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1

[Luis Hidalgo y Carpio, Editor of Gaceta Médica de México (1818-1879)].  

PubMed

Luis Hidalgo y Carpio (1818-1879) was a notable physician who made important contributions to the field of medicine during his time. Nevertheless, reference sources on the aspect from Hidalgo y Carpio that we would like to emphasize (i.e. as an editor of a medical journal) are scarce since precisely when Hidalgo y Carpio was named President of the Medical Society (later the Academia Nacional de Medicina), in 1987, the publication of the Gaceta Médica de México was temporarily interrupted. Hidalgo y Carpio played a key role as an editor at a time when the medical community of Mexico required a means whereby the scientific achievements could be published and discussed among peers and colleagues. Under Hidalgo y Carpio, the Gaceta Médica de México soon reached a wide audience, not only as a periodical publication but also for the prestige of the Academy that represented. PMID:19518024

Rodríguez-Pérez, Martha Eugenia

2009-01-01

2

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Comment on `Magnetic and electric field strengths of high voltage power lines and household appliances' José Luis Giordano Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, CPSI, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Twins paradox S R Carson Norton College, Malton, North Yorkshire, UK On alternative ways of finding the ratio of specific heats of gases Tomas Ficker Physics Department, Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic

1998-03-01

3

Gilbert Lui's Econometrics World  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Chinese University of Hong Kong student Gilbert C. S. Lui has created this extensive compilation of econometrics, statistics, and mathematics Internet resources. Gilbert Lui's Econometrics World links readers to university departments worldwide, journals of interest, and statistical software information in addition to econometric society and personal homepages.

4

Web Editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creation of Webpages, with their long and complex pages of HTML code for even the simplest of formats, can be greatly facilitated by the use of Web editors. These powerful tools provide shortcuts to change the appearance or arrangement of Webpages, eliminating many keystrokes. Recent Web editors have added many new and sophisticated features to this basic function. This preconference

Robb Waltner; Susan Wishnetsky

1999-01-01

5

TOAD Editor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) computer program (LAR-13755), implements format designed to facilitate transfer of data across communication networks and dissimilar host computer systems. Any data file conforming to TOAD format standard called TOAD file. TOAD Editor is interactive software tool for manipulating contents of TOAD files. Commonly used to extract filtered subsets of data for visualization of results of computation. Also offers such user-oriented features as on-line help, clear English error messages, startup file, macroinstructions defined by user, command history, user variables, UNDO features, and full complement of mathematical statistical, and conversion functions. Companion program, TOAD Gateway (LAR-14484), converts data files from variety of other file formats to that of TOAD. TOAD Editor written in FORTRAN 77.

Bingle, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

1993-01-01

6

MPS Editor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and commands that have been created.

Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

2011-01-01

7

Editor's Comment.  

PubMed

Models for investigation in Urology: Rats, Pigs and Dogs. Importance of basic research in penile reconstruction and bladder overactivity. The May-June 2014 issue of the International Braz J Urol presents original contributions with a lot papers in different fields. The papers come from many different countries such as Brazil, USA, China, Italy, Korea, Germany, Greece, Iran and Turkey, and as usual the editor's comment highlights some papers. In this number we can observe some papers about basic research in Peyronie's disease and bladder overactivity. Several medical treatments are suggested to Peyronie's disease and overactive bladder. A lot of surgical techniques exist for the treatment of Peyronie's disease and penile reconstruction but the best surgical treatment still is under discussion. These two diseases still represent a clinical challenge for the urologist. We summarize three interesting papers about basic research in these topics below. Doctor Salehipour and collegues, from the Departments of Urology, from the Shiraz university from Shiraz, Iran performed on page 105 an interesting study to evaluate the efficacy of human amniotic membrane (AM) grafting in the canine penile tunica albuginea defect; the authors developed an animal model as the first step toward an innovating new method for the treatment of Peyronie's disease. The authors concluded that the amniotic membrane can be used as a suitable substitution for tunica albuginea. It is safe, inexpensive, biodegradable, and available and may be used for the treatment of Peyronie's disease, penile cancers, congenital penile deformities, and penile reconstructive surgery. Doctor Dambros and collegues from the department of urology of the University Hospital Maastricht and the School of medicine Sao Leopoldo, Sao Paulo, Brazil performed on page 113 a elegant study about the involuntary detrusor contractions. The authors studied the possibility to induce the muscle overactivity with oxidative stress using hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The authors concluded that an oxidative stressor, like HOCl, is capable of inducing smooth muscle overactivity. This model can be used for the development and testing of new treatment modalities for the overactive detrusor. Furthermore, this study provides evidence for a causal relationship between oxidative stress and detrusor overactivity. Doctor Zhang and collegues from the department of urology and Pathology from Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, performed on page 119 a study about a model for establishment and evaluation of detrusor overac- tivity in female Wistar rats. The authors ligated the perineal urethra of female Wistar rats and then performed filling cystometry. They observed that bladder weight increased significantly in detrusor overactivity rats and concluded that ligating perineal urethra and filling cystometry with intra-urethral cannula approach is a simple and easily reproducible method to establish and evaluate the model of detrusor overactivity in rats. PMID:25010294

Favorito, Luciano A

2014-01-01

8

New Editors for Eos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two new editors have been appointed to the Eos editorial board. José D. Fuentes of the Department of Meteorology at Pennsylvania State University is the new editor for atmospheric sciences. He succeeds Hassan Virji, who served as editor from mid-2006 to early 2010. David Halpern, a senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory who is currently on assignment at NASA headquarters in Washington, D. C., is the new editor for ocean sciences.

Richman, Barbara T.

2011-01-01

9

Editor's Comment.  

PubMed

Bladder Cancer: What we can do against this powerful enemy? The March-April 2014 issue of the International Braz J Urol presents original contributions with a lot papers in different fields. The papers come from many different countries such as Brazil, USA, China, Italy, Japan, Chile and Turkey, and as usual the editor's comment highlights some papers. In this number we can observe some papers about bladder cancer. The bladder cancer represents a clinical challenge for the urologist and in this number we had papers about the clinical diagnosis, prognostic markers, radiation therapy and the natural history of the high-grade T1 bladder cancer. The high-grade T1 bladder cancer is a very dangerous disease and the time of indication of radical cystectomy is very important in this treatment. We summarize the papers about bladder cancer below. Doctor Canter and collegues, from the Departments of Urology, from the university from Pennsylvania, USA performed on page 172 an interesting study Using two non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) databases, the authors re-examined the rate of progression of HG T1 bladder cancer in your bladder cancer populations. A total of 222 patients were identified and the authors found that the risk of progression at approximately four years was only 8.6%. This study could potentially serve as a starting point in re-examining the treatment algorithm for patients with HG T1 bladder cancer Doctor Zhao and collegues from the Qingdao University, Qungdao, China performed on page 179 a elegant study about prognostic markers in bladder cancer. The goal of this study was to utilize long-term patient follow-up to determine whether epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related markers can predict bladder cancer patient survival and progression of disease. The authors make the analysis of 121 bladder cancer patients and revealed that the frequency of E-cadherin expression was 59.5% (72/121), Twist was 54.5% (66/121), and Vimentin was 24.8% (30/121). In this analysis, grade and Vimentin expression were found to be significant prognostic factors in predicting progression-free survival in bladder cancer. Doctor Freilich and collegues from the Moffitt Cancer Center, Florida, USA performed on page 190 a study about the evaluation of Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder cancer. They studied 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy and concluded that Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost. Doctor Dobbs and collegues from the Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, USA performed on page 198 a interesting clinical study about the incidence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) as the sole presenting symptom for bladder cancer. The authors evaluated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of newly diagnosed bladder cancer patients who presented with LUTS in the absence of gross or microscopic hematuria. They studied 340 patients and observed that 4.1% of bladder cancer patients in our series presented solely with LUTS. In this cohort a small percentage of patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer present with LUTS without gross or microscopic hematuria. Despite a higher incidence of CIS com- pared to patients with other presenting symptoms, the majority of patients with LUTS presented with Ta lesions. This study suggests that urologists should have a low threshold for evaluating patients with unexplained LUTS for underlying bladder cancer. PMID:24856479

Favorito, Luciano A

2014-01-01

10

A Text Editor Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A design for a text editor is developed and described so that it may easily be implemented without further development of the design. The editor avoids movement of text in memory by allowing the text to be stored non-contiguously. The editor provides comm...

J. M. Kai

1974-01-01

11

New Journal Editors Appointed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Solid Earth, Reviews of Geophysics, JGR-Space Physics, Paleoceanography, and Tectonics. At GRL, new editors Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia, Charlottesville), Ruth Harris (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.), Wolfgang Knorr (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK), Geoffrey Tyndall (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), and Michael Wysession (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.) have joined Editor-in-Chief Eric Calais and other editors Margaret Chen, Fabio Florindo, Anne Müller, Nikolai Ostgaard, Eric Rignot, and Meric Srokosz.

Major, Barbara

2009-11-01

12

Boerhaave: Author and Editor *  

PubMed Central

The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images

Lindeboom, G. A.

1974-01-01

13

Editor's Note (January 2005)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this section the editor discusses opportunities for teachers to demonstrate science concepts on the playground or in one's local neighborhood. The current journal issue is dedicated to finding and using these local resources, referred to as "Community Science".

Ohana, Chris

2005-01-01

14

2011 Editors' Picks  

Cancer.gov

2011 Editors' Picks Continued Shortage of Chemotherapy Drugs Causing Concern (January 11) Preserving Fertility While Battling Cancer (January 11) Can Aspirin Reduce Cancer Risk and Mortality? (January 25) Coming Home to Roost: The Self-Seeding Hypothesis

15

Editors, Authors, and Audiences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an author's frustrations with poor editing in the form of advice from an editor who has been edited. Discusses deciding what to change, grammar and style, and knowing the audience and the author. (RS)

Wieringa, Douglas

1995-01-01

16

2008 Editors' Picks  

Cancer.gov

2008 Editors' Picks A Kinder Cut: Advances in Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer (January 8, 2008) Oral Contraceptives Reduce Long-Term Risk of Ovarian Cancer (February 5, 2008) Thyroid Cancer's Rising Incidence: Reality or Illusion? (Part 1) (February

17

Editors' Fall Picks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

2008-01-01

18

Panel Library And Editor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Panel Library and Editor computer program is grapical-user-interface builder program for use on workstations of Silicon Graphics IRIS family. Program creates "widgets" manipulated by user. Appearance similar to X-Windows System. Used by programmers to write user-friendly mouse-driven application programs for IRIS workstations. Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) written in C Language and Scheme.

Raible, Eric; Tristram, David; Walatka, Pam

1992-01-01

19

Editor's Note (March 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If science is the study of the natural world, how can we avoid physics and chemistry? Our students should understand the connections of the biological and physical realms before they hit the more abstract treatment in high school. This editorial includes reflections on science education from Science and Children 's field editor.

Ohana, Chris

2004-03-01

20

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Enjoying physics Elizabeth Swinbank The Salters Advanced Physics Project, University of York, UK Energy exchange Chris Parton 40 Bellshill Road, Uddingston, Glasgow G71 7LZ, UK

1997-11-01

21

Editor's Note (May 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wherever you live, the weather provides a backdrop for studying science, and weather patterns play a critical role in our daily lives. They can determine everything from indoor recess to global economic patterns. This selection includes notes from the Field Editor of Science and Children about the study of weather with elementary students.

Ohana, Chris

2004-05-01

22

2007 Editors' Picks  

Cancer.gov

2007 Editors' Picks Robotic Prostate Surgery: Too Much Too Fast? (January 16, 2007) Late in Life, Prostate Cancer Screening May Do More Harm than Good (January 23, 2007) CA125: Biography of an Ovarian Biomarker (January 30, 2007) A New Tobacco Threat?

23

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents The imaginary Sun? Harold Aspden Energy Science Ltd, PO Box 35, Southampton SO16 7RB, UK Difficult physics? Tim Akrill Chief Examiner, A-level Physics, Edexcel Foundation Was it a dream? Bill Jarvis 6 Peggy's Mill Road, Edinburgh EH4 6JY

1999-09-01

24

From the Editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

For our second issue for the year, we are pleased to provide aspecial issue on New Business Models for Electronic Commerce guestedited by Matti Rossi, Timo Saarinen, and Virpi Kristiina Tuunainenfrom the Helsinki School of Economics. This special issuerepresents the completion of yet another project originallyinitiated by the previous editors. It demonstrates thatconsiderable effort and time is required on the

Ruth; Udo

2003-01-01

25

Editor's Note (October 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Instead of tedious labeling of rocks, geology is a dynamic, relevant field that in many ways provides a context and connection for all other fields of science. This selection includes notes from the field editor of Science and Children regarding the dynamic and critical importance of geology.

Ohana, Chris

2004-10-01

26

Editor's Note (March 2006)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this section the editor discusses how children are expected to understand how their bodies work as well as how to keep their bodies healthy as aligned with the National Science Education Standards. She gives an overview of the articles in the current journal which teach health-related concepts.

Ohana, Chris

2006-03-01

27

Editors' Spring Picks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

Library Journal, 2011

2011-01-01

28

Editor's Note: Hot Properties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Properties are "hot," not in terms of real estate but in science class. Here, the editor highlights the feature articles related to this month's theme, Properties of Objects and Materials. With these articles as a guide, you can move students toward a deeper understanding of property. As you do so, they will build a strong foundation for future science learning.

Ohana, Chris

2008-01-01

29

Editor's Note (February 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As a consumer and producer of professional development, the current field editor reflects on the types of professional development that she has experienced over the years. From very valuable workshops to being subjected to inservices that were a waste of teachers' time, she shares her thoughts on science education in this edition of Science and Children .

Ohana, Chris

2004-02-01

30

Editor's Corner: Summer Magic  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Does the question, "Why do I even bother?" ever occur to you at the end of the school year? If so, you're in good company--the Field Editor asks himself this perennial question every June. He shares his reflections of summer renewal in this month's Editor's Corner, and suggests a good way to help you begin your own renewal process--use summer to catch up on your reading! He presents an overview of feature articles in this month's The Science Teacher (TST) that offer some great ideas for the coming school year, recommends some past issues of TST that you may have only had time to scan during the busy school year, and takes a look ahead at upcoming issues of TST.

Metz, Steve

2006-07-01

31

An online editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

An online, interactive system for text editing is described in detail, with remarks on the theoretical and experimental justification for its form. Emphasis throughout the system is on providing maximum convenience and power for the user. Notable features are its ability to handle any piece of text, the content-searching facility, and the character-by-character editing operations. The editor can be programmed

L. Peter Deutsch; Butler W. Lampson

1967-01-01

32

Editor's Note (April 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever worked with your students on some authentic problem? An issue in the school or community comes up and your class studies it? Most of you probably have. You have taught using some instructional technique for years, then someone "invents" it and it is suddenly in vogue. Project-based learning is one of these techniques. This selection includes notes from the Science and Children Field Editor about the value of project-based science.

Ohana, Chris

2004-04-01

33

Editor's Roundtable: Creative connections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By integrating creative projects into their instruction, science teachers have the opportunity to awaken "creative expression and knowledge into their students." This month's Editor's Roundtable column highlights the articles in this issue of Science Scope that showcase innovative projects on topics ranging from tornadoes, to microscopes, to fossils, to deep-sea creatures. However, with today's overflowing curriculum and high stakes testing, we cannot let creative projects, regardless of their fun and publicity potential, derail or dilute the delivery of science content.

Liftig, Inez F.

2006-07-01

34

Editor's Corner: Science Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With increasing emphasis on hands-on inquiry activities, teachers need to be as knowledgeable as possible about safety. Unfortunately, accidents in science classrooms are no exception! As a result, the theme of this issue of The Science Teacher (TST) is Science Safety. The Field Editor highlights several articles that address this theme and announces an ongoing "Spotlight on Safety" feature that will appear in upcoming issues of TST.

Metz, Steve

2005-09-01

35

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Another round of cocktails (highballs)Anthony Anderson and John Vanderkooy Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada Interpolation: a lost artRonald Newburgh The Rivers School, 333 Winter Street, Weston, MA 02493, USA What's in a bulb?Don Hinson 51 Greenway, Chesham, Bucks, HP5 2BY, UK

1999-07-01

36

ION Configuration Editor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

Borgen, Richard L.

2013-01-01

37

Editor's Corner: Building Together  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As modern science becomes more interdisciplinary, teachers look for activities and ideas that require thinking across the disciplines and include material from outside a strictly focused, discipline-based curriculum. In this issue of The Science Teacher, authors demonstrate ways to build bridges across the disciplines, using everything from violins and earthquakes to poetry and pharmacology. The Field Editor also introduces a free website sponsored by NSTA to support teachers around the country in helping students understand the background causes of enormous tragedy, such as Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Metz, Steve

2005-11-01

38

HEART handbook for guest editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This handbook outlines the basic job of guest editors for the HEART Conference proceedings, published by the DoD Nuclear Information and Analysis Center in the Journal of Radiation Effects, Research and Engineering. Suggestions are offered for procedures to aid the editors, authors, reviewers, and the publisher in assuring that the journal communicates clearly, concisely, and honestly.

Vittitoe

1991-01-01

39

OED: Object-Oriented Editor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the paper an object-oriented editor, called OED, is defined in the FranzLISP programming language. Though editors are usually associated with sets of functions to manipulate textfiles, in the work the term is being used to characterize a family of LISP...

J. C. Boudreaux

1987-01-01

40

Editors in the Electronic Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for newspaper writers and editors, this collection of articles includes the following titles and authors: "VDTs, TV Haven't Shocked Editors" by Jay Rogers; "Opinions Vary on Electronics' Effect" by Bob Nordyke; "A Few Kind Words for the Censors" by Hugh A. Mulligan; "Those Awards Have Their Limitations" by Larry Fortner; "Obituaries Are…

Dye, Robert M., Ed.

41

EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict. The effect of this is two fold: reviewers are drawn from the metrological community and know that a high standard is required, while authors know that good work dealing with fine measurements will be read and appreciated by those who know the field. Articles in the third category have appeared regularly in Metrologia. The continuing association with the CIPM is well exemplified, in this issue, by the article from Dr Hugh Preston-Thomas - President of the CCT, Vice-President of the CIPM and a former editor - on The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) and by "News from the BIPM". Last year, a major article described the new international electrical reference standards. Only the fourth category of article presents problems: with honourable exceptions - the 1987 supplement by Prof. George Gillies on the Newtonian Gravitational Constant, for example - the reviews promised in 1965 are absent. As the new editor my thoughts have come to centre on the matter of reviews. This, I find, is not a unique consideration, for my predecessor raised the matter in his own introductory editorial some years ago. The intention of the original Editorial Board was: 'Review articles will be published . . . in order that both the specialist and the nonspecialist may have a convenient and readily available means of surveying the rapidly changing situation in fundamental metrology'. This seems a wholly admirable intention and one that should not be forgotten. I ask potential authors to think about reviews on topics of current interest and to contact me or any member of the Editorial Board to discuss possibilities. I'd also be interested to have the names of individuals I could approach in the name of Metrologia with a view to asking them to write on a particular topic. Intending authors will have all the support - moral rather than financial, I fear - that the editorial office can provide. Finally, I ask readers to note that the pages of Metrologia are open to all. "Letters to the Editor" provides a forum for debate on metrological matters and, within the

Blackburn, D. A.

1990-01-01

42

Message from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans, General Atomics, USA A. Hassanein, Purdue University, USA Y.-M. Jeon, National Fusion Research Institute, Spain S. Kajita, Nagoya University, Japan T.P. Kiviniemi, Aalto University, Finland R.M. More, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA F. Sattin, Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CNR, Italy J.A. Snipes, ITER Organization, France W. Suttrop, Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics-Garching, Germany F.L. Tabares, Energy Environment and Technology Research Centre, Spain Y. Ueda, Osaka University, Japan V.S. Voitsenya, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine G. Xu, Chinese Academy of Sciences-Hefei Institutes of Physical Sciences, People's Republic of China In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion . At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2013. Our thanks to them! We also wish to express our thanks to Paul Thomas, who served as Guest Editor for the special issue of the overview and summary reports from the 24th Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego, October 2012. This issue is of great value as a summary of the major developments worldwide in fusion research in the last two years. Authors The winner of the 2013 Nuclear Fusion Award is D.G. Whyte for the paper: I-mode: an H-mode energy confinement regime with L-mode particle transport in Alcator C-Mod [1], and we congratulate him and coauthors on this achievement. We also note special topic papers published in 2013: Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendestein 7-X by H.S. Bosch et al [2], Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER by I.T. Chapman et al [3] and IFMIF: overview of the validation activities by J. Knaster et al [4]. The Board of Editors The Board of Editors has had a substantial turnover in members. For their great service to the journal, we wish to thank the following outgoing Board Members whose term of service was reached at the end of

Stambaugh, Ronald D.

2014-01-01

43

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are contained within a single PostScript or PDF document available at the bottom of this page. Contents On the determination of a period of oscillation P Glaister Department of Mathematics, University of Reading Finding the ratio of the specific heats of gases G Millar 75 Morningside Rd, Edinburgh EH10 4AY Moving frame and the Doppler effect in mechanical waves Murshed Hossain Department of Chemistry and Physics, Rowan College of New Jersey, Glassboro, and Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, USA . The fly and train paradox Don Koks Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Australia Easier A-levels? P C Clark Head of Physics, Oundle School Centripetal acceleration Telford Moore Depute Rector, Hawick High School Curriculum development at 16-19 Bryan R Chapman 16-19 Curriculum Development Officer, Institute of Physics, London A fly on the wall P Litchfield Rochdale, Lancs Motion revealed by a laser Frank Munley Raonoke College, Salem, VA 24153, USA

1996-01-01

44

JGR-Red Deputy Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

William M. Kaula, of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, has been appointed deputy editor of the red section of the Journal of Geophysical Research—to serve from October 1, 1982, to June 30, 1983. He will handle special editorial problems that require immediate attention while the new editor, Gerald Schubert (Eos, September 7, 1982), is on sabbatical. Schubert will handle the standard editorial and review process.

45

The Borgesian Garden: Luis Fernando Verissimo, Chico Buarque and Luis Aguilar Monsalve  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the end of twentieth century and the beginning of the twentieth first century had come into view some Latin American writers that could not avoid the influential literature of earlier decades. Jorge Luis Borges, one of the most prominent authors from the first and second half of the XX century has been the main source of influence in the

Carla Castano

2009-01-01

46

33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters...DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Fossil...

2013-07-01

47

Tule Elk at San Luis National Wildlife Refuge  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Tule elk are shown here in their natural habitat at San Luis National Wildlife Refuge; Recovery Act funding will enable the refuge to build a Visitor Center to better serve the public. Related to the R8AF ? Construct Headquarters Visitor Building ? San Luis NWR project....

2009-07-15

48

GOES Imagery of Hurricane Luis (WMS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On September 6, 1995, Hurricane Luis was a Category 4 hurricane located about 250 kilometers northeast of Puerto Rico. GOES-9, a new weather satellite in geostationary orbit, was undergoing a check-out period and tested a new, rapid scanning capability by taking high-resolution visible images of Luis at 22 images per hour, much more rapid than the normal rate of one image every 15 minutes. These images clearly show a number of hurricane features that had been hard to observe before, including the evolution of the eyewall structures and small-scale vortex features within the eye. It is also possible to see the formation of the new hurricane arm to the southeast of the eye. This arm is marked by the formation of clouds in the bubbling regions that indicate intense updrafts. The island of Puerto Rico can only be seen as a stationary disturbance under the bright white cloudbank to the southwest of the eye of the hurricane.

Sokolowsky, Eric; Maher, Steve; Mitchell, Horace; Chesters, Dennis

2004-02-11

49

New AGU Journal Editors Appointed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, JGR-Oceans, JGR-Planets, and JGR-Earth Surface. Geophysical Research Letters welcomes Benoît Lavraud (Centre d’Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse, France) and Peter Strutton (University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia). Lavraud's area of expertise is space sciences, and Strutton's is ocean sciences.

Major, Barbara

2010-11-01

50

Mondrian: a teachable graphical editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mondrian is an object-oriented graphical editor that can learn new graphical procedures through programming by demonstration. A user can demonstrate a sequence of graphical editing commands on a concrete example to illustrate how the new procedure should work. An interface agent records the steps of the procedure in a symbolic form, using machine learning techniques, tracking relationships between graphical objects

Henry Lieberman

1993-01-01

51

Message from the Editor Message from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

Thomas, Paul

2012-04-01

52

Line-Editor Computer Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

Scott, Peter J.

1989-01-01

53

Grouping in collaborative graphical editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Often collaborative graphical systems lag behind well accepted single-user applications in terms of features supported. The frequently used operations of group\\/ungroup offered by almost every single-user graphical editor have not been considered by the collaborative graphical editing systems that try to preserve the intentions of the users involved in the concurrent editing. In this paper we present a novel algorithm

Claudia-Lavinia Ignat; Moira C. Norrie

2004-01-01

54

Instructional Support System (ISS) Test Editor User Manual December 1987 (VAX and Zenith 248 Versions).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Instructional Support System Development Subcomponent consists of four editors: Course Structure Editor, Lesson Definition Editor, Curriculum Definition Editor, and the Test Editor. This group of editors is used to define the rules by which the traini...

1987-01-01

55

Editor's Corner: Reflection and Renewal  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

According to Field Editor, Steve Metz, science teachers know that the traditional time for reflection on the past year is more likely to come in July than in January. Since summer is the time for reflecting on past practices and planning in anticipation of the year ahead and a time to catch up on reading, he highlights several articles from the 2005 issues The Science Teacher (TST). In addition, he discusses the focus of the summer issue of TST and takes a look at the year ahead.

Metz, Steve

2005-07-01

56

Editor's Corner: Supporting New Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many new teachers who leave schools after the first year report lack of support and poor working conditions as the primary reasons for leaving. New teachers can feel alone and vulnerable even working in a school building alongside scores of other teachers. At a time when many of our teachers are approaching retirement, and science and mathematics teachers are scarce, especially in urban settings, it is imperative that we support and retain teachers new to the profession. In this month's column, the field editor discusses this critical issue and shares his positive experience working along side a new teacher during the 2006-2007 school year.

Metz, Steve

2007-07-01

57

76 FR 39091 - San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice of Effectiveness of Surrender  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice of Effectiveness...Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District (District) for the...Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District, 17 FERC ]...

2011-07-05

58

Design of an Editor for the B Programming Language.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The B programming language syntax directed editor conceptual model, user interface, and commands are described. The editor is a screen editor, using focusing to select objects to be changed. Edit commands and pointing commands (which control focus) are se...

A. Nienhuis

1983-01-01

59

Formal Specification of a Display Editor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper presents a formalization of the design of a Display Editor. The formalization is rigorous enough to serve as a touchstone for the correctness of implementations of the editor and to permit various desirable properties of the design to be proven....

B. Sufrin

1981-01-01

60

RALEE--RNA ALignment Editor in Emacs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Production of high quality multiple sequence align- ments of structured RNAs relies on an iterative combination of manual editing and structure prediction. An essential feature of an RNA alignment editor is the facility to mark-up the align- ment based on how it matches a given secondary structure prediction, but few available alignment editors offer such a feature. The RALEE

Sam Griffiths-jones

2005-01-01

61

Panel Discussion With PR/PRL Editors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Editors from Physical Review Letters, Physical Review B, and Physical Review E will, after short introductions, answer questions from and respond to comments from the audience. Moderator: Martin Blume Editor-in-Chief (BNL) Panelists: Peter Adams, Physical Review B Irwin Oppenheim, Physical Review E (MIT) Jack Sandweiss, Physical Review Letters (Yale) Gene Wells, Physical Review Letters

2001-03-01

62

Editor's Corner: Food for Thought  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Food issues often appear in the news and other media. For example, the media regularly address food safety concerns--from Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) or "Mad Cow Disease" to Salmonella and Escherichia coli (E. coli) outbreaks. Obesity is another major concern in the United States, and childhood obesity is a growing concern. Eating disorders are prevalent among teenagers, and healthy dietary habits seem ever more difficult in this age of fast-food restaurants and take-out. It is not surprising that teachers have found the science of food to be a rich and interesting topic. In this month's column, the field editor discusses these relevant issues and shares a favorite food-related activity.

Metz, Steve

2004-10-01

63

PROGRAMMABLE DISPLAY PUSHBUTTON LEGEND EDITOR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is a pushbutton device available from Micro Switch which has a programmable 16 x 35 matrix of LEDs on the pushbutton surface. Any desired legends can be displayed on the PDPs, producing user-friendly applications which greatly reduce the need for dedicated manual controls. Because the PDP can interact with the operator, it can call for the correct response before transmitting its next message. It is both a simple manual control and a sophisticated programmable link between the operator and the host system. The Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor, PDPE, is used to create the LED displays for the pushbuttons. PDPE encodes PDP control commands and legend data into message byte strings sent to a Logic Refresh and Control Unit (LRCU). The LRCU serves as the driver for a set of four PDPs. The legend editor (PDPE) transmits to the LRCU user specified commands that control what is displayed on the LED face of the individual pushbuttons. Upon receiving a command, the LRCU transmits an acknowledgement that the message was received and executed successfully. The user then observes the effect of the command on the PDP displays and decides whether or not to send the byte code of the message to a data file so that it may be called by an applications program. The PDPE program is written in FORTRAN for interactive execution. It was developed on a DEC VAX 11/780 under VMS. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 12800 bytes. It requires four Micro Switch PDPs and two RS-232 VAX 11/780 terminal ports. The PDPE program was developed in 1985.

Busquets, A. M.

1994-01-01

64

EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This year Nuclear Fusion celebrates its fiftieth anniversary. This has been marked by the January special edition, containing papers presented at the plenary and celebratory evening session of the 22nd Fusion Energy Conference at Geneva. These papers underline the enormous progress that has been made in the last 50 years both in experiment and theory. Whilst the technical challenges that we face are still formidable, they are largely concerned with engineering a fusion reactor rather than fundamental plasma physics. In my editorial of a year ago, I remarked on the price of oil and the incentive that it gives to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. This last year, attention has shifted somewhat from the markets to the environment and the Copenhagen climate summit in particular. The timescale for action on the environment is much shorter than we can possibly match and so we can only play our part towards developing long term solutions. Our responsibility is to present a programme that has the clear goal in developing a sustainable source of energy and, as the next step, make an unambiguous success of ITER. The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2009 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2010. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, seven of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2008 to November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion award was Steven A. Sabbagh et al for the paper entitled 'Resistive wall stabilized oper

Thomas, Paul

2010-02-01

65

EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support for ITER. Such political visibility is good news, of course, but it brings with it the obligation to perform. Fortunately, good performance was much in evidence in the papers presented at the conference, of which a significant proportion contain 'ITER' in the title. Given this importance of ITER and the undertaking by the Nuclear Fusion journal to publish papers associated with Fusion Energy Conference presentations, the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board has decided to adopt a simplified journal scope that encompasses technology papers more naturally. The scope is available from http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Journal%20information but is reproduced here for clarity: Nuclear Fusion publishes articles making significant advances to the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The journal scope includes: the production, heating and confinement of high temperature plasmas; the physical properties of such plasmas; the experimental or theoretical methods of exploring or explaining them; fusion reactor physics; reactor concepts; fusion technologies. The key to scope acceptability is now '....significant advances....' rather than any particular area of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is hoped that this will make scope decisions easier for the Nuclear Fusion office, the referees and the Editor.The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. This is underlined by the fact that Nuclear Fusion has received an impact factor of 4.270, as listed in ISI's 2009 Science Citation Index. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2010 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2011. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, two of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2009 to November 2010 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their special issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Osamu Naito, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Japan Masahiro Kobayashi, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan Duccio Testa, Lausanne Federal Polytechnic University, Switzerland Vladimir Pustovitov, Russian Research Centre, Kurchatov Insitute, Russia Christopher Holland, University of California at San Diego, USA Yuri Gribov, ITER International Organisation, Cadarache, France Eriko Jotaki, Kyushu University, Japan Sven Wiesen, Jülich Research Centre, Germany Viktor S. Marchenko, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine Richard Stephens, General Atomics, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2010. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award was J.E. Rice et al for the paper entitled 'Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks' (2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 1618-24). The prize was awarde

Thomas, Paul

2011-01-01

66

Seroprevalencia de sífilis en mujeres embarazadas en San Luis Potosí  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To determine the seroprevalence of syphilis in pregnant women. Methods. A seroepidemiologic survey was conducted in 1 857 women giving birth at a general hospital in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Results. Five women (0.27 %) were diagnosed with syphilis at the time of deliv- ery. Maternal factors associated with a greater likelihood of syphilis included older

Daniel E Noyola; Octavio Malacara-Alfaro; Victoria Lima-Rogel; Abraham Torres-Montes

2006-01-01

67

Juan Luis Vives: Tradition and Innovation in Renaissance Rhetoric.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that Juan Luis Vives' efforts to rehabilitate the discipline of discourse may well have been the most original of the sixteenth century, and that his discussion of elecutio (the essence of rhetoric) is considerably more distinguished than that of the better known Peter Ramus. (RS)

Abbott, Don Paul

1986-01-01

68

Working (And Sparring) With Luis: Some Personal Recollections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Luis Alvarez was the most remarkable physicist I have ever worked with. As a member of his bubble chamber group at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley and subsequently as a leader of that group for several years, I could appreciate his outstanding attributes as a physicist and his forceful and colorful personality. Each day at the lab seemed exciting.

Moishe Pripstein

2011-01-01

69

Social Integration and Health Behavioral Change in San Luis, Honduras  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the effects of social integration on behavioral change in the course of an intensive, community-based public health intervention. The intervention trained volunteers and mobilized local organizations to promote 16 key family health practices in rural San Luis, Honduras, during 2004 to 2006. A mixed methods approach is used.…

McQuestion, Michael J.; Calle, Ana Quijano; Drasbek, Christopher; Harkins, Thomas; Sagastume, Lourdes J.

2010-01-01

70

Educational and Demographic Profile: San Luis Obispo County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Luis Obispo County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

2004-01-01

71

Geologic Map of the San Luis Quadrangle, Costilla County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The map area includes San Luis and the primarily rural surrounding area. San Luis, the county seat of Costilla County, is the oldest surviving settlement in Colorado (1851). West of the town are San Pedro and San Luis mesas (basalt-covered tablelands), which are horsts with the San Luis fault zone to the east and the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone to the west. The map also includes the Sanchez graben (part of the larger Culebra graben), a deep structural basin that lies between the San Luis fault zone (on the west) and the central Sangre de Cristo fault zone (on the east). The oldest rocks exposed in the map area are the Pliocene to upper Oligocene basin-fill sediments of the Santa Fe Group, and Pliocene Servilleta Basalt, a regional series of 3.7?4.8 Ma old flood basalts. Landslide deposits and colluvium that rest on sediments of the Santa Fe Group cover the steep margins of the mesas. Rare exposures of the sediment are comprised of siltstones, sandstones, and minor fluvial conglomerates. Most of the low ground surrounding the mesas and in the graben is covered by surficial deposits of Quaternary age. The alluvial deposits are subdivided into three Pleistocene-age units and three Holocene-age units. The oldest Pleistocene gravel (unit Qao) forms extensive coalesced alluvial fan and piedmont surfaces, the largest of which is known as the Costilla Plain. This surface extends west from San Pedro Mesa to the Rio Grande. The primary geologic hazards in the map area are from earthquakes, landslides, and localized flooding. There are three major fault zones in the area (as discussed above), and they all show evidence for late Pleistocene to possible Holocene movement. The landslides may have seismogenic origins; that is, they may be stimulated by strong ground shaking during large earthquakes. Machette and Thompson based this geologic map entirely on new mapping, whereas Drenth supplied geophysical data and interpretations.

Machette, Michael N.; Thompson, Ren A.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

2008-01-01

72

Richard Gilbert, Reporter and Assistant City Editor.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Looks at the experiences of Richard Gilbert, reporter and assistant editor for "The Herald Telephone," a daily newspaper in Bloomington, Indiana, and discusses Gilbert's suggested guidelines for high school journalism advisers. (MS)

Bender, Larry

1988-01-01

73

EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The end of 2008 cannot pass without remarking that the economic news has repeatedly strengthened the case for nuclear fusion; not perhaps to solve the immediate crises but to offer long-term security of energy supply. Although temporary, the passage of the price of oil through 100 per barrel is a portent of things to come and should bolster our collective determination to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. It is with great pride, therefore, that I can highlight the contributions that the Nuclear Fusion journal has made to the research programme and the consolidation of its position as the lead journal in the field. Of course, the journal would be nothing without its authors and referees and I would like to pass on my sincere thanks to them all for their work in 2008 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2009. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most loyal referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least two different manuscripts during the period from November 2007 to November 2008 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! T. Hino (Hokkaido University, Japan) M. Sugihara (ITER Cadarache, France) M. Dreval (Saskatchewan University, Canada) M. Fenstermacher (General Atomics, USA) V.S. Marchenko (Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine) G.V. Pereverzev (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany) V. Philipps (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany) S. Zweben (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA) Y. Hirano (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan) Y. Takase (Tokyo University, Japan) In addition there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2008. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2007 award was Clemente Angioni for the paper entitled `Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade' (Nucl. Fusion 44 8277-845). The winner of the 2008 Nuclear Fusion award is Todd Evans et al for the paper `Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 45 595-607). The awards were presented by the IAEA Deputy Director General, Werner Burkart, and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, on 16 October 2008 at the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. Given the topicality of these papers for the ITER design, it is a matter of pride to the journal that the work should be published in Nuclear Fusion. Reviews Like many who have worked for a long time in the field, I still make use of Nuclear Fusion Reviews that go back 20 or 30 years. It is particularly useful, therefore, that the Board of Editors has been working to re-activate the review programme. The first fruits will appear in this issue, in the form of `A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa. The special procedures for Reviews should be noted: most specifically that they should normally be commissioned by the Board of Editors. However, not only is the Board of Editors working on a programme but I am sure that they would be pleased to consider suggestions for review subjects. Letters The reputation of Nuclear Fusion is based on high quality full length articles. However, in the words of the journal

Thomas, Paul

2009-01-01

74

Editor profile: Donald H. Eckhardt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For Don Eckhardt, editor of AGU's Geodynamics book series, the scope of subjects appropriate for inclusion in the series is wide. “ The forces implied in the term ‘geodynamics’ operate on this planet on all scales and from the surface deep into the interior,” he says. The articles collected in the red volumes are often united, he suggests, by “an emphasis on common techniques as much as by subject matter.”Like the potential range of topics in the geodynamics series, the breadth of Eckhardt's professional responsibilities is large. As director of the Earth Sciences Division at the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory (AFGL) at Hanscom Air Force Base near Bedford, Mass., he oversees research and development in geodesy, gravity, seismology, geology, and dynamical astronomy. He administers more than 50 outside contracts while actively conducting theoretical and applied research of his own. In the past year, he has become well-known for his proposition that geophysical measurements made by an AFGL team demonstrate the existence and magnitude of two previously undetected fundamental forces in the universe, supplementing electromagnetism, the strong and weak nuclear forces, and Newtonian gravity.

