's Basket still provides interesting tidbits for the Journal's broad readership.

  13. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content of one's own in the same or different journals. Self-plagiarism causes duplicate papers in the scientific literature, violates copyright agreements, and unduly burdens reviewers, editors, and the scientific publishing enterprise. Plagiarism from others' works constitutes the most offensive form of plagiarism. Effectively, it is using someone else's work as if it is your own. Any text, equations, ideas, or figures taken from another paper or work must be specifically acknowledged as they occur in that paper or work. Figures, tables, or other images reproduced from another source normally require permission from the publisher. Text or concepts can, for example, be quoted as follows: "As stated by xxx (name of lead author), "text" [reference]." Action on Notification of Allegations of Plagiarism: OSA identifies an act of plagiarism in a published document to be the substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. OSA has implemented a process for dealing with cases of plagiarism. When the Editor-in-Chief of a journal is notified of an instance of either of the two possible forms of plagiarism discussed above, he or she will make a preliminary investigation of the allegations, including a request for the accused authors to explain the situation. If further action is justified, then the Editor-in-Chief will convene a panel consisting of the Editor-in-Chief of the OSA journal involved, the Chair of the Board of Editors, and the Senior Director of Publications. Their unanimous decision confirming that an act of plagiarism has occurred requires the insertion of the following statement in the official OSA electronic record of the plagiarizing article: "It has come to the attention of the Optical Society of America that this article should not have been submitted owing to its substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements found in the following previously published material: [citation data-including the authors, journal title, full citation of the earlier published material.]" The same statement shall be added to the next available print run of the journal in an appropriate location such as a "Notice to Readers."

  14. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content of one's own in the same or different journals. Self-plagiarism causes duplicate papers in the scientific literature, violates copyright agreements, and unduly burdens reviewers, editors, and the scientific publishing enterprise. Plagiarism from others' works constitutes the most offensive form of plagiarism. Effectively, it is using someone else's work as if it is your own. Any text, equations, ideas, or figures taken from another paper or work must be specifically acknowledged as they occur in that paper or work. Figures, tables, or other images reproduced from another source normally require permission from the publisher. Text or concepts can, for example, be quoted as follows: "As stated by xxx (name of lead author), "text" [reference]." Action on Notification of Allegations of Plagiarism: OSA identifies an act of plagiarism in a published document to be the substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. OSA has implemented a process for dealing with cases of plagiarism. When the Editor-in-Chief of a journal is notified of an instance of either of the two possible forms of plagiarism discussed above, he or she will make a preliminary investigation of the allegations, including a request for the accused authors to explain the situation. If further action is justified, then the Editor-in-Chief will convene a panel consisting of the Editor-in-Chief of the OSA journal involved, the Chair of the Board of Editors, and the Senior Director of Publications. Their unanimous decision confirming that an act of plagiarism has occurred requires the insertion of the following statement in the official OSA electronic record of the plagiarizing article: "It has come to the attention of the Optical Society of America that this article should not have been submitted owing to its substantial replication, without appropriate attribution, of significant elements found in the following previously published material: [citation data-including the authors, journal title, full citation of the earlier published material.]" The same statement shall be added to the next available print run of the journal in an appropriate location such as a "Notice to Readers."

  15. Information Scientists: Between Editors and Data Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouty, M.; Woelfel, F.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Claude, H.; Dubois, P.; Eisele, A.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Neuville, M.; Ochsenbein, F.; Perret, E.; Vannier, P.; Vonflie, P.; Chassagnard, G.

    2010-10-01

    Since the emergence of electronic publications in the early 1990s, astronomy has played a pioneering role in the development and implementation of new capabilities and services. As a data center, the CDS contributed significantly to this evolution: a synergy between data centers and journal editors started in the 1990s with the publication of large tables and data sets in electronic form and contributed to an efficient linking of publications with existing databases like SIMBAD or NED. This collaborative work, carried out in practice by information scientists, illustrates a new role for us who now have to deal with both editor and database requirements. After a short description of the CDS, we present our peculiar responsibilities related to the publication process: ensuring, prior to publication, that the link from selected objects quoted by the authors in their papers to the SIMBAD database is correct and maintained in the long term, that the tables and their complete descriptions are accessible through VizieR, and that the data and bibliography are correctly entered in SIMBAD. The Dictionary of Nomenclature, which plays an important role in these procedures, is briefly presented. Finally, the skills we developed for these activities are shortly discussed.

  16. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wppling, Roger

    2012-02-01

    Physica Scripta celebrated 40 years of successful publishing in 2010 and has, through the years, gone from being a journal devoted to the communication of results from research conducted by Swedish physicists to the present international journal for all aspects of physics. The journal has shown an impressive growth in its number of submissions (up 20 % only last year), both in terms of regular papers and Topical Issues and the, unique to Physica Scripta, Comments sections. I have been associated with Physica Scripta for more than 25 years, the last 15 as Editor-in-Chief, and I have decided that the time has come to step down. I wish my successor as Editor-in-Chief, Dr Suzanne Lidstrm, all success in her new position. I will follow the development of the journal through the web-page www.physica.org and I encourage you to do the same and also that you continue to submit high impact papers to our journal.

  17. Web-Based Media Contents Editor for UCC Websites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seoksoo

    The purpose of this research is to "design web-based media contents editor for establishing UCC(User Created Contents)-based websites." The web-based editor features user-oriented interfaces and increased convenience, significantly different from previous off-line editors. It allows users to edit media contents online and can be effectively used for online promotion activities of enterprises and organizations. In addition to development of the editor, the research aims to support the entry of enterprises and public agencies to the online market by combining the technology with various UCC items.

  18. 75 FR 59285 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County...) incidental to a 5.5-acre (239,580-square foot) redevelopment project in the community of Los Osos, San Luis... and Wildlife Service as endangered on December 15, 1994 (59 FR 64613). Section 9 of the Act (16...

  19. 75 FR 49022 - San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Petition for a Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad--Petition for a Declaratory Order AGENCY... comments. SUMMARY: In response to a petition filed by the San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad (SLRG), the...

  20. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and, in his hands, the expansion continued and the transition to electronic production took place. In 2005, an agreement was signed with IOP Publishing and the bustling production work of the in-house team moved abroad to Bristol, leaving just the Editor-in-Chief to man the ship at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. In 2011, however, as Roger prepared to step down, submissions had reached astounding levels as is evident from figure 1: that year, almost 1500 manuscripts were received by Physica Scripta, now acknowledged to be amongst the fastest growing journals in IOP Publishing, when measured in these terms. The year on year increase stands at 20% and, once again, of the extensive range of topics covered, condensed matter physics had been identified as the subject area in most need of attention because the burden of reviewing had become too great for one editor to oversee alone. Thus, when I joined Physica Scripta in January of this year, securing new External Editors for this field was perceived to be the most urgent task. It is, therefore, with the greatest of pleasure that I am able to announce the arrival of two new editors for this section: Professors David Keen and Tapio Rantala. Physica Scripta statistics Figure 1. The annual submissions made to Physica Scripta in recent years have rocketed and the rejection rate (given as a percentage) has increased rapidly. The modest increase in the number of articles accepted (shaded in blue) reflects a deliberate policy to augment the scientific quality. Professor Rantala has been selected by the Finnish Physical Society to replace Professor Matti Manninen, who is stepping down as the Finnish representative on the journal's Editorial Board. Professor Rantala is a prominent theorist and has been engaged in active research in a number of fields. In his early work, he was interested in surface science and molecular physics, however his expertise is predominantly in the domain of solid or materials physics related to semiconductors and certain complex materials. His recent interests have extended his domain of activity towards the field of quantum chemistry as he is now actively engaged in electronic structure theory and its applications, and light-matter interactions, in particular. The other new member of our editorial team, Professor David Keen, comes highly recommended by Professor Stephen Lovesey, a long-standing friend and former colleague, who was, himself, a former condensed matter editor for the journal many years ago. Professor Keen works in structural disorder, typically studying at the boundary between crystalline, amorphous and liquid phases using neutron and x-ray diffraction and atomistic modelling. Three examples of the areas in which he conducts research are 'liquid-like' disorder in superionic crystalline materials, solid-state amorphization transitions and disorder-induced properties, such as unusual negative thermal expansion. Through working at these boundaries, and at the ISIS neutron scattering facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for over 20 years, he has gained wide experience of all areas of structural condensed matter physics, encompassing crystallography and the structure and simulation of liquid and amorphous materials. Professor Keen has been a Guest Editor for a number of special issues of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. My thanks are extended to Stephen for his advice and for recommending such an enthusiastic new editor to join us. Until recently, the extensive review process engaged by Physica Scripta involved almost every manuscript being forwarded to several researchers for examination. The volume of material being received at present, however, makes this procedure untenable and undesirable, as it would be unfair on those researchers willing to participate in the peer review process to continue to review articles that are obviously destined for rejection. Thus, as a direct result of the increase in volume, a screening procedure has been implemented whereby manuscripts containing insufficiently novel results or papers deemed to be too specialized to warrant inclusion in a broad-based physics journal are being eliminated by experts working actively in the field and deemed to be well-qualified to make this judgment. All of the manuscripts that pass this preliminary round of selection commence the full peer review process. Nevertheless, as it is unrealistic to expect to recruit expert editors to screen every aspect of all subjects, a few manuscripts are occasionally rejected on the basis of just one particularly unfavourable report. These measures are being implemented, in part, because of an awareness that certain researchers are being asked to engage in reviewing with inappropriate regularity: it is my aim to do my best to protect these researchers from excessive and onerous reviewing. As mentioned briefly above, the extensive variety in the material covered by Physica Scripta makes the support of a considerable number of expert subject editors from a variety of fields a necessity. We still have some fields where the addition of further editors is imperative, so I will be striving to identify these and the gaps in our editorial coverage with a view to building up the service that our experts can provide. This is a matter of some urgency, as it must be achieved before the existing editors start to bow under the strain! A second, but by no means less important, priority is to continue to augment the quality of the scientific publications as a whole. This will be achieved by maintaining the trend of increasingly strict acceptance criteria demonstrated in figure 1, where it can be seen that, although the submissions are increasing rapidly, a tight rein is being kept on the quality: the acceptances will not increase with greater rapidity than the quality allows. In addition to the manuscripts received through the conventional submissions process, our popular Comments articles, in which foremost scientists address different topics of interest in their specialist areas, will be expanded. These articles are comprised of discussion papers presenting a historical overview of a subject or reviewing the present state of knowledge, but they go beyond presenting straightforward facts to consider issues that remain open and controversial results. They are written with the explicit intention of being accessible to researchers with a relevant background who are not active in the field, and form part of our deliberate attempt to make research accessible to a wide audience. Another area targeted for growth is that of the Topical Issues, a select series of peer-reviewed publications that includes the Nobel Symposia, and conferences and workshops of notable interest. For completeness, I would like to mention that the Nobel lectures and biographies are available to download free from the Physica Scripta Web site (http://iopscience.iop.org/1402-4896). I would invite all researchers engaged in teaching potential or actual research students to read these inspirational articles. We take our role as the physics journal of the non-profit-making Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences seriously, and intend to actively pursue the goal of promoting physics and strengthening its influence in society. One step taken to achieve this is that of publicising our most accessible articles and making them freely available to the greatest possible extent. Professor Matti Manninen is leaving us subsequent to his appointment as Rector of the University of Jyväskylä. On behalf of IOP Publishing and Physica Scripta, I would like to mention our gratitude to him for his many years of service. In the same breath, I would like to extend a warm welcome to Professors Keen and Rantala. Last, but not least, the considerable contribution that Professor Roger Wäppling has made to the progress of Physica Scripta must be acknowledged. Brought in to expand the condensed matter section in 1985, and promoted to Editor-in-Chief when Professor Bárány stepped down, Roger has managed to increase the contributions in pretty much every subject area, with mathematical physics and quantum physics now being particularly popular sections. Forget the coveralls, Roger's shoes will be large ones to step into! I would like to conclude on a personal note. I have now known Roger for 25 years; during my student days, to my great jealousy, he travelled incessantly and, in my memories, at least, he was away somewhere exotic and exciting every week. There was one thing, however, that one could always guarantee, which was that Roger would return, pop his head around the door and say 'I think it is time we had a party!' I wish him the very best of luck as he prepares for his retirement, I trust that it will be long and happy. I hope that Roger will continue to don his party shoes and join us on many occasions in the future.

  1. Journal editors impasse with outcome reporting bias.

    PubMed

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Caplan, Arthur L

    2015-09-01

    Several requirements and regulations have been issued to promote clinical trial transparency through prospective registration of trials, disclosure of results, access to trial reports submitted to regulatory agencies and access to anonymized patient-level data. Clinical trial results are disseminated through articles. Yet, many present outcome reporting bias. Open access to trial data will help to deter outcome reporting bias. However, this is not enough to clinicians. Access to trial protocols by journal staff has proven rather inefficacious in preventing outcome reporting bias. Two proposals have been suggested or implemented to tackle outcome reporting bias that are discussed in this article. Editors should implement quality-control processes aiming at preventing outcome reporting bias. Readers should be informed as to the efficiency of the implemented process. PMID:26108701

  2. John F. Dewey—Tectonics Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    ‘I want the journal to acquire a reputation for very rapid, fair, and accurate reviewing,’ asserted John F. Dewey, editor-in-chief of AGU's newest journal, Tectonics. Dewey said that he will rule the bimonthly, which will begin publication in February, ‘with a bit of a rod of iron’ to ensure that Tectonics is ‘where only original and important papers are published.’‘I'm going to be very strict with reviewers,’ Dewey explained in his quick British clip. ‘If the review does not come back to me within 10 days to 2 weeks, I'll review the paper myself. I'm also going to have a system whereby, if a paper needs major surgery after being refereed, it will be rejected. Papers will have to be in virtually publishable condition before they are first submitted,’ he said.

  3. Journal Editor Perceptions of Universities: Some Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainardes, Emerson Wagner; Raposo, Mario; Alves, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Out of considerations as to the importance of university relationships with their various stakeholders, the primary objective of this research project was to identify the perceptions of academic journal editors regarding universities. Editors were asked to provide their perceptions on: (a) the relevance of universities to academic publications;…

  4. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  5. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  6. Editor Observations about the NACADA Journal's First 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Terry

    2007-01-01

    From tape-recorded telephone interviews with each of the former NACADA Journal editors, I transcribed and analyzed their observations to create a history of the first 25 years of the NACADA Journal. Editors were asked to comment on the definition of a research journal, primary audience of the Journal as well as challenges, strengths, weaknesses,…

  7. JSME: a free molecule editor in JavaScript

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A molecule editor, i.e. a program facilitating graphical input and interactive editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. Today, when a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. One of the most popular tools for molecular structure input on the web is the JME applet. Since its release nearly 15 years ago, however the web environment has changed and Java applets are facing increasing implementation hurdles due to their maintenance and support requirements, as well as security issues. This prompted us to update the JME editor and port it to a modern Internet programming language - JavaScript. Summary The actual molecule editing Java code of the JME editor was translated into JavaScript with help of the Google Web Toolkit compiler and a custom library that emulates a subset of the GUI features of the Java runtime environment. In this process, the editor was enhanced by additional functionalities including a substituent menu, copy/paste, drag and drop and undo/redo capabilities and an integrated help. In addition to desktop computers, the editor supports molecule editing on touch devices, including iPhone, iPad and Android phones and tablets. In analogy to JME the new editor is named JSME. This new molecule editor is compact, easy to use and easy to incorporate into web pages. Conclusions A free molecule editor written in JavaScript was developed and is released under the terms of permissive BSD license. The editor is compatible with JME, has practically the same user interface as well as the web application programming interface. The JSME editor is available for download from the project web page http://peter-ertl.com/jsme/ PMID:23694746

  8. Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xun, Gong

    2007-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power

  9. Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xun, Gong

    2007-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power…

  10. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality.Martin Stutzmann's scientific output has continued and today he can be found listed among the 400 most cited physicists worldwide. According to the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) he has published nearly 400 articles in source journals; they have been cited over 4600 times. His scientific visibility has been partly responsible for the success of the journal under his leadership. When he took over in 1995 the Impact Factors of physica status solidi (a) and (b) were about 0.5. Now they oscillate around 1.0. The journals occupy places 30 (a) and 29 (b) among the 57 condensed matter publications listed in the ISI. Six years ago these places were 34 (a) and 30 (b). The journal is even better placed with respect to the so-called cited half-life which is 8.2 years for pss (a) (place 16 among 57) and 6.7 years for pss (b) (place 20 among 57). Martin, of course, has contributed with his original publications to the success of the journal, having published 36 articles in pss (a) and 32 in pss (b).I would like to some of the editorial decisions implemented under Martin's leadership. They have been largely responsible for the quantitative improvements just described. Martin introduced international standards of peer review, usually involving two anonymous referees: The increase of the rejection rate from ca. 20% to 60% followed. He discontinued the Short Notes, which had become nearly irrelevant, and replaced them, in 1997 by Rapid Research Notes (today Rapid Research Letters) with especially strict reviewing rules and a rather attractive layout. Martin's participation in many international conferences and their organization gave him a handle to acquire the publication of conference proceedings. Organizing committees usually prefer publication in international journals rather than special books because of their guaranteed future availability in libraries and the partaking in the reviewing procedure. The journal became increasingly popular along these lines, a fact which moved Martin to launch in 2002 part (c) of the journal, devoted mainly, but not exclusively, to conference articles. Martin also introduced the publication of Feature Articles, topical issues, and the instrument of the Editor's Choice to highlight articles deemed to be especially interesting. He appointed Regional Editors (6 at this point) which represent the journal in important geographic regions. He also brought the journal online, a must these days. The upheavals that followed the collapse of most of the communist world, the rapid development of science in many emerging nations and the enhanced competitiveness, even in the developed countries, have not ebbed out. Some of them are particular damaging to the reputation of science in a world increasingly skeptical of its values. I am thinking of scientific misconduct and outright fraud, in the form of plagiarism and data fabrication. physica status solidi was also afflicted by this plague: after all, it happened in the best of families. Two of the most notorious offenders of the past decade, J. H. Schön and Y. Park, also visited physica status solidi. In two courageous editorials Martin Stutzmann and Stefan Hildebrandt (Managing Editor of the journal) rapidly exposed these cases of misconduct together with other cases in which there was also good reason to suspect misconduct. Some of the articles involved were rapidly retracted by the authors, others were not. It is reassuring to say that none of them had any impact worth mentioning (1-3 citations, mostly by the authors themselves or in the editorials just mentioned). Only few journal editors dared to convey to the readers a warning that some work of those authors may be faulty even if no air-tight proof was available. However, Martin and Stefan did. We wish that Martin will remain at the helm at least another decade, before he switches to research on the liquid state as practiced in Southern France.

  11. Luis de Florez and the Special Devices Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Paul Louis

    This Dissertation presents the life of Luis de Florez and the World War II history of the Special Devices Division (SDD) of the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics. Luis de Florez was a well known consulting engineer, aviation fuel expert, private pilot and reserve Naval officer. While on active duty in 1940, he received the assignment to improve the Navy's flight training methods. To accomplish this objective, he promoted the concept of synthetic training, the use of simulators and other non-operational equipment, to provide training for Navy flight personnel such as pilots, gunners, navigators, flight engineers, radio operators and others as well as for ground based people like mechanics. He founded the Special Devices Division to design the tools and equipment needed for this type of training. The success of synthetic training and the devices developed by the SDD received recognition by the awarding of the Collier Trophy to de Florez in December 1944. This trophy is awarded annually for the most significant aeronautical achievement of the previous year (1943). De Florez received the award for the strategic accomplishment of training thousands of American airmen in 1943. The work of the Division also had other important technical, social, financial and operational impacts on the prosecution of WW II by the Allies. The work of the Division also had impacts on American society as a whole that persist to the present day. These impacts are discussed in detail. The Dissertation presents details of the devices and their use in aviation training as well as a history of the Division during the war. After the war, de Florez led an advisory board for the CIA. These activities and some of both the positive and negative results of the work of this board are discussed. This discussion includes de Florez' involvement in the CIA's drug experiments and the unfortunate Frank Olsen affair.

  12. ESDAPT - APT PROGRAMMING EDITOR AND INTERPRETER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.

    1994-01-01

    ESDAPT is a graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. ESDAPT has a graphical user interface that provides the user with an APT syntax sensitive text editor and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statement can also be created using menus and screen picks. ESDAPT interprets APT geometry statements and displays the results in its view windows. Tool paths are generated by batching the APT source to an APT processor (COSMIC P-APT recommended). The tool paths are then displayed in the view windows. Hardcopy output of the view windows is in color PostScript format. ESDAPT is written in C-language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4 series computers running SunOS. ESDAPT requires 4Mb of disk space, 7Mb of RAM, and MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Release 4, or OpenWindows version 3 for execution. Program documentation in PostScript format and an executable for OpenWindows version 3 are provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ESDAPT is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. This program was developed in 1992.

  13. A Python-based IRAF Task Parameter Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, M. D.

    As part of the development of a new Python-based CL for IRAF tasks by the Science Software Group at STScI, we have developed a GUI-based parameter editor for IRAF tasks using Tkinter. This new parameter editor is intended to provide the equivalent functionality of the IRAF EPAR task, but to make parameter editing easier by using appropriate user interface elements, such as menu choice lists, action buttons, and file browsers. This paper describes the design and functionality of the parameter editor as well as planned enhancements.

  14. Team of three JGR-Space Physics editors appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three editors from the United States, Europe, and Asia have been appointed to lead JGR-Space Physics into the new millennium. This new team will recognize and foster the substantial contributions that scientists from the international community make to the journal. Janet Luhmann, a Senior Fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, will serve as Senior Editor. Luhmann will play a coordinating role for the regional editors, which will be especially important as the Union moves into electronic publishing and adopts new ways of using the technology to publish research findings.

  15. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  16. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality.Martin Stutzmann's scientific output has continued and today he can be found listed among the 400 most cited physicists worldwide. According to the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) he has published nearly 400 articles in source journals; they have been cited over 4600 times. His scientific visibility has been partly responsible for the success of the journal under his leadership. When he took over in 1995 the Impact Factors of physica status solidi (a) and (b) were about 0.5. Now they oscillate around 1.0. The journals occupy places 30 (a) and 29 (b) among the 57 condensed matter publications listed in the ISI. Six years ago these places were 34 (a) and 30 (b). The journal is even better placed with respect to the so-called cited half-life which is 8.2 years for pss (a) (place 16 among 57) and 6.7 years for pss (b) (place 20 among 57). Martin, of course, has contributed with his original publications to the success of the journal, having published 36 articles in pss (a) and 32 in pss (b).I would like to some of the editorial decisions implemented under Martin's leadership. They have been largely responsible for the quantitative improvements just described.Martin introduced international standards of peer review, usually involving two anonymous referees: The increase of the rejection rate from ca. 20% to 60% followed.He discontinued the Short Notes, which had become nearly irrelevant, and replaced them, in 1997 by Rapid Research Notes (today Rapid Research Letters) with especially strict reviewing rules and a rather attractive layout.Martin's participation in many international conferences and their organization gave him a handle to acquire the publication of conference proceedings. Organizing committees usually prefer publication in international journals rather than special books because of their guaranteed future availability in libraries and the partaking in the reviewing procedure. The journal became increasingly popular along these lines, a fact which moved Martin to launch in 2002 part (c) of the journal, devoted mainly, but not exclusively, to conference articles.Martin also introduced the publication of Feature Articles, topical issues, and the instrument of the Editor's Choice to highlight articles deemed to be especially interesting.He appointed Regional Editors (6 at this point) which represent the journal in important geographic regions. He also brought the journal online, a must these days.The upheavals that followed the collapse of most of the communist world, the rapid development of science in many emerging nations and the enhanced competitiveness, even in the developed countries, have not ebbed out. Some of them are particular damaging to the reputation of science in a world increasingly skeptical of its values. I am thinking of scientific misconduct and outright fraud, in the form of plagiarism and data fabrication. physica status solidi was also afflicted by this plague: after all, it happened in the best of families. Two of the most notorious offenders of the past decade, J. H. Schn and Y. Park, also visited physica status solidi. In two courageous editorials Martin Stutzmann and Stefan Hildebrandt (Managing Editor of the journal) rapidly exposed these cases of misconduct together with other cases in which there was also good reason to suspect misconduct. Some of the articles involved were rapidly retracted by the authors, others were not.It is reassuring to say that none of them had any impact worth mentioning (1-3 citations, mostly by the authors themselves or in the editorials just mentioned). Only few journal editors dared to convey to the readers a warning that some work of those authors may be faulty even if no air-tight proof was available. However, Martin and Stefan did.We wish that Martin will remain at the helm at least another decade, before he switches to research on the liquid state as practiced in Southern France.

  17. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming editor signals change and in turn this induces in some people expectation, hope of improvement and maybe radical revolution. Others cower and hope for stability, continuation of the same and as little outward sign of change as possible. So I should like to signal that I hope to satisfy both camps. The Editor-in-Chief is primarily a guardian of the journal and should change nothing that does not need changing. Maintaining a standard at the same level is a valuable achievement in itself. This is no different from taking on any other leadership role such as in a team or department. One has to lead by consensus and with respect for the position. Conversely there are things I would like to see improved (otherwise I should not have been hired) and I commit to attempting these but in a spirit of cooperation with the Board, the publisher (IOP), IPEM and the readership. Any other approach would be doomed anyway. So, what would I like to see changed? Dare I say anything too strongly upfront? Like Alun six years ago I would like there to be more debate via correspondence but this depends on the readers to do more writing along these lines. Personally I feel PMB, like many journals, has developed to the point where most readers sadly can understand only a small fraction of its contents. I have talked to older readers who said they regularly used to read all or half of the journal. Now many of us can manage only the papers in our specialty. Yet this is somewhat inevitable as medical physics has progressed from a fledgling science to the vast activity it is today, topics have become deeply complicated and we cannot and should not reverse the clock. To address this, I would like to see authors provide some form of `intelligible lay-scientific summary' of their paper as a condition of its publication. I think readers would then enjoy reading all, not just some, of these and maybe become attracted to other areas than the ones in which they currently work. I would like to see the voluntary and anonymous publication of selected referees' comments `tailing' (some) published papers. They would need to be brief, specifically crafted for the purpose, of substantial impact, avoid excess length or editorial detail and above all be polite and constructive. I think this would bring more life into what (for all journals not just PMB) is a somewhat clinically manicured format. Issues requiring detailed response or countering would need to proceed as usual to their own peer-reviewed papers but maybe a quarter page of a reviewer's carefully submitted footnotes might be interesting. It might also be nice to have stated for each paper the referees' expertise and their scientific background. Maintaining referee anonymity would be an undebateable pre-requisite. I don't know if this would be feasible, popular or even generally desirable but I shall ask the Board for their views. We live in an age when publications serve more needs than the dissemination of knowledge. CVs, careers, future funding, university assessments and so on all depend on the production of a healthy list of peer-reviewed papers. This is also probably unstoppable and younger workers are growing up accepting it while (some) older ones may hark back to less cluttered times. So improving the impact of PMB has to be a goal. An obvious mechanism is just to cut the number of published papers and raise the acceptance standard. Yet this would be deeply unpopular given the above extra reasons to publish and that it is hard to believe PMB is currently publishing `substandard' material. The Board and I will have to address that. Over the next few years the debate over e-journals versus paper journals, open access publication, and freedom or otherwise of the web will all impact on PMB. Only the day I wrote this I read that in a London lecture Bill Gates has predicted that in just ten years electronic flexipaper with wireless internet access will be able to find anything on the web including journals. Scientists anywhere and everywhere in the world, at home, in the office, on transport, or on the beach, will be able to read journals (if they want this facility that is); so will there be any need for PMB hardcopy? I think there will but many think otherwise. Times will change and we again need to manage the change for good. I should like to thank the outgoing Editor and all those who have placed confidence in me that I will maintain the good, change and develop what needs to be so treated, contribute some fresh thoughts and serve with energy, dignity and patience.

  18. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality.Martin Stutzmann's scientific output has continued and today he can be found listed among the 400 most cited physicists worldwide. According to the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) he has published nearly 400 articles in source journals; they have been cited over 4600 times. His scientific visibility has been partly responsible for the success of the journal under his leadership. When he took over in 1995 the Impact Factors of physica status solidi (a) and (b) were about 0.5. Now they oscillate around 1.0. The journals occupy places 30 (a) and 29 (b) among the 57 condensed matter publications listed in the ISI. Six years ago these places were 34 (a) and 30 (b). The journal is even better placed with respect to the so-called cited half-life which is 8.2 years for pss (a) (place 16 among 57) and 6.7 years for pss (b) (place 20 among 57). Martin, of course, has contributed with his original publications to the success of the journal, having published 36 articles in pss (a) and 32 in pss (b).I would like to some of the editorial decisions implemented under Martin's leadership. They have been largely responsible for the quantitative improvements just described.Martin introduced international standards of peer review, usually involving two anonymous referees: The increase of the rejection rate from ca. 20% to 60% followed.He discontinued the Short Notes, which had become nearly irrelevant, and replaced them, in 1997 by Rapid Research Notes (today Rapid Research Letters) with especially strict reviewing rules and a rather attractive layout.Martin's participation in many international conferences and their organization gave him a handle to acquire the publication of conference proceedings. Organizing committees usually prefer publication in international journals rather than special books because of their guaranteed future availability in libraries and the partaking in the reviewing procedure. The journal became increasingly popular along these lines, a fact which moved Martin to launch in 2002 part (c) of the journal, devoted mainly, but not exclusively, to conference articles.Martin also introduced the publication of Feature Articles, topical issues, and the instrument of the Editor's Choice to highlight articles deemed to be especially interesting.He appointed Regional Editors (6 at this point) which represent the journal in important geographic regions. He also brought the journal online, a must these days.The upheavals that followed the collapse of most of the communist world, the rapid development of science in many emerging nations and the enhanced competitiveness, even in the developed countries, have not ebbed out. Some of them are particular damaging to the reputation of science in a world increasingly skeptical of its values. I am thinking of scientific misconduct and outright fraud, in the form of plagiarism and data fabrication. physica status solidi was also afflicted by this plague: after all, it happened in the best of families. Two of the most notorious offenders of the past decade, J. H. Schön and Y. Park, also visited physica status solidi. In two courageous editorials Martin Stutzmann and Stefan Hildebrandt (Managing Editor of the journal) rapidly exposed these cases of misconduct together with other cases in which there was also good reason to suspect misconduct. Some of the articles involved were rapidly retracted by the authors, others were not.It is reassuring to say that none of them had any impact worth mentioning (1-3 citations, mostly by the authors themselves or in the editorials just mentioned). Only few journal editors dared to convey to the readers a warning that some work of those authors may be faulty even if no air-tight proof was available. However, Martin and Stefan did.We wish that Martin will remain at the helm at least another decade, before he switches to research on the liquid state as practiced in Southern France.

  19. The San Luis Project: An Attempt to Decentralize Physics in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, T. A.; Valladares, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a project being conducted by the Physics Institute of the University of San Luis Potori, Mexico, in order to avoid concentrating physics education and research activities in Mexico City. (SL)

  20. Ground water recharge to the aquifers of northern San Luis Valley, Colorado: A remote sensing investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator); Huntley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground water recharge to the aquifers of San Luis Valley west of San Luis Creek was primarily from ground water flow in the volcanic aquifers of the San Juan Mountains. The high permeability and anisotropic nature of the volcanic rocks resulted in very little contrast in flow conditions between the San Juan Mountains and San Luis Valley. Ground water recharge to aquifers of eastern San Luis Valley was primarily from stream seepage into the upper reaches of the alluvial fans at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The use of photography and thermal infrared imagery resulted in a savings of time and increase in accuracy in regional hydrogeologic studies. Volcanic rocks exhibited the same spectral reflectance curve as sedimentary rocks, with only the absolute magnitude of reflectance varying. Both saline soils and vegetation were used to estimate general ground water depths.

  1. The Letters Not Sent by a Journal Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    In the late hours of the night, even the most conscientious of journal editors may slip into writing imaginary letters to cherished authors and reviewers. Here are some of the letters that I composed:

  2. Horatio Alger in the Newsroom: Social Origins of American Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jack R.

    1976-01-01

    Concludes that American newspaper editors of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries came from elite social backgrounds, which is contrary to the rags-to-riches image fostered by previous historians. (RB)

  3. ZED- A LINE EDITOR FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZED editor for the DEC VAX is a simple, yet powerful line editor for text, program source code, and non-binary data. Line editors can be superior to screen editors in some cases, such as executing complex multiple or conditional commands, or editing via slow modem lines. ZED excels in the area of text processing by using procedure files. For example, such procedures can reformat a file of addresses or remove all comment lines from a FORTRAN program. In addition to command files, ZED also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, on-line help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. The ZED editor was originally developed at Cambridge University in London and has been continuously enhanced since 1976. Users of the Cambridge implementation have devised such elaborate ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating Pi. This implementation of ZED strives to maintain the characteristics of the Cambridge editor. A complete ZED manual is included on the tape. ZED is written entirely in C for either batch or interactive execution on the DEC VAX under VMS 4.X and requires 80,896 bytes of memory. This program was released in 1988 and updated in 1989.

  4. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/. PMID:24425826

  5. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed for my PhD in the Department of Physics at the University of Manchester. Since that time I have witnessed many changes in instrumentation and techniques. I believe that I have been fortunate in not spending all of my time in a university. Having worked in or with industry throughout my career I have been able to see the trends from the perspective of both sectors. In my area of fluorescence spectroscopy I have seen the cost of systems fall in real terms, the performance rise, an increased need for user-friendly software and less emphasis on performance specification when customers decide which instrument to purchase. Such trends, no doubt replicated in other areas, reflect the migration of system instrumentation away from being the preserve of the specialist to much wider use and customization across the disciplines and skill-set. MST has embraced this change through its multidisciplinary remit in Special Features, Topical Reviews, Rapid Communications, Perspectives and regular Papers. These days there is much more of a partnership between industry and academia in research and this is to be applauded in these challenging times. I want to encourage contributions to MST from industry as well as academia, as MST is the ideal place to showcase the latest innovation from inception to commercial exploitation. Backed by one of the premier learned societies, the Institute of Physics, I have no doubt that MST will continue in its success and I look forward to helping to advance its high standing to even greater heights.

  6. An Update: 1976 and 1987 Editors' Predictions of Audience Reactions to Videotex and A Comparison: 1987 Audience Reactions and 1976 and 1987 Editors' Predictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Lucinda D.

    To discover if editors' perceptions of audience opinions had changed and to determine the accuracy of editors' predictions regarding readers' reactions to using videotex, a 1987 study repeated a 1976 survey of Associated Press managing editors, and compared the responses with the original survey results. Surveys were sent to 302 Associated Press…

  7. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  8. JGR-Solid Earth and Planets editor Seth A. Stein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Seth A. Stein, one of the editors of the Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth and Planets, says that his approach to editing the journal is based on the premise that authors, reviewers, and editors are all drawn from the same community: the journal's readers. “We all want JGR to publish interesting papers of the highest possible quality. Each of us believes that the papers we review are improved by our comments. It follows, although it is a little harder for most of us to accept, that our own papers generally contain better science and are more useful to readers as a result of reviews,” Stein told Eos.Stein, an associate professor of geological sciences at Northwestern University (Evanston, Ill.), is one of the seven editors of JGR—Solid Earth and Planets for 1987 and 1988 (see box). His specialties are tectonophysics and seismology.

  9. Writing filter processes for the SAGA editor, appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirslis, Peter A.

    1985-01-01

    The SAGA editor provides a mechanism by which separate processes can be invoked during an editing session to traverse portions of the parse tree being edited. These processes, termed filter processes, read, analyze, and possibly transform the parse tree, returning the result to the editor. By defining new commands with the editor's user defined command facility, which invoke filter processes, authors of filter can provide complex operations as simple commands. A tree plotter, pretty printer, and Pascal tree transformation program were already written using this facility. The filter processes are introduced, parse tree structure is described and the library interface made available to the programmer. Also discussed is how to compile and run filter processes. Examples are presented to illustrate aspect of each of these areas.

  10. Implementing a computerized text-management system: an editor's view

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of sophisticated function-key-driven programs for handling text on a video-display terminal enables the editorial staff of a publications department to take an active role on a computerized text-management team, along with compositors and other keyboard operators. Although there are still many things that editors cannot do on a computer terminal, the bulk of manipulating straight text can be speeded, and the problems of rekeyboarding and interpretation of editorial markings can be largely bypassed. The computer also gives editors new tools that open the way for greater control over both the editorial process and the quality of technical publishing. 5 figures.

  11. Oligocene basaltic volcanism of the northern Rio Grande Rift: San Luis Hills, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.A.; Johnson, C.M.; Mehnert, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    The inception of the Rio Grande Rift in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado was accompanied by voluminous mafic volcanism preserved in part as erosional remnants on an intrarift horst within the current axial rift graben of the San Luis Valley. Major and trace element constraints support a petrogenetic model of fractionation plus lower crustal assimilation for petrologic suites within the San Luis Hills rocks, although the model cannot relate lavas for the entire series to a common parent. Most mafic lavas of the San Luis Hills were evolved (Mg # <60) and contaminated by LREE-enriched silicic partial melts of granulitic lower crust depleted in Rb, Th, and U. However, relatively noncontaminated lavas can be identified and indicate at least two mantle source regions were involved. -from Authors

  12. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking forward to further development of the journal as a forum for high-quality international research at the forefront of nanoscale science and technology under the scientific leadership of Professor Mark Reed and the eminent Editorial Board. This, together with the innovative publishing practises offered by IOP Publishing, will re-affirm the journal as the premier publication in the area, and indispensable reading for you and your colleagues in the years to come.

  13. 76 FR 39091 - San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice of Effectiveness of Surrender

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... for a Conduit Hydroelectric Project \\1\\ to the San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District (District) for the Lopez Water Treatment Plant Hydropower Generation Unit Project No. 4804. The... Energy Regulatory Commission San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice...

  14. 76 FR 62819 - Notice of Intent To Amend the Resource Management Plan for the San Luis Resource Area, Colorado...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ..., the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) San Luis Valley Public Lands Center, Monte Vista, Colorado... EA for the San Luis Valley Public Lands Center, announces the beginning of the scoping process, and..., lands and realty, hydrology, soils, vegetation and fire. Authority: 40 CFR 1501.7 and 43 CFR...

  15. 75 FR 76726 - San Luis Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission San Luis Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of San Luis ] Solar, LLC's application for market-based rate... filings in the above-referenced proceeding are accessible in the Commission's eLibrary system by...

  16. Lagrangian water quality dynamics in the San Luis Drain, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmar, E. C.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Henson, S. S.; Borglin, S. E.; Kendall, C.

    2007-12-01

    Integration of temporal changes in biological and water quality constituents during downstream transport is critical to understanding aquatic ecosystem and biogeochemical dynamics of rivers, estuaries, and the near- coastal waters into which rivers flow. Changes in chemical, physical, and biological water quality constituents during downstream transport can be evaluated by following a specific parcel of water, known as a Lagrangian study. The objective of this study was to differentiate changes in water quality constituents occurring within a parcel of water as it travels downstream to the changes observed at a fixed sampling location. We sampled a parcel of agricultural drainage water as it traveled downstream for 84 h in a concrete-lined channel (San Luis Drain in San Joaquin Valley) with no additional water inputs or outputs. The Lagrangian sampling occurred in August 2006 and June 2007. Data from the Lagrangian study was compared to data collected at a fixed point using an automatic pump sampler and water quality sonde. Fluorescence (a measure of algal pigments), dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and conductivity were measured every 30 minutes, as well as collecting grab samples every 2 h for nutrient and suspended sediment analyses. Sinusoidal diel (24 h) patterns were observed for dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature within the parcel of water. Algal pigments, nutrients, suspended solids, and turbidity did not exhibit sinusoidal diel patterns, generally observed at a fixed sampling location. The diel patterns observed indicated changes that would occur during downstream transport. Algal pigments showed a rapid day time increase during the first 24 to 48 h followed by a plateau or decrease for the remainder of the study. Algal growth was apparent each day during the study, as measured by increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations, in spite of non-detectable phosphate concentrations (<5 ppb) and nearly complete consumption of soluble silica during the 2007 study. Because current monitoring programs generally entail weekly to monthly (usually midday) sampling, they are insufficient to accurately estimate fluxes of nutrients and organic matter through productive rivers, such as the San Joaquin. Information from this study will assist in developing appropriate monitoring protocols to capture diel variability and also provides process-level information for understanding changes in water quality constituents during downstream transport.

  17. Announcement: New Editor-In-Chief, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-06-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish review papers, and spectroscopy is only one of many techniques used in astrophysics, but it was prophetic in that the Journal has become a truly international endeavor, with more than a third of the papers coming from abroad and many of the referees residing outside the United States. The past Managing Editor, Dr. S. Chandrasekhar, established a tradition of first-class research. When he stepped down in 1971, he realized that in order to accommodate for the rapid growth of the Journal, a person with organizational ability was needed. That led to editing by about 15 Scientific Editors with diversified specialized knowledge, an on-line edition that is slowly replacing the printed edition in importance and completeness, and facilities (subject headings, indexing, yellow pages, and instant recall of references in the on-line edition) for improved information retrieval. The next step for Dr. Kennicutt will be to make use of the current computing opportunities to provide a more efficient flow of manuscripts and to push for faster and less expensive publication. And who can predict the options that will be available in publication and data retrieval in the coming years? HELMUT A. ABT Editor-in-Chief

  18. Announcement: New Editor-In Robert C. Kennicutt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-06-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish review papers, and spectroscopy is only one of many techniques used in astrophysics, but it was prophetic in that the Journal has become a truly international endeavor, with more than a third of the papers coming from abroad and many of the referees residing outside the United States. The past Managing Editor, Dr. S. Chandrasekhar, established a tradition of first-class research. When he stepped down in 1971, he realized that in order to accommodate for the rapid growth of the Journal, a person with organizational ability was needed. That led to editing by about 15 Scientific Editors with diversified specialized knowledge, an on-line edition that is slowly replacing the printed edition in importance and completeness, and facilities (subject headings, indexing, yellow pages, and instant recall of references in the on-line edition) for improved information retrieval. The next step for Dr. Kennicutt will be to make use of the current computing opportunities to provide a more efficient flow of manuscripts and to push for faster and less expensive publication. And who can predict the options that will be available in publication and data retrieval in the coming years? HELMUT A. ABT Editor-in-Chief

  19. Announcement: New Editor-in-Chief Robert C. Kennicutt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-05-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish review papers, and spectroscopy is only one of many techniques used in astrophysics, but it was prophetic in that the Journal has become a truly international endeavor, with more than a third of the papers coming from abroad and many of the referees residing outside the United States. The past Managing Editor, Dr. S. Chandrasekhar, established a tradition of first-class research. When he stepped down in 1971, he realized that in order to accommodate for the rapid growth of the Journal, a person with organizational ability was needed. That led to editing by about 15 Scientific Editors with diversified specialized knowledge, an on-line edition that is slowly replacing the printed edition in importance and completeness, and facilities (subject headings, indexing, yellow pages, and instant recall of references in the on-line edition) for improved information retrieval. The next step for Dr. Kennicutt will be to make use of the current computing opportunities to provide a more efficient flow of manuscripts and to push for faster and less expensive publication. And who can predict the options that will be available in publication and data retrieval in the coming years? HELMUT A. ABT Editor-in-Chief

  20. IN DEFENSE OF ECORISK ASSESSMENT (LETTER TO EDITOR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are writing to convey a more accurate portrayal of the status of ecological ("environmental" in Europe) risk assessment that was presented in the recent article by M. Power and L.S. McCarty (Fallacies in Ecological Risk Assessment Practices," August 1997, pp 370A-...

  1. Kamide reflects on JGR and the role of editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Peter

    After serving the space physics community for more than 11 years, Y. Kamide of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory at Nagoya University in Toyokawa, Japan, retired as editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics for the Asian/Pacific region. He had been a JGR editor since AGU first opened two editorial offices in Europe and the Asian/Pacific region in 1989. Even as the initial JGR editor in Asia, Kamide was not new to AGU editorial business. Before accepting the JGR position, Kamide served 3 years as the editor in Japan for Geophysical Research Letters.According to Kamide, over the last 5 years, the number of high-quality submissions to JGR in the Asian/Pacific region has increased dramatically, by a factor of 2.5. This increase came mostly from the younger generation of scientists, which bodes well for the future of JGR and space physics in general. Together with the substantial contributions to JGR from the European community, this achievement has been recognized by AGU as proof that JGR is truly an international journal of the highest editorial standards.

  2. Journal Editor Says Predictions Were Optimistic--and Wrong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleland, LaRue

    1995-01-01

    Presents comments from a former editor of this journal, describing some of the journal's history. Notes that some predictions the author made about journalism/mass communication education's future in an editorial written in 1970 turned out to be fanciful. Discusses continuing challenges. (SR)

  3. Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

  4. Newspaper Editors Point to J-Grad Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Gordon; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Editors of 227 weekly and daily newspapers who responded to a questionnaire indicated that journalism schools should increase the number of hours required of their students; teach more grammar, spelling, and punctuation; require internships; and broaden journalism training to include photography and layout. (TJ)

  5. All's well that ends well for JAMIA editors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Dr Randolph A Miller begins a self-imposed JAMIA retirement on January 1, 2011 after serving as Editor-in-Chief for eight and a half years. He lauds the selection of Lucia Ohno-Machado as an energetic, innovative, and highly qualified successor. PMID:20962122

  6. Ridom TraceEdit: a DNA trace editor and viewer.

    PubMed

    Rothgänger, Jörg; Weniger, Markus; Weniger, Thomas; Mellmann, Alexander; Harmsen, Dag

    2006-02-15

    Ridom TraceEdit is a cross-platform graphical DNA trace viewer and editor. TraceEdit displays the chromatogram files from Applied Biosystems automated sequencers and files in the Staden SCF format. Incorrect base calls can be edited and saved. PMID:16357036

  7. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the

  8. An Editor's View of the State of Applied Developmental Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocking, Rodney R.

    Addressed are issues and problems of definition that arose in establishing a new scientific journal. Specifically, the problems considered are those confronting the "Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology" (JADP) in its first 5 years of existence. The first matter of definition discussed is the editor's role. Ways in which editorial power was…

  9. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  10. Professor and Editor Trade Places to Avoid Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanervo, Ellen; Ferrier, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Relates the story of how the city editor of a small daily newspaper and a journalism professor at the local university traded places for a semester. Details the problems they faced, the discoveries they made, and the benefits they found from such an exchange. (SR)

  11. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for biological, medical and life science applications or sensors and sensing systems. Selected papers or special features in recent issues of MST attest to this development [1-3]. In parallel with these new fields, board members have always kept their eye on the other journal topics. Many papers published in MST have been downloaded very often and highly cited. This shows the acceptance and reputation of MST. Thanks to the activity of all board members over the last ten years MST has published a number of excellent review articles. This has strengthened the prestige of MST. A new series of articles was introduced under the banner of 'Perspectives' in 2008. They highlight milestones in a selected field and indicate some future challenges from the point of view of the author [4]. In summary, it can be stated that MST is on a good path. This was created thanks to the activity of all members of the Editorial Board. In recent years we have enlarged this board with well known scientists from universities and industry from all over the world. This will ensure a continuously positive development of MST. As outgoing Editor-in-Chief, I can say that I have found my task fascinating and I have enjoyed it very much. I have learned a lot in this time because I have come into close contact with a large number of scientists from a vast spectrum of technical areas and parts of our world. My special gratitude is dedicated to all the Editorial Board members of the last ten years and especially to Sharon D'Souza from IOPP. Furthermore, I would like to pass on to my successor, Professor David Birch from University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, my best wishes for an enjoyable and successful tenure as Editor-in-Chief! References [1] Tanaka M, Baba T and Postek M T 2011 Nanometrology Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 020101 [2] Potyrailo R A et al 2011 RFID sensors as the common sensing platform for single-use biopharmaceutical manufacturing Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 082001 [3] Fritze H 2011 High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 012002 [4] Birch D J S 2011 Fluorescence detections and directions Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 052002

  12. Chasing Personal Meaning: Pedagogical Lessons through Luis Rodriguez's "Always Running"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theisen-Homer, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    In this autobiographical narrative, the author recounts her experiences teaching the novel "Always Running" by Luis Rodriguez with her English classes at a high school in a gang-heavy area. When she first started teaching, this teacher struggled to engage students. One particularly disruptive student requested to read "Always…

  13. Emphatic or Reflexive? On the Endophoric Character of French "lui-meme" and Similar Complex Pronouns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zribi-Hertz, Anne

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the referential properties of a class of complex pronouns labelled M-Pronouns, exemplified by Old English "himself," French "lui-meme," and English "his own." It is shown that M-Pronouns exhibit some properties commonly taken as characterizing reflexive anaphors, and that they also occur as "intensive" pronouns. Contains 66…

  14. Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: An Economic Measure of Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). GNRP is equal to aggregate consumption minus the depreciation of man-made and natural capital. We measure the move...

  15. SPECIAL PROBLEM REPORT, IMPROVING EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING PROCEDURES IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CANNON, DALE CARTER

    A SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED BY MAIL QUESTIONNAIRE TO GATHER DATA ON THE FARM POPULATION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, TO GET NAMES OF COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND PROVIDE MOTIVATION FOR EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING. THE MEAN AGE OF RESPONDENTS WAS 50, THE LARGE MAJORITY WITH CHILDREN AT HOME, THREE-FOURTHS NATIVE TO CALIFORNIA, ONE-HALF BEING BORN IN…

  16. Reading Recovery Effectiveness: A Five-Year Success Story in San Luis Coastal Unified School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Wayne; Denton, Edwin; Kelly, Patricia; Neal, Judith

    1999-01-01

    Describes a five-year longitudinal study of "Reading Recovery," a program in the San Luis (California) Coastal Unified School District, providing tutoring for children struggling with beginning reading. Of 613 participating first graders, 513 successfully completed the program. "Graduates" reached average reading and writing proficiency and…

  17. Survey of San Luis Valley School Closures. Resource Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Alfred M.

    School closures in Colorado's San Luis Valley were surveyed, listing the pros and cons of closing school during the potato harvest. In 1958, 12 of 31 elementary schools and 7 of 13 secondary schools ceased operation for periods up to 18 days during the potato harvest, closing schools to 4,447 students. Of these students, 904 elementary children…

  18. Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an ...

  19. 76 FR 14042 - San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Alamosa, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service ; 60138-1265-6CCP-S3] San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Alamosa, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent; request for comments. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and...

  20. San Luis Valley Board of Cooperative Services Bilingual-Bicultural Program. Curriculum: Kindergarten Through Third Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Luis Valley Board of Cooperative Services, Alamosa, CO.

    For the children in the San Luis Valley (Colorado), bilingual education has provided a successful atmosphere for both the monolingual English speakers and the non-English speakers. They teach each other, learn about each other's culture, and appreciate and understand others better. This curriculum guide, funded by Title VII of the Elementary and…

  1. FLAn: A Free Hypermedia Editor to Create Foreign Language Learning Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilickaya, Ferit, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Glossing words is done via special software called multimedia editors. Foreign Language Annotator (FLAn), created by Thibeault (2011), is one of these multimedia editors. FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor that works on both Macs and PCs, allows instructors to turn static texts into dynamic learning units by attaching…

  2. Preparing Students To Work on Newspaper Copy Desks: Are Educators Meeting Editors' Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auman, Ann E.; Cook, Betsy B.

    A study surveyed two groups in the fall of 1994, journalism educators and newspaper editors. Educators completed a survey regarding the course content and skill areas emphasized in beginning level copy editing courses, while editors were asked to respond to questions regarding the skills they expect entry-level copy editors to have. Respondents…

  3. Late Glacial and Holocene Record of Hydroclimate in the San Luis Valley, Southern Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Koran, M.

    2012-12-01

    Lake sediments from the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, archive a detailed record of Late Glacial and Holocene climatic fluctuations in the southern Rocky Mountains. Together with radiometric dating analysis, measurements of grain size, magnetic susceptibility, total inorganic carbon (TIC), oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the TIC fraction on sediment samples from San Luis Lake (at an average resolution of 60 years per sample) allow us to generate a sediment record of climatic change in the region spanning the last 16ka (1 ka=1000 cal yrs). This record documents the timing and duration of major climate episodes and trends, comparable to the existing paleoclimate records from the American Southwest. The Late Glacial record of San Luis Lake contains a big wet episode in the late part of the Mystery Interval (MI), a relatively dry climate during Bølling-Allerød (B/A) warm interval, and a relatively wet episode during the Younger Dryas (YD) interval, similar to the lake-level record found in the Estancia basin in central New Mexico. The early to middle Holocene record of d18O in the San Luis Lake parallels the calcite d18O record of Bison Lake in northern Colorado, documenting a history of significant change in precipitation seasonality across the northern boundary of the North American monsoon (NAM). The middle Holocene epoch is characterized by greater variations in magnetic susceptibility, d18O and d13C, suggesting the prevalence of wet, variable or transitional climate conditions. In contrast, the late Holocene climate is relatively dry, as indicated by more positive values of d18O in San Luis Lake. The results of this study reveal a complex history of climate evolution due to the interactions of two seasonally distinct precipitation regimes with mountainous landforms in the region.

  4. PREFACE: Introductory remarks from the Editors Introductory remarks from the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Meseguer, A.; Marques, F.

    2012-06-01

    The local organizers of the 4th BIFD (Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics) Symposium held in Barcelona on 18-21 July 2011 would like to thank the editors of Fluid Dynamics Research for offering us the opportunity of publishing a peer-reviewed special issue of the journal with a selection of the contributions presented at this conference. We thank both the authors and the referees for working with us on the rather tight schedule necessary to release the issue within one year of the date of the conference. We also thank the invited speakers, B Eckhardt, L Tuckerman, and J M Vega, for contributing keynote papers to this special issue. The series of BIFD symposia started as a small workshop in Madeira, Portugal, in 2004 with no more than 20 participants. This number increased rapidly during the second and third symposia held in 2006 (Denmark) and 2009 (United Kingdom), with 40 and 110 participants, respectively. The 4th BIFD symposium has consolidated this event as one of the leading conferences in hydrodynamic stability, with nearly 200 participants from around the world. The main goal of this conference is to bring together scientists and engineers from different disciplines directly or indirectly related to fluid dynamics, bifurcation theory and hydrodynamic stability theory. The conference covered many research areas within the aforementioned fields, ranging from thermal, shear and centrifugal flows to biofluids, films, drops, viscoelastic flows and magnetohydrodynamics. The structure of the conference, with invited plenary talks and focused sessions, helped the participants find their home in the conference and share state-of-the-art knowledge within the field of hydrodynamic instabilities. The financial support from MICINN (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Grant no FIS2009-08065-E) and UPC (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) is greatly appreciated. The local organizers would also like to thank ETSAB (Barcelona School of Architecture) for providing their facilities and support staff, as well as CIMNE (Center for Numerical Methods in Engineering) for helping us with the administrative tasks and management of this event.

  5. The Digital Audio Editor as a Teaching and Laboratory Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latta, Gregory

    2001-10-01

    Digital audio editors such as Software Audio Workshop and Cool Edit Pro are powerful tools used in the radio and audio recording fields for editing digital audio. However, they are also powerful tools in the physics classroom and laboratory. During this presentation the author will show how a digital audio editor, combined with a library of audio .wav files produced by the author as part of sabbatical work, can be used to: 1. demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively the relationship between the decibel, sound intensity, and loudness perception, 2. demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively the relationship between frequency and pitch perception, 3. perform additive and subtractive sound synthesis, 4. demonstrate comb filtering, 5. demonstrate constructive and destructive interference, and 6. turn the computer into an accurate signal generator (sine wave, square wave, etc.) with a frequency resolution of 1Hz. Availability of the required software and .wav file library will also be discussed.

  6. Reference accuracy: authors', reviewers', editors', and publishers' contributions.

    PubMed

    Barroga, Edward F

    2014-12-01

    Scientific authors are responsible for the accuracy of their writings and references to others' works. However, relying on authors is not enough when it comes to processing their manuscripts. Joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers, editors, and publishers throughout the publishing process may prevent most reference errors. This article analyzes essential aspects of bibliographic management and focuses on the importance of validating references by all stakeholders of scholarly publishing. PMID:25469055

  7. Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

  8. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  9. A perspective on computer documentation: System developer vs. technical editor

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, E.T.; Truett, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    Between the computer-knowledgeable {open_quotes}techie{close_quotes} and the technical writer is a chasm created by differences in knowledge bases and skills. Although this gap is widened by misunderstandings and misconceptions of system development roles, it is bridged by mutual need and dual appreciation. Often the editor/writer is {open_quotes}behind{close_quotes} from beginning to end. The writer normally joins the team after the programmers are well into system development and do not want to {open_quotes}waste time{close_quotes} discussing fundamentals. The writer is usually excluded from technical discussions because it is assumed that he/she would not understand anyway. Later in the system development cycle, the writer has no time to polish the documentation before a new version of the software is issued which implies that the documentation must be revised. Nevertheless, the editor/writer`s product is critical for the end-user`s appreciation of the software, a fact which promotes unity to complete the comprehensive package of software and documentation. This paper explores the planks in the bridge that spans the chasm between developers and their fundamental PR agents, the technical editors/writers. This paper defines approaches (e.g., The Circling Theory) and techniques (Bold Thrust!) employed for effective communication -- between software developer and technical writer as well as between the software and the end-user.

  10. The Lives and Hard Times of Magazine Editors in the Big Apple: A Report on the Society of Magazine Editors' Educators Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, John W.

    This report chronicles the first Society of Magazine Editors' educators seminar, which was held in New York from May 13-17, 1974, and was attended by ten journalism faculty. The industry's concerns, as expressed through editors, are paper, printing, postage, people, and profit. The Magazine Publishers Association (MPA) seems mostly concerned with…

  11. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Sherwood, P.B.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 and 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstock for the production of ethanol.

  12. Dual-system Tectonics of the San Luis Range and Vicinity, Coastal Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    The M 6.5 "San Simeon" earthquake of December 22, 2003, occurred beneath the Santa Lucia Range in coastal central California, and resulted in around $250,000,000 property damage and two deaths from collapse of an historic building in the town of Paso Robles, located 40 km from the epicenter. The earthquake and more than 10,000 aftershocks were well recorded by nearby seismographs, which permitted detailed analysis of the event (eg: McLaren et al., 2008). This analysis facilitated evaluation of the hazard of the occurrence of a similar event in the nearby San Luis Range, located along the coast west of the city of San Luis Obispo some 55 km south of the San Simeon epicenter. The future occurrence of earthquakes analogous to the 2003 event in this area had been proposed in the late 1960’s (eg: Benioff and Smith, 1967; Richter, 1969) but the apparent hazard of such occurrences came to be overshadowed by the discovery of the “Hosgri” strike slip fault passing close to the area in the offshore. However data accumulated since the early 1970’s clearly demonstrate the hazard as being partitioned between nearby earthquakes of strike slip origin, and underlying earthquakes of thrust origin analogous to that of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. And for the onshore San Luis Range area, an underlying actively seismogenic thrust wedge appears to provide the maximum potential seismic ground motion; exceeding that potentially resulting from large events on nearby strike slip faults of the San Simeon-Hosgri system, for onshore sites. Understanding and documentation of the geology, geomorphology, tectonics and seismogenesis of the San Luis Range and vicinity has recently experienced a quantum improvement as both new and accumulated data have been analysed. An integrated interpretation of all available data now clearly shows that a dual “side by side” system of active tectonics exists in the region. Essentially the most obvious evidence for this is seen simply in the topography; the rapidly uplifting San Luis Range represents the field of NE-SW compression driving a thrust—backthrust thrust fault wedge “popup” while the adjacent shear strike slip faulting associated with the plate boundary San Gregorio-Hosgri splay of the San Andreas fault system results in only minor surface deformation of the sea floor surface of late Quaternary marine planation. Interaction between the two tectonic systems occurs mainly along the SE shoreline of Estero Bay where NNW aligned strike slip faults intersect the uplifting San Luis Range thrust fault “popup” wedge, and along the recently identified Shoreline fault, against which the SSW-vergent leading edge of the San Luis Range thrust impinges at depths of 1-5 km. The latter structural relationship gives rise to locally pronounced west facing sea floor surface scarps along a fault with mostly or entirely horizontal strike slip motion. Overall the San Luis Range and vicinity constitutes an excellent full scale laboratory for observation of evidence of a variety of tectonic processes in action. The opportunity for studies of tectonism here arises not only from the geologically and topographically clearly exhibited effects of the two interacting tectonic fields (NNW shear; NE-SW compression) but also from the extensive baseline studies of the area conducted during the past 40 years.

  13. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.; Sherwood, P.B.

    1983-07-01

    The commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source was assessed. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (IGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstocks for the production of ethanol.

  14. Airborne electromagnetic and magnetic survey data of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Bloss, Benjamin R.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys in southern Colorado, United States. These airborne geophysical surveys provide high-resolution and spatially comprehensive datasets characterizing the resistivity structure of the shallow subsurface of each survey region, accompanied by magnetic-field information over matching areas. These data were collected to provide insight into the distribution of groundwater brine in the Paradox Valley, the extent of clay aquitards in the San Luis Valley, and to improve our understanding of the geologic framework for both regions. This report describes these contracted surveys and releases digital data supplied under contract to the USGS.

  15. Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    I am very pleased to join the outstanding leadership team for the journal Nuclear Fusion as Scientific Editor. The journal's high position in the field of fusion energy research derives in no small measure from the efforts of the IAEA team in Vienna, the production and marketing of IOP Publishing, the Board of Editors led by its chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, the Associate Editor for Inertial Confinement Max Tabak and the outgoing Scientific Editor, Paul Thomas. During Paul's five year tenure submissions have grown by over 40%. The usage of the electronic journal has grown year by year with about 300 000 full text downloads of Nuclear Fusion articles in 2011, an impressive figure due in part to the launch of the full 50 year archive. High quality has been maintained while times for peer review and publishing have been reduced and the journal achieved some of the highest impact factors ever (as high as 4.27). The journal has contributed greatly to building the international scientific basis for fusion. I was privileged to serve from 2003 to 2010 as chairman of the Coordinating Committee for the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) which published in Nuclear Fusion the first ITER Physics Basis (1999) and its later update (2007). The scientific basis that has been developed to date for fusion has led to the construction of major facilities to demonstrate the production of power-plant relevant levels of fusion reactions. We look forward to the journal continuing to play a key role in the international effort toward fusion energy as these exciting major facilities and the various approaches to fusion continue to be developed. It is clear that Nuclear Fusion maintains its position in the field because of the perceived high quality of the submissions, the refereeing and the editorial processes, and the availability and utility of the online journal. The creation of the Nuclear Fusion Prize, led by the Board of Editors chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, for the most outstanding paper published in the journal each year has furthered the submission and recognition of papers of the highest quality. The accomplishments of the journal's team over the last five years will be a tough act to follow but I look forward to working with this competent and dedicated group to continue the journal's high standards and ensure that Nuclear Fusion remains the journal of choice for authors and readers alike.

  16. Epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Perez, Uciel R; Hernández-Sierra, Juan F; Escalante-Padrón, Francisco J; Contreras-Vidales, Soledad; Berman-Puente, Ana M; Hernandez-Maldonado, Fernando; Noyola, Daniel E

    2014-05-01

    We analyzed data from 147 patients with suspected pertussis in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Bordetella pertussis was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 59 (40.1%) cases. The incidence of B. pertussis infection was 2.3 per 100,000 population. There were 6 deaths among the study patients. We conclude that the impact of pertussis in our state is significantly higher than previously estimated. PMID:24220229

  17. Geologic Map of the San Luis Hills Area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Ren A.; Machette, Michael N.

    1989-01-01

    This report is a digital image of the U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1906, 'Geologic map of the San Luis Hills area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado,' which was published in 1989 by Thompson and Machette, scale 1:50,000 but has been unavailable in a digital version. The map area represents the southwestern portion of the Alamosa 30' x 60' quadrangle, which is currently being remapped by the U.S. Geological Survey. The northern and eastern margins of the San Luis Hills area have been remapped at greater detail and thus small portions of the map area have been updated. The northern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1392, the northeastern portion is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1124, and the eastern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2007-1074. The most significant changes to the 1989 map area are recognition of Lake Alamosa and its deposits (Alamosa Formation), remapping of bedrock in the northeastern San Luis Hills, and redating of volcanic units in the San Luis Hills. Although unpublished, new 40Ar/39Ar ages for volcanic units in the Conejos and Hinsdale Formations add precision to the previous K/Ar-dated rocks, but do not change the basic chronology of the units. The digital version of this map was prepared by Theodore R. Brandt by scanning the original map at 300 pixels per inch, prior to creating the press-quality (96 Mb) and standard (5 Mb) .pdf files.

  18. [Luis Simarro: precursor of Spanish Neurology and Grand Master of the freemasons].

    PubMed

    García-Albea, E

    Luis Simarro is considered to be the great precursor of Spanish Neurology, Neurohistology and Psychology. Together with Cajal he was one of the most outstanding figures of the Spanish freemasons in the field of medicine, where he reached the highest rank: Grand Master of the Spanish Great Orient. These historical notes summarize the scientific contribution of Simarro and his extensive work in the field of politics where he was influential in the modernization of Spain. PMID:11424060

  19. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    On 1 January, 2004, I assumed the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics. I will start by saying that I will do my best to justify the confidence of the journal management and publishing staff in my abilities. I was fortunate to have been able to work, as an Editorial Board member, with my predecessor, the previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Allister Ferguson. Allister has provided a high degree of intellectual stewardship for the journal in the last five years. He has made the job appear a worthy challenge for me. I therefore take this opportunity to thank Allister on behalf of the Editorial Board and publishing staff of the journal. Several other factors contributed to my decision to accept this position. The first is the group of people who actually go about the business of publishing. The Senior Publisher, Nicola Gulley (and her predecessor Sophy Le Masurier); the Managing Editor, Jill Membrey; the Publishing Administrators, Nina Blakesley and Sarah Towell; the Production Editor, Katie Gerrard and their office staff form an amazing group and have managed to make the operation of the journal incredibly efficient. An index of this is the speed with which incoming manuscripts are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and its web publication, if accepted, is 130 days. This is three to five times shorter than for most other journals. A factor that contributes to this success is a responsive pool of referees that the publishing staff have as a valuable resource. Ultimately, the standard bearers of any journal are the referees. Therefore, a grateful `thank you' is due from all of us at J. Phys. D to all our referees, who diligently perform this honourable task. The Associate Editors of the journal, Professors Lawler, Margaritondo and O'Grady, also provide immense scientific leadership. They help in defining new directions for the journal and in the publishing process. Last, but not least, a remarkable asset of the journal, and a tremendous intellectual resource, is the Editorial Board. The board members are all distinguished scientists and engineers who provide valuable counsel in defining the technical scope of the journal and its management. The members attend the board meetings at least once a year and, as a dynamic group, discuss ways of making the journal better. Most of them, including myself, also publish in J. Phys. D on a regular basis. This is truly a unique feature. So, what do I hope to accomplish during my tenure? I will strive to continue the legacy established by Allister and to look at ways of making a first-rate journal even better. At the heart of this is the quality of papers published. This can be done in several ways: raising the bar for refereeing and acceptance, regular publication of topical clusters and special issues in important areas, and publication of review articles by internationally renowned researchers and academics. In all these areas, the Editorial Board members can play a leading role. While I believe that the present topical scope of the journal is adequate and covers the important areas of applied physics, it is easy to miss out on important emerging areas. Therefore, we will have to keep the scope of the journal under constant scrutiny. Above all, the content of the journal must remain relevant at all times. I look forward to working with the journal's excellent staff, Associate Editors, and the Editorial Board.

  20. Problems faced by editors of peer reviewed medical journals.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Shaukat A

    2004-01-01

    Forty-six medical and dental journals are published from Pakistan of which only 29 are currently recognized by the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council. Only a few are peer reviewed. Six are indexed in Medline while EMBASE Excerpta Medica and World Health Organization Index Medicus for Eastern Mediterranean Region cover others. Editors of the peer reviewed medical journals are faced with numerous problems, which relate to the authors. Some of these are: shortage of quality of manuscripts, poor quality of reviewers, problems with indexation in international indexing services particularly Medline, duplicate submission and authorship and lastly, financial problems. Patronage from the Pharma industry is the major source of revenue which itself has serious implications. Editing a medical journal is a very stressful job and the editors have to work under too many pressures. A lot of useful data is presented at medical conferences, but a vast majority of it remains unpublished for various reasons, which adversely affects the citation rate from scientists from the developing third world countries in the world of medical literature. A few lectures on medical writing and research methodology to final year medical students will expose them to the art of medical writing. Specialty organizations can be persuaded to have a session on medical writing at their conferences, which will be extremely helpful not only to the potential new authors but also others, thereby improving the quality of their manuscripts. In addition to regular seminars, workshops for authors, reviewers and training courses for editors, subscribing to local medical journals by healthcare professionals and libraries are some of the measures that will help improve the situation to a great extent. PMID:14968187

  1. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre-review, with the aim to raise the quality of our content, three years later the number of published articles has remained stable at around 220 per year, whilst the number of downloads and citations to the journal has grown. In 2011, three topical issues have been published, on: (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures (Guest Editor: Alberta Bonanni, University of Linz, Austria) Flexible OLEDs and organic electronics (Guest Editors: Jang-Joo Kim, Min-Koo Han, Cambridge University, UK, and Yong-Young Noh, Seoul National University, Korea) From heterostructures to nanostructures: an 80th birthday tribute to Zhores Alferov (Guest Editor: Dieter Bimberg, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) For the coming years, I will strongly support that the number of published topical issues will continue on the same level or slightly rise. SST has planned the publication of the following topical issues for 2012: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors (Guest Editors: Jung Han, Yale University, USA, and Michael Kneissl, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) Topological insulators (Guest Editors: Alberto Morpurgo, Université de Genève, Switzerland and Björn Trauzettel, Universität Basel, Switzerland) Atomic layer deposition (Guest Editor: Marek Godlewski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland) 50th Anniversary of the laser diode (Guest Editors: Mike Adams, Univeristy of Essex, UK and Stephane Calvez, University of Strathclyde, UK) In addition to the traditional topics of SST, I as Editor-in-chief, strongly support and welcome the submission of manuscripts on organic semiconductors, topological insulators, semiconductor nanostructures for photovoltaic, solid-state lighting and energy harvesting, IC application beyond Moore's law and fundamental works on semiconductors based on abundant materials. I am extremely optimistic about the future of SST. I believe that we will raise the standards of acceptance while maintaining the short time from submission to first decision. I am confident that we will continue to improve the quality of the papers published in this already first-class journal. I look forward to working with the journal's excellent staff and Editorial Board Members.

  2. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of developing a team of Associate Editors to promote the journal in the number of critical sub-areas of smart materials and structures, and to play a key, integral role in the review process. Associate Editors will be chosen to serve in a number of sub-areas to ensure expertise and continuation of the rigorous review process. Under my leadership as the new Editor-in-Chief of SMS, I aim to ensure that SMS maintains and grows in quality to best serve our diverse community of researchers.

  3. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  4. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  5. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  6. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  7. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  8. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting. PMID:26847670

  9. A Generic Metadata Editor Supporting System Using Drupal CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Banks, N. G.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    Metadata handling is a key factor in preserving and reusing scientific data. In recent years, standardized structural metadata has become widely used in Geoscience communities. However, there exist many different standards in Geosciences, such as the current version of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC CSDGM), the Ecological Markup Language (EML), the Geography Markup Language (GML), and the emerging ISO 19115 and related standards. In addition, there are many different subsets within the Geoscience subdomain such as the Biological Profile of the FGDC (CSDGM), or for geopolitical regions, such as the European Profile or the North American Profile in the ISO standards. It is therefore desirable to have a software foundation to support metadata creation and editing for multiple standards and profiles, without re-inventing the wheels. We have developed a software module as a generic, flexible software system to do just that: to facilitate the support for multiple metadata standards and profiles. The software consists of a set of modules for the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), with minimal inter-dependencies to other Drupal modules. There are two steps in using the system's metadata functions. First, an administrator can use the system to design a user form, based on an XML schema and its instances. The form definition is named and stored in the Drupal database as a XML blob content. Second, users in an editor role can then use the persisted XML definition to render an actual metadata entry form, for creating or editing a metadata record. Behind the scenes, the form definition XML is transformed into a PHP array, which is then rendered via Drupal Form API. When the form is submitted the posted values are used to modify a metadata record. Drupal hooks can be used to perform custom processing on metadata record before and after submission. It is trivial to store the metadata record as an actual XML file or in a storage/archive system. We are working on adding many features to help editor users, such as auto completion, pre-populating of forms, partial saving, as well as automatic schema validation. In this presentation we will demonstrate a few sample editors, including an FGDC editor and a bare bone editor for ISO 19115/19139. We will also demonstrate the use of templates during the definition phase, with the support of export and import functions. Form pre-population and input validation will also be covered. Theses modules are available as open-source software from the Islandora software foundation, as a component of a larger Drupal-based data archive system. They can be easily installed as stand-alone system, or to be plugged into other existing metadata platforms.

  10. Uranium series isotopes concentration in sediments at San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Méndez-García, C.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of the radioisotopes concentrations were determined in sediments near the surface and core samples extracted from two reservoirs located in an arid region close to Chihuahua City, Mexico. At San Marcos reservoir one core was studied, while from Luis L. Leon reservoir one core from the entrance and another one close to the wall were investigated. ²³²Th-series, ²³⁸U-series, ⁴⁰K and ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations (AC, Bq kg⁻¹) were determined by gamma spectrometry with a high purity Ge detector. ²³⁸U and ²³⁴U ACs were obtained by liquid scintillation and alpha spectrometry with a surface barrier detector. Dating of core sediments was performed applying CRS method to ²¹⁰Pb activities. Results were verified by ¹³⁷Cs AC. Resulting activity concentrations were compared among corresponding surface and core sediments. High ²³⁸U-series AC values were found in sediments from San Marcos reservoir, because this site is located close to the Victorino uranium deposit. Low AC values found in Luis L. Leon reservoir suggest that the uranium present in the source of the Sacramento – Chuviscar Rivers is not transported up to the Conchos River. Activity ratios (AR) ²³⁴U/²³⁸U and ²³⁸U/²²⁶Ra in sediments have values between 0.9–1.2, showing a behavior close to radioactive equilibrium in the entire basin. ²³²Th/²³⁸U, ²²⁸Ra/²²⁶Ra ARs are witnesses of the different geological origin of sediments from San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs.

  11. Andreae is New Editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2004-10-01

    As the incoming editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles, I would like to introduce myself and my ideas for the journal to Eos readers and to current and potential GBC authors. I've had a somewhat ``roaming'' scientific evolution, coming from ``straight'' chemistry through hard-rock geochemistry to chemical oceanography, the field in which I did my Ph.D. I taught marine chemistry at Florida State University for a number of years, and developed an interest in ocean/atmosphere interactions and atmospheric chemistry. In 1987 I took on my present job at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Mainz, Germany, and, after leaving the seacoast, my interests shifted to interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere, including the role of vegetation fires. My present focus is on the role of biogenic aerosols and biomass smoke in regulating cloud properties and influencing climate.

  12. Educating science editors: is there a comprehensive strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Gorin, Sergey V.; Kitas, George D.

    2014-01-01

    The article considers available options to educate science editors in the fast-transforming digital environment. There is no single course or resource that can cover their constantly changing and diversifying educational needs. The involvement in research, writing, and reviewing is important for gaining editing skills, but that is not all. Membership in editorial associations and access to updated scholarly information in the field are mandatory for maintaining editorial credentials. Learned associations offer access to a few widely-recognized periodicals. There are also formal training courses covering issues in science writing and ethical editing, but no high-level evidence data exist to promote any of these. Networking with like-minded specialists within the global and regional editorial associations seems a useful strategy to upgrade editorial skills and resolve problems with the quality control and digitization of scholarly periodicals. PMID:25559840

  13. Medicare's outpatient code editor is key to APC payments.

    PubMed

    Leary, R; Farley, D E

    2001-07-01

    Since implementation of the outpatient prospective payment system (PPS) in August 2000, HCFA has used an inadequate communication process to inform providers about billing and coding requirements. Numerous program memorandums have been issued to communicate changes to the outpatient PPS and even to correct information that was provided in previous program memorandums. Providers need to monitor changes in outpatient PPS policy by reading the program memorandums posted on HCFA's Web site (www.hcfa.org) and through reviewing other informal communications posted to the HCFA Web site. In addition, the outpatient code editor (OCE) contains information about quarterly APC classification updates. In fact, the OCE is the only source of this information in many cases. Because the outpatient PPS differs from any other PPS implemented by HCFA, providers should ensure that they have all the current information they need to comply with the system's billing and coding requirements. PMID:11467230

  14. The X-windows interactive navigation data editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    A new computer program called the X-Windows Interactive Data Editor (XIDE) was developed and demonstrated as a prototype application for editing radio metric data in the orbit-determination process. The program runs on a variety of workstations and employs pull-down menus and graphical displays, which allow users to easily inspect and edit radio metric data in the orbit data files received from the Deep Space Network (DSN). The XIDE program is based on the Open Software Foundation OSF/Motif Graphical User Interface (GUI) and has proven to be an efficient tool for editing radio metric data in the navigation operations environment. It was adopted by the Magellan Navigation Team as their primary data-editing tool. Because the software was designed from the beginning to be portable, the prototype was successfully moved to new workstation environments. It was also itegrated into the design of the next-generation software tool for DSN multimission navigation interactive launch support.

  15. A Diagram Editor for Efficient Biomedical Knowledge Capture and Integration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bohua; Jakupovic, Elvis; Wilson, Justin; Dai, Manhong; Xuan, Weijian; Mirel, Barbara; Athey, Brian; Watson, Stanley; Meng, Fan

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying complex disorders requires the integration of data and knowledge from different sources including free text literature and various biomedical databases. To facilitate this process, we created the Biomedical Concept Diagram Editor (BCDE) to help researchers distill knowledge from data and literature and aid the process of hypothesis development. A key feature of BCDE is the ability to capture information with a simple drag-and-drop. This is a vast improvement over manual methods of knowledge and data recording and greatly increases the efficiency of the biomedical researcher. BCDE also provides a unique concept matching function to enforce consistent terminology, which enables conceptual relationships deposited by different researchers in the BCDE database to be mined and integrated for intelligible and useful results. We hope BCDE will promote the sharing and integration of knowledge from different researchers for effective hypothesis development. PMID:21347131

  16. The X-windows interactive navigation data editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinker, G. C.

    1992-02-01

    A new computer program called the X-Windows Interactive Data Editor (XIDE) was developed and demonstrated as a prototype application for editing radio metric data in the orbit-determination process. The program runs on a variety of workstations and employs pull-down menus and graphical displays, which allow users to easily inspect and edit radio metric data in the orbit data files received from the Deep Space Network (DSN). The XIDE program is based on the Open Software Foundation OSF/Motif Graphical User Interface (GUI) and has proven to be an efficient tool for editing radio metric data in the navigation operations environment. It was adopted by the Magellan Navigation Team as their primary data-editing tool. Because the software was designed from the beginning to be portable, the prototype was successfully moved to new workstation environments. It was also itegrated into the design of the next-generation software tool for DSN multimission navigation interactive launch support.

  17. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  18. Educating science editors: is there a comprehensive strategy?

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Gorin, Sergey V; Kitas, George D

    2014-12-01

    The article considers available options to educate science editors in the fast-transforming digital environment. There is no single course or resource that can cover their constantly changing and diversifying educational needs. The involvement in research, writing, and reviewing is important for gaining editing skills, but that is not all. Membership in editorial associations and access to updated scholarly information in the field are mandatory for maintaining editorial credentials. Learned associations offer access to a few widely-recognized periodicals. There are also formal training courses covering issues in science writing and ethical editing, but no high-level evidence data exist to promote any of these. Networking with like-minded specialists within the global and regional editorial associations seems a useful strategy to upgrade editorial skills and resolve problems with the quality control and digitization of scholarly periodicals. PMID:25559840

  19. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan-Michael

    2005-01-01

    On the occasion of taking over the responsibility of Editor-in-Chief from Keith Burnett I feel privileged to thank Keith on behalf of us, the readers and authors, for his excellent work and commitment to Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B). He has led the journal through a time of change for the atomic, molecular and optical community with the advent and rapid development of ultracold atomic physics. This has brought the atomic/molecular physics and quantum optics community closer together than ever before. J. Phys. B will respond to this development to serve you, the readers and authors who form this community, even better in the future. In addition to ultracold atomic physics, novel light sources which combine synchrotron and laser pulse properties, i.e. microscopic spatial and temporal resolution, will also spark innovative AMO research. This also applies to collisions, which may enjoy a renaissance when realized in trap environments or in the presence of powerful high-frequency radiation. In parallel with a quickly changing scientific environment, we live and work in a time of change regarding the dissemination of our research due to the new tools and possibilities of the internet. As the new scientific Editor-in-Chief I ask for your trust and input to master the challenge between tradition and innovation so that J. Phys. B can continue to offer a high-quality publication and an excellent service to all scientists who do research in atomic, molecular and optical physics.

  20. Appropriate roles for the subscriber, publisher, editor, author, and reviewer in the archives of plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2013-11-01

    Authors, editors and reviewers, publishers, and subscribers all play their role in scientific journals. These 5 stakeholders are essential to journals. In this paper, firstly, I briefly summarize the role of each journal stakeholder and their respective goals. Secondly, the status of each participant in the Archives of Plastic Surgery is described. Finally, I propose an appropriate role and plan for each of them. Specific roles and responsibilities include the following: subscribers should welcome and submit the critiques of published papers in letters to the editor. Publishers should trust editors and provide them with adequate financial support for ongoing quality improvement of the journal. The editor-in-chief should be given a sufficient period of time-several years-to build up journal quality and train the incoming editor. The editors, including section editors, are also responsible for increasing the author pool. One editor might be designated a 'devil's referee', that is, a kind of devil's advocate with the responsibility of examining the originality of the manuscript, taking a skeptical view of the manuscript, and looking for holes in the methods and results of reported experiments. Authors' responsibilities include submitting manuscripts with scientific integrity and being ready to take responsibility for their articles even long after publication. Finally, reviewers' responsibilities include identifying similar articles not cited. Reviewers are also welcome to write a discussion on the article they review. PMID:24286037

  1. Adolescent Sexual Initiation through the Lens of Letters to the Editor Published in Polish Teenage Magazines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacz, Marek S.; Bajka-Kopacz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called "advice columns," often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published in Polish…

  2. Letter to the editor of TAAP, in response to letter from Anders et al.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology: We would like to address the letter to the editor submitted by Anders et al. regarding the substantive issues raised regarding our paper "Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physi...

  3. Adolescent Sexual Initiation through the Lens of Letters to the Editor Published in Polish Teenage Magazines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacz, Marek S.; Bajka-Kopacz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called "advice columns," often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published in Polish

  4. Editorial Page Editors and Endorsements: Chain-owned vs. Independent Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Dizier, Byron

    Questionnaires were sent to 114 of the 228 editorial page editors at newspapers in the United States with daily circulations greater than 50,000 for a study that compared (1) the editor-publisher relationship existing at chains to that found at independent papers, and (2) the 1984 presidential endorsements made by chains to those by independent

  5. "Clones," Codes, and Conflicts of Interest in Cartooning: Cartoonists and Editors Look at Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel; And Others

    A study examined differences between political cartoonists and op-ed page editors on both traditional ethical issues (such as conflicts of interest) and the special, style-related concerns of editorial cartoonists. Hypotheses proposed were that editors and cartoonists (1) would condemn "cloning" or copying, reflecting an ethical principle…

  6. Editorial Page Editors and Endorsements: Chain-owned vs. Independent Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Dizier, Byron

    Questionnaires were sent to 114 of the 228 editorial page editors at newspapers in the United States with daily circulations greater than 50,000 for a study that compared (1) the editor-publisher relationship existing at chains to that found at independent papers, and (2) the 1984 presidential endorsements made by chains to those by independent…

  7. A "Situational" and "Coorientational" Measure of Specialized Magazine Editors' Perceptions of Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Dennis W.

    A study was undertaken of specialized magazine editors' perceptions of audience characteristics as well as the perceived role of their publications. Specifically, the study examines the relationship between the editors' perceptions of reader problem recognition, level of involvement, constraint recognition, and possession of reference criteria and…

  8. Magazine Article Placement: How Editors, Regular Contributors, and Novice Writers Rate Query Letters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    About 350,000 freelance magazine articles were purchased by magazine editors last year from the 22,000 freelancers and 225,000 would-be freelancers in the United States. A study examined the factors editors judge most important in selecting freelance magazine article proposals, using factor analysis and qualitative examination of persuasive…

  9. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  10. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  11. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  12. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  13. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  14. An International Call for Democratizing the Academic Journal Culture from a Community of Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Pryor, Caroline R.; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Harris, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    In our reflective essay from our multiple perspectives as journal editors, peer reviewers, and published authors, we present ideas about editorial support, democracy, and innovation in the publishing process. As four tenured professors who work in universities in the states of Illinois, Virginia, Texas, and Kentucky, we are a community of editors

  15. Debunking the Mutilated Boy: A Study of Newspaper Editors and an Inflammatory Rumor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lee

    A study examined how newspaper editors resolve issues relating to rumors--that is whether to cover stories which may turn out to be false. The "mutilated boy" rumor was chosen for its antiquity and endurance, its powerful theme, and its ability to create intense anxiety in a community. Thirty-three of the 86 editors who responded to the…

  16. EDITORIAL: A word from the new Editor-in-Chief A word from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    TIn the autumn of 2010 I became the Editor-in Chief of European Journal of Physics (EJP). EJP is a place for teachers, instructors and professors to exchange their views on teaching physics at university level and share their experience. It is general opinion that no good research is possible without connection with good, high-quality teaching, at the university level in particular. Therefore excellence in physics teaching is important to the physics community. European Journal of Physics is proud of its contribution to achieving this goal. As Editor-in-Chief, I will continue to work to this general objective of the journal. We will publish articles on specific topics in physics, stressing originality of presentation and suitability for use in students'laboratories, lectures and physics teaching in general. We will also publish more pedagogical papers presenting the achievements of particular teaching methods. In addition, we will continue to publish special sections on particular areas of physics, as well as the annual special section on physics competitions. European Journal of Physics is in good shape. Due to the work of the previous editors and the publisher, the readership is high and growing steadily, and many excellent papers are being submitted and published. I hope that this positive trend for the journal will continue, and I will do my best to keep to this high standard. A few words about myself. I work in the Institute of Physics in Warsaw, Poland. My main research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and I have published about 80 research papers on this topic. For many years I was involved in teaching physics at university and in high school. I am a co-author of a textbook on physics for high-school students and of a problem book in quantum mechanics. For the last ten years, I have been involved in the International Physics Olympiad and over the last few years I have been a member of the Editorial Board of European Journal of Physics.

  17. Observing with HST II: A New Graphical Program Editor for RPS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Roman, A.; Asson, D.

    1995-12-01

    During HST's 5th observing cycle, the Remote Proposal Submission System (RPS2) significantly improved the observing program development process. RPS2 will continue to provide insight into the schedulability windows, detailed timing, and feasibility of an observing program. For cycle 6, two major capabilities have been added to RPS2, a graphical program editor and support for coordinated parallel observations. The program editor was developed to simplify the program preparation process. A major feature of this editor is to prevent observers from entering incorrect specifications, thus reducing the amount of program editing required. This is accomplished by providing a menu-based graphical editor. Many of the program editor's menus not only provide lists of valid selections, but also lists of invalid selections with explanations describing why the selection is invalid. RPS2 will also support coordinated parallel observations. These observations significantly increase the science return by allowing observers to use two of HST's science instruments simultaneously.

  18. Novel High Efficiency Microcolumnar LuI3:Ce for Hard X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Z.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Miller, Stuart R.; Brecher, Charles; Bhandari, Harish B.; Kenesei, Peter; Ross, Stephen K.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Singh, Bipin

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a structured scintillator using a vacuum deposition technique that is suitable for manufacturing large area scintillators in a microcolumnar form. While providing high absorption efficiency, it also allows great temporal and spatial resolution X-ray imaging. Microcolumnar films of extremely fast and bright cerium-doped lutetium iodide (LuI3:Ce) scintillator were synthesized. It has high density (~5.6 g/cm3), high effective atomic number (59.7), bright green emission (540 nm range, well matched to commercial optics and CCD sensors), light yield exceeding 115,000 ph/MeV, and rapid, afterglow-free decay (~28 ns). This new scintillator could resolve the 153 ns bunch structure of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Due to the fast, afterglow-free decay, and high efficiency of LuI3:Ce, during the experiments performed at the 1-ID hard X-ray beamline at the APS, single 65 keV X-ray photons could be resolved with high signal-to-noise ratio and with temporal resolution better than 20ns. In the future, it will enable a wide range of hard X-ray (20 keV to 100 keV) imaging and/or high frame-rate applications such as dynamic studies of the structural and electrochemical properties of batteries using microtomographic X-ray imaging, internal corrosion in fuel cells, and time-resolved muscle diffraction experiments.