75

Editor's Corner - Science Literacy: Then and Now  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The history of science is also a history of science writing. For scientists and also for our science students, the ability to communicate through writing and reading is a crucial skill at the heart of developing scientific literacy. In this month's Editor's Corner, the Field Editor discusses the connection between literacy, science, and writing. In addition, he highlights several literary works that will generate interest in science.

Metz, Steve

2006-02-01

76

DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas  

PubMed Central

Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs.

2012-01-01

77

SLEM (SLAVE Emulator Editor): A user-friendly, advanced text editor  

SciTech Connect

SLEM is a new full-screen editor for VAX/VMS computers which is programmed in the VAXTPU language. In addition to executing more quickly than EDT, SLEM proviees several new, advanced features while employing a user interface which is similar to EDT. The SLEM enhancements in the VAXTPU facility are like the SLAVE editor enhancements to EDT.

Mills-Curran, W.C.

1986-11-01

78

Epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.  

PubMed

We analyzed data from 147 patients with suspected pertussis in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Bordetella pertussis was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 59 (40.1%) cases. The incidence of B. pertussis infection was 2.3 per 100,000 population. There were 6 deaths among the study patients. We conclude that the impact of pertussis in our state is significantly higher than previously estimated. PMID:24220229

Ochoa-Perez, Uciel R; Hernández-Sierra, Juan F; Escalante-Padrón, Francisco J; Contreras-Vidales, Soledad; Berman-Puente, Ana M; Hernandez-Maldonado, Fernando; Noyola, Daniel E

2014-05-01

79

Geothermal resource assessment of western San Luis Valley, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Colorado Geological Survey initiated and carried out a fully integrated assessment program of the geothermal resource potential of the western San Luis Valley during 1979 and 1980. The San Luis Valley is a large intermontane basin located in southcentral Colorado. While thermal springs and wells are found throughout the Valley, the only thermal waters found along the western part of the Valley are found at Shaw Warm Springs which is a relatively unused spring located approximately 6 miles (9.66 km) north of Del Norte, Colorado. The waters at Shaws Warm Spring have a temperature of 86 F (30 C), a discharge of 40 gallons per minute and contain approximately 408 mg/l of total dissolved solids. The assessment program carried out din the western San Luis Valley consisted of: soil mercury geochemical surveys; geothermal gradient drilling; and dipole-dipole electrical resistivity traverses, Schlumberger soundings, Audio-magnetotelluric surveys, telluric surveys, and time-domain electro-magnetic soundings and seismic surveys. Shaw Warm Springs appears to be the only source of thermal waters along the western side of the Valley. From the various investigations conducted the springs appear to be fault controlled and is very limited in extent. Based on best evidence presently available estimates are presented on the size and extent of Shaw Warm Springs thermal system. It is estimated that this could have an areal extent of 0.63 sq. miles (1.62 sq. km) and contain 0.0148 Q's of heat energy.

Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard; Ringrose, Charles D.

1983-01-01

80

Gravity survey in the San Luis Valley area, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the summers of 1963 and 1964, a regional gravity survey covering 6,000 square miles of the San Luis Valley and surrounding areas was made to determine subsurface basement configurations and to guide future crustal studies. The San Luis Valley, a large intermontane basin, is a segment of the Rio Grande trough, a reef system characterized by volcanism, normal faulting, and tilted fault blocks. The gravity data, accurate to about 0.5 mgal, were reduced to complete-Bouguer anomaly values. The Bouguer-anomaly gravity map delineates a series of en-echelon gravity highs in the central and western San Luis Valley. These gravity highs are interpreted as horsts of Precambrian rock buried by basin fill. A series of en-echelon gravity lows along the eastern edge of the Valley is interpreted as a graben filled with sedimentary and igneous rock estimated to be up to 30,000 ft thick. The relatively high regional gravity over the Sangre de Cristo Mountains suggests that these mountains are locally uncompensated. A subcircular gravity low in the Bonanza area is interpreted as an indication of low-density volcanic rocks within a caldera structure.

Gaca, J. Robert; Karig, Daniel E.

1965-01-01

81

A Microsoft Windows version of the MCNP visual editor  

SciTech Connect

Work has started on a Microsoft Windows version of the MCNP visual editor. The MCNP visual editor provides a graphical user interface for displaying and creating MCNP geometries. The visual editor is currently available from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) as software package PSR-358. It currently runs on the major UNIX platforms (IBM, SGI, HP, SUN) and Linux. Work has started on converting the visual editor to work in a Microsoft Windows environment. This initial work focuses on converting the display capabilities of the visual editor; the geometry creation capability of the visual editor may be included in future upgrades.

Schwarz, R.A.; Carter, L.L.; Pfohl, J.

1999-07-01

82

Using multiple sequence alignment editors and formatters.  

PubMed

Sequence alignment editors enable the user to manually edit a multiple sequence alignment (msa) in order to obtain a more reasonable or expected alignment. Editors allow sequences to be reordered and/or modified using the computer's cut and paste commands. They are designed to accept various msa formats and to provide the output file in a suitable user-designated format. Sequence formatters provide various output formatting options, such as color and shading schemes to enhance visualization of residue alignments. The formatters can output files in Postscript, EPS, RTF, and other widely recognized formats, while accepting the standard input formats, such as MSF, ALN, and FASTA. This article introduces a number of sequence alignment editors and formatters, and provides links to sites where they can be found. PMID:20147226

Mount, David W

2009-07-01

83

Panel Discussion With PR/PRL Editors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Panelists: Peter Adams, Physical Review B Irwin Oppenheim, Physical Review E & Massachsetts Institute of Technology Jack Sandweiss, Physical Review Letters & Yale University Reinhardt Schuhmann, Physical Review Letters The panel will include Editors from Physical Review Letters, Physical Review B, and Physical Review E. They will briefly discuss some current issues facing the journals, such as raising the standards for PRL acceptance and the role of electronic media attachments (e.g., movies) to journal articles. Opinions on these issues from the audience will be solicited. The Editors will also respond to questions and comments from the audience.

Blume, Martin

2002-03-01

84

Editor's Roundtable: Never cut corners on safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaching science in a less-than-adequately equipped room is unsafe and just plain dangerous. Where safety is concerned, there are no shortcuts, no make-do techniques that Science Scope authors or anyone else can offer you. School districts must provide safe science teaching facilities--no ifs, ands, or buts, and no substitutions accepted. Safety is not negotiable. In this Editor's Roundtable discussion, the Editor addresses this critical issue and highlights some great ideas from the February 2007 issue of Science Scope that will help you stretch your science-supply funds and still keep your curriculum on track without ever cutting corners on safety.

Liftig, Inez

2007-02-01

85

EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. As many of you are no doubt aware, our latest impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen to 1.228. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. The popularity of the journal amongst authors and readers has prompted us to introduce a new subject classification for articles, to make it easier for readers to find articles of interest. The eight subject categories are: Measurement theory and practical developments (e.g. precision measurements, metrology, new measurement principles, signal processing techniques, theory of measurement, calibration); Sensors and sensing systems (based on physical, chemical or biological principles; micro- and nano-scale systems; sensors for physical, chemical and biological quantities); Optical and laser based techniques (e.g. fibre optics, interferometry, etc); Fluid mechanics measurements (e.g. fluid flow, velocimetry, particle sizing, etc); Imaging techniques (e.g. tomography, microscopy, holography, THz, etc); Spectroscopy (e.g. optical, acoustic, dielectric, MS, NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS, fluorescence, PCS, x-ray, etc); New and improved techniques for materials evaluation (e.g. non-destructive testing and evaluation, structural measurements); Novel instrumentation. We kindly ask you to assign your paper to a category when you send it to the journal. In order to maintain our rapid publication times (currently authors can expect a decision 53 days after submitting their article, and once accepted, articles are published in an average of 40 days), we are adopting an article numbering scheme. This will enable us to continue to publish articles as soon as they are ready, and to classify them according to subject and type. Details can be found on our website at www.iop.org/journals/mst. Another change will be to the names of some of our articles. Design Notes will now be called Technical Design Notes to clarify that these are short descriptive articles giving readers a practical and useful 'how to' guide to a new piece of equipment or a technique. Review Articles will change their name to Topical Reviews to reflect the fact that these provide a review of a topic of current interest. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. Last year's topics included inverse problems in engineering, nanoscale metrology, microwave moisture measurements, metrology for high energy physics experiments and accelerometers, and optical fibre sensors among others. Remember to set up a free e-mail alert so you can be e-mailed as soon as articles in your field are published! There simply remains for me to say thank you again for your contribution to Measurement Science and Technology, and I wish you all the best for a successful 2008!

Hauptmann, Peter

2008-01-01

86

EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the time of writing, the construction of ITER is making, quite literally, visible progress; buildings have gone up, the tokamak pit has been equipped with the seismic pads and pylons have been put in place for the high tension input to the power supplies. Most of the main procurement arrangements have been let and we will see an increasing volume of deliveries to the ITER site over the coming years. In addition, the National Ignition Facility has started full operation and will undoubtedly see important results coming from it in 2012. These projects are important reminders of what a monumental endeavour we are all engaged in and the potential of nuclear fusion to improve the long-term condition of the human race. We can be proud, therefore, that the Nuclear Fusion journal makes such an important contribution to controlled fusion programmes and is maintaining its position as the leading journal in the field. More than 350 articles are submitted each year from over 40 countries. Nuclear Fusion continues to be the most highly cited journal in the field, with an impact factor of 3.303, as listed in the ISI 2010 Science Citation Index. The journal depends on its authors and referees for its success and so I would like to thank them all for their hard work in 2011, which should maintain the level of readership and the citation indices for years to come. I sincerely hope that 2012 will be as good. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, three of the top referees have reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2010 to November 2011 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA Cadarache, France Russell Doerner, University of California - San Diego, USA Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany Akihide Fujisawa, Kyushi University, Japan Gerardo Giruzzi, CEA Cadarache, France Grigory Kagan, LANL, USA Morten Lennholm, CCFE, UK Akinobu Matsuyama, NIFS, Japan Peter Stangeby, University of Toronto, Canada Leonid Zakharov, PPPL, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2011. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Award is H. Urano, for the paper 'Dimensionless parameter dependence of H-mode pedestal width using hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in JT-60U' (Nucl. Fusion 48 045008). The award was presented at the Plasma Conference 2011 (Joint meeting of 28th JSPF Annual Meeting, The 29th Symposium on Plasma Processing, and Division of Plasma Physics, 2011 Autumn Meeting of The Physical Society of Japan). This is the sixth year that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has awarded an annual prize to honour exceptional work published in Nuclear Fusion. IOP Publishing has generously made a contribution of $2500 to the award. The Nuclear Fusion Electronic Archive The journal's electronic archive has been online since the beginning of the year. The archive has been a roaring success and has contributed to the nearly 300 000 downloads of journal papers in 2011. The archive can be accessed via http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Archive. It has direct links to 16 landmark papers, from authors such as Artsimovich and Mercier. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the Nuclear Fusion office in Vienna and IOP Pub

Thomas, Paul

2012-01-01

87

EMACS: The Extensible, Customizable, Self-Documenting Display Editor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

EMACS is a display editor which is implemented in an interpreted higher level language. This allows users to make extensions that fit the editor better to their own diverse applications, to experiment with alternative command languages, and to share exten...

R. M. Stallman

1979-01-01

88

Editor's Note (November/December 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At a time in which teachers are pressured to teach more and more to higher standards, writing in the content areas can provide an authentic way to teach writing skills. This selection includes notes from the field editor of Science and Children on incorporating writing in the science curriculum.

Ohana, Chris

2004-11-01

89

Editors' Ability and Willingness to Work Effectively.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests that student editors know their jobs, set a good example for the staff, have regular staff meetings, make assignments clear, not "hog" good assignments, be available to the staff, help the staff learn to rewrite, attend all staff or editorial board meetings, and accept decisions of the board. (TJ)

Dodd, Julie

1978-01-01

90

Copyright Tips for Editors and Publishers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Expands on three main copyright tips as they apply to editors and publishers: (1) know copyright basics (copyright notice, copyright registration, fair use); (2) know whom to contact if you have copyright questions or if you need to obtain copyright permission; and (3) communicate questions, intentions, and policies clearly and fully. (EJS)

Polansky, Barbara Friedman

1985-01-01

91

Technical Journal Editors and Writing Style.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares technical journal editing practices with journal style, examining variables that reflect active, verbal expression of ideas and parsimony and clarity of sentence construction. Finds that editors have little professional training in editing and style, little knowledge of style terms and differences, and spend little time editing, and only…

Bostian, Lloyd; Hollander, Barbara

1990-01-01

92

EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included particle image velocimetry; optoelectronic, electronic and optical fibre sensors; and density metrology among others, and next year we will publish a special issue on nanoscale metrology which I'm sure will be of interest to many of you. Remember to set up a free e-mail alert so you can be e-mailed as soon as articles in your field are published! The Editorial Board invites topical review articles and this year several interesting topics were covered by international leaders in their field. For example, Paul Lambeck (Univ. Twente, Netherlands) has written about integrated optical sensors in the chemical domain; Bernd Fellmuth, Christof Gaiser and Joachim Fischer of PTB, Germany have contributed an interesting article on the determination of the Boltzmann constant; Juergen Czarske (TU Dresden, Germany) has published an article on laser Doppler velocimetry; while Adrian Dobroiu, Chiko Otani and Kodo Kawase (RIKEN, Japan) have written about terahertz wave sources and imaging applications. We were also pleased to publish a review by Brian Culshaw (Univ. Strathclyde, UK) on the optical fibre Sagnac interferometer. We hope that these articles and the others published this year will provide a useful overview for our readers, and be helpful to new researchers. In June 2005 we introduced the second phase of our author and referee homepages. Many of you already have your own referee homepages set up, and we have now introduced an authors section where authors can submit their manuscript, access referee reports, collect proofs, and track the progress of their article from submission, through the peer-review process, to decision and publication. Of course we still understand that some people prefer to receive things by e-mail or post so we will do our best to be flexible for both authors and referees. Our author and referee web pages have proved extremely popular, and partly as a result of our innovation in this area, most authors can expect to receive a first decision on their paper within 55 days. Once accepted, papers are published within 40 days (on average), and although

Hauptmann, Peter

2006-12-01

93

Editor and Student Views on the Censorship Game.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Out of 200 newspaper editors randomly selected from a directory, 64 responded to a questionnaire eliciting their opinions on the subject materials most often censored by groups in the United States. The editors' responses were compared to those of 121 freshmen at Cameron University (Oklahoma). A majority of the editors supported the First…

Raburn, Josephine

94

76 FR 414 - Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement for the Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN North) Rail...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Angeles to San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN North) Rail Corridor Improvements Studies: Los Angeles...environmental impact report (EIR) for rail corridor improvements to the Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN North) rail corridor (LOSSAN North Program)....

2011-01-04

95

Solar Radiation in the City of San Luis-Argentina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present paper it is analyzed the solar radiation measured in San Luis city during seven years (2000-2006). Values of clarity index and clear days fraction are obtained, verifying the Suerhcke relationship, comparing average values measured against the obtained values also by the models of Ångström-Prescott, of Reitvel, and of Glover and McCulloch. It is analyzed the diffuse fraction of the global solar radiation, finding the correlation between Kd and Kt proposed by Page, and the percentage of cloudy, partially cloudy and clear sky days are also found, seeking to find a relationship with the ENSO phenomena.

Adaro, Jorge; Fasulo, Amílcar; Nieto, María Beatriz; Zizzias, Javier

2009-03-01

96

New Editors Appointed for Sections of Journal of Geophysical Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New editors have been appointed for the Atmospheres, Biogeosciences, and Oceans sections of the Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). Joost de Gouw (NOAA, Boulder, Colo.) and Renyi Zhang (Texas A&M, College Station) are filling the vacancies of retiring Atmospheres section editors John Austin and Jose Fuentes. De Gouw and Zhang join the continuing editors Steven Ghan and Yinon Rudich. Sara Pryor (Indiana University, Bloomington) is joining the Atmospheres section editorial board as an associate editor now; she will transition to editor in January 2010.

2009-04-01

97

Editor's Corner: Making Sense of the World  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this month's Editor's Corner, the Field Editor paints a vivid word picture to describe the theme in this month's edition of The Science Teacher, which is the blending of art and science to help students make sense of the world. The overlap of art and science can provide rich experiences and deep understanding for students. For science teachers, one of the most compelling points of contact between science and art is the requirement of both for careful observation. Art can provide classroom experiences that develop the observational skills so important in science. Teachers in all disciplines now understand that students learn in different ways and that we must appeal to the multiple student strengths and intelligences present in every classroom. This theme appears again and again as a rationale for integrating art into science classes.

Metz, Steve

2005-01-01

98

Editor's Corner: Teaching Science for All  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diversity comes in many flavors. Achievement gaps have been identified with respect to race and ethnicity, but also regarding gender, limited English ability, socioeconomic status, and learning differences. The Science Teacher (TST) has a long history of providing support and teaching suggestions to help close these achievement gaps. This issue of TST continues the tradition with articles designed "to promote excellence and innovation in science teaching for all," as discussed by the Field Editor.

2006-03-01

99

The editor-referee system and publication an editor's view of the process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter explains the functioning of scientific journals from the editorial side of the process. Both the history and current functioning of scientific journals are reviewed with a particular emphasis on the evolution of the referee's role. In its current form, the evaluation of a submission is interactive between the three parties - the author(s), editors, and reviewers. The editors serve as the mediators and final evaluators, seeking advice from one or more contacted experts who are in the special position of evaluating the science, presentation, and significance of the work. The chapter explains how this proceeds, and its advantages, pitfalls, and criteria - scientific, archival, and ethical - and how these have evolved historically and consensually. Since referees and editors are also authors, the symbiosis of the process is one of its strengths, since all participants exchange roles.

Shore, S. N.

2011-07-01

100

Luis de Florez and the Special Devices Division  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This Dissertation presents the life of Luis de Florez and the World War II history of the Special Devices Division (SDD) of the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics. Luis de Florez was a well known consulting engineer, aviation fuel expert, private pilot and reserve Naval officer. While on active duty in 1940, he received the assignment to improve the Navy's flight training methods. To accomplish this objective, he promoted the concept of synthetic training, the use of simulators and other non-operational equipment, to provide training for Navy flight personnel such as pilots, gunners, navigators, flight engineers, radio operators and others as well as for ground based people like mechanics. He founded the Special Devices Division to design the tools and equipment needed for this type of training. The success of synthetic training and the devices developed by the SDD received recognition by the awarding of the Collier Trophy to de Florez in December 1944. This trophy is awarded annually for the most significant aeronautical achievement of the previous year (1943). De Florez received the award for the strategic accomplishment of training thousands of American airmen in 1943. The work of the Division also had other important technical, social, financial and operational impacts on the prosecution of WW II by the Allies. The work of the Division also had impacts on American society as a whole that persist to the present day. These impacts are discussed in detail. The Dissertation presents details of the devices and their use in aviation training as well as a history of the Division during the war. After the war, de Florez led an advisory board for the CIA. These activities and some of both the positive and negative results of the work of this board are discussed. This discussion includes de Florez' involvement in the CIA's drug experiments and the unfortunate Frank Olsen affair.

Dawson, Paul Louis

101

Editor's Roundtable: Classroom benefit of being bionic!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Science Education Standards indicate that "technology as design is included in the Standards as parallel to science as inquiry." As a result, this issue of Science Scope contains a collection of design and construction activities that teachers can use to meet this standard. The Editor of the Roundtable column discusses some of these exciting projects, and she also shares an activity that she uses in her classroom that has personal relevance by helping students to understand the costs, constraints, advantages, risks, and other consequences associated with technological solutions to problems.

Liftig, Inez F.

2006-11-01

102

Bureau of Labor Statistics: The Editor's Desk  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Editor's Desk (familiarly shortened TED) at the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, brings out daily "fresh information from all over the Bureau," coupled with intriguing data and links of note. On the site's homepage, visitors will find sections like Topics, Archive by Year, Archive by Program, and About TED. The Topics area includes a panoply of subjects, such as Benefits, Projections, and Technology. The Recent Articles area contains links to pieces on job openings, payroll employment, and large technology firms. Additionally, the site contains an On Interest area which features statistical overviews of major trends in employment, health care, and collective bargaining. [KMG

2013-05-16

103

OPM Scheme Editor 2: A graphical editor for specifying object-protocol structures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document describes an X-window based Schema Editor for the Object-Protocol Model (OPM). OPM is a data model that supports the specification of complex object and protocol classes. objects and protocols are qualified in OPM by attributes that are defi...

I. M. A. Chen V. M. Markowitz F. Pang O. Ben-Shachar

1993-01-01

104

LuI3:Ce--A new scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report on a new cerium doped, high atomic number scintillator, LuI3:Ce, for gamma ray spectroscopy. Crystals of this material have been grown using Bridgman process. LuI3 crystals doped with 0.5 and 5 percent Ce3+ show high light output ({approx}50,000 photons/MeV) and fast principal decay constant (23 to 31 ns). The Ce3+ emission peaks at 474 nm. Energy resolution of LuI3:Ce coupled to photomultiplier tube (PMT) and measured at 662 keV was {approx}11 percent [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)]. Timing resolution of LuI3-PMT and BaF2-PMT detectors operating in coincidence mode was measured to be 210 ps (FWHM). Potential applications of this scintillator are discussed.

Shah, K.S.; Glodo, J.; Klugerman, M.; Higgins, W.; Gupta, T.; Wong, P.; Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Dorenbos, P.

2004-10-23

105

LuI3:Cea new scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we report on a new cerium doped, high atomic number scintillator, LuI3:Ce, for gamma ray spectroscopy. Crystals of this material have been grown using Bridgman process. LuI3 crystals doped with 0.5 and 5% Ce3+ show high light output (?50 000 photons\\/MeV) and fast principal decay constant (23 to 31 ns). The Ce3+ emission peaks at 474 nm.

K. S. Shah; J. Glodo; M. Klugerman; W. Higgins; T. Gupta; P. Wong; W. W. Moses; S. E. Derenzo; M. J. Weber; P. Dorenbos

2004-01-01

106

EMACS the extensible, customizable self-documenting display editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

EMACS is a display editor which is implemented in an interpreted high level language. This allows users to extend the editor by replacing parts of it, to experiment with alternative command languages, and to share extensions which are generally useful. The ease of extension has contributed to the growth of a large set of useful features. This paper describes the

Richard M. Stallman

1981-01-01

107

EMACS: The Extensible, Customizable Self-Documenting Display Editor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

EMACS is a display editor which is implemented in an interpreted high level language. This allows users to extend the editor by replacing parts of it, to experiment with alternative command languages, and to share extensions which are generally useful. Th...

R. M. Stallman

1981-01-01

108

Editor Observations about the NACADA Journal's First 25 Years  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From tape-recorded telephone interviews with each of the former NACADA Journal editors, I transcribed and analyzed their observations to create a history of the first 25 years of the NACADA Journal. Editors were asked to comment on the definition of a research journal, primary audience of the Journal as well as challenges, strengths, weaknesses,…

Kuhn, Terry

2007-01-01

109

Design and Implementation of a Dynamic Metadata Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper discusses the development of a web-based editor to support the authoring and management of Dublin Core (DC) metadata for web sources, using the Resource Description Framework (RDF) as the main representation scheme. The metadata editor is dynamic in the sense that it has the capability to automatically extract relevant content of DC metadata elements from the Dublin

Nor Adnan Yahaya; Rosiza Buang; Noor Hafizah Hassan; Petronas Berhad

2008-01-01

110

The evaluation of text editors: methodology and empirical results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a methodology for evaluating text editors on several dimensions: the time it takes experts to perform basic editing tasks, the time experts spend making and correcting errors, the rate at which novices learn to perform basic editing tasks, and the functionality of editors over more complex tasks. Time, errors, and learning are measured experimentally; functionality is measured

Teresa L. Roberts; Thomas P. Moran

1983-01-01

111

JSME: a free molecule editor in JavaScript.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: A molecule editor, i.e. a program facilitating graphical input and interactive editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. Today, when a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. One of the most popular tools for molecular structure input on the web is the JME applet. Since its release nearly 15 years ago, however the web environment has changed and Java applets are facing increasing implementation hurdles due to their maintenance and support requirements, as well as security issues. This prompted us to update the JME editor and port it to a modern Internet programming language - JavaScript. SUMMARY: The actual molecule editing Java code of the JME editor was translated into JavaScript with help of the Google Web Toolkit compiler and a custom library that emulates a subset of the GUI features of the Java runtime environment. In this process, the editor was enhanced by additional functionalities including a substituent menu, copy/paste, drag and drop and undo/redo capabilities and an integrated help. In addition to desktop computers, the editor supports molecule editing on touch devices, including iPhone, iPad and Android phones and tablets. In analogy to JME the new editor is named JSME. This new molecule editor is compact, easy to use and easy to incorporate into web pages. CONCLUSIONS: A free molecule editor written in JavaScript was developed and is released under the terms of permissive BSD license. The editor is compatible with JME, has practically the same user interface as well as the web application programming interface. The JSME editor is available for download from the project web page http://peter-ertl.com/jsme/ PMID:23694746

Bienfait, Bruno; Ertl, Peter

2013-05-21

112

JSME: a free molecule editor in JavaScript  

PubMed Central

Background A molecule editor, i.e. a program facilitating graphical input and interactive editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. Today, when a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. One of the most popular tools for molecular structure input on the web is the JME applet. Since its release nearly 15 years ago, however the web environment has changed and Java applets are facing increasing implementation hurdles due to their maintenance and support requirements, as well as security issues. This prompted us to update the JME editor and port it to a modern Internet programming language - JavaScript. Summary The actual molecule editing Java code of the JME editor was translated into JavaScript with help of the Google Web Toolkit compiler and a custom library that emulates a subset of the GUI features of the Java runtime environment. In this process, the editor was enhanced by additional functionalities including a substituent menu, copy/paste, drag and drop and undo/redo capabilities and an integrated help. In addition to desktop computers, the editor supports molecule editing on touch devices, including iPhone, iPad and Android phones and tablets. In analogy to JME the new editor is named JSME. This new molecule editor is compact, easy to use and easy to incorporate into web pages. Conclusions A free molecule editor written in JavaScript was developed and is released under the terms of permissive BSD license. The editor is compatible with JME, has practically the same user interface as well as the web application programming interface. The JSME editor is available for download from the project web page http://peter-ertl.com/jsme/

2013-01-01

113

Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power…

Xun, Gong

2007-01-01

114

EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and, in his hands, the expansion continued and the transition to electronic production took place. In 2005, an agreement was signed with IOP Publishing and the bustling production work of the in-house team moved abroad to Bristol, leaving just the Editor-in-Chief to man the ship at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. In 2011, however, as Roger prepared to step down, submissions had reached astounding levels as is evident from figure 1: that year, almost 1500 manuscripts were received by Physica Scripta, now acknowledged to be amongst the fastest growing journals in IOP Publishing, when measured in these terms. The year on year increase stands at 20% and, once again, of the extensive range of topics covered, condensed matter physics had been identified as the subject area in most need of attention because the burden of reviewing had become too great for one editor to oversee alone. Thus, when I joined Physica Scripta in January of this year, securing new External Editors for this field was perceived to be the most urgent task. It is, therefore, with the greatest of pleasure that I am able to announce the arrival of two new editors for this section: Professors David Keen and Tapio Rantala. Physica Scripta statistics Figure 1. The annual submissions made to Physica Scripta in recent years have rocketed and the rejection rate (given as a percentage) has increased rapidly. The modest increase in the number of articles accepted (shaded in blue) reflects a deliberate policy to augment the scientific quality. Professor Rantala has been selected by the Finnish Physical Society to replace Professor Matti Manninen, who is stepping down as the Finnish representative on the journal's Editorial Board. Professor Rantala is a prominent theorist and has been engaged in active research in a number of fields. In his early work, he was interested in surface science and molecular physics, however his expertise is predominantly in the domain of solid or materials physics related to semiconductors and certain complex materials. His recent interests have extended his domain of activity t

Lidström, Suzanne

2012-04-01

115

A case study of the suicide of Luis Mendès France, in Bordeaux, in 1695.  

PubMed

After being condemned and imprisoned in Lisbon by the Portuguese Inquisition, Luis Mendes de Franca exiled himself in late 1683 to France, where his descendants adopted the family name Mendes France. In 1695, at the age of 55 years, Luis Mendes committed suicide in Bordeaux by a pistol shot that decapitated him. The inquest conducted at that time concluded that Luis Mendes was insane and thus not guilty of the crime of suicide. We hypothesize that he used a flint stone-type pistol loaded with an extraordinarily large quantity of black gunpowder. Using available information on historic firearms, ammunition, and powder, coupled with the preserved testimony of historic figures, we propose a reconstruction of this drama and a diagnostic approach to the psychiatric aspects of the suicide. PMID:15577527

Bénézech, Michel; Chapenoire, Stéphane

2004-12-01

116

[Notes and brief thoughts about Dr. Luis Cifuentes Delatte (1907-2005)].  

PubMed

This paper offers a brief biographical sketch of Dr. Luis Cifuentes Delatte (1907-2005) and his professional and educational activities developed in his late years in the Department of Urology at Fundacion Jimenez Diaz (1979-1987), from the perspective, the testimony and particular point of view of the author. In addition, we emphasize the friendship of Dr. Luis Cifuentes with the philosopher Xavier Zubiri (1898-1983) and his cultural links with the intellectual society of his time, his origin and personal trajectory from the Ortega's philosophical-humanist view. In the same way we emphasize Dr. Luis Cifuentes Delatte's contribution to the National Academy of Medicine, where he was member (1972-2005), summarizing his lectures; we also briefly show some of the, unfortunately scarce, autobiographical memories the distinguished urologist published. PMID:19166104

Gómiz-León, Juan José

2008-12-01

117

EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming editor signals change and in turn this induces in some people expectation, hope of improvement and maybe radical revolution. Others cower and hope for stability, continuation of the same and as little outward sign of change as possible. So I should like to signal that I hope to satisfy both camps. The Editor-in-Chief is primarily a guardian of the journal and should change nothing that does not need changing. Maintaining a standard at the same level is a valuable achievement in itself. This is no different from taking on any other leadership role such as in a team or department. One has to lead by consensus and with respect for the position. Conversely there are things I would like to see improved (otherwise I should not have been hired) and I commit to attempting these but in a spirit of cooperation with the Board, the publisher (IOP), IPEM and the readership. Any other approach would be doomed anyway. So, what would I like to see changed? Dare I say anything too strongly upfront? Like Alun six years ago I would like there to be more debate via correspondence but this depends on the readers to do more writing along these lines. Personally I feel PMB, like many journals, has developed to the point where most readers sadly can understand only a small fraction of its contents. I have talked to older readers who said they regularly used to read all or half of the journal. Now many of us can manage only the papers in our specialty. Yet this is somewhat inevitable as medical physics has progressed from a fledgling science to the vast activity it is today, topics have become deeply complicated and we cannot and should not reverse the clock. To address this, I would like to see authors provide some form of `intelligible lay-scientific summary' of their paper as a condition of its publication. I think readers would then enjoy reading all, not just some, of these and maybe become attracted to other areas than the ones in which they currently work. I would like to see the voluntary and anonymous publication of selected referees' comments `tailing' (some) published paper

Webb, Steve

2006-01-01

118

Of Salsa and Sonnets, Stories and Soul: A Conversation with Cuban-American Literary Critic William Luis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contains an interview conducted in Spring 2000 via email with William Luis, an author, professor of Spanish at Vanderbilt University, and leading authority on Latin American, Caribbean, Afro-Hispanic, and Latino literatures. Offers Luis' perspective on topics of literature and ethnic/cultural identity. (EV)

Figueredo, Danilo H.

2000-01-01

119

Writing a case report: an editor's eye view.  

PubMed

'That was a nice presentation. Why not write it up for a journal?' With such words a thousand case reports are born. But they are like birds tossed over a stormy ocean: only a few gain a foothold in the rigging of passing ships--for the rest, oblivion. So, how do you persuade an editor to accept your wonderful case report? Here are some reflections from the editor's standpoint. PMID:11211590

Fox, R

2000-12-01

120

ZED- A LINE EDITOR FOR THE DEC VAX  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ZED editor for the DEC VAX is a simple, yet powerful line editor for text, program source code, and non-binary data. Line editors can be superior to screen editors in some cases, such as executing complex multiple or conditional commands, or editing via slow modem lines. ZED excels in the area of text processing by using procedure files. For example, such procedures can reformat a file of addresses or remove all comment lines from a FORTRAN program. In addition to command files, ZED also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, on-line help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. The ZED editor was originally developed at Cambridge University in London and has been continuously enhanced since 1976. Users of the Cambridge implementation have devised such elaborate ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating Pi. This implementation of ZED strives to maintain the characteristics of the Cambridge editor. A complete ZED manual is included on the tape. ZED is written entirely in C for either batch or interactive execution on the DEC VAX under VMS 4.X and requires 80,896 bytes of memory. This program was released in 1988 and updated in 1989.

Scott, P. J.

1994-01-01

121

Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an ...

122

InSAR deformation time series for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies for both the surface water and the ground water. In 1998 the state of Colorado commissioned the Rio

J. A. Reeves; R. Knight; H. A. Zebker; W. A. Schreüder; P. Shanker; T. R. Lauknes

2009-01-01

123

Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: An Economic Measure of Regional Sustainability  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). GNRP is equal to aggregate consumption minus the depreciation of man-made and natural capital. We measure the move...

124

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes

P. T. Zawislanski; S. M. Benson; R. TerBerg; S. E. Borglin

2001-01-01

125

The San Luis project: An attempt to decentralize physics in Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overwhelming concentration of physics activity in Mexico City, resulting in a ''brain drain'' from other parts of the country, has led to a number of efforts designed to decentralize the Mexican educational and research establishments. We evaluate here one such project, established in June 1972 at the University of San Luis Potosí and continuing at present. Begun primarily as

T. A. Will; A. A. Valladares

1976-01-01

126

San Luis Valley Board of Cooperative Services Bilingual-Bicultural Program. Curriculum: Kindergarten Through Third Grade.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the children in the San Luis Valley (Colorado), bilingual education has provided a successful atmosphere for both the monolingual English speakers and the non-English speakers. They teach each other, learn about each other's culture, and appreciate and understand others better. This curriculum guide, funded by Title VII of the Elementary and…

San Luis Valley Board of Cooperative Services, Alamosa, CO.

127

Emphatic or Reflexive? On the Endophoric Character of French "lui-meme" and Similar Complex Pronouns.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the referential properties of a class of complex pronouns labelled M-Pronouns, exemplified by Old English "himself," French "lui-meme," and English "his own." It is shown that M-Pronouns exhibit some properties commonly taken as characterizing reflexive anaphors, and that they also occur as "intensive" pronouns. Contains 66…

Zribi-Hertz, Anne

1995-01-01

128

EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed for my PhD in the Department of Physics at the University of Manchester. Since that time I have witnessed many changes in instrumentation and techniques. I believe that I have been fortunate in not spending all of my time in a university. Having worked in or with industry throughout my career I have been able to see the trends from the perspective of both sectors. In my area of fluorescence spectroscopy I have seen the cost of systems fall in real terms, the performance rise, an increased need for user-friendly software and less emphasis on performance specification when customers decide which instrument to purchase. Such trends, no doubt replicated in other areas, reflect the migration of system instrumentation away from being the preserve of the specialist to much wider use and customization across the disciplines and skill-set. MST has embraced this change through its multidisciplinary remit in Special Features, Topical Reviews, Rapid Communications, Perspectives and regular Papers. These days there is much more of a partnership between industry and academia in research and this is to be applauded in these challenging times. I want to encourage contributions to MST from industry as well as academia, as MST is the ideal place to showcase the latest innovation from inception to commercial exploitation. Backed by one of the premier learned societies, the Institute of Physics, I have no doubt that MST will continue in its success and I look forward to helping to advance its high standing to even greater heights.

Birch, David

2012-01-01

129

Late Glacial and Holocene Record of Hydroclimate in the San Luis Valley, Southern Colorado, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake sediments from the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, archive a detailed record of Late Glacial and Holocene climatic fluctuations in the southern Rocky Mountains. Together with radiometric dating analysis, measurements of grain size, magnetic susceptibility, total inorganic carbon (TIC), oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the TIC fraction on sediment samples from San Luis Lake (at an average resolution of 60 years per sample) allow us to generate a sediment record of climatic change in the region spanning the last 16ka (1 ka=1000 cal yrs). This record documents the timing and duration of major climate episodes and trends, comparable to the existing paleoclimate records from the American Southwest. The Late Glacial record of San Luis Lake contains a big wet episode in the late part of the Mystery Interval (MI), a relatively dry climate during Bølling-Allerød (B/A) warm interval, and a relatively wet episode during the Younger Dryas (YD) interval, similar to the lake-level record found in the Estancia basin in central New Mexico. The early to middle Holocene record of d18O in the San Luis Lake parallels the calcite d18O record of Bison Lake in northern Colorado, documenting a history of significant change in precipitation seasonality across the northern boundary of the North American monsoon (NAM). The middle Holocene epoch is characterized by greater variations in magnetic susceptibility, d18O and d13C, suggesting the prevalence of wet, variable or transitional climate conditions. In contrast, the late Holocene climate is relatively dry, as indicated by more positive values of d18O in San Luis Lake. The results of this study reveal a complex history of climate evolution due to the interactions of two seasonally distinct precipitation regimes with mountainous landforms in the region.

Yuan, F.; Koran, M.

2012-12-01

130

Writing filter processes for the SAGA editor, appendix G  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SAGA editor provides a mechanism by which separate processes can be invoked during an editing session to traverse portions of the parse tree being edited. These processes, termed filter processes, read, analyze, and possibly transform the parse tree, returning the result to the editor. By defining new commands with the editor's user defined command facility, which invoke filter processes, authors of filter can provide complex operations as simple commands. A tree plotter, pretty printer, and Pascal tree transformation program were already written using this facility. The filter processes are introduced, parse tree structure is described and the library interface made available to the programmer. Also discussed is how to compile and run filter processes. Examples are presented to illustrate aspect of each of these areas.

Kirslis, Peter A.

1985-01-01

131

SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

Bykat, Alex

1988-12-01

132

Announcement: New Editor-in-Chief Robert C. Kennicutt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish review papers, and spectroscopy is only one of many techniques used in astrophysics, but it was prophetic in that the Journal has become a truly international endeavor, with more than a third of the papers coming from abroad and many of the referees residing outside the United States. The past Managing Editor, Dr. S. Chandrasekhar, established a tradition of first-class research. When he stepped down in 1971, he realized that in order to accommodate for the rapid growth of the Journal, a person with organizational ability was needed. That led to editing by about 15 Scientific Editors with diversified specialized knowledge, an on-line edition that is slowly replacing the printed edition in importance and completeness, and facilities (subject headings, indexing, yellow pages, and instant recall of references in the on-line edition) for improved information retrieval. The next step for Dr. Kennicutt will be to make use of the current computing opportunities to provide a more efficient flow of manuscripts and to push for faster and less expensive publication. And who can predict the options that will be available in publication and data retrieval in the coming years? HELMUT A. ABT Editor-in-Chief

Abt, Helmut A.

1999-05-01

133

Announcement: New Editor-In Robert C. Kennicutt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish review papers, and spectroscopy is only one of many techniques used in astrophysics, but it was prophetic in that the Journal has become a truly international endeavor, with more than a third of the papers coming from abroad and many of the referees residing outside the United States. The past Managing Editor, Dr. S. Chandrasekhar, established a tradition of first-class research. When he stepped down in 1971, he realized that in order to accommodate for the rapid growth of the Journal, a person with organizational ability was needed. That led to editing by about 15 Scientific Editors with diversified specialized knowledge, an on-line edition that is slowly replacing the printed edition in importance and completeness, and facilities (subject headings, indexing, yellow pages, and instant recall of references in the on-line edition) for improved information retrieval. The next step for Dr. Kennicutt will be to make use of the current computing opportunities to provide a more efficient flow of manuscripts and to push for faster and less expensive publication. And who can predict the options that will be available in publication and data retrieval in the coming years? HELMUT A. ABT Editor-in-Chief

Abt, Helmut A.

1999-06-01

134

Announcement: New Editor-In-Chief, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish review papers, and spectroscopy is only one of many techniques used in astrophysics, but it was prophetic in that the Journal has become a truly international endeavor, with more than a third of the papers coming from abroad and many of the referees residing outside the United States. The past Managing Editor, Dr. S. Chandrasekhar, established a tradition of first-class research. When he stepped down in 1971, he realized that in order to accommodate for the rapid growth of the Journal, a person with organizational ability was needed. That led to editing by about 15 Scientific Editors with diversified specialized knowledge, an on-line edition that is slowly replacing the printed edition in importance and completeness, and facilities (subject headings, indexing, yellow pages, and instant recall of references in the on-line edition) for improved information retrieval. The next step for Dr. Kennicutt will be to make use of the current computing opportunities to provide a more efficient flow of manuscripts and to push for faster and less expensive publication. And who can predict the options that will be available in publication and data retrieval in the coming years? HELMUT A. ABT Editor-in-Chief

Abt, Helmut A.

1999-06-01

135

EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking forward to further development of the journal as a forum for high-quality international research at the forefront of nanoscale science and technology under the scientific leadership of Professor Mark Reed and the eminent Editorial Board. This, together with the innovative publishing practises offered by IOP Publishing, will re-affirm the journal as the premier publication in the area, and indispensable reading for you and your colleagues in the years to come.

Couzin, Nina

2009-01-01

136

Electronics Department: Ple. The Program Listing Editor for Pdp-8.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Program Listing Editor (PLE) is a PDP-8 program for copying a text stored in ASCII-code on a paper tape. The final printout will be in a standard format (A4: 210 mm x 297 mm). The pages may be headed with a text (repeated on top of each page), and the...

J. V. Olsen

1969-01-01

137

June 2014 Letter to the Editor-in-Chief.  

PubMed

Letter to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Altitude Does Not Reduce Concussion Incidence in Professional Football Players: A Poor Understanding of Health Statistics and Altitude Physiology" with Authors' Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2014;44(6):458-460. doi:10.2519/jospt.2014.0201. PMID:24881904

2014-06-01

138

Letter to the Editor on Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A letter to the Editor-Dr. Chandramuki's comments are appreciated and reference 28, which was inadvertently omitted from the article by Watt et al., is given below. I agree that it is difficult to culture Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the cerebrospinal ...

G. Watt

1989-01-01

139

Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

Pardue, Mary Jane

2014-01-01

140

Using a Computerized Text-Editor in Freshman Composition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine how useful a computerized text editor would be in helping students to revise their papers, an interactive text manipulation system (Wylbur) was made available to two classes of freshman composition students at the University of California, Los Angeles. Since the course received no advance publicity, students did not know when they…

Gerrard, Lisa

141

All's well that ends well for JAMIA editors  

PubMed Central

Dr Randolph A Miller begins a self-imposed JAMIA retirement on January 1, 2011 after serving as Editor-in-Chief for eight and a half years. He lauds the selection of Lucia Ohno-Machado as an energetic, innovative, and highly qualified successor.

2010-01-01

142

Comments on ``Anonymous Reviews'' No Anonymity for Associate Editors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an ideal world, I would agree with the recent letters to Eos by M. Beck (1 July), C. J. Robinove (29 July), and R. E. Criss, and A. M. Hofmeister (29 July) calling for all reviews by referees and associate editors (AEs) to be signed. But in an ideal world, they, as well as the rest of us, would invariably be fined for petty infractions such as exceeding the speed limit by even 1 km/hr, so it might not be much fun to live there. Human nature being what it is, offering anonymity to referees is probably necessary to ensure the smooth operation of journals. The above correspondents did not distinguish between the problems created by anonymous referees and those created by anonymous AEs, but I believe this is an important distinction. The AGU publication guidelines state that the Editor is the sole judge of what is accepted and what is rejected, while all other opinions are advisory. This is fine in theory, but may not always reflect reality. When there is, say, only one editor assisted by a team of 20 to 30 AEs, as a practical matter, the AEs are the real decision-makers and the Editor cannot possibly find the time to study each manuscript carefully. This reality should be reflected by having the AEs sign their reviews without exception, so that the identity of the actual decision-maker is made clear in every case.

Geller, Robert J.

143

IN DEFENSE OF ECORISK ASSESSMENT (LETTER TO EDITOR)  

EPA Science Inventory

Dear Editor: We are writing to convey a more accurate portrayal of the status of ecological ("environmental" in Europe) risk assessment that was presented in the recent article by M. Power and L.S. McCarty (Fallacies in Ecological Risk Assessment Practices," August 1997, pp 370A-...

144

Welcome from our new Editor-in-Chief  

Microsoft Academic Search

I am delighted to be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics for the next five years. J. Phys. G is at an exciting juncture in its history, with 2005 marking the journal's 31st year of publication. In the past few years the journal has truly blossomed under the guidance of its previous

A B Balantekin

2005-01-01

145

Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

2008-01-01

146

Unblocking brainstorming through the use of a simple group editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Earlier studies of computerized brainstorming showed that by restructuring group processes, groups can overcome well known performance deficits that groups suffer relative to nominal groups. These earlier tools are essentially computerized versions of Nominal Group Technique. We examined the ability of a simple, unstructured parallel editor to facilitate idea generation in face to face groups. Our results showed that parallel

Charles McLaughlin Hymes; Gary M. Olson

1992-01-01

147

Developing and Presenting Auditory Demonstrations: Two Sound Editor Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Experiencing examples of auditory phenomena can clarify textbook and lecture explanations. The addition of visual displays to auditory demonstrations can make them more understandable. Two sound editor programs, Audacity[R] and Adobe Audition Pro 2.0[R], provide excellent capabilities for the display and authoring of auditory demonstrations.…

Firment, Michael J.

2006-01-01

148

ERWIN: Reduction-System Window-Oriented Editor. User's Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

ERWIN is the editor of the OREL-Reduction system. It offers a convenient development and programming environment for the construction and maintenance of reduction expressions of OREL/2, as well as command procedures written in OREL/C. ERWIN is syntax-orie...

H. Mevissen

1991-01-01

149

Dual-system Tectonics of the San Luis Range and Vicinity, Coastal Central California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The M 6.5 "San Simeon" earthquake of December 22, 2003, occurred beneath the Santa Lucia Range in coastal central California, and resulted in around $250,000,000 property damage and two deaths from collapse of an historic building in the town of Paso Robles, located 40 km from the epicenter. The earthquake and more than 10,000 aftershocks were well recorded by nearby seismographs, which permitted detailed analysis of the event (eg: McLaren et al., 2008). This analysis facilitated evaluation of the hazard of the occurrence of a similar event in the nearby San Luis Range, located along the coast west of the city of San Luis Obispo some 55 km south of the San Simeon epicenter. The future occurrence of earthquakes analogous to the 2003 event in this area had been proposed in the late 1960’s (eg: Benioff and Smith, 1967; Richter, 1969) but the apparent hazard of such occurrences came to be overshadowed by the discovery of the “Hosgri” strike slip fault passing close to the area in the offshore. However data accumulated since the early 1970’s clearly demonstrate the hazard as being partitioned between nearby earthquakes of strike slip origin, and underlying earthquakes of thrust origin analogous to that of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. And for the onshore San Luis Range area, an underlying actively seismogenic thrust wedge appears to provide the maximum potential seismic ground motion; exceeding that potentially resulting from large events on nearby strike slip faults of the San Simeon-Hosgri system, for onshore sites. Understanding and documentation of the geology, geomorphology, tectonics and seismogenesis of the San Luis Range and vicinity has recently experienced a quantum improvement as both new and accumulated data have been analysed. An integrated interpretation of all available data now clearly shows that a dual “side by side” system of active tectonics exists in the region. Essentially the most obvious evidence for this is seen simply in the topography; the rapidly uplifting San Luis Range represents the field of NE-SW compression driving a thrust—backthrust thrust fault wedge “popup” while the adjacent shear strike slip faulting associated with the plate boundary San Gregorio-Hosgri splay of the San Andreas fault system results in only minor surface deformation of the sea floor surface of late Quaternary marine planation. Interaction between the two tectonic systems occurs mainly along the SE shoreline of Estero Bay where NNW aligned strike slip faults intersect the uplifting San Luis Range thrust fault “popup” wedge, and along the recently identified Shoreline fault, against which the SSW-vergent leading edge of the San Luis Range thrust impinges at depths of 1-5 km. The latter structural relationship gives rise to locally pronounced west facing sea floor surface scarps along a fault with mostly or entirely horizontal strike slip motion. Overall the San Luis Range and vicinity constitutes an excellent full scale laboratory for observation of evidence of a variety of tectonic processes in action. The opportunity for studies of tectonism here arises not only from the geologically and topographically clearly exhibited effects of the two interacting tectonic fields (NNW shear; NE-SW compression) but also from the extensive baseline studies of the area conducted during the past 40 years.

Hamilton, D. H.

2010-12-01

150

Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source was assessed. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (IGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstocks for the production of ethanol.

Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.; Sherwood, P.B.

1983-07-01

151

Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to assess the commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 and 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstock for the production of ethanol.

Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Sherwood, P.B.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.

1983-07-01

152

Tekedit - An Enhanced Editor for Direct View Storage Tube (DVST) Graphics Display Devices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An overview and functional description of an editor for host files using Direct View Storage Tubes (DVST) with enhanced refresh capabilities is given. Tekedit is an editor designed to augment a system editor for creating or modifying host files using a gr...

M. Johnson

1984-01-01

153

Editors of Nursing Journals. Who Are They and How Were They Chosen?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports results from a survey of nine editors of nursing journals. Results indicate that two-thirds of the editors had previous editorial experience and had been on a review panel or editorial advisory board. There is also evidence that editors hold almost total control over what is and is not published. (CH)

Blank, Jacqueline J.; McElmurry, Beverly J.

1988-01-01

154

Stopped at the Gate: Women's Sports, “Reader Interest,” and Decision Making by Editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Newspaper sports pages have been criticized for failure to incorporate women's sports equitably, although few studies have examined why editors consistently sideline women's sports. This survey of 285 sports editors in the southeastern United States explores gatekeeping factors that may affect coverage received by women's sports. Results show that many editors fail to systematically ascertain reader interests, many believe that

Marie Hardin

2005-01-01

155

FLAn: A Free Hypermedia Editor to Create Foreign Language Learning Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Glossing words is done via special software called multimedia editors. Foreign Language Annotator (FLAn), created by Thibeault (2011), is one of these multimedia editors. FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor that works on both Macs and PCs, allows instructors to turn static texts into dynamic learning units by attaching…

Kilickaya, Ferit, Ed.

2011-01-01

156

Editor and authors' psychology and the chance of teaching.  

PubMed

It is the duty of the editor to communicate with the authors who submit their scientific work for publication. The question arises as to the best way to perform this communication. The goal is to publish papers that would make their authors proud and the readers of the journal, satisfied. This goal is expressed with honesty, kindness, politeness, diplomacy and when the editor communicated with authors from other Countries, the advice of a person familiar with the traditions of these Countries may be welcome. The unpleasant editor's duty to inform the authors of their paper being rejected, can be expressed either by writing a brief straight forward letter or by giving a more detailed answer or finally, by explaining to the authors their errors in a detailed manner, in other words, by giving them advice and consultation. In his reply to the authors whose paper has been rejected, the editor may touch a sensitive part of their behavior. Authors may consider their paper as "their intellectual child". Some times authors make unacceptable mistakes that may or may not be revealed by the reviewers. Explaining in detail errors and thus counseling the authors, is hard work for the editor but not always appreciated by the authors. The value of counseling and teaching has been emphasized even by ancient philosophers but nowadays enthusiasm in learning is sometimes lacking. Is there a solution to the above? Perhaps if "the instructions to authors" of a journal specified clearly the "submission terms" for accepting a paper for publication, then the authors could be self-evaluated and perhaps all parties concerned would be happier. PMID:17160154

Grammaticos, Philip C

2006-01-01

157

Geologic Map of the San Luis Hills Area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a digital image of the U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1906, 'Geologic map of the San Luis Hills area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado,' which was published in 1989 by Thompson and Machette, scale 1:50,000 but has been unavailable in a digital version. The map area represents the southwestern portion of the Alamosa 30' x 60' quadrangle, which is currently being remapped by the U.S. Geological Survey. The northern and eastern margins of the San Luis Hills area have been remapped at greater detail and thus small portions of the map area have been updated. The northern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1392, the northeastern portion is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1124, and the eastern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2007-1074. The most significant changes to the 1989 map area are recognition of Lake Alamosa and its deposits (Alamosa Formation), remapping of bedrock in the northeastern San Luis Hills, and redating of volcanic units in the San Luis Hills. Although unpublished, new 40Ar/39Ar ages for volcanic units in the Conejos and Hinsdale Formations add precision to the previous K/Ar-dated rocks, but do not change the basic chronology of the units. The digital version of this map was prepared by Theodore R. Brandt by scanning the original map at 300 pixels per inch, prior to creating the press-quality (96 Mb) and standard (5 Mb) .pdf files.

Thompson, Ren A.; Machette, Michael N.

1989-01-01

158

EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for biological, medical and life science applications or sensors and sensing systems. Selected papers or special features in recent issues of MST attest to this development [1-3]. In parallel with these new fields, board members have always kept their eye on the other journal topics. Many papers published in MST have been downloaded very often and highly cited. This shows the acceptance and reputation of MST. Thanks to the activity of all board members over the last ten years MST has published a number of excellent review articles. This has strengthened the prestige of MST. A new series of articles was introduced under the banner of 'Perspectives' in 2008. They highlight milestones in a selected field and indicate some future challenges from the point of view of the author [4]. In summary, it can be stated that MST is on a good path. This was created thanks to the activity of all members of the Editorial Board. In recent years we have enlarged this board with well known scientists from universities and industry from all over the world. This will ensure a continuously positive development of MST. As outgoing Editor-in-Chief, I can say that I have found my task fascinating and I have enjoyed it very much. I have learned a lot in this time because I have come into close contact with a large number of scientists from a vast spectrum of technical areas and parts of our world. My special gratitude is dedicated to all the Editorial Board members of the last ten years and especially to Sharon D'Souza from IOPP. Furthermore, I would like to pass on to my successor, Professor David Birch from University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, my best wishes for an enjoyable and successful tenure as Editor-in-Chief! References [1] Tanaka M, Baba T and Postek M T 2011 Nanometrology Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 020101 [2] Potyrailo R A et al 2011 RFID sensors as the common sensing platform for single-use biopharmaceutical manufacturing Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 082001 [3] Fritze H 2011 High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 012002 [4] Birch D J S 2011 Fluorescence detections and di

Hauptmann, Peter

2012-01-01

159

Editor's Roundtable: Stop avoiding your e-mails!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Don't expect the online "innovation" to go away--email communication is here to stay, and it is your responsibility as an educational professional to respond to them, and even use them to your advantage. This month's Editor's Roundtable column discusses the upsides to the effective use of e-mail to communicate with parents, students, and administrators. In additon, it provides some helpful guidelines for you to follow.

Robert A. Liftig, Edd -.

2007-03-01

160

Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

1986-01-01

161

CollabEd: A Platform for Collaboratizing Existing Editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

CollabEd is a platform for easily collaboratizing linear editing systems. We will describe our modular design, which is geared toward building CollabEd plugins for existing editors and eliminating the need for developers to provide or understand the networking and data consistency controls required for real-time, synchronous collaborative editing. In this paper we showcase our open-source CollabEd application already ported for

Kenroy G. Granville; Timothy J. Hickey

2009-01-01

162

Editor's Note: Animals and the Capacity to Care (September 2007)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the study of animals can serve to motivate, it can also present difficulties. Some animals are just too hard to study through inquiry. The animals may be too large or small, too distant, or too dangerous to bring into the classroom. Technology has been critical in enabling students to learn in new ways about many animals. In this edition, the field editor discusses studying animals and their role in the environment.

Ohana, Chris

2007-09-01

163

Editor's Corner: Exploring Our Place in the Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Gazing upward, the night sky has always been a source of awe and wonder. It is difficult not to ponder the truly profound questions of existence. How did everything begin? How big is the universe? What is our place in the universe? The Field Editor provides an overview of This month's issue of The Science Teacher (TST) as it explores these questions and provides diverse perspectives and methods to help address these questions in the science classroom.

Metz, Steve

2005-02-01

164

Authors, editors, and the signs, symptoms and causes of plagiarism  

PubMed Central

Plagiarism and inadequate citing appear to have reached epidemic proportions in research publication. This article discusses how plagiarism is defined and suggests some possible causes for the increase in the plagiarism disease. Most editors do not have much tolerance for text re-use with inadequate citation regardless of reasons why words are copied from other sources without correct attribution. However, there is now some awareness that re-use of words in research articles to improve the writing or “the English” (which has become a common practice) should be distinguished from intentional deceit for the purpose of stealing other authors’ ideas (which appears to remain a very rare practice). Although it has become almost as easy for editors to detect duplicate text as it is for authors to re-use text from other sources, editors often fail to consider the reasons why researchers resort to this strategy, and tend to consider any text duplication as a symptom of serious misconduct. As a result, some authors may be stigmatized unfairly by being labeled as plagiarists. The article concludes with practical advice for researchers on how to improve their writing and citing skills and thus avoid accusations of plagiarism.

Shashok, Karen

2011-01-01

165

CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

de Cosa, A.

2011-12-01

166

Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I am very pleased to join the outstanding leadership team for the journal Nuclear Fusion as Scientific Editor. The journal's high position in the field of fusion energy research derives in no small measure from the efforts of the IAEA team in Vienna, the production and marketing of IOP Publishing, the Board of Editors led by its chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, the Associate Editor for Inertial Confinement Max Tabak and the outgoing Scientific Editor, Paul Thomas. During Paul's five year tenure submissions have grown by over 40%. The usage of the electronic journal has grown year by year with about 300 000 full text downloads of Nuclear Fusion articles in 2011, an impressive figure due in part to the launch of the full 50 year archive. High quality has been maintained while times for peer review and publishing have been reduced and the journal achieved some of the highest impact factors ever (as high as 4.27). The journal has contributed greatly to building the international scientific basis for fusion. I was privileged to serve from 2003 to 2010 as chairman of the Coordinating Committee for the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) which published in Nuclear Fusion the first ITER Physics Basis (1999) and its later update (2007). The scientific basis that has been developed to date for fusion has led to the construction of major facilities to demonstrate the production of power-plant relevant levels of fusion reactions. We look forward to the journal continuing to play a key role in the international effort toward fusion energy as these exciting major facilities and the various approaches to fusion continue to be developed. It is clear that Nuclear Fusion maintains its position in the field because of the perceived high quality of the submissions, the refereeing and the editorial processes, and the availability and utility of the online journal. The creation of the Nuclear Fusion Prize, led by the Board of Editors chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, for the most outstanding paper published in the journal each year has furthered the submission and recognition of papers of the highest quality. The accomplishments of the journal's team over the last five years will be a tough act to follow but I look forward to working with this competent and dedicated group to continue the journal's high standards and ensure that Nuclear Fusion remains the journal of choice for authors and readers alike.

Stambaugh, Ronald

2012-04-01

167

Presence of Oxyodontherium (Macraucheniidae, Litopterna) in the Río Quinto Formation, San Luis (Argentina)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with the new mammal remains from the Río Quinto Formation, found at the Arroyo La Petra locality (San Luis, Argentina). They consist of an incomplete skull and two mandibular fragments of a macraucheniid, both with milk dentition and M1/m1 erupting, corresponding to a very young individual. Morfometrical characteristics of the specimens allow their identification as Oxyodontherium zeballosi and provide the first cranial data for this species. The holotype of this species is considered a juvenile individual. We maintain a conservative position in maintaining O. zeballosi as a valid species though based on juvenile specimens. However, a full systematic revision of the Family Macraucheniidae is needed to verify the validity and phylogenetic relationships of the taxa included in it. The identification of O. zeballosi indicates a late Miocene age for the fossiliferous level, which implies a cronoestratigraphic extension of the Río Quinto Formation, thus far considered as Pliocene in age. In addition, the presence of Oxyodontherium in San Luis Province increases the geographical distribution of this macrauchenid, whose record previously was limited to Miocene outcrops of the Paraná River (Entre Ríos Province). Its presence in the Mio-Pliocene beds of Uruguay is very doubtful because it is based on a metapodial.

Cerdeño, Esperanza; Chiesa, Jorge; Ojeda, Guillermo

2008-03-01

168

Novel High Efficiency Microcolumnar LuI3:Ce for Hard X-ray Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a structured scintillator using a vacuum deposition technique that is suitable for manufacturing large area scintillators in a microcolumnar form. While providing high absorption efficiency, it also allows great temporal and spatial resolution X-ray imaging. Microcolumnar films of extremely fast and bright cerium-doped lutetium iodide (LuI3:Ce) scintillator were synthesized. It has high density (~5.6 g/cm3), high effective atomic number (59.7), bright green emission (540 nm range, well matched to commercial optics and CCD sensors), light yield exceeding 115,000 ph/MeV, and rapid, afterglow-free decay (~28 ns). This new scintillator could resolve the 153 ns bunch structure of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Due to the fast, afterglow-free decay, and high efficiency of LuI3:Ce, during the experiments performed at the 1-ID hard X-ray beamline at the APS, single 65 keV X-ray photons could be resolved with high signal-to-noise ratio and with temporal resolution better than 20ns. In the future, it will enable a wide range of hard X-ray (20 keV to 100 keV) imaging and/or high frame-rate applications such as dynamic studies of the structural and electrochemical properties of batteries using microtomographic X-ray imaging, internal corrosion in fuel cells, and time-resolved muscle diffraction experiments.

Marton, Z.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Miller, Stuart R.; Brecher, Charles; Bhandari, Harish B.; Kenesei, Peter; Ross, Stephen K.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Singh, Bipin

2014-03-01

169

EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of developing a team of Associate Editors to promote the journal in the number of critical sub-areas of smart materials and structures, and to play a key, integral role in the review process. Associate Editors will be chosen to serve in a number of sub-areas to ensure expertise and continuation of the rigorous review process. Under my leadership as the new Editor-in-Chief of SMS, I aim to ensure that SMS maintains and grows in quality to best serve our diverse community of researchers.

Garcia, Ephrahim

2008-02-01

170

Editor's Corner: May You Live in Interesting Times!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As the 2004-2005 began, science teachers were faced with unprecedented challenges. Limited budgets were stretched to the breaking point. The mandates of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), state and national standards, and high-stakes testing required teachers to reflect on past practices and current teaching strategies. In this month's column, the field editor shares his thoughts on these issues. In addition, he highlights various strategies found in this issue of The Science Teacher (TST) that will help teachers to face these challenges with confidence, especially as they relate to "Science on a Shoestring Budget."

Metz, Steve

2004-09-01

171

Editor's Roundtable: Systems--A powerful interdisciplinary theme  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A systems approach to science education is one of the powerful interdisciplinary ideas that AAAS recommends be woven through science learning at all levels and in all content areas. AAAS also calls for making systems thinking explicit in middle school and suggests that students investigate biological, electrical, and mechanical systems to determine how they work by identifying their parts and the connections and effects these parts have, not only on each other, but on the entire system as well. To that end--this month's issue is devoted to incorporating a systems approach to science teaching. Here the Editor highlights the articles related to this interdisciplinary theme.

Liftig, Inez

2008-07-01

172

THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA  

SciTech Connect

Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register their datasets to the NGEE data archive and allows the NGEE archive to publish these datasets via a data search portal (http://ngee.ornl.gov/data). These highly descriptive metadata created using OME allows the Archive to enable advanced data search options using keyword, geo-spatial, temporal and ontology filters. Similarly, ARM OME allows scientists or principal investigators (PIs) to submit their data products to the ARM data archive. How would OME help Big Data Centers like the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC)? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological, geological, and chemical components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the NGEE and ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and interoperability. Useful Links: USGS OME: http://mercury.ornl.gov/OME/ NGEE OME: http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov/ngeemetadata/ ARM OME: http://archive2.ornl.gov/armome/ Contact: Ranjeet Devarakonda (devarakondar@ornl.gov) References: [1] Federal Geographic Data Committee. Content standard for digital geospatial metadata. Federal Geographic Data Committee, 1998. [2] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system." Earth Science Informatics 3.1-2 (2010): 87-94. [

Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL] [ORNL; Shrestha, Biva [ORNL] [ORNL; Palanisamy, Giri [ORNL] [ORNL; Hook, Leslie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Killeffer, Terri S [ORNL] [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL] [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL] [ORNL; Zolly, Lisa [United States Geological Service (USGS)] [United States Geological Service (USGS); Hutchison, Viv [United States Geological Service (USGS)] [United States Geological Service (USGS); Frame, Mike [United States Geological Service (USGS)] [United States Geological Service (USGS); Cialella, Alice [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Lazer, Kathy [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

2014-01-01

173

Anomalous Representations of Reality in Luis Valdez's "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Luis Valdez creates anomalous realities in two of his plays, "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer," in order to defy dominant expressions of reality as well as classifications of "Chicano" and "Mexican." The anomalous realities, represented primarily by a bodiless head in the first play and an eighty-four-year-old Yaqui…

Saborio, Linda

2008-01-01

174

DNA fingerprinting by ERIC-PCR for comparing Listeria spp. strains isolated from different sources in San Luis, Argentina  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, a total of 24 Listeria spp. strains were analyzed. Twenty-two isolates were obtained in San Luis (Argen- tina) from human, animal, and food samples. Two types of strains, Listeria monocytogenes CLIP 22762 and Listeria innocua CLIP 74915, were included as reference strains. All isolates were biochemically identified and characterized by serotyping, phage typing, and amplification of the

A. LACIAR; L. VACA; R. LOPRESTI; A. VEGA; C. MATTANA

175

InSAR data produce specific storage estimates for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies in order to sustain water levels in the confined aquifer system. The water level from 1970 - 2000

J. Reeves; R. J. Knight; H. A. Zebker; W. Schreuder; P. S. Agram; T. Lauknes

2010-01-01

176

Differences and Commonalities: Farmer Stratifications in the San Luis Valley Research/Extension Project Area. ARE Research Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A research project in the San Luis Valley of Colorado sought to isolate a few unique farm types that could become target groups for the design and implementation of agricultural research and extension programs. Questionnaires were completed by 44 of 65 farmers in one watershed area of Conejos County. Analysis revealed a complex pattern of…

Eckert, Jerry B.

177

Pulsed field, PCR ribotyping and multiplex PCR analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica strains isolated from meat food in San Luis Argentina  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characterization of phenotypic and genotypic virulence markers of Yersinia enterocolitica strains belonging to biotypes (B) 1A, 2 and 3, mostly isolated from food in San Luis, Argentina, and the assessment of their genotypic diversity using PFGE and PCR ribotyping, were performed in our laboratory for the first time. Thirty five Y. enterocolitica strains, two reference strains and 33 strains

Cecilia S. M. Lucero Estrada; Lidia del Carmen Velázquez; María Esther Escudero; Gabriela Isabel Favier; Valeria Lazarte; Ana María Stefanini de Guzmán

2011-01-01

178

Importance of the vertical component of groundwater flow: a hydrogeochemical approach in the valley of San Luis Potosi, Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fractured volcanics exert a control on groundwater flow in the San Luis Potosi (SLP) valley. The chemical composition and temperature of water pumped from boreholes partially penetrating the fractured volcanics indicate that the produced water originates from an upward vertical flow. Most of the thermal groundwater has been detected in areas related to regional faults and lineaments. Intensive and uncontrolled

J. J. Carrillo-Rivera; A. Cardona; D. Moss

1996-01-01

179

Master Mentors: Linda Golian-Lui University of Hawaii-Hilo--George Oberle George Mason University, VA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many movers and shakers inspire admiration and even awe, but those who inspire love are the mentors who have changed lives. That is why many grateful librarians nominated Linda Golian-Lui and George Oberle. Both of them were accidental librarians, work-study students whose supervisors encouraged them to become paraprofessionals, and then…

Library Journal, 2005

2005-01-01

180

Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.  

PubMed Central

In the 13 years since it was first published the "Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals" (the Vancouver style), developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, has been widely accepted by both authors and editors; over 400 journals have stated that they will consider manuscripts that conform to its requirements. This is the fourth edition of the "Uniform requirements."

1994-01-01

181

Editorial Page Editors and Endorsements: Chain-owned vs. Independent Newspapers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Questionnaires were sent to 114 of the 228 editorial page editors at newspapers in the United States with daily circulations greater than 50,000 for a study that compared (1) the editor-publisher relationship existing at chains to that found at independent papers, and (2) the 1984 presidential endorsements made by chains to those by independent…

St. Dizier, Byron

182

Adolescent sexual initiation through the lens of letters to the editor published in Polish teenage magazines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called ‘advice columns’, often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published in Polish magazines and, secondly, how these themes are reflective of Poland's socio-cultural

Marek S. Kopacz; Aleksandra Bajka-Kopacz

2012-01-01

183

Adolescent sexual initiation through the lens of letters to the editor published in Polish teenage magazines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called ‘advice columns’, often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published in Polish magazines and, secondly, how these themes are reflective of Poland's socio-cultural

Marek S. Kopacz; Aleksandra Bajka-Kopacz

2011-01-01

184

Satisfaction vs. Sacrifice: Sports Editors Assess the Influences of Life Issues on Job Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey (N = 184) and interviews examine issues that influence job satisfaction among newspaper sports editors. The results indicate that perceived organizational support has a strong, positive correlation to job satisfaction, while work-family conflict and role overload have a negative influence. The interviews indicate that sports editors do not receive as much organizational support as the survey suggests. Motivation-hygiene

Scott Reinardy

2007-01-01

185

SATISFACTION VS. SACRIFICE: SPORTS EDITORS ASSESS THE INFLUENCES OFLIFE ISSUES ON JOB SATISFACTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generally speaking, newspaper sports editors enjoy their work. What's not to enjoy? They hang out with other sports-loving colleagues, talking about the latest developments on the local, regional, and nation- al sports scene. Sports editors are perceived by the public as experts on all things sports, and they work with sports entities that are mostly insu- lated from the public.

Scott Reinardy

186

Letter to the editor of TAAP, in response to letter from Anders et al.  

EPA Science Inventory

To the Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology: We would like to address the letter to the editor submitted by Anders et al. regarding the substantive issues raised regarding our paper "Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physi...

187

A "Situational" and "Coorientational" Measure of Specialized Magazine Editors' Perceptions of Readers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was undertaken of specialized magazine editors' perceptions of audience characteristics as well as the perceived role of their publications. Specifically, the study examines the relationship between the editors' perceptions of reader problem recognition, level of involvement, constraint recognition, and possession of reference criteria and…

Jeffers, Dennis W.

188

Journal Editors' Views on the Criteria a Paper Must Meet to Be Publishable  

Microsoft Academic Search

Editors of archival psychological and educational journals were asked to rate the importance of 38 potential standards that can be used to judge publishability of a paper. The standards included classic internal and external validity standards as well as writing standards and criteria pertaining to the visibility of issues in the paper and the author of the paper. The editors

Julie Lounds; Margaret Oakar; Katryn Knecht; Michael Moran; Martha Gibney; Michael Pressley

2002-01-01

189

Syned -- A Language-Based Editor for an Interactive Programming Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Language-based editors (LBE's) for programming languages are central components of Interactive Programming Environments (IPE's). These editors incorporate knowledge about programming languages in order to make program construction less difficult. They may also serve as gateways to the IPE, structuring programs as objects amenable to manipulation and control by the IPE. This paper describes Syned, a prototype LBE which runs under

E. R. Gansner; J. R. Horgan; D. J. Moore; P. T. Surko; D. E. Swartwout; J. H. Reppy

1983-01-01

190

Letters to the Editor: Public Writing as a Response to Reading.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study conducted by the copy editor of a small daily newspaper in Porter County, Indiana examines readers' motivations for writing letters to the editor. Analysis was based on letters that appeared in "The Vidette Messenger" September 16-30, 1992. Of 75 letters, 32 were responses to information published in the paper during the last 2 weeks. All…

Rinehammer, Nora

191

Analyzing the Creative Editing Behavior of Wikipedia Editors Through Dynamic Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes editing patterns of Wikipedia contributors using dynamic social network analysis. We have developed a tool that converts the edit flow among contributors into a temporal social network. We are using this approach to identify the most creative Wikipedia editors among the few thousand contributors who make most of the edits amid the millions of active Wikipedia editors.

Takashi Iba; Bernd Peters; Peter A. Gloor

2009-01-01

192

29 CFR 793.8 - âNews editor  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.8 âNews editor.â A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present...

2013-07-01

193

Appropriate Roles for the Subscriber, Publisher, Editor, Author, and Reviewer in the Archives of Plastic Surgery  

PubMed Central

Authors, editors and reviewers, publishers, and subscribers all play their role in scientific journals. These 5 stakeholders are essential to journals. In this paper, firstly, I briefly summarize the role of each journal stakeholder and their respective goals. Secondly, the status of each participant in the Archives of Plastic Surgery is described. Finally, I propose an appropriate role and plan for each of them. Specific roles and responsibilities include the following: subscribers should welcome and submit the critiques of published papers in letters to the editor. Publishers should trust editors and provide them with adequate financial support for ongoing quality improvement of the journal. The editor-in-chief should be given a sufficient period of time-several years-to build up journal quality and train the incoming editor. The editors, including section editors, are also responsible for increasing the author pool. One editor might be designated a 'devil's referee', that is, a kind of devil's advocate with the responsibility of examining the originality of the manuscript, taking a skeptical view of the manuscript, and looking for holes in the methods and results of reported experiments. Authors' responsibilities include submitting manuscripts with scientific integrity and being ready to take responsibility for their articles even long after publication. Finally, reviewers' responsibilities include identifying similar articles not cited. Reviewers are also welcome to write a discussion on the article they review.

2013-01-01

194

Virucidal activity of essential oils from aromatic plants of San Luis, Argentina.  

PubMed

Essential oils obtained from eight aromatic plants of San Luis Province, Argentina, were screened for virucidal activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Junin virus (JUNV) and dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2). The most potent inhibition was observed with the essential oil of Lippia junelliana and Lippia turbinata against JUNV with virucidal concentration 50% (VC(50)) values in the range 14-20 ppm, whereas Aloysia gratissima, Heterotheca latifolia and Tessaria absinthioides inhibited JUNV in the range 52-90 ppm. The virucidal activity was time- and temperature-dependent. The essential oils of A. gratissima, Artemisia douglasiana, Eupatorium patens and T. absinthioides inactivated HSV-1 at 65-125 ppm. However, only A. douglasiana and E. patens had any discernible effect on DEN-2 infectivity with VC(50) values of 60 and 150 ppm, respectively. PMID:14595590

García, C C; Talarico, L; Almeida, N; Colombres, S; Duschatzky, C; Damonte, E B

2003-11-01

195

Comparison of Software Architectures for Integrating Voice I/O into Existing Alarm Processing and Display System Editors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We integrate Voice Command interfaces into the existing architectures of Editor tools developed to specify the configuration of a Site Independent Configurable Alarm Display System (SICADS). The complete SICADS software package consists of the editor tool...

B. R. Funkhouser S. E. Helgesen M. R. Moseley

1988-01-01

196

Portable EDITOR (PEDITOR): A portable image processing system. [satellite images  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The PEDITOR image processing system was created to be readily transferable from one type of computer system to another. While nearly identical in function and operation to its predecessor, EDITOR, PEDITOR employs additional techniques which greatly enhance its portability. These cover system structure and processing. In order to confirm the portability of the software system, two different types of computer systems running greatly differing operating systems were used as target machines. A DEC-20 computer running the TOPS-20 operating system and using a Pascal Compiler was utilized for initial code development. The remaining programmers used a Motorola Corporation 68000-based Forward Technology FT-3000 supermicrocomputer running the UNIX-based XENIX operating system and using the Silicon Valley Software Pascal compiler and the XENIX C compiler for their initial code development.

Angelici, G.; Slye, R.; Ozga, M.; Ritter, P.

1986-01-01

197

From the editor: an interview with Dr. Scott Grundy.  

PubMed

During the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions in November 2014, this Editor had the opportunity to interview Dr. Scott Grundy regarding the new recommendations for guideline development that was issued by the International Atherosclerosis Society. (The full document is published in this issue of the journal). In developing this report, Dr. Grundy chaired a panel of international experts who spent 1 year in consideration of new evidence and regional concerns regarding the clinical management of lipoprotein disorders and vascular disease prevention. His experience in developing the Adult Treatment Panel Reports from the National Cholesterol Education Program in the United States and his extensive research in lipoprotein physiology and related disorders makes him unique in offering the expertise for worldwide leadership in this effort. PMID:24528682

Grundy, Scott; Brown, W Virgil

2014-01-01

198

A Diagram Editor for Efficient Biomedical Knowledge Capture and Integration  

PubMed Central

Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying complex disorders requires the integration of data and knowledge from different sources including free text literature and various biomedical databases. To facilitate this process, we created the Biomedical Concept Diagram Editor (BCDE) to help researchers distill knowledge from data and literature and aid the process of hypothesis development. A key feature of BCDE is the ability to capture information with a simple drag-and-drop. This is a vast improvement over manual methods of knowledge and data recording and greatly increases the efficiency of the biomedical researcher. BCDE also provides a unique concept matching function to enforce consistent terminology, which enables conceptual relationships deposited by different researchers in the BCDE database to be mined and integrated for intelligible and useful results. We hope BCDE will promote the sharing and integration of knowledge from different researchers for effective hypothesis development.

Yu, Bohua; Jakupovic, Elvis; Wilson, Justin; Dai, Manhong; Xuan, Weijian; Mirel, Barbara; Athey, Brian; Watson, Stanley; Meng, Fan

2008-01-01

199

Automatic Adverse Drug Events Detection Using Letters to the Editor  

PubMed Central

We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research.

Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M.