  19. Presence of Oxyodontherium (Macraucheniidae, Litopterna) in the Río Quinto Formation, San Luis (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, Esperanza; Chiesa, Jorge; Ojeda, Guillermo

    2008-03-01

    This paper deals with the new mammal remains from the Río Quinto Formation, found at the Arroyo La Petra locality (San Luis, Argentina). They consist of an incomplete skull and two mandibular fragments of a macraucheniid, both with milk dentition and M1/m1 erupting, corresponding to a very young individual. Morfometrical characteristics of the specimens allow their identification as Oxyodontherium zeballosi and provide the first cranial data for this species. The holotype of this species is considered a juvenile individual. We maintain a conservative position in maintaining O. zeballosi as a valid species though based on juvenile specimens. However, a full systematic revision of the Family Macraucheniidae is needed to verify the validity and phylogenetic relationships of the taxa included in it. The identification of O. zeballosi indicates a late Miocene age for the fossiliferous level, which implies a cronoestratigraphic extension of the Río Quinto Formation, thus far considered as Pliocene in age. In addition, the presence of Oxyodontherium in San Luis Province increases the geographical distribution of this macrauchenid, whose record previously was limited to Miocene outcrops of the Paraná River (Entre Ríos Province). Its presence in the Mio-Pliocene beds of Uruguay is very doubtful because it is based on a metapodial.

  20. THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Shrestha, Biva; Palanisamy, Giri; Hook, Leslie A; Killeffer, Terri S; Boden, Thomas A; Cook, Robert B; Zolly, Lisa; Hutchison, Viv; Frame, Mike; Cialella, Alice; Lazer, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register their datasets to the NGEE data archive and allows the NGEE archive to publish these datasets via a data search portal (http://ngee.ornl.gov/data). These highly descriptive metadata created using OME allows the Archive to enable advanced data search options using keyword, geo-spatial, temporal and ontology filters. Similarly, ARM OME allows scientists or principal investigators (PIs) to submit their data products to the ARM data archive. How would OME help Big Data Centers like the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC)? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological, geological, and chemical components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the NGEE and ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and interoperability. Useful Links: USGS OME: http://mercury.ornl.gov/OME/ NGEE OME: http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov/ngeemetadata/ ARM OME: http://archive2.ornl.gov/armome/ Contact: Ranjeet Devarakonda (devarakondar@ornl.gov) References: [1] Federal Geographic Data Committee. Content standard for digital geospatial metadata. Federal Geographic Data Committee, 1998. [2] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system." Earth Science Informatics 3.1-2 (2010): 87-94. [3] Wilson, B. E., Palanisamy, G., Devarakonda, R., Rhyne, B. T., Lindsley, C., & Green, J. (2010). Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata. [4] Pouchard, L. C., Branstetter, M. L., Cook, R. B., Devarakonda, R., Green, J., Palanisamy, G., ... & Noy, N. F. (2013). A Linked Science investigation: enhancing climate change data discovery with semantic technologies. Earth science informatics, 6(3), 175-185.

  1. The New Online Metadata Editor for Generating Structured Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, R.; Shrestha, B.; Palanisamy, G.; Hook, L.; Killeffer, T.; Boden, T.; Cook, R. B.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Frame, M. T.; Cialella, A. T.; Lazer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nobody is better suited to "describe" data than the scientist who created it. This "description" about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [1] [2]. Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. How is OME helping Big Data Centers like ORNL DAAC? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the ESDIS Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and interoperability.References:[1] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system." Earth Science Informatics 3.1-2 (2010): 87-94. [2] Wilson, Bruce E., et al. "Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata." NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) (2010).

  2. Training the unseasoned technical writer-editor: From the trainee's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Many unseasoned technical writer-editors who are not adequately trained may become seasoned inadequately trained technical writer-editors. This problem can occur when a trainee is involved in an ineffective training program, but it can be alleviated by the trainer's assessing the unseasoned writer's talents, becoming involved with the trainee's growth in writing and editing skills, and helping him to visualize his potential as a technical writer-editor. Assessment, support, mentoring, and nurturing are important elements in the trainee's growth process and in any good training or internship program. 1 ref.

  3. Una Vida de Esperanza (A Life of Hope). Out of Poverty and Violence Comes the Poetry of Luis Rodriguez.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, Sara, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Explores the childhood and adolescence of the Hispanic American poet Luis Rodriguez, who grew up in Los Angeles (California) and was involved in gangs with other children of Mexican immigrants. Rodriguez's autobiography is offered so that adolescents, including his own son, may learn from his experience. (SLD)

  4. More than Meets the Eye: Adult Education for Critical Consciousness in Luis Camnitzer's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana Carlina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness through the conceptual art of Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework grounding this research was critical public pedagogy, influenced by both critical theory and Stuart Hall's systems of representation (1997). This framework…

  5. Happiness Is Bilingual Education for the Children in the San Luis Valley Schools, School Year 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Luis Valley Board of Cooperative Services, Alamosa, CO.

    The San Luis Valley Bilingual Bicultural Program was begun in 10 schools at the kindergarten level. Each year the next higher grade was to be implemented until the program was in existence from K-4. During 1972-73, there were 1,092 kindergarten and first grade children and 86 teaching staff participating in the program. Its primary goal was…

  6. Master Mentors: Linda Golian-Lui University of Hawaii-Hilo--George Oberle George Mason University, VA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Many movers and shakers inspire admiration and even awe, but those who inspire love are the mentors who have changed lives. That is why many grateful librarians nominated Linda Golian-Lui and George Oberle. Both of them were accidental librarians, work-study students whose supervisors encouraged them to become paraprofessionals, and then…

  7. 78 FR 16569 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC, Permian Basin Railways, and San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Corporate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC, Permian Basin Railways, and San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption-- Massachusetts Coastal Railroad, LLC Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC (IPH), its wholly...

  8. Differences and Commonalities: Farmer Stratifications in the San Luis Valley Research/Extension Project Area. ARE Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Jerry B.

    A research project in the San Luis Valley of Colorado sought to isolate a few unique farm types that could become target groups for the design and implementation of agricultural research and extension programs. Questionnaires were completed by 44 of 65 farmers in one watershed area of Conejos County. Analysis revealed a complex pattern of…

  9. Master Mentors: Linda Golian-Lui University of Hawaii-Hilo--George Oberle George Mason University, VA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Many movers and shakers inspire admiration and even awe, but those who inspire love are the mentors who have changed lives. That is why many grateful librarians nominated Linda Golian-Lui and George Oberle. Both of them were accidental librarians, work-study students whose supervisors encouraged them to become paraprofessionals, and then

  10. Scientist as detective: Luis Alvarez and the pyramid burial chambers, the JFK assassination, and the end of the dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Charles G.

    2007-11-01

    Luis Alvarez (1911-1988) was one of the most brilliant and productive experimental physicists of the twentieth century. His investigations of three mysteries, all of them outside his normal areas of research, show what remarkable things a far-ranging imagination working with an immense store of knowledge can accomplish.

  11. Anomalous Representations of Reality in Luis Valdez's "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saborio, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Luis Valdez creates anomalous realities in two of his plays, "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer," in order to defy dominant expressions of reality as well as classifications of "Chicano" and "Mexican." The anomalous realities, represented primarily by a bodiless head in the first play and an eighty-four-year-old Yaqui…

  12. Reducing Seismic Hazards Through Local Geologic Review, San Luis Obispo County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, L. I.

    2005-12-01

    San Luis Obispo County is located on the California coastline midway between the large metropolitan areas of Los Angeles and San Francisco. Until the early 1990s, San Luis Obispo was mainly rural and believed to have a lower seismic hazard compared to Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay area. Economic growth in the middle 1990s caused the county to grow nearly 30 percent in 5 years, with new residents emigrating from Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay area. Local government had vague geologic report requirements. Hence, the quality of reports submitted to the County was poor. Two events changed this: first, the County established a new County Geologist position and program; second, the 2003 M6.5 San Simeon earthquake made the general public greatly aware of the seismic risks in their own backyard. Through stringent peer-review, the County Geologist program has reduced seismic losses by requiring detailed engineering geologic reports based on guidelines outlined in the California Geological Survey's Special Publication 117. In addition, in-depth liquefaction studies are required in the community of Oceano, where liquefaction was previously unknown, but revealed in the San Simeon earthquake. Other improvements in seismic hazard characterization include trenching late Quaternary faults, using probabilistic estimates of ground motion, and recognition of enhanced ground shaking in basins and along ridgetops. The success of the County Geologist program was based on several factors: hiring a local geologist with expertise in seismic hazards, support of the County's decision-makers, and cooperative technical studies with the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Geological Survey, CalTrans, and the California Coastal Commission. Some resistance was initially from the land development community, but was resolved by applying policy fairly and uniformly. Thus, standard-of-practice in seismic hazard characterization in San Luis Obispo County is closer to that of the urban parts of state. Local governments should consider creating their own geologic review program, but should be aware of the time and consensus-building involved to create a successful effort. Most importantly, the new program should enact and enforce the most detailed and current guidelines immediately. Subsequent efforts to "raise the bar" become increasing difficult. However, the payoff of increasing public safety and improved knowledge of local seismic hazards make geologic review programs worthwhile.

  13. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; TerBerg, R.; Borglin, S.E.

    2001-06-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems which may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to the groundwater; increased exposure to the biota; and reduced productivity of farm crops. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through November 2000, as well as the results of these investigations.

  14. CONTRIBUTIONS TO RICKETTSIOSES RESEARCH IN COLOMBIA (1917-1943), LUIS B. PATIÑO CAMARGO.

    PubMed

    Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Botero-García, Carlos A; Hidalgo, Marylin

    2016-01-01

    Colombian physician Luis Benigno Patiño Camargo was one of the pioneers in the study of rickettsioses in South America, demonstrating for the first time in Colombia the presence of Rickettsia rickettsii as the etiological agent of a highly deadly exanthematic febrile syndrome in the 1930s. However, Patiño-Camargo performed other investigations from 1917-1943, which represent the first descriptions and scientific evidence of the presence ofR. prowazekii and R. typhi in Colombia. Almost 60 years after the latest research conducted by Dr. Patiño-Camargo, rickettsioses were again a matter of interest and research. In the last decade over 20 research studies have been published, showing new endemic areas forR. rickettsii, as well as the description of new rickettsial species in Colombia. PMID:27074327

  15. CONTRIBUTIONS TO RICKETTSIOSES RESEARCH IN COLOMBIA (1917-1943), LUIS B. PATIÑO CAMARGO

    PubMed Central

    FACCINI-MARTÍNEZ, Álvaro A.; BOTERO-GARCÍA, Carlos A.; HIDALGO, Marylin

    2016-01-01

    Colombian physician Luis Benigno Patiño Camargo was one of the pioneers in the study of rickettsioses in South America, demonstrating for the first time in Colombia the presence of Rickettsia rickettsii as the etiological agent of a highly deadly exanthematic febrile syndrome in the 1930s. However, Patiño-Camargo performed other investigations from 1917-1943, which represent the first descriptions and scientific evidence of the presence of R. prowazekii and R. typhi in Colombia. Almost 60 years after the latest research conducted by Dr. Patiño-Camargo, rickettsioses were again a matter of interest and research. In the last decade over 20 research studies have been published, showing new endemic areas for R. rickettsii, as well as the description of new rickettsial species in Colombia. PMID:27074327

  16. Labor attributes and strategies: the case of tomato workers in san luis potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Maria Isabel Mora

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the economic crisis in the 1980s that affected Mexico and the rest of Latin America, official policies encouraged commercial agriculture, especially the cultivation of export crops. During that period, women's entry into the paid labor market accelerated. For many women in rural areas, this meant widening opportunities for participation and a chance not only to help their families, but also to look for a partner, earn their own money, and "see the world." This article analyzes the incorporation of women into the tomato agro-industry in the Altiplano region of el Valle de Arista, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. It discusses the strategies that women workers use-physical appearance, experience, and efficiency-as characteristics that are "required" in order to stay in this highly competitive, segmented, and precarious labor market. PMID:21342870

  17. Diffusion Coefficients of a Non-Linear Astrophysical Process: Luis Carrasco's Scientific (and other) Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, L. A.

    2009-11-01

    The Luis Carrasco phenomenon in Astrophysics is a widespread event that has appeared in many branches of theoretical and observational Astronomy, as well as in astronomical instrumentation. It is an ubiquitous and highly non-linear effect with multiple coupling constants. To understand it, it is necessary to dwell, not only into many areas of Astronomy, but of human culture and knowledge in general. Some authors believe that it is only through the ``many-worlds'' interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, that this effect can be understood. In this work, we will demonstrate its fractal nature, present a panoramic view of this global effect, and estimate its diffusion coefficients in the regular and irregular regimes. Connections with areas outside Astronomy will be shown.

  18. The Technical Editor and the Non-Native Speaker of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leki, Ilona

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes current views of second-language acquisition, focusing on the types and origins of the problems of nonnative technical writers. Offers suggestions to help editors avoid or alleviate the problems. (PRA)

  19. Science publishing: A day in the life of an APS editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    I will share my experience in working as an editor for a scholarly journal. The talk will include information on my career path, the skills and qualifications needed, and give insight into my day-to-day activities

  20. Genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in San Luis Potosí, México

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although epidemiologic and socioeconomic criteria and biomedical risk factors indicate high-priority for tuberculosis (TB) control in Mexico, molecular epidemiology studies of the disease in the country are scarce. Methods Complete sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained from 248 of the 432 pulmonary TB (PTB) cases confirmed from 2006 to 2010 on the population under epidemiological surveillance in the state of San Luis Potosí, México. From most PTB cases with complete data Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates were recovered and their spoligotypes, lineages and families, geographic distribution and drug resistance determined. Results Pulmonary tuberculosis incidence ranged from 2.4 to 33.4 (cases per 100,000 inhabitants) in the six state sanitary jurisdictions that were grouped in regions of low (jurisdictions I-II-III), intermediate (jurisdictions IV-V) and high incidence (jurisdiction VI) with 6.2, 17.3 and 33.4 rates, respectively. Most patients were poor, 50-years-median-age males and housewives. Among the 237 MTC spoligotyped isolates, 232 corresponded to M. tuberculosis (104 spoligotypes in 24 clusters) and five to M. bovis. The predominant Euro-American lineage was distributed all over the state, the East-Asian lineage (Beijing family) in the capital city, the Indo-Oceanic (Manila family) in eastern localities, and M. bovis in rural localities. Conclusions In San Luis Potosí TB affects mainly poor male adults and is caused by M. tuberculosis and to a minor extent by M. bovis. There is great genotypic diversity among M. tuberculosis strains, the Euro-American lineage being much more prevalent than the Indo-Oceanic and East-Asian lineages. The frequency of resistant strains is relatively low and not associated to any particular lineage. PMID:23635381

  1. EDITORIAL: Message from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R.

    2005-01-01

    On 1 January 2005 I become Editor-in-Chief of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. I look forward to assisting contributors, referees and the Board in maintaining the high standards of this international journal, whose bibliometric impact factor has consistently matched or exceeded that of other journals in the field. The robust, good health of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion reflects that of its user communities. With a decision to proceed to the construction of ITER apparently imminent, magnetic confinement fusion research is preparing to take a major step forwards. A new generation of laser-plasma interaction facilities for inertial fusion research is also rising at key sites around the world. Technical progress in our field is underpinned by scientific excellence, and the publication of results in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion will, I hope, continue to play its part. The journal will continue to offer the benefits of refereeing by two experts, combined with the rapid turnaround achieved by the highly efficient editorial office at the Institute of Physics Publishing in Bristol. Looking elsewhere, there may be opportunities for gentle incremental broadening of the scientific scope of the journal, in the medium term. One looks in particular to those branches of plasma physics that, in recent years, have become more strongly represented in the series of conferences organized by the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society. The recent special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) B1--592) provides an indication. Finally, it is a pleasure to thank my predecessor, Professor Ian Hutchinson of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for handing on his role with the journal in such promising condition.

  2. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the 13 years since it was first published the "Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals" (the Vancouver style), developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, has been widely accepted by both authors and editors; over 400 journals have stated that they will consider manuscripts that conform to its requirements. This is the fourth edition of the "Uniform requirements." PMID:8287338

  3. SEQGEL: a versatile and comfortable DNA editor which supports a special keyboard and a speech synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Brglin, T R

    1986-06-01

    A DNA editor for an Apple II is described which contains many additional functions apart from just editing sequences. The data files are normal ASCII text or binary files and can thus be used easily by other programs. The program supports a special keyboard which greatly facilitates typing of DNA sequences. Furthermore a speech synthesizer is supported by the editor. The speech feedback, together with the special keyboard, reduces typing errors to a minimum. PMID:3450366

  4. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    As I begin my tenure as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM), I look upon this opportunity as both an honour and a real challenge. The journal is in great shape thanks to the work of my predecessors, Marshall Stoneham and David Ferry. The journal's solid reputation is based largely on the work these gentlemen have done over the past decade. The other main reason for the success of JPCM is the amazing staff in Bristol; keep up the good work, please. When discussing the journal with scientists from all corners of the globe, one thing is always mentioned—JPCM is a very reliable journal with well-written, high-quality papers, and a fast but rigorous peer-review process that provides fair, detailed and constructive referee reports for the benefit of authors. This is due almost entirely to our great authors and referees; we rely on them every day—thank you. As the new Editor-in-Chief I hope to continue to improve still further the journal's status in condensed matter science. As mentioned above, our reputation is excellent, but the reality is that we live in a world of bibliometrics and rankings. Over the past few years JPCM has been repositioned as a journal at the forefront of condensed matter physics, and the impact of the journal should increase further as a result of continued emphasis on commissioning in cutting-edge areas identified by the Editorial Board and the journal team. In addition to regular papers, JPCM has a number of other content streams that authors and readers can benefit from. Fast track communications (FTCs) offer exceptionally fast publication for work of the highest impact and urgency. By their select nature, FTCs benefit from personal treatment by the Editorial Board and the average receipt-to-first-decision time is just 11 days (the average receipt-to-publication time is just 45 days). Topical reviews in JPCM make the journal one of the most authoritative sources of review content for condensed matter physics. Different from a traditional review, these can highlight emerging areas in the field, alerting our readers to new opportunities. Topical reviews can also serve to highlight experimental tools that can assist researchers. Special issues are a compilation of invited papers on a selected topic from authors selected by guest editors and approved by the Editorial Board. This concentration of high-quality, original papers draws attention to all the papers in a special issue. These issues should not be considered as conference proceedings, and all papers go through our excellent review procedures and must comply with the usual strict criteria applied to regular papers in JPCM. Expanding these programs will be a high priority of mine. Other mechanisms that will draw attention to the journal and individual papers include the use of multimedia, our annual highlights compilation, our excellent web presence and the introduction of open-access articles. Authors can also benefit from extra promotion of their work via LabTalk, IOP Select and personalized 'recommended reader' campaigns. A challenge for JPCM is to ensure that it is at the forefront in terms of online tools and article presentation. The first step has been taken with the introduction of 'article evolution'—an enhanced HTML for all articles that will provide a new and interactive user experience for the benefit of our authors and readers (for further information, visit iopscience.iop.org/info/page/articleevolution). Many new features are available, such as being able to zoom in and out of images and export them to Powerpoint. MathJax technology has been incorporated, improving the rendering of mathematics, and a mobile view of abstract and article pages is also available. This format will be developed on an ongoing basis in response to the demands of the community. I therefore encourage you to contact me, or the journal team, with any feedback you may have regarding this new article format and how it can be improved. Finally, as mentioned above, a great deal of our success depends on our readers and authors. I hope that you continue to see JPCM as a great resource and that you consider the journal in your research on a daily basis.

  5. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As a journal that reports advances in atomic, molecular and optical science (AMO), Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) provides the AMO research community with three unique fora: topical reviews, tutorials and special issues. Developed under the leadership of editor Jan Michael Rost and his Editorial Board, these sections have cemented J. Phys. B's reputation as a major journal showcasing the AMO community's advances. For me, an AMO scientist, it is therefore a special pleasure to be entrusted with continuing the tradition of excellence established by Jan Michael and the Editorial Board. I intend to build on this foundation by ensuring that the journal makes full use of these tools. Topical reviews: a unique focus When J. Phys. B becomes the first journal you turn to for initial reviews about important emerging areas in your field, we as an Editorial Board will have succeeded. To us, a topical review is different from a traditional review—a topical review focuses on emerging sub-fields of AMO physics. Its function is to alert and educate our readers about emerging opportunities. Topical reviews can also serve a closely related function for readers: keeping us up-to-date with critical technologies that lie slightly outside our own fields, such as advances in free-electron lasers science, (which will surely affect our field). Our overall goal is to make your research more productive because of the topical reviews you read within the journal. Tutorials J. Phys. B tutorials are aimed at graduate students or researchers venturing into a new field. Just as in my own research group I encourage all graduate students to write their theses in a way that will be useful to both future graduate students and the larger community beyond my group, J. Phys. B has designed tutorials to fill this function on the journal scale. Thus, tutorial authors are able to write in greater depth than can be included in a paper in nature, science or in the regular pages of J. Phys. B. Often a professor and student will collaborate on a tutorial while the student is writing a thesis. Our challenge as an Editorial Board is to identify the most important topics and most talented authors for such tutorials. Special issues Authors find it uniquely appealing to publish in J. Phys. B special issues, because these issues feature a concentration of papers on a selected topic. This concentration draws attention to all papers in the special issue. However, a special issue never takes over the entire publication, and all J. Phys. B special issue articles are reviewed in the usual way. As an Editorial Board, we will look for emerging sub-fields which have reached a level of maturity that would benefit from a special issue. Suggestions from you, our colleagues As an AMO scientist, I myself am widely informed about my own speciality of attosecond science, but not necessarily up-to-date on emerging advances in other AMO specialities. The Editorial Board and I need your suggestions for special issues, for topical reviews, for tutorials, and for how we can improve J. Phys. B further still. So please email your suggestions, backed by your explanation of why the sub-field is important. Although we cannot guarantee that we will accept all suggestions, I do promise that the Editorial Board will seriously consider every one of them. J. Phys. B's publication process Producing a regular publication is an arduous process. It is the staff who carry out the day-to-day processes on which reliable production depends. They see that your paper is reviewed and published quickly. They are dedicated to serving your specialized needs. The editor's and the Board's role is to serve as a conduit: we help the staff understand the specialized needs of the science community and help the science community to understand the specialized nature of publishing. Looking ahead to my five years as editor, I hope they will be as successful as those of my predecessor, Jan Michael Rost. Jan Michael has steered the journal through the many changes that have occurred in scientific publishing in recent years. While every scientific journal searches for new ways to better-serve its readers, J. Phys. B has developed unique services that can make us scientists more productive. That is the highest accolade I can possibly give to Jan Michael as I begin to build on the strong foundation that he has put in place.

  6. Avogadro: an advanced semantic chemical editor, visualization, and analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Avogadro project has developed an advanced molecule editor and visualizer designed for cross-platform use in computational chemistry, molecular modeling, bioinformatics, materials science, and related areas. It offers flexible, high quality rendering, and a powerful plugin architecture. Typical uses include building molecular structures, formatting input files, and analyzing output of a wide variety of computational chemistry packages. By using the CML file format as its native document type, Avogadro seeks to enhance the semantic accessibility of chemical data types. Results The work presented here details the Avogadro library, which is a framework providing a code library and application programming interface (API) with three-dimensional visualization capabilities; and has direct applications to research and education in the fields of chemistry, physics, materials science, and biology. The Avogadro application provides a rich graphical interface using dynamically loaded plugins through the library itself. The application and library can each be extended by implementing a plugin module in C++ or Python to explore different visualization techniques, build/manipulate molecular structures, and interact with other programs. We describe some example extensions, one which uses a genetic algorithm to find stable crystal structures, and one which interfaces with the PackMol program to create packed, solvated structures for molecular dynamics simulations. The 1.0 release series of Avogadro is the main focus of the results discussed here. Conclusions Avogadro offers a semantic chemical builder and platform for visualization and analysis. For users, it offers an easy-to-use builder, integrated support for downloading from common databases such as PubChem and the Protein Data Bank, extracting chemical data from a wide variety of formats, including computational chemistry output, and native, semantic support for the CML file format. For developers, it can be easily extended via a powerful plugin mechanism to support new features in organic chemistry, inorganic complexes, drug design, materials, biomolecules, and simulations. Avogadro is freely available under an open-source license from http://avogadro.openmolecules.net. PMID:22889332

  7. Introduction to the Special Collection of Papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: A Methodology for Evaluating Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, descripti...

  8. CHAIRMEN'S PREFACE AND EDITORS' NOTE: Unification of Fundamental Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Lars; Nilsson, Jan S.; Salomonson, Per; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

    1987-01-01

    Chairmen's PrefaceIn 1984 we obtained a grant from the Nobel Foundation to organize a Nobel Symposium on "Unification of the Fundamental Interactions". In our proposal which we submitted in the fall of 1983 we stated that we wanted to cover the various attempts to unification such as GUT'S, supergravity, Kaluza-Klein theories and superstrings. What has happened in particle physics since then is already history. With the realization that certain superstring theories could be anomaly free, it became clear that these models could encompass earlier attempts to unification as well as solving the fundamental problem of quantum gravity. The excitement that some of us had felt for some time now spread through most of the particle physics community and this excitement certainly was evident during the Symposium. With the international advisory committee we originally chose a list of around 30 invitees which could best represent the various subjects listed above. When it came to the final planning of the programme essentially all talks dealt with superstrings! We were very fortunate that almost all of the invitees managed to come to the Symposium. From the western world only three were unable to participate, André Neveu, Steven Weinberg and Bruno Zumino. We certainly missed them during the meeting. We were particularly happy that Stephen Hawking managed to take part actively. Our real problem was to get participants from the Soviet Union. Out of eight invitations only one came through. We were very happy to have Renata Kallosh, who really did her utmost to enlighten us about not only her own work but also about recent progress in the USSR, However, we were very sorry that in spite of all our letters, telegrammes and endless attempts to get telephone calls through and despite the good relations between the Swedish and Soviet Academies of Sciences we had to miss Ludwig Faddeev, Valodja Gribov, Andrej Linde, Victor Ogievetsky, Sasha Polyakov, Misha Shifman and Arkadij Vainshtein. We had hoped that the Nobel Symposium should be a signal for improved relations between East and West, but in this respect we failed. The Symposium was held in the small town of Marstrand, a summer resort on an island outside Göteborg. The idea was to have it relatively close to home and to show the participants perhaps the best part of the local nature. Another motive was to keep the participants semi-isolated to provide ample time for discussions. With the somewhat heavy programme we found that even so, the days were not long enough. This Symposium was the second Nobel Symposium on elementary particle physics. The first one, also organized by our group, was held in 1968. We hope and believe that the next one need not be awaited another 18 years! The Symposium was made possible by a generous grant from the Nobel Foundation. An additional grant from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences was also essential. A grant from Nordita made it possible to invite some ten Nordic observers. We also gratefully acknowledge help with the organization of the Symposium from the city of Goteborg, the city of Kungälv, Volvo, Skandinaviska Enskilda banken, Ericsson AB and IBM Sweden. We thank all the participants for all their efforts, to come to our remote part of the world, to give excellent talks, to write up their talks astonishingly quickly and to share with us so much of their knowledge and expertise. Last but not least we are indebted to the members of the organizing committee, members of the group and the secretarial staff. Goteborg, August 1986 Editors' NoteIn these Proceedings the lectures are given in the order of their oral presentation at the Symposium. Regrettably, a few contributors could not participate (V. Gribov, A. Linde, V. Ogievetsky, M. Shifman and A. M. Polyakov). Their contributions have been placed close to the end of the Proceedings. As these authors did not have the opportunity of correcting the proofs, responsibility for printing errors must rest with the Editors. It is a pleasure to thank all the authors for their enthusiastic and rapid response in our efforts to bring the contributions to the stage of printing. Without the efficient and fruitful collaboration with Physica Scripta the publication of these Proceedings would have been substantially delayed.

  9. Pliocene and Pleistocene geologic and climatic evolution in the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, K.L.; Larson, E.E.; Smith, G.; Katzman, D.; Smith, G.R.; Cerling, T.; Wang, Y.; Baker, R.G.; Lohmann, K.C.; Repenning, C.A.; Patterson, P.; Mackie, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sediments of the Alamosa Formation spanning the upper part of the Gauss and most of the Matuyama Chrons were recovered by coring in the high (2300 m) San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado. The study site is located at the northern end of the Rio Grande rift. Lithologic changes in the core sediments provide evidence of events leading to integration of the San Luis drainage basin into the Rio Grande. The section, which includes the Huckleberry Ridge Ash (2.02 Ma) and spans the entire Matuyama Chron, contains pollen, and invertebrate and vertebrate fossils. Stable isotope analyses of inorganic and biogenic carbonate taken over most of the core indicate substantially warmer temperatures than occur today in the San Luis Valley. At the end of the Olduvai Subchron, summer precipitation decreased, summer pan evaporation increased, and temperatures increased slightly compared to the earlier climate represented in the core. By the end of the Jaramillo Subchron, however, cold/wet and warm/dry cycles become evident and continue into the cold/wet regime associated with the deep-sea oxygen-isotope Stage 22 glaciation previously determined from outcrops at the same locality. Correspondence between the Hansen Bluff climatic record and the deep-sea oxygen-isotope record (oxygen-isotope stages from about 110-18) is apparent, indicating that climate at Hansen Bluff was responding to global climatic changes. ?? 1992.

  10. [The relevance of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) for medical publishing and research].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Humberto B

    2014-01-01

    The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors is a leading independent institution providing guidance for the report of biomedical research and health related topics in medical journals. Established in 1978, it is currently constituted by editors of fourteen general medical journals from different countries, plus one representative for the US National Library of Medicine and one representative for the World Association of Biomedical Journal Editors. Since 1978 the Committee provides a document, originally named "Uniform Requirements…", "to help authors, editors, and others involved in peer review and biomedical publishing create and distribute accurate, clear, unbiased medical journal articles". This document has been updated several times and the last version was released in August 2013, now renamed "Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals", available in www.icmje.org and citable as "ICMJE Recommendations". A vast proportion of medical journals, worldwide, have adopted these recommendations as rules. The ICMJE discusses and provides guidance on several relevant aspects including criteria on authorship, peer review, scientific misconduct, conflicts of interest, clinical trials registration, good editorial practices, the relations between editors and journal owners, the protection of individuals subject to medical research, the solvency of electronic publications, among others. The 2013 ICMJE Annual Meeting took place in Santiago, Chile, in November 4 and 5. The photograph shows attendants to the final session. PMID:24861118

  11. US health journal editors' opinions and policies on research in race, ethnicity, and health.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, T.; Bhopal, R.

    1998-01-01

    Health research on race and ethnicity has been criticized for lacking rigor in conceptualization, terminology, and analysis. Scientific journals' editorial processes help determine research quality. This survey assessed editors' awareness of current debates, attitudes toward recent recommendations, and involvement in developing editorial policies. Twenty-nine editors of health journals with impact factors of > or = 1 (based on citation ratings) were sent a questionnaire including four key problems identified in research literature and recommendations from federal agencies; 23 (79%) responded. Seven editors relevant policies. Two had read the federal directive on racial and ethnic classification; one was aware of its current review. Most perceived the four key problems as uncommon. The majority agreed with Public Health Service recommendations on race and ethnicity research, except for analyzing effects of racism. Approximately 20% had discussed issues with co-editors, editorial boards, or reviewers. About 40% saw further discussion as beneficial; four planned to draft guidelines. Editors' potential for helping resolve problems in race/ethnicity research is not being realized. Greater participation would be beneficial to public health research and practice. PMID:9685775

  12. G. K. Batchelor. Founding editor of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, D. G.

    1999-05-01

    Although developments in fluid mechanics continue at a heady pace, and are reported in JFM at about 800 pages per month, things in the editorial management of JFM change only slowly. There is a continuity among the JFM Editorial Team and among the policies they espouse and implement that appears to be appreciated by the fluid mechanics community. A major change has, however, occurred from January 1999, in that George Batchelor has, after 43 years as Editor, stepped down from the day-to-day handling of papers and from the formulation of policies and practices, and allowed himself to be named on our masthead as Founding Editor. I say ‘allowed’ because George's initial wish was not to be so named, feeling that this might be seen as an immodest and presumptuous title. But Founding Editor is exactly what George was and is. He launched JFM in May 1956, having persuaded Taylor & Francis to be the publisher and printer, and having enlisted the help of G. F. Carrier, W. C. Griffith and M. J. Lighthill as Associate Editors, and T. Brooke Benjamin and I. Proudman as Assistant Editors. Then, as now, all members of the JFM Editorial Team were to work autonomously in the handling of papers, with complete delegated authority and similar workloads, but all following similar procedures and with similar philosophies, and all under the watchful eye of G. K. B.

  13. STK Integrated Message Production List Editor (SIMPLE) for CEO Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, Mike; Heydorn, James

    2014-01-01

    Late in fiscal year 2011, the Crew Earth Observations (CEO) team was tasked to upgrade and replace its mission planning and mission operations software systems, which were developed in the Space Shuttle era of the 1980s and 1990s. The impetuses for this change were the planned transition of all workstations to the Windows 7 64-bit operating system and the desire for more efficient and effective use of Satellite Tool Kit (STK) software required for reliable International Space Station (ISS) Earth location tracking. An additional requirement of this new system was the use of the same SQL database of CEO science sites from the SMMS, which was also being developed. STK Integrated Message Production List Editor (SIMPLE) is the essential, all-in-one tool now used by CEO staff to perform daily ISS mission planning to meet its requirement to acquire astronaut photography of specific sites on Earth. The sites are part of a managed, long-term database that has been defined and developed for scientific, educational, and public interest. SIMPLE's end product is a set of basic time and location data computed for an operator-selected set of targets that the ISS crew will be asked to photograph (photography is typically planned 12 to 36 hours out). The CEO operator uses SIMPLE to (a) specify a payload operations planning period; (b) acquire and validate the best available ephemeris data (vectors) for the ISS during the planning period; (c) ingest and display mission-specific site information from the CEO database; (d) identify and display potential current dynamic event targets as map features; (e) compute and display time and location information for each target; (f) screen and select targets based on known crew availability constraints, obliquity constraints, and real-time evaluated constraints to target visibility due to illumination (sun elevation) and atmospheric conditions (weather); and finally (g) incorporate basic, computed time and location information for each selected target into the daily CEO Target List product (message) for submission to ISS payload planning and integration teams for their review and approval prior to uplink. SIMPLE requires and uses the following resources: an ISS mission planning period Greenwich Mean Time start date/time and end date/time), the best available ISS mission ephemeris data (vectors) for that planning period, the STK software package configured for the ISS, and an ISS mission-specific subset of the CEO sites database. The primary advantages realized by the development and implementation of SIMPLE into the CEO payload operations support activity are a smooth transition to the Windows 7 operating system upon scheduled workstation refresh; streamlining of the input and verification of the current ISS ephemeris (vector data); seamless incorporation of selected contents of the SQL database of science sites; the ability to tag and display potential dynamic event opportunities on orbit track maps; simplification of the display and selection of encountered sites based on crew availability, illumination, obliquity, and weather constraints; the incorporation of high-quality mapping of the Earth with various satellite-based datasets for use in describing targets; and the ability to encapsulate and export the essential selected target elements in XML format for use by onboard Earth-location systems, such as Worldmap. SIMPLE is a carefully designed and crafted in-house software package that includes detailed help files for the user and meticulous internal documentation for future modifications. It was delivered in February 2012 for test and evaluation. Following acceptance, it was implemented for CEO mission operations support in May 2012.

  14. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

    2002-07-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

  15. A geophysical study of the hydrogeology of the Carrizo plain area, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.W. )

    1991-02-01

    This investigation was conducted to attempt to locate structural geologic features and variations in aquifer characteristics in an area within the Carrizo plain, San Luis Obispo County, California. The investigation included a review of the established geologic knowledge for the region, followed by field studies. The field studies included surface magnetometer surveys, thermal borehole logging, and a piezometric level survey. Existing borehole electric logs were obtained. The conclusions of the investigation were then derived from a collective interpretation. The investigation concluded that a fault appears to extend beneath the valley fill in the northwestern part of the area, and that a subsurface basaltic dike is apparently located in the southeastern part of the area. Evaluations indicate that the valley has a deep aquifer overlain by a confining clay-rich layer in the central part of the area. Areal and depth-related variations in water quality are probably influenced by the presence of evaporites near Soda Lake and in the region near the San Andreas fault.

  16. Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Eason, Tarsha; Cabezas, Heriberto

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an important method in information theory. Our adaptation of Fisher information provides a means of monitoring the variables of a system to characterize dynamic order, and, therefore, its regimes and regime shifts. This work is part of the SLB Sustainability Metrics Project, which aimed to evaluate movement over time towards or away from regional sustainability. One of the key goals of this project was to use readily available data to assess the sustainability of the system including its environmental, social and economic aspects. For this study, Fisher information was calculated for fifty-three variables which characterize the consumption of food and energy, agricultural production, environmental characteristics, demographic properties and changes in land use for the SLB system from 1980 to 2005. Our analysis revealed that while the system displayed small changes in dynamic order over time with a slight decreasing trend near the end of the period, there is no indication of a regime shift. Therefore, the SLB system is stable with very slight movement away from sustainability in more recent years. PMID:21930337

  17. Theoretical investigation of the lowest-lying electronic structure of LuI molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, J.; Taher, F.; Magnier, S.

    2014-01-01

    CASSCF/MRCI calculations using Effective Core Potential (ECP) basis sets for both Lu and I atoms, have been performed for the first 22 electronic states in the representation 2s+1Λ(±) for the LuI molecule. This investigation included the corresponding 43 molecular states in the representation Ω(±) when taking the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in consideration. Calculated potential energy curves (PECs) have been displayed. Spectroscopic constants Te, ωe, ωeχe, Be and the internuclear distance Re have been calculated for the ground state and for the low-lying electronic states situated below 40,410 cm-1 and for their corresponding components with SOC. The transition dipolar moments between states have been given at the minimum position Re = 2.75 Å of the ground state X1Σ+. The calculated set of singlet and triplet states provides a theoretical prediction for more than 19 yet unobserved electronic states.

  18. Agricultural producers' perceptions of sandhill cranes in the San Luis Valley of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Management for migratory birds at an ecosystem scale requires forming cooperative partnerships with the private sector. To be effective, however, wildlife managers must understand the economic and social attitudes of private landowners to ensure that strategies involving stakeholders are viable and can be implemented. We documented attitudes of farmers in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado toward Rocky Mountain Population greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) using a self administered, mail-back survey. Overall response rate was 46.7%. Viewing sandhill cranes in the SLV was considered somewhat important or important by 78.6% of respondents. In contrast, only 62.1% of respondents indicated that viewing sandhill cranes was somewhat important or important on their own land. Farmers' attitudes toward viewing sandhill cranes on their own property were related (P=0.02) to perceived conflicts with crop production. The extent of crane use (P=0.04) was the only variable we tested that predicted whether conflicts were reported. Our results suggest that partnerships between farmers and natural resource agencies concerned with management of sandhill cranes may be viable. However, the role of farmers in any proposed management strategy must be examined carefully because there may be an upper limit of crane use on private land that farmers will tolerate.

  19. Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

  20. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

  1. Magazine or journal—what is the difference? The role of the monitoring editor

    PubMed Central

    Bretscher, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Scientific communication, career advancement, and funding decisions are all dependent on research publications. The way manuscripts are handled by high-visibility, professionally edited magazines differs from the way academic journals evaluate manuscripts, using active scientists as monitoring editors. In this essay, I discuss the benefits that come with the involvement of active scientists. I enumerate the decisions a monitoring editor has to make, and how he or she goes about making them. Finally, I indicate ways in which authors can help to make the process a smoother and more positive experience. PMID:23533210

  2. An interactive editor for definition of touch-sensitive zones for a graphic display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Burt L., III; Jones, Denise R.

    1987-01-01

    In the continuing effort to develop more efficient man-machine communications methods, touch displays have shown potential as straightforward input systems. The development of software necessary to handle such systems, however, can become tedious. In order to reduce the need for redundant programming, a touch editor has been developed which allows a programmer to interactively define touch-sensitive areas for a graphic display. The information produced during the editing process is written to a data file, which can be accessed easily when needed by an application program. This paper outlines the structure, logic, and use of the editor, as well as the hardware with which it is presently compatible.

  3. Conflicts of interest for medical publishers and editors: protecting the integrity of scientific scholarship.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2011-09-01

    Competition of interest may exist at all levels in the medical publication process. Ensuring the integrity of scientific scholarship involves protecting editorial independence, promoting the use of scientific arbitration boards, promoting transparency throughout all stages of publication, and protecting the relationship between the publisher and its editors through an effective legal framework. It is incumbent upon the publisher, editors, authors, and readers to ensure that the highest standards of scientific scholarship are upheld. Doing so will help reduce fraud and misrepresentation in medical research and increase the trustworthiness of landmark findings in science. PMID:21872119

  4. Improving the quality of papers submitted to dental journals: Transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Cape Town on Wednesday, 25 June 2014.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Giannobile, William V; Sourgen, Deborah L; Balaji, S M; Honkala, Eino; Lynch, Christopher D

    2015-08-01

    This satellite symposium was the fourth in a series for editors, publishers, reviewers and all those with an interest in scientific publishing. It was held on Wednesday 25th June 2014 at the IADR International meeting in Cape Town, South Africa. The symposium attracted more than 180 attendees. This symposium placed an emphasis on how the quality of papers submitted to dental journals could be improved. The panel included representation from editors, researchers and publishers from North America, India and the Gulf States. The symposium identified a number of challenges for editors and publishers, including the poor quality of many papers submitted to dental and other scientific journals, plagiarism, attempted duplicate publication and sometimes fraudulent results. Where possible speakers are identified by name. A subsequent symposium was held during the IADR meeting in Boston on March 11th 2015. Involvement open to editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. PMID:25748020

  5. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    I am honoured to take on the leadership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) as the successor to Professor Mark J Kushner, with whom I have had the pleasure to work on the journal for many years. Under Mark's insightful and energetic leadership over the last six years, PSST has cemented its position as the journal of choice within its subject area and is now one of the most successful journals in the field. In this first issue of 2014, I would like to reflect on some of the events and achievements of 2013. At the start of the year the PSST Editorial Board, recognizing the vital importance of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) data to low-temperature plasma physics, agreed that PSST would accept papers reporting such new data, generated through both experiment and theory. Jonathan Tennyson joined the Editorial Board to represent this area. In March Anne Bourdon joined the Associate Editor team and has since then played a key part in the journal's review process alongside our other Editors. During the autumn, PSST moved to a new editorial management system. In December Deborah O'Connell was awarded the 2013 Hershkowitz Early Career Award and Review and joins the Editorial Board as of 2014. I would also like to thank Miles Turner for his work in leading the drafting of a guide on the details necessary in the reporting of the results of computer simulations; the main conclusions of this report have been incorporated into the journal policy. Overall 2013 has been another successful year for PSST; paper submissions were up by 8% on the previous year and there was the highest ever number of downloads of PSST papers in one year. Another noteworthy feature of 2013 was the continuing improvement in publication times while maintaining our high standards for acceptance and providing expert feedback coupled with encouragement particularly to younger researchers and groups. Largely as a result of the hard work of our referees and Associate Editors, the average time from receipt-to-first decision of a paper is only 50 days. In 2014 we will continue to support the low-temperature plasma physics community through the publication of special topical issues. Those already scheduled for next year are: Transport in B-fields in low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Rod Boswell and Igor D Kaganovich Spots and patterns on electrodes of gas discharges, Guest Editors: Mikhail S Benilov and Ulrich Kogelschatz Interaction of electromagnetic waves with low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Osamu Sakai and Shahid Rauf We will also launch a new feature: LabTalks, a way in which our authors can showcase their group's work and communicate their research published in PSST to a wider audience. Full details are on the PSST website. Along with the leadership team, made up of Associate Editors, Anne, Nick and Richard and the great PSST staff at Institute of Physics Publishing, led by Alice Malhador, I will strive to grow, improve and deliver a journal which reflects the excellent science from the low-temperature plasma community. We hope we can continue to count on your vital support as authors and referees.

  6. Tracing groundwater recharge in the San Luis Valley, Colorado: Groundwater contamination susceptibility in an agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Tanya; Hindshaw, Ruth; Singer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Water is a vital resource in any agricultural watershed, yet in the arid western United States farming practices threaten the quality and availability of groundwater. This is a pressing concern in the San Luis Valley, southern Colorado, where agriculture comprises 30% of the local economy, and employs over half the valley population. Although 54 % of the water used for irrigation is surface water, farmers do not usually apply this water directly to their fields. Instead, the water is often diverted into pits which recharge the aquifer, and the water is subsequently pumped during the following irrigation season. The Rio Grande Water Conservation District recognises that recharge to the unconfined aquifer has been outpaced by commercial irrigation for at least four decades, resulting in a decline in groundwater levels. Recycled irrigation water, and leakage from unlined canals now represent the greatest recharge contribution to the unconfined aquifer in this region. This makes the shallow groundwater particularly susceptible to agricultural contamination. The purpose of this study is to assess groundwater contamination in the unconfined and upper confined aquifers of the San Luis Valley, which are the most susceptible to contamination due to their close proximity to the surface. Although concentrations of potentially harmful contaminants from agricultural runoff are regularly monitored, the large spatial and temporal fluctuations in values make it difficult to determine long-term trends. We have analysed δ18O, δ2H and major-ion chemistry of 57 groundwater, stream and precipitation samples, collected in June 2014, and interpreted them alongside regional stream flow data and groundwater levels. This will allow us to study the seasonality and locality of groundwater recharge to provide greater insight into the watershed's potential for pollution. A groundwater vulnerability assessment was performed using the model DRASTIC (Depth to water, Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media, Topography, Influence of the vadose zone and hydraulic Conductivity). Each variable is assigned a weighting and rating, which provides a quantitative assessment of an area's pollution potential. Using this method of investigation, the groundwater vulnerability map produced classifies 5% of the area as having low pollution potential, 34% as having moderate pollution potential, and 61% as having high pollution potential. The groundwater vulnerability map may be used to predict the variation in agricultural contaminant concentrations in the unconfined aquifer. Major ion analyses revealed that nitrate concentrations are highly variable, varying between 0.435 and 949μM/L, and exceed the EPA maximum contaminant level at four sites. The spatial variability in nitrate concentrations, as well as sulphate and phosphate concentrations, is much greater than the differences predicted by the model. This suggests that this variability is not a result of differences in the hydrogeology between sites, but instead may be related to individual farm practices or a result of point sources such as animal waste, septic tanks and sewage release. Understanding the impact of commercial irrigation on groundwater quality and availability is vital for developing effective strategies to stabilise groundwater levels, and protect the farmers and local population that rely on this water.