2012-01-01

200

EDITORIAL: A word from the new Editor-in-Chief A word from the new Editor-in-Chief  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TIn the autumn of 2010 I became the Editor-in Chief of European Journal of Physics (EJP). EJP is a place for teachers, instructors and professors to exchange their views on teaching physics at university level and share their experience. It is general opinion that no good research is possible without connection with good, high-quality teaching, at the university level in particular. Therefore excellence in physics teaching is important to the physics community. European Journal of Physics is proud of its contribution to achieving this goal. As Editor-in-Chief, I will continue to work to this general objective of the journal. We will publish articles on specific topics in physics, stressing originality of presentation and suitability for use in students'laboratories, lectures and physics teaching in general. We will also publish more pedagogical papers presenting the achievements of particular teaching methods. In addition, we will continue to publish special sections on particular areas of physics, as well as the annual special section on physics competitions. European Journal of Physics is in good shape. Due to the work of the previous editors and the publisher, the readership is high and growing steadily, and many excellent papers are being submitted and published. I hope that this positive trend for the journal will continue, and I will do my best to keep to this high standard. A few words about myself. I work in the Institute of Physics in Warsaw, Poland. My main research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and I have published about 80 research papers on this topic. For many years I was involved in teaching physics at university and in high school. I am a co-author of a textbook on physics for high-school students and of a problem book in quantum mechanics. For the last ten years, I have been involved in the International Physics Olympiad and over the last few years I have been a member of the Editorial Board of European Journal of Physics.

Mostowski, Jan

2011-01-01

201

The Best Stylists: A Survey of Editors, and Implications for the Teaching of Style in Freshman Composition Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 112 editors from magazines, newspapers, and publishing houses was conducted to obtain their judgments about prose style, the best prose stylists, and representative works by those stylists. Of the 112 editors surveyed, only 22 responded with useful data. The results indicated very little consensus among editors, and almost no…

Spigelmire, Lynne

202

Introduction to the Special Collection of Papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: A Methodology for Evaluating Regional Sustainability  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, descripti...

203

Transient Electromagnetic Soundings Near Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Colorado (2006 Field Season)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) soundings were made near Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado to obtain subsurface information of use to hydrologic modeling. Seventeen soundings were made to the east and north of the sand dunes. Using a small loop TEM system, maximum exploration depths of about 75 to 150 m were obtained. In general, layered earth interpretations of the data found that resistivity decreases with depth. Comparison of soundings with geologic logs from nearby wells found that zones logged as having increased clay content usually corresponded with a significant resistivity decrease in the TEM determined model. This result supports the use of TEM soundings to map the location of the top of the clay unit deposited at the bottom of the ancient Lake Alamosa that filled the San Luis Valley from Pliocene to middle Pleistocene time.

Fitterman, David V.; de Sozua Filho, Oderson A.

2009-01-01

204

A multi-dimensional analysis of the upper Rio Grande-San Luis Valley social-ecological system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Upper Rio Grande (URG), located in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado, is the primary contributor to streamflow to the Rio Grande Basin, upstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos at Presidio, TX. The URG-SLV includes a complex irrigation-dependent agricultural social-ecological system (SES), which began development in 1852, and today generates more than 30% of the

Ken Mix

2010-01-01

205

Prevalence of Disorders of Executive Cognitive Functioning among the Elderly: Findings from the San Luis Valley Health and Aging Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The San Luis Valley Health and Aging Study is a population-based epidemiologic study of chronic illness and disability among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white persons over the age of 60 in two counties in rural southern Colorado, USA. Between 1993 and 1995, we examined the prevalence of impaired executive cognitive functioning in a sample of 1,313 individuals living both in the

Jim Grigsby; Kathryn Kaye; Susan M. Shetterly; Judith Baxter; Nora E. Morgenstern; Richard F. Hamman

2002-01-01

206

Depressive Symptoms in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Rural Elderly The San Luis Valley Health and Aging Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literature on depression in rural and Hispanic elderly adults is sparse. This report describes the prevalence of depressive symptoms in 1,151 community-dwelling, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White participants in the San Luis Valley Health and Aging Study, conducted in rural Colorado during 1993-1995. The prevalence and odds ratios of high depressive symptoms, defined as a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale

Carolyn J. Swenson; Judith Baxter; Susan M. Shetterly; Sharon L. Scarbro; Richard F. Hamman

207

Alleviation of drought stress of Chile ancho pepper ( Capsicum annuum L. cv. San Luis) with arbuscular mycorrhiza indigenous to Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Selecting indigenous mycorrhizal fungi that enhance plant water status is important in Mexico for sustainable production systems of Chile ancho pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. San Luis). To determine mycorrhizal enhancement of drought resistance, plants were either non-inoculated (NonAMF), or inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF): Glomus fasciculatum and a mixed Glomus spp. from Mexico (ZAC-19). Plants were then exposed

F. T Davies; V Olalde-Portugal; L Aguilera-Gomez; M. J Alvarado; R. C Ferrera-Cerrato; T. W Boutton

2002-01-01

208

Issues in Communication Education: An Interview with Joe Ayers (Editor 1999-2002).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an interview with Joe Ayres, editor of this journal from 1999 to 2002. Addresses issues such as curriculum content, competencies for undergraduate students, graduate students, student retention, and the role of mentoring in higher education. (SG)

Crandall, Heather; Hazel, Michael

2002-01-01

209

Medicare Code Editor (MCE) for Hospital Billing. (Software Distributed on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (MS-CMSG/MCE) software edits medical record data to help identify coding errors, and inconsistencies between clinical data and coding. This release of the MS Grouper with MCE softwa...

2013-01-01

210

Instructional Support System (ISS) Hierarchy File Editor User Manual, December 1987 (VAX Version).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Instructional Support System Hierarchy File Editor allows system administrators to display hierarchy record information about specific courses. Each hierarchy record contains the following data: general information, group test array, group data flags,...

1987-01-01

211

FlaME: Flash Molecular Editor - a 2D structure input tool for the web  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: So far, there have been no Flash-based web tools available for chemical structure input. The authors herein present a feasibility study, aiming at the development of a compact and easy-to-use 2D structure editor, using Adobe's Flash technology and its programming language, ActionScript. As a reference model application from the Java world, we selected the Java Molecular Editor (JME). In

Pavel Dallakian; Norbert Haider

2011-01-01

212

“Ethnocentricity” in top journals of services management : Authors, editorial review boards, editorial boards and editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The objective is to describe the “ethnocentricity” (i.e. geographical affiliation of editor(s), editorial board(s), editorial review board(s) and author(s)) of selected journals in services management. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The sample is restricted to the examination and comparison of five top journals in services management during a six-year period. In total, the content analysis consisted of 1,189 articles. Findings –

Göran Svensson; Terje Slåtten; Bård Tronvoll

2007-01-01

213

XML editor for search and retrieval of bibliographic records in the Z39.50 standard  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is modelling and implementation of the XML-based editor for search and retrieval of bibliographic records. Search and retrieval of bibliographic records are enabled by the editor from the remote databases via the Z39.50 protocol. The client application is realized in the Java environment and business logic is based on the XML technologies. Design\\/methodology\\/approach

Danijela Boberic; Dusan Surla

2009-01-01

214

Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado.  

PubMed

This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an important method in information theory. Our adaptation of Fisher information provides a means of monitoring the variables of a system to characterize dynamic order, and, therefore, its regimes and regime shifts. This work is part of the SLB Sustainability Metrics Project, which aimed to evaluate movement over time towards or away from regional sustainability. One of the key goals of this project was to use readily available data to assess the sustainability of the system including its environmental, social and economic aspects. For this study, Fisher information was calculated for fifty-three variables which characterize the consumption of food and energy, agricultural production, environmental characteristics, demographic properties and changes in land use for the SLB system from 1980 to 2005. Our analysis revealed that while the system displayed small changes in dynamic order over time with a slight decreasing trend near the end of the period, there is no indication of a regime shift. Therefore, the SLB system is stable with very slight movement away from sustainability in more recent years. PMID:21930337

Eason, Tarsha; Cabezas, Heriberto

2012-02-01

215

Impact of Hurricane Luis on the health services of Antigua and Barbuda.  

PubMed

Antigua and Barbuda, located in the Caribbean, was one of the countries most affected by Hurricane Luis in 1995. Electricity, water supply and health facilities were disrupted for several weeks. Inadequate criteria at the design stages, unsound structural design, and lack of maintenance of building components, are some of the reasons that damage was so severe. The main hospitals and 6 health facilities were destroyed and flooded and most of the medical staff had to cope with their own damaged houses. Although the knowledge and materials are available to reduce the losses caused by hurricanes, building codes are not reinforced by laws and preventive maintenance to protect health care facilities from natural hazard damage is not usually budgeted for. The additional cost of making a single or two-storey health facility almost invulnerable to future catastrophe in a hurricane is only 2% in initial capital cost and becomes negligible when spread over the life of a building. The effort of UN International Decade for Natural Disasters (IDNDR) directed towards disaster mitigation should be increased over the remainder of the decade to ensure that standards are respected and building codes are mandatory. PMID:9170235

Gibbs, T; van Alphen, D

1996-01-01

216

Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

1975-01-01

217

Selenium volatilization in vegetated agricultural drainage sediment from the San Luis Drain, Central California.  

PubMed

The presence of large amounts of Se-laden agricultural drainage sediment in the San Luis Drain, Central California, poses a serious toxic threat to wildlife in the surrounding environment. Effective management of the drainage sediment becomes a practical challenge because the sediment is polluted with high levels of Se, B, and salts. This two-year field study was conducted to identify the best plant species that are salt and B tolerant and that have a superior ability of volatilizing Se from drainage sediment. The drainage sediment was mixed with clean soil, and vegetated with salado alfalfa (Medicago sativa 'salado'), salado grass (Sporobulus airoides 'salado'), saltgrass-turf (Distichlis spp. 'NYPA Turf'), saltgrass-forage (Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene), cordgrass (Spartina patens 'Flageo'), Leucaenia (Leucaena leucocephola), elephant grass (Pennistum purpureum), or wild type-Brassica (Brassica spp.). Results show that elephant grass produced the greatest amount of biomass and accumulated highest concentrations of B. Highest concentrations of Se, S, and Cl were observed in wild-type Brassica. Biogenic volatilization of Se by plants and soil microbes was greater in summer. Among the treatments, the mean daily rates of Se volatilization (microg Se m(-2)d(-1)) were wild-type Brassica (39) > saltgrass-turf (31) > cordgrass (27) > saltgrass forage (24) > elephant grass (22) > salado grass (21) > leucaenia (19) > salado alfalfa (14) > irrigated bare soil (11) > non-irrigated bare soil (6). Overall, rates of Se volatilization in drainage sediment were relatively low due to high levels of sulfate. To manage Se in drainage sediment by phytoremediation, the biological volatilization process needs to be enhanced substantially under field conditions. PMID:16018890

Bañuelos, G S; Lin, Z-Q; Arroyo, I; Terry, N

2005-09-01

218

CHAIRMEN'S PREFACE AND EDITORS' NOTE: Unification of Fundamental Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chairmen's PrefaceIn 1984 we obtained a grant from the Nobel Foundation to organize a Nobel Symposium on "Unification of the Fundamental Interactions". In our proposal which we submitted in the fall of 1983 we stated that we wanted to cover the various attempts to unification such as GUT'S, supergravity, Kaluza-Klein theories and superstrings. What has happened in particle physics since then is already history. With the realization that certain superstring theories could be anomaly free, it became clear that these models could encompass earlier attempts to unification as well as solving the fundamental problem of quantum gravity. The excitement that some of us had felt for some time now spread through most of the particle physics community and this excitement certainly was evident during the Symposium. With the international advisory committee we originally chose a list of around 30 invitees which could best represent the various subjects listed above. When it came to the final planning of the programme essentially all talks dealt with superstrings! We were very fortunate that almost all of the invitees managed to come to the Symposium. From the western world only three were unable to participate, André Neveu, Steven Weinberg and Bruno Zumino. We certainly missed them during the meeting. We were particularly happy that Stephen Hawking managed to take part actively. Our real problem was to get participants from the Soviet Union. Out of eight invitations only one came through. We were very happy to have Renata Kallosh, who really did her utmost to enlighten us about not only her own work but also about recent progress in the USSR, However, we were very sorry that in spite of all our letters, telegrammes and endless attempts to get telephone calls through and despite the good relations between the Swedish and Soviet Academies of Sciences we had to miss Ludwig Faddeev, Valodja Gribov, Andrej Linde, Victor Ogievetsky, Sasha Polyakov, Misha Shifman and Arkadij Vainshtein. We had hoped that the Nobel Symposium should be a signal for improved relations between East and West, but in this respect we failed. The Symposium was held in the small town of Marstrand, a summer resort on an island outside Göteborg. The idea was to have it relatively close to home and to show the participants perhaps the best part of the local nature. Another motive was to keep the participants semi-isolated to provide ample time for discussions. With the somewhat heavy programme we found that even so, the days were not long enough. This Symposium was the second Nobel Symposium on elementary particle physics. The first one, also organized by our group, was held in 1968. We hope and believe that the next one need not be awaited another 18 years! The Symposium was made possible by a generous grant from the Nobel Foundation. An additional grant from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences was also essential. A grant from Nordita made it possible to invite some ten Nordic observers. We also gratefully acknowledge help with the organization of the Symposium from the city of Goteborg, the city of Kungälv, Volvo, Skandinaviska Enskilda banken, Ericsson AB and IBM Sweden. We thank all the participants for all their efforts, to come to our remote part of the world, to give excellent talks, to write up their talks astonishingly quickly and to share with us so much of their knowledge and expertise. Last but not least we are indebted to the members of the organizing committee, members of the group and the secretarial staff. Goteborg, August 1986 Editors' NoteIn these Proceedings the lectures are given in the order of their oral presentation at the Symposium. Regrettably, a few contributors could not participate (V. Gribov, A. Linde, V. Ogievetsky, M. Shifman and A. M. Polyakov). Their contributions have been placed close to the end of the Proceedings. As these authors did not have the opportunity of correcting the proofs, responsibility for printing errors must rest with the Editors. It is a pleasure to thank all the authors for their enthusiastic and rapid

Brink, Lars; Nilsson, Jan S.; Salomonson, Per; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

1987-01-01

219

Late Miocene-Pleistocene evolution of a Rio Grande rift subbasin, Sunshine Valley-Costilla Plain, San Luis Basin, New Mexico and Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sunshine Valley–Costilla Plain, a structural subbasin of the greater San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift, is bounded to the north and south by the San Luis Hills and the Red River fault zone, respectively. Surficial mapping, neotectonic investigations, geochronology, and geophysics demonstrate that the structural, volcanic, and geomorphic evolution of the basin involves the intermingling of climatic cycles and spatially and temporally varying tectonic activity of the Rio Grande rift system. Tectonic activity has transferred between range-bounding and intrabasin faults creating relict landforms of higher tectonic-activity rates along the mountain-piedmont junction. Pliocene–Pleistocene average long-term slip rates along the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone range between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/year with late Pleistocene slip rates approximately half (0.06 mm/year) of the longer Quaternary slip rate. During the late Pleistocene, climatic influences have been dominant over tectonic influences on mountain-front geomorphic processes. Geomorphic evidence suggests that this once-closed subbasin was integrated into the Rio Grande prior to the integration of the once-closed northern San Luis Basin, north of the San Luis Hills, Colorado; however, deep canyon incision, north of the Red River and south of the San Luis Hills, initiated relatively coeval to the integration of the northern San Luis Basin. Long-term projections of slip rates applied to a 1.6 km basin depth defined from geophysical modeling suggests that rifting initiated within this subbasin between 20 and 10 Ma. Geologic mapping and geophysical interpretations reveal a complex network of northwest-, northeast-, and north-south–trending faults. Northwest- and northeast-trending faults show dual polarity and are crosscut by north-south– trending faults. This structural model possibly provides an analog for how some intracontinental rift structures evolve through time.

Ruleman, C. A.; Thompson, R. A.; Shroba, R. R.; Anderson, M.; Drenth, B. J.; Rotzien, J.; Lyon, J.

2013-01-01

220

Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

1991-01-01

221

Dear Editor(s) published article your Journal. your journal IIS? Journal Name: International Journal Engineering Business Enterprise Applications (Ojibwa) Manuscript Title: Study effect cognitive aspect social capital recognizing entrepreneurial opportunities small medium companies Author Name: proof. Mahomet Roza Hamidizadeh  

EPA Pesticide Factsheets

Did you mean: Dear Editor(s) published article your Journal. your journal IIS? Journal Name: International Journal Engineering Business Enterprise Applications (Ojibwa) Manuscript Title: Study effect cognitive aspect social capital recognizing entrepreneurial opportunities small medium companies Author Name: proof. Mahomet Roza Hamidizadeh ?

222

InSAR deformation time series for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies for both the surface water and the ground water. In 1998 the state of Colorado commissioned the Rio Grande Decision Support System to refine the hydogeologic characterization of the system, including the development of a MODFLOW finite difference model of groundwater flow. The main challenge in the SLV is acquiring sufficient data to characterize the spatially heterogeneous, time-varying behavior of the groundwater system. Here we apply the small baseline subset analysis (SBAS) interferometric radar (InSAR) technique to provide such data. InSAR techniques yield the deformation of Earth's surface at fine spatial resolution occurring between two satellite overflights, and SBAS permits solution for a time series of deformation maps. The measured deformation can be related to changes in the water table in underlying confined aquifers. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. Historically, InSAR measurements have been difficult to make in agricultural areas. The change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation and the loss of useful information about surface deformation. The recently-developed SBAS method allows stable deformation estimates at certain ground points in an otherwise decorrelated time series of data. We applied this approach to data collected by the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV from track 98 frame 2853 for the years 1992-2001. We used the Generic SAR (GSAR) SBAS software developed by Norut to produce time series deformation measurements for many positions across the entire SLV. We find that the 2000 km2 area captured in track 98 frame 2853 shows very high levels of correlation in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. We extracted a time series displaying the change in deformation over the time period of 1992 to 2001, with a sampling interval of approximately 3 months. The ability to obtain such high quality temporal data across the entire SLV suggests that improved groundwater flow models describing finer- scale heterogeneities than are presently represented are possible with the integration of InSAR data. Specifically, the objective is to develop a quantitative relationship between ground surface deformations measured by InSAR and confined aquifer heads.

Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreüder, W. A.; Shanker, P.; Lauknes, T. R.

2009-05-01

223

Magazine or journal--what is the difference? The role of the monitoring editor  

PubMed Central

Scientific communication, career advancement, and funding decisions are all dependent on research publications. The way manuscripts are handled by high-visibility, professionally edited magazines differs from the way academic journals evaluate manuscripts, using active scientists as monitoring editors. In this essay, I discuss the benefits that come with the involvement of active scientists. I enumerate the decisions a monitoring editor has to make, and how he or she goes about making them. Finally, I indicate ways in which authors can help to make the process a smoother and more positive experience.

Bretscher, Anthony

2013-01-01

224

Guidelines, editors, pharma and the biological paradigm shift.  

PubMed

Private investment in biomedical research has increased over the last few decades. At most places it has been welcomed as the next best thing to technology itself. Much of the intellectual talent from academic institutions is getting absorbed in lucrative positions in industry. Applied research finds willing collaborators in venture capital funded industry, so a symbiotic growth is ensured for both.There are significant costs involved too. As academia interacts with industry, major areas of conflict of interest especially applicable to biomedical research have arisen. They are related to disputes over patents and royalty, hostile encounters between academia and industry, as also between public and private enterprise, legal tangles, research misconduct of various types, antagonistic press and patient-advocate lobbies and a general atmosphere in which commercial interest get precedence over patient welfare.Pharma image stinks because of a number of errors of omission and commission. A recent example is suppression of negative findings about Bayer's Trasylol (Aprotinin) and the marketing maneuvers of Eli Lilly's Xigris (rhAPC). Whenever there is a conflict between patient vulnerability and profit motives, pharma often tends to tilt towards the latter. Moreover there are documents that bring to light how companies frequently cross the line between patient welfare and profit seeking behaviour.A voluntary moratorium over pharma spending to pamper drug prescribers is necessary. A code of conduct adopted recently by OPPI in India to limit pharma company expenses over junkets and trinkets is a welcome step.Clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are considered important as they guide the diagnostic/therapeutic regimen of a large number of medical professionals and hospitals and provide recommendations on drugs, their dosages and criteria for selection. Along with clinical trials, they are another area of growing influence by the pharmaceutical industry. For example, in a relatively recent survey of 2002, it was found that about 60% of 192 authors of clinical practice guidelines reported they had financial connections with the companies whose drugs were under consideration. There is a strong case for making CPGs based not just on effectivity but cost effectivity. The various ramifications of this need to be spelt out. Work of bodies like the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration and Guidelines Advisory Committee (GAC) are also worth a close look.Even the actions of Foundations that work for disease amelioration have come under scrutiny. The process of setting up 'Best Practices' Guidelines for interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and clinicians has already begun and can have important consequences for patient care. Similarly, Good Publication Practice (GPP) for pharmaceutical companies have also been set up aimed at improving the behaviour of drug companies while reporting drug trialsThe rapidly increasing trend toward influence and control by industry has become a concern for many. It is of such importance that the Association of American Medical Colleges has issued two relatively new documents - one, in 2001, on how to deal with individual conflicts of interest; and the other, in 2002, on how to deal with institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), as also medical education and research institutions at other places, have to adopt means that minimize their conflicts of interest.Both medical associations and research journal editors are getting concerned with individual and institutional conflicts of interest in the conduct of clinical research and documents are now available which address these issues. The 2001 ICMJE revision calls for full disclosure of the sponsor's role in research, as well as assurance that the investigators are independent of the sponsor, are fully accountable for the design and conduct of the trial, have independent access to all trial data and control all editorial and publication decisions. However the fin

Singh, Ajai R; Singh, Shakuntala A

2007-01-01

225

Predicting arsenic concentrations in groundwater of San Luis Valley, Colorado: implications for individual-level lifetime exposure assessment.  

PubMed

Consumption of inorganic arsenic in drinking water at high levels has been associated with chronic diseases. Risk is less clear at lower levels of arsenic, in part due to difficulties in estimating exposure. Herein we characterize spatial and temporal variability of arsenic concentrations and develop models for predicting aquifer arsenic concentrations in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, an area of moderately elevated arsenic in groundwater. This study included historical water samples with total arsenic concentrations from 595 unique well locations. A longitudinal analysis established temporal stability in arsenic levels in individual wells. The mean arsenic levels for a random sample of 535 wells were incorporated into five kriging models to predict groundwater arsenic concentrations at any point in time. A separate validation dataset (n = 60 wells) was used to identify the model with strongest predictability. Findings indicate that arsenic concentrations are temporally stable (r = 0.88; 95 % CI 0.83-0.92 for samples collected from the same well 15-25 years apart) and the spatial model created using ordinary kriging best predicted arsenic concentrations (? = 0.72 between predicted and observed validation data). These findings illustrate the value of geostatistical modeling of arsenic and suggest the San Luis Valley is a good region for conducting epidemiologic studies of groundwater metals because of the ability to accurately predict variation in groundwater arsenic concentrations. PMID:24429726

James, Katherine A; Meliker, Jaymie R; Buttenfield, Barbara E; Byers, Tim; Zerbe, Gary O; Hokanson, John E; Marshall, Julie A

2014-08-01

226

What Authors Need to Know About the Way Editors Think: Report From the Congress on Peer Review in Biomedical Publication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Editors of biomedical journals from around the world convened in Sep- tember 2001 in Barcelona, Spain, for the Fourth International Con- gress on Peer Review in Biomedi- cal Publication. For 3 days, discus- sions centered around editors defin- ing their role in maintaining the in- tegrity of content of medical jour- nals and presentations of research studies on publication bias.

Anne Victoria Neale

227

More than 25 Years of the "American Journal of Evaluation": The Recollections of Past Editors in Their Own Words  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the important role that past editors of the "American Journal of Evaluation" and its predecessors, "Evaluation Practice" and "Evaluation News," played in the development of the American Evaluation Association (AEA). In interviews presented here, the editors recount the history of the association, the journal, and the field as…

Gargani, John

2011-01-01

228

CMS Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (CMSG/MCE) Version 23.0 (software distributed on CD-ROM) Documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is documentation for the CMS Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (CMSG/MCE) Version 23.0 Product. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (formerly Health Care Financing Administration) Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (CMSG/MCE) software ...

2005-01-01

229

EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I am honoured to take on the leadership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) as the successor to Professor Mark J Kushner, with whom I have had the pleasure to work on the journal for many years. Under Mark's insightful and energetic leadership over the last six years, PSST has cemented its position as the journal of choice within its subject area and is now one of the most successful journals in the field. In this first issue of 2014, I would like to reflect on some of the events and achievements of 2013. At the start of the year the PSST Editorial Board, recognizing the vital importance of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) data to low-temperature plasma physics, agreed that PSST would accept papers reporting such new data, generated through both experiment and theory. Jonathan Tennyson joined the Editorial Board to represent this area. In March Anne Bourdon joined the Associate Editor team and has since then played a key part in the journal's review process alongside our other Editors. During the autumn, PSST moved to a new editorial management system. In December Deborah O'Connell was awarded the 2013 Hershkowitz Early Career Award and Review and joins the Editorial Board as of 2014. I would also like to thank Miles Turner for his work in leading the drafting of a guide on the details necessary in the reporting of the results of computer simulations; the main conclusions of this report have been incorporated into the journal policy. Overall 2013 has been another successful year for PSST; paper submissions were up by 8% on the previous year and there was the highest ever number of downloads of PSST papers in one year. Another noteworthy feature of 2013 was the continuing improvement in publication times while maintaining our high standards for acceptance and providing expert feedback coupled with encouragement particularly to younger researchers and groups. Largely as a result of the hard work of our referees and Associate Editors, the average time from receipt-to-first decision of a paper is only 50 days. In 2014 we will continue to support the low-temperature plasma physics community through the publication of special topical issues. Those already scheduled for next year are: Transport in B-fields in low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Rod Boswell and Igor D Kaganovich Spots and patterns on electrodes of gas discharges, Guest Editors: Mikhail S Benilov and Ulrich Kogelschatz Interaction of electromagnetic waves with low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Osamu Sakai and Shahid Rauf We will also launch a new feature: LabTalks, a way in which our authors can showcase their group's work and communicate their research published in PSST to a wider audience. Full details are on the PSST website. Along with the leadership team, made up of Associate Editors, Anne, Nick and Richard and the great PSST staff at Institute of Physics Publishing, led by Alice Malhador, I will strive to grow, improve and deliver a journal which reflects the excellent science from the low-temperature plasma community. We hope we can continue to count on your vital support as authors and referees.

Graham, W. G.

2014-02-01

230

Treatment of Effect Indices in Journal Editorial Policies: An Editor's Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reviews the education and experiences that led one journal editor to support the reporting and interpretation of magnitude-of-effect (ME) indices in substantive research. The paper reviews the controversies associated with the use of ME indices as result interpretation aids and describes the influences of these controversies on journal…

Snyder, Patricia

231

Using Letters to the Editor as Teaching Examples: Some Opening Strategies for Instructors of Persuasive Discourse.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The opportunity to discover the flaws in newspaper letters to the editor and to evaluate the ensuing consequences can help beginning persuasive writing students, who have had little practice at forming arguments, begin to conceptualize for themselves the ways that principles of persuasive discourse apply in particular writing situations. The study…

Mistichelli, Bill

232

Medicare Code Editor (MCE) for Hospital Billing. (Software Distributed on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) software detects and reports errors in the coding of Medicare claims data. While the program identifies and indicates the nature of the error, it does not correct the error. A particular error condition is associated with ea...

2013-01-01

233

The Location of Knowledge: A Conversation with the Editors on Knowledge, Experience, and Place  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As co-editors of this theme issue of this journal, the authors have accepted that knowledge systems and teacher education programs are deeply interconnected. Further, they claim that teacher education programs must incorporate in theory and practice the fact that knowledge systems are a determining factor in the effectiveness of a teacher…

Shultz, Lynette; Kelly, Jennifer; Weber-Pillwax, Cora

2009-01-01

234

FlaME: Flash Molecular Editor - a 2D structure input tool for the web  

PubMed Central

Background So far, there have been no Flash-based web tools available for chemical structure input. The authors herein present a feasibility study, aiming at the development of a compact and easy-to-use 2D structure editor, using Adobe's Flash technology and its programming language, ActionScript. As a reference model application from the Java world, we selected the Java Molecular Editor (JME). In this feasibility study, we made an attempt to realize a subset of JME's functionality in the Flash Molecular Editor (FlaME) utility. These basic capabilities are: structure input, editing and depiction of single molecules, data import and export in molfile format. Implementation The result of molecular diagram sketching in FlaME is accessible in V2000 molfile format. By integrating the molecular editor into a web page, its communication with the HTML elements on this page is established using the two JavaScript functions, getMol() and setMol(). In addition, structures can be copied to the system clipboard. Conclusion A first attempt was made to create a compact single-file application for 2D molecular structure input/editing on the web, based on Flash technology. With the application examples presented in this article, it could be demonstrated that the Flash methods are principally well-suited to provide the requisite communication between the Flash object (application) and the HTML elements on a web page, using JavaScript functions.

2011-01-01

235

How Well Do Americans Know Geography? "National Geographic" Editor Discusses Meaning for Schools (Interview).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gilbert Grosvenor, editor of "National Geographic," is interviewed about the importance of geography for Americans. He claims our lack of geographic knowledge impedes our ability to act and compete in the world market as a world power and points out that geographic ignorance extends to people employed at high levels of government. (MD)

Koerner, Thomas

1987-01-01

236

Persnickety editor, Founding Father, Mentor and Friend: The Legacy of Fred Mumpton  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper is a tribute to Dr Fred Munpton, the founder of the International Committee on Natural Zeolites (ICNZ), by one of his students, who later succeed him as president of the ICNZ. The tribute reflects on Dr. Mumpton's skills as an editor and his zeal for the study of natural zeolites.

Ming, Douglas W.

2006-01-01

237

Incremental recognition in gesture-based and syntax-directed diagram editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diagram editing is an attractive application of gestural interfaces and pen-based computers which promise a new input paradigm where users communicate with computers in diagram languages by using gestures. A key problem in building gesture-based diagram editors is the recognition of handsketched diagrams. Existing approaches concentrate either on gesture recognition or on parsing visual languages, there has been a lack

Rui Zhao; Siemens Nixdorf

1993-01-01

238

Professional Wisdom and Writing for Publication: Qualitative Interviews with Editors and Authors in Early Childhood Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College and university faculty members specializing in early childhood education face some unique challenges in scholarly writing. The purpose of this research was to use open-ended interviews as a way to gather the collective wisdom of a group of key informants about academic writing and publishing in the field. Twenty-two editors and/or authors,…

Jalongo, Mary Renck

2013-01-01

239

LETTER TO EDITOR ON ARTICLE "ARSENIC MEANS BUSINESS"  

EPA Science Inventory

The letter to the editor was written to point out that different forms of arsenic are found in source waters and that the technologies listed in the article such as POU RO will not necessarily be effective on all waters. The letter pointed out that most technologies are more eff...

240

Editor Musical: uma Aplicação para a Aprendizagem de Música apoiada por Meios Eletrônicos Interativos  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the Editor Musical, a collaborative interactive tool developed to support Musical Education, enabling activities of music composition for beginners, individually or collaboratively, on a local network or remotely, on presencial or long distance learning environments. This interdisciplinary research required studies in different areas: computer supported collaborative learning, distance education, music education software and teaching music with music

Irene Karaguilla Ficheman; Ricardo Augusto Lipas; Susana Ester Krüger; Roseli de Deus Lopes

2003-01-01

241

Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership [in HRD].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These three papers are from a symposium on professional journals that was facilitated by Wim J. Nijhoff at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership" (Gary N. McLean) describes the purpose and operation of the "Human Resource Development…

1995

242

More on Lexical Bias: How Efficient Can a "Lexical Editor'" Be?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lexical bias effect (the tendency for phonological speech errors to create words more often than nonwords) has been debated for over 30 years. One account attributes the effect to a lexical editor, a strategic component of the production system that examines each planned phonological string, and suppresses it if it is a nonword. The…

Nozari, Nazbanou; Dell, Gary S.

2009-01-01

243

The View from the Editor's Chair: Dewey Decimal Classification 16 to 19.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The retiring editor of Dewey Decimal Classification recounts the development of the system from the 16th through the 19th editions, i.e., 1956-1980. During this period, the system has undergone major changes to internationalize its character. Special prov...

B. A. Custer

1979-01-01

244

Medicare Severity Grouper with Medicare Code Editor Software ICD-10 Pilot Version 31.0.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This ICD-10 Medicare Severity (MS) Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (MCE) software pilot contains ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 codes effective FY 2013. This software is intended to give users the opportunity to group and edit claims using both ICD-9-CM codes and ...

2013-01-01

245

Integrated Outpatient Code Editor ICD-10 Pilot (Ver. 14.3). (Software on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Integrated Outpatient Code Editor (IOCE) Pilot software contains ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes effective 10/1/2006 to present, and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes published December 2011. This software is intended to give users the opportunity to edit outpatien...

2013-01-01

246

Making leisure and recreation research a scholarly topic: Views of a journal editor, 1972–1982  

Microsoft Academic Search

The founding co?editor of Leisure Sciences provides a critical analysis of the events of 1972–1982 that shaped the topics of leisure and recreation research. Specific topics include: the development of publication outlets for research; leisure in the hierarchy of scholarly activity; the attempt to establish boundaries on leisure research; what are the criteria for acceptable research; and who does leisure

Rabel J. Burdge

1983-01-01

247

University-government relationships in the training of technical writers-editors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traditional and nontraditional methods of training technical writers-editors are reviewed. Combining work experience with classroom instruction in the form of cooperative education provides a method of strengthening the Federal career service in professional occupations. The NASA Langley experience that successfully introduced students to the special demands of technical writing and editing is described.

Stohrer, Freda F.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

1979-01-01

248

Revision, Validation, and Evaluation of the Undergraduate Teacher Field Work Experience in Reading at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Education majors at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo are primarily English speaking only and need guidance in strategies for adapting instruction for a variety of levels of second language acquisition students. This project addressed the problem of a lack of sufficient preparation of undergraduate students to participate…

Ceaser, Lisbeth

249

Followup Study of Transfer Students from C.O.S. to California State University, Fresno, & California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo, Fall 1984.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted at College of the Sequoias (COS) to assess the academic success of students transferring to California State University, Fresno (Fresno State), and California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal-Poly). The study focused on the number of units completed at COS, grade point average (GPA) at COS, COS units…

Webb, Elaine

250

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi enhance fruit growth and quality of chile ancho ( Capsicum annuum L. cv San Luis) plants exposed to drought  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and drought on fruit quality was evaluated in chile ancho (Capsicum annuum L. cv San Luis). AMF treatments were (1) Glomus fasciculatum (AMFG), (2) a fungal species consortium from the forest “Los Tuxtla” in Mexico (AMFT), (3) a fungal species consortium from the Sonorian desert in Mexico (AMFD), and (4) a noninoculated control

Hortencia G. Mena-Violante; Omar Ocampo-Jiménez; Luc Dendooven; Gerardo Martínez-Soto; Jaquelina González-Castañeda; Fred T. Davies Jr; Víctor Olalde-Portugal

2006-01-01

251

La experiencia en la estructuración del PPS de la Universidad Polítécnica de San Luis Potosí - Programa para el Impulso de Asociaciones Público-Privadas en Estados Mexicanos (PIAPPEM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presentación expuesta durante el Cuarto Encuentro Técnico en Materia de Estructuración de Proyectos de Asociación Público-Privada, llevado a cabo en Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, México, el 16, 17 y 18 de febrero de 2011. La Universidad Politécnica de San Luis Potosí observa cinco beneficios de trabajar con una Alianza Público Privada (APPs): 1) La Secretaría espera obtener un valor presente neto

Samuel Soberano

2011-01-01

252

Hydrovolcanic evolution of the Joya Prieta maar, San Luis Potosí, northeast Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Joya Prieta is a Quaternary maar volcano emplaced at the western sector of the Sierra Madre Oriental fold and thrust belt. The crater is located at the axis of an open Laramide fold with a N20°W axis trend. It is the most easterly structure of the Santo Domingo Group, a cluster of intraplate maars and tuff-rings northeast of San Luis Potosí. A characteristic feature of these maars is that they are emplaced in close relationship with anticlines, exposing impressive inner crater walls of folded strata. In the Joya Prieta maar, the calcareous basement rocks are clearly exposed and unconformably overlain by the volcanic succession. A generalized stratigraphic sequence registers, from base to top, olivine-bearing basalt lava resting unconformably atop El Abra Formation limestone. The lava is overlain by thick and oxidized scoria and spatter agglomerate that grades into a moderately sorted spatter-fall layer with pervasive palagonite alteration. In direct contact with no evidence of reworking, pedogenesis or remobilization, the maar-forming sequence starts with parallel-stratified fall layers of altered basaltic pumice and scoria, with lava and limestone lithic clasts. This fall deposit marks the influx of xenocrystals and xenoliths, widely documented in previous works; they comprise mainly kaersutite mega crystals and spinel lherzolite respectively. The proximal fall deposit is divided into two thick layers by an indurated ash-tuff bed with pellets and single-rimmed accretionary lapilli. The upper layer of this fall deposit passes gradually onto an alternation of lapilli-sized layers with parallel ash-tuff horizons until it grades into cross-stratified, lithic-rich lapilli-tuff. The heterolithologic lapilli tuff is cemented on a fine ash matrix with palagonized juvenile clasts and abundant lava, shale and limestone lithics exhibiting a plethora of lithofacies in the like of parallel-bedded tuff, low-angle cross-bedded tuff and massive strata. This passes gradually onto the uppermost massive, lithic-rich lapilli-tuff with impact sags, antidunes and abundant lithic blocks forming heterolithologic breccia facies. The volcanic succession at Joya Prieta maar started with the eruption of 'dry' basaltic effusive products. At the final stages of this lava effusion, considerable amounts of groundwater gained entrance into the system forming the highly altered spatter deposit, this condition enhanced explosivity within the volcano conduit and near the vent. Volcanic tremors and moderate explosions may have occurred and thus affected the local aquifer, hosted in fractured calcareous rocks, therefore enhancing secondary permeability, what produced more efficient magma-water interactions responsible for the explosive phase. Hydrogeological conditions today and ancient may have to be explored in order to constrain the possible causes of late magma-water interactions.

Davila-Harris, P.; Aranda-Gomez, J. J.; Carrasco, G.

2013-05-01

253

Scientific Value of Systematic Reviews: Survey of Editors of Core Clinical Journals  

PubMed Central

Background Synthesizing research evidence using systematic and rigorous methods has become a key feature of evidence-based medicine and knowledge translation. Systematic reviews (SRs) may or may not include a meta-analysis depending on the suitability of available data. They are often being criticised as ‘secondary research’ and denied the status of original research. Scientific journals play an important role in the publication process. How they appraise a given type of research influences the status of that research in the scientific community. We investigated the attitudes of editors of core clinical journals towards SRs and their value for publication. Methods We identified the 118 journals labelled as “core clinical journals” by the National Library of Medicine, USA in April 2009. The journals’ editors were surveyed by email in 2009 and asked whether they considered SRs as original research projects; whether they published SRs; and for which section of the journal they would consider a SR manuscript. Results The editors of 65 journals (55%) responded. Most respondents considered SRs to be original research (71%) and almost all journals (93%) published SRs. Several editors regarded the use of Cochrane methodology or a meta-analysis as quality criteria; for some respondents these criteria were premises for the consideration of SRs as original research. Journals placed SRs in various sections such as “Review” or “Feature article”. Characterization of non-responding journals showed that about two thirds do publish systematic reviews. Discussion Currently, the editors of most core clinical journals consider SRs original research. Our findings are limited by a non-responder rate of 45%. Individual comments suggest that this is a grey area and attitudes differ widely. A debate about the definition of ‘original research’ in the context of SRs is warranted.

Antes, Gerd; von Elm, Erik

2012-01-01

254

Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge  

SciTech Connect

The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

2005-08-28

255

Forecasting Selenium Discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: Ecological Effects of A Proposed San Luis Drain Extension  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Selenium discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary (Bay-Delta) could change significantly if federal and state agencies (1) approve an extension of the San Luis Drain to convey agricultural drainage from the western San Joaquin Valley to the North Bay (Suisun Bay, Carquinez Strait, and San Pablo Bay); (2) allow changes in flow patterns of the lower San Joaquin River and Bay-Delta while using an existing portion of the San Luis Drain to convey agricultural drainage to a tributary of the San Joaquin River; or (3) revise selenium criteria for the protection of aquatic life or issue criteria for the protection of wildlife. Understanding the biotransfer of selenium is essential to evaluating effects of selenium on Bay-Delta ecosystems. Confusion about selenium threats to fish and wildlife stem from (1) monitoring programs that do not address specific protocols necessary for an element that bioaccumulates; and (2) failure to consider the full complexity of the processes that result in selenium toxicity. Past studies show that predators are more at risk from selenium contamination than their prey, making it difficult to use traditional methods to predict risk from environmental concentrations alone. This report presents an approach to conceptualize and model the fate and effects of selenium under various load scenarios from the San Joaquin Valley. For each potential load, progressive forecasts show resulting (1) water-column concentration; (2) speciation; (3) transformation to particulate form; (4) particulate concentration; (5) bioaccumulation by invertebrates; (6) trophic transfer to predators; and (7) effects on those predators. Enough is known to establish a first-order understanding of relevant conditions, biological response, and ecological risks should selenium be discharged directly into the North Bay through a conveyance such as a proposed extension of the San Luis Drain. The approach presented here, the Bay-Delta selenium model, determines the mass, fate, and effects of selenium released to the Bay-Delta through use of (1) historical land-use, drainage, alluvial-fill, and runoff databases; (2) existing knowledge concerning biogeochemical reactions and physiological parameters of selenium (e.g., speciation, partitioning between dissolved and particulate forms, and bivalve assimilation efficiency); and (3) site-specific data mainly from 1986 to 1996 for clams and bottom-feeding fish and birds. Selenium load scenarios consider effluents from North Bay oil refineries and discharges of agricultural drainage from the San Joaquin Valley to enable calculation of (a) a composite freshwater endmember selenium concentration at the head of the estuary; and (b) a selenium concentration at a selected seawater location (Carquinez Strait) as a foundation for modeling. Analysis of selenium effects also takes into account the mode of conveyance for agricultural drainage (i.e., the San Luis Drain or San Joaquin River); and flows of the Sacramento River and San Joaquin River on a seasonal or monthly basis. Load scenarios for San Joaquin Valley mirror predictions made since 1955 of a worsening salt (and by inference, selenium) build-up exacerbated by an arid climate and massive irrigation. The reservoir of selenium in the San Joaquin Valley is sufficient to provide loading at an annual rate of approximately 42,500 pounds of selenium to a Bay-Delta disposal point for 63 to 304 years at the lower range of projections presented here, even if influx of selenium from the California Coast Ranges could be curtailed. Disposal of wastewaters on an annual basis outside of the San Joaquin Valley may slow the degradation of valley resources, but drainage alone cannot alleviate the salt and selenium build-up in the San Joaquin Valley, at least within a century. Load scenarios also show the different proportions of selenium loading to the Bay-Delta. Oil refinery loads from 1986 to 1992 ranged from 8.5 to 20 pounds of selenium per day;

Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

2006-01-01

256

Spring stopover food resources and land use patterns of Rocky Mountain population Sandhill Carnes in the San Luis Valley, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Virtually the entire Rocky Mountain population (RMP) of greater sandhill cranes uses the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado as a spring stopover area. RMP cranes in the SLV depend on unharvested grain provided on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge, and on waste grain in privately owned fields. In recent years, however, fall tillage and irrigation of grain fields has become increasingly widespread in the SLV. These changes in farming practices have resulted in an unmeasured reduction in waste grain availability for RMP cranes during spring and have prompted concern over whether current or projected foods are adequate to meet spring demands of the target population size of 18,000-20,000 RMP cranesa?|

Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.

2001-01-01

257

Estimating temporal changes in hydraulic head using InSAR data in the San Luis Valley, Colorado  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

sustainability of the confined aquifer system in the San Luis Valley, Colorado is of utmost importance to the valley's agricultural economy. There is a dearth of hydraulic head measurements in the confined aquifer to which the current groundwater flow model can be calibrated. Here we investigate the extent to which spatially and temporally dense measurements of deformation from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data can be used to fill in spatial and temporal gaps in the head data set by calibrating the InSAR data with head at the monitoring well locations. We conduct this calibration at 11 wells where we expect sufficient deformation for reliable InSAR measurement, given the accepted level of uncertainty (˜1 cm). In the San Luis Valley, crop growth degrades the quality of the InSAR signal, which means that the high-quality deformation data may not be collocated with the wells. We use kriging to estimate the deformation directly at the well locations. We find that the calibration is valid at three well locations where the seasonal magnitude of the deformation is much larger than the uncertainty of the InSAR measurement. At these well locations, we predict head prior to and within the temporal sampling window of the head measurements. We find that 59% of the InSAR-predicted hydraulic head values agree with the measured values, within the uncertainty of the data. Given our success in extending the hydraulic head data temporally, the next step in our research is to use InSAR data to interpolate spatially between head measurements.

Reeves, Jessica A.; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Schreüder, Willem A.

2014-05-01

258

How is research publishing going to progress in the next 20 years?: transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Seattle on Wednesday, 20 March 2013.  

PubMed

On March 20th 2013, a one-hour session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing was held at the IADR International Session in Seattle. Organised by Kenneth Eaton and Christopher Lynch (Chair and Secretary, respectively, of the British Dental Editors Forum), the meeting sought to bring together leading international experts in dental publishing, as well as authors, reviewers and students engaged in research. The meeting was an overwhelming success, with more than 100 attendees. A panel involving four leading dental editors led a discussion on anticipated developments in publishing dental research with much involvement and contribution from audience members. This was the third such meeting held at the IADR for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. A follow-up session will take place in Cape Town on 25 June 2014 as part of the annual IADR meeting. The transcript of the Seattle meeting is reproduced in this article. Where possible speakers are identified by name. At the first time of mention their role/position is also stated, thereafter only their name appears. We are grateful to Stephen Hancocks Ltd. for their generous sponsorship of this event. For those who were not able to attend the authors hope this article gives a flavour of the discussions and will encourage colleagues to attend future events. Involvement is open to Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. It is a very open group and all those with an interest will be welcome to join in. PMID:24440711

Eaton, Kenneth A; Rex Holland, G; Giannobile, William V; Hancocks, Stephen; Robinson, Peter G; Lynch, Christopher D

2014-03-01

259

How is research publishing going to progress in the next 20 years? Transcription of Session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and Others with an Interest in Scientific Publishing Held at IADR Meeting In Seattle on Wednesday, 20 March 2013.  

PubMed

On March 20th 2013, a one-hour session for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing was held at the IADR International Session in Seattle. Organised by Kenneth Eaton and Chris Lynch (Chair and Secretary, respectively, of the British Dental Editors Forum), the meeting sought to bring together leading international experts in dental publishing, as well as authors, reviewers and students engaged in research. The meeting was an overwhelming success, with more than 100 attendees. A panel involving four leading dental editors led a discussion on anticipated developments in publishing dental research with much involvement and contribution from audience members. This was the third such meeting held at the IADR for Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. A follow up session will take place in Cape Town on 25 June 2014 as part of the annual IADR meeting. The transcript of the meeting is reproduced in this article. Where possible speakers are identified by name. At the first time of mention their role/ position is also stated, thereafter only their name appears. We are grateful to Stephen Hancocks Ltd for their generous sponsorship of this event. For those who were not able to attend the authors hope this article gives a flavour of the discussions and will encourage colleagues to attend future events. Involvement is open to Editors, Associate Editors, Publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. It is a very open group and all those with an interest will be welcome to join in. PMID:24750223

Eaton, K A; Holland, G R; Giannobile, W V; Hancocks, S; Robinson, P G; Lynch, C D

2014-05-01

260

Programming the Navier-Stokes computer: An abstract machine model and a visual editor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Navier-Stokes computer is a parallel computer designed to solve Computational Fluid Dynamics problems. Each processor contains several floating point units which can be configured under program control to implement a vector pipeline with several inputs and outputs. Since the development of an effective compiler for this computer appears to be very difficult, machine level programming seems necessary and support tools for this process have been studied. These support tools are organized into a graphical program editor. A programming process is described by which appropriate computations may be efficiently implemented on the Navier-Stokes computer. The graphical editor would support this programming process, verifying various programmer choices for correctness and deducing values such as pipeline delays and network configurations. Step by step details are provided and demonstrated with two example programs.

Middleton, David; Crockett, Tom; Tomboulian, Sherry

1988-01-01

261

Writing a narrative biomedical review: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.  

PubMed

Review articles comprehensively covering a specific topic are crucial for successful research and academic projects. Most editors consider review articles for special and regular issues of journals. Writing a review requires deep knowledge and understanding of a field. The aim of this review is to analyze the main steps in writing a narrative biomedical review and to consider points that may increase the chances of success. We performed a comprehensive search through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science using the following keywords: review of the literature, narrative review, title, abstract, authorship, ethics, peer review, research methods, medical writing, scientific writing, and writing standards. Opinions expressed in the review are also based on personal experience as authors, peer reviewers, and editors. PMID:21800117

Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Blackmore, Heather; Kitas, George D

2011-11-01

262

Red`s natural editor: A program designed to edit FORTRAN programs  

SciTech Connect

This program allows the user to edit files using a completely natural method. You don`t need a lot of time to learn how to use this program; it`s as simple as using a typewriter. Even while you are reading this report you can start editing files. Although it is as simple as using a typewriter, this is a full screen editor, so that you can overwrite (replace) anything, delete or insert characters or lines, copy or move lines, find or change anything. All of this can be done without using any complicated combinations of key strokes (as you are forced to memorize with other editors). This program is written in standard FORTRAN. Although it was designed and implemented on an IBM-PC, it can be easily adapted for use on virtually any graphics terminal.

Cullen, D.E.

1993-09-01

263

Are the Editors faced with e-problems performing their duties and responsibilities satisfactorily?  

PubMed

Astonishing revolution in information technology, developments in electronic publishing and availability of manuscript management software's has provided lot of facilities to authors, reviewers as well as editors but it has also given birth to lot of e-problems. This communication highlights some of these e-problems besides discussing the manuscript management system practiced by Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences through modified Open Journal System. It also cautions the editors of small journals faced with financial and human resource constraints to keep themselves abreast of all these developments, go for automation in e publishing gradually as all the stake holders i.e. authors, reviewers and office management staff learns these and become used to it. PMID:24353696

Ali Jawaid, Shaukat; Jawaid, Masood

2013-09-01

264

An interview with Dan L. Longo, Section Editor of the Malignant hematological diseases section  

PubMed Central

Dan L. Longo is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in the division of hematology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Deputy Editor of the New England Journal of Medicine. He is a Master of the American College of Physicians and is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. He has been active in research on the treatment of malignant lymphoma including new treatments targeting CD30, CD40, HLA Class II molecules and immunoglobulin idiotype. His laboratory work has focused in part on the regulation of lymphocyte proliferation, NK cell effects on hematopoiesis, and tumor-induced immunosuppression. He is the Section Editor of the Malignant hematological diseases section for BMC Hematology. In this interview, he explains how he first became interested in hematology and gives his personal view on the recent progress and future challenges of the hematological cancer field in particular.

2013-01-01

265

CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) (software distributed on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (MS-CMSG/MCE) software edits medical record data to help identify coding errors, and inconsistencies between clinical data and coding. This release of the MS Grouper with MCE softwa...

2012-01-01

266

CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) (software distributed on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (MS-CMSG/MCE) software edits medical record data to help identify coding errors, and inconsistencies between clinical data and coding. This release of the MS Grouper with MCE softwa...

2011-01-01

267

CMS Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (CMSG/MCE) Version 24.0 (software distributed on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (formerly Health Care Financing Administration) Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (CMSG/MCE) software edits medical record data to help identify coding errors, and inconsistencies between clinical data and coding...

2006-01-01

268

Syntax-Directed Pretty Printing - A First Step Towards a Syntax-Directed Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A language-independent syntax-directed pretty printer has been implemented as the first step towards building a language-independent syntax-directed editor. The syntax-directed pretty printer works in two phases: the grammar processing phase and the program processing phase. In the grammar processing stage, a grammar which contains a context-free grammar and information for the parser and pretty printer is processed and all files

Lisa F. Rubin

1983-01-01

269

GenEd - An Editor with Generic Semantics for Formal Reasoning about Visual Notations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the object-oriented editor GenEd support- ing the design of specifications for visual notations. Prominent features of GenEd are (1) it is generic, i.e. domain-specific syntax and semantics are specified by users; (2) built-in parser for actual drawings, driven by formal specifications; (3) powerful reasoning capabili- ties about diagrams and their specification. GenEd's specification language is based on a

Volker Haarslev; Michael Wessel

1996-01-01

270

On being the Editor of the Medical Journal of Australia: Living dangerously  

PubMed Central

Editorial independence is crucial for the viability of a journal and editors have many masters – the public, the readers, the authors and the owners. Negotiating the resultant minefield requires a purposeful and independent stance. This is particularly so in instances of a relatively modern phenomenon: concerted attempts by clinical groups to influence, or even abort, publication of articles, which may threaten their practice. Moreover, modern social media facilitates this manipulation.

Van Der Weyden, Martin B.

2012-01-01

271

TAPAAL: Editor, Simulator and Verifier of Timed-Arc Petri Nets  

Microsoft Academic Search

TAPAAL is a new platform independent tool for modelling, simulation and verication of timed-arc Petri nets. TAPAAL provides a stand-alone editor and simulator, while the verication module translates timed-arc Petri net models into networks of timed automata and uses the UPPAAL engine for the automatic analysis. We report on the status of the rst release of TAPAAL (available at www.tapaal.net),

Joakim Byg; Kenneth Yrke Jørgensen; Jirí Srba

2009-01-01

272

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Modeling Neurodevelopment Outcomes and Ethylmercury Exposure from Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dear Editor, The neurotoxic effects of ethylmercury (EtHg) accidentally consumed in Iraq were sufficient to withdraw ethylmercury- containing fungicides as seed dressing. Despite that, not only did thimerosal continue to be used in pharmaceutical preparations but also toxicological interest in EtHg-derived substances diminished considerably and was never addressed with regard to the small quantities used as a vaccine preservative. Thimerosal-containing

Jose G. Dorea; Rejane C. Marques

273

Conflicts of interest in biomedical publications: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.  

PubMed

This article overviews evidence on common instances of conflict of interest (COI) in research publications from general and specialized fields of biomedicine. Financial COIs are viewed as the most powerful source of bias, which may even distort citation outcomes of sponsored publications. The urge to boost journal citation indicators by stakeholders of science communication is viewed as a new secondary interest, which may compromize the interaction between authors, peer reviewers and editors. Comprehensive policies on disclosure of financial and non-financial COIs in scholarly journals are presented as proxies of their indexing in evidence-based databases, and examples of successful medical journals are discussed in detail. Reports on clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and clinical practice guidelines may be unduly influenced by author-pharmaceutical industry relations, but these publications do not always contain explicit disclosures to allow the readers to judge the reliability of the published conclusions and practice-changing recommendations. The article emphasizes the importance of adhering to the guidance on COI from learned associations such as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). It also considers joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers and editors as a foundation for appropriately defining and disclosing potential COIs. PMID:24382859

Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Akazhanov, Nurbek A; Kitas, George D

2013-12-01

274

The Editors' Recollections on the Occasion of the 60th Anniversary of The American Journal of Human Genetics  

PubMed Central

Volume 1, Number 1 of The American Journal of Human Genetics was published in September 1949. The first paper was an 18-page preface to the journal by H. J. Muller, president of The American Society of Human Genetics, entitled “Progress and Prospects in Human Genetics.” Charles W. Cotterman served as the first editor, and since that time a dozen other human geneticists have shared that distinction. In recognition of the 60th anniversary of AJHG, recollections of five editors are recorded here.

2009-01-01

275

Digital data from the Questa-San Luis and Santa Fe East helicopter magnetic surveys in Santa Fe and Taos Counties, New Mexico, and Costilla County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats and survey procedures for aeromagnetic data collected during high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico in December, 2005. One survey covers the eastern edge of the San Luis basin, including the towns of Questa, New Mexico and San Luis, Colorado. A second survey covers the mountain front east of Santa Fe, New Mexico, including the town of Chimayo and portions of the Pueblos of Tesuque and Nambe. Several derivative products from these data are also presented as grids and images, including reduced-to-pole data and data continued to a reference surface. Images are presented in various formats and are intended to be used as input to geographic information systems, standard graphics software, or map plotting packages.

Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V. J. S.; Drenth, B. J.; Geophex Ltd.

2006-01-01

276

The potential effect of unchecked statistical assumptions: A fault in San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace v. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This Article explores the possible impact of several unchecked assumptions on the calculated risk of a radiation leak used by the San Luis Obispo court in evaluating the safety of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. Further, it demonstrates that these assumptions are quite restrictive and should be verified with empirical data before subsequent results are routinely accepted. This Article emphasizes the San Luis Obispo court's statistical assumptions and their effect on safety estimates. However, unchecked assumptions of risk analyses similarly arise in other areas such as environmental or occupational health and safety. Better information concerning the statistical accuracy and reliability of the risk and benefits of technology to society is also useful in the continuing debate concerning the social costs and benefits that has involved a number of distinguished legal scholars.

Gastwirth, J.L.

1989-01-01

277

Deep structure of the northern Rio Grande rift beneath the San Luis basin (Colorado) from a seismic reflection survey: implications for rift evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A seismic reflection survey by Chevron across the San Luis basin (northern Rio Grande rift) and San Juan volcanic field of southern Colorado is reprocessed with extended correlation to search for basement structure. The trace of the main bounding fault of the basin, a high-angle normal fault against the Sangre de Cristo Range, can be correlated to a wide zone of dipping reflection fabric and soles out at lower crustal depths (26-28 km). The deeper reflection fabric represent either broad extensional strain or pre-existing structure, such as a Laramide thrust system. The Sangre de Cristo bounding fault in San Luis basin does not sole out at mid-crustal depths but continues into the lower crust with a shallower dip. The basin architecture in the northern Rio Grande rift (San Luis basin) provides little if any evidence that the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault should flatten in a shallow listric fashion. This fault geometry is quite similar to the high-angle bounding fault in the Espanola basin but contrasts with less deeply-rooted faults in the Albuquerque basin in the central Rio Grande rift. Deeper soling out of the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault could be due to less extension in the northern Rio Grande rift and/or greater strength of the lithosphere compared to the central Rio Grande rift. Unequivocal Moho reflections beneath the San Luis basin cannot be identified, probably due to limited signal penetration or a gradational nature of the Moho. The majority of rift-related movement observed on the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault is post-Eocene. Either the western margin of the basin is marked by a tight monocline or a low-angle normal fault.

Tandon, Kush; Brown, Larry; Hearn, Thomas

1999-02-01

278

Geochemistry and petrology of spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico: Partial melting and mantle metasomatism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, are divided into two distinct groups according to their major element and trace element characteristics. Group Ia xenoliths are characterized by light rare earth element (LREE) depletion ((La\\/Lu)N=0.10-0.77 in clinopyroxene) and linear major and compatible trace element relationships. Group Ib xenoliths are characterized by FeO and Na2O enrichment

Yan Liang; Don Elthon

1990-01-01

279

Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

Knott, J. M.

1976-01-01

280

Scanning and transmission electron microscope of suspended lead-rich particles in the air of San Luis Potosi, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the city of San Luis Potosi exists an important metallurgical plant and is known that in the adjacent urban zone, there is a high concentration of lead in the air, it is also supposed that most of the particles with lead have an anthropogenic origin because these particles show morphological characteristics and chemical composition very different in comparison with common lead minerals. In this work it was proved that most of the airborne particles with lead present in this urban zone, effectively came from the copper smelter. The airborne particles with lead were compared with particles with lead obtained starting from samples of slag and lead calcine of the copper smelter. To perform the comparative study, these particles were studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) in conjunction with scanning electron microscope to obtain chemical composition and associated morphological characteristics. Results suggest that these particles, composed of only one phase, are chemically distinct from any crustal lead mineral. Because of the complexity of the chemical composition of these particles (Pb, S, Cu, As, Fe, Zn, Cd, Sb, O), some of the airborne particles were analyzed by transmission microscopy in order to associate crystalline structure with any particular chemical phase.

Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Jacinto, P. Santiago; Fernández, M. Monroy

281

Petrology, geochemistry and mineralization of the Las Águilas and Virorco mafic-ultramafic bodies, San Luis Province, Argentina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The layered mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Sierras de San Luis, Argentina (Las Águilas, Las Higueras and Virorco), constitute a 3-5-km-wide belt that extends over 100 km from NE to SW. They carry a sulphide mineralization consisting of pyrrhotite, pentlandite and chalcopyrite, in veins and as disseminated to massive ore. Disseminated spinels are frequently associated with the sulphide minerals as well as platinum group minerals. A strong correlation between S, Ni, Co, Cu, Cr, Pt and Pd indicates the presence of one to three levels of mineralization within the ultramafic units. The maximum concentration of these elements coincides with the units containing platinum group minerals (PGM) and spinel group minerals. This clear relationship constitutes a good prospecting guide in the search for layers with high-grade ore, probably associated with deeper stratigraphic levels where ultramafic rocks are dominant. The bulk rock chemistry and concentrations of metals and platinum group elements as well as textural evidence suggest that the parental magma was mafic with tholeiitic affinities and MgO rich. The Las Águilas layered mafic-ultramafic body and the remaining bodies in the area bear similar characteristics to well-known stratified complexes developed in extensional tectonic regimes, as it is the case of Jinchuan (China), Kabanga (Tanzania) and Fiambala (Argentina).

Ferracutti, Gabriela; Bjerg, Ernesto; Mogessie, Aberra

2013-04-01

282

Detection of residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.  

PubMed

Organochlorine pesticides were intensively used in Mexico from 1950 until their ban and restriction in 1991. However, the presence of these compounds is commonly reported in many regions of the country. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region, San Luis Potosi state, which has been identified as possibly polluted by pesticides. Composed samples from 24 zones covering an area of approximately 5,440 ha were analyzed. The most frequently found pesticides were p,p´-DDT followed by ,p,p´-DDE, heptachlor, endosulfan and ?-HCH whose frequency rates were 100, 91, 83 and 54%, respectively. The concentration of p,p´-DDT in the crops grown in these soils was in the following order: chili > maize > tomato > alfalfa. The results obtained in this study show that p,p´-DDT values are lower or similar to those found in other agricultural regions of Mexico. Methyl and ethyl parathion were the most frequent organophosphate pesticide detected in 100% and 62.5% of the samples with average concentrations of 25.20 and 47.48 ?g kg(-1), respectively. More research is needed to establish the background levels of pesticides in agricultural soils and their potential ecological and human health effects in this region. PMID:24813984

Velasco, Antonio; Hernández, Sergio; Ramírez, Martha; Ortíz, Irmene

2014-07-01

283

News from the editors of Fluids and Barriers of the CNS  

PubMed Central

This editorial announces a new affiliation between Fluids and Barriers of the CNS (FBCNS) and the International Brain Barriers Society (IBBS) with mutual benefits to the journal and to society members. This is a natural progression from the appointment of two new Co-Editors in Chief: Professor Lester Drewes and Professor Richard Keep in 2013. FBCNS provides a unique and specialist platform for the publication of research in the expanding fields of brain barriers and brain fluid systems in both health and disease.

2014-01-01

284

Louise Eisenhardt, M.D.: first editor of the Journal of Neurosurgery (1944-1965).  

PubMed

This is a literary portrait of Louise Eisenhardt, M.D., associate of Harvey Cushing, scholar, investigator, editor, teacher, and curator of the Brain Tumor Registry at Yale. She was a Charter Member of the Harvey Cushing Society which she served as President, long-term Secretary-Treasurer, and Historian. She achieved many "firsts" for women in medicine. A figure in the Homeric tradition of observing accurately and reporting honestly, Dr. Eisenhardt set high standards for both colleagues and students as well as for aspiring medical authors. She left a tradition worthy of emulation. PMID:8283278

Davey, L M

1994-02-01

285

Letters to the editor of the local paper: A scientific responsibility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our local papers often contain, from the point of view of the scientist, strange letters to the editor. As part of our duty to fellow citizens, we need to take the opportunity the bad science in the letters proffers to try to explain the scientific view to readers. In many cases, the letter writers minds are already made up; however, other readers whose heads may nod in agreement to the original letter may become more informed and change their ideas in response. I will describe some of my experiences in trying to meet this responsibility.

Aubrecht, Gordon

2011-04-01

286

Editor's note  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, was founded in 1957 by Niels Bohr and Torsten Gustafsson at Blegdamsvej in Copenhagen, joint to Bohr's legendary Institute. Today, memories of Bohr and his famous visitors -- Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Lev Landau and many others -- strongly contribute to Nordita's genius loci and inspire next generations of her visitors. Nordita awards ``Nordic Project'' grants to individual Nordic physicists to help conduct a world-class research in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Island, Norway, and Sweden). Research reported here was generously supported by the Nordic Project "Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Black Hole and Neutron Star sources" awarded in 2005 to Marek Abramowicz. The Project supported the ``Nordita Workdays on QPO" (March 25 -- April 1, 2005) organized by Marek Abramowicz, Axel Brandenburg and Juri Poutanen with help of Hanne Bergen, Helle http://www.nordita.dk/positions/norproject.html

2005-11-01

287

Editors' Introduction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article outlines problems associated with large mental hospitals, describes how knowledge gained from these problems can be used to create alternative treatment programs, and introduces the papers in this special issue on community-based treatment programs for individuals with developmental disabilities. (JDD)

Lovaas, O. Ivar, Ed.; Buch, Greg, Ed.

1992-01-01

288

Section Editors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1. Data Acquisition, Trigger and Controls Niko NeufeldCERNniko.neufeld@cern.ch Tassos BeliasDemokritosbelias@inp.demokritos.gr Andrew NormanFNALanorman@fnal.gov Vivian O'DellFNALodell@fnal.gov 2. Event Processing, Simulation and Analysis Rolf SeusterTRIUMFseuster@cern.ch Florian UhligGSIf.uhlig@gsi.de Lorenzo MonetaCERNLorenzo.Moneta@cern.ch Pete ElmerPrincetonpeter.elmer@cern.ch 3. Distributed Processing and Data Handling Nurcan OzturkU Texas Arlingtonnurcan@uta.edu Stefan RoiserCERNstefan.roiser@cern.ch Robert IllingworthFNAL Davide SalomoniINFN CNAFDavide.Salomoni@cnaf.infn.it Jeff TemplonNikheftemplon@nikhef.nl 4. Data Stores, Data Bases, and Storage Systems David LangeLLNLlange6@llnl.gov Wahid BhimjiU Edinburghwbhimji@staffmail.ed.ac.uk Dario BarberisGenovaDario.Barberis@cern.ch Patrick FuhrmannDESYpatrick.fuhrmann@desy.de Igor MandrichenkoFNALivm@fnal.gov Mark van de SandenSURF SARA sanden@sara.nl 5. Software Engineering, Parallelism & Multi-Core Solveig AlbrandLPSC/IN2P3solveig.albrand@lpsc.in2p3.fr Francesco GiacominiINFN CNAFfrancesco.giacomini@cnaf.infn.it Liz SextonFNALsexton@fnal.gov Benedikt HegnerCERNbenedikt.hegner@cern.ch Simon PattonLBNLSJPatton@lbl.gov Jim KowalkowskiFNAL jbk@fnal.gov 6. Facilities, Infrastructures, Networking and Collaborative Tools Maria GironeCERNMaria.Girone@cern.ch Ian CollierSTFC RALian.collier@stfc.ac.uk Burt HolzmanFNALburt@fnal.gov Brian Bockelman U Nebraskabbockelm@cse.unl.edu Alessandro de SalvoRoma 1Alessandro.DeSalvo@ROMA1.INFN.IT Helge MeinhardCERN Helge.Meinhard@cern.ch Ray PasetesFNAL rayp@fnal.gov Steven GoldfarbU Michigan Steven.Goldfarb@cern.ch

Groep, D. L.; Bonacorsi, D.

2014-06-01

289

Editors' Introduction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Articles in this special issue explore the place of special education in the context of liberal democracy, describing why special education was created, what it was intended to do, and where it is headed. (SLD)

Cottle, Thomas J.; Fain, Gerald S.

1998-01-01

290

Editor's message  

Microsoft Academic Search

We had 14 submissions for this issue and accepted 2. We are still much below the acceptance rate that we would like to achieve, even when averaging on two or three issues. I can observe a significant increase in the quality and innovation of the papers submitted though. However, because of the very short turn-around (there is generally less than

Christophe Diot

2006-01-01

291

Editor's message  

Microsoft Academic Search

This April 2006 issue is thin. We hope the quality will satisfy you though. Maybe because of the SIGCOMM deadline or the season holidays or both, we only received around 10 submissions and one article was selected for publication. This acceptance rate is much lower than what we would like to see for CCR, and I take this as a

Christophe Diot

2006-01-01

292

Editors' introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The papers suggest that limiting global emissions of greenhouse gases to current levels over the next 20 to 40 years would be a very challenging target. Energy efficiency improvement is the most cost-effective means of limiting greenhouse gas emissions over this period. However, the sectoral papers suggest that the growth in demand for energy services is likely to overwhelm the

Adam Rose

1996-01-01

293

Editors' note  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This topical issue of Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes is a collection of reference articles covering the GREGOR solar telescope, its science capabilities, its subsystems, and its dedicated suite of instruments for high-resolution observations of the Sun. Because ground-based telescopes have life spans of several decades, it is only natural that they continuously reinvent themselves. Literally, the GREGOR telescope builds on the foundations of the venerable Gregory-Coudé Telescope (GCT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. Acknowledging the fact that new discoveries in observational solar physics are driven by larger apertures to collect more photons and to scrutinize the Sun in finer detail, the GCT was decommissioned and the building was made available to the GREGOR project.

Denker, Carsten; Feller, Alex; Schmidt, Wolfgang; von der Lühe, Oskar

2012-11-01

294

Characteristics of highly successful orthopedic surgeons: a survey of orthopedic chairs and editors  

PubMed Central

Background Highly successful orthopedic surgeons are a small group of individuals who exert a large influence on the orthopedic field. However, the characteristics of these leaders have not been well-described or studied. Methods Orthopedic surgeons who are departmental chairs, journal editors, editorial board members of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British edition), or current or past presidents of major orthopedic associations were invited to complete a survey designed to provide insight into their motivations, academic backgrounds and accomplishments, emotional and physical health, and job satisfaction. Results In all, 152 surgeons completed the questionnaire. We identified several characteristics of highly successful surgeons. Many have contributed prolific numbers of publications and book chapters and obtained considerable funding for research. They were often motivated by a “desire for personal development (interesting challenge, new opportunities),” whereas “relocating to a new institution, financial gain, or lack of alternative candidates” played little to no role in their decisions to take positions of leadership. Most respondents were happy with their specialty choice despite long hours and high levels of stress. Despite challenges to their time, successful orthopedic surgeons made a strong effort to maintain their health; compared with other physicians, they exercise more, are more likely to have a primary care physician and feel better physically. Conclusion Departmental chairs, journal editors and presidents of orthopedic associations cope with considerable demands of clinical, administrative, educational and research duties while maintaining a high level of health, happiness and job satisfaction.

Klein, Guy; Hussain, Nasir; Sprague, Sheila; Mehlman, Charles T.; Dogbey, Godwin; Bhandari, Mohit

2013-01-01

295

Boulder ALignment Editor (ALE): a web-based RNA alignment tool  

PubMed Central

Summary: The explosion of interest in non-coding RNAs, together with improvements in RNA X-ray crystallography, has led to a rapid increase in RNA structures at atomic resolution from 847 in 2005 to 1900 in 2010. The success of whole-genome sequencing has led to an explosive growth of unaligned homologous sequences. Consequently, there is a compelling and urgent need for user-friendly tools for producing structure-informed RNA alignments. Most alignment software considers the primary sequence alone; some specialized alignment software can also include Watson–Crick base pairs, but none adequately addresses the needs introduced by the rapid influx of both sequence and structural data. Therefore, we have developed the Boulder ALignment Editor (ALE), which is a web-based RNA alignment editor, designed for editing and assessing alignments using structural information. Some features of BoulderALE include the annotation and evaluation of an alignment based on isostericity of Watson–Crick and non-Watson–Crick base pairs, along with the collapsing (horizontally and vertically) of the alignment, while maintaining the ability to edit the alignment. Availability: http://www.microbio.me/boulderale. Contact: jesse.stombaugh@colorado.edu

Stombaugh, Jesse; Widmann, Jeremy; McDonald, Daniel; Knight, Rob

2011-01-01

296

Sr Isotopes and Migration of Prairie Mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) from Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asserting mobility of ancient humans is a major issue for anthropologists. For more than 25 years, Sr isotopes have been used as a resourceful tracer tool in this context. A comparison of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios found in tooth enamel and in bone is performed to determine if the human skeletal remains belonged to a local or a migrant. Sr in bone approximately reflects the isotopic composition of the geological region where the person lived before death; whereas the Sr isotopic system in tooth enamel is thought to remain as a closed system and thus conserves the isotope ratio acquired during childhood. Sr isotope ratios are obtained through the geologic substrate and its overlying soil, from where an individual got hold of food and water; these ratios are in turn incorporated into the dentition and skeleton during tissue formation. In previous studies from Teotihuacan, Mexico we have shown that a three-step leaching procedure on tooth enamel samples is important to assure that only the biogenic Sr isotope contribution is analyzed. The same Sr isotopic tools can function concerning ancient animal migration patterns. To determine or to discard the mobility of prairie mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) found at Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, México the leaching procedure was applied on six molar samples from several fossil remains. The initial hypothesis was to use 87Sr/86Sr values to verify if the mammoth population was a mixture of individuals from various herds and further by comparing their Sr isotopic composition with that of plants and soils, to confirm their geographic origin. The dissimilar Sr results point to two distinct mammoth groups. The mammoth population from Laguna de Cruces was then not a family unit because it was composed by individuals originated from different localities. Only one individual was identified as local. Others could have walked as much as 100 km to find food and water sources.

Solis-Pichardo, G.; Perez-Crespo, V.; Schaaf, P. E.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.

2011-12-01

297

Luis Llorens Torres and the impossible return: identity, conflict and hope in the national poem of Puerto Rico.  

PubMed

The psychodynamic exploration of the content of literary works and of the personal lives of their authors oftentimes reveals how they can be mutually reflective of the other. Such is the case of the poem, "Valle de Collores" (The Valley of Collares), considered by many to be the national poem of Puerto Rico and of the author Luis Llorens Torres (1876-1944), regarded as the "Poet Laureate of Puerto Rico." The timelessness and wide appeal of certain literary works has been attributed, among other reasons, to the fact that they address universal inner conflicts that affect all human beings. The poem "Valle de Collores" is the narrative of a country boy who leaves home to face the larger world and, as he reaches adulthood, he looks back and expresses his impossible longing to return to the rural home of his childhood. It is a description of the universal struggles of human development and of separation-indi-viduation, loss and mourning and a longing to return, and a wish to merge with the early parental objects of childhood. The poem also parallels the history of the Puerto Rican people, in their transition from a rural society under Spanish rule to an industrialized society as an American Commonwealth. This difficult transition resulted in a massive immigration of Puerto Ricans to the United States that continues to this day. The poem also represents the longing of many Puerto Rican immigrants to return to their island home, and to a simpler time of more fundamental values. The land that is left behind and longed for becomes a metaphor for the early maternal imago. PMID:16570531

Rothe, Eugenio M

2005-12-01

298

Luis Llorens Torres and the impossible return: identity, conflict and hope in the national poem of Puerto Rico.  

PubMed

The psychodynamic exploration of the content of literary words and of the personal lives of their authors oftentimes reveals how they can be mutually reflective of the other. Such is the case of the poem, "Valle de Collores" (The Valley of Collores), considered by many to be the national poem of Puerto Rico and of the author Luis Llorens Torres (1876-1944), regarded as the "Poet Laureate of Puerto Rico." The timelessness and wide appeal of certain literary works has been attributed, among other reasons, to the fact that they address universal inner conflicts that affect all human beings. The poem "Valle de Collores" is the narrative of a country boy who leaves home to face the larger world and, as he reaches adulthood, he looks back and expresses his impossible longing to return to the rural home of his childhood. It is a description of the universal struggles of human development and of separation-individuation, loss and mourning and a longing to return, and a wish to merge with the early parental objects of childhood. The poem also parallels the history of the Puerto Rican people, in their transition from a rural society under Spanish rule to an industrialized society as an American Commonwealth. This difficult transition resulted in a massive immigration of Puerto Ricans to the United States that continues to this day. The poem also represents the longing of many Puerto Rican immigrants to return to their island home, and to a simpler time of more fundamental values. The land that is left behind and longed for becomes a metaphor for the early maternal imago. PMID:16193548

Rothe, Eugenio M

2005-01-01

299

[Geographic distribution of birds in the Sierra Madre Oriental of San Luis Potosi, Mexico: a regional analysis of conservation status].  

PubMed

The Sierra Madre Oriental region in the mexican state of San Luis Potosi is a relevant place for bird conservation at a country level. Therefore the main goal of this study was to analyze the geographic patterns of distribution and the conservation current state of the birds, to support the needs to expand the conservation areas in the future. Data was collected from various databases of zoological museums and collections, and field sampling methods conducted from January 2009 to May 2011. Potential distributions were modeled for 284 species using GARP software and then a map was developed to determine areas with favorable environmental characteristics for the distribution of species richness. Finally, the importance of conservation areas for the potential distribution of birds in the region was evaluated. A total of 359 species were recorded of which 71.4% are permanent residents, 19% are winter migrants and 4% are summer residents. From this total, 41 species were endemic, 47 were species at risk and 149 were neotropical migrants. The largest species richness correspond to oak forests, cloud forests, and tropical moist forests located at altitudes from 100m to 1 500m. Their potential distribution was concentrated towards the center and Southeast of the study area. Only 10% of areas with a high potential conservation was included in areas of priority for bird conservation (AICA) and just 3% of all potential areas were under some governmental category of protection. However, no conservation area has a management plan currently applied and monitored. The information generated is important for the development of management proposals for birds conservation in the region. PMID:23885599

Sahagún Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Navarro, Jaime Castro; Reyes Hernández, Humberto

2013-06-01

300

San Luis Valley recombinant chromosome 8 and tetralogy of Fallot: a review of chromosome 8 anomalies and congenital heart disease.  