  7. Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: an economic measure of regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Templeton, Joshua J; Wu, Shanshan

    2012-11-30

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). We measured the movement away from sustainability by examining the change in GNRP over time. Any attempt at green accounting requires both economic and natural capital data. However, limited data for the Basin requires a number of simplifying assumptions and requires transforming economic data at the national, state, and county levels to the level of the SLB. Given the contribution of agribusiness to the SLB, we included the depletion of both groundwater and soil as components in the depreciation of natural capital. We also captured the effect of the consumption of energy on climate change for future generations through carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions. In order to estimate the depreciation of natural capital, the shadow price of water for agriculture, the economic damages from soil erosion due to wind, and the social cost of carbon emissions were obtained from the literature and applied to the SLB using benefit transfer. We used Colorado's total factor productivity for agriculture to estimate the value of time (i.e., to include the effects of exogenous technological progress). We aggregated the economic data and the depreciation of natural capital for the SLB from 1980 to 2005. The results suggest that GNRP had a slight upward trend through most of this time period, despite temporary negative trends, the longest of which occurred during the period 1985-86 to 1987-88. However, given the upward trend in GNRP and the possibility of business cycles causing the temporary declines, there is no definitive evidence of moving away from sustainability. PMID:22483369

  8. [Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos: criminal and legal aspects of serial homicide with over 200 victims].

    PubMed

    Benecke, Mark; Rodriguez y Rowinski, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    This is the first scientific report on the crimes of the homosexual paedophile sadist Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos, based on a research stay of the authors in Columbia, and including discussions with the investigators, and the offender. Between 1992 and 1999, Garavito killed more than 200 children in the core age span between 8 and 13 years (as an exception, 6 to 16 years). His modus operandi remained stable. During daytime, he lured children of a lower social status out of crowded parts of the city into hidden areas that were overgrown with high plants. Garavito promised either payment for easy work, or drugs, or made other socially believable offers. The children were tied up, tortured, raped, and killed by at least one cut in the lateral part of the neck, or by decapitation. During the killings, Garavito was drunk. Even after his arrest (for attempted sexual abuse under a wrong identity) it was not immediately possible to track his crimes since Garavito had frequently changed his places of stay and his jobs. He also grew different hairdos and used wrong names. During his still ongoing confessions, he directs the investigators correctly to all scenes of crime spread over large parts of Columbia. In our report, we give an overview over the course of investigations, hint to similarities in the cases of the German serial killer Denke (1920's) and homosexual paedophile serial killer Jürgen Bartsch (1960's), and give preliminary impressions on the offender's personality. Furthermore, the violent environment and juridical peculiarities in Columbia are discussed. In spite of a total penalty of 2600 years in prison, it is formally well possible that Garavito will be released out of prison within the next 10 to 20 years, i.e. even before the maximum sentence of 40 years will be over. PMID:12462935

  9. KIR gene diversity in Mexican mestizos of San Luis Potosí.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Hernández, Diana Lorena; Hernández-Ramírez, Daniel; Noyola, Daniel Ernesto; García-Sepúlveda, Christian Alberto

    2011-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell function is regulated by different types of membrane-bound receptors of which killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are the most complex and diverse. KIRs are encoded by 17 different genes located within the leukocyte receptor complex (19q13.4). The frequency with which KIR gene features are present in different human populations differs. Here, we present our results on the KIR gene diversity observed in a large group of mestizos from the central Mexican city of San Luis Potosí. In total, 53 different KIR genotypes were observed, 47 with previously described gene profiles and six harboring novel KIR gene combinations. Group A homozygous haplotypes were seen in 102 individuals (34%), while group B homozygous haplotypes were present in 45 (15%). Heterozygous combinations of groups A and B haplotypes were seen in 153 individuals (51%). Haplotype frequency estimations based on a true content of 600 chromosomes showed a relatively balanced proportion of group A (59.5%) and group B (40.5%) haplotypes in our study population. A homozygous combination of the cA01|tA01 haplotype was present in 33% of the population with other frequent combinations being cA01|tA01, cB03|tB01 in 14.7% and cA01|tA01, cB02|tA01 in 12%. The dendrogram derived from activating KIR gene phylogenetic analysis revealed five clearly distinct clades corresponding to African, East Asian, Arab/Caucasoid, Mexican mestizo/Amerindian and South Asian populations. Our results illustrate the genetic contribution that Caucasoid and Amerindian populations have made toward present-day Mexicans and suggest an important Southeast Asian genetic contribution to native Amerindian populations. PMID:21638211

  10. Sedimentary record of storm deposits from Hurricane Ike, Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, A. D.; Horton, B. P.

    2012-10-01

    Prehistoric records of land-falling tropical cyclones further our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of tropical cyclone activity and its relationship with global climatic changes. Here, we describe deposit stratigraphy and sedimentology resulting from overwash during Hurricane Ike, which made landfall on September 13th 2008, to provide a much needed modern analogue for paleo-hurricane deposits and evaluate the hurricane's influence on barrier stability. We compared the volume, grain size distribution, organic content and foraminiferal assemblages of washover deposits at three sites from Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas that were up to 50 km west of Ike's landfall. Storm surge heights varied between 3.7 and 2.7 m with inland inundation extents of 330 to 113 m. At each of the study sites, Hurricane Ike eroded the shoreline and re-deposited a landward-thinning sand sheet between 0.02 and 0.28 m thick over short-grass prairie/salt-marsh soil. Shoreline erosion estimates suggest that only between 10 and 30% of eroded beach sediment is deposited on land as washover (net gain to barrier elevation), while the remainder is re-deposited subtidally or offshore, a potential net loss to the coastal sediment budget. The washover sediment was readily identifiable by abrupt changes in grain size, organic content, and buried in situ grasses. Foraminiferal assemblages within washover and short-grass prairie/salt-marsh sediments (when present) have similar assemblages, which are dominated by Ammonia spp. and Elphidium spp. These species are common to bay and nearshore environments of the Gulf of Mexico. Foraminiferal species Bolivina subaenariensis, Quinqueloculina seminulum and planktonic species are restricted to the washover deposits, which may suggest sediment provenance from inner shelf environments.

  11. The Location of Knowledge: A Conversation with the Editors on Knowledge, Experience, and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Lynette; Kelly, Jennifer; Weber-Pillwax, Cora

    2009-01-01

    As co-editors of this theme issue of this journal, the authors have accepted that knowledge systems and teacher education programs are deeply interconnected. Further, they claim that teacher education programs must incorporate in theory and practice the fact that knowledge systems are a determining factor in the effectiveness of a teacher…

  12. How Well Do Americans Know Geography? "National Geographic" Editor Discusses Meaning for Schools (Interview).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koerner, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Gilbert Grosvenor, editor of "National Geographic," is interviewed about the importance of geography for Americans. He claims our lack of geographic knowledge impedes our ability to act and compete in the world market as a world power and points out that geographic ignorance extends to people employed at high levels of government. (MD)

  13. Professional Wisdom and Writing for Publication: Qualitative Interviews with Editors and Authors in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2013-01-01

    College and university faculty members specializing in early childhood education face some unique challenges in scholarly writing. The purpose of this research was to use open-ended interviews as a way to gather the collective wisdom of a group of key informants about academic writing and publishing in the field. Twenty-two editors and/or authors,…

  14. Learning the Attachment Theory with the CM-ED Concept Map Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueda, U.; Arruarte, A.; Elorriaga, J. A.; Herran, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU with the aim of evaluating the CM-ED (concept map editor) with social education students. Concept mapping is a widely accepted technique that promotes meaningful learning. Graphically representing concepts of the learning domain and relationships between them

  15. Learning the Attachment Theory with the CM-ED Concept Map Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueda, U.; Arruarte, A.; Elorriaga, J. A.; Herran, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU with the aim of evaluating the CM-ED (concept map editor) with social education students. Concept mapping is a widely accepted technique that promotes meaningful learning. Graphically representing concepts of the learning domain and relationships between them…

  16. Persnickety editor, Founding Father, Mentor and Friend: The Legacy of Fred Mumpton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a tribute to Dr Fred Munpton, the founder of the International Committee on Natural Zeolites (ICNZ), by one of his students, who later succeed him as president of the ICNZ. The tribute reflects on Dr. Mumpton's skills as an editor and his zeal for the study of natural zeolites.

  17. Professional Wisdom and Writing for Publication: Qualitative Interviews with Editors and Authors in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2013-01-01

    College and university faculty members specializing in early childhood education face some unique challenges in scholarly writing. The purpose of this research was to use open-ended interviews as a way to gather the collective wisdom of a group of key informants about academic writing and publishing in the field. Twenty-two editors and/or authors,

  18. The Location of Knowledge: A Conversation with the Editors on Knowledge, Experience, and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Lynette; Kelly, Jennifer; Weber-Pillwax, Cora

    2009-01-01

    As co-editors of this theme issue of this journal, the authors have accepted that knowledge systems and teacher education programs are deeply interconnected. Further, they claim that teacher education programs must incorporate in theory and practice the fact that knowledge systems are a determining factor in the effectiveness of a teacher

  19. University-government relationships in the training of technical writers-editors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohrer, Freda F.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional and nontraditional methods of training technical writers-editors are reviewed. Combining work experience with classroom instruction in the form of cooperative education provides a method of strengthening the Federal career service in professional occupations. The NASA Langley experience that successfully introduced students to the special demands of technical writing and editing is described.

  20. An International Call for Democratizing the Academic Journal Culture from a Community of Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Pryor, Caroline R.; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Harris, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    In our reflective essay from our multiple perspectives as journal editors, peer reviewers, and published authors, we present ideas about editorial support, democracy, and innovation in the publishing process. As four tenured professors who work in universities in the states of Illinois, Virginia, Texas, and Kentucky, we are a community of editors…

  1. Editorial: Conflict of interest policy for Editors of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrity in the publication process requires impartiality at all levels of review. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) adheres to the policy of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals: Writin...

  2. More on Lexical Bias: How Efficient Can a "Lexical Editor'" Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nozari, Nazbanou; Dell, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The lexical bias effect (the tendency for phonological speech errors to create words more often than nonwords) has been debated for over 30 years. One account attributes the effect to a lexical editor, a strategic component of the production system that examines each planned phonological string, and suppresses it if it is a nonword. The…

  3. FlaME: Flash Molecular Editor - a 2D structure input tool for the web

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background So far, there have been no Flash-based web tools available for chemical structure input. The authors herein present a feasibility study, aiming at the development of a compact and easy-to-use 2D structure editor, using Adobe's Flash technology and its programming language, ActionScript. As a reference model application from the Java world, we selected the Java Molecular Editor (JME). In this feasibility study, we made an attempt to realize a subset of JME's functionality in the Flash Molecular Editor (FlaME) utility. These basic capabilities are: structure input, editing and depiction of single molecules, data import and export in molfile format. Implementation The result of molecular diagram sketching in FlaME is accessible in V2000 molfile format. By integrating the molecular editor into a web page, its communication with the HTML elements on this page is established using the two JavaScript functions, getMol() and setMol(). In addition, structures can be copied to the system clipboard. Conclusion A first attempt was made to create a compact single-file application for 2D molecular structure input/editing on the web, based on Flash technology. With the application examples presented in this article, it could be demonstrated that the Flash methods are principally well-suited to provide the requisite communication between the Flash object (application) and the HTML elements on a web page, using JavaScript functions. PMID:21284863

  4. Guidelines for Reviewers and the Editor at the Nuclear Safety Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetsel, H. B.

    The main purpose of this report is to help novice reviewers accelerate their apprenticeship at the Nuclear Safety Information Center, a computerized information service sponsored by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Guidelines for reviewers are presented in Part 1; Part 2 contains guidelines for the novice editor. The goal of the reviewers and…

  5. Guidelines, editors, pharma and the biological paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajai R; Singh, Shakuntala A

    2007-01-01

    Private investment in biomedical research has increased over the last few decades. At most places it has been welcomed as the next best thing to technology itself. Much of the intellectual talent from academic institutions is getting absorbed in lucrative positions in industry. Applied research finds willing collaborators in venture capital funded industry, so a symbiotic growth is ensured for both.There are significant costs involved too. As academia interacts with industry, major areas of conflict of interest especially applicable to biomedical research have arisen. They are related to disputes over patents and royalty, hostile encounters between academia and industry, as also between public and private enterprise, legal tangles, research misconduct of various types, antagonistic press and patient-advocate lobbies and a general atmosphere in which commercial interest get precedence over patient welfare.Pharma image stinks because of a number of errors of omission and commission. A recent example is suppression of negative findings about Bayer's Trasylol (Aprotinin) and the marketing maneuvers of Eli Lilly's Xigris (rhAPC). Whenever there is a conflict between patient vulnerability and profit motives, pharma often tends to tilt towards the latter. Moreover there are documents that bring to light how companies frequently cross the line between patient welfare and profit seeking behaviour.A voluntary moratorium over pharma spending to pamper drug prescribers is necessary. A code of conduct adopted recently by OPPI in India to limit pharma company expenses over junkets and trinkets is a welcome step.Clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are considered important as they guide the diagnostic/therapeutic regimen of a large number of medical professionals and hospitals and provide recommendations on drugs, their dosages and criteria for selection. Along with clinical trials, they are another area of growing influence by the pharmaceutical industry. For example, in a relatively recent survey of 2002, it was found that about 60% of 192 authors of clinical practice guidelines reported they had financial connections with the companies whose drugs were under consideration. There is a strong case for making CPGs based not just on effectivity but cost effectivity. The various ramifications of this need to be spelt out. Work of bodies like the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration and Guidelines Advisory Committee (GAC) are also worth a close look.Even the actions of Foundations that work for disease amelioration have come under scrutiny. The process of setting up 'Best Practices' Guidelines for interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and clinicians has already begun and can have important consequences for patient care. Similarly, Good Publication Practice (GPP) for pharmaceutical companies have also been set up aimed at improving the behaviour of drug companies while reporting drug trialsThe rapidly increasing trend toward influence and control by industry has become a concern for many. It is of such importance that the Association of American Medical Colleges has issued two relatively new documents - one, in 2001, on how to deal with individual conflicts of interest; and the other, in 2002, on how to deal with institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), as also medical education and research institutions at other places, have to adopt means that minimize their conflicts of interest.Both medical associations and research journal editors are getting concerned with individual and institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research and documents are now available which address these issues. The 2001 ICMJE revision calls for full disclosure of the sponsor's role in research, as well as assurance that the investigators are independent of the sponsor, are fully accountable for the design and conduct of the trial, have independent access to all trial data and control all editorial and publication decisions. However the findings of a 2002 study suggest that academic institutions routinely participate in clinical research that does not adhere to ICMJE standards of accountability, access to data and control of publication.There is an inevitable slant to produce not necessarily useful but marketable products which ensure the profitability of industry and research grants outflow to academia. Industry supports new, not traditional, therapies, irrespective of what is effective. Whatever traditional therapy is supported is most probably because the company concerned has a product with a big stake there, which has remained a 'gold standard' or which that player thinks has still some 'juice' left.Industry sponsorship is mainly for potential medications, not for trying to determine whether there may be non-pharmacological interventions that may be equally good, if not better. In the paradigm shift towards biological psychiatry, the role of industry sponsorship is not overt but probably more pervasive than many have realised, or the right thinking may consider good, for the health of the branch in the long run.An issue of major concern is protection of the interests of research subjects. Patients agree to become research subjects not only for personal medical benefit but, as an extension, to benefit the rest of the patient population and also advance medical research.We all accept that industry profits have to be made, and investment in research and development by the pharma industry is massive. However, we must also accept there is a fundamental difference between marketing strategies for other entities and those for drugs.The ultimate barometer is patient welfare and no drug that compromises it can stand the test of time. So, how does it make even commercial sense in the long term to market substandard products? The greatest mistake long-term players in industry may make is try to adopt the shady techniques of the upstart new entrant. Secrecy of marketing/sales tactics, of the process of manufacture, of other strategies and plans of business expansion, of strategies to tackle competition are fine business tactics. But it is critical that secrecy as a tactic not extend to reporting of research findings, especially those contrary to one's product.Pharma has no option but to make a quality product, do comprehensive adverse reaction profiles, and market it only if it passes both tests.Why does pharma adopt questionable tactics? The reasons are essentially two:What with all the constraints, a drug comes to the pharmacy after huge investments. There are crippling overheads and infrastructure costs to be recovered. And there are massive profit margins to be maintained. If these were to be dependent only on genuine drug discoveries, that would be taking too great a risk.Industry players have to strike the right balance between profit making and credibility. In profit making, the marketing champions play their role. In credibility ratings, researchers and paid spokes-persons play their role. All is hunky dory till marketing is based on credibility. When there is nothing available to make for credibility, something is projected as one and marketing carried out, in the calculated hope that profits can accrue, since profit making must continue endlessly. That is what makes pharma adopt even questionable means to make profits.Essentially, there are four types of drugs. First, drugs that work and have minimal side-effects; second, drugs which work but have serious side-effects; third, drugs that do not work and have minimal side-effects; and fourth, drugs which work minimally but have serious side-effects. It is the second and fourth types that create major hassles for industry. Often, industry may try to project the fourth type as the second to escape censure.The major cat and mouse game being played by conscientious researchers is in exposing the third and fourth for what they are and not allowing industry to palm them off as the first and second type respectively. The other major game is in preventing the second type from being projected as the first. The third type are essentially harmless, so they attract censure all right and some merriment at the antics to market them. But they escape anything more than a light rap on the knuckles, except when they are projected as the first type.What is necessary for industry captains and long-term players is to realise:Their major propelling force can only be producing the first type. 2. They accept the second type only till they can lay their hands on the first. 3. The third type can be occasionally played around with to shore up profits, but never by projecting them as the first type. 4. The fourth type are the laggards, real threat to credibility and therefore do not deserve any market hype or promotion.In finding out why most pharma indulges in questionable tactics, we are lead to some interesting solutions to prevent such tactics with the least amount of hassles for all concerned, even as both profits and credibility are kept intact. PMID:22058616

  6. Scientific Value of Systematic Reviews: Survey of Editors of Core Clinical Journals

    PubMed Central

    Antes, Gerd; von Elm, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Synthesizing research evidence using systematic and rigorous methods has become a key feature of evidence-based medicine and knowledge translation. Systematic reviews (SRs) may or may not include a meta-analysis depending on the suitability of available data. They are often being criticised as ‘secondary research’ and denied the status of original research. Scientific journals play an important role in the publication process. How they appraise a given type of research influences the status of that research in the scientific community. We investigated the attitudes of editors of core clinical journals towards SRs and their value for publication. Methods We identified the 118 journals labelled as “core clinical journals” by the National Library of Medicine, USA in April 2009. The journals’ editors were surveyed by email in 2009 and asked whether they considered SRs as original research projects; whether they published SRs; and for which section of the journal they would consider a SR manuscript. Results The editors of 65 journals (55%) responded. Most respondents considered SRs to be original research (71%) and almost all journals (93%) published SRs. Several editors regarded the use of Cochrane methodology or a meta-analysis as quality criteria; for some respondents these criteria were premises for the consideration of SRs as original research. Journals placed SRs in various sections such as “Review” or “Feature article”. Characterization of non-responding journals showed that about two thirds do publish systematic reviews. Discussion Currently, the editors of most core clinical journals consider SRs original research. Our findings are limited by a non-responder rate of 45%. Individual comments suggest that this is a grey area and attitudes differ widely. A debate about the definition of ‘original research’ in the context of SRs is warranted. PMID:22563469

  7. Superinfection between Influenza and RSV Alternating Patterns in San Luis Potosí State, México

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Hernández, Jorge Xicoténcatl; Núñez-López, Mayra; Comas-García, Andreu; Cherpitel, Daniel Ernesto Noyola; Ocampo, Marcos Capistrán

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to explain through the ecological hypothesis superinfection and competitive interaction between two viral populations and niche (host) availability, the alternating patterns of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and influenza observed in a regional hospital in San Luis Potosí State, México using a mathematical model as a methodological tool. The data analyzed consists of community-based and hospital-based Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) consultations provided by health-care institutions reported to the State Health Service Epidemiology Department from 2003 through 2009. PMID:25803450

  8. Late Miocene-Pleistocene evolution of a Rio Grande rift subbasin, Sunshine Valley-Costilla Plain, San Luis Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, C.A.; Thompson, R.A.; Shroba, R.R.; Anderson, M.; Drenth, B.J.; Rotzien, J.; Lyon, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sunshine Valley–Costilla Plain, a structural subbasin of the greater San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift, is bounded to the north and south by the San Luis Hills and the Red River fault zone, respectively. Surficial mapping, neotectonic investigations, geochronology, and geophysics demonstrate that the structural, volcanic, and geomorphic evolution of the basin involves the intermingling of climatic cycles and spatially and temporally varying tectonic activity of the Rio Grande rift system. Tectonic activity has transferred between range-bounding and intrabasin faults creating relict landforms of higher tectonic-activity rates along the mountain-piedmont junction. Pliocene–Pleistocene average long-term slip rates along the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone range between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/year with late Pleistocene slip rates approximately half (0.06 mm/year) of the longer Quaternary slip rate. During the late Pleistocene, climatic influences have been dominant over tectonic influences on mountain-front geomorphic processes. Geomorphic evidence suggests that this once-closed subbasin was integrated into the Rio Grande prior to the integration of the once-closed northern San Luis Basin, north of the San Luis Hills, Colorado; however, deep canyon incision, north of the Red River and south of the San Luis Hills, initiated relatively coeval to the integration of the northern San Luis Basin. Long-term projections of slip rates applied to a 1.6 km basin depth defined from geophysical modeling suggests that rifting initiated within this subbasin between 20 and 10 Ma. Geologic mapping and geophysical interpretations reveal a complex network of northwest-, northeast-, and north-south–trending faults. Northwest- and northeast-trending faults show dual polarity and are crosscut by north-south– trending faults. This structural model possibly provides an analog for how some intracontinental rift structures evolve through time.

  9. An energy systems view of sustainability: emergy evaluation of the San Luis Basin, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Daniel E; Garmestani, Ahjond S

    2012-03-01

    Energy Systems Theory (EST) provides a framework for understanding and interpreting sustainability. EST implies that "what is sustainable" for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system and within the system of concern. The pulsing paradigm explains the ubiquitous cycles of change that apparently govern ecosystems, rather than succession to a steady state that is then sustainable. Therefore, to make robust decisions among environmental policies and alternatives, decision-makers need to know where their system resides in the cycles of change that govern it. This theory was examined by performing an emergy evaluation of the sustainability of a regional system, the San Luis Basin (SLB), CO. By 1980, the SLB contained a climax stage agricultural system with well-developed crop and livestock production along with food and animal waste processing. The SLB is also a hinterland in that it exports raw materials and primary products (exploitation stage) to more developed areas. Emergy indices calculated for the SLB from 1995 to 2005 revealed changes in the relative sustainability of the system over this time. The sustainability of the region as indicated by the renewable emergy used as a percent of total use declined 4%, whereas, the renewable carrying capacity declined 6% over this time. The Emergy Sustainability Index (ESI) showed the largest decline (27%) in the sustainability of the region. The total emergy used by the SLB, a measure of system well-being, was fairly stable (CV = 0.05). In 1997, using renewable emergy alone, the SLB could support 50.7% of its population at the current standard of living, while under similar conditions the U.S. could support only 4.8% of its population. In contrast to other indices of sustainability, a new index, the Emergy Sustainable Use Index (ESUI), which considers the benefits gained by the larger system compared to the potential for local environmental damage, increased 34% over the period. PMID:22115513

  10. Contamination of heavy metals in birds from Embalse La Florida (San Luis, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Cid, Fabricio Damián; Gatica-Sosa, Claudia; Antón, Rosa Isabel; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2009-11-01

    Embalse La Florida is an artificial lake located in midwestern Argentina's San Luis province. It provides drinking water to approximately 70% of the province's human population and approximately 20% of the province is irrigated with water from the reservoir. The presence of heavy metals in Embalse La Florida's water has previously been reported. Nevertheless, no information about the levels of these contaminants in birds is available for this region. The aim of this study, therefore, is to (1) establish baseline data on lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) levels in birds from Embalse La Florida, (2) assess metal accumulation patterns between organs and bird species, and (3) evaluate the potential risk that these heavy metals pose for the local avifauna. We measured Pb and Cd in bone, pectoralis muscle, liver, gonad, and brain of three bird species representative of the Embalse La Florida ecosystem: Podiceps major (Great Grebe), Phalacrocorax brasilianus (Neotropic Cormorant), both of which are piscivorous, and Pitangus sulphuratus (Great Kiskadee), which is omnivorous. We also measured both heavy metals in Great Grebe eggs. Pb and Cd were detected in all of the tissues we assayed, and Pb concentrations were significantly higher than those for Cd in all tissues. The patterns of Pb and Cd accumulation differed between tissues, however. In general, gonads had the highest concentrations of Pb while Cd tended to accumulate in the liver. An interspecific analysis revealed that the omnivorous species had higher levels of both metals in bone, liver, and brain compared to both piscivorous species. There were no differences in Pb and Cd concentrations between males and females. The highest liver level of Pb (4.69 ppm wet weight) detected in Great Kiskadee, was comparable to those associated with toxic effects in birds, and Pb concentrations found in the liver of two females and two males (2.07 to 2.32 ppm wet weight) were also similar to those that could be physiologically detrimental in other species. In all birds assayed, Cd levels in liver tissue were lower than those typically shown to be harmful. Our results indicate that Great Kiskadees are highly polluted by Pb and their exposure to this contaminant exceeds the level reported to trigger adverse effects. This is the first study to assay heavy metals in birds from midwest Argentina and provides a starting point for studies examining the impact that these metals have on both wildlife and humans in the region. PMID:19890561

  11. InSAR imaging of seasonal groundwater change in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.

    2011-12-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. The valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators facing the challenge of developing appropriate management policies for both surface water and ground water supplies. Legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels within the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978 - 2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the confined aquifer system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide spatially dense maps of deformation of Earth's surface, with one pixel representing the deformation of a 50 m by 50 m area on the ground. This deformation can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. In this study we used data from the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites, which have 31 acquisitions archived from 1992 - 2001. We applied small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to create a time series of deformation for all pixels with high data quality. We find that the seasonal deformation measured by InSAR mimics hydraulic head measurements made in the confined aquifer system. We also find that the deformation occurring in the confined aquifer system is primarily elastic and recoverable in nature. At many well locations there are gaps in the hydraulic head record during the period relevant for the 2004 legislation. We find that high quality InSAR data exist during those time periods and can be used to fill historical gaps in hydraulic head data. We have processed the deformation time series for 2500 km2 of area on the ground at a spatial resolution of ~ 50 m. We find it useful to visualize the deformation over such a large area throughout time using an animation depicting the time series deformation patterns. InSAR can be used in this way, as a qualitative tool to see how the extent of groundwater pumping and/or the compressibility of sediments vary throughout the valley. The animation also allows us to identify InSAR acquisitions that show strong atmospheric signals, which were not removed during SBAS analysis.

  12. InSAR deformation time series for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreüder, W. A.; Shanker, P.; Lauknes, T. R.

    2009-05-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies for both the surface water and the ground water. In 1998 the state of Colorado commissioned the Rio Grande Decision Support System to refine the hydogeologic characterization of the system, including the development of a MODFLOW finite difference model of groundwater flow. The main challenge in the SLV is acquiring sufficient data to characterize the spatially heterogeneous, time-varying behavior of the groundwater system. Here we apply the small baseline subset analysis (SBAS) interferometric radar (InSAR) technique to provide such data. InSAR techniques yield the deformation of Earth's surface at fine spatial resolution occurring between two satellite overflights, and SBAS permits solution for a time series of deformation maps. The measured deformation can be related to changes in the water table in underlying confined aquifers. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. Historically, InSAR measurements have been difficult to make in agricultural areas. The change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation and the loss of useful information about surface deformation. The recently-developed SBAS method allows stable deformation estimates at certain ground points in an otherwise decorrelated time series of data. We applied this approach to data collected by the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV from track 98 frame 2853 for the years 1992-2001. We used the Generic SAR (GSAR) SBAS software developed by Norut to produce time series deformation measurements for many positions across the entire SLV. We find that the 2000 km2 area captured in track 98 frame 2853 shows very high levels of correlation in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. We extracted a time series displaying the change in deformation over the time period of 1992 to 2001, with a sampling interval of approximately 3 months. The ability to obtain such high quality temporal data across the entire SLV suggests that improved groundwater flow models describing finer- scale heterogeneities than are presently represented are possible with the integration of InSAR data. Specifically, the objective is to develop a quantitative relationship between ground surface deformations measured by InSAR and confined aquifer heads.

  13. Initial vegetation species and senescience/stress indicator mapping in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; King, Trude V. V.; Ager, Cathy; Swayze, Gregg A.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed AVIRIS data obtained over agricultural areas in the San Luis Valley of Colorado. The data were acquired on September 3, 1993. A combined method of radiative transfer modeling and ground calibration site reflectance was used to correct the flight data to surface reflectance. This method, called Radiative Transfer Ground Calibration, or RTGC, corrects for variable water vapor in the atmosphere and produces spectra free of artifacts with spectral channel to channel noise approaching the signal to noise of the raw data. The calibration site soil samples were obtained on the day of the overflight and measured on our laboratory spectrometer. The site was near the center of the AVIRIS scene and the spectra of the soil is spectrally bland, especially in the region of the chlorophyll absorption in the visible portion of the spectrum. The center of the scene is located at approximately 106 deg 03' longitude, 37 deg 23' latitude, and the scene covers about 92 square kilometers. This scene is one of 28 in the area for a general project to study the Summitville abandoned mine site, located in the mountains west of the San Luis Valley, and its effects on the surrounding environment.

  14. [Co-editors and editors with Jewish origins of the first German journals for anaesthesia. Their fate under National Socialism and an attempt at a biographical appreciation].

    PubMed

    Goerig, M; Goetz, A E

    2010-09-01

    The decision to publish the journals Der Schmerz and Narkose und Anaesthesie in 1928 was an important step towards the professionalization of anaesthesiology in Germany. The appearance of both journals, which for economic reasons merged into Schmerz - Narkose - Anaesthesie 1 year later, was initiated and vehemently supported by Jewish physicians. As editors and co-editors they were deeply involved with the editorial tasks of the journals for years from the early beginnings. When the National Socialistic Party took over the government in Germany many of the Jewish colleagues were forced to quit their editorial tasks, were eliminated and replaced by "Arians", they were persecuted and often arrested, forced to emigrate or decided to commit suicide due to inhumane personal circumstances. It is our intention to recall the biography and the terrible fate of the nearly unknown Jewish members of the editorial board of the first German anaesthesia journals. Moreover the biographic sketches promote a continuous discussion about the victims of an inhumane and barbarous ideology. PMID:20842476

  15. Writing a narrative biomedical review: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Blackmore, Heather; Kitas, George D

    2011-11-01

    Review articles comprehensively covering a specific topic are crucial for successful research and academic projects. Most editors consider review articles for special and regular issues of journals. Writing a review requires deep knowledge and understanding of a field. The aim of this review is to analyze the main steps in writing a narrative biomedical review and to consider points that may increase the chances of success. We performed a comprehensive search through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science using the following keywords: review of the literature, narrative review, title, abstract, authorship, ethics, peer review, research methods, medical writing, scientific writing, and writing standards. Opinions expressed in the review are also based on personal experience as authors, peer reviewers, and editors. PMID:21800117

  16. Programming the Navier-Stokes computer: An abstract machine model and a visual editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David; Crockett, Tom; Tomboulian, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes computer is a parallel computer designed to solve Computational Fluid Dynamics problems. Each processor contains several floating point units which can be configured under program control to implement a vector pipeline with several inputs and outputs. Since the development of an effective compiler for this computer appears to be very difficult, machine level programming seems necessary and support tools for this process have been studied. These support tools are organized into a graphical program editor. A programming process is described by which appropriate computations may be efficiently implemented on the Navier-Stokes computer. The graphical editor would support this programming process, verifying various programmer choices for correctness and deducing values such as pipeline delays and network configurations. Step by step details are provided and demonstrated with two example programs.

  17. [Declarations issued by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors in conjunction with the Vancouver standards].

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    These statements, which are published by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors in conjunction with the Vancouver standards, cover some of the legal, ethical, and practical aspects of the publication of research papers, and of the comments generated by them, in biomedical journals. Following a definition of what constitutes a peer-reviewed journal, the roles of journal owners and editors are described, along with those of members of an editorial board, and procedural norms are set forth in connection with conflicts of interests, retractions or corrections, fraud, and breaches of confidentiality. Among the last topics explored are the problems involved in the dissemination of research results by the popular media, the handling of advertising within the journal, and the simultaneous acceptance of manuscripts whose authors have arrived at opposite conclusions regarding the results of a particular study. PMID:9608815

  18. A Java chemical structure editor supporting the Modular Chemical Descriptor Language (MCDL).

    PubMed

    Trepalin, Sergei V; Yarkov, Alexander V; Pletnev, Igor V; Gakh, Andrei A

    2006-01-01

    A compact Modular Chemical Descriptor Language (MCDL) chemical structure editor (Java applet) is described. The small size (approximately 200 KB) of the applet allows its use to display and edit chemical structures in various Internet applications. The editor supports the MCDL format, in which structures are presented in compact canonical form and is capable of restoring bond orders as well as of managing atom and bond drawing overlap. A small database of cage and large cyclic fragment is used for optimal representation of difficult-to-draw molecules. The improved algorithm of the structure diagram generation can be used for other chemical notations that lack atomic coordinates (SMILES, InChI). PMID:17962754

  19. Use of a modified journal club and letters to editors to teach critical appraisal skills.

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire D

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report the use of a journal club and letter to the editor writing project to teach critical appraisal skills to health sciences students. Data were collected from 22 consecutive classes (n = 907 students) between 1997 and 2003. The program took place in an 11-week evidence-based practice course in the second year of a chiropractic curriculum. After didactic preparation, students participated in several journal club exercises to appraise papers representing specific research designs. Students then critically appraised a recent article of their choice and wrote a critical appraisal essay in the form of a letter to the editor. The project was evaluated through a review of student assessment, an anonymous survey instrument, and the number of letters submitted and published. Assessments of student performance were consistently high, yielding an average score of 23.7 out of 25 possible points on an objective scale. Responses from 277 students completing a survey on their perceptions of the project were positive, indicating that the goals of the project were being met. Over the 7-year period, approximately 450 letters were written, 12 were submitted for publication, and 10 were published. The results of this study suggest that the use of a journal club and letter-to-the-editor writing project may provide a means by which health care students can gain skills in critical appraisal. Further investigation into these methods should be undertaken. PMID:17425191

  20. [Stanis?awa Adamowiczowa--first editor in-chief of Journal "Przeglad Epidemiologiczny"].

    PubMed

    Gromulska, Marta

    2010-01-01

    First issue of Epidemiological Review was published in 1920. First editor in chief was Stanis?awa Adamowiczowa, PhD (1888-1965), who had worked in National Central Epidemiological Institute since 1919, and later, for period of 45 years, interrupted by breaks resulting from political situation, worked in National Institute of Hygiene. In this jubilee article, we present scientific resume of S. Adamowiczowa which focuses on her achievements in infectious diseases epidemiology, and particularly in analysis and evaluation of current epidemiological data distribution in Poland and worldwide in the period. She was the pioneer in systemic organization of registries of new cases of diseases in the highly populated Polish cities; she initiated use of statistical methods in this field. As editor in chief of Epidemiological Review, she started publishing Epidemiological Chronicle, which is continuously added as a supplement to every second issue, each year. Name of S. Adamowiczowa is associated with Ludwik Rajchman--director of Hygiene Section in League of Nations, with Witold Chod?ko PhD--she led courses in National School of Hygiene in Warsaw, with prof. Marcin Kacprzak--as co-author and co-editor of books on hygiene and epidemiology. A brief list of scientific publications of S. Adamowiczowa is also presented. PMID:20499652

  1. Improving rural newspaper coverage of nutrition stories: an educational assessment of editors' attitudes and learning needs.

    PubMed

    Nothwehr, Faryle; Chrisman, Matthew; Andsager, Julie L

    2014-11-01

    Local newspapers are an important source of information for rural residents but often lack accurate or helpful nutrition-related information. To improve the quantity and quality of nutrition stories in rural, local newspapers, it is important to understand the perspective of editors. An online survey of 51 rural Midwest editors was conducted to assess attitudes toward writing nutrition stories, sources of information, perceived challenges, and interest in learning more about writing such stories. Of respondents, 49% were female, and 63% had at least a 4-year college degree. Through a mix of closed- and open-ended questions, the majority indicated positive attitudes toward nutrition stories, were confident in their abilities to write them, and expressed interest in learning more. Challenges cited include lack of print space, small staff, lack of specific requests from readers for nutrition stories, and the need to avoid offending local agricultural businesses. Results should be useful in planning an educational intervention for editors. Meanwhile, public health practitioners should provide concise press releases to their local newspapers about their activities. Also, greater expressions of appreciation from public health professionals and other readers may lead to higher prioritization of nutrition-related stories, and ultimately to an environment more supportive of healthy eating. PMID:24648288

  2. How is research publishing going to progress in the next 20 years? Transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Seattle on Wednesday, 20 March 2013.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Holland, G R; Giannobile, W V; Hancocks, S; Robinson, P G; Lynch, C D

    2014-05-01

    On March 20th 2013, a one-hour session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing was held at the IADR International Session in Seattle. Organised by Kenneth Eaton and Chris Lynch (Chair and Secretary, respectively, of the British Dental Editors Forum), the meeting sought to bring together leading international experts in dental publishing, as well as authors, reviewers and students engaged in research. The meeting was an overwhelming success, with more than 100 attendees. A panel involving four leading dental editors led a discussion on anticipated developments in publishing dental research with much involvement and contribution from audience members. This was the third such meeting held at the IADR for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. A follow up session will take place in Cape Town on 25 June 2014 as part of the annual IADR meeting. The transcript of the meeting is reproduced in this article. Where possible speakers are identified by name. At the first time of mention their role/ position is also stated, thereafter only their name appears. We are grateful to Stephen Hancocks Ltd for their generous sponsorship of this event. For those who were not able to attend the authors hope this article gives a flavour of the discussions and will encourage colleagues to attend future events. Involvement is open to Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. It is a very open group and all those with an interest will be welcome to join in. PMID:24750223

  3. How is research publishing going to progress in the next 20 years?: transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Seattle on Wednesday, 20 March 2013.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Rex Holland, G; Giannobile, William V; Hancocks, Stephen; Robinson, Peter G; Lynch, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    On March 20th 2013, a one-hour session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing was held at the IADR International Session in Seattle. Organised by Kenneth Eaton and Christopher Lynch (Chair and Secretary, respectively, of the British Dental Editors Forum), the meeting sought to bring together leading international experts in dental publishing, as well as authors, reviewers and students engaged in research. The meeting was an overwhelming success, with more than 100 attendees. A panel involving four leading dental editors led a discussion on anticipated developments in publishing dental research with much involvement and contribution from audience members. This was the third such meeting held at the IADR for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. A follow-up session will take place in Cape Town on 25 June 2014 as part of the annual IADR meeting. The transcript of the Seattle meeting is reproduced in this article. Where possible speakers are identified by name. At the first time of mention their role/position is also stated, thereafter only their name appears. We are grateful to Stephen Hancocks Ltd. for their generous sponsorship of this event. For those who were not able to attend the authors hope this article gives a flavour of the discussions and will encourage colleagues to attend future events. Involvement is open to Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. It is a very open group and all those with an interest will be welcome to join in. PMID:24440711

  4. Hydrovolcanic evolution of the Joya Prieta maar, San Luis Potosí, northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila-Harris, P.; Aranda-Gomez, J. J.; Carrasco, G.

    2013-05-01

    The Joya Prieta is a Quaternary maar volcano emplaced at the western sector of the Sierra Madre Oriental fold and thrust belt. The crater is located at the axis of an open Laramide fold with a N20°W axis trend. It is the most easterly structure of the Santo Domingo Group, a cluster of intraplate maars and tuff-rings northeast of San Luis Potosí. A characteristic feature of these maars is that they are emplaced in close relationship with anticlines, exposing impressive inner crater walls of folded strata. In the Joya Prieta maar, the calcareous basement rocks are clearly exposed and unconformably overlain by the volcanic succession. A generalized stratigraphic sequence registers, from base to top, olivine-bearing basalt lava resting unconformably atop El Abra Formation limestone. The lava is overlain by thick and oxidized scoria and spatter agglomerate that grades into a moderately sorted spatter-fall layer with pervasive palagonite alteration. In direct contact with no evidence of reworking, pedogenesis or remobilization, the maar-forming sequence starts with parallel-stratified fall layers of altered basaltic pumice and scoria, with lava and limestone lithic clasts. This fall deposit marks the influx of xenocrystals and xenoliths, widely documented in previous works; they comprise mainly kaersutite mega crystals and spinel lherzolite respectively. The proximal fall deposit is divided into two thick layers by an indurated ash-tuff bed with pellets and single-rimmed accretionary lapilli. The upper layer of this fall deposit passes gradually onto an alternation of lapilli-sized layers with parallel ash-tuff horizons until it grades into cross-stratified, lithic-rich lapilli-tuff. The heterolithologic lapilli tuff is cemented on a fine ash matrix with palagonized juvenile clasts and abundant lava, shale and limestone lithics exhibiting a plethora of lithofacies in the like of parallel-bedded tuff, low-angle cross-bedded tuff and massive strata. This passes gradually onto the uppermost massive, lithic-rich lapilli-tuff with impact sags, antidunes and abundant lithic blocks forming heterolithologic breccia facies. The volcanic succession at Joya Prieta maar started with the eruption of 'dry' basaltic effusive products. At the final stages of this lava effusion, considerable amounts of groundwater gained entrance into the system forming the highly altered spatter deposit, this condition enhanced explosivity within the volcano conduit and near the vent. Volcanic tremors and moderate explosions may have occurred and thus affected the local aquifer, hosted in fractured calcareous rocks, therefore enhancing secondary permeability, what produced more efficient magma-water interactions responsible for the explosive phase. Hydrogeological conditions today and ancient may have to be explored in order to constrain the possible causes of late magma-water interactions.

  5. Followup Study of Transfer Students from C.O.S. to California State University, Fresno, & California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo, Fall 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Elaine

    A study was conducted at College of the Sequoias (COS) to assess the academic success of students transferring to California State University, Fresno (Fresno State), and California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal-Poly). The study focused on the number of units completed at COS, grade point average (GPA) at COS, COS units…

  6. Revision, Validation, and Evaluation of the Undergraduate Teacher Field Work Experience in Reading at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceaser, Lisbeth

    Education majors at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo are primarily English speaking only and need guidance in strategies for adapting instruction for a variety of levels of second language acquisition students. This project addressed the problem of a lack of sufficient preparation of undergraduate students to participate…

  7. A New Destination for "The Flying Bus"?: The Implications of Orlando-Rican Migration for Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreneche, Gabriel Ignacio; Lombardi, Jane; Ramos-Flores, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Puerto Rican author Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea" explores the duality, hybridity, and fluidity of US-Puerto Rican identity through the frequent travel of migrants between New York City (the traditional destination city for Puerto Rican migrants) and the island. In recent years, however, the "flying bus" has adopted a new number one…

  8. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  9. Spring stopover food resources and land use patterns of Rocky Mountain population Sandhill Carnes in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Virtually the entire Rocky Mountain population (RMP) of greater sandhill cranes uses the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado as a spring stopover area. RMP cranes in the SLV depend on unharvested grain provided on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge, and on waste grain in privately owned fields. In recent years, however, fall tillage and irrigation of grain fields has become increasingly widespread in the SLV. These changes in farming practices have resulted in an unmeasured reduction in waste grain availability for RMP cranes during spring and have prompted concern over whether current or projected foods are adequate to meet spring demands of the target population size of 18,000-20,000 RMP cranesa?|

  10. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation: Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goering, S. W.; Garing, K. L.; Coury, G. E.; Fritzler, E. A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The institutional and environmental analyses indicate that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  11. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, R.; Brunetti, G.; Feretti. L.