PubMed

Tetralogy of Fallot, the most common cyanotic heart defect, has not been closely associated with a specific chromosome defect. The San Luis Valley Recombinant Chromosome 8 [SLV Rec(8)] syndrome is strongly associated with congenital heart disease, particularly tetralogy of Fallot. This article reviews SLV Rec(8) syndrome and other chromosome 8 aberrations to suggest locations for cardiogenic genes. SLV Rec(8) [rec(8),dup q,inv(8)(p23q22)] syndrome has been found in Hispanic families in the southwestern United States. Congenital heart disease is found in 93.3% of SLV Rec(8) individuals (n = 45), with tetralogy of Fallot constituting 40.5% of all lesions and conotruncal defects, 55.6%. These frequencies exceed the incidence of tetralogy of Fallot (10%) and conotruncal defects (20%) among all children with heart defects (P less than 0.003 for both). Review of patients with deletion 8p (n = 13) showed heart defects in 84.6% with 27.3% being conotruncal defects. Among duplication 8q patients (n = 20), 45% had heart defects with conotruncal defects constituting 44%. Neither group differed significantly from expected in its incidence of conotruncal defects. Among patients with mosaic trisomy 8 (n = 47), 12 had heart abnormalities including one conotruncal defect. Among 3 patients with other rec(8) chromosomes, one had a ventricular septal defect. The cause of heart defects in SLV Rec(8) cannot be assigned to either the deletion of 8p or the duplication of 8q. The lack of an association between other chromosome 8 abnormalities and tetralogy of Fallot suggests that genes at the SLV Rec(8) breakpoints or an interaction between genes on both arms of chromosome 8 are important. PMID:1746613

Gelb, B D; Towbin, J A; McCabe, E R; Sujansky, E

1991-09-15

301

How to build a scientific publishing career based on hundreds of letters-to-the-editor: "The Art of Loss".  

PubMed

Letters-to-the-editor represent an important characteristic of scientific interchange especially because the initial peer-review may not fulfill the qualitative control of a manuscript. On the other hand, it is well known that such publications are accepted easier than regular ones and may be a gateway for authors without outstanding scientific merits to input their names in high impact factor journals. A letter-to-the-editor (intended as a commentary to one of our works) allowed us to discover a very peculiar and unexpected fact for the medical literature, worthy to be shared with the worldwide scientific community. PMID:21707416

Neghina, Raul; Neghina, Adriana M

2011-01-01

302

Modelización de escenarios de cambio potencial en la vegetación y el uso de suelo en la Sierra Madre Oriental de San Luis Potosí, México  

Microsoft Academic Search

ResumenResumen Se realizó la modelación de la dinámica de cambio en el uso de suelo y la vegetación en la región de la Sierra Madre Oriental del estado de San Luis Potosí, considerado un sitio de importancia para la conservación en México por su alta biodiversidad. Para determinar la variación espacial se analizaron imágenes de satélite en un período de

Francisco Javier Sahagún-Sánchez; José Luis Flores Flores; Leonardo Chapa Vargas; Humberto Reyes-Hernández

2011-01-01

303

Modelización de escenarios de cambio potencial en la vegetación y el uso de suelo en la Sierra Madre Oriental de San Luis Potosí, México  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resumen:Se realizó la modelación de la dinámica de cambio en el uso de suelo y la vegetación en la región de la Sierra Madre Oriental del estado de San Luis Potosí, considerado un sitio de importancia para la conservación en México por su alta biodiversidad. Para determinar la variación espacial se analizaron imágenes de satélite en un período de 16

Francisco Javier Sahagún-Sánchez; José Luis Flores Flores; Leonardo Chapa Vargas; Humberto Reyes-Hernández

2011-01-01

304

Medicare Code Editor (MCE) for Hospital Billing (on magnetic tape) (software distributed on magnetic tape or cartridge).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) software detects and reports errors in the coding of Medicare claims data. While the program identifies and indicates the nature of the error, it does not correct the error. A particular error condition is associated with ea...

2012-01-01

305

Serials Management in the Electronic Era: Papers in Honor of Peter Gellatly, Founding Editor of "The Serials Librarian."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book assesses progress and technical changes in the field of serials management and anticipates future directions and challenges for librarians. The book consists of 18 chapters: (1) "Introduction" (Jim Cole and James W. Williams); (2) "Peter Gellatly--Editor with a Deft Touch" (Ruth C. Carter); (3) "The "Deseret News" Web Edition" (Stewart…

Cole, Jim, Ed.; Williams, James W., Ed.

306

Communicating Styles Rules to Editors of International Standards: An Analysis of ISO TC 184/SC4 Style Documents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Looks at a sample of instructional documents using Restricted and Elaborated Code and metadiscourse analysis to determine how easily users can read and understand the material. Suggests that the documents do not send a clear message to authors and editors and can be stylistically hard to understand and consequently, the approved standards…

Warren, Thomas L.

2001-01-01

307

Integrated Outpatient Code Editor ICD-10 Pilot (Ver. 14.3). (Data Files on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Integrated Outpatient Code Editor (IOCE) Pilot software contains ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes effective 10/1/2006 to present, and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes published December 2011. This software is intended to give users the opportunity to edit outpatien...

2013-01-01

308

MS Grouper with Medicare Code Editor ICD-10 Pilot Software (Distributed on CD-ROM) (Version 28.0).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medicare Severity Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (MSG/MCE) software edits medical record data to help identify coding errors and inconsistencies between clinical data and coding.This software: (1) assigns the medical record to a Major Diagnostic Ca...

2010-01-01

309

Integrated Outpatient Code Editor (IOCE) Pilot Software ICD-10 for z/OS Batch (Version 15.0).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Integrated Outpatient Code Editor (IOCE) Pilot software contains ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes effective 4/1/2007 through 9/30/2014 and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes published from December 2011 through July 2013 with an effective date of 10/1/2014. This soft...

2014-01-01

310

MS Grouper with Medicare Code Editor ICD-10 Pilot Software (Distributed on CD-ROM) (Version 28.0) Documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the documentation for the Medicare Severity (MS) Grouper with Medicare Code Editor (MCE) ICD-10 pilot software which contains ICD-9-CM codes effective 10/01/2010 and ICD-10 codes published in December 2010. The software is intended to give users t...

2011-01-01

311

MARSYAS3D: A PROTOTYPE AUDIO BROWSER-EDITOR USING A LARGE SCALE IMMERSIVE VISUAL AND AUDIO DISPLAY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most audio editing tools offer limited capabilities for browsing and editing large collections of files. Moreover working with many audio files tends to clutter the limited screen space of a desktop monitor. In this paper we describe MARSYAS3D, a prototype au- dio browser and editor for large audio collections. A variety of 2D and 3D graphics interfaces for working with

George Tzanetakis; Perry Cook

2001-01-01

312

Grammar, Punctuation, and Capitalization: a Handbook for Technical Writers and Editors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Writing problems are addressed which are often encountered in technical documents and preferences are indicated (Langley's) when authorities do not agree. It is directed toward professional writers, editors, and proofreaders. Those whose profession lies in other areas (for example, research or management), but who have occasion to write or review others' writing will also find this information useful. A functional attitude toward grammar and punctuation is presented. Chapter 1 on grammar presents grammatical problems related to each part of speech. Chapter 2 on sentence structure concerns syntax, that is, effective arrangement of words, with emphasis on methods of revision to improve writing effectiveness. Chapter 3 addresses punctuation marks, presenting their function, situations when they are required or incorrect, and situations when they are appropriate but optional. Chapter 4 presents capitalization, which is mostly a matter of editorial style and preference rather than a matter of generally accepted rules. An index and glossary are included.

Mccaskill, Mary K.

1990-01-01

313

The CROWN Initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women's health  

PubMed Central

Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a "core outcomes set" - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women's health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN's health) Initiative.

2014-01-01

314

Letter to the editor: Current progress in patient-specific modeling by Neal and Kerckhoffs (2010).  

PubMed

A recent review article on 'Current progress in patient-specific modeling' in Briefings in Bioinformatics contains the statement summarizing the results of our previous study 'On the unimportance of constitutive models in computing brain deformation for image-guided surgery' published in Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology as confirmation of adequacy of linear elastic model for such computation. The purpose of this Letter to the Editor is to clarify this statement by informing the Readers of Briefings in Bioinformatics that our study indicates the following: (i) a simple linear elastic constitutive model for the brain tissue is sufficient when used with an appropriate finite deformation solution (i.e. geometrically non-linear analysis); and (ii) Linear analysis approach that assumes infinitesimally small brain deformations leads to unrealistic results. PMID:21798956

Wittek, Adam; Miller, Karol

2011-09-01

315

ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

Oakes, W. R., Jr.

1984-01-01

316

The CROWN initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women's health  

PubMed Central

Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a "core outcomes set" - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women's health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN's health) Initiative.

2014-01-01

317

EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even more so than physics itself. The journal is successfully positioned at the crucial interface between fundamental research and technological R&D. Continuing in this position—that changes all the time—will require special attention to the evolving trends and to the novelties that continuously appear in our domain. At the same time, we should not dilute the 'physics' character that is the trademark of JPD. The second challenge is the impact of bibliometrics and ranking. This is again a rapidly evolving factor; it practically did not exist when I first joined the Editorial Board. The journal must reach equilibrium between scientific leadership and careful management of bibliometrics. On one hand, we must continue to improve its good position in the rankings. However, this objective must be reconciled with the duty to respond to new developments that, by their very nature, have limited bibliometric impact. In meeting this challenge, we can count on two very effective instruments that make our journal quite unique: topical reviews and special issues. Maintaining and expanding these programs is for me a top priority. I would like to thank in advance all the authors that will select our journal for the dissemination of their results. I am committed to providing for them an effective and open medium. Most likely, 'applied physics' will not be at the end of my mandate what it is now. However, the journal must continue to mirror not the past but the present and, hopefully, the future. Authors in new domains of applied physics, who may wonder if their research fits the journal scope, are particularly welcome; we will always respond to the evolution of our attractive, dynamic, wonderful discipline.

Margaritondo, Giorgio

2011-04-01

318

A multi-dimensional analysis of the upper Rio Grande-San Luis Valley social-ecological system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Upper Rio Grande (URG), located in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado, is the primary contributor to streamflow to the Rio Grande Basin, upstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos at Presidio, TX. The URG-SLV includes a complex irrigation-dependent agricultural social-ecological system (SES), which began development in 1852, and today generates more than 30% of the SLV revenue. The diversions of Rio Grande water for irrigation in the SLV have had a disproportionate impact on the downstream portion of the river. These diversions caused the flow to cease at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico in the late 1880s, creating international conflict. Similarly, low flows in New Mexico and Texas led to interstate conflict. Understanding changes in the URG-SLV that led to this event and the interactions among various drivers of change in the URG-SLV is a difficult task. One reason is that complex social-ecological systems are adaptive, contain feedbacks, emergent properties, cross-scale linkages, large-scale dynamics and non-linearities. Further, most analyses of SES to date have been qualitative, utilizing conceptual models to understand driver interactions. This study utilizes both qualitative and quantitative techniques to develop an innovative approach for analyzing driver interactions in the URG-SLV. Five drivers were identified for the URG-SLV social-ecological system: water (streamflow), water rights, climate, agriculture, and internal and external water policy. The drivers contained several longitudes (data aspect) relevant to the system, except water policy, for which only discreet events were present. Change point and statistical analyses were applied to the longitudes to identify quantifiable changes, to allow detection of cross-scale linkages between drivers, and presence of feedback cycles. Agricultural was identified as the driver signal. Change points for agricultural expansion defined four distinct periods: 1852--1923, 1924--1948, 1949--1978 and 1979--2007. Changes in streamflow, water allocations and water policy were observed in all agriculture periods. Cross-scale linkages were also evident between climate and streamflow; policy and water rights; and agriculture, groundwater pumping and streamflow.

Mix, Ken

319

Phytoremediation management of selenium-laden drainage sediments in the San Luis Drain: a greenhouse feasibility study.  

PubMed

An estimated 100,000m(3) selenium (Se)-laden drainage sediment resides in the San Luis Drain (SLD) of Central California. This greenhouse study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of growing salt- and boron-tolerant plant species in sediment for reduction of Se content by plant extraction. Drainage sediment was collected from the SLD and mixed with control soil (i.e., uncontaminated soil) to the following ratios (sediment:control soil) by volume: 0:3 (i.e., control soil only), 1:2 (i.e., 1/3 sediment and 2/3 control soil), 2:1 (i.e., 2/3 sediment and 1/3 control soil), and 3:0 (i.e., sediment only). Salt-tolerant plant species consisted of canola (Brassica napus var. Hyola 420), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea var. Au Triumph), salado grass (Sporobulus airoides), and cordgrass (Spartina patens var. Flageo). Increased ratios of sediment:soil resulted in decreased dry matter production for all tested plant species; especially at ratios of sediment:soil greater than 1:2. Plant Se concentrations (mgkg(-1) DM) ranged as follows for plant species at all ratios of sediment:soil: canola (51-72), tall fescue (16-36), and cordgrass and salado grass (9-14). Total Se concentrations in the soil were at least 20% lower at postharvest compared to preplant concentrations for all plant species at each ratio of sediment:soil. In contrast, water-extractable Se concentrations in the soil were at least three times higher at postharvest than at preplant for all plant species, irrespective of the ratio of sediment:soil. Leaching of Se occurred in irrigated bare pots from each respective ratio of sediment:soil over a duration of 60 days. Based upon the downward movement of Se in bare pots of sediment:soil, it may be more prudent to leave the drainage sediment in the SLD, incorporate clean soil, and then grow low maintenance salt-tolerant plants (e.g., cordgrass, salado grass) in the concrete-lined canal. By this means, possible contamination of groundwater with soluble Se will be eliminated, while phytoremediation slowly reduces Se content in the drainage sediment. PMID:16216624

Bañuelos, G S; Lin, Z-Q

2005-11-01

320

Analysis of the potential impacts on surface water quality resulting from the proposed use of the San Luis Drain to transport agricultural drainage through the northern Grasslands  

SciTech Connect

An Environmental Assessment and initial Study for the interim use of a portion of the San Luis Drain for conveyance water through the Grassland Water District and adjacent Grassland areas was conducted. The project proposes the use of 18 miles of the San Luis Drain for the conveyance of agricultural drainage water for a period of five years and the elimination of agricultural drainage discharges from 76 miles of existing channels in and adjacent to the Grassland Water District. A report was prepared to (a) quantify the potential project effects on surface water quality within Salt and Mud Sloughs and the San Joaquin River using currently available data, and (b) to improve the understanding of existing water supply and drainage operations within the Grassland area. After submission of the original report it was brought to the attention of one of the coauthors that the database on selenium and boron concentrations in drainage water did not include the water quality data collected by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (CRWQCB). In addition, the US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) requested further examination of Grasslands hydrology to estimate the quantity of supplemental water that would be needed to restore the San Joaquin River to the same TDS and trace element concentrations prior to implementation of the project. This report addresses these issues.

Quinn, N.W.T.

1992-05-01

321

Episodic Late Holocene dune movements on the sand-sheet area, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Colorado, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GSDNPP) in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, contains a variety of eolian landforms that reflect Holocene drought variability. The most spectacular is a dune mass banked against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, which is fronted by an extensive sand sheet with stabilized parabolic dunes. Stratigraphic exposures of parabolic dunes and associated luminescence dating of quartz grains by single-aliquot regeneration (SAR) protocols indicate eolian deposition of unknown magnitude occurred ca. 1290-940, 715 ± 80, 320 ± 30, and 200-120 yr ago and in the 20th century. There are 11 drought intervals inferred from the tree-ring record in the past 1300 yr at GSDNPP potentially associated with dune movement, though only five eolian depositional events are currently recognized in the stratigraphic record. There is evidence for eolian transport associated with dune movement in the 13th century, which may coincide with the "Great Drought", a 26-yr-long dry interval identified in the tree ring record, and associated with migration of Anasazi people from the Four Corners areas to wetter areas in southern New Mexico. This nascent chronology indicates that the transport of eolian sand across San Luis Valley was episodic in the late Holocene with appreciable dune migration in the 8th, 10-13th, and 19th centuries, which ultimately nourished the dune mass against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

Forman, S. L.; Spaeth, M.; Marín, L.; Pierson, J.; Gómez, J.; Bunch, F.; Valdez, A.

2006-07-01

322

InSAR data produce specific storage estimates for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies in order to sustain water levels in the confined aquifer system. The water level from 1970 - 2000 remains a key, but poorly known, component for characterization. Some relevant data, such as water levels measured in wells, were collected during this period and incorporated into a groundwater flow model. However, data with finer spatial and temporal resolution would be very valuable in understanding the behavior and therefore the management of the system. Spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide maps of the deformation of the Earth’s surface at a spatial resolution of 50 m; these data are acquired approximately once per month. The deformation measured by InSAR can be related to water levels in the confined aquifer system. However, changes in cm-scale crop structure in agricultural areas lead to signal decorrelation over long periods of time, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply the recently developed small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected by the European Space Agency’s ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV for the years 1992-2001. The SBAS measurements show high levels of InSAR correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. By using SBAS analysis, we are able to estimate the magnitude of the seasonal deformation and compare it with hydraulic head measurements in nearby wells. We directly compare, at three well locations, specific storage parameters estimated from InSAR data to those estimated using traditional pump test techniques. The InSAR and pump test estimated parameters are: 3.4 x10-5 ft-1 vs. 1.7 x 10-5 ft-1, 2.2 x 10-6 ft-1 vs. 2.2 x 10-6 ft-1, and 5.3 x 10-6 ft-1 vs. 4.7 x 10-6 ft-1, at wells denoted ALA 6, ALA 13, and CON 2, respectively. Thus the well and radar data estimates agree within a worst-case factor of two at locations where we analyzed both data sets. The ability to obtain such high quality specific storage estimates suggests that integrating InSAR data into the current groundwater flow model may allow us to describe the finer-scale heterogeneities of the entire SLV confined aquifer system. This new form of data analysis could significantly advance our approach to groundwater management in agricultural areas lacking modern infrastructure around the world.

Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.; Agram, P. S.; Lauknes, T.

2010-12-01

323

Selected water-quality characteristics and flow of ground water in the San Luis basin, including the Conejos River subbasin, Colorado and New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chemical analyses of water from 99 wells and 19 springs in the San Luis basin in Colorado and New Mexico were evaluated to determine selected water quality characteristics as an aid in understanding the flow of groundwater in the basin. The evaluation shows that the distribution of chemical water types in the basin is consistent with chemical changes to be expected along flow paths in rocks typical of those in the basin. The San Luis basin area is underlain by a surficial (< 100-ft-thick) unconfined aquifer and, in turn, by a confining bed and a deeper confined aquifer. Previous studies have indicated that the groundwater system is recharged around the edges of the basin and that groundwater then moves toward discharge areas in the topographically closed part of the basin and along principal streams. The evaluation of water quality data showed that groundwater at the perimeter of the San Luis basin is primarily a calcium bicarbonate type, which is typical in recharge areas. Groundwater near the center of the basin is primarily a sodium bicarbonate type, which is typical of groundwater in downgradient areas. The change in principal cation from calcium to sodium indicates chemical evolution of the water along the groundwater flow path and supports previously developed concepts of groundwater movement in the basin. The exchange of calcium for sodium along the flow path also is assumed to occur in the Conejos River subbasin. Upgradient wells yield calcium bicarbonate type water, whereas downgradient wells yield sodium bicarbonate type water. However, an exception to this relation is found at McIntire Spring, which yields calcium bicarbonate type water from a downgradient location. The source of water discharging from the spring may be the confined aquifer, with hydraulic connection along the Manassa fault. The concentration of dissolved solids in water from both the unconfined and confined aquifers increases downgradient. The increase is dramatic in the closed basin, ranging from < 500 mg/L to > 30 ,000 mg/L. In this area, the normal increase in concentration by dissolution of minerals along the flow path is exceeded by the increase due to evapotranspiration from the shallow water table. (Lantz-PTT)

Williams, R. S., Jr.; Hammond, S. E.

1989-01-01

324

An editor for pathway drawing and data visualization in the Biopathways Workbench  

PubMed Central

Background Pathway models serve as the basis for much of systems biology. They are often built using programs designed for the purpose. Constructing new models generally requires simultaneous access to experimental data of diverse types, to databases of well-characterized biological compounds and molecular intermediates, and to reference model pathways. However, few if any software applications provide all such capabilities within a single user interface. Results The Pathway Editor is a program written in the Java programming language that allows de-novo pathway creation and downloading of LIPID MAPS (Lipid Metabolites and Pathways Strategy) and KEGG lipid metabolic pathways, and of measured time-dependent changes to lipid components of metabolism. Accessed through Java Web Start, the program downloads pathways from the LIPID MAPS Pathway database (Pathway) as well as from the LIPID MAPS web server . Data arises from metabolomic (lipidomic), microarray, and protein array experiments performed by the LIPID MAPS consortium of laboratories and is arranged by experiment. Facility is provided to create, connect, and annotate nodes and processes on a drawing panel with reference to database objects and time course data. Node and interaction layout as well as data display may be configured in pathway diagrams as desired. Users may extend diagrams, and may also read and write data and non-lipidomic KEGG pathways to and from files. Pathway diagrams in XML format, containing database identifiers referencing specific compounds and experiments, can be saved to a local file for subsequent use. The program is built upon a library of classes, referred to as the Biopathways Workbench, that convert between different file formats and database objects. An example of this feature is provided in the form of read/construct/write access to models in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) contained in the local file system. Conclusion Inclusion of access to multiple experimental data types and of pathway diagrams within a single interface, automatic updating through connectivity to an online database, and a focus on annotation, including reference to standardized lipid nomenclature as well as common lipid names, supports the view that the Pathway Editor represents a significant, practicable contribution to current pathway modeling tools.

Byrnes, Robert W; Cotter, Dawn; Maer, Andreia; Li, Joshua; Nadeau, David; Subramaniam, Shankar

2009-01-01

325

Modification to the Monte N-Particle (MCNP) Visual Editor (MCNPVised) to read in Computer Aided Design (CAD) files  

SciTech Connect

Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) (Reference 1) is the code of choice for doing complex neutron/photon/electron transport calculations for the nuclear industry and research institutions. The Visual Editor for Monte Carlo N-Particle (References 2 to 11) is recognized internationally as the best code for visually creating and graphically displaying input files for MCNP. The work performed in this grant enhanced the capabilities of the MCNP Visual Editor to allow it to read in a 2D Computer Aided Design (CAD) file, allowing the user to modify and view the 2D CAD file and then electronically generate a valid MCNP input geometry with a user specified axial extent.

Schwarz, Randy A. Carter, Leeland L.

2004-01-29

326

CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) Version 25.1 (software distributed on CD-ROM) Documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is documentation for the CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) Version 25.1 Product. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (formerly Health Care Financing Administration) Medicare Severity Grouper with Med...

2008-01-01

327

CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) Version 25.0 (software distributed on CD-ROM) Documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is documentation for the CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) Version 25.0 Product. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (formerly Health Care Financing Administration) Medciare Severity Grouper with Med...

2007-01-01

328

CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) Version 26.0 (software distributed on CD-ROM) Documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is documentation for the CMS Medicare Severity Grouper Software with Medicare Code Editor (MS-DRG/MCE) Version 26.0 Product. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (formerly Health Care Financing Administration) Medicare Severity Grouper with Med...

2008-01-01

329

The CROWN initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women's health  

PubMed Central

Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a “core outcomes set” - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women’s health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN’s health) Initiative.

2014-01-01

330

The CROWN Initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women's health.  

PubMed

Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a "core outcomes set" - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women's health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN's health) Initiative. PMID:24993666

Khan, Khalid; O'Donovan, Peter

2014-01-01

331

The CROWN Initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women's health  

PubMed Central

Clinical trials, systematic reviews and guidelines compare beneficial and non-beneficial outcomes following interventions. Often, however, various studies on a particular topic do not address the same outcomes, making it difficult to draw clinically useful conclusions when a group of studies is looked at as a whole. This problem was recently thrown into sharp focus by a systematic review of interventions for preterm birth prevention, which found that among 103 randomised trials, no fewer than 72 different outcomes were reported. There is a growing recognition among clinical researchers that this variability undermines consistent synthesis of the evidence, and that what is needed is an agreed standardised collection of outcomes - a “core outcomes set” - for all trials in a specific clinical area. Recognising that the current inconsistency is a serious hindrance to progress in our specialty, the editors of over 50 journals related to women’s health have come together to support The CROWN (CoRe Outcomes in WomeN’s health) Initiative.

2014-01-01

332

Guest editors' introduction to the special section on information technology and evidence implementation.  

PubMed

Healthcare is experiencing a transformation-perhaps as significant as the publication of the first randomized controlled trial-in the ways in which basic discovery is translated into effective practice. The change is being precipitated by efforts to undergird the healthcare industry with the same transformational capacities from information technology as is afforded to other sectors in the economy. Although the transformation has been slow in materializing, change is expected to accelerate under the stimulating influence of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. As the changes ripple throughout the healthcare sector, two aspects of medical care in the twenty-first century are expected to rise in importance: data and behavior. Each of the articles within this inaugural issue of Translational Behavioral Medicine has been selected to illustrate treatment of these two assets in one way or another. The editors hope this first issue will serve as a vanguard illustration for how behavioral scientists can be included as integral members of the design team in creating a new platform for evidence implementation in the USA and abroad. PMID:24073027

Abernethy, Amy P; Hesse, Bradford W

2011-03-01

333

Seven decades of history of science: I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), second editor of Isis.  

PubMed

I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), the first American to receive a Ph.D. in history of science, was a Harvard undergraduate ('37) and then a Ph.D. student and protégé of George Sarton, founder of Isis and the History of Science Society. He went on to succeed Sarton as editor of Isis (1952-1958) and, later, president of the Society (1961-1962); he was also a president of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. Cohen was an internationally recognized Newton scholar; his interests were encyclopedic, ranging from science and public policy to the history of computers, with several decades as a special consultant for history of computing with IBM. Among his hundreds of publications were such major books as Franklin and Newton (1956), The Birth of a New Physics (1959; rpt., 1985), The Newtonian Revolution (1980), Revolution in Science (1985), Science and the Founding Fathers (1995), Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer (1999), and his last book, The Triumph of Numbers (2005), not to mention two jointly authored contributions, the variorum edition and new English translation of Newton's Principia, which will surely still be read a century from now. PMID:19554868

Dauben, Joseph W; Gleason, Mary Louise; Smith, George E

2009-03-01

334

Critics, authors and editors concerned over recent moves to eliminate book review sections in nation's newspapers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The folly of downsizing book reviewshttp://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/opinion/la-op-connelly29apr29,1,3962449.story?coll=la-news-commentBattle of the book reviewshttp://www.calendarlive.com/books/cl-ca-bloggers13may13,0,4948424.storyCRITICAL MASS: The blog of the national book critics circle board of directorshttp://bookcriticscircle.blogspot.com/Salman Rushdie and Stephen Colbert discuss literary criticismhttp://www.comedycentral.com/motherload/player.jhtml?ml_video=86627&ml_collection=&ml_gateway=&ml_gateway_id=&ml_comedian=&ml_runtime=&ml_context=show&ml_origin_url=%2Fmotherload%2Findex.jhtml%3Fml_video%3D86627&ml_playlist=&lnk=&is_large=trueHelp Protect Atlanta's Book Reviewhttp://www.petitiononline.com/atl2007/petition.htmlOver the past few years, newspapers around the country have been eliminating or downsizing their book review sections. Newspapers from the Los Angeles Times to the Chicago Tribune to the most recent Atlanta Journal Constitution have slowly removed their book editor position. Some, such as the San Francisco Chronicle folded their book review section into another part of the newspaper but after strong community protests it was restored. Although San Francisco Chronicle readers have their beloved Book Review Section back, it has been cut in half to make room for advertising. Newspapers who have made cuts cite reasons such as the lack of readership due to the growing popularity of online reviews, but book critics and authors both worry about the trend. The Washington Post and the New York Times have increased their coverage of book reviews in order to provide more content for those loosing their book review sections, but overall the trend is to remove or drastically downsize the book review section of newspapers. Over the past month, the National Book Critics Circle has launched a campaign to save book reviews. They began a blog, Critical Mass, which posts comments from writers, book editors, critics, newspaper editors and owners. It might seem odd that authors would be concerned about the demise of their fiercest critics, but book critics play an important role in the world of books. Critics are known for finding hidden treasures by unknown authors, books that may go unnoticed by the book reading public. While well-known authors need book critics less than their unknown colleagues, most note the importance of critics early in their career. John Updike, in his rules for book reviewing observed the important relationship between reviewer and public: "The communion between reviewer and his public is based upon the presumption of certain possible joys in reading, and all our discriminations should curve toward that end." The first link will take users to a piece in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the recent changes by newspaper's book review sections. The second link will take users to an Opinion piece in the Los Angeles times by author Michael Connelly criticizing the downsizing of book reviews. The third link leads to another piece in the LA Times, discussing the pros and cons of print versus online book reviews. The fourth link leads to the National Book Critics Circle's new blog, Critical Mass, which includes interesting posts by critics, authors, editors and more. The fifth link will whisk users to a short video of Salman Rushdie's recent visit to the Colbert Report to discuss the recent moves by newspapers to downsize book reviews and explain why critics aren't necessarily the enemies of authors. The last link leads to an online petition that contains more than 5,000 signatures (including Rushdie and Norman Mailer). The petition asks that the Atlanta Journal Constitution restore its book section. Anyone may sign and show their support, and they may also peruse the names of those who have already signed to search for the many influential authors who are concerned with this recent trend.

335

Simulation of smoke plumes from agricultural burns: application to the San Luis/Rio Colorado airshed along the U.S./Mexico border.  

PubMed

Vegetation fires emit a number of air pollutants, thus impacting air quality at local, regional and global scales. One such pollutant is the particulate matter (PM) that is known to trigger adverse health effects. In this study, the CALPUFF/CALMET/MM5 modeling system is employed to simulate PM(10) dispersion (PM with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm) from agricultural fires in the Yuma/San Luis area along the U.S./Mexico border, with the aim of investigating local and regional air quality impacts of fires. To the extent possible the data collected from and observations made in the study area were employed to infer inputs to the modeling system, but insufficient information available on burning practices and input parameters, such as the duration of fire, PM(10) emission rate and plume rise, necessitated relying on some previously published research as well as the Fire Emission Production Simulator (FEPS) model to provide necessary inputs. Under the simulated conditions the fire plumes did not disperse much, and thus mostly affected the area near the sources. The PM impact of fires on populated (receptor) areas in Yuma/San Luis was less than 15 microg/m(3), calculated on the basis of EPA-recommended 24-hr averaged PM(10). If the formation of secondary particles is considered, the impacts could have been greater. In order to conduct more realistic fire plume simulations, it is imperative to have accurate fire-activity records such as the firing technique applied, fuel condition, time of burning as well as some model updates. In all, this paper presents a methodology for calculating agricultural-burns introduced PM, while identifying critical improvements that need to be made in future work. PMID:17889257

Choi, Yu-Jin; Fernando, H J S

2007-12-15

336

Forecasting selenium discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: ecological effects of a proposed San Luis drain extension  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the next few years, federal and state agencies may be required to evaluate proposals and discharge permits that could significantly change selenium (Se) inputs to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary (Bay-Delta), particularly in the North Bay (i.e., Suisun Bay and San Pablo Bay). These decisions may include discharge requirements for an extension of the San Luis Drain (SLD) to the estuary to convey subsurface agricultural drainage from the western San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a renewal of an agreement to allow the existing portion of the SLD to convey subsurface agricultural drainage to a tributary of the San Joaquin River (SJR) (coincident with changes in flow patterns of the lower SJR), and refinements to promulgated Se criteria for the protection of aquatic life for the estuary. Understanding the biotransfer of Se is essential to evaluating the fate and impact of proposed changes in Se discharges to the Bay-Delta. However, past monitoring programs have not addressed the specific protocols necessary for an element that bioaccumulates. Confusion about Se threats in the past have stemmed from failure to consider the full complexity of the processes that result in Se toxicity. Past studies show that predators are more at risk from Se contamination than their prey, making it difficult to use traditional methods to predict risk from environmental concentrations alone. In this report, we employ a novel procedure to model the fate of Se under different, potentially realistic load scenarios from the SJV. For each potential load, we progressively forecast the resulting environmental concentrations, speciation, transformation to particulate form, bioaccumulation by invertebrates, trophic transfer to predators, and effects in those predators. Enough is known to establish a first order understanding of effects should Se be discharged directly into the North Bay via a conveyance such as the SLD. Our approach uses 1) existing knowledge concerning the biogeochemical reactions of Se (e.g., speciation, partitioning between dissolved and particulate forms, and bivalve assimilation efficiency) and 2) site-specific data mainly from 1986 to 1996 on clams and bottom-feeding fish and birds. Forecasts of Se loading from oil refineries and agricultural drainage from the SJV enable the calculation of a composite freshwater endmember Se concentration at the head of the estuary and at Carquinez Strait as a foundation for modeling. Our analysis of effects also takes into account the mode of conveyance for agricultural drainage (i.e., the SLD or SJR). The effects of variable flows on a seasonal or monthly basis from the Sacramento River and SJR are also considered. The results of our forecasts for external SJV watershed sources of Se mirror predictions made since 1955 of a worsening salt (and by inference, Se) buildup exacerbated by the arid climate and irrigation for agricultural use. We show that the reservoir of Se in the SJV is sufficient to provide loading at an annual rate of approximately 42,500 pounds (lbs) of Se to a Bay-Delta disposal point for 63 to 304 years at the lower range of our projections, even if influx of Se from the California Coast Ranges could be curtailed. Disposal of wastewaters on an annual basis outside of the SJV may slow the degradation of valley resources, but drainage alone cannot alleviate the salt and Se buildup in the SJV, at least within a century. Our forecasts show the different proportions of Se loading to the Bay-Delta. Oil refinery loads from 1986 to 1992 ranged from 11 to 15 lbs Se per day; with treatment and cleanup, loads decreased to 3 lbs Se per day in 1999. In contrast, SJV agricultural drainage loads could range from of 45 to 117 lbs Se per day across a set of reasonable conditions. Components of this valley-wide load include five source subareas (i.e., Grassland, Westlands, Tulare, Kern, and Northern) based on water and drainage management. Loads vary per subarea mainly because of proximity of the s

Luoma, Samuel N.; Presser, Theresa S.

2000-01-01

337

DINAMO: a coupled sequence alignment editor/molecular graphics tool for interactive homology modeling of proteins.  

PubMed

Gaining functional information about a novel protein is a universal problem in biomedical research. With the explosive growth of the protein sequence and structural databases, it is becoming increasingly common for researchers to attempt to build a three-dimensional model of their protein of interest in order to gain information about its structure and interactions with other molecules. The two most reliable methods for predicting the structure of a protein are homology modeling, in which the novel sequence is modeled on the known three-dimensional structure of a related protein, and fold recognition (threading), where the sequence is scored against a library of fold models, and the highest scoring model is selected. The sequence alignment to a known structure can be ambiguous, and human intervention is often required to optimize the model. We describe an interactive model building and assessment tool in which a sequence alignment editor is dynamically coupled to a molecular graphics display. By means of a set of assessment tools, the user may optimize his or her alignment to satisfy the known heuristics of protein structure. Adjustments to the sequence alignment made by the user are reflected in the displayed model by color and other visual cues. For instance, residues are colored by hydrophobicity in both the three-dimensional model and in the sequence alignment. This aids the user in identifying undesirable buried polar residues. Several different evaluation metrics may be selected including residue conservation, residue properties, and visualization of predicted secondary structure. These characteristics may be mapped to the model both singly and in combination. DINAMO is a Java-based tool that may be run either over the web or installed locally. Its modular architecture also allows Java-literate users to add plug-ins of their own design. PMID:9697175

Hansen, M; Bentz, J; Baucom, A; Gregoret, L

1998-01-01

338

A survey of the awareness, knowledge, policies and views of veterinary journal Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines for publication of research  

PubMed Central

Background Wider adoption of reporting guidelines by veterinary journals could improve the quality of published veterinary research. The aims of this study were to assess the knowledge and views of veterinary Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines, identify the policies of their journals, and determine their information needs. Editors-in-Chief of 185 journals on the contact list for the International Association of Veterinary Editors (IAVE) were surveyed in April 2012 using an online questionnaire which contained both closed and open questions. Results The response rate was 36.8% (68/185). Thirty-six of 68 editors (52.9%) stated they knew what a reporting guideline was before receiving the questionnaire. Editors said they had found out about reporting guidelines primarily through articles in other journals, via the Internet and through their own journal. Twenty of 57 respondents (35.1%) said their journal referred to reporting guidelines in its instructions to authors. CONSORT, REFLECT, and ARRIVE were the most frequently cited. Forty-four of 68 respondents (68.2%) believed that reporting guidelines should be adopted by all refereed veterinary journals. Qualitative analysis of the open questions revealed that lack of knowledge, fear, resistance to change, and difficulty in implementation were perceived as barriers to the adoption of reporting guidelines by journals. Editors suggested that reporting guidelines be promoted through communication and education of the veterinary community, with roles for the IAVE and universities. Many respondents believed a consensus policy on guideline implementation was needed for veterinary journals. Conclusions Further communication and education about reporting guidelines for editors, authors and reviewers has the potential to increase their adoption by veterinary journals in the future.

2014-01-01

339

The Effect of Regulation Caused by a Dam on the Distribution of the Functional Feeding Groups of the Benthos in the Sub Basin of the Grande River (San Luis, Argentina)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The construction of small dams in principal streams is one of the most common forms of regulation in the province of San Luis\\u000a since they cause changes of physical, chemical and biological nature downstream. The purpose of this study was to analyze\\u000a the short-term modifications in the food organization of benthic macroinvertebrates communities due to the construction of\\u000a a dam

Adriana Vallania; Maria Del Carmen Corigliano

2007-01-01

340

Digital data and derivative products from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the central San Luis basin, covering parts of Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande counties, Colorado, and Taos county, New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes data collected from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey flown over the central San Luis basin during October, 2004, by PRJ, Inc., on contract to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The survey extends from just north of Alamosa, Colorado, southward to just northwest of Taos, New Mexico. It covers large parts of the San Luis Valley in Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande Counties, southern Colorado, and the Taos Plateau in Taos County, northern New Mexico. The survey was designed to complement two surveys previously acquired along the eastern borders of the San Luis Basin over the vicinities of Taos, New Mexico (Bankey and others, 2004a) and Blanca, Colorado (Bankey and others, 2004b). Our overall objective in conducting these surveys is to improve knowledge of the subsurface geologic framework in order to understand ground-water systems in populated alluvial basins along the Rio Grande. These USGS efforts are conducted in collaboration with other federal, state, and local governmental entities where possible.

Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V. J. S.; Webbers, Ank; PRJ, Inc.

2005-01-01

341

Determinants of scientific output: an in-depth view of the productivity of tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro.  

PubMed

Bibliometric studies have found that male researchers have their greatest productivity around the age of 40, that female researchers produce less than their male colleagues, that incentives for collaboration are slow to affect productivity and that, just like humans, research institutes become larger, less productive, more expensive to maintain and less able to raise money as they grow old. Almost invariably, these conclusions come from statistical studies of large numbers of European and American scientists, and there are practically no studies about tropical researchers. We present an in-depth analysis of the productivity of an internationally recognized tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro, based on the totality of his published work and on our own knowledge, as co-workers and friends, of the life frame in which that scientific output was produced. His life output departs from the expected pattern in that he had the highest productivity before reaching the expected peak productivity age, and that when he reached it his productivity fell and never recovered. Furthermore, marriage did not produce the expected fall in productivity. A close analysis of his life indicates that in the middle of his career he switched to intense teaching and conservation activities, and this better explains why his output of scientific research articles was low afterwards. This switch may occur in other tropical scientists. PMID:21246981

Monge-Nájera, Julián; Nielsen-Muñoz, Vanessa; Beatriz Azofeifa, Ana

2010-12-01

342

The PREP suite: predictive RNA editors for plant mitochondrial genes, chloroplast genes and user-defined alignments  

PubMed Central

RNA editing alters plant mitochondrial and chloroplast transcripts by converting specific cytidines to uridines, which usually results in a change in the amino acid sequence of the translated protein. Systematic studies have experimentally identified sites of RNA editing in organellar transcriptomes from several species, but these analyses have not kept pace with rate of genome sequencing. The PREP (predictive RNA editors for plants) suite was developed to computationally predict sites of RNA editing based on the well-known principle that editing in plant organelles increases the conservation of proteins across species. The PREP suite provides predictive RNA editors for plant mitochondrial genes (PREP-Mt), for chloroplast genes (PREP-Cp), and for alignments submitted by the user (PREP-Aln). These servers require minimal input, are very fast, and are highly accurate on all seed plants examined to date. PREP-Mt has proved useful in several research studies and the newly developed PREP-Cp and PREP-Aln servers should be of further assistance for analyses that require knowledge of the location of sites of RNA editing. The PREP suite is freely available at http://prep.unl.edu/.

Mower, Jeffrey P.

2009-01-01

343

The editor, the publisher, and his mother: the representation of lesbians and gays in the new york times.  

PubMed

The attention and prominence given to issues in media outlets may affect the importance citizens attribute to them, so the actors who influence mass media coverage decisions may have political power in society generally. This article seeks to measure the relative influence of journalists, social trends, events, government officials, editors, and owners on the New York Times coverage of lesbians and gays from 1960 to 1995. Although many factors affected the nature and frequency of such coverage, the findings of this article show that the owners of the Times exerted decisive influence. Documentary evidence reveals that the Times' owners actively intervened to suppress coverage of lesbians and gays until 1987, even as reporters and editors recognized that increased social visibility made them newsworthy. Statistical analysis confirms that, although some actual events and statements of officials attracted attention from the newspaper throughout the period, they were more likely to generate prominent coverage after 1987 when the stories were consistent with the enthusiasms of the owners. PMID:24059965

Chomsky, Daniel; Barclay, Scott

2013-01-01

344

"Anti-smoking data are exaggerated" versus "the data are clear and indisputable": examining letters to the editor about tobacco.  

PubMed

Media advocacy plays a unique role in tobacco control policy development. Letters to the editor in particular are an interesting form of media advocacy because they reflect community sentiment regarding the policy agenda and provide insight into the public debate. The authors used ethnographic context analysis to examine the techniques used by writers of 262 tobacco-related letters to the editor published in 61 newspapers across Missouri over a 2-year period when tobacco tax and smoke-free indoor air initiatives were occurring across the state. The authors found that pro-tobacco control letter writers often used didactic strategies, citing numbers and reports, to convey information and presented their training or experience as a health professional (e.g., M.D., Ph.D.) to add legitimacy to their arguments. Anti-tobacco control letter writers, in contrast, used narrative strategies to support their stance, claimed authority as a smoker or small business owner to legitimize their claims by relating to the audience, and used collectivity to capture the attention of policymakers. These results present the importance of strategic media advocacy in tobacco control. Tobacco control advocates should increase their use of narrative strategies and collectivity in order to better connect with the public and policymakers. PMID:22376195

Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Harris, Jenine K; Israel, Kendre; Schell, Sarah; Mohr, Anneke

2012-01-01

345

New evidence for self-medication in bonobos: Manniophyton fulvum leaf- and stemstrip-swallowing from LuiKotale, Salonga National Park, DR Congo.  

PubMed

The swallowing of entire leaves by apes across Africa without chewing has been observed for over 40 plant species. Here we add evidence for (a) a new site, LuiKotale where leaf-swallowing of Manniophyton fulvum (Euphorbiaceae) is observed in bonobos, (b) a so far unreported ingestion of unchewed stemstrips of M. fulvum, we name stemstrip-swallowing; and (c) a test of some of the requirements put forward by Huffman for the assessment of plants ingested for medical purpose. As ecological correlates we analyzed M. fulvum phenological data and examined 1,094 dung piles collected between 2002 and 2009. By that we assessed availability and choice of leaves. In addition, we provide the first full description of the behavior related to this plant species' use by chimpanzees or bonobos using 56 bouts of M. fulvum ingestion observed between October 2007 and February 2010. With these data we tested and met 4 of the 6 requirements given by Huffman, supporting ingestion of this species as self-medication. Despite species' year-round availability and abundance, M. fulvum was ingested only at specific times, in very small amounts, and by a small proportion of individuals per party. In the absence of our own parasitological data, we used M. fulvum swallowing as evidence for parasite infestation, and seasonality as a proxy for stressors underlying seasonal fluctuation and impacting immune responses. Using these indirect factors available, we investigated conditions for a parasite to develop to its infective stage as well as conditions for the host to cope with infections. Both rain and temperature were good predictors for M. fulvum ingestion. We discuss the use of M. fulvum with respect to its hispidity and subsequent purging properties and provide insight into its ethnomedicinal uses by humans, stimulating speculations about potentially additional pharmacological effects. PMID:24105933

Fruth, Barbara; Ikombe, Nono Bondjengo; Matshimba, Gaby Kitengie; Metzger, Sonja; Muganza, Désiré Musuyu; Mundry, Roger; Fowler, Andrew

2014-02-01

346

High quality InSAR data linked to seasonal change in hydraulic head for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels in the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978-2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide fine spatial resolution measurements of Earth surface deformation, which can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. However, change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected from 1992 to 2001. We are able to show high levels of correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. At three well locations we see a seasonal variation in the InSAR data that mimics the hydraulic head data. We use measured values of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR data. In general the magnitude of estimated and measured head agree to within the calculated error. However, the errors are unacceptably large due to both errors in the InSAR data and uncertainty in the measured value of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient. We conclude that InSAR is capturing the seasonal head variation, but that further research is required to obtain accurate hydraulic head estimates from the InSAR deformation measurements.

Reeves, Jessica A.; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.; Shanker Agram, Piyush; Lauknes, Tom R.

2011-12-01

347

Problems of Journalism; Proceedings of the 1975 Annual Convention of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (Washington, D.C., April 16-18, 1975).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports the 1975 proceedings of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) convention held in Washington, D.C., April 16-18. The contents include a list of officers and directors, past presidents of the society, and a copy of the ASNE Code of Ethics. Also contained in the document are reports on such individual sessions as…

American Society of Newspaper Editors, Easton, PA.

348

Sylvia Taylor Johnson, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of "The Journal of Negro Education" (1994-2001): A World-Class Champion Runner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With characteristic crystal clarity and advanced, sharply honed research skills, Dr. Sylvia T. Johnson was able to take full advantage of holding the position of Editor-in-Chief of "The Journal of Negro Education" from 1994 to 2001. This article summarizes her accomplishments through the many hats she wore.

Hughes, Gerunda B.; Wallace, Michael B.

2007-01-01

349

Is There Room in the Well-Wrought Urn for Race and Gender? A Literary Journal and a Feminist Editor at the Turn of the Millennium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers the author's experiences as a female editing a literary journal. Discusses and addresses many implications regarding the role of an editor. Concludes with the intent to provoke faculty members, departments, and upper-level administrators to peer into the "urn," invert it, and give it a good shake. (SG)

Wondra, Janet

2001-01-01

350

[Book review] Ecological Scale - Theory and Applications by D.L. Peterson and V. Thomas Parker, editors  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Covering the complexity of the scale topic, this volume represents an important compilation of information on a topic that is often misunderstood, and one for which little attention is paid (although, thankfully, this seems to be on the decline). Although technical, this book provides full exposure to the scale issue in ecology and is an important reference for researchers and resource managers who are working to understand and preserve ecological function in parks. The authors and editors have combined to provide a needed examination of a very important topic. In summary, why purchase all those books on scale when just one will do? The mountain of information alone stuffed into this one book should prompt all parks to get a copy and have it on hand as a quick and ready reference.

O'Connell, A.F., Jr.

2000-01-01

351

Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet: Letter to the Editor  

SciTech Connect

Letter to the Editors from Leonard Evans, Bloomfield Hills, MI: Single-vehicle crashes, which account for half of occupant fatalities, are not mentioned in 'Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet', by Thomas P. Wenzel and Marc Ross (March-April). Simple physics shows that in such crashes risk declines as vehicle mass increases. The authors write 'driving imported luxury cars carries extremely low risk, for reasons that are not obvious'. The reasons are obvious--the cars are purchased by low-risk drivers. If they swapped vehicles with drivers of sports cars (which have high risk), the risks would stick with the drivers, not the vehicles. The article reflects the American belief that death on our roads can be substantially reduced by making vehicles in which it is safer to crash. From 1979 through 2002, Great Britain, Canada and Australia reduced fatalities by an average of 49 percent, compared with 16 percent in the U.S. Accumulating the differences over this time shows that by merely matching the safety performance of these other countries, about 200,000 fewer Americans would have died. These trends continue. In 2006 the U.S. recorded 42,642 traffic deaths, a modest 22 percent decline from our all-time high. Sweden recorded 445, a reduction of 66 percent from their all-time high. The obsessive focus on vehicles rather than on countermeasures that scientific research shows substantially reduce risk is at the core of our dramatic safety failure. The only way to substantially reduce deaths is to reduce the risk of crashing, not to make it safer to crash. The response from Drs. Wenzel and Ross: Of course Dr. Evans is correct in stating that driver behavior influences crash risk. In our article we made clear that our estimates of risk include how well a vehicle/driver combination avoids a crash, as well as how crash-worthy a vehicle (and robust a driver) is once a crash occurs. We also analyzed two variables that can account for driver behavior: the fraction of all driver fatalities that are young men, and a 'bad driver' rating that combines information about the current crash (drug or alcohol involvement, driving without a license, or reckless driving) as well as the operator's driving record for the previous three years. For example, the high risks of sports cars, and the low risks of minivans, are clearly influenced by who drives these types of vehicles (36 percent young males and 0.77 bad driver rating for sports cars, vs. 4 percent and 0.21 for minivans; the average values for all types of cars are 20 percent and 0.50). On the other hand, we were surprised to find that the imported luxury cars, with the lowest risks, have only average drivers (21 percent young males, 0.57 bad driver rating). That is the basis for our conclusion that the design of imported luxury vehicles, or at least specific safety features on them, overcome risky behavior taken by their drivers. The safety of vehicles has greatly improved over the years. In our studies we have found several examples of models that greatly reduced their risks over time; for example, the Ford Focus has a much better risk to its drivers (118) than the Ford Escort it replaced (148). Our data indicate that more young males drive the Focus (21 percent) than the Escort (15 percent), and that Focus drivers are perhaps slightly more risky (0.50 vs. 0.44 bad driver rating). Clearly vehicle design does not play as small a role in vehicle safety as Dr. Evans suggests. Dr. Evans asserts that we ignore single-vehicle crashes and that simple physics dictates that vehicle mass provides safety in single-vehicle crashes. By itself, additional vehicle mass does provide some protection from rapid deceleration in crashes with a movable object, particularly for an unbelted occupant. However, when it comes to vehicle safety, our research by vehicle model indicates that there is essentially no relationship between car mass and risk, even in frontal crashes. In his own papers, Dr. Evans appears to admit that it is not clear whether mass, or size (specifically crush space) is inherent to vehi

Wenzel, Thomas P; Wenzel, Thomas P; Ross, Marc

2008-05-01

352

Letter to the Editor Atorvastatin in combination with ezetimibe and carotid atherosclerosis.  

PubMed

Dear Editor, Luo et al. (2014) reported that the combination of atorvastatin plus ezetimibe de-creased carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) significantly more than atorvastatin mono-therapy. We would like to add a few comments. The ENHANCE trial (Kastelein et al., 2008) did not compare the effect of atorvastatin plus ezetimibe versus atorvastatin monotherapy on cIMT, as mentioned by Luo et al. (2014). The statin used was simvastatin. As Luo et al. (2014) state, the cIMT in ENHANCE was set too low and could not be reduced further. There are other deficiencies in the ENHANCE trial; these are discussed by us in Paraskevas et al. (2011). Briefly, the latter article also comments on other trials that show that ezetimibe, used together with a statin, decreases cIMT. Furthermore, this article also considers evidence that atorvas-tatin 80 mg/day did not reduce the cIMT when compared with placebo (CASHMERE study), probably because the cIMT was too low (virtually identical to that in ENHANCE). How-ever, ENHANCE produced useful information. The C-reactive protein (CRP) level dropped significantly more in the simvastatin plus ezetimibe group compared with the simvastatin monotherapy group (Kastelein et al., 2008). The same pattern was reported by Luo et al. (2014), in which the fall in high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) level was significantly greater in the atorvastatin plus ezetimibe group compared with the atorvastatin monotherapy group. Indeed as Luo et al. (2014) state, doubling the dose of a statin only results in about 6% further fall in low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. A meta-analysis by our group showed that adding ezetimibe to a statin results in an average 23.6% fall in LDL-C levels compared with statin monotherapy (Mikhailidis et al., 2007). This meta-analysis also showed that the addition of ezetimibe to a statin increased the fall in CRP levels. Another meta-analysis showed that adding ezetimibe to a statin is more effective than doubling the dose of the statin (Mikhailidis et al., 2011). Ezetimibe has several potentially useful actions other than altering the lipid pro-file (Lioudaki et al., 2011). However, it is difficult to assess the contribution of these effects on vascular risk. Other researchers, as well as our group, have observed that high triglyceride levels fall to a greater extent than low levels when ezetimibe is added to a statin (Gazi et al., 2007; Fras and Mikhailidis, 2008; Migdalis et al., 2009; Shigematsu et al., 2012). Therefore, it would be useful to know if the fall in triglyceride levels was greater in the atorvastatin plus ezetimibe group compared with the atorvastatin monotherapy group if only triglyceride levels ?1.7 or ?2.0 mM are considered in the Luo et al. (2014) study. Also, it would be interesting to know if Luo et al. (2014) performed kidney function tests, since there is some evidence that adding ezetimibe to a statin will improve that variable (Gazi et al., 2007; Migdalis et al., 2009). The debate about the evidence supporting the use of ezetimibe to reduce the risk of vascular events continues (Gouni-Berthold et al., 2012). However, the findings of Luo et al. (2014) further support the conclusion that the cIMT results of the ENHANCE trial should not be included in this debate. Secondly, it is relevant that several guidelines mention that the use of ezetimibe is appropriate if LDL-C targets are not reached by statin monotherapy (Catapano et al., 2011; Perk et al., 2012; Teramoto et al., 2013; Anderson et al., 2013; Wanner and Tonelli, 2014; IAS Position Paper, 2014). The recent dyslipidemia guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (Stone et al., 2013) focus on statins and only briefly mentions other lipid lowering options (Mikhailidis et al., 2014). PMID:25062416

Paraskevas, K I; Mikhailidis, D P; Giannoukas, A D

2014-01-01

353

Life and times of the impact factor: retrospective analysis of trends for seven medical journals (1994-2005) and their Editors' views  

PubMed Central

Objective (1) To analyse trends in the journal impact factor (IF) of seven general medical journals (Ann Intern Med, BMJ, CMAJ, JAMA, Lancet, Med J Aust and N Engl J Med) over 12 years; and (2) to ascertain the views of these journals' past and present Editors on factors that had affected their journals' IFs during their tenure, including direct editorial policies. Design Retrospective analysis of IF data from ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports—Science Edition, 1994 to 2005, and interviews with Editors-in-Chief. Setting Medical journal publishing. Participants Ten Editors-in-Chief of the journals, except Med J Aust, who served between 1999 and 2004. Main outcome measures IFs and component numerator and denominator data for the seven general medical journals (1994 to 2005) were collected. IFs are calculated using the formula: (Citations in year z to articles published in years x and y)/(Number of citable articles published in years x and y), where z is the current year and x and y are the previous two years. Editors' views on factors that had affected their journals' IFs were also obtained. Results IFs generally rose over the 12-year period, with the N Engl J Med having the highest IF throughout. However, percentage rises in IF relative to the baseline year of 1994 were greatest for CMAJ (about 500%) and JAMA (260%). Numerators for most journals tended to rise over this period, while denominators tended to be stable or to fall, although not always in a linear fashion. Nine of ten eligible editors were interviewed. Possible reasons given for rises in citation counts included: active recruitment of high-impact articles by courting researchers; offering authors better services; boosting the journal's media profile; more careful article selection; and increases in article citations. Most felt that going online had not affected citations. Most had no deliberate policy to publish fewer articles (lowering the IF denominator), which was sometimes the unintended result of other editorial policies. The two Editors who deliberately published fewer articles did so as they realized IFs were important to authors. Concerns about the accuracy of ISI counting for the IF denominator prompted some to routinely check their IF data with ISI. All Editors had mixed feelings about using IFs to evaluate journals and academics, and mentioned the tension between aiming to improve IFs and ‘keeping their constituents [clinicians] happy.’ Conclusions IFs of the journals studied rose in the 12-year period due to rising numerators and/or falling denominators, to varying extents. Journal Editors perceived that this occurred for various reasons, including deliberate editorial practices. The vulnerability of the IF to editorial manipulation and Editors' dissatisfaction with it as the sole measure of journal quality lend weight to the need for complementary measures.

Chew, Mabel; Villanueva, Elmer V; Van Der Weyden, Martin B

2007-01-01

354

GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The organization of a distributed system can have a tremendous impact on its capabilities, its performance, and its ability to evolve to meet changing requirements. For example, the client - server organization model has proven to be adequate for organizing a distributed system as a number of distributed servers that offer various functions to client processes across the network. However, it lacks peer-to-peer capabilities, and experience with the model has been predominantly in the context of local networks. To achieve peer-to-peer cooperation in a more global context, systems issues of scale, heterogeneity, configuration management, accounting and sharing are crucial, and the complexity of migrating from locally distributed to more global systems demands new tools and techniques. An emphasis on interfaces and modules leads to the modelling of a complex distributed system as a collection of interacting objects that communicate with each other only using requests sent to well defined interfaces. Although object granularity typically varies at different levels of a system architecture, the same object abstraction can be applied to various levels of a computing architecture. Since 1989, the Object Management Group (OMG), an international software consortium, has been defining an architecture for distributed object systems called the Object Management Architecture (OMA). At the core of the OMA is a `software bus' called an Object Request Broker (ORB), which is specified by the OMG Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification. The OMA distributed object model fits the structure of heterogeneous distributed applications, and is applied in all layers of the OMA. For example, each of the OMG Object Services, such as the OMG Naming Service, is structured as a set of distributed objects that communicate using the ORB. Similarly, higher-level OMA components such as Common Facilities and Domain Interfaces are also organized as distributed objects that can be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S Rahkila and S Stenberg, discusses the application of CORBA to telecommunication management netwo

Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

1997-09-01

355

GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation of the critical organizational/business processes. In particular, this paper examines the issues of execution atomicity and failure atomicity, differentiating between correctness requirements of system failures and logical failures, and surveys techniques that can be used to ensure data consistency in workflow management systems. While the first paper is concerned with correctness assuming transactional workflows in which selective transactional properties are associated with individual tasks or the entire workflow, the second paper, `Scheduling workflows by enforcing intertask dependencies' by Attie et al, assumes that the tasks can be either transactions or other activities involving legacy systems. This second paper describes the modelling and specification of conditions involving events and dependencies among tasks within a workflow using temporal logic and finite state automata. It also presents a scheduling algorithm that enforces all stated dependencies by executing at any given time only those events that are allowed by all the dependency automata and in an order as specified by the dependencies. In any system with decentralized control, there is a need to effectively cope with the tension that exists between autonomy and consistency requirements. In `A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems', Ben-Shaul and Heineman focus on the specific requirement of enforcing failure atomicity in decentralized, autonomous and interacting workflow management systems. Their paper describes a model in which each workflow manager must be able to specify the sequence of tasks that comprise an atomic unit for the purposes of correctness, and the degrees of local and global atomicity for the purpose of cooperation with other workflow managers. The paper also discusses a realization of this model in which treaties and summits provide an agreement mechanism, while underlying transaction managers are responsible for maintaining failure atomicity. The fourth and fifth papers are experience papers describing a workflow management system and a l

Chrysanthis, Panos K.

1996-12-01

356

GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quality of Service (QoS) has emerged in the last few years as a topical and challenging research area in distributed systems. For a broad definition of QoS we refer to the ISO's Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (ISO/IEC IS 10746-2): `The notion of QoS is a system or object property, and consists of a set of quality requirements on the collective behaviour of one or more objects . . .'. In the context of this special issue, QoS is primarily associated with systems such as distributed multimedia application platforms or distributed simulations. The QoS requirements of such systems typically relate to measures of rate and latency of information transfer, probability of a communication being disrupted, probability of system failure, probability of storage failure, etc. The role of QoS management is thus to ensure that applications are able to specify and obtain the quality of service that they require for their correct execution. In general, the functions of QoS management may be subsumed under the following headings: (i) QoS specification and mapping, (ii) QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control and (iii) QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation. QoS specification defines the QoS required by an application in terms of both timeliness constraints and guarantees. QoS mapping then translates between QoS representations at different system levels, relieving the user of the necessity of thinking in terms of low-level QoS representations. For example, a user may express a jitter requirement by manipulating a slider in a GUI, and this could be mapped at the lower layers into a requirement for an absolute bound on ATM cell jitter and a jitter smoothing buffer of a certain size. QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control are collectively responsible for configuring a system in preparation for the execution of a QoS requiring application. QoS negotiation provides a framework in which the QoS levels supported by individual system components (e.g. file server, operating system and network) are composed to build the required end-to-end service. Providing such a service may well require explicit resource allocation (e.g. of network bandwidth or CPU cycles); admission control may also be required to ensure that requested QoS levels can be met. QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation are concerned with supporting QoS during the run time of an application. QoS monitoring and QoS adaptation are conceptually related in a feedback loop in which current QoS levels are observed and fine grained reconfiguration is triggered as necessary to ensure that the required levels are maintained. An example of such a loop is to be found in Internet tools such as vic or vat which monitor network delay and adapt by adjusting the size of an elastic playout buffer. QoS renegotiation is a coarser grained adaptation, often explicitly initiated by the user, in which required QoS levels are revised at run time. An example could be a user scaling a video display from colour to monochrome so that sufficient resources can be freed to support an additional connection. The papers in this special issue were selected from the fourth QoS Workshop held in Paris in March 1996. To understand the overall evolution of QoS research it is useful to know some background on the series of workshops of which the Paris workshop was a part. The first workshop to be dedicated exclusively to QoS issues was organized in Canada by the European RACE project R2088 (TOPIC) in cooperation with the University of Montreal in June 1994. A European counterpart of this initiating event occurred in the same year in September 1994 in Aachen, Germany. This latter event was held in cooperation with the European Conference on Intelligence in Broadband Services and Networks (IS&N94). A third workshop was then held in conjunction with the IFIP conference on Open Distributed Processing (ICODP95) in Brisbane, Australia in March 1995. By 1996 more independence, and also more recognition of QoS as an independent research area, was achieved in the

Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

1997-03-01

357

GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quality of Service (QoS) has emerged in the last few years as a topical and challenging research area in distributed systems. For a broad definition of QoS we refer to the ISO's Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (ISO\\/IEC IS 10746-2): `The notion of QoS is a system or object property, and consists of a set of quality requirements on

Geoff Coulson; Jan B. de Meer

1997-01-01

358

Eocene to Quaternary mafic-intermediate volcanism in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico: The transition from Farallon plate subduction to intra-plate continental magmatism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field (SLPVF) of central Mexico includes volcanic sequences of felsic, intermediate and basic compositions that were erupted as discrete episodes from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Volcanism was dominated by widespread and voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites of the mid-Tertiary Ignimbrite Flare-up. However, the complete volcanic history must consider basaltic and andesitic Eocene–Pleistocene volcanic successions that provide key evidence for understanding the geochemical evolution of the volcanism in the SLPVF during this time span. Five sequences are recognized according to their geochemical characteristics, each comprising a volcano-tectonic episode. The first episode comprises basaltic andesites and andesites erupted during three intervals, 45–42 Ma, 36–31 Ma, and 31–30 Ma. The oldest was derived from subduction magmatism, whereas the youngest has an intra-plate magmatic signature and this represents the transition from the end of a long lasting subduction regime of the Farallon plate to the initiation of intra-plate continental extension in the North American plate. The second episode, at 29.5–28 Ma, comprises a bimodal succession of high-silica rhyolites and alkaline basalts (hawaiites) that are interpreted as magmatism generated in an intra-plate continental extension regime during the Basin and Range faulting. The third episode, at 21 Ma, is characterized by trachybasalts and trachyandesites that represent mantle basaltic melts that were contaminated through assimilation of the lower crust during advanced stage of intra-plate extension that started at Oligocene. The fourth episode includes 12 Ma alkaline basalts and andesites that were erupted from fissures. These mantle derived magmas evolved to andesites by crustal anatexis and crystal fractionation within a continued, extensional, intra-plate regime. Lastly, the fifth episode comprises 5.0 to 0.6 Ma alkaline basalts (basanites) containing mantle xenoliths, that were erupted from maars and tuff cones, which are the youngest manifestations of mantle-derived intra-plate extensional events. Based upon this volcanic record, the last subduction manifestations of the extinct Farallon plate occurred at about 42 Ma, this was followed by a transition to intra-plate magmatism between 42 and 31 Ma, and an extensional, intra-plate tectonic setting from 31 Ma to almost Present.

Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Tristán-González, Margarito; de Jesús Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo; López-Doncel, Rubén A.; Bellon, Hervé; Martínez-Esparza, Gilberto

2014-04-01

359

Use of InSAR to identify land-surface displacements caused by aquifer-system compaction in the Paso Robles area, San Luis Obispo County, California, March to August 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The population in San Luis Obispo County has grown steadily during the 1990s, and some land use has been converted from dry farming to grazing to irrigated vineyards and urban areas. Because insufficient surface-water supplies are available to meet the growing demand, ground-water pumpage has increased and the resulting water-level declines have raised concern that this water resource may become overstressed. One particular concern is whether the larger ground-water basins within the county function as large individual basins or whether subsurface structures divide these large basins into smaller subbasins, as differences in ground-water-level data suggest. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is used in locating land-surface displacement, which may indicate subsurface structures in ground-water basins by determining seasonal and historical land-surface changes. Owing to the high spatial detail of InSAR imagery, the InSAR-derived displacement maps can be used with ground-water-level data to reveal differential aquifer-system compaction related to the presence of geological structures or the distribution of compressible sediments that may define subbasin boundaries. This report describes InSAR displacement maps of the Paso Robles area of San Luis Obispo County and compares them to maps of seasonal changes in ground-water levels to detect the presence of aquifer-system compaction.

Valentine, D. W.; Densmore, J. N.; Galloway, D. L.; Amelung, Falk

2000-01-01

360

Use of InSAR to identify land-surface displacements caused by aquifer-system compaction in the Paso Robles area, San Luis Obispo County, California, March to August 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The population in San Luis Obispo County has grown steadily during the 1990s, and some land use has been converted from dry farming to grazing to irrigated vineyards and urban areas. Because insufficient surface-water supplies are available to meet the growing demand, ground-water pumpage has increased and the resulting water-level declines have raised concern that this water resource may become overstressed. One particular concern is whether the larger ground-water basins within the county function as large individual basins or whether subsurface structures divide these large basins into smaller subbasins, as differences in ground-water-level data suggest. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is used in locating land-surface displacement, which may indicate subsurface structures in ground-water basins by determining seasonal and historical land-surface changes. Owing to the high spatial detail of InSAR imagery, the InSAR-derived displacement maps can be used with ground-water-level data to reveal differential aquifer-system compaction related to the presence of geological structures or the distribution of compressible sediments that may define subbasin boundaries. This report describes InSAR displacement maps of the Paso Robles area of San Luis Obispo County and compares them to maps of seasonal changes in ground-water levels to detect the presence of aquifer-system compaction.

Valentine, David W.; Densmore, Jill N.; Galloway, Devin L.; Amelung, Falk

2001-01-01

361

Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, Guest Editors of Special Issue (part 2): Junctional Targets of Skin and Heart Disease.  

PubMed

Abstract Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease. PMID:24854768

Cowin, Pamela

2014-06-01

362

NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Selected as Editor's Choice in 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's newest and most powerful X-ray space telescope, has been selected as the winner of the Editor's Choice category of the 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation. The team of government, industry, university and research institutions that designed, built and deployed Chandra for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala, will be formally recognized June 24 at a gala awards celebration at Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fl. Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Science Center, Cambridge, Mass., which conducts the Chandra science mission for NASA, will receive the award on behalf of the team. "Chandra has opened a new window for astronomers into the universe of high-energy cosmic events such as pulsars, supernova remnants and black holes," said Tananbaum. "We're now able to create spectacularly detailed images of celestial phenomena whose mere existence we could only hypothesize before." Among Chandra's most significant discoveries to date, he lists the detection of a giant ring around the heart of the Crab Nebula, details of the shock wave created by an exploding star and resolution of the high-energy X-ray "glow" in the universe into millions of specific light sources. "The successful launch, deployment and on-orbit operations of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is a testament to the solid partnership between TRW, NASA and the science community that has been enabling NASA's most important space science missions for the past 40 years," said Timothy W. Hannemann, executive vice president and general manager, TRW Space & Electronics Group. "The extraordinary images that Chandra is delivering daily speaks loudly not only to the quality of the science instruments on board, but also to the engineering talents and dedication to mission success exhibited by every member of NASA's Chandra mission team." Chandra, named in honor of Nobel laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, was launched in July 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia and deployed to a highly elliptical Earth orbit. Over the next five years, it will use the world's most powerful X-ray telescope to probe the mysteries of a universe that cannot be seen by the human eye or conventional optical telescopes. Its array of exquisite mirrors, ground and polished by Raytheon Optical Systems, Inc., and assembled and aligned by Eastman Kodak, will allow Chandra to gather and focus X-rays from celestial sources billions of light years away. Chandra's science instrument module was designed and built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., then integrated with instruments provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Penn State University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Space Research Organization of The Netherlands, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. Ball Aerospace also produced Chandra's aspect camera. The Discover Awards for Technological Innovation, now in their 11th year, are designed to acknowledge the creativity of men, women, corporations and institutions who have reached superior levels of ingenuity. Each year, Discover Magazine's editorial staff reviews thousands of new products and ideas presented in the scientific literature or nominated by leading technology-based companies and research organizations. The editorial staff selects semi-finalists in each of eight technology categories, then submits the nominations to an independent panel of experts. The panel then selects the finalists and the winner in each area of technology. The Editor's choice category is reserved for innovations so unique or promising that they go beyond the magazine's established innovation categories by providing a marked advance in their field. Chandra's powerful X-ray telescope can resolve distant images eight times sharper and detect X-ray sources 20 times fainter than any previous X-ray space telescope. Chandra, along with the rest of the winners, will be listed in the July issue

2000-06-01

363

Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed: a reply to a "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors.  

PubMed

The "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about a recently published, and is in our considered opinion inaccurate and factually incorrect, editorial that has appeared in several journals in toxicology. Some of the shortcomings of the editorial are discussed in detail. We call for a better founded scientific debate which may help to overcome a polarisation of views detrimental to reaching a consensus about scientific foundations for endocrine disrupter regulation in the EU. PMID:23981490

Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg; van den Berg, Martin; Blumberg, Bruce; Bjerregaard, Poul; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Bornman, Riana; Brandt, Ingvar; Brian, Jayne V; Casey, Stephanie C; Fowler, Paul A; Frouin, Heloise; Giudice, Linda C; Iguchi, Taisen; Hass, Ulla; Jobling, Susan; Juul, Anders; Kidd, Karen A; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Lind, Monica; Martin, Olwenn V; Muir, Derek; Ochieng, Roseline; Olea, Nicolas; Norrgren, Leif; Ropstad, Erik; Ross, Peter S; Rudén, Christina; Scheringer, Martin; Skakkebaek, Niels Erik; Söder, Olle; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana; Swan, Shanna; Toppari, Jorma; Tyler, Charles R; Vandenberg, Laura N; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Wiberg, Karin; Zoeller, R Thomas

2013-01-01

364

Evaluating adherence to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' policy of mandatory, timely clinical trial registration  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether two specific criteria in Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts (URM) created by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)—namely, including the trial ID registration within manuscripts and timely registration of trials, are being followed. Materials and methods Observational study using computerized analysis of publicly available Medline article data and clinical trial registry data. We analyzed a purposive set of five ICMJE founding journals looking at all trial articles published in those journals during 2010–2011, and data from the ClinicalTrials.gov (CTG) trial registry. We measured adherence to trial ID inclusion policy as the percentage of trial journal articles that contained a valid trial ID within the article (journal-based sample). Adherence to timely registration was measured as the percentage of trials that registered the trial before enrolling the first participant within a 60-day grace period. We also examined timely registration rates by year of all phase II and higher interventional trials in CTG (registry-based sample). Results To determine trial ID inclusion, we analyzed 698 clinical trial articles in five journals. A total of 95.8% (661/690) of trial journal articles included the trial ID. In 88.3% the trial-article link is stored within a structured Medline field. To evaluate timely registration, we analyzed trials referenced by 451 articles from the selected five journals. A total of 60% (272/451) of articles were registered in a timely manner with an improving trend for trials initiated in later years (eg, 89% of trials that began in 2008 were registered in a timely manner). In the registry-based sample, the timely registration rates ranged from 56% for trials registered in 2006 to 72% for trials registered in 2011. Discussion Adherence to URM requirements for registration and trial ID inclusion increases the utility of PubMed and links it in an important way to clinical trial repositories. This new integrated knowledge source can facilitate research prioritization, clinical guidelines creation, and precision medicine. Conclusions The five selected journals adhere well to the policy of mandatory trial registration and also outperform the registry in adherence to timely registration. ICMJE's URM policy represents a unique international mandate that may be providing a powerful incentive for sponsors and investigators to document clinical trials and trial result publications and thus fulfill important obligations to trial participants and society.

Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J

2013-01-01

365

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding electric fields inside dielectricsN GauthierRoyal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, Canada The Reflection PrincipleAlladi RamakrishnanAlladi Centenary Foundation, Mylapore, Madras, India Moving SpheresF J Rubio-HernandezUniversity of Malaga, SpainD HinsonLlanrwst, Gwynedd, UK Healing SCAA's scar: an attempt to return formulae to examinationsKeith FullerGuildford High School for Girls, Guildford, UK No flies on trainsDavid R HallidayEastSurrey College, UK Brushing up an old favourite: finding `g'Jon ScaifeUniversity of Sheffield

1995-07-01

366

Editor's Note: Classification Matters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Classification skills, so foundational to science, must be taught. While children have a passion and drive to organize and categorize their experiences, sometimes the way they organize them doesn't lead to a worthwhile or accurate scientific understanding. Just as putting a pencil in the hands of a child doesn't automatically teach them to write, having a child sort rocks won't lead to an understanding of classification. The articles in this issue aim to help you teach students how to classify successfully and with purpose.

Ohana, Chris

2009-03-01

367

Editor's Note (February 2007)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learning makes more sense and is retained when it has a context and connection to other knowledge. We know this from a wealth of sources: research, our experiences as students--and as teachers. We remember things that have a rich set of connections. Teaching that is too focused in one context is much less likely to be transferred to other contexts. If one of ourgoals is to develop our students into critical, reflective thinkers, we have to extend skills and knowledge across the traditional content areas.

Ohana, Chris

2007-02-01

368

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teachers' input to the physics syllabusRoy DansonMacclesfield College of Further Education, Cheshire, UK A new measure for ellipsesP GlaisterDepartment of Mathematics, University of Reading, UK Problems with vectorsP S TaylorTheoretical Physics Department, Imperial College, London, UK On an analogy for Ohm's lawPaulo Murilo Castro de OliveiraInstituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Nirerói, Brazil The equations of PhysicsA T JacksonBelfast Institute of Further and Higher Education An impossible observation?Bob KibblePurley Sixth Form College, London, UK

1992-03-01

369

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reform Comprehensive Heuristic Teaching in middle school physicsMu Xiao-yong and Shu Bing-ruPhysics Department, Suzhou University, People's Republic of China Maxwell's thermodynamics equations - a simplified aide-mémoireD BagayokoDepartment of Physics, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA

1992-05-01

370

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radon variations D J Noble Plockton High School, Ross shire IV52 8TU, UK Environmental physics A T Jackson Belfast Institute of Further and Higher Education On mnemonic schemes A T Bardócz Teacher Training College, Szombathely, Hungary Regarding mnemonic devices for Maxwell's relations A H Kalantar Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada TG6 2G2 On an analogy for Ohm's law H S Fricker Bradford Grammar School Further reflections D Hinson `Brenig', Town Hill, Llanrwst, Gwynedd LL26 0NF, UK Moving charges W Jarvis 6 Peggy''s Mill Road, Edinburgh EH4 6JY, UK More on the distance travelled A Tan Department of Physics, Alabama A&M University, USA

1991-12-01

371

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bad physics?Robin ParkerHead of Physics, Longdean School, Hemel Hempstead, UK Newton's lawsJ W Warren35 St Andrews Avenue, Wembley HA0 2QB, UK Misleading thermodynamicsP E LileyMechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1288, USA IB Physics revisitedMark HeadleeCoordinator of Physics, Armand Hammer United World College, Montezuma, NM 87731-0248, USA

1994-01-01

372

[Letters to Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

``A METEOR SHOWER AT NORTHWICH.-At Northwich on Monday night, February 3, about ten o'clock, a very brilliant meteor was observed in the sky passing from east to west. The meteor displayed an intense white light in its course, and emitted sparks which appeared of various hues. It was visible about six or eight seconds, and from one to two minutes

William F. Denning

1873-01-01

373

Editor's Corner: Brainy Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Despite being a subject of intense interest and scrutiny for all of human history, many aspects of human brain function are still rather poorly understood. However, this is about to change rapidly, as modern imaging techniques create a revolution in our understanding of neuroscience and cognition. These discoveries will provide new insights into how people learn, and are particularly important in providing better understanding of learning disorders and attentional problems. The implications of these findings for teachers are significant--it is our job, after all, to help brains develop into functional, critical-thinking minds.