    2006-06-01

    This volume of AN contains the proceedings of the international conference The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetism, held in Bologna (Italy) from August 29th to September 2nd, 2005, hosted by the Istituto di Radioastronomia INAF. Since cosmic magnetism has been recognized as one of five key science projects for The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), one of the goals of the conference was to discuss the current knowledge on this and related issues, and to determine how observations with the SKA, in cooperation with other future facilities, will provide a deeper understanding of the role of magnetic fields in the cosmological process and in the structures that we observe today. The meeting started with the discussion of theoretical aspects, followed by the observational results and implications, and finally by the future prospects. In addition to the talks, listed in Sect. 2, about 40 posters were presented.

  12. Editor's Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozzens, Susan E.

    1986-01-01

    Offers perspectives and ideas on a range of issues related to policy-relevant research in science studies. Identifies and discusses major challenges and problems involved in science policy studies. Presents an overview of articles that address the theme of funding and knowledge growth. (ML)

  13. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The widespread eutrophication of coastal waters has been the subject to much scientific and management effort, yet we have too few examples where there is a substantive scientific record, and sustained tracking of management actions. In this issue Greening and colleagues review the time courses of ambient conditions, describe what was done to remediate severely eutrophic water quality, and demonstrate the recovery trajectory of a number of variables useful to track ecosystem responses. In addition, a compelling aspect of the paper is that it also describes the social side of the recovery, i.e., what was needed to bring the community and political action to perceive and act upon the issues, and develop a plan to address the problems. The improvement in water quality and environmental conditions currently taking place in Tampa Bay is an excellent example of what can be achieved with the combination of basic understanding of the scientific issues, application of reasonable technological advances, and the marshaling of popular support for action.

  14. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, was founded in 1957 by Niels Bohr and Torsten Gustafsson at Blegdamsvej in Copenhagen, joint to Bohr's legendary Institute. Today, memories of Bohr and his famous visitors -- Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Lev Landau and many others -- strongly contribute to Nordita's genius loci and inspire next generations of her visitors. Nordita awards ``Nordic Project'' grants to individual Nordic physicists to help conduct a world-class research in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Island, Norway, and Sweden). Research reported here was generously supported by the Nordic Project "Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Black Hole and Neutron Star sources" awarded in 2005 to Marek Abramowicz. The Project supported the ``Nordita Workdays on QPO" (March 25 -- April 1, 2005) organized by Marek Abramowicz, Axel Brandenburg and Juri Poutanen with help of Hanne Bergen, Helle http://www.nordita.dk/positions/norproject.html

  15. Editors' note.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Ellen R; Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The Fall 2014 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) contains original research that evaluates the role of teletherapy and online language exercises in the treatment of chronic aphasia; investigates whether improvements are maintained after in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and studies the use of in-home telerehabilitation for proximal humerus fractures. Within the context of two case studies, authors evaluated three service delivery models (direct, hybrid, and telepractice) for stuttering intervention. The results of a preliminary qualitative investigation are presented for telepractice in rural schools in Australia. And, schemas are offered for privacy and security analyses for store and forward applications in physical and occupational therapy. The Fall 2014 issue also contains a book review, and announcements from the American Telemedicine Association and the Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center. PMID:25945224

  16. Editor's Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Byrd L.; Gentry, Atron A.

    1995-01-01

    This issue focuses on problematic interactions between ethnic and racially diverse students and monocultural students. Declining or stable enrollments in four-year colleges by students of color mean that no major change in the experiential backgrounds of teachers appears likely, leading to strong concerns about fostering multicultural

  17. Editor's Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiute, Colette

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this volume is to examine a range of inquiries on the social nature of literacy development in a variety of contexts among children aged 3 through 12, considering literacy in the home and at school; and interactions between parents and children, between teachers and children, and among classmates. (MDM)

  18. Editor's Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Introduces the articles in this journal issue, noting the burgeoning interest in the roots of parental beliefs, values, and goals. Highlights thematic continuities among the otherwise diverse research approaches presented, for example, synthesis of different theoretical perspectives of parent beliefs, or the context in which parental beliefs

  19. Editors' Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shmuel; Collins, W. Andrew

    1993-01-01

    Introduces the topic of father-adolescent relationships along with two basic models of fatherhood. The first is of the father who does not take an active role in the upbringing of his children but who assumes responsibility to protect and provide for them; second is of the father who may be flexible, i.e., more involved, in response to varying

  20. Editor's Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pianta, Robert C.

    1992-01-01

    Explains the volume's goal of providing a framework for inquiry into the role of relationships between children and nonparental adults in children's development. Reviews the volume's seven articles, each of which addresses an important developmental question and has implications for policy and practice in child care and school settings. (BC)

  1. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Progress in marine sciences often follows the development of new methods. The Invited Feature Article "New Insight into Particulate Mineral and Organic Matter in Coastal Ocean Waters through Optical Inversion" by Xiaodong Zhang, Robert Hans Stavn, Alexander U. Falster, Deric J. Gray, and Richard W. Gould demonstrates a new method that uses scattering and transmissometer data to differentiate between particle size distribution of suspended mineral and that of suspended organic matter. The method helps define the particular groups of phytoplankton that may be dominant, whether organic detritus may be more significant in suspended organic matter, add insight on the dominant size classes of mineral aggregates, and helps differentiate between organic detritus-dominated systems and biogenic-dominated systems.

  2. Editor's Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge, Stanley G. M.; Makoni, Sinfree; Ridge, Elaine,

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a special issue that examines higher education in South Africa 7 years after apartheid and focuses on state-supported institutions, which constitute the main core of higher education in South Africa. Describes factors influencing higher education change and examines three steps taken by the Minister of Education toward the envisaged

  3. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    The widespread eutrophication of coastal waters clearly involves increased nitrogen loads, in most cases with nitrogen derived from human activities on contributing watersheds. This has prompted regulators, managers, and other stakeholders to set standards for water quality that involve lowering nitrogen loads to estuaries and other coastal waters. To carry out the proscribed lowering of nitrogen loads there are a number of options. In many instances and sites with high human density and intense activity, advanced wastewater treatment plants are unavoidable, but such environmental engineering approaches are costly. There are many coastal zones with lower population densities where other, less costly alternative strategies might be less expensive and more attuned to "green" approaches.

  4. Editors' Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Suggests that adults have the responsibility to teach youth about the danger of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Briefly discusses each of the five articles in this issue, which is titled Adolescents in the AIDS Epidemic, and deals with the prevention of AIDS among adolescents. (BC)

  5. Section Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groep, D. L.; Bonacorsi, D.

    2014-06-01

    1. Data Acquisition, Trigger and Controls Niko NeufeldCERNniko.neufeld@cern.ch Tassos BeliasDemokritosbelias@inp.demokritos.gr Andrew NormanFNALanorman@fnal.gov Vivian O'DellFNALodell@fnal.gov 2. Event Processing, Simulation and Analysis Rolf SeusterTRIUMFseuster@cern.ch Florian UhligGSIf.uhlig@gsi.de Lorenzo MonetaCERNLorenzo.Moneta@cern.ch Pete ElmerPrincetonpeter.elmer@cern.ch 3. Distributed Processing and Data Handling Nurcan OzturkU Texas Arlingtonnurcan@uta.edu Stefan RoiserCERNstefan.roiser@cern.ch Robert IllingworthFNAL Davide SalomoniINFN CNAFDavide.Salomoni@cnaf.infn.it Jeff TemplonNikheftemplon@nikhef.nl 4. Data Stores, Data Bases, and Storage Systems David LangeLLNLlange6@llnl.gov Wahid BhimjiU Edinburghwbhimji@staffmail.ed.ac.uk Dario BarberisGenovaDario.Barberis@cern.ch Patrick FuhrmannDESYpatrick.fuhrmann@desy.de Igor MandrichenkoFNALivm@fnal.gov Mark van de SandenSURF SARA sanden@sara.nl 5. Software Engineering, Parallelism & Multi-Core Solveig AlbrandLPSC/IN2P3solveig.albrand@lpsc.in2p3.fr Francesco GiacominiINFN CNAFfrancesco.giacomini@cnaf.infn.it Liz SextonFNALsexton@fnal.gov Benedikt HegnerCERNbenedikt.hegner@cern.ch Simon PattonLBNLSJPatton@lbl.gov Jim KowalkowskiFNAL jbk@fnal.gov 6. Facilities, Infrastructures, Networking and Collaborative Tools Maria GironeCERNMaria.Girone@cern.ch Ian CollierSTFC RALian.collier@stfc.ac.uk Burt HolzmanFNALburt@fnal.gov Brian Bockelman U Nebraskabbockelm@cse.unl.edu Alessandro de SalvoRoma 1Alessandro.DeSalvo@ROMA1.INFN.IT Helge MeinhardCERN Helge.Meinhard@cern.ch Ray PasetesFNAL rayp@fnal.gov Steven GoldfarbU Michigan Steven.Goldfarb@cern.ch

  6. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We wish to draw the attention of the readers of Comptes rendus Geoscience to two thematic issues of our companion journals Comptes rendus Physique (volume 16, issue No. 1, 2015, pp. 1-138) and Comptes rendus Mecanique (volume 343, issue No. 2, 2015, pp. 75-178), respectively devoted to "Granular Physics" and to "Mechanics of granular and polycrystalline solids". In particular, the issue of snow avalanches, which is of interest to the community of geoscientists, is widely discussed in these two dossiers.

  7. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    In the Invited Feature Article in this issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Ruben Kosyan and Violeta Velikova describe the disastrous anthropogenic impact on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, and Ukraine over the last 100 years and its inverse correlation with economic development as exemplified by improving water quality during a downturn in the economy. This degradation is now accelerating from the renovation and construction of ports and terminals, the development of resorts, hazardous industrial development, oil and gas exploration, and unsustainable agricultural and fishing practices. There appears to be no enforcement of protected areas. In the absence of scientific research on these issues, coastal zone management appears to be based on 'learning after seeing disastrous effects'. Without recognition of the need for Integrated Coastal Zone Management, the Black Sea coast and the coastal waters will deteriorate, as was observed between the 1970s and the 1990s.

  8. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-05-01

    In this issue Fabricius, Logan, Weeks, Lewis, and Brodie report a sophisticated synthesis of remotely sensed data that reveals important features of turbidity affecting the Great Barrier Reef region. This study details sources, geographic distributions, and transport, as well as highlights some processes leading to changing turbidity regimes. It is an excellent example of incisive processing and analysis of large, existing data sets, aiming at novel discovery of important aspects of coastal conditions. The results of course beg for efforts at obtaining and examining further information, on associated nutrient deliveries, particularly of nitrogen, detailing biological effects on food webs and corals, and more on the changing baselines that appear imminent. The results of this study therefore are an impressive basis for further work on important aspects of the largest coral region in the world, and could be an example to emulate elsewhere.

  9. Editor's introduction.

    PubMed

    Walters, LeRoy

    1985-08-01

    An introduction is provided for a journal issue devoted to philosophical questions surrounding new modes of human reproduction, the early stages of human development, and the genetic alteration of human beings. The introduction includes a chart of 16 alternative methods of artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, showing for each method the source of gametes, site of fertilization, and site of pregnancy. A two-by-two matrix is used to classify the major types of gene therapy, depending on whether it applies to somatic or germline cells and to cell repair or enhancement. PMID:11643819

  10. Lithium Systematics Revealed in Samples from ODP Leg 204 (Hydrate Ridge): A Tribute to Lui-Heung Chan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. E.; Chan, L.; Ungerer, A.

    2008-12-01

    Changes in chemical and isotopic composition of interstitial fluids with depth have shown to be powerful tracers of fluid sources and migration patterns, an area of research pioneered by Lui-Heung Chan. It was due to her expertise and passion to unravel key geochemical processes in accretionary margins that we pursued lithium analyses in sediment and pore waters recovered by drilling on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. The data reveals several important processes associated with lithium systematics in marine sediments. Specifically: 1) Lithium is consumed at shallow sequences, probably resulting from an interplay of reactions involving alteration of volcanogenic material that occurs simultaneously with release of light lithium from clay sites by exchange with ammonium, as shown previously for the Costa Rica margin. 2) Release of light lithium at depth is consistent with that previously reported in deep sequences of accretionary margins along the Pacific Rim, and likely occurs during clay alteration reactions that precede illitization. 3) An increase in dissolved lithium, associated with anomalously light lithium isotopic composition in a high permeability zone (Horizon A) document migration of aqueous fluids along this horizon, which is thought to act as a methane pathway feeding massive gas hydrate deposits at the seafloor. 4) Analyses of fluids collected from zones of massive hydrate formation at the summit sites reveal that there is no isotopic fractionation of lithium during gas hydrate formation. Lui's life long dedication to precise and accurate measurements of lithium isotopes forms the cornerstone to our understanding of lithium geochemistry and led to important new perspectives on a wide range of natural processes. The rigor of her analytical approaches, the influence of her publications, the patience and dedication to train others and her contagious enthusiasm will be sorely missed. She had a tremendous influence in the personal and professional lives of many geoscientists; she was an inspiration to us all.

  11. Archosauriform remains from the Late Triassic of San Luis province, Argentina, Quebrada del Barro Formation, Marayes-El Carrizal Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianechini, Federico A.; Codorniú, Laura; Arcucci, Andrea B.; Castillo Elías, Gabriela; Rivarola, David

    2016-03-01

    Here we present archosauriform remains from 'Abra de los Colorados', a fossiliferous locality at Sierra de Guayaguas, NW San Luis Province. Two fossiliferous levels were identified in outcrops of the Quebrada del Barro Formation (Norian), which represent the southernmost outcrops of the Marayes-El Carrizal Basin. These levels are composed by massive muddy lithofacies, interpreted as floodplain deposits. The specimens consist of one incomplete maxilla (MIC-V718), one caudal vertebra (MIC-V719), one metatarsal (MIC-V720) and one indeterminate appendicular bone (MIC-V721). The materials can be assigned to Archosauriformes but the fragmentary nature and lack of unambiguous synapomorphies preclude a more precise taxomic assignment. The maxilla is remarkably large and robust and represents the posterior process. It preserved one partially erupted tooth with ziphodont morphology. This bone shows some anatomical traits and size match with 'rauisuchians' and theropods. MIC-V719 corresponds to a proximal caudal vertebra. It has a high centrum, a ventral longitudinal furrow, expanded articular processes for the chevrons, a posteriorly displaced diapophysis located below the level of the prezygapophyses, and short prezygapophyses. This vertebra would be from an indeterminate archosauriform. MIC-V720 presents a cylindrical diaphysis, with a well-developed distal trochlea, which present resemblances with metatarsals of theropods, pseudosuchians, and silesaurids, although the size matches better with theropods. MIC-V721 has a slender diaphysis and a convex triangular articular surface, and corresponds to an indeterminate archosauriform. Despite being fragmentary, these materials indicate the presence of a diverse archosauriforms association from Late Triassic beds of San Luis. Thus, they add to the faunal assemblage recently reported from this basin at San Juan Province, which is much rich and diverse than the coeval paleofauna well known from Los Colorados Formation in the Ischigualasto-Villa Union Basin.

  12. New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, Rebecca

    2014-04-01

    We are delighted to announce that Professor Martin Evans of University of Edinburgh has been appointed as the new Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. Martin Evans has been Editor of the Statistical Physics section of the journal since 2009. Prior to this, he served as a Board Member for the journal. His areas of research include statistical mechanics of nonequilibrium systems, phase transitions and scaling regimes in nonequilibrium statistical physics, glassy dynamics, phase transitions and ordering in driven diffusive systems, mass transport models, condensation models, zero range processes and exclusion processes. We very much look forward to working with Martin to continue to improve the journal's quality and interest to the readership. We would like to thank our outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Professor Murray Batchelor. Murray has worked hard and provided excellent guidance in improving the quality of the journal and the service that the journal provides to authors, referees and readers. During the last five years, we have raised the quality threshold for acceptance in the journal and currently reject over 70% of submissions. As a result, papers published in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical are amongst the best in the field. We have also maintained and improved on our excellent receipt-to-first-decision times, which now average under 40 days for papers. With the help of Martin Evans and our distinguished Editorial Board, we will be working to further improve the quality of the journal whilst continuing to offer excellent services to our readers, authors and referees. We hope that you benefit from reading the journal. If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at jphysa@iop.org. Rebecca Gillan Publisher

  13. Creating OGC Web Processing Service workflows using a web-based editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, J.; Walker, P.; Grant, M.

    2012-04-01

    The OGC WPS (Web Processing Service) specifies how geospatial algorithms may be accessed in an SOA (Service Oriented Architecture). Service providers can encode both simple and sophisticated algorithms as WPS processes and publish them as web services. These services are not only useful individually but may be built into complex processing chains (workflows) that can solve complex data analysis and/or scientific problems. The NETMAR project has extended the Web Processing Service (WPS) framework to provide transparent integration between it and the commonly used WSDL (Web Service Description Language) that describes the web services and its default SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) binding. The extensions allow WPS services to be orchestrated using commonly used tools (in this case Taverna Workbench, but BPEL based systems would also be an option). We have also developed a WebGUI service editor, based on HTML5 and the WireIt! Javascript API, that allows users to create these workflows using only a web browser. The editor is coded entirely in Javascript and performs all XSLT transformations needed to produce a Taverna compatible (T2FLOW) workflow description which can be exported and run on a local Taverna Workbench or uploaded to a web-based orchestration server and run there. Here we present the NETMAR WebGUI service chain editor and discuss the problems associated with the development of a WebGUI for scientific workflow editing; content transformation into the Taverna orchestration language (T2FLOW/SCUFL); final orchestration in the Taverna engine and how to deal with the large volumes of data being transferred between different WPS services (possibly running on different servers) during workflow orchestration. We will also demonstrate using the WebGUI for creating a simple workflow making use of published web processing services, showing how simple services may be chained together to produce outputs that would previously have required a GIS (Geographic Information System) locally.

  14. Multistate Model Builder (MSMB): a flexible editor for compact biochemical models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Building models of molecular regulatory networks is challenging not just because of the intrinsic difficulty of describing complex biological processes. Writing a model is a creative effort that calls for more flexibility and interactive support than offered by many of today’s biochemical model editors. Our model editor MSMB — Multistate Model Builder — supports multistate models created using different modeling styles. Results MSMB provides two separate advances on existing network model editors. (1) A simple but powerful syntax is used to describe multistate species. This reduces the number of reactions needed to represent certain molecular systems, thereby reducing the complexity of model creation. (2) Extensive feedback is given during all stages of the model creation process on the existing state of the model. Users may activate error notifications of varying stringency on the fly, and use these messages as a guide toward a consistent, syntactically correct model. MSMB default values and behavior during model manipulation (e.g., when renaming or deleting an element) can be adapted to suit the modeler, thus supporting creativity rather than interfering with it. MSMB’s internal model representation allows saving a model with errors and inconsistencies (e.g., an undefined function argument; a syntactically malformed reaction). A consistent model can be exported to SBML or COPASI formats. We show the effectiveness of MSMB’s multistate syntax through models of the cell cycle and mRNA transcription. Conclusions Using multistate reactions reduces the number of reactions need to encode many biochemical network models. This reduces the cognitive load for a given model, thereby making it easier for modelers to build more complex models. The many interactive editing support features provided by MSMB make it easier for modelers to create syntactically valid models, thus speeding model creation. Complete information and the installation package can be found at http://www.copasi.org/SoftwareProjects. MSMB is based on Java and the COPASI API. PMID:24708852

  15. Authorship problems in scholarly journals: considerations for authors, peer reviewers and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Kitas, George D

    2013-02-01

    Authorship problems in scholarly journals shake the foundations of research, diminish scientific quality of papers and devalue records of citation tracking services. The 'Publish or Perish' mantra is thought to drive some instances of unfair, honorary authorship, particularly in countries of emerging scientific power. Though causes of honorary, gift, guest and ghost authorship are still ill-defined, it is possible to avoid some of these instances by improving awareness of what constitutes authorship and by adhering to the editorial policies of learned associations. This paper overviews common cases of inappropriate authorship and suggests options to solve related problems by authors, reviewers and editors of scholarly journals. PMID:23124697

  16. Virtual reality and claustrophobia: multiple components therapy involving game editor virtual environments exposure.

    PubMed

    Malbos, E; Mestre, D R; Note, I D; Gellato, C

    2008-12-01

    The effectiveness of a multiple components therapy regarding claustrophobia and involving virtual reality (VR) will be demonstrated through a trial which immersed six claustrophobic patients in multiple context-graded enclosed virtual environments (VE) using affordable VR apparatus and software. The results of the questionnaires and behavior tests exhibited a significant reduction in fear towards the enclosed space and quality of life improvement. Such gains were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Presence score indicated the patients felt immersed and present inside the game editor VE. PMID:18954278

  17. Avoiding Common Writing Mistakes That Make Your Editors and Reviewers Cringe.

    PubMed

    Porcino, Antony; Moraska, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Writing for scientific journals is not an inherently simple task for most people. It requires purposeful effort and multiple revisions of the initial manuscript draft. While each author and article has its own individuality, writing well to address the core elements of a scientific report is necessary. As editors of the IJTMB, we often see weaknesses in the core elements of the manuscripts we receive. This editorial summarizes common recurring issues, and provides suggestions on how to avoid these pitfalls in the submission of a research article or case report to the IJTMB. PMID:26668673

  18. Advanced software development workstation. Engineering scripting language graphical editor: DRAFT design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Engineering Scripting Language (ESL) is a language designed to allow nonprogramming users to write Higher Order Language (HOL) programs by drawing directed graphs to represent the program and having the system generate the corresponding program in HOL. The ESL system supports user generation of HOL programs through the manipulation of directed graphs. The components of this graphs (nodes, ports, and connectors) are objects each of which has its own properties and property values. The purpose of the ESL graphical editor is to allow the user to create or edit graph objects which represent programs.

  19. News from the editors of Fluids and Barriers of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This editorial announces a new affiliation between Fluids and Barriers of the CNS (FBCNS) and the International Brain Barriers Society (IBBS) with mutual benefits to the journal and to society members. This is a natural progression from the appointment of two new Co-Editors in Chief: Professor Lester Drewes and Professor Richard Keep in 2013. FBCNS provides a unique and specialist platform for the publication of research in the expanding fields of brain barriers and brain fluid systems in both health and disease. PMID:24940481

  20. From the Editors: Assessing the International Journal of Exercise Science after Two Years

    PubMed Central

    LYONS, T. SCOTT; NAVALTA, JAMES W.

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of the International Journal of Exercise Science continues to rise. As a student-focused journal, we are pleased to provide these future professionals with opportunities to gain experience with the peer review process, both through submitting their original work and as manuscript reviewers. Our editorial process is changing as section editors with specialties within the field of exercise science have agreed to take on these responsibilities. In addition, we are proud to also publish conference proceedings from various meetings held around the world. A list of individuals who have reviewed manuscripts throughout the last year is included.

  1. Ontology-Based Controlled Natural Language Editor Using CFG with Lexical Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgoong, Hyun; Kim, Hong-Gee

    In recent years, CNL (Controlled Natural Language) has received much attention with regard to ontology-based knowledge acquisition systems. CNLs, as subsets of natural languages, can be useful for both humans and computers by eliminating ambiguity of natural languages. Our previous work, OntoPath [10], proposed to edit natural language-like narratives that are structured in RDF (Resource Description Framework) triples, using a domain-specific ontology as their language constituents. However, our previous work and other systems employing CFG for grammar definition have difficulties in enlarging the expression capacity. A newly developed editor, which we propose in this paper, permits grammar definitions through CFG-LD (Context-Free Grammar with Lexical Dependency) that includes sequential and semantic structures of the grammars. With CFG describing the sequential structure of grammar, lexical dependencies between sentence elements can be designated in the definition system. Through the defined grammars, the implemented editor guides users' narratives in more familiar expressions with a domain-specific ontology and translates the content into RDF triples.

  2. Digital data from the Questa-San Luis and Santa Fe East helicopter magnetic surveys in Santa Fe and Taos Counties, New Mexico, and Costilla County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V.J.S.; Drenth, B.J.; Geophex Ltd.

    2006-01-01

    This report contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats and survey procedures for aeromagnetic data collected during high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico in December, 2005. One survey covers the eastern edge of the San Luis basin, including the towns of Questa, New Mexico and San Luis, Colorado. A second survey covers the mountain front east of Santa Fe, New Mexico, including the town of Chimayo and portions of the Pueblos of Tesuque and Nambe. Several derivative products from these data are also presented as grids and images, including reduced-to-pole data and data continued to a reference surface. Images are presented in various formats and are intended to be used as input to geographic information systems, standard graphics software, or map plotting packages.

  3. Pharmacological aspects of selected herbs employed in hispanic folk medicine in the San Luis Valley of Colorado, USA: II. Asclepias asperula (inmortal) and Achillea lanulosa (plumajillo).

    PubMed

    Kelley, B D; Appelt, G D; Appelt, J M

    1988-01-01

    Interviews with Hispanic families in the San Luis Valley of Colorado revealed that several herbs, including Asclepias asperula (inmortal) and Achillea lanulosa (plumajillo), are popular ingredients in Hispanic folk medicine preparations. A review of the scientific literature indicates that related species of Asclepias asperula and Achillea lanulosa contain pharmacologically active compounds; these data serve as the focal point for continuing ethnopharmacologic investigation at the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy. PMID:3352279

  4. {open_quotes}Black Gold{close_quotes} leads to new structural interpretation, Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, T.A.; Belcher, J.S.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    In the course of exploring for gold along the east margin of the Rio Grande Rift (northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains and northeastern San Luis Basin) live Cretaceous oil was discovered in fractured Precambrian gneiss in 25 of 42 shallow drill holes. Geologic mapping located two outcrops of Mesozoic sediments along the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Mancos Shale, Dakota Group and Morrison Formation sediments were identified from 17 drill holes. These are the first known occurrences of Mesozoic sediments in the area. Previous investigations had concluded that the Mesozoic section eroded from the San Luis uplift during the Laramide. Surface and subsurface geologic data was integrated with gravity, magnetic and seismic surveys for a new structural interpretation. The San Luis Basin is separated from the mountains by an intermediate block and the main basin-bounding fault is three miles west-southwest of the mountain front. A major low-angle, normal fault or detachment fault is related to Miocene rifting. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments are interpreted to be present in the hanging wall of this low angle fault. Buried and thermally matured in a Laramide intermountane basin, these sediments are likely the source of the present day oil found in Precambrian rocks.

  5. Potential human health risk by 234,238U and 210Po due to consumption of fish from the "Luis L. Leon" reservoir (Northern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Porres, M. Y.; Rodríguez-Villa, M. A.; Herrera-Peraza, E.; Cabral-Lares, M.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Conchos River is one of the most important in northern Mexico and the main surface waterway in the arid state of Chihuahua. The Luis L. Leon dam produces the Luis L. Leon Reservoir, which is the last major reservoir before the Conchos River enters the Rio Grande at the Texas-Chihuahua border. Activity concentrations (AC) of 234,238U and 210Po in fillet and liver of three stocked fish species (Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus), as well as in water from the Luis L. Leon reservoir were determined. 238U and 234U ACs in fillet samples showed values of 0.007-0.014 and 0.01-0.02 Bq kg-1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus species, present 210Po AC of 1.16-3.26 0.70-1.13 and 0.93-1.37 Bqṡkg-1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues respect to their concentrations in water was determined. Lepomis cyanellus species showed the highest BAF for total uranium in fillet, with value 1.5. The annual effective dose for uranium in adults by fish consumption in this work ranged from 4.46×10-3 to 3.68×10-2 μSvṡyear-1. The difference in concentrations of uranium in fillet among the studied species is likely primarily due to their differences in diet and habitat.

  6. The tectonic significance of K/Ar illite fine-fraction ages from the San Luis Formation (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemmer, Klaus; Steenken, André; Müller, Stefan; de Luchi, Mónica G. López; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2011-04-01

    The Sierra de San Luis forms the southern tip of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas in central Argentina. Two narrow belts of low-grade phyllites and quartz arenites, i.e. the San Luis Formation, have accommodated part of the strain-related differential exhumation of the medium- to high-grade metamorphic domains that constitute to the basement complex of the sierra. Eleven phyllite samples were subjected to the K/Ar fine-fraction dating technique. Results are interpreted in relation to the Kübler index of the illites, which indicate epimetamorphic conditions for the majority of the samples. Obtained ages between 330 and 290 Ma cover a period of compressional tectonics in the late Mississippian (Visean/Serpukhovian boundary) followed by the subsidence during the formation of the Paganzo Basin in the provinces of La Rioja and San Luis. These tectonic movements are coincident with the Toco orogeny in northern Chile and southern Bolivia. This suggests that the older K/Ar ages document the compressional stage and that younger ages record the cooling of the basement during the subsequent extensional uplift of the basement.

  7. Modification to the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Visual Editor (MCNPVised) to Read in Computer Aided Design (CAD) Files

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph Schwarz; Leland L. Carter; Alysia Schwarz

    2005-08-23

    Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) is the code of choice for doing complex neutron/photon/electron transport calculations for the nuclear industry and research institutions. The Visual Editor for Monte Carlo N-Particle is internationally recognized as the best code for visually creating and graphically displaying input files for MCNP. The work performed in this grant was used to enhance the capabilities of the MCNP Visual Editor to allow it to read in both 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) files, allowing the user to electronically generate a valid MCNP input geometry.

  8. The Editors' Recollections on the Occasion of the 60th Anniversary of The American Journal of Human Genetics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Volume 1, Number 1 of The American Journal of Human Genetics was published in September 1949. The first paper was an 18-page preface to the journal by H. J. Muller, president of The American Society of Human Genetics, entitled “Progress and Prospects in Human Genetics.” Charles W. Cotterman served as the first editor, and since that time a dozen other human geneticists have shared that distinction. In recognition of the 60th anniversary of AJHG, recollections of five editors are recorded here.

  9. Wikipedia and Medicine: Quantifying Readership, Editors, and the Significance of Natural Language

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Background Wikipedia is a collaboratively edited encyclopedia. One of the most popular websites on the Internet, it is known to be a frequently used source of health care information by both professionals and the lay public. Objective This paper quantifies the production and consumption of Wikipedia’s medical content along 4 dimensions. First, we measured the amount of medical content in both articles and bytes and, second, the citations that supported that content. Third, we analyzed the medical readership against that of other health care websites between Wikipedia’s natural language editions and its relationship with disease prevalence. Fourth, we surveyed the quantity/characteristics of Wikipedia’s medical contributors, including year-over-year participation trends and editor demographics. Methods Using a well-defined categorization infrastructure, we identified medically pertinent English-language Wikipedia articles and links to their foreign language equivalents. With these, Wikipedia can be queried to produce metadata and full texts for entire article histories. Wikipedia also makes available hourly reports that aggregate reader traffic at per-article granularity. An online survey was used to determine the background of contributors. Standard mining and visualization techniques (eg, aggregation queries, cumulative distribution functions, and/or correlation metrics) were applied to each of these datasets. Analysis focused on year-end 2013, but historical data permitted some longitudinal analysis. Results Wikipedia’s medical content (at the end of 2013) was made up of more than 155,000 articles and 1 billion bytes of text across more than 255 languages. This content was supported by more than 950,000 references. Content was viewed more than 4.88 billion times in 2013. This makes it one of if not the most viewed medical resource(s) globally. The core editor community numbered less than 300 and declined over the past 5 years. The members of this community were half health care providers and 85.5% (100/117) had a university education. Conclusions Although Wikipedia has a considerable volume of multilingual medical content that is extensively read and well-referenced, the core group of editors that contribute and maintain that content is small and shrinking in size. PMID:25739399

  10. Use of multiple indicators to assess the environmental quality of urbanized aquatic surroundings in San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Mirian R; González, Patricia; Moglia, Marta; Gonzáles, Soledad Oliva; Jofré, Mariana

    2014-07-01

    Urbanization can cause significant changes in the integrity of fluvial ecosystems, which makes it necessary to assess environmental conditions of areas where population growth rates are high. A study of the environmental quality of Chorrillos River (San Luis-Argentina) and its tributaries was carried out in order to evaluate the potential effect of an urbanization gradient. Six sites were sampled along the main course and tributaries of the river. Urbanization variables were measured and included to calculate an Urbanization Index. Physical–chemical analyses were performed in water samples to evaluate water quality through the use of a simplified index of water quality (SIWQ). Plants, macroinvertebrates, and amphibians metrics were used to assess the biological state of the studied sites. The Urbanization Index varied significantly between sites and was significantly correlated to the SIWQ. However, no significant correlations were found between SIWQ and macroinvertebrates and amphibians variables. Water quality of Chorrillos River and its tributaries is good, but it is affected by anthropic influences as reflected by the declining of SIWQ values. Although biological sampling constitutes an important tool in the assessment of water quality of rivers, in this report biological results were not conclusive. PMID:24659439

  11. Influence of urbanization and tourist activities on the water quality of the Potrero de los Funes River (San Luis - Argentina).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cesar A; Quintar, Silvya; González, Patricia; Mallea, Miguel A

    2007-10-01

    A study of the water quality of the Potrero de los Funes River (San Luis - Argentina) was carried out in order to evaluate the possible effect of the anthropogenic activities on the river developed in the homonymous town. Samples were collected during the period March 2000-November 2005 at three selected sampling sites (RP(1), RP(2) and RP(3)). Different physicochemical and bacteriological parameters (turbidity, pH, conductivity, suspended solids, alkalinity, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, chlorides, nitrates, phosphates, sulphates, chemical oxygen demand (COD), 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD(5)), dissolved oxygen, total coliforms, Escherichia coli and total heterotrophic bacteria) were analysed according to the Standard Method for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. When comparing the values of total coliforms, E. coli, total heterotrophic bacteria, COD, BOD(5) and phosphates from the zone without anthropogenic influence (RP(1)) and the urban zones (RP(2) and RP(3)) an important variation in the parameters was observed. These results indicate that the urban activity produces a serious and negative effect on the water quality, thus constituting a sanitary risk and may have a major impact on the trophic status of the Potrero de los Funes dam. As case study, we report on the use of General Quality Index (GQI) to evaluate spatial and seasonal changes in the water quality of Potrero de los Funes River. Results revealed a significant degradation of the water quality at RP(2) and RP(3). PMID:17294278

  12. Community Response to Concentrating Solar Power in the San Luis Valley: October 9, 2008 - March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B. C.; Hunter, L. M.; Kirkland, T. M.; Tierney, K. J.

    2010-06-01

    This report is about the social acceptance of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants in the San Luis Valley, approximately 200 miles southwest of Denver, Colorado. The research focused on social factors that may facilitate and impede the adoption and implementation of CSP. During the winter of 2008-2009, interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 25 CSP-related stakeholders inside and outside the Valley. Interviews focused on the perceived advantages and disadvantages of siting a hypothetical 100-MW CSP facility in the Valley, the level of community support and opposition to CSP development, and related issues, such as transmission. State policy recommendations based on the findings include developing education programs for Valley residents, integrating Valley decision makers into an energy-water-land group, providing training for Valley decision makers, offering workforce training, evaluating models of taxation, and forming landholder energy associations. In addition, the SLV could become a laboratory for new approaches to CSP facility and transmission siting decision-making. The author recommends that outside stakeholders address community concerns and engage Valley residents in CSP decisions. Engaging the residents in CSP and transmission decisions, the author says, should take parallel significance with the investment in solar technology.

  13. Evaluation of the transfer of soil arsenic to maize crops in suburban areas of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Alfaro-Barbosa, J M; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Pérez-Maldonado, I N; Caballero-Quintero, A; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2014-11-01

    The presence of arsenic (As) in agricultural food products is a matter of concern because it can cause adverse health effects at low concentrations. Agricultural-product intake constitutes a principal source for As exposure in humans. In this study, the contribution of the chemical-soil parameters in As accumulation and translocation in the maize crop from a mining area of San Luis Potosi was evaluated. The total arsenic concentration and arsenic speciation were determined by HG-AFS and IC-HG-AFS, respectively. The data analysis was conducted by cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The soil pH presented a negative correlation with the accumulated As in each maize plant part, and parameters such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) presented a higher correlation with the As translocation in maize. Thus, the metabolic stress in maize may induce organic acid exudation leading a higher As bioavailability. A high As inorganic/organic ratio in edible maize plant tissues suggests a substantial risk of poisoning by this metalloid. Careful attention to the chemical changes in the rhizosphere of the agricultural zones that can affect As transfer through the food chain could reduce the As-intoxication risk of maize consumers. PMID:25128885

  14. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  15. Detection of residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Antonio; Hernández, Sergio; Ramírez, Martha; Ortíz, Irmene

    2014-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides were intensively used in Mexico from 1950 until their ban and restriction in 1991. However, the presence of these compounds is commonly reported in many regions of the country. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region, San Luis Potosi state, which has been identified as possibly polluted by pesticides. Composed samples from 24 zones covering an area of approximately 5,440 ha were analyzed. The most frequently found pesticides were p,p'-DDT followed by ,p,p'-DDE, heptachlor, endosulfan and γ-HCH whose frequency rates were 100, 91, 83 and 54%, respectively. The concentration of p,p'-DDT in the crops grown in these soils was in the following order: chili > maize > tomato > alfalfa. The results obtained in this study show that p,p'-DDT values are lower or similar to those found in other agricultural regions of Mexico. Methyl and ethyl parathion were the most frequent organophosphate pesticide detected in 100% and 62.5% of the samples with average concentrations of 25.20 and 47.48 μg kg(-1), respectively. More research is needed to establish the background levels of pesticides in agricultural soils and their potential ecological and human health effects in this region. PMID:24813984

  16. Comprehensive Paleomagnetic Study of the Oligocene-Miocene Rocks from the San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.; Torres-Hernandez, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive paleomagnetic study of the Oligocene-Miocene sequence of lithological units from the San Luis Potosí volcanic field in central Mexico was accomplished to set up the magnetostratigraphic record. Two hundred and one oriented standard paleomagnetic cores corresponding to twenty-eight paleomagnetic sites were collected from all units. Rock-magnetic properties are characteristic for each unit. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves and continuous susceptibility vs. temperature experiments point from low to medium-Ti content in titanomagnetite as the main opaque magnetic minerals, presumably result from oxy-exsolution processes during the initial flow cooling. Opaque mineral microscopy supports this assumption. Unblocking temperature and hysteresis parameters suggests predominance of pseudo-single domain magnetic grain size. Thermal and alternating field demagnetizations show mostly well-defined univectorial magnetizations. Most sites present a mean direction with small angular dispersion. The overall mean direction (N=10, Dec=1.1°, Inc=34.1°, k=531 and α95=2.1°) is characterized by small angular dispersion and inclination close to dipolar value for the locality. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility lineation match the geologically inferred flow direction.

  17. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) concentration in soil from San Luis Potosi, Mexico: levels and ecological and human health risk characterization.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Orta-García, Sandra T; Ochoa-Martínez, Ángeles C; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia G; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Jiménez-Avalos, Jorge Armando; González-Palomo, Ana K; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in soils from the city of San Luis Potosi in Mexico and perform an ecological and human health risk characterization. In order to confirm the presence of PBDEs, outdoor surface soil samples were collected and the concentrations of PBDEs in urban, industrial, agricultural, and brick kiln industry areas were determined. The mean total PBDEs levels obtained in the study sites were 25.0 ± 39.5 μg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation) in the brick kiln industry zone; 34.5 ± 36.0 μg/kg in the urban zone; 8.00 ± 7.10 μg/kg in the industrial zone and 16.6 ± 15.3 μg/kg in the agricultural zone. The ecological and human health risk characterization showed relatively low-hazard quotient values. However, the moderately high PBDEs levels found in soils highlight the necessity to establish a systematic monitoring process for PBDEs in environmental and biological samples. PMID:26566197

  18. Luminescence dating of anthropogenic features of the San Luis Valley, Colorado: from stone huts to stone walls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Donlan, Rebecca A.; Kardos, Barbara Maat

    2015-01-01

    The Snake Nest Wall site and the Crestone Stone Huts are in the northern San Luis Valley, Colorado, and provide a unique opportunity to date high-altitude archeological sites of unknown age and origin using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). We sampled sediment underlying foundation stones of these structures to establish a chronological framework for each site's construction. OSL dating of the quartz grains directly under the Snake Nest Wall suggest that the stones and, therefore, the structure was most recently emplaced between 1855 and 1890 A.D. Dating of the sediment beneath the Crestone Stone Huts suggests the construction time of these huts is between 1860 and 1890 A.D. Analysis of the equivalent dose (DE) dispersion of the OSL samples at Snake Nest Wall and the Crestone Huts shows that the majority of sediments were fully bleached prior to deposition and the low scatter suggests that short-term or shallow alluvial processes were the dominant transport for sediments. In both cases, the OSL ages show that the construction was during very recent historical times, although it is likely that the Snake Nest Wall was rebuilt in the late 19th century. Further study is warranted at the Snake Nest Wall since it shows signs of greater antiquity and a continued presence of human use. The Crestone Huts are shown to be a product of railroad building during the boomtown days of Lucky and Crestone.

  19. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even more so than physics itself. The journal is successfully positioned at the crucial interface between fundamental research and technological R&D. Continuing in this position—that changes all the time—will require special attention to the evolving trends and to the novelties that continuously appear in our domain. At the same time, we should not dilute the 'physics' character that is the trademark of JPD. The second challenge is the impact of bibliometrics and ranking. This is again a rapidly evolving factor; it practically did not exist when I first joined the Editorial Board. The journal must reach equilibrium between scientific leadership and careful management of bibliometrics. On one hand, we must continue to improve its good position in the rankings. However, this objective must be reconciled with the duty to respond to new developments that, by their very nature, have limited bibliometric impact. In meeting this challenge, we can count on two very effective instruments that make our journal quite unique: topical reviews and special issues. Maintaining and expanding these programs is for me a top priority. I would like to thank in advance all the authors that will select our journal for the dissemination of their results. I am committed to providing for them an effective and open medium. Most likely, 'applied physics' will not be at the end of my mandate what it is now. However, the journal must continue to mirror not the past but the present and, hopefully, the future. Authors in new domains of applied physics, who may wonder if their research fits the journal scope, are particularly welcome; we will always respond to the evolution of our attractive, dynamic, wonderful discipline.

  20. Interview with Future Medicinal Chemistry's US Senior Editor, Iwao Ojima. Interview by Issac Bruce.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Iwao

    2012-10-01

    Professor Iwao Ojima studied at the University of Tokyo (Japan) before being appointed as a Senior Research Fellow and Group Leader at the Sagami Institute of Chemical Research. He is now Director of the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery at State University of New York (USA) and has been a visiting professor in European, North American and Asian academic institutions. Professor Ojima agreed to serve as the US Senior Editor of Future Medicinal Chemistry when it launched in 2009 and continues to provide his expertise to the journal. Professor Ojima spoke to Future Medicinal Chemistry about why medicinal chemistry is such an exciting field to work in, the state of the pharmaceutical industry, and what features and issues make this journal unique. PMID:23157234

  1. MrEnt: an editor for publication-quality phylogenetic tree illustrations.

    PubMed

    Zuccon, Alessandro; Zuccon, Dario

    2014-09-01

    We developed MrEnt, a Windows-based, user-friendly software that allows the production of complex, high-resolution, publication-quality phylogenetic trees in few steps, directly from the analysis output. The program recognizes the standard Nexus tree format and the annotated tree files produced by BEAST and MrBayes. MrEnt combines in a single software a large suite of tree manipulation functions (e.g. handling of multiple trees, tree rotation, character mapping, node collapsing, compression of large clades, handling of time scale and error bars for chronograms) with drawing tools typical of standard graphic editors, including handling of graphic elements and images. The tree illustration can be printed or exported in several standard formats suitable for journal publication, PowerPoint presentation or Web publication. PMID:24655308

  2. JOSPT Experiences Tremendous Growth, Change in 14 Years With Editor-in-Chief Simoneau in Charge.

    PubMed

    Nyland, John A

    2015-12-01

    As Editor-in-Chief, Dr Guy G. Simoneau and his editorial board have taken JOSPT from an acceptable US-based journal to a highly influential worldwide force behind contemporary orthopaedic and sports physical therapy research and practice. Today, the bridge Dr Simoneau constructed spans the orthopaedic and sports physical therapy globe for the betterment of clinical practice and research. His work fully supports JOSPT's latest strategic plan to provide value-added knowledge translation, develop a broader authorship and readership, increase global marketing of the JOSPT brand, and expand current relationships to new partners and stakeholders. The bridge places JOSPT on very firm footing, tying its rich history to the promise of an exciting and successful future. PMID:26620640

  3. Grammar, Punctuation, and Capitalization: a Handbook for Technical Writers and Editors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaskill, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Writing problems are addressed which are often encountered in technical documents and preferences are indicated (Langley's) when authorities do not agree. It is directed toward professional writers, editors, and proofreaders. Those whose profession lies in other areas (for example, research or management), but who have occasion to write or review others' writing will also find this information useful. A functional attitude toward grammar and punctuation is presented. Chapter 1 on grammar presents grammatical problems related to each part of speech. Chapter 2 on sentence structure concerns syntax, that is, effective arrangement of words, with emphasis on methods of revision to improve writing effectiveness. Chapter 3 addresses punctuation marks, presenting their function, situations when they are required or incorrect, and situations when they are appropriate but optional. Chapter 4 presents capitalization, which is mostly a matter of editorial style and preference rather than a matter of generally accepted rules. An index and glossary are included.

  4. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  5. Australian letters to the editor on tobacco: triggers, rhetoric, and claims of legitimate voice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine Clegg; McLeod, Kim; Wakefield, Melanie

    2005-11-01

    News coverage of tobacco issues influences both individual behavior change and policy progression. Thus, media advocacy is increasingly recognized as important for promoting public health. Letters to the editor (LTE) are a basic form of media advocacy, serving to demonstrate community sentiment on a given issue. Such letters are yet to receive systematic analytic consideration. The authors conducted an ethnographic content analysis of LTE on tobacco issues from a sample of 11 Australian daily newspapers over a 3-year period (2001 to 2003, N=361). They argue that letters are artifacts of active engagement in a public debate and note that various stakeholders adopt similar strategies to pursue their objectives. They illustrate how identifying personal and collective identities is crucial in the assertion of legitimacy of voice in LTEs. Better understanding is needed of both the particular issues that spark public engagement, and the salient rhetoric employed by advocates of disparate positions. PMID:16204400

  6. Comparison of surrogate reporter systems for enrichment of cells with mutations induced by genome editors.

    PubMed

    He, Zuyong; Shi, Xuan; Liu, Meirui; Sun, Guangjie; Proudfoot, Chris; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Lillico, Simon G; Chen, Yaosheng

    2016-03-10

    Genome editors are powerful tools that allow modification of the nuclear DNA in eukaryotic cells both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro modified cells are often phenotypically indistinguishable from unmodified cells, hampering their isolation for analysis. Episomal reporters encoding fluorescent proteins can be used for enrichment of modified cells by flow cytometry. Here we compare two surrogate reporters, RGS and SSA, for the enrichment of porcine embryonic fibroblasts containing mutations induced by ZFNs or CRISPR/Cas9. Both systems were effective for enrichment of edited porcine cells with the RGS reporter proving more effective than the SSA reporter. We noted a higher-fold enrichment when editing events were induced by Cas9 compared to those induced by ZFNs, allowing selection at frequencies as high as 70%. PMID:26778541

  7. Prior Publication and Redundancy in Contemporary Science: Are Authors and Editors at the Crossroads?

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Sonia Maria Ramos; Roig, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    We discuss prior publication and redundancy in contemporary science in the context of changing perceptions of originality in the communication of research results. These perceptions have been changing in the publication realm, particularly in the last 15 years. Presenting a brief overview of the literature, we address some of the conflicts that are likely to arise between authors and editors. We illustrate our approach with conference presentations that are later published as journal articles and focus on a recent retraction of an article that had been previously published as a conference proceedings. Although we do not make definitive pronouncements on the matter-as many concepts are evolving-we do argue that conference papers that contain sufficient details for others to attempt a replication and are indexed in scientific databases such as PubMed, challenge some currently held assumptions of prior publication and originality in the sciences. Our view is that these important issues are in need of further clarification and harmonization within the science publishing community. This need is more evident when we consider current notions of research integrity when it comes to communication to peers. Revisiting long-standing views about what constitutes prior publication and developing a clearer set of guidelines for authors and editors to follow should reduce conflicts in the research environment, which already exerts considerable pressure, especially on newcomers in academia. However, while clearer guidelines are timely, developing them is only part of the challenge. The present times seem to call for deeper changes in the research and publication systems. PMID:25341850

  8. Publication Criteria and Recommended Areas of Improvement within School Psychology Journals as Reported by Editors, Journal Board Members, and Manuscript Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Craig A.; Floyd, Randy G.; Fuhrmann, Melanie J.; Martinez, Rebecca S.

    2011-01-01

    Two online surveys were completed by editors, associate editors, editorial board members, and members or fellows of the Division 16 of the American Psychological Association. These surveys targeted (a) the criteria for a manuscript to be published in school psychology journals, and (b) the components of the peer-review process that should be…

  9. 77 FR 74175 - Solicitation of Review Editors for the Draft Report of the National Climate Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ..., Adaptation; Research Agenda for Climate Change Science; The NCA Long-Term Process. Dated: December 6, 2012... Report of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC). AGENCY: Office of... editors of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) National...

  10. [P. I. Shatilov--original domestic clinician, scientist and teacher, one of the first editors of medical journal "Vrachebnoe Delo"].

    PubMed

    Lesovoĭ, V N; Pertseva, Zh N

    2009-01-01

    The article tells about life and activity of original domestic clinician, scientist and teacher, one of the first managing editors of medical journal "Vrachebnoe Delo". P. I. Shatilov was presented as individuality, who united in himself such moral values as humanism, disinterestedness, faithfulness to physician duty, selflessness, understanding of participation in public activity. PMID:20455462

  11. Serials Management in the Electronic Era: Papers in Honor of Peter Gellatly, Founding Editor of "The Serials Librarian."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jim, Ed.; Williams, James W., Ed.

    This book assesses progress and technical changes in the field of serials management and anticipates future directions and challenges for librarians. The book consists of 18 chapters: (1) "Introduction" (Jim Cole and James W. Williams); (2) "Peter Gellatly--Editor with a Deft Touch" (Ruth C. Carter); (3) "The "Deseret News" Web Edition" (Stewart…

  12. A TV Reporter, an Adviser's Internship, a TV Anchor/Reporter, an Assignment Editor, a TV Photojournalist's Bag of Tricks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrow, Kris; Youngblood, Steve; Madden, Tracy; Hamburger, Jeff; Johnson, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Intends to help high school journalism students understand the field they are preparing for by presenting brief descriptions of a day in the work life of a television news reporter, a TV anchor/reporter, and a television news assignment editor. Describes the five-week internship at a local television news station of a journalism instructor. (SR)

  13. Editor Views of Press Role in U.S. and Europe: Differences Across Cultures, or Differences Within?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olien, Clarice N.; And Others

    To determine whether there are systematic differences in press role between nations or blocs of nations, an exploratory study examined structural differences between United States and European political systems and whether, in light of these differences, press roles may vary in some respects across continents. These editors were interviewed about…

  14. New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The Institute of Physics is delighted to announce that the new Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics will be Professor Giorgio Margaritondo of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. Giorgio will, with the help of his world-class Editorial Board, maintain standards of scientific rigour whilst ensuring that research published is of the highest quality. 'I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth.' said Professor Margaritondo. 'Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging!' Professor Margaritondo received the Laurea Summa cum Laude from the University of Rome in 1969. He has been a full professor of Applied Physics at the EPFL since 1990. In 2001, he became Dean of the EPFL Faculty of Basic Sciences. In 2004, he was nominated Provost and he served until 2010, when he became Dean of Continuing Education. He previously worked at the Italian National Research Council, at Bell Laboratories and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research activity concerns the physics of semiconductors and superconductors (electronic states, surfaces and interfaces) and of biological systems; his main experimental techniques are electron spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy, x-ray imaging and scanning near-field microscopy, including experiments with synchrotron light and with free electron lasers. Author of more than 650 scientific publications and 9 books, he was also coordinator in 1995-98 of the scientific division of the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste. In 1997-2003 he was coordinator of the European Commission Round Table on synchrotron radiation. He is the president of the Council of the European Commission Integrated Initiative on Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser Science (IA-SFS and then ELISA), the largest network in the world in this domain. He is Fellow of the American Physical Society and of the American Vacuum Society and Fellow and Chartered Physicist of the Institute of Physics.

  15. Arsenic and cadmium exposure in children living near a smelter complex in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Barriga, F; Santos, M A; Mejía, J J; Batres, L; Yáñez, L; Carrizales, L; Vera, E; del Razo, L M; Cebrián, M E

    1993-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess environmental contamination by arsenic and cadmium in a smelter community (San Luis Potosí City, México) and its possible contribution to an increased body burden of these elements in children. Arsenic and cadmium were found in the environment (air, soil, and household dust, and tap water) as well as in the urine and hair from children. The study was undertaken in three zones: Morales, an urban area close to the smelter complex; Graciano, an urban area 7 km away from the complex; and Mexquitic, a small rural town 25 km away. The environmental study showed that Morales is the most contaminated of the zones studied. The range of arsenic levels in soil (117-1396 ppm), dust (515-2625 ppm), and air (0.13-1.45 micrograms/m3) in the exposed area (Morales) was higher than those in the control areas. Cadmium concentrations were also higher in Morales. Estimates of the arsenic ingestion rate in Morales (1.0-19.8 micrograms/kg/day) were equal to or higher than the reference dose of 1 microgram/kg/day calculated by the Environmental Protection Agency. The range of arsenic levels in urine (69-594 micrograms/g creatinine) and hair (1.4-57.3 micrograms/g) and that of cadmium in hair (0.25-3.5 micrograms/g) indicated that environmental exposure has resulted in an increased body burden of these elements in children, suggesting that children living in Morales are at high risk of suffering adverse health effects if exposure continues. PMID:8344231

  16. Jorge Luis Borges and the New Physics: the Literature of Modern Science and the Science of Modern Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Mark Robert

    1992-01-01

    By examining the works of the Argentine writer, Jorge Luis Borges, and the parallels it has with modern physics, literature and science converge in their quest for truth regarding the structure and meaning of the universe. The classical perception of physics as a "hard" science--that of quantitative, rational thought which was established during the Newtonian era--has been replaced by the "new physics," which integrates the so-called "soft" elements into its paradigm. It presents us with a universe based not exclusively on a series of particle-like interactions, or a "billiard-ball" hypothesis where discrete objects have a measurable position and velocity in absolute space and time, but rather on a combination of these mechanistic properties and those that make up the non-physical side of nature such as intuition, consciousness, and emotion. According to physicists like James Jeans science has been "humanized" to the extent that the universe as a "great machine" has been converted into a "great thought.". In nearly all his collections of essays and short stories, Borges complements the new physics by producing a literature that can be described as "scientized." The abstract, metaphysical implications and concerns of the new world-view, such as space, time, language, consciousness, free will, determinism, etc., appear repeatedly throughout Borges' texts, and are treated in terms that are remarkably similar to those expressed in the scientific texts whose authors include Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrodinger. As a final comparison, Borges and post-modern physicists address the question of the individual's ability to ever comprehend the universe. They share an attitude of incredulity toward all models and theories of reality simply because they are based on partial information, and therefore seen only as conjectures.

  17. Sr Isotopes and Migration of Prairie Mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) from Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Pichardo, G.; Perez-Crespo, V.; Schaaf, P. E.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.

    2011-12-01

    Asserting mobility of ancient humans is a major issue for anthropologists. For more than 25 years, Sr isotopes have been used as a resourceful tracer tool in this context. A comparison of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios found in tooth enamel and in bone is performed to determine if the human skeletal remains belonged to a local or a migrant. Sr in bone approximately reflects the isotopic composition of the geological region where the person lived before death; whereas the Sr isotopic system in tooth enamel is thought to remain as a closed system and thus conserves the isotope ratio acquired during childhood. Sr isotope ratios are obtained through the geologic substrate and its overlying soil, from where an individual got hold of food and water; these ratios are in turn incorporated into the dentition and skeleton during tissue formation. In previous studies from Teotihuacan, Mexico we have shown that a three-step leaching procedure on tooth enamel samples is important to assure that only the biogenic Sr isotope contribution is analyzed. The same Sr isotopic tools can function concerning ancient animal migration patterns. To determine or to discard the mobility of prairie mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) found at Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, México the leaching procedure was applied on six molar samples from several fossil remains. The initial hypothesis was to use 87Sr/86Sr values to verify if the mammoth population was a mixture of individuals from various herds and further by comparing their Sr isotopic composition with that of plants and soils, to confirm their geographic origin. The dissimilar Sr results point to two distinct mammoth groups. The mammoth population from Laguna de Cruces was then not a family unit because it was composed by individuals originated from different localities. Only one individual was identified as local. Others could have walked as much as 100 km to find food and water sources.

  18. Luis Llorens Torres and the impossible return: identity, conflict and hope in the national poem of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Eugenio M

    2005-01-01

    The psychodynamic exploration of the content of literary words and of the personal lives of their authors oftentimes reveals how they can be mutually reflective of the other. Such is the case of the poem, "Valle de Collores" (The Valley of Collores), considered by many to be the national poem of Puerto Rico and of the author Luis Llorens Torres (1876-1944), regarded as the "Poet Laureate of Puerto Rico." The timelessness and wide appeal of certain literary works has been attributed, among other reasons, to the fact that they address universal inner conflicts that affect all human beings. The poem "Valle de Collores" is the narrative of a country boy who leaves home to face the larger world and, as he reaches adulthood, he looks back and expresses his impossible longing to return to the rural home of his childhood. It is a description of the universal struggles of human development and of separation-individuation, loss and mourning and a longing to return, and a wish to merge with the early parental objects of childhood. The poem also parallels the history of the Puerto Rican people, in their transition from a rural society under Spanish rule to an industrialized society as an American Commonwealth. This difficult transition resulted in a massive immigration of Puerto Ricans to the United States that continues to this day. The poem also represents the longing of many Puerto Rican immigrants to return to their island home, and to a simpler time of more fundamental values. The land that is left behind and longed for becomes a metaphor for the early maternal imago. PMID:16193548

  19. Luis Llorens Torres and the impossible return: identity, conflict and hope in the national poem of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Eugenio M

    2005-12-01

    The psychodynamic exploration of the content of literary works and of the personal lives of their authors oftentimes reveals how they can be mutually reflective of the other. Such is the case of the poem, "Valle de Collores" (The Valley of Collares), considered by many to be the national poem of Puerto Rico and of the author Luis Llorens Torres (1876-1944), regarded as the "Poet Laureate of Puerto Rico." The timelessness and wide appeal of certain literary works has been attributed, among other reasons, to the fact that they address universal inner conflicts that affect all human beings. The poem "Valle de Collores" is the narrative of a country boy who leaves home to face the larger world and, as he reaches adulthood, he looks back and expresses his impossible longing to return to the rural home of his childhood. It is a description of the universal struggles of human development and of separation-indi-viduation, loss and mourning and a longing to return, and a wish to merge with the early parental objects of childhood. The poem also parallels the history of the Puerto Rican people, in their transition from a rural society under Spanish rule to an industrialized society as an American Commonwealth. This difficult transition resulted in a massive immigration of Puerto Ricans to the United States that continues to this day. The poem also represents the longing of many Puerto Rican immigrants to return to their island home, and to a simpler time of more fundamental values. The land that is left behind and longed for becomes a metaphor for the early maternal imago. PMID:16570531

  20. Socio-Urban Spatial Patterns Associated with Dyslipidemia among Schoolchildren in the City of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aradillas-García, Celia; Palos-Lucio, Gabriela; Padrón-Salas, Aldanely

    2016-02-01

    The places where a child lives and attends to school are both major environmental and social determinants of its present and future health status. Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and some of their risk factors among child and adolescent populations are obesity and dyslipidemia, so finding the patterns of distribution of these risk factors by gender, type of school, area, and margination level is important to do health intervention focusing in their necessities to prevent diseases at younger ages. Because of that, a cross-sectional study was performed among elementary and junior high school students from public and private schools in six of the seven areas of the metropolitan zone of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Biochemical dyslipidemia indicators (triglycerides, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein) and anthropometric data (weight and height) were obtained. Seventeen public schools and five private schools with a total of 383 students were included. More than half of the studied population (53.0 %) had elevated triglyceride levels. A total of 330 students (86.2 %) had normal levels of total cholesterol with a mean value of 141.7 mg/dl, and 202 schoolchildren (52.8 %) had lower than acceptable levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with a mean value of 43.9 mg/dl. There were differences in the levels of high-density protein between the areas and the type of school where they had been studied. Finally, a total of 150 students (39.4 %) had at least one altered lipid value and 103 participants (26.9 %) had two altered values. Several students, despite their young age, showed a high prevalence of risk factors, so it is important to design programs according to their necessities. PMID:26666249

  1. [Geographic distribution of birds in the Sierra Madre Oriental of San Luis Potosi, Mexico: a regional analysis of conservation status].

    PubMed

    Sahagn Snchez, Francisco Javier; Navarro, Jaime Castro; Reyes Hernndez, Humberto

    2013-06-01

    The Sierra Madre Oriental region in the mexican state of San Luis Potosi is a relevant place for bird conservation at a country level. Therefore the main goal of this study was to analyze the geographic patterns of distribution and the conservation current state of the birds, to support the needs to expand the conservation areas in the future. Data was collected from various databases of zoological museums and collections, and field sampling methods conducted from January 2009 to May 2011. Potential distributions were modeled for 284 species using GARP software and then a map was developed to determine areas with favorable environmental characteristics for the distribution of species richness. Finally, the importance of conservation areas for the potential distribution of birds in the region was evaluated. A total of 359 species were recorded of which 71.4% are permanent residents, 19% are winter migrants and 4% are summer residents. From this total, 41 species were endemic, 47 were species at risk and 149 were neotropical migrants. The largest species richness correspond to oak forests, cloud forests, and tropical moist forests located at altitudes from 100m to 1 500m. Their potential distribution was concentrated towards the center and Southeast of the study area. Only 10% of areas with a high potential conservation was included in areas of priority for bird conservation (AICA) and just 3% of all potential areas were under some governmental category of protection. However, no conservation area has a management plan currently applied and monitored. The information generated is important for the development of management proposals for birds conservation in the region. PMID:23885599

  2. Introduction to the special collection of papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Hopton, Matthew E

    2012-11-30

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, description of the region, overview of the methods, and summary of the results. Although there are a multitude of scientifically based sustainability metrics, many are data intensive, difficult to calculate, and fail to capture all aspects of a system. We wanted to see if we could develop an approach that decision-makers could use to understand if their system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The goal was to produce a scientifically defensible, but straightforward and inexpensive methodology to measure and monitor environmental quality within a regional system. We initiated an interdisciplinary pilot project in the San Luis Basin, south-central Colorado, to test the methodology. The objectives were: 1) determine the applicability of using existing datasets to estimate metrics of sustainability at a regional scale; 2) calculate metrics through time from 1980 to 2005; and 3) compare and contrast the results to determine if the system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The sustainability metrics, chosen to represent major components of the system, were: 1) Ecological Footprint to capture the impact and human burden on the system; 2) Green Net Regional Product to represent economic welfare; 3) Emergy to capture the quality-normalized flow of energy through the system; and 4) Fisher information to capture the overall dynamic order and to look for possible regime changes. The methodology, data, and results of each metric are presented in the remaining four papers of the special collection. Based on the results of each metric and our criteria for understanding the sustainability trends, we find that the San Luis Basin is moving away from sustainability. Although we understand there are strengths and limitations of the methodology, we argue that each metric identifies changes to major components of the system. PMID:22560056

  3. Counterclockwise rotations in the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic fields of San Luis Potosí and Sierra de Guanajuato (eastern Mesa Central, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, Louis; Gattacceca, Jerôme; Rangin, Claude; Martínez-Reyes, Juventino; Demory, François

    2014-12-01

    We used paleomagnetic and structural data to investigate the late Eocene-Oligocene tectonic evolution of the Mesa Central area in Mexico. The Mesa Central was affected by NW-trending faults (Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system) coeval with a Late Eocene-Oligocene ignimbrite flare-up and by post-27 Ma NNE-trending grabens related to the Basin and Range. We obtained reliable paleomagnetic directions from 61 sites within the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic series (~ 30 to ~ 27 Ma) of the San Luis Potosí volcanic field and Sierra de Guanajuato. For each site we also measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Tilt corrections were made using AMS data for 33 sites where in situ bedding measurements were not available. Paleomagnetic directions indicate counterclockwise rotations of about 10° with respect to stable North America after 30-25 Ma. Structural data suggest that the volcanic succession was mainly affected by normal faults. However, we also found evidences for oblique or horizontal striae showing a left-lateral component along NW-trending faults and a right lateral component along NE-trending faults. Both motions are consistent with a N-S extension oblique to the Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system. Previous paleomagnetic studies in northern and southern Mexico show the prevalence of minor left-lateral shear components along regional-scale transpressional and transtensional lineaments. Our paleomagnetic data may reflect thus small vertical-axis rotations related to a minor shear component coeval with the Oligocene intra-arc extension in central Mexico.

  4. Letters to the Editor of the AAS Newsletter: A Personal Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1987 the American Astronomical Society Newsletter has published some 142 Letters to the Editor that provide the personal statements and concerns of astronomers about the policies, priorities, and experiences of being an astronomer. While these Letters do not provide a scientific sampling of the issues, they do provide an illuminating picture of the astronomical scene as seen from the perspectives of our colleagues. I describe the history and policies of the Letters section, then summarize the issues presented and debated in these Letters. The topics (in order of numbers of Letters published) are: (1) publishing and refereeing, (2) how the AAS and IAU conduct their business, (3) jobs and how to get them, (4) support for astronomy, (5) scientific units and time, (6) public policy issues, (7) planning for telescopes and space missions, (8) how astronomers do their work, (9) women in astronomy, (10) the work environment, and (11) other issues. A chronological list of the Letters by title and author is included.

  5. Seven decades of history of science: I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), second editor of Isis.

    PubMed

    Dauben, Joseph W; Gleason, Mary Louise; Smith, George E

    2009-03-01

    I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), the first American to receive a Ph.D. in history of science, was a Harvard undergraduate ('37) and then a Ph.D. student and protégé of George Sarton, founder of Isis and the History of Science Society. He went on to succeed Sarton as editor of Isis (1952-1958) and, later, president of the Society (1961-1962); he was also a president of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. Cohen was an internationally recognized Newton scholar; his interests were encyclopedic, ranging from science and public policy to the history of computers, with several decades as a special consultant for history of computing with IBM. Among his hundreds of publications were such major books as Franklin and Newton (1956), The Birth of a New Physics (1959; rpt., 1985), The Newtonian Revolution (1980), Revolution in Science (1985), Science and the Founding Fathers (1995), Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer (1999), and his last book, The Triumph of Numbers (2005), not to mention two jointly authored contributions, the variorum edition and new English translation of Newton's Principia, which will surely still be read a century from now. PMID:19554868

  6. Macedonian journal of chemistry and chemical engineering: open journal systems--editor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Zdravkovski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The development and availability of personal computers and software as well as printing techniques in the last twenty years have made a profound change in the publication of scientific journals. Additionally, the Internet in the last decade has revolutionized the publication process to the point of changing the basic paradigm of printed journals. The Macedonian Journal of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering in its 40-year history has adopted and adapted to all these transformations. In order to keep up with the inevitable changes, as editor-in-chief I felt my responsibility was to introduce an electronic editorial managing of the journal. The choice was between commercial and open source platforms, and because of the limited funding of the journal we chose the latter. We decided on Open Journal Systems, which provided online submission and management of all content, had flexible configuration--requirements, sections, review process, etc., had options for comprehensive indexing, offered various reading tools, had email notification and commenting ability for readers, had an option for thesis abstracts and was installed locally. However, since there is limited support it requires a moderate computer knowledge/skills and effort in order to set up. Overall, it is an excellent editorial platform and a convenient solution for journals with a low budget or journals that do not want to spend their resources on commercial platforms or simply support the idea of open source software. PMID:25711222

  7. Getting published well requires fulfilling editors' and reviewers' needs and desires.

    PubMed

    Schoenwolf, Gary C

    2013-12-01

    Publication in international scientific journals provides an unparalleled opportunity for authors to showcase their work. Where authors publish affects how the community values the work. This value directly determines the impact of the work on the field-papers must be read and cited to advance the field, and because the scientific literature is vast, only a subset of the literature is widely read and cited. Moreover, the value placed on the work also affects the authors' scientific reputation and career advancement. Consequently, it is essential that manuscripts receive the recognition they deserve by being published in one of the "best" journals that the scientific findings allow. Several factors determine where a paper is published: how well the topic of the paper fits the scope of the journal, the quality of the study and the manuscript describing it, the advance the paper makes in its field, the importance of the advance, and the extent to which the paper impacts the broader community of science. As scientists, we assume that our papers will be assessed objectively using only well defined scientific standards, but editors and reviewers also view papers subjectively, having biases of what defines a high-quality publication based on Western standards. Therefore, scientists trained in other parts of the world can be significantly disadvantaged in getting their papers published in the best journals. Here, I present concrete suggestions for improving the perception of a paper in the reader's minds, increasing the likelihood that it will get published well. PMID:24131034

  8. Modification to the Monte N-Particle (MCNP) Visual Editor (MCNPVised) to read in Computer Aided Design (CAD) files

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Randy A. Carter, Leeland L.

    2004-01-29

    Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) (Reference 1) is the code of choice for doing complex neutron/photon/electron transport calculations for the nuclear industry and research institutions. The Visual Editor for Monte Carlo N-Particle (References 2 to 11) is recognized internationally as the best code for visually creating and graphically displaying input files for MCNP. The work performed in this grant enhanced the capabilities of the MCNP Visual Editor to allow it to read in a 2D Computer Aided Design (CAD) file, allowing the user to modify and view the 2D CAD file and then electronically generate a valid MCNP input geometry with a user specified axial extent.

  9. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors at the Forefront of Improving the Quality and Indexing Chances of its Member Journals

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Chang-Ok; Oh, Se Jeong

    2013-01-01

    The article overviews some achievements and problems of Korean medical journals published in the highly competitive journal environment. Activities of Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors (KAMJE) are viewed as instrumental for improving the quality of Korean articles, indexing large number of local journals in prestigious bibliographic databases and launching new abstract and citation tracking databases or platforms (eg KoreaMed, KoreaMed Synapse, the Western Pacific Regional Index Medicus [WPRIM]). KAMJE encourages its member journals to upgrade science editing standards and to legitimately increase citation rates, primarily by publishing more great articles with global influence. Experience gained by KAMJE and problems faced by Korean editors may have global implications. PMID:23678253

  10. The Use of InSAR Data to Map Hydraulic Head Levels in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    A measurement of hydraulic head in the aquifer is a critical metric needed for effective water management. Here we report on the use of InSAR data to inform groundwater management in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. We selected the SLV for study, as it is an important agricultural area struggling with groundwater management after a period of extreme drought. The techniques developed here can also be used to assist groundwater management in other agricultural areas, such as California's Central Valley. Reeves at al. (2013) analyzed 30 C-band ERS scenes over the SLV between 1992 and 2000 using the small baseline subset method (SBAS). They concluded that InSAR data can be used to calibrate the subsidence-to-head relationship and temporally extend hydraulic head measurements. To study the extent to which InSAR deformation time series can be used to interpolate spatial gaps in the well-based head measurements, we need to derive an InSAR ground deformation map due to groundwater extraction over the entire SLV. A major error source of InSAR data is highly variable temporal decorrelation over agricultural areas such as the SLV, which limits the number of InSAR pixels that can be selected for the SBAS analysis. Because L-band spaceborne radar systems such as ALOS PALSAR suffer less from temporal decorrelation than C-band and X-band spaceborne radar systems, we processed 92 small baseline interferograms using 17 ALOS scenes acquired between January 2007 and March 2011. We further employed an SBAS ground deformation model to represent surface subsidence due to groundwater extraction, which consists of a seasonal deformation superimposed on a linear trend. We observed that the long-term subsidence rate is smaller than 5 mm/year over the entire SLV and the magnitude of the seasonal subsidence can be up to 2 cm. Our results indicate that there is no severe long-term water storage loss in the confined aquifer at the SLV, consistent with previous C-band InSAR study (Reeves at al., 2013) and well-based hydraulic head data. The next step in our research is to estimate Sk through calibration using co-located InSAR subsidence map and hydraulic head data measured at 36 confined aquifer wells. We can then interpolate the estimates of Sk spatially and reconstruct a hydraulic head map over the entire SLV jointly using InSAR and well data.

  11. A multi-dimensional analysis of the upper Rio Grande-San Luis Valley social-ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, Ken

    The Upper Rio Grande (URG), located in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado, is the primary contributor to streamflow to the Rio Grande Basin, upstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos at Presidio, TX. The URG-SLV includes a complex irrigation-dependent agricultural social-ecological system (SES), which began development in 1852, and today generates more than 30% of the SLV revenue. The diversions of Rio Grande water for irrigation in the SLV have had a disproportionate impact on the downstream portion of the river. These diversions caused the flow to cease at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico in the late 1880s, creating international conflict. Similarly, low flows in New Mexico and Texas led to interstate conflict. Understanding changes in the URG-SLV that led to this event and the interactions among various drivers of change in the URG-SLV is a difficult task. One reason is that complex social-ecological systems are adaptive, contain feedbacks, emergent properties, cross-scale linkages, large-scale dynamics and non-linearities. Further, most analyses of SES to date have been qualitative, utilizing conceptual models to understand driver interactions. This study utilizes both qualitative and quantitative techniques to develop an innovative approach for analyzing driver interactions in the URG-SLV. Five drivers were identified for the URG-SLV social-ecological system: water (streamflow), water rights, climate, agriculture, and internal and external water policy. The drivers contained several longitudes (data aspect) relevant to the system, except water policy, for which only discreet events were present. Change point and statistical analyses were applied to the longitudes to identify quantifiable changes, to allow detection of cross-scale linkages between drivers, and presence of feedback cycles. Agricultural was identified as the driver signal. Change points for agricultural expansion defined four distinct periods: 1852--1923, 1924--1948, 1949--1978 and 1979--2007. Changes in streamflow, water allocations and water policy were observed in all agriculture periods. Cross-scale linkages were also evident between climate and streamflow; policy and water rights; and agriculture, groundwater pumping and streamflow.

  12. Analysis of the potential impacts on surface water quality resulting from the proposed use of the San Luis Drain to transport agricultural drainage through the northern Grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-05-01

    An Environmental Assessment and initial Study for the interim use of a portion of the San Luis Drain for conveyance water through the Grassland Water District and adjacent Grassland areas was conducted. The project proposes the use of 18 miles of the San Luis Drain for the conveyance of agricultural drainage water for a period of five years and the elimination of agricultural drainage discharges from 76 miles of existing channels in and adjacent to the Grassland Water District. A report was prepared to (a) quantify the potential project effects on surface water quality within Salt and Mud Sloughs and the San Joaquin River using currently available data, and (b) to improve the understanding of existing water supply and drainage operations within the Grassland area. After submission of the original report it was brought to the attention of one of the coauthors that the database on selenium and boron concentrations in drainage water did not include the water quality data collected by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (CRWQCB). In addition, the US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) requested further examination of Grasslands hydrology to estimate the quantity of supplemental water that would be needed to restore the San Joaquin River to the same TDS and trace element concentrations prior to implementation of the project. This report addresses these issues.

  13. Representing the nature of science in a science textbook: Exploring author-editor-publisher interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiuseppe, Maurizio

    Current reforms in elementary and secondary science education call for students and teachers to develop more informed views of the nature of science---a process in which learning materials like science textbooks play a significant role. This dissertation reports on a case study of the development of representations of the nature of science in one unit of a senior high school chemistry textbook by the book's author, editor, and publisher. The study examines the multiple discourses that arose as the developers reflected on their personal and shared understandings of the nature of science; squared these understandings with mandated curricula, the educational needs of chemistry students and teachers, and the exigencies of large-scale commercial textbook publishing; and developed and incorporated into the textbook representations of the nature of science they believed were the most suitable. Analyses of the data in this study indicate that a number of factors significantly influenced the development of representations of the nature of science, including representational accuracy (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science conformed to what the developers believed were contemporary understandings of the nature of science), representational consistency (the degree to which similar representations of the nature of science in different parts of the textbook conveyed the same meaning), representational appropriateness (the age-, grade-, and reading-level suitability of the suggested nature of science representations), representational alignment (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science addressed the requirements of mandated curricula), representational marketability (the degree to which textbook developers believed suggested representations of the nature of science would affect sales of the textbook in the marketplace), and a number of "Workplace Resources" factors such as the availability of time, relevant expertise, effective channels of communication, and opportunities for professional development. The developers of the unit of the textbook studied in this thesis made judicious decisions in the face of competing interests as they endeavoured to represent the nature of science in their science textbook.

  14. InSAR data produce specific storage estimates for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.; Agram, P. S.; Lauknes, T.

    2010-12-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies in order to sustain water levels in the confined aquifer system. The water level from 1970 - 2000 remains a key, but poorly known, component for characterization. Some relevant data, such as water levels measured in wells, were collected during this period and incorporated into a groundwater flow model. However, data with finer spatial and temporal resolution would be very valuable in understanding the behavior and therefore the management of the system. Spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide maps of the deformation of the Earth’s surface at a spatial resolution of 50 m; these data are acquired approximately once per month. The deformation measured by InSAR can be related to water levels in the confined aquifer system. However, changes in cm-scale crop structure in agricultural areas lead to signal decorrelation over long periods of time, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply the recently developed small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected by the European Space Agency’s ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV for the years 1992-2001. The SBAS measurements show high levels of InSAR correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. By using SBAS analysis, we are able to estimate the magnitude of the seasonal deformation and compare it with hydraulic head measurements in nearby wells. We directly compare, at three well locations, specific storage parameters estimated from InSAR data to those estimated using traditional pump test techniques. The InSAR and pump test estimated parameters are: 3.4 x10-5 ft-1 vs. 1.7 x 10-5 ft-1, 2.2 x 10-6 ft-1 vs. 2.2 x 10-6 ft-1, and 5.3 x 10-6 ft-1 vs. 4.7 x 10-6 ft-1, at wells denoted ALA 6, ALA 13, and CON 2, respectively. Thus the well and radar data estimates agree within a worst-case factor of two at locations where we analyzed both data sets. The ability to obtain such high quality specific storage estimates suggests that integrating InSAR data into the current groundwater flow model may allow us to describe the finer-scale heterogeneities of the entire SLV confined aquifer system. This new form of data analysis could significantly advance our approach to groundwater management in agricultural areas lacking modern infrastructure around the world.

  15. A Review of the Proposed North County Center in Paso Robles--An Educational Center of the San Luis Obispo County Community College District. Commission Report 97-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This three-part report presents the recommendations of the California Postsecondary Education Commission on a proposal by the San Luis Obispo County Community College District (SLOCCCD) to create an educational center in the City of Paso Robles. Part 1 provides the Commission's conclusions and recommendations, indicating that, based on a needs…

  16. The Relation of Age-Grade Reading Skills to Environmental-Cultural Factors in the Life-Space of Scholastically Retarded Ethnic Groups in Selected San Luis Valley Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Donald I.; Gardner, Florene Field

    A study involving 101 sixth-grade children in the San Luis Valley Public Schools in Colorado was made (1) to determine factors causing measurable differences in scholastic achievement between Anglo American and Spanish American children and (2) to suggest methods for correcting these differences. History of the region, cultural differences between…

  17. NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2008-10-01

    The Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods are now standard routines in various data analyses, irrespective of ones own preference to the more conventional approach based on so-called frequentists understanding of the notion of the probability. It is not the purpose of the Editor to show all achievements of these methods in various branches of science, technology and medicine. In the case of condensed matter physics most of the oldest examples of Bayesian analysis can be found in the excellent tutorial textbooks by Sivia and Skilling [1], and Bretthorst [2], while the application of the Maximum Entropy Methods were described in `Maximum Entropy in Action' [3]. On the list of questions addressed one finds such problems as deconvolution and reconstruction of the complicated spectra, e.g. counting the number of lines hidden within the spectrum observed with always finite resolution, reconstruction of charge, spin and momentum density distribution from an incomplete sets of data, etc. On the theoretical side one might find problems like estimation of interatomic potentials [4], application of the MEM to quantum Monte Carlo data [5], Bayesian approach to inverse quantum statistics [6], very general to statistical mechanics [7] etc. Obviously, in spite of the power of the Bayesian and Maximum Entropy Methods, it is not possible for everything to be solved in a unique way by application of these particular methods of analysis, and one of the problems which is often raised is connected not only with a uniqueness of a reconstruction of a given distribution (map) but also with its accuracy (error maps). In this `Comments' section we present a few papers showing more recent advances and views, and highlighting some of the aforementioned problems. References [1] Sivia D S and Skilling J 2006 Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial 2nd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press) [2] Bretthorst G L 1988 Bayesian Spectruim Analysis and Parameter Estimation (Berlin: Springer) [3] Buck B and Macaulay V A 1991 Maximum Entropy in Action (Oxford: Clarendon) [4] Carlsson A E 1987 Phys. Rev. Lett. 59 1108 [5] von der Linden W, Preuss R and Hanke W 1996 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 8 3881 [6] Lemm J C, Uhlig J and Weiguny A 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 2068 [7] Dewar R 2003 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 36 631

  18. A survey of the awareness, knowledge, policies and views of veterinary journal Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines for publication of research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wider adoption of reporting guidelines by veterinary journals could improve the quality of published veterinary research. The aims of this study were to assess the knowledge and views of veterinary Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines, identify the policies of their journals, and determine their information needs. Editors-in-Chief of 185 journals on the contact list for the International Association of Veterinary Editors (IAVE) were surveyed in April 2012 using an online questionnaire which contained both closed and open questions. Results The response rate was 36.8% (68/185). Thirty-six of 68 editors (52.9%) stated they knew what a reporting guideline was before receiving the questionnaire. Editors said they had found out about reporting guidelines primarily through articles in other journals, via the Internet and through their own journal. Twenty of 57 respondents (35.1%) said their journal referred to reporting guidelines in its instructions to authors. CONSORT, REFLECT, and ARRIVE were the most frequently cited. Forty-four of 68 respondents (68.2%) believed that reporting guidelines should be adopted by all refereed veterinary journals. Qualitative analysis of the open questions revealed that lack of knowledge, fear, resistance to change, and difficulty in implementation were perceived as barriers to the adoption of reporting guidelines by journals. Editors suggested that reporting guidelines be promoted through communication and education of the veterinary community, with roles for the IAVE and universities. Many respondents believed a consensus policy on guideline implementation was needed for veterinary journals. Conclusions Further communication and education about reporting guidelines for editors, authors and reviewers has the potential to increase their adoption by veterinary journals in the future. PMID:24410882

  19. Letter to the Editor: On the term ‘interaction’ and related phrases in the literature on Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Janitza, Silke; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Van Steen, Kristel; Strobl, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    In an interesting and quite exhaustive review on Random Forests (RF) methodology in bioinformatics Touw et al. address—among other topics—the problem of the detection of interactions between variables based on RF methodology. We feel that some important statistical concepts, such as ‘interaction’, ‘conditional dependence’ or ‘correlation’, are sometimes employed inconsistently in the bioinformatics literature in general and in the literature on RF in particular. In this letter to the Editor, we aim to clarify some of the central statistical concepts and point out some confusing interpretations concerning RF given by Touw et al. and other authors. PMID:24723569

  20. Letter to the Editor: On the term 'interaction' and related phrases in the literature on Random Forests.

    PubMed

    Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Janitza, Silke; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Van Steen, Kristel; Strobl, Carolin

    2015-03-01

    In an interesting and quite exhaustive review on Random Forests (RF) methodology in bioinformatics Touw et al. address--among other topics--the problem of the detection of interactions between variables based on RF methodology. We feel that some important statistical concepts, such as 'interaction', 'conditional dependence' or 'correlation', are sometimes employed inconsistently in the bioinformatics literature in general and in the literature on RF in particular. In this letter to the Editor, we aim to clarify some of the central statistical concepts and point out some confusing interpretations concerning RF given by Touw et al. and other authors. PMID:24723569

  1. 2007 Rocky Mountain Section Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip - Quaternary Geology of the San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, September 7-9, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Coates, Mary-Margaret; Johnson, Margo L.

    2007-01-01

    Prologue Welcome to the 2007 Rocky Mountain Cell Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip, which will concentrate on the Quaternary geology of the San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico. To our best knowledge, Friends of the Pleistocene (FOP) has never run a trip through the San Luis Basin, although former trips in the region reviewed the 'Northern Rio Grande rift' in 1987 and the 'Landscape History and Processes on the Pajarito Plateau' in 1996. After nearly a decade, the FOP has returned to the Rio Grande rift, but to an area that has rarely hosted a trip with a Quaternary focus. The objective of FOP trips is to review - in the field - new and exciting research on Quaternary geoscience, typically research being conducted by graduate students. In our case, the research is more topically oriented around three areas of the San Luis Basin, and it is being conducted by a wide range of Federal, State, academic, and consulting geologists. This year's trip is ambitious?we will spend our first day mainly on the Holocene record around Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, the second day on the Quaternary stratigraphy around the San Luis Hills, including evidence for Lake Alamosa and the 1.0 Ma Mesita volcano, and wrap up the trip's third day in the Costilla Plain and Sunshine Valley reviewing alluvial stratigraphy, the history of the Rio Grande, and evidence for young movement on the Sangre de Cristo fault zone. In the tradition of FOP trips, we will be camping along the field trip route for this meeting. On the night before our trip, we will be at the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve's Pinyon Flats Campground, a group facility located about 2 miles north of the Visitors Center. After the first day's trip, we will dine and camp in the Bachus pit, about 3 miles southwest of Alamosa. For the final night (after day 2), we will bed down at La Junta Campground at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Wild and Scenic Rivers State Recreation Area, west of Questa, New Mexico, overlooking a majestic canyons of the Rio Grande and Red River. This is the 48th meeting of the Rocky Mountain Section of FOP, which was initiated by Gerry Richmond (USGS-Denver, deceased) in 1952 (see the following table, which lists all the Rocky Mountain Section field trips). The Rocky Mountain Section has been inactive for three years owing to a series of problems, including an unfortunate cancellation of Dennis Dahms' trip to the southern Wind River Range in 2005. Hopefully, this year's trip will provide the logistical initiative and scientific momentum for future Friends of the Pleistocene trips in the Rocky Mountain region.

  2. Letter to the Editor: Use of some inappropriate terms in Spanish in Oral Medicine and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Urizar, J-M; Mosqueda-Taylor, A

    2016-01-01

    Dear Editor: According to the Dictionary of the Spanish Language of the Royal Spanish Academy (DLERAE) (1) anglicism refers to those words or terms of English language that are used in another. The Spanish language has acquired and uses numerous anglicisms, especially for words that have no option to be translated into Spanish, such as those absent in this language like internet, wifi, whisky, etc. In Medicine there is a lot of anglicisms are inevitably used today in the medical language, such as: stress, test, distress, gold standard, score, shunt, level, etc. Dentistry also commonly uses many anglicisms, such as forceps, bonding, inlays, composite, etc. that would be justified in most cases due to the absence of a fully equivalent word in Spanish. However, in some instances this is debatable, and their use only represents a linguistic simplification. Our intention by sending this letter is to draw attention of the readers of this journal over temptation of giving a Spanish style to certain English words employed in Oral Medicine and Pathology. To illustrate this we present three examples of this inadequate circumstance. The first refers to "disorder", a term widely used in recent years in connection with oral precancer (oral potentially malignant disorders). This word is usually translated as "desorden" ,a word which although may sound very similar in Spanish, does not means exactly the same and it is not justified to use it. According DLERAE (1) when we say "desorden" we mean: 1) confusion and disorderly or 2) disturbance of order and discipline of a group, a meeting, a community of people, or 3) disturbance that alters the tranquility of public, or 4) excess or abuse. Therefore, we consider more appropriate to translate it as "trastorno", whose meanings in DLERAE (1) are: 1) action and effect of modify the permanent features of something or the development of a process, and 2) mild impairment of health. The word "trastornar" has, among others, the meanings: 1) reverse the regular order of something and 2) to alter the normal functioning of something or the activity of someone. Our proposal is to translate "oral potentially malignant disorders" into Spanish as "trastornos orales potencialmente malignos". Similarly, the term "verrucous", which defines a similar clinical appearance of verrucae is very often mistakenly translated into Spanish as "verrucoso", a word that has no basis in the DLERAE (1). We therefore believe that this word should be translated as "verrugoso", and therefore "verrucous leukoplakia" should be translated as "leucoplasia verrugosa", analogous to the translation of "verruga" for the English term "verruca". Finally, another inadequate translation into Spanish occurs with the word "necrotizing", which is usually translated incorrectly as "necrotizante", a term that does not exist in the DLERAE (1). Thus, we believe it should be translated into Spanish as "necrosante" coming from the verb "necrosar" (action to produce necrosis)1, so that "necrotizing sialometaplasia" would be translated as "sialometaplasia necrosante" as "necrotizing granulomas" would be "granulomas necrosantes". The confusion stems from the act of trying to translate the English verbs ending with "tize" as "tizar", when these should be left in their Spanish infinitive form "ar", and therefore "anesthetize" is "anestesiar" or "phagocytize" is "fagocitar", etc. PMID:26827072

  3. The editor, the publisher, and his mother: the representation of lesbians and gays in the New York Times.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Daniel; Barclay, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The attention and prominence given to issues in media outlets may affect the importance citizens attribute to them, so the actors who influence mass media coverage decisions may have political power in society generally. This article seeks to measure the relative influence of journalists, social trends, events, government officials, editors, and owners on the New York Times coverage of lesbians and gays from 1960 to 1995. Although many factors affected the nature and frequency of such coverage, the findings of this article show that the owners of the Times exerted decisive influence. Documentary evidence reveals that the Times' owners actively intervened to suppress coverage of lesbians and gays until 1987, even as reporters and editors recognized that increased social visibility made them newsworthy. Statistical analysis confirms that, although some actual events and statements of officials attracted attention from the newspaper throughout the period, they were more likely to generate prominent coverage after 1987 when the stories were consistent with the enthusiasms of the owners. PMID:24059965

  4. "Anti-smoking data are exaggerated" versus "the data are clear and indisputable": examining letters to the editor about tobacco.