Metz, Steve

2007-01-01

374

Editor's Note (July 2005)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Summer is the time to work on next year with the luxury of time. This section gives an overview of ideas that involve time for preparation or coordination. This is time that November may not provide but that summer does.

Ohana, Chris

2005-07-01

375

Editor's Note (February 2003)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Aren't patchwork quilts beautiful? What would you answer if you were asked, "Why is the patchwork quilt usually the favorite of quilt fanciers as well as the average person?"Most of us prefer the patchwork quilt because of its beautiful colors and unique designs. Could those same words not be applied to our classrooms today? The diversity of children--not only in culture and color, but also in strengths, talents, and needs--brings a beauty and uniqueness to our classrooms that is to be celebrated.

Mcshane, Joan

2003-02-01

376

Message from the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The journal Nuclear Fusion has played a key role in the development of the physics basis for fusion energy. That physics basis has been sufficiently advanced to enable construction of such major facilities as ITER along the tokamak line in magnetic fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in laser-driven fusion. In the coming decade, while ITER is being constructed and brought into deuterium-tritium (DT) operation, this physics basis will be significantly deepened and extended, with particular key remaining issues addressed. Indeed such a focus was already evident with about 19% of the papers submitted to the 24th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego, USA appearing in the directly labelled ITER and IFE categories. Of course many of the papers in the other research categories were aimed at issues relevant to these major fusion directions. About 17% of the papers submitted in the 'Experiment and Theory' categories dealt with the highly ITER relevant and inter-related issues of edge-localized modes, non-axisymmetric fields and plasma rotation. It is gratifying indeed to see how the international community is able to make such a concerted effort, facilitated by the ITPA and the ITER-IO, around such a major issue for ITER. In addition to deepening and extending the physics bases for the mainline approaches to fusion energy, the coming decade should see significant progress in the physics basis for additional fusion concepts. The stellarator concept should reach a high level of maturity with such facilities as LHD operating in Japan and already producing significant results and the W7-X in the EU coming online soon. Physics issues that require pulses of hundreds of seconds to investigate can be confronted in the new superconducting tokamaks coming online in Asia and in the major stellarators. The basis for steady-state operation of a tokamak may be further developed in the upper half of the tokamak operating space—the wall stabilized regime. New divertor geometries are already being investigated. Progress should continue on additional driver approaches in inertial fusion. Nuclear Fusion will continue to play a major role in documenting the significant advances in fusion plasma science on the way to fusion energy. Successful outcomes in projects like ITER and NIF will bring sharply into focus the remaining significant issues in fusion materials science and fusion nuclear science and technology needed to move from the scientific feasibility of fusion to the actual realization of fusion power production. These issues are largely common to magnetic and inertial fusion. Progress in these areas has been limited by the lack of suitable major research facilities. Hopefully the coming decade will see progress along these lines. Nuclear Fusion will play its part with increased papers reporting significant advances in fusion materials and nuclear science and technology. The reputation and status of the journal remains high; paper submissions are increasing and the Impact Factor for the journal remains high at 4.09 for 2011. We look forward in the coming months to publishing expanded versions of many of the outstanding papers presented at the IAEA FEC in San Diego. We congratulate Dr Patrick Diamond of the University of California at San Diego for winning the 2012 Nuclear Fusion Prize for his paper [1] and Dr Hajime Urano of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency for winning the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Prize for his paper [2]. Papers of such quality by our many authors enable the high standard of the journal to be maintained. The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required by our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering ten of the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, three of the top referees have reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excel

Stambaugh, Ronald D.

2013-01-01

377

[Letters to Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

I HAVE read with considerable interest the letters on the above subject by Profs. Meek, Lewis, Drs. Orton, Pearsall, and others. The question of river pollution is a very large one, bristling with many difficulties. When the legal and technical obstacles of defining pollution have been overcome, one is still confronted with the greater difficulty of measuring it. It should

J. W. Haigh Johnson

1924-01-01

378

From the Editor's Desk  

Microsoft Academic Search

All public service departments of the ministries associated with the seafarers need to view seafarers hard working life and isolated living of sacrifice, for the world trade, with a human touch, bringing in considerable foreign exchange to their country. View the genuine needs of Seafarer's Welfare, giving top priority and concession to seafarers, owing to their living and working out

Kunal Anshuman

379

Editor's Note (January 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this month's section we explore the integration of math into the science curriculum. Meaningful math and science integration can also help teachers identify specific skills and standards that support their science and mathematics curricula.

Ohana, Chris

2004-01-01

380

Editor's Note (September 2006)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Investigation skills are taught for several reasons--to help students become better thinkers and problem solvers; to help them be better versed in the nature of scientific work; and to help them remember content and facts. We know that students do not learn new science skills in observation, for example, without explicit attention to the skill. Simply observing something does not improve observation skills. Yet almost every major commercial curriculum will rattle off all of the process skills in a lesson when none are directly taught. Throughout this issue, the aim is to fill some of those gaps.

Ohana, Chris

2006-01-01

381

From the guest editors.  

PubMed

Carlos Castilo-Chavez is a Regents Professor, a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, and a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at Arizona State University. His research program is at the interface of the mathematical and natural and social sciences with emphasis on (i) the role of dynamic social landscapes on disease dispersal; (ii) the role of environmental and social structures on the dynamics of addiction and disease evolution, and (iii) Dynamics of complex systems at the interphase of ecology, epidemiology and the social sciences. Castillo-Chavez has co-authored over two hundred publications (see goggle scholar citations) that include journal articles and edited research volumes. Specifically, he co-authored a textbook in Mathematical Biology in 2001 (second edition in 2012); a volume (with Harvey Thomas Banks) on the use of mathematical models in homeland security published in SIAM's Frontiers in Applied Mathematics Series (2003); and co-edited volumes in the Series Contemporary Mathematics entitled '' Mathematical Studies on Human Disease Dynamics: Emerging Paradigms and Challenges'' (American Mathematical Society, 2006) and Mathematical and Statistical Estimation Approaches in Epidemiology (Springer-Verlag, 2009) highlighting his interests in the applications of mathematics in emerging and re-emerging diseases. Castillo-Chavez is a member of the Santa Fe Institute's external faculty, adjunct professor at Cornell University, and contributor, as a member of the Steering Committee of the '' Committee for the Review of the Evaluation Data on the Effectiveness of NSF-Supported and Commercially Generated Mathematics Curriculum Materials,'' to a 2004 NRC report. The CBMS workshop '' Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications'' lectures delivered by C. Castillo-Chavez and F. Brauer in 2011 have been published by SIAM in 2013. PMID:24245643

Chowell, Gerardo; Feng, Zhilan; Song, Baojun

2013-01-01

382

Editor's Corner: Model Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Models are at the core of the scientific enterprise. They help us make predictions, understand complex systems, generate new ideas, and visualize both the very large and the very small. The generation of models is the creative engine that drives scientifi

Metz, Steve

2011-02-01

383

Projects in VR Editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

eople who experience an immersive VR system usually report feeling as if they were really in the displayed virtual situation, and can often be observed behaving in accordance with that feeling, even though they know that they're not actually there. Researchers refer to this feeling as \\

Larry Rosenblum; Simon Julier; Franco Tecchia; Christoph Guger; Beau Lotto; Simon Julier

2010-01-01

384

Editor's Roundtable: Model behavior  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Models are manageable representations of objects, concepts, and phenomena, and are everywhere in science. Models are "thinking tools" for scientists and have always played a key role in the development of scientific knowledge. Models of the solar system,

Liftig, Inez

2010-11-01

385

PREFACE: Editors' Preface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

These are the proceedings of the 26th edition of the Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics. As in previous years the unique character of this conference series has allowed us to bring nuclear scientists from very different fields together to discuss their scientific achievements. At the high-energy frontier results from the first elementary collisions at the LHC were shown. At the lower energies the RHIC beam energy scan is underway to span the gap between the SPS and RHIC and search for critical phenomena in the nuclear matter phase diagram. RHIC is at its peak of scientific output and many of the measurements and theories discussed here will serve as a roadmap for new measurements at the LHC and at the lower RHIC energies. The nuclear structure and astrophysics communities have started to construct dedicated facilities at Michigan State University (F-RIB) and the GSI in Germany (FAIR). These proceedings of the 26th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics again provide a snapshot of the status of the field. The articles, many of which are written by some of the most promising young scientists in the field, are conveying the feeling of excitement that permeates all subfields of nuclear science. Rene Bellwied (Wayne State University) Roy Lacey (SUNY Stony Brook) Scott Pratt (Michigan State University)

Bellwied, Rene; Lacey, Roy; Pratt, Scott

2010-04-01

386

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conservation and capacitanceGuy S M MooreSchool of Physical Sciences, Hatfield Polytechnic, Herts AL10 9AB, UK On mass and energyJ StrnadDepartment of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia A simple derivation of E =mc2Guy S M MooreSchool of Physical Sciences, Hatfield Polytechnic, Herts AL10 9AB, UK Put put rockets revisitedJames D Edmonds JrPhysics Department, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA 70609, USA

1992-01-01

387

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A closer look at the critical angle L Bettany Woolwich College, Villas Road, London SE18 7PN, UK Redshifted stars approaching G S Moore Division of Physical Sciences, Hatfield Polytechnic, Herts AL10 9AB, UK Projectiles W W McLean Dunoon Grammar School, Argyll PA23 8LU, UK Conservation and capacitance C Parton 40 Bellshill Road, Uddington, Glasgow G71 7LZ, UK A simple derivation of E = mc2 V P Srivastava Regional College of Education, Ajmer, India

1991-07-01

388

Guest Editors' introduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Special Issue on Management This special issue contains seven papers originally presented at an International Workshop on Services for Managing Distributed Systems (SMDS'95), held in September 1995 in Karslruhe, Germany. The workshop was organized to present the results of two ESPRIT III funded projects, Sysman and IDSM, and more generally to bring together work in the area of distributed systems management. The workshop focused on the tools and techniques necessary for managing future large-scale, multi-organizational distributed systems. The open call for papers attracted a large number of submissions and the subsequent attendance at the workshop, which was larger than expected, clearly indicated that the topics addressed by the workshop were of considerable interest both to industry and academia. The papers selected for this special issue represent an excellent coverage of the issues addressed by the workshop. A particular focus of the workshop was the need to help managers deal with the size and complexity of modern distributed systems by the provision of automated support. This automation must have two prime characteristics: it must provide a flexible management system which responds rapidly to changing organizational needs, and it must provide both human managers and automated management components with the information that they need, in a form which can be used for decision-making. These two characteristics define the two main themes of this special issue. To satisfy the requirement for a flexible management system, workers in both industry and universities have turned to architectures which support policy directed management. In these architectures policy is explicitly represented and can be readily modified to meet changing requirements. The paper `Towards implementing policy-based systems management' by Meyer, Anstötz and Popien describes an approach whereby policy is enforced by event-triggered rules. Krause and Zimmermann in their paper `Implementing configuration management policies for distributed applications' present a system in which the configuration of the system in terms of its constituent components and their interconnections can be controlled by reconfiguration rules. Neumair and Wies in the paper `Case study: applying management policies to manage distributed queuing systems' examine how high-level policies can be transformed into practical and efficient implementations for the case of distributed job queuing systems. Koch and Krämer in `Rules and agents for automated management of distributed systems' describe the results of an experiment in using the software development environment Marvel to provide a rule based implementation of management policy. The paper by Jardin, `Supporting scalability and flexibility in a distributed management platform' reports on the experience of using a policy directed approach in the industrial strength TeMIP management platform. Both human managers and automated management components rely on a comprehensive monitoring system to provide accurate and timely information on which decisions are made to modify the operation of a system. The monitoring service must deal with condensing and summarizing the vast amount of data available to produce the events of interest to the controlling components of the overall management system. The paper `Distributed intelligent monitoring and reporting facilities' by Pavlou, Mykoniatis and Sanchez describes a flexible monitoring system in which the monitoring agents themselves are policy directed. Their monitoring system has been implemented in the context of the OSIMIS management platform. Debski and Janas in `The SysMan monitoring service and its management environment' describe the overall SysMan management system architecture and then concentrate on how event processing and distribution is supported in that architecture. The collection of papers gives a good overview of the current state of the art in distributed system management. It has reached a point at which a first generation of systems, based on policy representation with

Magee, Jeff; Moffett, Jonathan

1996-06-01

389

Editor's Note: Reaching Out  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Science Education Teaching Standards state that students should be provided with opportunities to use resources outside the classroom (Standard D; NRC 1996). Involving parents in learning, including informal learning sites, and tapping into o

Froschauer, Linda

2010-02-01

390

Molecule Viewers and Editors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This metasite is an excellent resource for chemical researchers and educators. It provides links to three free software programs: JchemPaint, Jmol, and OpenChem. JchemPaint, developed at the Max Planck Institute of Chemical Ecology, is a Java program for drawing 2-D chemical structures. Jmol, primarily authored by J. Daniel Gezelter of Notre Dame University, is a Java/Swing program for viewing molecular visualization and measurement. OpenChem, a large collaborative effort, is a Python-based program for investigating nanotechnology, machines and molecular structures. All three of the programs are still under construction, but each page contains helpful troubleshooting information and discussion lists.

391

Molecule Viewers and Editors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This metasite is an excellent resource for chemical researchers and educators. It provides links to three free software programs: JchemPaint, Jmol, and OpenChem. JchemPaint, developed at the Max Planck Institute of Chemical Ecology, is a Java program for drawing 2-D chemical structures. Jmol, primarily authored by J. Daniel Gezelter of Notre Dame University, is a Java/Swing program for viewing molecular visualization and measurement. OpenChem, a large collaborative effort, is a Python-based program for investigating nanotechnology, machines and molecular structures. All three of the programs are still under construction, but each page contains helpful troubleshooting information and discussion lists.

2007-06-01

392

Editor's Note: STEM Careers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There is a new impetus for encouraging students to become more knowledgeable about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and perhaps encourage them to choose a career in science-related fields. Several groups and individuals, including

Froschauer, Linda

2010-03-01

393

Letters to the Editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mistaken determination of absorption and scattering coefficientsAlun M RobertsDepartment of Biotechnology, South Bank Polytechnic, London SE1 0AA, UK Mistaken determination of absorption and scattering coefficientsK TurveyDepartment of Applied Chemical and Physical Sciences, Napier Polytechnic, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK The heresy of absolute motionJames D Edmonds JrPhysics Department, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA 70609, USA Direction of motion of a travelling waveN GauthierDepartment of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario K7K 5L0, Canada Rayleigh scattering by a Bohr atomG P Sastry and Kapeeleshwar KrishanaDepartment of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India

1992-07-01

394

Letter from the Editors  

PubMed Central

We are happy to publish this special issue dedicated to Prof. Rosangela Marchelli. This issue not only celebrates her long-standing scientific activity on occasion of her significant anniversary, but it is meant to recognize her contribution to Bioorganic Chemistry in the field of Artificial DNA, and in particular of Peptide Nucleic Acids.

Corradini, Roberto; Sforza, Stefano

2012-01-01

395

Editor's Note: Understanding Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Science is a data-based subject. In any experiment, the two most important product components are the data and the analysis of that data--what happened, and what does it mean? When considering how to design inquiry experiences for students, the author beli

Froschauer, Linda

2011-01-01

396

Guest Editor's Introduction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the field of international traveler and nomadic education research and argues for the need to extend the boundaries of this "field" significantly. Research on the education of travelers and nomads is mobile and fluid, but the approach used in this collection, the mapping and celebration of international diversity, is needed to expand…

Danaher, Patrick Alan

2000-01-01

397

[Letters to Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

MAY a self-constituted Anubis of the scientific philosophy of `the ancients' raise a plaint outside the door of the Temple of Modern Knowledge from which he hears the voice of its Secretary stating his opinion about their views? (Supp. NATURE, Nov. 3). The irreversibility of living energies was fundamental knowledge on which the ancient scientists of Aryavarta based their doctrines

L. W. W

1928-01-01

398

Editor's Note: New Heights  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ask five-year-olds what they want to be when they grow up and we may hear "astronaut," "dinosaur paleontologist," or even "princess." Rather than repeat all of the more realistic professions surrounding them, they go with jobs that capture their imagination--riding in a spaceship, digging up Triceratops, or being waited on hand and foot. In this issue, we present lessons and programs that will help students realize their dreams of traveling to space.

Ohana, Chris

2008-09-01

399

Geological and geochemical studies of the Sierra del Morro-Oeste (San Luis Province, Argentina): Meta-sediments and meta-volcanics from a probable back-arc setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sierra del Morro-Oeste covers an area of some 40 km 2 in the northeastern part of San Luis Province, Argentina. This area is an integral part of the scheelite- and wolframite-bearing crystalline basement of the Sierras Pampeanas. A "characteristic rock sequence"—several tens of meters thick—is concordantly embedded between uniform country rocks (quartz-oligoclase/andesine micaschists and gneises); it includes layered alternations of banded amphibolites, hornblende-epidote schists, scheelite-bearing calc-silicate rocks, lenses of barren marble, and, locally, tourmaline-bearing micaschists. Chemical analyses of amphibolite samples allow these metamorphic rocks to be interpreted as derivatives of a tholeiite-basaltic volcanism. The amphibolites are subdivided into two groups (A and B) because of significant differences in their chemical composition. These differences are related to hydrothermal seafloor alteration. This sea-water alteration has been most effective in the youngest tholeiite-basaltic lava extrusions. The derivatives of the submarine altered tholeiite-basaltic lavas (amphibolites of Group B) can therefore be interpreted as younger in comparison with the primary lavas of the non-altered amphibolites of Group A. The extrusion of the tholeiite-basaltic lavas obviously took place during an initial stage of back-arc basin rifting on continental crust.

Delakowitz, B.; Höll, R.; Hack, M.; de Brodtkorb, M. K.; Stärk, H.

400

Potential Human Health Risk by Metal(loid)s, 234,238U and 210Po due to Consumption of Fish from the "Luis L. Leon" Reservoir (Northern M?xico)  

PubMed Central

Concentrations of As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb and Zn and activity concentrations from 234,238U and 210Po in water, fillet, liver and gills were determined in three stocked fish species from the Luis L. Leon reservoir, located in Northern Mexico. The considered species were Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus. 238U and 234U activity concentration (AC) in fillet samples showed values of 0.007–0.014 and 0.01–0.02 Bq?kg?1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for L. cyanellus, C. carpio and I. furcatus present 210Po AC of 1.16–3.26, 0.70–1.13 and 0.93–1.37 Bq?kg?1 ww. Arsenic, mercury and lead concentration intervals in fillet samples were 0.13–0.39, 0.005–0.126 and 0.009–0.08 mg?kg?1 ww, respectively, while in gill samples they were 0.11–0.43, 0.002–0.039 and 0.02–0.26 mg?kg?1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues with respect to their concentrations in water was determined. L. cyanellus showed the highest BAF values for As and total U, being BAFAs = 37 and 40 L?kg?1 in fillet and gills, respectively, and BAFU total = 1.5 L?kg?1 in fillet. I. furcatus showed the highest BAF values for Hg and Pb, being BAFHg = 40 and 13 L?kg?1 in fillet and gills, and BAFPb = 6.5 and 22 L?kg?1 in fillet and gills, respectively. Some metal(loid) concentrations are slightly higher than European regulations for fish fillets. The difference in concentrations of metal(loid)s in fillet among the studied species is probably due to their differences in diet and habitat.

Luna-Porres, Mayra Y.; Rodriguez-Villa, Marco A.; Herrera-Peraza, Eduardo F.; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia; Montero-Cabrera, Maria E.

2014-01-01

401

Potential Human Health Risk by Metal(loid)s, 234,238U and 210Po due to Consumption of Fish from the "Luis L. Leon" Reservoir (Northern México).  

PubMed

Concentrations of As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb and Zn and activity concentrations from 234,238U and 210Po in water, fillet, liver and gills were determined in three stocked fish species from the Luis L. Leon reservoir, located in Northern Mexico. The considered species were Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus. 238U and 234U activity concentration (AC) in fillet samples showed values of 0.007-0.014 and 0.01-0.02 Bq?kg-1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for L. cyanellus, C. carpio and I. furcatus present 210Po AC of 1.16-3.26, 0.70-1.13 and 0.93-1.37 Bq?kg-1 ww. Arsenic, mercury and lead concentration intervals in fillet samples were 0.13-0.39, 0.005-0.126 and 0.009-0.08 mg?kg-1 ww, respectively, while in gill samples they were 0.11-0.43, 0.002-0.039 and 0.02-0.26 mg?kg-1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues with respect to their concentrations in water was determined. L. cyanellus showed the highest BAF values for As and total U, being BAFAs = 37 and 40 L?kg-1 in fillet and gills, respectively, and BAFU total = 1.5 L?kg-1 in fillet. I. furcatus showed the highest BAF values for Hg and Pb, being BAFHg = 40 and 13 L?kg-1 in fillet and gills, and BAFPb = 6.5 and 22 L?kg-1 in fillet and gills, respectively. Some metal(loid) concentrations are slightly higher than European regulations for fish fillets. The difference in concentrations of metal(loid)s in fillet among the studied species is probably due to their differences in diet and habitat. PMID:24968208

Luna-Porres, Mayra Y; Rodríguez-Villa, Marco A; Herrera-Peraza, Eduardo F; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia; Montero-Cabrera, María E

2014-01-01

402

Big-Bang-Gate Cosmic Titanic: Why Aren't Physics Journal's Editors Bringing It To The Center of Scientific Attention  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Until now science's greatest debacle occurred when Copernicus exposed Ptolemaic cosmologists' 1300 hundred year-long fraud that it must be true because observations fit theory so well, while they ignored the untested state of its central assumption of Earth centered planetary motion. With much hubris modern physicists are confident this could never happen again, that the integrity of physics journals editors suffices to guarantee that a challenge to the reigning cosmological theory -- big bang cosmology -- would immediately be brought to the center of scientific attention for analysis and discussion. In fact a decade ago it was reported [MPLA 2619 (1997); arXiv:gr-gc/9806061] that, like Ptolemaic cosmology before it, big bang's central assumption that GR expansion effects cause in-flight expansion had never been tested and, further, that experimental testing of it using GR operation of the GPS showed it to be false. This result proves it is impossible for the 2.73 K CBR to be fireball relic radiation. These results were expanded in CERN reports EXT-2003-021;022, but have been uniformly rejected by physics journals, one of which accepted a paper similar to CERN EXT-2003-022, only to reject it a few days later with the admission not to publish it because of fearing reaction of the worldwide physics community. For update on my PRL submission see http://www.alphacosmos.net. )

Gentry, Robert

2010-02-01

403

PRELIMINARY PALEOMAGNETIC RESULTS FROM OUTFLOW EOCENE-OLIGOCENE ASH FLOW TUFFS FROM THE WESTERN MARGIN OF THE SAN LUIS BASIN: IMPLICATION FOR THE KINEMATIC EVOLUTION OF THE RIO GRANDE RIFT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Rio Grande rift (RGR), a late Cenozoic continental rift from central Colorado to southern New Mexico, hanging wall margins typically contain en echelon normal fault systems with intervening areas of typically complex structure, called relay zones. Relay zones transfer displacement through complex strain patterns and eventual linkage of faults and hold clues as to how fault zones initiate and grow. The western margin of the RGR at the latitude of the San Luis basin (SLB) exposes laterally continuous Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks, well-correlated by 40Ar/39Ar data, and well-preserved rift structures. Ash flow tuffs are usually excellent recorders of the instantaneous geomagnetic field and five ash flow tuffs (ca. 32.3 to 27.3 Ma; including the Saguache Creek, La Jara Canyon, Masonic Park, Fish Canyon, and Carpenter Ridge tuffs) have been sampled in spatial detail along west to east transects of the eastern San Juan volcanic field to the westernmost margin of the RGR at the SLB. Data obtained from our sampling approach will yield a comprehensive definition of relative vertical-axis rotations across the area and will be used to assess the timing of RGR fault linkages. Preliminary paleomagnetic data from the Masonic Park tuff (ca. 28.2 Ma) suggest up to ~17° clockwise rotation between sample locations on the Colorado Plateau and locations to the east, nearest the western margin of the RGR. Preliminary data from the Fish Canyon tuff (ca. 27.8 Ma) show a ~12° clockwise rotation. The relative clockwise vertical-axis rotation of sampling sites in both ash flow tuffs nearest the RGR margin suggests that relay zone development with attending vertical-axis rotation played an important role in the opening of the northern RGR. Our data set is not sufficiently robust at present to test the hypothesis that rotation was taking place concurrently with eruption of these large-volume ash flow tuffs in the early Oligocene, but it is a possibility and if so, the RGR at the latitude of the SLB began to open by about 28 Ma, some 1.5 Ma earlier than previously thought and coeval with late-stage volcanism in the San Juan region.

Mason, S. N.; Geissman, J. W.; Sussman, A. J.

2009-12-01

404

Sustainability Metrics: The San Luis Basin Project  

EPA Science Inventory

Sustainability is about promoting humanly desirable dynamic regimes of the environment. Metrics: ecological footprint, net regional product, exergy, emergy, and Fisher Information. Adaptive management: (1) metrics assess problem, (2) specific problem identified, and (3) managemen...

405

Digital Earth Workbench: 3D Hurricane Luis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Digital Earth Workbench is an interactive application that runs on a SGI Onyx Infinite Reality system and is controlled by an Immersive Workbench, tracked stereo glasses, and a tracked wand. The application allows an unprecedented freedom to roam georeferenced datasets at multiple resolutions and timescales. This animation is one of a series of direct creen captures of the application in operation. The occasional menu appearance denotes direct intervention by the operator to add or delete data or to activate a new control option.

Maher, Steve; Hasler, Fritz

1999-11-12

406

EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This year Nuclear Fusion celebrates its fiftieth anniversary. This has been marked by the January special edition, containing papers presented at the plenary and celebratory evening session of the 22nd Fusion Energy Conference at Geneva. These papers underline the enormous progress that has been made in the last 50 years both in experiment and theory. Whilst the technical challenges that

Paul Thomas

2010-01-01

407

EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2010, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the

Peter Hauptmann

2011-01-01

408

EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support

Paul Thomas

2011-01-01

409

Apollo: a sequence annotation editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The well-established inaccuracy of purely computational methods for annotating genome sequences necessitates an interactive tool to allow biological experts to refine these approximations by viewing and independently evaluating the data supporting each annotation. Apollo was developed to meet this need, enabling curators to inspect genome annotations closely and edit them. FlyBase biologists successfully used Apollo to annotate the Drosophila melanogaster

SE Lewis; SMJ Searle; N Harris; M Gibson; V Iyer; J Richter; C Wiel; L Bayraktaroglu; E Birney; MA Crosby; JS Kaminker; BB Matthews; SE Prochnik; CD Smith; JL Tupy; GM Rubin; S Misra; CJ Mungall; ME Clamp

2002-01-01

410

A word from the editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welcome to the third issue of the ACM Computers in Entertainmentmagazine! In this exciting issue we present eight articles on adiversity of entertainment technology topics including Internetmovie piracy, performing arts, animatronics, robotics, music,games, and interactive television.To get started, the Interviews section features video interviewswith our distinguished advisory board members Leonard Kleinrock andRichard Edlund. Leonard talks about nomadic computing, embeddedtechnology, smart

Newton Lee

2004-01-01

411

A word from the editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welcome to the fourth issue of the ACM Computers in Entertainment magazine! In this exciting new issue, we publish six interesting papers on entertainment technologies from authors around the world including Greece, Malaysia, Portugal, UK, and USA. Two papers were selected for revision from four best winning papers at the ACM SIGCHI 2004 International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment

Newton Lee

2004-01-01

412

Editorial - Energy & Fuels editor search.  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic activity and selectivity for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and olefin hydrogenation of FCC naphtha have been determined for MoS2 (no Co) catalysts on different supports and for a commercial CoMo/alumina HDS catalyst both with and without the addition of alkali. For MoS2 catalysts, the specific HDS activity is higher on silica than alumina, while addition of Cs resulted in no change in the activity. The differences in activity, however, are relatively small, a factor of less than two. EXAFS and XRD structural analysis indicate that small MoS2 particles are present on all catalysts. The differences in rate are not due to differences in particle size, dispersion, or support physical properties, but are likely due to the modification of catalytic properties by an interaction with the support. While there is a small influence on the rate, the composition of the support, or modification by Cs, has no effect on the HDSlolefin hydrogenation selectivity. The olefin hydrogenation conversion increases linearly with HDS conversion, and at high HDS conversion, few olefins remain in the FCC naphtha. Similar to the effect for Cs promotion of MoS2 on alumina, the addition of K to sulfided CoMo/alumina had little affect on the activity or selectivity for HDS and olefin hydrogenation. Unlike MoS2 catalysts, however, with sulfided CoMo at less than about 85% HDS conversion, the rate of olefin hydrogenation is low, but it increases rapidly as the sulfur in the naphtha drops below about 300 ppm. Selective HDS of FCC naphtha appears to correlate primarily to the formation of the CoMoS phase, rather than to the basic nature of the support. It is proposed that the enhanced olefin hydrogenation selectivity of CoMo catalysts is due to the competitive adsorption of sulfur compounds, which inhibit adsorption and saturation of olefins in the naphtha.

Winans, R. E.; Chemistry

2001-05-01

413

Editor's Corner: Our Patchwork Heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Enriching the classroom experience for all learners will contribute fabric to the great patchwork heritage that is our nation's strength. Therefore, in recognition of the need to include all types of diverse learners, this issue of The Science Teacher (TST) is devoted to "Science for All." This theme serves as an umbrella for ideas and strategies to mitigate academic achievement gaps associated with ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, physical disabilities, limited English language proficiency, and learning differences. All of this is at the core of the NSTA mission: "to promote excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning for all."

Metz, Steve

2009-03-01

414

Editor's Note: States of Matter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There is a common misunderstanding of chemicals and chemistry. Chemicals are "bad." Chemists are a nerdy set in the same category as those zany physicists, except that chemists work with more dangerous materials--"chemicals." A change in attitude is necessary. It really is a "matter" of considerable importance to citizens and our abilities to make informed decisions as consumers and voters. Since chemistry is important and all around us--let this issue open your eyes to the possibilities and excitement within it!

Ohana, Chris

2008-12-01

415

EDITORIAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amid the underbrush of a tropical forest lie a few G.I.'s on hill 837. A few who will have to sing carols this Christmas eve over the crackle of gunfire. Winged merchants of death will provide music from above as their payload splits the night in a cacophonous celebration of our savior's birth. Major Hegod Sir! Reconnaissance Flight 307 reports

Jack Lehman; A Christmas Story; VINCENT BUONORA

1968-01-01

416

EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments

Peter Hauptmann

2006-01-01

417

A word from the editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welcome to ACM Computers in Entertainment, a premier online magazine featuring video interviews with leading professionals and interesting articles on entertainment technology and its applications. In this October\\/December 2007 issue, the Interviews column features video interviews with our distinguished advisory board member Michelle Hinn (October 19, 2007) and the president of the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences Joseph Olin

Newton Lee

2008-01-01

418

EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments

Peter Hauptmann

2008-01-01

419

A word from the editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welcome to the inaugural issue of the ACM Computers inEntertainment magazine! The theme for this issue is EducatingChildren Through Entertainment, with a focus on computer games andeducation.To get started, the Interviews section features video interviewswith Alan Kay and Roy E. Disney. Alan talked about soft fun versushard fun, and his research on Squeak for enhancing and amplifyinglearning in children's education.

Newton Lee

2003-01-01

420

EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2008, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments

Peter Hauptmann

2009-01-01

421

Editor's Corner: Where's the Evidence?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"What evidence do you have for that idea?" It is a simple question, but one asked far less than it should be. Too often, we hear justifications such as, "Everybody knows that ...," "It's what I've heard," or "It's just what I believe." But formulating exp

Metz, Steve

2009-11-01

422

Text editor on a chip  

SciTech Connect

The authors propose a processor which provides useful facilities for implementing text editing commands. The processor now being developed is a component of the general front-end editing system which parses the program text and processes the text. This processor attached to a conventional microcomputer system bus executes screen editing functions. Conventional text editing is a typical application of the microprocessors. But in this paper emphasis is given to the firmware and hardware processing of texts in order that the processor can be fabricated in a single VLSI chip. To increase the overall regularity and decrease the design cost, the basic instructions are text editing oriented with short basic cycles. 6 references.

Jung Wan Cho; Heung Kyu Lee

1983-01-01

423

Editor's Note: Creating Problem Solvers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You'll see that even young children are able to raise questions about the world around them and are willing to seek answers while making careful observations. Although there is no prescription for how to problem solve, the author provides some suggestions

Froschauer, Linda

2009-10-01

424

Books received by the editor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several wonderful books arrived at SUNY ESF this spring and summer while the book review responsibilities were transferring from Helmut Elsenbeer to Theodore Endreny. Many of these books have found a reviewer, but others are still available. If the readers see a book that they would like to review, you are encouraged to E-mail: te@esf.edu and enquire about writing a review.

2002-10-01

425

A Visually Oriented Text Editor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

HERMAN employs Evans & Sutherland Picture System 2 to provide screenoriented editing capability for DEC PDP-11 series computer. Text altered by visual indication of characters changed. Group of HERMAN commands provides for higher level operations. HERMAN provides special features for editing FORTRAN source programs.

Gomez, J. E.

1985-01-01

426

Editor's Corner: Create and Innovate!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Just as changes in music delivery have radically altered the music business, dramatic changes in the workplace have required rethinking the way our schools work. To develop 21st-century skills, we must create classrooms that foster creativity and encourag

Metz, Steve

2010-09-01

427

Editor's Corner: National Lab Day  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In November 2009, President Obama helped launch National Lab Day (NLD)--an initiative that promises to become the most ambitious science-education partnership project ever in the United States. NLD is a nationwide movement to "build local communities of su

Metz, Steve

2010-04-01

428

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-05-01

429

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-04-01

430

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-06-01

431

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-03-01

432

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-01-01

433

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-07-01

434

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-08-01

435

Out of the Editor's Basket  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information (press releases) on selected products are collected. Links to the WWW sites of the product manufacturers can be found in the Advertiser's Index for three months after the month of publication.

2009-02-01

436

Editor's Corner: Science for All  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This issue of The Science Teacher (TST) marks our 12th consecutive annual issue devoted to the theme "Science for All." In its infancy, this special issue focused exclusively on the important topic of teaching science in multicultural classrooms. While TST will continue to actively seek and publish articles on teaching and learning practices for multicultural classrooms, we also recognize that diversity comes in many flavors. Over these dozen years, the Science for All theme has evolved to now serve as an umbrella for articles about a wide range of issues surrounding the inclusion of all learners. This current issue of TST continues this tradition. Our goal must be for all students to achieve science literacy. Science is for all.

Metz, Steve

2007-03-01

437

Intelligent editor/printer enhancements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microprocessor support hardware, software, and cross assemblers relating to the Motorola 6800 and 6809 process systems were developed. Pinter controller and intelligent CRT development are discussed. The user's manual, design specifications for the MC6809 version of the intelligent printer controller card, and a 132-character by 64-line intelligent CRT display system using a Motorola 6809 MPU, and a one-line assembler and disassembler are provided.

Woodfill, M. C.; Pheanis, D. C.

1983-01-01

438

A word from the editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welcome to ACM Computers in Entertainment, a premier online magazine featuring video interviews with leading professionals and interesting articles on entertainment technology and its applications. In this April\\/June 2008 issue of ACM CIE, we feature the Video Interviews of Gabrielle Weinman at Team One (November 8, 2007) and David Harris at MTV New Media (November 8, 2007): • Gabrielle Weinman

Newton Lee

2008-01-01

439

A word from the editor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welcome to the third volume and first issue of 2005 for the ACMComputers in Entertainment online magazine!In this issue we publish seven interesting papers onentertainment technologies, including animation, games, interactiveTV, storytelling, and artificial intelligence. The article oninverse kinematics was voted the best paper and presentation at theSecond International Game Design and Technology Workshop, held lastSeptember at Liverpools John Moores University.To

Newton Lee

2005-01-01

440

Editor's Corner: Spirit and Opportunity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Throughout the 2004 school year, The Science Teacher (TST) feature articles focused on providing inquiry experiences with meaningful assessments in our classrooms. Issue themes focused on developing skills in the classroom for "doing science." In this issue, some authors emphasized "Interpreting Evidence." The May 2004 issue of TST continued the tradition of publishing teacher/student/community projects. For most of these projects, students were in the field interpreting evidence and then they provided a service to their community based on their research.

Gerking, Janet

2004-04-01

441

Coherent Radar: Guest Editor's Introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

veryone knows that echoes are caused by sound reflecting off objects. The presence of too many reflectors, however, frequently makes it impossible to distinguish a particular echo in the presence of the background \\

Russell Rzemien

1997-01-01

442

Editor's Corner: The Central Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Of all the subjects, chemistry should arguably be the most enjoyable; it is filled with things that bubble, change color, burst into flame, and otherwise provide visual and intellectual intrigue. As the paradigmatic laboratory science, it may also be the

Metz, Steve

2009-09-01

443

Editor's Roundtable: Classroom management � la Goldilocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Classroom management is a difficult balancing act. Like Goldilocks, teachers should sample all the classroom management techniques available to them to find the ones that are "just right" for their classroom. Therefore, teachers must quickly establish a c

Liftig, Inez

2009-07-01

444

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Ferromagnetic fullerene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New magnetic forms of C60 have been identified which occur in the rhombohedral polymer phase. The existence of previously reported ferromagnetic rhombohedral C60 is confirmed. This property has been shown to occur over a range of preparation temperatures at 9 GPa. The structure is shown to be crystalline in nature containing whole undamaged buckyballs. Formation of radicals is most likely due to thermally activated shearing of the bridging bond resulting in dangling bond formation. With increasing temperatures this process occurs in great enough numbers to trigger cage collapse and graphitization. The magnetically strongest sample was formed at 800 K, and has a saturated magnetization at 10 K, in fields above 3 kOe, of 0.045 emu g-1.

Wood, R. A.; Lewis, M. H.; Lees, M. R.; Bennington, S. M.; Cain, M. G.; Kitamura, N.

2002-06-01

445

Editor's Note: Inquiry--Process Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We take for granted that students have some abilities in questioning, observing, predicting, planning an investigation, collecting data, interpreting information, and communicating their ideas. But, this is more than likely not the case. We must be delibe

Froschauer, Linda

2010-10-01