    PubMed

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Harris, Jenine K; Israel, Kendre; Schell, Sarah; Mohr, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Media advocacy plays a unique role in tobacco control policy development. Letters to the editor in particular are an interesting form of media advocacy because they reflect community sentiment regarding the policy agenda and provide insight into the public debate. The authors used ethnographic context analysis to examine the techniques used by writers of 262 tobacco-related letters to the editor published in 61 newspapers across Missouri over a 2-year period when tobacco tax and smoke-free indoor air initiatives were occurring across the state. The authors found that pro-tobacco control letter writers often used didactic strategies, citing numbers and reports, to convey information and presented their training or experience as a health professional (e.g., M.D., Ph.D.) to add legitimacy to their arguments. Anti-tobacco control letter writers, in contrast, used narrative strategies to support their stance, claimed authority as a smoker or small business owner to legitimize their claims by relating to the audience, and used collectivity to capture the attention of policymakers. These results present the importance of strategic media advocacy in tobacco control. Tobacco control advocates should increase their use of narrative strategies and collectivity in order to better connect with the public and policymakers. PMID:22376195

  5. From the Editor's Desk, Editor's Highlights, Letters to the Editor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This issue of Toxicological Sciences features several exciting changes: a redesigned cover, revised category subheadings, and this “Look Inside ToxSci” feature. Together with my esteemed colleagues in the field of green chemistry, we have outlined some exciting opportunities for the field of toxicology in the editorial on green chemistry and toxicology. There are insightful articles on the regulatory challenges regarding mixtures that are being addressed by the European Union and on risk assessment of carbon nanotubes. In the past, we have highlighted a single article from each issue. It has become increasingly difficult to select just one article from the volume of high quality work, so beginning this month we will highlight multiple articles in each issue here in “Look Inside ToxSci.” From solvents, pesticides, and nanoparticles to the microbiome, the highlighted articles span the breadth of our field. Of course, this issue contains something that will never change; our raison d'etre …the best original research in the field of toxicology. —Gary W. Miller PMID:25232149

  6. Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet: Letter to the Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Thomas P; Wenzel, Thomas P; Ross, Marc

    2008-05-01

    Letter to the Editors from Leonard Evans, Bloomfield Hills, MI: Single-vehicle crashes, which account for half of occupant fatalities, are not mentioned in 'Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet', by Thomas P. Wenzel and Marc Ross (March-April). Simple physics shows that in such crashes risk declines as vehicle mass increases. The authors write 'driving imported luxury cars carries extremely low risk, for reasons that are not obvious'. The reasons are obvious--the cars are purchased by low-risk drivers. If they swapped vehicles with drivers of sports cars (which have high risk), the risks would stick with the drivers, not the vehicles. The article reflects the American belief that death on our roads can be substantially reduced by making vehicles in which it is safer to crash. From 1979 through 2002, Great Britain, Canada and Australia reduced fatalities by an average of 49 percent, compared with 16 percent in the U.S. Accumulating the differences over this time shows that by merely matching the safety performance of these other countries, about 200,000 fewer Americans would have died. These trends continue. In 2006 the U.S. recorded 42,642 traffic deaths, a modest 22 percent decline from our all-time high. Sweden recorded 445, a reduction of 66 percent from their all-time high. The obsessive focus on vehicles rather than on countermeasures that scientific research shows substantially reduce risk is at the core of our dramatic safety failure. The only way to substantially reduce deaths is to reduce the risk of crashing, not to make it safer to crash. The response from Drs. Wenzel and Ross: Of course Dr. Evans is correct in stating that driver behavior influences crash risk. In our article we made clear that our estimates of risk include how well a vehicle/driver combination avoids a crash, as well as how crash-worthy a vehicle (and robust a driver) is once a crash occurs. We also analyzed two variables that can account for driver behavior: the fraction of all driver fatalities that are young men, and a 'bad driver' rating that combines information about the current crash (drug or alcohol involvement, driving without a license, or reckless driving) as well as the operator's driving record for the previous three years. For example, the high risks of sports cars, and the low risks of minivans, are clearly influenced by who drives these types of vehicles (36 percent young males and 0.77 bad driver rating for sports cars, vs. 4 percent and 0.21 for minivans; the average values for all types of cars are 20 percent and 0.50). On the other hand, we were surprised to find that the imported luxury cars, with the lowest risks, have only average drivers (21 percent young males, 0.57 bad driver rating). That is the basis for our conclusion that the design of imported luxury vehicles, or at least specific safety features on them, overcome risky behavior taken by their drivers. The safety of vehicles has greatly improved over the years. In our studies we have found several examples of models that greatly reduced their risks over time; for example, the Ford Focus has a much better risk to its drivers (118) than the Ford Escort it replaced (148). Our data indicate that more young males drive the Focus (21 percent) than the Escort (15 percent), and that Focus drivers are perhaps slightly more risky (0.50 vs. 0.44 bad driver rating). Clearly vehicle design does not play as small a role in vehicle safety as Dr. Evans suggests. Dr. Evans asserts that we ignore single-vehicle crashes and that simple physics dictates that vehicle mass provides safety in single-vehicle crashes. By itself, additional vehicle mass does provide some protection from rapid deceleration in crashes with a movable object, particularly for an unbelted occupant. However, when it comes to vehicle safety, our research by vehicle model indicates that there is essentially no relationship between car mass and risk, even in frontal crashes. In his own papers, Dr. Evans appears to admit that it is not clear whether mass, or size (specifically crush space) is inherent to vehicle safety. Additional research indicates that it is not size per se that protects in two-vehicle crashes, but how well the stiff structures on the vehicles are aligned. The auto manufacturing industry has voluntarily made design changes to their pickup trucks to increase the likelihood that truck and car bumpers will interact in a frontal crash, reducing the aggressivity of pickup trucks in recent years. Regarding the differences in experiences between the U.S. and other countries, it is important to keep in mind that the U.S. vehicle fleet is fairly unique; about half of U.S. vehicles are light duty trucks (pickups, SUVs and minivans), which many studies have shown are dangerous to other road users.

  7. Potential for RbGd 2Br 7:Ce, LaBr 3:Ce, LaBr 3:Ce, and LuI 3:Ce in nuclear medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2005-01-01

    Several new scintillators (RbGd2Br7:Ce, LaCl3:Ce, LaBr3:Ce, and LuI3:Ce) have excellent energy resolution, high light output, short decay time, and moderate density and effective atomic number, making them attractive for nuclear medical imaging. We analyze how well these four materials meet the requirements for SPECT and PET. Because of their high light output and excellent energy resolution, LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce have the potential to replace NaI:Tl as the material of choice for SPECT. The light output and energy resolution make LaBr3:Ce and LuI3:Ce the most promising of these scintillators for PET, but their relatively low density and photoelectric fraction make them less attractive than BGO and LSO.

  8. Survey of editors and reviewers of high-impact psychology journals: statistical and research design problems in submitted manuscripts.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alex; Reeder, Rachelle; Hyun, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed 21 editors and reviewers from major psychology journals to identify and describe the statistical and design errors they encounter most often and to get their advice regarding prevention of these problems. Content analysis of the text responses revealed themes in 3 major areas: (a) problems with research design and reporting (e.g., lack of an a priori power analysis, lack of congruence between research questions and study design/analysis, failure to adequately describe statistical procedures); (b) inappropriate data analysis (e.g., improper use of analysis of variance, too many statistical tests without adjustments, inadequate strategy for addressing missing data); and (c) misinterpretation of results. If researchers attended to these common methodological and analytic issues, the scientific quality of manuscripts submitted to high-impact psychology journals might be significantly improved. PMID:21560804

  9. A Medieval Irish Treatise on Astronomy Recalled, with a Memoir of its Translator and Editor, Maura Power (1887-1916)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck, M. T.; Conway-Piskorski, M.

    1998-01-01

    A 15th century treatise on astronomy in Irish, an adaptation of a Latin translation of an older Arabic text, was transcribed and published together with an English translation and commentaries under the title An Irish Astronomical Tract in 1914. This work is familiar to Celtic language scholars but is little known among astronomers. Here we briefly describe the text, and include a memoir of its editor and translator Maura Power, a young woman who combined a specialist knowledge of the Irish language with an understanding of medieval science. We also recall two other Irish scholars - the geologist Maxwell Close and the astronomer John Ellard Gore - who played their part in recognizing the value of this early Irish scientific text.

  10. Digital data and derivative products from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the central San Luis basin, covering parts of Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande counties, Colorado, and Taos county, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V.J.S.; Webbers, Ank; PRJ, Inc

    2005-01-01

    This report describes data collected from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey flown over the central San Luis basin during October, 2004, by PRJ, Inc., on contract to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The survey extends from just north of Alamosa, Colorado, southward to just northwest of Taos, New Mexico. It covers large parts of the San Luis Valley in Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande Counties, southern Colorado, and the Taos Plateau in Taos County, northern New Mexico. The survey was designed to complement two surveys previously acquired along the eastern borders of the San Luis Basin over the vicinities of Taos, New Mexico (Bankey and others, 2004a) and Blanca, Colorado (Bankey and others, 2004b). Our overall objective in conducting these surveys is to improve knowledge of the subsurface geologic framework in order to understand ground-water systems in populated alluvial basins along the Rio Grande. These USGS efforts are conducted in collaboration with other federal, state, and local governmental entities where possible.

  11. Erratum: Letter to the Editor: Exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma (buphthalmos) from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} is the reprint of a corrected table from a previous paper about the exclusion of primary congenital glaucoma from two candidate regions of chromosome arm 6p and chromosome 11.

  12. Letter to The Editor: Setting the record straight: a rebuttal to an erroneous analysis on transgenic insecticidal crops and natural enemies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A letter to the editor was submitted in reply to an article published in Environmental Entomology by Lovei, Andow and Arpaia entitled “ Transgenic Insecticidal Crops and Natural Enemies: A Detailed Review of Laboratory Studies”. The non-target effects of transgenic insecticidal crops has been a topi...

  13. Response to the Letter to the Editor of Crop Science from Donald R. Davis regarding our research article published in Crop Science (2011: 51:2721-2727)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This letter serves as a response to the Letter to the Editor submitted by Donald R. Davis regarding our research article entitled “Mineral Concentration of Broccoli Florets in Relation to Year of Cultivar Release” published in Crop Science (2011, 51:2721-2727). In our manuscript, we clearly stated ...

  14. A Study of the Perceptions of Publishers, Editors and Education Reporters Related to the Desirability and Feasibility of Three Approaches to Increasing Newspaper Coverage of American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, James Brian

    This study sought to determine the perceptions of U.S daily newspaper publishers, editors, and education reporters regarding the desirability and feasibility of three approaches to increasing education news coverage: increased traditional local emphasis on education news coverage by daily newspapers, expanded wire service coverage of education,…

  15. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation of the critical organizational/business processes. In particular, this paper examines the issues of execution atomicity and failure atomicity, differentiating between correctness requirements of system failures and logical failures, and surveys techniques that can be used to ensure data consistency in workflow management systems. While the first paper is concerned with correctness assuming transactional workflows in which selective transactional properties are associated with individual tasks or the entire workflow, the second paper, `Scheduling workflows by enforcing intertask dependencies' by Attie et al, assumes that the tasks can be either transactions or other activities involving legacy systems. This second paper describes the modelling and specification of conditions involving events and dependencies among tasks within a workflow using temporal logic and finite state automata. It also presents a scheduling algorithm that enforces all stated dependencies by executing at any given time only those events that are allowed by all the dependency automata and in an order as specified by the dependencies. In any system with decentralized control, there is a need to effectively cope with the tension that exists between autonomy and consistency requirements. In `A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems', Ben-Shaul and Heineman focus on the specific requirement of enforcing failure atomicity in decentralized, autonomous and interacting workflow management systems. Their paper describes a model in which each workflow manager must be able to specify the sequence of tasks that comprise an atomic unit for the purposes of correctness, and the degrees of local and global atomicity for the purpose of cooperation with other workflow managers. The paper also discusses a realization of this model in which treaties and summits provide an agreement mechanism, while underlying transaction managers are responsible for maintaining failure atomicity. The fourth and fifth papers are experience papers describing a workflow management system and a large scale workflow application, respectively. Schill and Mittasch, in `Workflow management systems on top of OSF DCE and OMG CORBA', describe a decentralized workflow management system and discuss its implementation using two standardized middleware platforms, namely, OSF DCE and OMG CORBA. The system supports a new approach to workflow management, introducing several new concepts such as data type management for integrating various types of data and quality of service for various services provided by servers. A problem common to both database applications and workflows is the handling of missing and incomplete information. This is particularly pervasive in an `electronic market' with a huge number of retail outlets producing and exchanging volumes of data, the application discussed in `Information flow in the DAMA project beyond database managers: information flow managers'. Motivated by the need for a method that allows a task to proceed in a timely manner if not all data produced by other tasks are available by its deadline, Russell et al propose an architectural framework and a language that can be used to detect, approximate and, later on, to adjust missing data if necessary. The final paper, `The evolution towards flexible workflow systems' by Nutt, is complementary to the other papers and is a survey of issues and of work related to both workflow and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) areas. In particular, the paper provides a model and a categorization of the dimensions which workflow management and CSCW systems share. Besides summarizing the recent advancements towards efficient workflow management, the papers in this special issue suggest areas open to investigation and it is our hope that they will also provide the stimulus for further research and development in the area of workflow management systems.

  16. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    The organization of a distributed system can have a tremendous impact on its capabilities, its performance, and its ability to evolve to meet changing requirements. For example, the client - server organization model has proven to be adequate for organizing a distributed system as a number of distributed servers that offer various functions to client processes across the network. However, it lacks peer-to-peer capabilities, and experience with the model has been predominantly in the context of local networks. To achieve peer-to-peer cooperation in a more global context, systems issues of scale, heterogeneity, configuration management, accounting and sharing are crucial, and the complexity of migrating from locally distributed to more global systems demands new tools and techniques. An emphasis on interfaces and modules leads to the modelling of a complex distributed system as a collection of interacting objects that communicate with each other only using requests sent to well defined interfaces. Although object granularity typically varies at different levels of a system architecture, the same object abstraction can be applied to various levels of a computing architecture. Since 1989, the Object Management Group (OMG), an international software consortium, has been defining an architecture for distributed object systems called the Object Management Architecture (OMA). At the core of the OMA is a `software bus' called an Object Request Broker (ORB), which is specified by the OMG Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification. The OMA distributed object model fits the structure of heterogeneous distributed applications, and is applied in all layers of the OMA. For example, each of the OMG Object Services, such as the OMG Naming Service, is structured as a set of distributed objects that communicate using the ORB. Similarly, higher-level OMA components such as Common Facilities and Domain Interfaces are also organized as distributed objects that can be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S Rahkila and S Stenberg, discusses the application of CORBA to telecommunication management networks. In the second paper, P Narasimhan, L E Moser and P M Melliar-Smith present a fault-tolerant extension of an ORB. The third paper, by J Liang, S Sédillot and B Traverson, provides an overview of the CORBA Transaction Service and its integration with the ISO Distributed Transaction Processing protocol. In the fourth paper, D Sherer, T Murer and A Würtz discuss the evolution of a cooperative software engineering infrastructure to a CORBA-based framework. The fifth paper, by R Fatoohi, evaluates the communication performance of a commercially-available Object Request Broker (Orbix from IONA Technologies) on several networks, and compares the performance with that of more traditional communication primitives (e.g., BSD UNIX sockets and PVM). We wish to thank both the referees and the authors of these papers, as their cooperation was fundamental in ensuring timely publication.

  17. Plant endemism in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis (Argentina): understanding links between phylogeny and regional biogeographical patterns1

    PubMed Central

    Chiapella, Jorge O.; Demaio, Pablo H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a checklist with all known endemic plants occurring in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis, an isolated mountainous range located in central Argentina. In order to obtain a better understanding of the evolutionary history, relationships and age of the regional flora, we gathered basic information on the biogeographical and floristic affinities of the endemics, and documented the inclusion of each taxon in molecular phylogenies. We listed 89 taxa (including 69 species and 20 infraspecific taxa) belonging to 53 genera and 29 families. The endemics are not distributed evenly, being more abundant in the lower than in the middle and upper vegetation belts. Thirty-two genera (60.3%) have been included in phylogenetic analyses, but only ten (18.8%) included local endemic taxa. A total of 28 endemic taxa of the Sierras CSL have a clear relationship with a widespread species of the same genus, or with one found close to the area. Available phylogenies for some taxa show divergence times between 7.0 – 1.8 Ma; all endemic taxa are most probably neoendemics sensu Stebbins and Major. Our analysis was specifically aimed at a particular geographic area, but the approach of analyzing phylogenetic patterns together with floristic or biogeographical relationships of the endemic taxa of an area, delimited by clear geomorphological features, could reveal evolutionary trends shaping the area. PMID:25878555

  18. Non-seismic geophysics compared and integrated with seismic in a frontier oil play: Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Longacre, M.B.; Christopherson, K.R.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    Four non-seismic geophysical tools have made a significant contribution to a new geological interpretation of the northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/northeast San Luis Basin of south-central Colorado. Gravity, aeromagnetic, magnetotelluric, (MT) and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were acquired and interpreted during the early stages of exploration. Two-dimensional modeling of the gravity and magnetics placed the main, basin-bounding fault three miles southwest of the mountain front, identified an intermediate fault block at the basin margin and identified a thick sequence of non-magnetic, intermediate density rocks on top of this block. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments is interpreted, supported by the discovery of outcrops of Cretaceous sediments and live Cretaceous oil. Magnetotelluric data was acquired to confirm the presence of Mesozoic sediments and depth to basement. Detailed TDEM data has been useful in correlating the MT with surface geology. Integration of the gravity, magnetic and MT data with seismic resulted in minor modifications to the new geological model.

  19. Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-08-20

    This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

  20. Early stage evolution of the mafic-ultramafic belt at La Melada, Sierra de San Luis, Argentina: P-T constraints from metapyroxenite pseudosection modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Gabriele; Franceschelli, Marcello; Brogioni, Norma

    2012-08-01

    At La Melada, Sierra de San Luis, Argentina, two lenses of mafic-ultramafic rocks, which underwent Famatinian metamorphism followed by shear deformation, form part of a NNE-SSW-trending belt along the eastern flank of the Sierra. Metapyroxenites from the lenses are granoblastic rocks made up of igneous and metamorphic minerals, with varying degrees of deformation and mylonitization. These rocks preserve evidence of post-magmatic re-equilibration that followed the emplacement of the mafic-ultramafic rocks. Microstructural investigation and P-T pseudosection modelling suggest that La Melada metapyroxenites experienced a temperature and pressure decrease from the M0 (800 °C < T < 920 °C; 0.7 GPa < P < 0.9 GPa) to the M1 stage (720 °C < T < 780 °C; 0.6 GPa < P < 0.7 GPa). Further re-equilibration led to the formation of talc + cummingtonite during the M2 stage and to the development of metamorphic plagioclase and dolomite in the post-M2 stage. The P-T segment reconstructed for La Melada metapyroxenites is consistent with a back-arc setting and with P-T paths previously reported in the literature.

  1. Evaluation of the impact of acid mine drainage on the chemistry and the macrobenthos in the Carolina stream (San Luis, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Tripole, Susana; Gonzalez, Patricia; Vallania, Adriana; Garbagnati, Marcela; Mallea, Miguel

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of acid mine drainage on the chemistry and the macrobenthos of the Carolina stream (San Luis - Argentina). Samples were obtained in the years 1997-1998 at two sites: site C(1), located 200 m upstream of the drainage, and site C(2), located 800 m downstream. The system buffer capacity was evaluated in the non - contaminated site by means of the buffer index calculation. The physico - chemical changes observed as a consequence of the contribution of acid mine drainage (AMD) were: a decreasing of pH and an increase in the ionic concentration, especially sulfate and Fe coming from the oxidation produced by chemiolithotrophic bacteria. The values obtained indicated a low buffer capacity and a high intrinsic vulnerability of the system to resist the impact originated by the AMD, producing a remarkable decreasing of pH of the receiving stream. These changes caused modifications in the original benthic community that was replaced by organisms more tolerant to the acid stress. A reduction in the abundance and in the taxonomic richness of the benthic macroinvertebrates was observed when compared with the reference station. An increase in the proportion of Chironomidae and of Acari and a decrease in the proportion of the remaining taxa were observed. The most sensitive groups were Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera and Mollusca. The community was mostly affected by the following variables: pH, conductivity, sulfate and dissolved total Fe. PMID:16565803

  2. Association between Urine Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis as a Toxicity Factor in a Rural Community in the State of San Luis Potosi

    PubMed Central

    Jarquín-Yañez, Lizet; Mejía-Saavedra, José de Jesús; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Gaona, Enrique; Rocha-Amador, Diana Olivia; López-Guzmán, Olga Dania; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13 mg/L) was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinical examination, and the severity of damage was determined using Dean's index and the Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF) index. Results. The range of exposure in the study population, evaluated through the fluoride content in urine, was 1.1 to 5.9 mg/L, with a mean of 3.14 ± 1.09 mg/L. Dental fluorosis was present in all subjects, of which 95% had severe cases. Higher urine fluoride levels and greater degrees of severity occurred in older children. Conclusions. The results show that dental fluorosis was determined by the presence of fluoride exposure finding a high positive correlation between the severity of fluorosis and urine fluoride concentration and the years of exposure suggested a cumulative effect. PMID:25789336

  3. Life and times of the impact factor: retrospective analysis of trends for seven medical journals (1994-2005) and their Editors' views

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Mabel; Villanueva, Elmer V; Van Der Weyden, Martin B

    2007-01-01

    Objective (1) To analyse trends in the journal impact factor (IF) of seven general medical journals (Ann Intern Med, BMJ, CMAJ, JAMA, Lancet, Med J Aust and N Engl J Med) over 12 years; and (2) to ascertain the views of these journals' past and present Editors on factors that had affected their journals' IFs during their tenure, including direct editorial policies. Design Retrospective analysis of IF data from ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation ReportsScience Edition, 1994 to 2005, and interviews with Editors-in-Chief. Setting Medical journal publishing. Participants Ten Editors-in-Chief of the journals, except Med J Aust, who served between 1999 and 2004. Main outcome measures IFs and component numerator and denominator data for the seven general medical journals (1994 to 2005) were collected. IFs are calculated using the formula: (Citations in year z to articles published in years x and y)/(Number of citable articles published in years x and y), where z is the current year and x and y are the previous two years. Editors' views on factors that had affected their journals' IFs were also obtained. Results IFs generally rose over the 12-year period, with the N Engl J Med having the highest IF throughout. However, percentage rises in IF relative to the baseline year of 1994 were greatest for CMAJ (about 500%) and JAMA (260%). Numerators for most journals tended to rise over this period, while denominators tended to be stable or to fall, although not always in a linear fashion. Nine of ten eligible editors were interviewed. Possible reasons given for rises in citation counts included: active recruitment of high-impact articles by courting researchers; offering authors better services; boosting the journal's media profile; more careful article selection; and increases in article citations. Most felt that going online had not affected citations. Most had no deliberate policy to publish fewer articles (lowering the IF denominator), which was sometimes the unintended result of other editorial policies. The two Editors who deliberately published fewer articles did so as they realized IFs were important to authors. Concerns about the accuracy of ISI counting for the IF denominator prompted some to routinely check their IF data with ISI. All Editors had mixed feelings about using IFs to evaluate journals and academics, and mentioned the tension between aiming to improve IFs and keeping their constituents [clinicians] happy. Conclusions IFs of the journals studied rose in the 12-year period due to rising numerators and/or falling denominators, to varying extents. Journal Editors perceived that this occurred for various reasons, including deliberate editorial practices. The vulnerability of the IF to editorial manipulation and Editors' dissatisfaction with it as the sole measure of journal quality lend weight to the need for complementary measures. PMID:17339310

  4. New evidence for self-medication in bonobos: Manniophyton fulvum leaf- and stemstrip-swallowing from LuiKotale, Salonga National Park, DR Congo.

    PubMed

    Fruth, Barbara; Ikombe, Nono Bondjengo; Matshimba, Gaby Kitengie; Metzger, Sonja; Muganza, Désiré Musuyu; Mundry, Roger; Fowler, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    The swallowing of entire leaves by apes across Africa without chewing has been observed for over 40 plant species. Here we add evidence for (a) a new site, LuiKotale where leaf-swallowing of Manniophyton fulvum (Euphorbiaceae) is observed in bonobos, (b) a so far unreported ingestion of unchewed stemstrips of M. fulvum, we name stemstrip-swallowing; and (c) a test of some of the requirements put forward by Huffman for the assessment of plants ingested for medical purpose. As ecological correlates we analyzed M. fulvum phenological data and examined 1,094 dung piles collected between 2002 and 2009. By that we assessed availability and choice of leaves. In addition, we provide the first full description of the behavior related to this plant species' use by chimpanzees or bonobos using 56 bouts of M. fulvum ingestion observed between October 2007 and February 2010. With these data we tested and met 4 of the 6 requirements given by Huffman, supporting ingestion of this species as self-medication. Despite species' year-round availability and abundance, M. fulvum was ingested only at specific times, in very small amounts, and by a small proportion of individuals per party. In the absence of our own parasitological data, we used M. fulvum swallowing as evidence for parasite infestation, and seasonality as a proxy for stressors underlying seasonal fluctuation and impacting immune responses. Using these indirect factors available, we investigated conditions for a parasite to develop to its infective stage as well as conditions for the host to cope with infections. Both rain and temperature were good predictors for M. fulvum ingestion. We discuss the use of M. fulvum with respect to its hispidity and subsequent purging properties and provide insight into its ethnomedicinal uses by humans, stimulating speculations about potentially additional pharmacological effects. PMID:24105933

  5. Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia Strains from Human, Animal, and Food Samples in San Luis, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Gabriela Isabel; Lucero Estrada, Cecilia; Cortiñas, Teresa Inés; Escudero, María Esther

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella spp., and Yersinia species was investigated in humans, animals, and foods in San Luis, Argentina. A total of 453 samples were analyzed by culture and PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all the strains was studied, the genomic relationships among isolates of the same species were determined by PFGE, and the potencial virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains was analyzed. Yersinia species showed higher prevalence (9/453, 2.0%, 95% CI, 0.7–3.3%) than STEC (4/453, 0.9%, 95% CI, 0–1.8%) and Salmonella spp. (3/453, 0.7%, 95% CI, 0–1.5%). Y. enterocolitica and Y. intermedia were isolated from chicken carcasses (6/80, 7.5%, 95% CI, 1.5–13.5%) and porcine skin and bones (3/10, 30%, 95% CI, 0–65%). One STEC strain was recovered from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) and STEC stx1/stx2 genes were detected in bovine stools (3/129, 2.3%, 95% CI, 0–5.0%). S. Typhimurium was isolated from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) while one S. Newport and two S. Gaminara strains were recovered from one wild boar (1/3, 33%, 95% CI, 0–99%). The knowledge of prevalence and characteristics of these enteropathogens in our region would allow public health services to take adequate preventive measures. PMID:25177351

  6. High quality InSAR data linked to seasonal change in hydraulic head for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jessica A.; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.; Shanker Agram, Piyush; Lauknes, Tom R.

    2011-12-01

    In the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels in the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978-2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide fine spatial resolution measurements of Earth surface deformation, which can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. However, change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected from 1992 to 2001. We are able to show high levels of correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. At three well locations we see a seasonal variation in the InSAR data that mimics the hydraulic head data. We use measured values of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR data. In general the magnitude of estimated and measured head agree to within the calculated error. However, the errors are unacceptably large due to both errors in the InSAR data and uncertainty in the measured value of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient. We conclude that InSAR is capturing the seasonal head variation, but that further research is required to obtain accurate hydraulic head estimates from the InSAR deformation measurements.

  7. The RNA Editor Gene Adar1 is Induced in Myoblasts by Inflammatory Ligands and Buffers Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Micah; Long, Kimberly; Nie, Yongzhan; Gupta, Mayetri; Yang, Jinghua

    2010-01-01

    Muscle atrophy remains a significant concern in multiple inflammatory conditions, including injury, sepsis, cachexia and HIV associated wasting. Herein, we show that inflammatory stressors, including TNF?, IFN? or LPS, potently induced the novel expression of the RNA editor ADAR1, an observation not previously described in muscle cells. We also observed that cytokine stimulation suppressed muscle associated microRNAs, an observation also not previously demonstrated. To map potential effects of ADAR1 induction in the muscle program, we conducted knockdown and over-expression studies in the mouse C2C12 muscle precursor cell (MPC) line and in primary human MPCs. We show that knockdown of stress-induced ADAR1 increased inflammation-mediated declines in the muscle differentiation markers myogenin and myosin heavy chain, and knockdown reduced levels of active phosphorylated Akt (phospho-Akt), but had no effect on microRNA transcript levels, suggesting a role for ADAR1 in buffering inflammatory stress effects on myogenic transcription and protein synthesis pathways. Additionally, over-expression of recombinant ADAR1 suppressed active phosphorylated dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (phospho-PKR), consistent with a role for ADAR1 in limiting inflammation driven catabolic atrophy pathways. Collectively, these data identify a novel regulatory role for ADAR1 activation under inflammatory stress to both promote muscle protein synthesis pathways and limit atrophy pathways. PMID:20590675

  8. One Size Doesn't Fit All - RefEditor: Building Personalized Diploid Reference Genome to Improve Read Mapping and Genotype Calling in Next Generation Sequencing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Johnston, H. Richard; Zhang, Guosheng; Li, Yun; Hu, Yi-Juan; Qin, Zhaohui S.

    2015-01-01

    With rapid decline of the sequencing cost, researchers today rush to embrace whole genome sequencing (WGS), or whole exome sequencing (WES) approach as the next powerful tool for relating genetic variants to human diseases and phenotypes. A fundamental step in analyzing WGS and WES data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. This is an important issue because incorrectly mapped reads affect the downstream variant discovery, genotype calling and association analysis. Although many read mapping algorithms have been developed, the majority of them uses the universal reference genome and do not take sequence variants into consideration. Given that genetic variants are ubiquitous, it is highly desirable if they can be factored into the read mapping procedure. In this work, we developed a novel strategy that utilizes genotypes obtained a priori to customize the universal haploid reference genome into a personalized diploid reference genome. The new strategy is implemented in a program named RefEditor. When applying RefEditor to real data, we achieved encouraging improvements in read mapping, variant discovery and genotype calling. Compared to standard approaches, RefEditor can significantly increase genotype calling consistency (from 43% to 61% at 4X coverage; from 82% to 92% at 20X coverage) and reduce Mendelian inconsistency across various sequencing depths. Because many WGS and WES studies are conducted on cohorts that have been genotyped using array-based genotyping platforms previously or concurrently, we believe the proposed strategy will be of high value in practice, which can also be applied to the scenario where multiple NGS experiments are conducted on the same cohort. The RefEditor sources are available at https://github.com/superyuan/refeditor. PMID:26267278

  9. Why Japanese publishers are behind in making journals online? : Library needs assesment may bring up new business models : Interview with Wataru Hoshino, director at The Japan Society of Publishing Studies and director editor in chief at The Bunka Tushin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Utako

    Why Japanese publishers are behind in making journals online? : Library needs assesment may bring up new business models : Interview with Wataru Hoshino, director at The Japan Society of Publishing Studies and director editor in chief at The Bunka Tushin

  10. WebProtégé: A Collaborative Ontology Editor and Knowledge Acquisition Tool for the Web

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Tania; Nyulas, Csongor; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present WebProtégé—a lightweight ontology editor and knowledge acquisition tool for the Web. With the wide adoption of Web 2.0 platforms and the gradual adoption of ontologies and Semantic Web technologies in the real world, we need ontology-development tools that are better suited for the novel ways of interacting, constructing and consuming knowledge. Users today take Web-based content creation and online collaboration for granted. WebProtégé integrates these features as part of the ontology development process itself. We tried to lower the entry barrier to ontology development by providing a tool that is accessible from any Web browser, has extensive support for collaboration, and a highly customizable and pluggable user interface that can be adapted to any level of user expertise. The declarative user interface enabled us to create custom knowledge-acquisition forms tailored for domain experts. We built WebProtégé using the existing Protégé infrastructure, which supports collaboration on the back end side, and the Google Web Toolkit for the front end. The generic and extensible infrastructure allowed us to easily deploy WebProtégé in production settings for several projects. We present the main features of WebProtégé and its architecture and describe briefly some of its uses for real-world projects. WebProtégé is free and open source. An online demo is available at http://webprotege.stanford.edu. PMID:23807872

  11. Faculty Member’s Views, Attitude and Current Practice As Regards International Committee of Medical Journal Editors Criteria for Authorship

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Masood; Jawaid, Shaukat Ali

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and views of faculty members on criteria for authorship by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), their current practice of choosing the authors, views on gift authorship and problems they had faced concerning authorship. Methods It was a cross sectional survey from January 2011 to July 2011 among faculty members of various private and public sector medical institutions of Pakistan through a self-administered questionnaire. Main outcome measures included awareness and use of ICMJE criteria, which contribution to research merit authorship and their perceptions about gift authorship. Results Two hundred eighteen faculty members (180 males, 38 females) participated in the study. One hundred twenty eight (58.7%) were from surgery and allied disciplines. Ninety six percent had published between one to five papers while 60(27.5%) had six to ten papers to their credit. One hundred eleven (50.9%) claimed they were aware about the authorship criteria, only twenty two (19.8%) could name this document. Only four (1.8%) could correctly state this. Only one hundred twenty (55.0%) said that all three criteria’s must be met to be eligible for authorship. Ninety three (42.7%) said that they were not included as authors though they deserved it while sixty three said they did not merit but were still included. Forty two (19.3%) said that they were not aware when they were listed as authors. Conclusion A vast majority of young faculty members are not aware of the existence of authorship criteria and gift authorship is quite common. PMID:26060616

  12. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical and acoustic properties. The rock strength values range from 23 to 219 MPa and the Poisson's ratio from 0.1 to 0.38. Potential geologic hazards in the Diablo Canyon area were identified and described to provide an overall picture of processes that may affect tunnel construction activities.

  13. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical and acoustic properties. The rock strength values range from 23 to 219 MPa and the Poisson's ratio from 0.1 to 0.38. Potential geologic hazards in the Diablo Canyon area were identified and described to provide an overall picture of processes that may affect tunnel construction activities.

  14. Thermal history of the upper mantle beneath a young back-arc extensional zone: ultramafic xenoliths from San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Wilhelm; Besch, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    At the San Luis Potosí (SLP) volcanic field (Central Mexico), Quaternary basanites and tuff breccias have sampled a suite of ultramafic xenoliths, predominately spinel lherzolites, spinel-olivine websterites, spinel pyroxenites, and hornblende-rich pyroxenites. Spinel lherzolites from the La Ventura maars have protogranular to equigranular textures, those from the Santo Domingo maars are strongly sheared. Both spinel-lherzolite types show similar whole-rock major and trace-element abundances. They are fertile to slightly depleted with mineralogical and geochemical heterogeneities induced by partial melting processes. Pyroxenites with either magmatic or metamorphic textures are high-pressure cumulates. Hornblende-rich pyroxenites are genetically linked to the host basanites. Most of the protogranular spinel lherzolites contain veinlets of glass along grain boundaries. These glasses are chemically homogeneous and have trachybasaltic to trachyandesitic compositions. Mg- and Fe2+-partitioning between olivine and glass suggests chemical equilibrium between the melts represented by the glasses and the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at about 1,000°C and 10 to 15 kbar. The melts are interpreted to be of upper mantle origin. They may have been formed by in-situ partial melting in the presence of volatiles or represent percolating melts chemically buffered by the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at uppermost mantle conditions. Mineral chemistry in all rock types of the whole xenolith suite reveals distinct disequilibrium features reflecting partial re-equilibration stages towards lower temperatures estimated to be from 1,050°C to 850°C at 9 to 15 kbar. The presence of similar zoning and exsolution features mainly documented in pyroxenes along with similar maximum and minimum temperatures requires all sampled xenoliths to have undergone the same temperature regime within the upper mantle. The sheared spinel lherzolites from the Sto. Domingo field are interpreted as formerly protogranular material which was sheared during uplift and cooling. The estimated mantle temperatures are higher than those predicted by low heat-flow measurements at the SLP fild, indicating that surface heat flow has not equilibrated to elevated temperatures at depth. This strongly supports a young perturbation event beneath the SLP area and connects the onset of uplift and cooling of the SLP-mantle segment with the back-arc extensional regime of the Quaternary volcanic cycle of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt.

  15. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-09-01

    Muscle forcesJ O LintonWolverhampton Grammar School, Wolverhampton WV3 9RB, UK More `On an analogy for Ohm's law'Ann C ArcherSt Margaret's School, Bushey, Herts, UK Fewer physics studentsM D BakallKingston College of Further Education, Surrey KT1 2AQ, UK Classical origins of `E = mc2'R T SmithBusiness Link Ltd, Moor Lane Business Centre, Widnes WA8 7AQ, UK Language and science in primary schoolsTim Watson63 Fort Royal Hill, Worcester WR5 1BY, UK

  16. Guest Editor's Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Patrick Alan

    2000-01-01

    Examines the field of international traveler and nomadic education research and argues for the need to extend the boundaries of this "field" significantly. Research on the education of travelers and nomads is mobile and fluid, but the approach used in this collection, the mapping and celebration of international diversity, is needed to expand…

  17. [From the editor].

    PubMed

    Dudek, Dominika; Soba?ski, Jerzy A; Klasa, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Dear Readers We are happy and proud to announce that we managed to achieve intention announced in the last issue: for the first time in PubMed there is a possibility of direct and free access to the full texts published in Polish Psychiatry (Polish and English language versions are available)!!! For the issue 6/2014 they have been downloaded by Medline users already 500 times. Owing to this, papers by Polish scientists-psychiatrists are more readily available to colleagues from around the world interested in them, and Polish Psychiatry actually becomes journal of international scope. We hope that it will result in a marked improvement in the bibliometric indicators (which, however, is unrealistic to expect in the current or next year) in the following years. Spring issue of Polish Psychiatry touches several important problems. We pay attention to the texts on addiction - behavioural (Internet addiction) and alcohol. Two papers by prof. M. Wojnar's team summarize the issues related to the coexistence of alcohol dependence with other psychiatric disorders. The issue of dual diagnosis has already appeared in our magazine (for example [1]). This is an extremely difficult problem, and patients are a real challenge, both therapeutic and diagnostic. They often require a comprehensive approach: pharmacotherapy of comorbid mental illness, psychoeducation, addiction treatment programmes. For these patients the maintenance of abstinence is particularly difficult, especially in a situation of exacerbation of psychopathological symptoms. An important direction is searching for additional pharmacotherapeutic methods which help to reduce the degree of alcohol abuse and the resulting damage. These include: acamprosate, drugs which are opioid receptor antagonists [2], and in the current issue the authors from the University of Cagliari focused on baclofen. (...). PMID:26093586

  18. Guest editor's note

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment transport processes in rivers are of great concern in many practical studies ranging from large-scale problems such as reservoir management, dam removal, and design of restoration works to small-scale problems such as local bed scour around intakes, outfalls and piers. Within the discipline...

  19. Letter to the Editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We would like to express several concerns regarding the article “Efficacy of vaccination of cattle with the Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo type hardjoprajitno component of a pentavalent Leptospira bacterin against experimental challenge with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo type hardj...

  20. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    A Local Physics Teachers Day: an amateur model for INSET Philip Britton Head of Physics, Leeds Grammar School Secretary, loP Education Group Determining a Slinky's spring constant Eric Kincanon Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA 99258-0051, USA Word Juxtapoz: an interesting tool for promoting physics education R Subramaniam, N K Goh and L S Chia Singapore Science Centre, Science Centre Road, Singapore 609081 Division of Chemistry, Nanyang Technological University, 469 Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259756

  1. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-09-01

    Computers and physics teachingR P BallingallHead of Science, Felsted School, Dunmow, Essex CM6 3JG, UK Students' conceptions of quantum physicsAzam MashhadiDepartment of Educational Studies, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Teaching energyM D EllseHead of Science, Monmouth School, Gwent NP5 3XP, UK Light as particlesH W BurchellThe Royal Grammar School, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK

  2. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    The teaching of energyJ W Warren35 St Andrews Avenue, Wembley HA0 2QB, UK Teaching energyK BamfordQueen Elizabeth Grammar School, Wakefield, UK Perverse symbolism indeed!T R BoagUniversity of Strathclyde, Glasgow

  3. From the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Yevseyev, Igor V.

    2012-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, We would like to note rather nostalgically that eight years have passed since the launch of the first issue of Laser Physics Letters. During that time our journal had gone a long and intricate way of becoming one of the major sources of information associated to all fields of laser physics. We feel mighty proud of the fact that our journal that started from virtually zero ground has attained commercial success right from the first issue. In this way, our journal was able to avoid that artificial green-house environment conditions so prevalent for the majority of other new science journals being brought to light. We can only explain this accomplishment by noticing that the idea of introducing a new journal LPL into the world laser community fell on a fertile ground previously created by our older journal Laser Physics and, especially, through our annual international Laser Physics Workshop. Certainly, we had understood this fact eight years ago and understand it now that the major condition of success of each scientific journal is its impact factor. That is why we have strived to work hard in order to achieve an admirable impact factor for Laser Physics Letters. The impact factor of our journal has been increasing year after year in a following manner: 1.225 in 2005, 1.226 in 2006, 1.918 in 2007, 3.779 in 2008, 5.502 in 2009, and 6.010 in 2010. As it is well known, the impact factor of any journal depends, first of all, on the number of published articles. This condition is sometimes being utilized by some journals, which tend to publish very few articles per year. In contrast to these journals, our Laser Physics Letters publishes a formidable number of about 150 articles per year. Thus our present impact factor attests to a real top level of peer-reviewed science journals in the world. We have no intention whatsoever to cut the annual number of published articles. We would like to remind you that last year our annual international Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'11) took place in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Among 450 participants of LPHYS'11 there were scientists from 45 countries. We would like to underscore that the vital, indispensable contribution to the success of this year workshop was generously made by Professor Dejan Milošević of University of Sarajevo. Incidentally, we would like our readers and authors be reminded that our next Laser Physics Workshop, LPHYS'12, will be held from July 23 to July 27, 2012, in Calgary, Canada. We are glad to invite all our readers and authors to take part in that Workshop. In conclusion, we would like to extend our profound gratefulness to our readers and authors for their constant loyal support and would kindly urge them to continue to send us their best manuscripts. We do hope that our readership will gain even greater expansion in foreseeable future. Sincerely Yours,

  4. "Finding Superman" Editor Responds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swail, Watson Scott

    2013-01-01

    Like many parents and educators, the author is concerned about both quality and equity in the school systems and schools, public and private. He is equally frustrated at the seemingly zealous focus on producing more and more charter schools when America have had: (1) limited success in that arena; and (2) limited data on their success. That

  5. From the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Yevseyev, Igor V.

    2011-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, First of all, we would like to inform you on our main achievement over the past year: The impact factor of Laser Physics Letters reached 5.502 in 2009. This has promoted the journal to one of the leading journals in the world in the field of laser physics. We are very grateful to all friends of the journal who have sent us their congratulations with this success. Of course, we understand that this success is caused by several reasons. One of them is a high quality of papers submitted by our authors. Thanks are due to all of the authors for their contributions to this success of the journal. The second reason is the hard work of our referees who have the highest qualification, and, moreover, who are capable of providing their reports within just a few days. We acknowledge the important role of the annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) attracting the authors for writing articles for LPL. The last, though not the least, we are very grateful to our distinguished publisher Wiley for its valuable contribution and endless efforts to make things better and, especially, to Wiley's V-P Steven Miron for his useful counsels. The location of the annual Workshop LPHYS varies each year, which makes it possible to attract scientists from different countries. In 2010, the annual international Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'10) was held in Brazil. Using the occasion, we stress the great work done by Prof. Bagnato for organizing this conference. In 2011, the conference LPHYS'11 will be held from July 11 to July 15 in the city of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in the Congress Center of the Hotel Hollywood. We plan the participation of about 600 scientists from more than 30 countries. Concluding, we hope that Laser Physics Letters, with the help of our authors, will support and further strengthen the status of a leading journal in the field of laser physics. Sincerely Yours,

  6. LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our paper entitled "The Effects of Perinatal Tebuconazole Exposure on Adult Neurological, Immunological, and Reproductive Function in Rats", which appeared in Toxicological Sciences 62:339-352, 2001, was part of a multidisciplinary project to evaluate long-term effects of develo...

  7. From the guest editors.

    PubMed

    Chowell, Gerardo; Feng, Zhilan; Song, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Carlos Castilo-Chavez is a Regents Professor, a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, and a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at Arizona State University. His research program is at the interface of the mathematical and natural and social sciences with emphasis on (i) the role of dynamic social landscapes on disease dispersal; (ii) the role of environmental and social structures on the dynamics of addiction and disease evolution, and (iii) Dynamics of complex systems at the interphase of ecology, epidemiology and the social sciences. Castillo-Chavez has co-authored over two hundred publications (see goggle scholar citations) that include journal articles and edited research volumes. Specifically, he co-authored a textbook in Mathematical Biology in 2001 (second edition in 2012); a volume (with Harvey Thomas Banks) on the use of mathematical models in homeland security published in SIAM's Frontiers in Applied Mathematics Series (2003); and co-edited volumes in the Series Contemporary Mathematics entitled '' Mathematical Studies on Human Disease Dynamics: Emerging Paradigms and Challenges'' (American Mathematical Society, 2006) and Mathematical and Statistical Estimation Approaches in Epidemiology (Springer-Verlag, 2009) highlighting his interests in the applications of mathematics in emerging and re-emerging diseases. Castillo-Chavez is a member of the Santa Fe Institute's external faculty, adjunct professor at Cornell University, and contributor, as a member of the Steering Committee of the '' Committee for the Review of the Evaluation Data on the Effectiveness of NSF-Supported and Commercially Generated Mathematics Curriculum Materials,'' to a 2004 NRC report. The CBMS workshop '' Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications'' lectures delivered by C. Castillo-Chavez and F. Brauer in 2011 have been published by SIAM in 2013. PMID:24245643

  8. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    First law of thermodynamics . . .Guy S M Moore36 Oakridge Avenue, Radlett, Hertfordshire WD7 8ER, UK The First law of thermodynamicsH AspdenAcres High, Hadrian Way, Chilworth, Southampton SO1 7HZ, UK Starting from basicsD G C JonesSchool of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK Geothermal energyJ Dunning-DaviesSchool of Mathematics, University of Hull, UK Amplitude dependence of the period for non-linear oscillatorsP GlaisterDepartment of Mathematics, University of Reading, UK The physics of a falling leafLaurence BettanyD'Youville College, 320 Porter Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201, USA Option JGren Ireson61 Bankfield Drive, Bramcote, Nottingham NG9 3EH, UK Physics teaching in Germany: a second lookGottfried MerzynGeorg-August-Universität Göttingen, Germany Teaching relativityJames D Edmonds JrPhysics Department, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA 70605, USA New element discoveredNeil McKenzieDirector, Administratium Abolition Society (c/o Department of Chemistry and Physics, The Nottingham Trent University, UK)

  9. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-12-01

    Radon variations D J Noble Plockton High School, Ross shire IV52 8TU, UK Environmental physics A T Jackson Belfast Institute of Further and Higher Education On mnemonic schemes A T Bardócz Teacher Training College, Szombathely, Hungary Regarding mnemonic devices for Maxwell's relations A H Kalantar Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada TG6 2G2 On an analogy for Ohm's law H S Fricker Bradford Grammar School Further reflections D Hinson `Brenig', Town Hill, Llanrwst, Gwynedd LL26 0NF, UK Moving charges W Jarvis 6 Peggy''s Mill Road, Edinburgh EH4 6JY, UK More on the distance travelled A Tan Department of Physics, Alabama A&M University, USA

  10. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-05-01

    Stirling 1994Lis Unsworth and Alexander BellSCOTVEC External Verifiers in Physical Sciences, Edinburgh, UK An elephant in the back seatJ M HathawayRetired Head of Physics, King Edward VI College, Nuneaton, UK Graphical construction of the tangent law of refractionA TanDepartment of Physics, Alabama A & M University, Normal, AL 35762, USA Measuring up to rainJim FawcettKing's School, Worcester, UK No flies on trainsCyril IsenbergUniversity of Kent at Canterbury, UK More on flies and trainsAlvin H BachmanThe City College/CUNY, NEW York, USA

  11. Letter to the Editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elementary chemistry errors are contained in: Adsorption sequence of toxic inorganic anions on a soil by S. Saeki published in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology (2008) 81:508-512. In the article, the author asserts emphatically that he is studying As(V) not As(III) adsorpt...

  12. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    Sine waves and slinky springsP GlaisterDepartment of Mathematics, University of Reading, UK Renewable energyR MarshallOakham School Physics Department, Station Road, Oakham LE15 6QT, UK Why does dust climb up a loudspeaker?Bill Jarvis6 Peggy's Mill Road, Edinburgh EH4 6JY, UK Level of airborne radon daughter productsDerek J Noble and Helen BrycePlockton High School, Ross-shire IV52 8TU, UK Evaluation of interactive learning materialsI R GomersallBradford Grammar School, Keighley Road, Bradford BD9 4JP, UK Passenger safetyR G Cawthorne8 Beverley Grove, Portsmouth PO6 1BP, UK

  13. Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Jeff; Moffett, Jonathan

    1996-06-01

    Special Issue on Management This special issue contains seven papers originally presented at an International Workshop on Services for Managing Distributed Systems (SMDS'95), held in September 1995 in Karslruhe, Germany. The workshop was organized to present the results of two ESPRIT III funded projects, Sysman and IDSM, and more generally to bring together work in the area of distributed systems management. The workshop focused on the tools and techniques necessary for managing future large-scale, multi-organizational distributed systems. The open call for papers attracted a large number of submissions and the subsequent attendance at the workshop, which was larger than expected, clearly indicated that the topics addressed by the workshop were of considerable interest both to industry and academia. The papers selected for this special issue represent an excellent coverage of the issues addressed by the workshop. A particular focus of the workshop was the need to help managers deal with the size and complexity of modern distributed systems by the provision of automated support. This automation must have two prime characteristics: it must provide a flexible management system which responds rapidly to changing organizational needs, and it must provide both human managers and automated management components with the information that they need, in a form which can be used for decision-making. These two characteristics define the two main themes of this special issue. To satisfy the requirement for a flexible management system, workers in both industry and universities have turned to architectures which support policy directed management. In these architectures policy is explicitly represented and can be readily modified to meet changing requirements. The paper `Towards implementing policy-based systems management' by Meyer, Anstötz and Popien describes an approach whereby policy is enforced by event-triggered rules. Krause and Zimmermann in their paper `Implementing configuration management policies for distributed applications' present a system in which the configuration of the system in terms of its constituent components and their interconnections can be controlled by reconfiguration rules. Neumair and Wies in the paper `Case study: applying management policies to manage distributed queuing systems' examine how high-level policies can be transformed into practical and efficient implementations for the case of distributed job queuing systems. Koch and Krämer in `Rules and agents for automated management of distributed systems' describe the results of an experiment in using the software development environment Marvel to provide a rule based implementation of management policy. The paper by Jardin, `Supporting scalability and flexibility in a distributed management platform' reports on the experience of using a policy directed approach in the industrial strength TeMIP management platform. Both human managers and automated management components rely on a comprehensive monitoring system to provide accurate and timely information on which decisions are made to modify the operation of a system. The monitoring service must deal with condensing and summarizing the vast amount of data available to produce the events of interest to the controlling components of the overall management system. The paper `Distributed intelligent monitoring and reporting facilities' by Pavlou, Mykoniatis and Sanchez describes a flexible monitoring system in which the monitoring agents themselves are policy directed. Their monitoring system has been implemented in the context of the OSIMIS management platform. Debski and Janas in `The SysMan monitoring service and its management environment' describe the overall SysMan management system architecture and then concentrate on how event processing and distribution is supported in that architecture. The collection of papers gives a good overview of the current state of the art in distributed system management. It has reached a point at which a first generation of systems, based on policy representation within systems and automated monitoring systems, are coming into practical use. The papers also serve to identify many of the issues which are open research questions. In particular, as management systems increase in complexity, how far can we automate the refinement of high-level policies into implementations? How can we detect and resolve conflicts between policies? And how can monitoring services deal efficiently with ever-growing complexity and volume? We wish to acknowledge the many contributors, besides the authors, who have made this issue possible: the anonymous reviewers who have done much to assure the quality of these papers, Morris Sloman and his Programme Committee who convened the Workshop, and Thomas Usländer and his team at the Fraunhofer Institute in Karlsruhe who acted as hosts.

  14. From the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Yevseyev, Igor V.

    2010-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, This preface opens the seventh volume of the journal Laser Physics Letters. We are happy to inform you that the first six years have been quite successful for the journal. In the years 2004-2009, Laser Physics Letters published around 700 original articles written by scientists from 55 countries. During these years, in addition to original articles, Laser Physics Letters published about 40 brief review invited articles written by top scientists from different countries. These review articles provide readers a unique possibility of being timely informed on the current research in different fields of laser physics and on the most fresh and important results in these fields. The brief review articles, published in Laser Physics Letters, have attracted high attention of readers and are extensively cited. Some of these review articles have been cited more than 60 times in the main journals covered by ISI Web of Science. This shows the great importance and attractiveness of the published brief review invited articles for the laser physics community. We certainly understand that such a success is due to the following reasons. First of all, the authors of Laser Physics Letters are the top scientists in the field of laser physics from all over the world. And, second, all 28 members of the Editorial Board, representing 13 countries, are strongly committed to do all their best for making the journal an excellent forum for the laser physics community. Laser Physics Letters publishes pioneering articles in different fields of laser physics. In order to be accessible to a wide auditorium, the papers should clearly point out the main contributions of the article to the field of research and their relation to other articles treating the topic. A well-written introduction is a prerequisite for a good paper. This allows the readers to better judge on the contribution of the article and to objectively evaluate the presented results. We are proud to announce that the 2008 impact factor of Laser Physics Letters reached 3.779. This is a rather good achievement for a journal published only six years. It is important to stress that each year Laser Physics Letters publishes about 150 articles. Therefore, the high impact factor is due not to the meager amount of published papers but really to the high quality of them. It is also very important that the accepted articles are displayed on the website in the section Early View just in two weeks after their acceptance. The early-view articles are already given their publication date and DOI. It makes them immediately accessible for readers and, respectively, for citation. The procedure of refereeing the submitted manuscripts is known to be of paramount importance for any journal. The refereeing process on Laser Physics Letters is unique in two points. First, it is very fast, with the standard time of reviewing about one week after the manuscript submission. Second, the refereeing is done exclusively by the top scientists in the respective fields of laser physics. Therefore, we hope that Laser Physics Letters has produced no biased or unjustified referee reports, which are so common for many journals. The Laser Physics Letters Editorial Board expresses deep gratitude to all referees of the journal. A well-organized and qualified work of the technical department of the journal is also of great importance. We are happy that this department always guarantees the highest quality of the manuscripts camera-ready copies and their figures, which has been noticed by many authors. It is worth mentioning the close collaboration of Laser Physics Letters with the annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS). The sequel of these Workshops was launched in 1992 by the Nobel Prize winner A.M. Prokhorov. There have already been 18 of these Workshops, whose history can be traced on the website www.lasphys.com. The eighteenth Workshop was held from July 13 to July 17 in Barcelona, Spain. About 580 participants from 37 countries took part in the Workshop. We hope that the next Workshop LPHYS'10, which will be held from July 5 to July 9, 2010, in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil, will also be as successful as the previous workshops. More detailed information on LPHYS'10 is given in the next page. Once again, the Editorial Board of Laser Physics Letters thanks the authors, readers, and referees of Laser Physics Letters. We do hope that our joint work will be beneficial for the development of the laser physics science. Sincerely Yours,

  15. NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Selected as Editor's Choice in 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's newest and most powerful X-ray space telescope, has been selected as the winner of the Editor's Choice category of the 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation. The team of government, industry, university and research institutions that designed, built and deployed Chandra for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala, will be formally recognized June 24 at a gala awards celebration at Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fl. Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Science Center, Cambridge, Mass., which conducts the Chandra science mission for NASA, will receive the award on behalf of the team. "Chandra has opened a new window for astronomers into the universe of high-energy cosmic events such as pulsars, supernova remnants and black holes," said Tananbaum. "We're now able to create spectacularly detailed images of celestial phenomena whose mere existence we could only hypothesize before." Among Chandra's most significant discoveries to date, he lists the detection of a giant ring around the heart of the Crab Nebula, details of the shock wave created by an exploding star and resolution of the high-energy X-ray "glow" in the universe into millions of specific light sources. "The successful launch, deployment and on-orbit operations of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is a testament to the solid partnership between TRW, NASA and the science community that has been enabling NASA's most important space science missions for the past 40 years," said Timothy W. Hannemann, executive vice president and general manager, TRW Space & Electronics Group. "The extraordinary images that Chandra is delivering daily speaks loudly not only to the quality of the science instruments on board, but also to the engineering talents and dedication to mission success exhibited by every member of NASA's Chandra mission team." Chandra, named in honor of Nobel laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, was launched in July 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia and deployed to a highly elliptical Earth orbit. Over the next five years, it will use the world's most powerful X-ray telescope to probe the mysteries of a universe that cannot be seen by the human eye or conventional optical telescopes. Its array of exquisite mirrors, ground and polished by Raytheon Optical Systems, Inc., and assembled and aligned by Eastman Kodak, will allow Chandra to gather and focus X-rays from celestial sources billions of light years away. Chandra's science instrument module was designed and built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., then integrated with instruments provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Penn State University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Space Research Organization of The Netherlands, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. Ball Aerospace also produced Chandra's aspect camera. The Discover Awards for Technological Innovation, now in their 11th year, are designed to acknowledge the creativity of men, women, corporations and institutions who have reached superior levels of ingenuity. Each year, Discover Magazine's editorial staff reviews thousands of new products and ideas presented in the scientific literature or nominated by leading technology-based companies and research organizations. The editorial staff selects semi-finalists in each of eight technology categories, then submits the nominations to an independent panel of experts. The panel then selects the finalists and the winner in each area of technology. The Editor's choice category is reserved for innovations so unique or promising that they go beyond the magazine's established innovation categories by providing a marked advance in their field. Chandra's powerful X-ray telescope can resolve distant images eight times sharper and detect X-ray sources 20 times fainter than any previous X-ray space telescope. Chandra, along with the rest of the winners, will be listed in the July issue of Discover Magazine, scheduled for delivery to newsstands on June 19. The 2000 award winners will also be featured at the magazine's Web site: www.discover.com. To follow Chandra's progress visit the Chandra websites at http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  16. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed: a reply to a "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg; van den Berg, Martin; Blumberg, Bruce; Bjerregaard, Poul; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Bornman, Riana; Brandt, Ingvar; Brian, Jayne V; Casey, Stephanie C; Fowler, Paul A; Frouin, Heloise; Giudice, Linda C; Iguchi, Taisen; Hass, Ulla; Jobling, Susan; Juul, Anders; Kidd, Karen A; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Lind, Monica; Martin, Olwenn V; Muir, Derek; Ochieng, Roseline; Olea, Nicolas; Norrgren, Leif; Ropstad, Erik; Ross, Peter S; Rudén, Christina; Scheringer, Martin; Skakkebaek, Niels Erik; Söder, Olle; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana; Swan, Shanna; Toppari, Jorma; Tyler, Charles R; Vandenberg, Laura N; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Wiberg, Karin; Zoeller, R Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about a recently published, and is in our considered opinion inaccurate and factually incorrect, editorial that has appeared in several journals in toxicology. Some of the shortcomings of the editorial are discussed in detail. We call for a better founded scientific debate which may help to overcome a polarisation of views detrimental to reaching a consensus about scientific foundations for endocrine disrupter regulation in the EU. PMID:23981490

  17. Hydrogeology, water quality, water budgets, and simulated responses to hydrologic changes in Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creek ground-water basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Eugene B.; Van Konyenburg, Kathryn M.

    1998-01-01

    Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creeks are underlain by thin, narrow ground-water basins that supply nearly all water used for local agricultural and municipal purposes. The creeks discharge to the Pacific Ocean near the northwestern corner of San Luis Obispo County, California. The basins contain heterogeneous, unconsolidated alluvial deposits and are underlain by relatively impermeable bedrock. Both creeks usually stop flowing during the summer dry season, and most of the pumpage during that time is derived from ground-water storage. Annual pumpage increased substantially during 1956?88 and is now a large fraction of basin storage capacity. Consequently, dry-season water levels are lower and the water supply is more vulnerable to drought. The creeks are the largest source of ground-water recharge, and complete basin recharge can occur within the first few weeks of winter streamflow. Agricultural and municipal pumpages are the largest outflows and cause dry-season water-level declines throughout the San Simeon Basin. Pumping effects are more localized in the Santa Rosa Basin because of subsurface flow obstructions. Even without pumpage, a large quantity of water naturally drains out of storage at the upper ends of the basins during the dry season. Ground water is more saline in areas close to the coast than in inland areas. Although seawater intrusion has occurred in the past, it probably was not the cause of high salinity in 1988?89. Ground water is very hard, and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some locations. Probability distributions of streamflow were estimated indirectly from a 120-year rainfall record because the periods of record for local stream-gaging stations were wetter than average. Dry-season durations with recurrence intervals between 5 and 43 years are likely to dry up some wells but not cause seawater intrusion. A winter with no streamflow is likely to occur about every 32 years and to result in numerous dry wells, seawater intrusion, and subsidence. Digital ground-water-flow models were used to estimate several items in the ground-water budgets and to investigate the effects of pumpage and drought. The models also were used to investigate the hydrologic effects of selected water-resources management alternatives. Selection of alternatives was not constrained by issues related to water rights, which were under dispute during the study. Increases in the area and intensity of irrigation could increase agricultural water demand by 26 to 35 percent, an increase that would lower water levels by as much as 10 feet and possibly cause subsidence in the lower Santa Rosa Basin. An additional municipal well in the lower Santa Rosa Basin could withdraw 100 acre-feet per year without causing seawater intrusion, but subsidence might occur. Transferring 270 acre-feet per year of treated wastewater from a percolation area near the coast to an area about 0.5 mile upstream of the municipal well field in the San Simeon Basin could raise upstream water levels by as much as 12 feet without causing significant water-table mounding or seawater intrusion. Decreases in agricultural pumping after a winter without streamflow could prevent seawater intrusion while allowing municipal pumping to continue at normal rates.

  18. Cyanobacteria/Foraminifera Association from Anoxic/Dysoxic Beds of the Agua Nueva Formation (Upper Cretaceous - Cenomanian/Turonian) at Xilitla, San Luis Potosi, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Piñón, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Rojas-León, A.; Duque-Botero, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Agua Nueva Formation in the vicinity of Xilitla, State of San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico, consists of interbedded brown shale (Grayish orange 10YR 7/4 to Moderate yellowish brown 10YR 5/4) and dark-gray fossiliferous limestone (Bluish gray 5B 6/1 to Dark bluish gray 5B 4/1), varying between 10 and 20 cm in thickness. The sequence also includes 2 to 4 cm- thick intermittent bentonite layers (Moderate greenish yellow 10Y 7/4, to dark greenish yellow 10Y 6/6 and Light olive 10Y 5/4). At the field scale, shaly intervals show no apparent internal structures, whereas most limestone beds show primary lamination at the millimeter scale (1-2 mm), and intermittent layers of black chert of about 5 cm thick. Pyrite is present as disseminated crystals and as 2 cm-thick layers. Bioturbation or macrobenthic organisms other than inoceramids do not occur in the Agua Nueva Formation at Xilitla. Unusual macrofossils are present only in limestone strata, and consist of well- preserved diverse genera of fishes such as sharks, Ptychodus sp. and teleosteans, Rhynchodercetis sp., Tselfatia sp., Goulmimichthys sp., and scales of Ichtyodectiformes, as well as ammonites and inoceramids (Blanco et al., 2006). The presence of Inoceramus (Mytyloides) labiatus (Maldonado-Koederll, 1956) indicates an Early Turonian age for the sequence. Total carbonate content (CaCO3 = TIC) varies between 62 and 94% in the Limestone beds, which yield Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from 0.4% to 2.5%; the shale intervals contain TIC values consistently lower than 33% and TOC lower than 0.8% Microscopically the limestone beds vary from mudstone to packstone composed essentially of coccoid cyanobacteria similar to coeval deposits in northeastern Mexico, Coahuila State, at Parras de La Fuente (Duque- Botero 2006). Similarly, the microspheroids are spherical to sub-spherical, and occur as isolated elements or aggregates forming series of chains of parallel-packed light lamina 1-2 mm thick. Filamentous cyanobacteria (> 1 mm in length) are also present oriented parallel to stratification. In addition to filamentous and coccoid cyanobacteria, the limestone beds contain rare benthic foraminifera, common planktic foraminifera, heterohelicids, Rotalipora spp., Rotalipora cf cushmani, Whiteinella spp, W. praehelvetica, which indicate a time interval from the latest Cenomanian to the earliest Turonian. Lithological, paleontological and microfacies data thus indicate that the sediments accumulated in open-marine to semi-restricted platform environments, under low-energy conditions. Primary lamination, pyrite and excellent degree of preservation of fishes, suggest that low oxygen concentration lead to the formation of anoxic/dysoxic conditions during the accumulation of these exceptional deposits, which are coeval with the worldwide development of OAE-2. Planktonic foraminifera and fishes indicate oxygenated conditions in the photic zone, but dysoxic/anoxic conditions near the bottom, which is consistent with the presence of inoceramids and the absence of bioturbation in the sediment.

  19. Personalized Medicine Across Disciplines and without Borders. Vural Özdemir speaks to Hannah Wilson, Commissioning Editor

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Vural

    2015-01-01

    Vural Özdemir began his career as a medical doctor in Turkey in 1990, as a scientist at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (ON, Canada), where he obtained his MSc and PhD in clinical pharmacology (1998), and subsequently completed a 4-year postdoctoral fellowship in personalized medicine with the late Werner Kalow, a founding pioneer in the field of pharmacogenetics. Özdemir contributed to the conception and development of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method as a novel way of measuring pharmacological heritability, pharmacogenetics of psychiatric drugs and studying the clinical role of CYP2D6 genetic variations for endogenous neurotransmitter metabolism in the human brain. Recognizing that scientific knowledge is a product of both technology and social systems that often remain unaccounted for (e.g., human values, distribution of power and human agency, immigration, racial disparities, socioeconomic class and equity), Özdemir discovered the literature in the field of science and technology studies, a rich scholarly enquiry that asks fundamental questions and challenges assumptions regarding the backstage of technoscience, situates technology within its political context and makes hitherto unseen connections that frame science in ways that enable robust, responsible and sustainable innovation. From 2008 to 2012, Özdemir was awarded a mid-career “science and society” fellowship in order to retool as independent faculty and senior scientist in science and technology studies (STS), conducting research on research and examining his own trade – pharmacogenetics science – as an insider on the outside. Recently, Özdemir was awarded senior career support from the Scientific and Tehnological Research Council of Turkey, is an Associate Professor of both Communications and Human Genetics at the Faculty of Communications and serves as an advisor to the Rector for International Technology and Innovation Policy, Gaziantep University in Turkey. He is also a Visiting Professor (Global Health & Technology Foresight) at Amrita University in Kerala, India, and cofounder of the Data-Enabled Life Sciences Alliance (DELSA Global), an open innovation and knowledge translation platform in Seattle (WA, USA). Özdemir was named as coinventor of 12 World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) indexed patents in personalized medicine and has authored more than 130 peer reviewed articles and chapters on the translation of omics technologies into public health action, global technology governance, diagnostics innovation strategy, history of bioethics and the ethics-of-bioethics. ‘Science Peace Corps’ and ‘Microgrants for Big Data’ are two new knowledge translation and science communication concepts developed by Özdemir for the global governance of biotechnology. He is Editor-in-Chief of OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (NY, USA). PMID:26120345

  20. Systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 5.0. Fault tree, event tree, and piping & instrumentation diagram (FEP) editors reference manual: Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.K.; Skinner, N.L.; Wood, S.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of several microcomputer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), primarily for nuclear power plants. The Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors allow the user to graphically build and edit fault trees, and event trees, and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs). The software is designed to enable the independent use of the graphical-based editors found in the Integrated Reliability and Risk Assessment System (IRRAS). FEP is comprised of three separate editors (Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping and Instrumentation Diagram) and a utility module. This reference manual provides a screen-by-screen guide of the entire FEP System.

  1. Guest Editor's introduction: Selected papers from the 4th USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sventek, Joe

    1998-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Introduction The USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems (COOTS) is held annually in the late spring. The conference evolved from a set of C++ workshops that were held under the auspices of USENIX, the first of which met in 1989. Given the growing diverse interest in object-oriented technologies, the C++ focus of the workshop eventually became too narrow, with the result that the scope was widened in 1995 to include object-oriented technologies and systems. COOTS is intended to showcase advanced R&D efforts in object-oriented technologies and software systems. The conference emphasizes experimental research and experience gained by using object-oriented techniques and languages to build complex software systems that meet real-world needs. COOTS solicits papers in the following general areas: application of, and experiences with, object-oriented technologies in particular domains (e.g. financial, medical, telecommunication); the architecture and implementation of distributed object systems (e.g. CORBA, DCOM, RMI); object-oriented programming and specification languages; object-oriented design and analysis. The 4th meeting of COOTS was held 27 - 30 April 1998 at the El Dorado Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Several tutorials were given. The technical program proper consisted of a single track of six sessions, with three paper presentations per session. A keynote address and a provocative panel session rounded out the technical program. The program committee reviewed 56 papers, selecting the best 18 for presentation in the technical sessions. While we solicit papers across the spectrum of applications of object-oriented technologies, this year there was a predominance of distributed, object-oriented papers. The accepted papers reflected this asymmetry, with 15 papers on distributed objects and 3 papers on object-oriented languages. The papers in this special issue are the six best distributed object papers (in the opinion of the program committee). They represent the diversity of research in this particular area, and should give the reader a good idea of the types of papers presented at COOTS as well as the calibre of the work so presented. The papers The paper by Jain, Widoff and Schmidt explores the suitability of Java for writing performance-sensitive distributed applications. Despite the popularity of Java, there are many concerns about its efficiency; in particular, networking and computation performance are key concerns when considering the use of Java to develop performance-sensitive distributed applications. This paper makes three contributions to the study of Java for these applications: it describes an architecture using Java and the Web to develop MedJava, which is a distributed electronic medical imaging system with stringent networking and computation requirements; it presents benchmarks of MedJava image processing and compares the results to the performance of xv, which is an equivalent image processing application written in C; it presents performance benchmarks using Java as a transport interface to exchange large medical images over high-speed ATM networks. The paper by Little and Shrivastava covers the integration of several important topics: transactions, distributed systems, Java, the Internet and security. The usefulness of this paper lies in the synthesis of an effective solution applying work in different areas of computing to the Java environment. Securing applications constructed from distributed objects is important if these applications are to be used in mission-critical situations. Delegation is one aspect of distributed system security that is necessary for such applications. The paper by Nagaratnam and Lea describes a secure delegation model for Java-based, distributed object environments. The paper by Frølund and Koistinen addresses the topical issue of providing a common way for describing Quality-of-Service (QoS) features in distributed, object-oriented systems. They present a general QoS language, QML, that can be used to capture QoS properties as part of a design. They also show how to extend UML to support QML concepts. The paper by Szymaszek, Uszok and Zielinski discusses the important issue of efficient implementation and usage of fine-grained objects in CORBA-based applications. Fine-grained objects can have serious ramifications on overall application performance and scalability, and the paper suggests that such objects should not be treated as first-class CORBA objects, proposing instead the use of collections and smart proxies for efficient implementation. The paper by Milojicic, LaForge and Chauhan describes a mobile objects and agents infrastructure. Their particular research has focused on communication support across agent migration and extensive resource control. The paper also discusses issues regarding interoperation between agent systems. Acknowledgments The editor wishes to thank all of the authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time, this special issue would not have been possible.

  2. Letter to the Editor in response to "publication performance of women compared to men in German cardiology" by Boehm et al. (2014).

    PubMed

    Weismann, Constance G; Colson, Eve R; Shapiro, Eugene D

    2015-03-01

    Based on their review of abstracts submitted to the German Cardiac Society, Boehm et al. (2014) report better success of female vs male cardiologists publishing in journals with an impact factor ≥5. However, only 25% of conference abstracts were submitted by women, perhaps suggesting a paucity of women in academic cardiology. In this 'letter to the editor' we review gender statistics in the medical field using Germany and the US as examples. While women are well represented in early career stages, only fewfull professors are women. This reflects a wasted opportunity to benefit from the best of both genders. Recent gender research has shown that subtle gender bias may play a role. To change the gender statistics in academic medicine a multifaceted approach is necessary. This will ultimately lead to a more equal representation of women in senior roles, and bring science, medical care, and leadership to a new level. PMID:25617604

  3. A Study of How Letters to the Editor Published in "The Stars and Stripes" Newspaper between March 1, 1918, and November 15, 1918, Reflected the Morale of the Troops during World War I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Vicky Ann

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation is a qualitative historical study that examines the state of morale of World War I soldiers as reflected in letters to the editor published in "The Stars and Stripes" newspaper between March 1, 1918, and November 15, 1918. The narrative includes extensive use of the actual words published in the soldiers' letters in order to…

  4. Geological and geochemical studies of the Sierra del Morro-Oeste (San Luis Province, Argentina): Meta-sediments and meta-volcanics from a probable back-arc setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delakowitz, B.; Höll, R.; Hack, M.; de Brodtkorb, M. K.; Stärk, H.

    The Sierra del Morro-Oeste covers an area of some 40 km 2 in the northeastern part of San Luis Province, Argentina. This area is an integral part of the scheelite- and wolframite-bearing crystalline basement of the Sierras Pampeanas. A "characteristic rock sequence"—several tens of meters thick—is concordantly embedded between uniform country rocks (quartz-oligoclase/andesine micaschists and gneises); it includes layered alternations of banded amphibolites, hornblende-epidote schists, scheelite-bearing calc-silicate rocks, lenses of barren marble, and, locally, tourmaline-bearing micaschists. Chemical analyses of amphibolite samples allow these metamorphic rocks to be interpreted as derivatives of a tholeiite-basaltic volcanism. The amphibolites are subdivided into two groups (A and B) because of significant differences in their chemical composition. These differences are related to hydrothermal seafloor alteration. This sea-water alteration has been most effective in the youngest tholeiite-basaltic lava extrusions. The derivatives of the submarine altered tholeiite-basaltic lavas (amphibolites of Group B) can therefore be interpreted as younger in comparison with the primary lavas of the non-altered amphibolites of Group A. The extrusion of the tholeiite-basaltic lavas obviously took place during an initial stage of back-arc basin rifting on continental crust.

  5. Big-Bang-Gate Cosmic Titanic: Why Aren't Physics Journal's Editors Bringing It To The Center of Scientific Attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Until now science's greatest debacle occurred when Copernicus exposed Ptolemaic cosmologists' 1300 hundred year-long fraud that it must be true because observations fit theory so well, while they ignored the untested state of its central assumption of Earth centered planetary motion. With much hubris modern physicists are confident this could never happen again, that the integrity of physics journals editors suffices to guarantee that a challenge to the reigning cosmological theory -- big bang cosmology -- would immediately be brought to the center of scientific attention for analysis and discussion. In fact a decade ago it was reported [MPLA 2619 (1997); arXiv:gr-gc/9806061] that, like Ptolemaic cosmology before it, big bang's central assumption that GR expansion effects cause in-flight expansion had never been tested and, further, that experimental testing of it using GR operation of the GPS showed it to be false. This result proves it is impossible for the 2.73 K CBR to be fireball relic radiation. These results were expanded in CERN reports EXT-2003-021;022, but have been uniformly rejected by physics journals, one of which accepted a paper similar to CERN EXT-2003-022, only to reject it a few days later with the admission not to publish it because of fearing reaction of the worldwide physics community. For update on my PRL submission see http://www.alphacosmos.net. )

  6. Letter to the editor concerning the article "Performance of gymnastics skill benefits from an external focus of attention" by Abdollahipour, Wulf, Psotta & Nieto (2015).

    PubMed

    Collins, Dave; Carson, Howie J; Toner, John

    2016-07-01

    Abdollahipour, Wulf, Psotta, and Nieto (2015) recently published data in the Journal of Sports Sciences to show that an external focus of attention promotes superior performance effects (gymnastics jump height and judged movement form score) when compared to internal or control foci during skill execution without an implement involved. While we do not contest the veracity of findings reported, nor others that have been used to support beneficial effects of an external focus of attention, in this Letter to the Editor we comment on considerable methodological limitations associated with this and previous studies that, we suggest, have resulted in serious theoretical oversights regarding the control of movement and, most crucially from our practitioner perspective, suboptimal recommendations for applied coaching practice. Specifically, we discuss the lack of consideration towards translational research in this area, the problematic nature of attentional focus cues employed, interpretation of findings in relation to other applied recommendations and coherence with mechanistic underpinning and, finally, the representative nature of task involved. In summary, while (laboratory) research evidence may appear to be conclusive, we suggest that the focus of attention effects are in need of more ecologically valid and rigorous testing as well as consideration of current coaching practices if it is to optimally serve the applied sporting domain that it purportedly aims to. PMID:26824823

  7. Authors' response to the letter to the editor: "Effects of acoustic feedback training in elite-standard Para-Rowing" by Schaffert and Mattes (2015).

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Nina; Mattes, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Our article in the Journal of Sports Sciences was designed to examine effects of auditory feedback on mean boat speed during on-water training of visually impaired athletes in elite-standard Para-Rowing. This aim is stated explicitly in the title, abstract, introduction and discussion section. The effects were analysed on the basis of a conservative approach to using inferential statistics by emphasising measures that communicate meaningful differences and effect sizes to help interpret the data's practical importance for sport competition. Biomechanical measurements have been combined with standardised questionnaires to assess the athletes' perceived experience during rowing with acoustic feedback. An application for high-performance rowing has already been used to successfully investigate the effects of acoustic feedback on the time structure of the rowing cycle during the recovery phase. In this response, we provide our comments to the concerns presented in the 'Letter to the Editor' along with a brief description of the issues that relate to research in high-performance sport. PMID:25599408

  8. First isolation and genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from free-range chickens on São Luis island, Maranhão state, Brazil, with a new genotype described.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I C; Pena, H F J; Santos, L S; Gennari, S M; Costa, F N

    2016-06-15

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan with worldwide distribution that infects warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans. Toxoplasma is considered to be monospecific, but three classical clonal lineages (Types I-III) have been described, especially for isolates from North America and Europe. However, recently, several studies have shown that many isolates, particularly from South America, are different from the classic types and highly diverse, with the presence of specific clonal lineages and non-archetypal genotypes. In order to isolate and genotypically characterize T. gondii, 60 free-range naturally infected chickens (Gallus domesticus) from four municipalities on São Luis island, state of Maranhão, Brazil, were first serologically screened for IgG anti-T. gondii antibodies by means of the immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT≥1:16). Heart and brain samples from seropositive chickens were bioassayed in mice. The isolates obtained from bioassaying were genotyped by means of PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) using 11 markers and by microsatellites (MS) using 15 markers. The frequency of anti-T. gondii antibodies in the chickens examined was 25.0% (15/60). Five isolates of T. gondii were obtained and named TgCkBrMA1 to 5. Four genotypes were described. One of them is reported for the first time. No classic clonal lineages of types I, II or III were found, but the Brazilian clonal lineage BrI was identified. MS analysis revealed five genotypes. The results corroborate studies already developed in other regions of Brazil, thus indicating that T. gondii has high genetic diversity in Brazil. PMID:27198795

  9. Beyond metformin: safety considerations in the decision-making process for selecting a second medication for type 2 diabetes management: reflections from a diabetes care editors' expert forum.

    PubMed

    Cefalu, William T; Buse, John B; Del Prato, Stefano; Home, Philip D; LeRoith, Derek; Nauck, Michael A; Raz, Itamar; Rosenstock, Julio; Riddle, Matthew C

    2014-09-01

    The trend toward personalized management of diabetes has focused attention on the differences among available pharmacological agents in terms of mechanisms of action, efficacy, and, most important, safety. Clinicians must select from these features to develop individualized therapy regimens. In June 2013, a nine-member Diabetes Care Editors' Expert Forum convened to review safety evidence for six major diabetes drug classes: insulin, sulfonylureas (SUs), thiazolidinediones (TZDs), glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. This article, an outgrowth of the forum, summarizes well-delineated and theoretical safety concerns related to these drug classes, as well as the panelists' opinions regarding their best use in patients with type 2 diabetes. All of the options appear to have reasonably wide safety margins when used appropriately. Those about which we know the most-metformin, SUs, insulin, and perhaps now also TZDs-are efficacious in most patients and can be placed into a basic initial algorithm. However, these agents leave some clinical needs unmet. Selecting next steps is a more formidable process involving newer agents that are understood less well and for which there are unresolved questions regarding risk versus benefit in certain populations. Choosing a specific agent is not as important as implementing some form of early intervention and advancing rapidly to some form of combination therapy as needed. When all options are relatively safe given the benefits they confer, therapeutic decision making must rely on a personalized approach, taking into account patients' clinical circumstances, phenotype, pathophysiological defects, preferences, abilities, and costs. PMID:25147257

  10. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  11. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4+ T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  12. A Visually Oriented Text Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    HERMAN employs Evans & Sutherland Picture System 2 to provide screenoriented editing capability for DEC PDP-11 series computer. Text altered by visual indication of characters changed. Group of HERMAN commands provides for higher level operations. HERMAN provides special features for editing FORTRAN source programs.

  13. Editor's introduction: antipsychotic prescribing practices.

    PubMed

    Essock, Susan M

    2002-01-01

    This commentary is an introduction to a set of articles reviewing antipsychotic prescribing practices for individuals with schizophrenia, noting where these practice patterns conform to or deviate from evidence-based practice, and identifying the pressing research questions raised by these variations. The delineation of practices supported by the evidence base is crucial for the practical concerns of creating practice guidelines and monitoring performance, as well as for identifying areas where the reach of clinical practice must exceed the grasp of current knowledge. These gaps in knowledge should guide the development of a research agenda that addresses pressing questions commonly confronted in everyday practice. We know from the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) project and other surveys that clinically significant research findings are not making their way into practice. Additionally, as the articles assembled here indicate, questions of pressing importance in routine practice have yet to make their way into research agendas. PMID:12047008

  14. Text editor on a chip

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Wan Cho; Heung Kyu Lee

    1983-01-01

    The authors propose a processor which provides useful facilities for implementing text editing commands. The processor now being developed is a component of the general front-end editing system which parses the program text and processes the text. This processor attached to a conventional microcomputer system bus executes screen editing functions. Conventional text editing is a typical application of the microprocessors. But in this paper emphasis is given to the firmware and hardware processing of texts in order that the processor can be fabricated in a single VLSI chip. To increase the overall regularity and decrease the design cost, the basic instructions are text editing oriented with short basic cycles. 6 references.

  15. Editor's note: notice of retraction.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    In 2009, Joachim Boldt published an article in Anesthesia & Analgesia comparing albumin and hydroxyethyl starch priming cardiopulmonary bypass. The study was retracted in December 2010 for lack of IRB approval. A subsequent investigation by Klinikum Ludwigshafen determined that the study was fabricated. Based on the finding by Landesrztekammer Rheinland-Pfalz, the State Medical Association of Rheinland-Pfalz, that the studies were conducted without IRB approval, Anesthesia & Analgesia retracted 22 papers by Dr. Boldt in 2011 for unethical conduct of research. A subsequent investigation by Klinikum Ludwigshafen found that Boldts studies "failed to meet required standards," included "false data" in at least 10 studies, and found "clear evidence of procedural irregularities and research misconduct on the part of Dr. Joachim Boldt." In light of these concerns, Justus-Liebig Universitt Giessen undertook an investigation of Dr. Boldts work from that institution. This investigation cast doubt on the veracity of Boldt J, Heesen M, Mller M, Pabsdorf M, Hempelmann G. The effects of albumin versus hydroxyethyl starch solution on cardiorespiratory and circulatory variables in critically ill patient. Anesth Analg 1996;83: 25461. Based on evidence of data manipulation reported by Justus-Liebig Universitt Giessen to the journal, this paper is hereby retracted. PMID:25329035

  16. LETTER TO THE EDITOR - BAZZANO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study revealed that people who ate legumes regularly had less coronary heart disease. An increase in dietary copper (Cu) with increasing legume consumption also may have contributed to the results in additi...

  17. Intelligent editor/printer enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodfill, M. C.; Pheanis, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Microprocessor support hardware, software, and cross assemblers relating to the Motorola 6800 and 6809 process systems were developed. Pinter controller and intelligent CRT development are discussed. The user's manual, design specifications for the MC6809 version of the intelligent printer controller card, and a 132-character by 64-line intelligent CRT display system using a Motorola 6809 MPU, and a one-line assembler and disassembler are provided.

  18. The CCCC (The Friendly Editor).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1993-01-01

    Muses briefly on topics related to workshops attended at the 1993 Conference on College Composition and Communication including stylistics, editing practice, communication versus art, and where technical writing belongs in academia. (SR)

  19. Editorial - Energy & Fuels editor search.

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Chemistry

    2001-05-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and olefin hydrogenation of FCC naphtha have been determined for MoS2 (no Co) catalysts on different supports and for a commercial CoMo/alumina HDS catalyst both with and without the addition of alkali. For MoS2 catalysts, the specific HDS activity is higher on silica than alumina, while addition of Cs resulted in no change in the activity. The differences in activity, however, are relatively small, a factor of less than two. EXAFS and XRD structural analysis indicate that small MoS2 particles are present on all catalysts. The differences in rate are not due to differences in particle size, dispersion, or support physical properties, but are likely due to the modification of catalytic properties by an interaction with the support. While there is a small influence on the rate, the composition of the support, or modification by Cs, has no effect on the HDSlolefin hydrogenation selectivity. The olefin hydrogenation conversion increases linearly with HDS conversion, and at high HDS conversion, few olefins remain in the FCC naphtha. Similar to the effect for Cs promotion of MoS2 on alumina, the addition of K to sulfided CoMo/alumina had little affect on the activity or selectivity for HDS and olefin hydrogenation. Unlike MoS2 catalysts, however, with sulfided CoMo at less than about 85% HDS conversion, the rate of olefin hydrogenation is low, but it increases rapidly as the sulfur in the naphtha drops below about 300 ppm. Selective HDS of FCC naphtha appears to correlate primarily to the formation of the CoMoS phase, rather than to the basic nature of the support. It is proposed that the enhanced olefin hydrogenation selectivity of CoMo catalysts is due to the competitive adsorption of sulfur compounds, which inhibit adsorption and saturation of olefins in the naphtha.

  20. [Interview with the editor-in-chief of Nature--a decade for psychiatrie disorders. Interview by Shinsuke Koike, Atsushi Nishida, Syudo Yamasaki and Shuntaro Ando].

    PubMed

    Campbell, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Nature is the most frequently cited interdisciplinary science journal globally; however, it has recently begun publishing impressive reviews and special topics in the fields of mental health and psychiatric disorders. An editorial entitled, "A decade for psychiatric disorders" was published on the first page of the first 2010 issue of Nature. This editorial was a significantly symbolic publication; not only did it have an impressive title, but also consisted of precise and appropriate content in accordance with the present conditions and future perspectives of psychiatric disorders. This was of further significance as it was published on the first page of the first 2010 issue. In this report, we review an interview with the author of the editorial and the editor-in-chief of Nature, Dr. Philip Campbell. He explained to us the reason for Nature increasingly publishing articles in the fields of mental health and psychiatric disorders, and the reason for this editorial being published in this impressive space. He opined that, although the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders has been gradually revealed through scientific progress in most research fields, a big gap remains between cancer and psychiatric disorders with regard to health policy and research conditions. The entire editorial team of Nature believed that they could contribute in some way to bridge this gap. He was of the opinion that the media should be apprised with appropriate information on psychiatric disorders by mental health researchers in order to dispel the stigma associated with these disorders and create awareness of the importance of mental health among the public. He drew our attention to the recent brilliant progress in neuroscience research and the future perspectives of mental health research; this trend was notably observed in recent articles in Nature. The concluding sentence in "A decade for psychiatric disorders" is, "Yet the exposure of many psychiatrists to contemporary biology is shallow at best. That, too, will need to change over the next decade." Therefore, psychiatrists have to pay close attention not only to the problem of stigma, but also to the scientific progress in psychiatric disorders, and, thus, need to change their thoughts and attitudes. PMID:22746042