Science.gov

Sample records for educational space modeling

  1. SPACE: Space Planning and Cost Estimating Model for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donovan E.; Wagner, W. Gary

    This paper presents SPACE, a space planning and cost estimating simulation model designed to allow analysis of alternative class scheduling patterns and their consequent resource demands. Several illustrative examples of the model's use are given, with documentation of the validation procedures using data from the University of California. The…

  2. Space ecoliteracy- five informal education models for community empowerment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramaiah, Jagannatha; Jagannath, Sahana; J, Spandana; J, Sadhana; Jagannath, Shobha

    Space ecoliteracy is a historical necessity and vital aspect of space age.Space Situational Awareness has taught lessons for mankind to look inward while stretching beyond cradle in human endeavours. Quality of life for every one on the only home of mankind-TERRA shall be a feasibility only after realizing Space ecoliteracy amongst all stakeholders in space quest. Objectives of Informal Environmental Education(UNESCO/UNEP/IEEP,1977) mandates awareness, attitude, knowledge, skill and participation at Individual and Community domains. Application of Space Technology at both Telecommunications and Remote Sensing domain have started making the fact that mankind has a challenge to learn and affirm earthmanship. Community empowerment focus after Earth Summit 1992 mandate of Sustainable Development has demonstrated a deluge of best practices in Agriculture,Urban, Industries and service sectors all over the globe. Further, deployment of Space technologies have proved the immense potential only after pre-empting the participatory approach at individual and community levels.Indian Space Programme with its 44th year of space service to national development has demonstrated self reliance in space technology for human development. Space technology for the most underdeveloped is a success story both in communication and information tools for quality of life. In this presentation Five Space Ecoliteracy models designed and validated since 1985 till date on informal environmental education namely 1) Ecological Environmental Studies by Students-EESS (1988): cited as one of the 20 best eco -education models by Earth Day Network,2)Community Eco Literacy Campaign-CEL,(2000): cited as a partner under Clean Up the World Campaign,UN, 3) Space Eco Literacy(2011)-an informa 8 week space eco literacy training reported at 39th COSPAR 12 assembly and 4) Space Eco Literacy by Practice(2014)- interface with formal education at institutions and 5) Space Ecoliteracy Mission as a space out reach in Popular Science are listed. Five models methodologies, design criterion and working details along with the net benefits to the community are discussed.

  3. A Model for E-Education: Extended Teaching Spaces and Extended Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Insung; Latchem, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes a model for e-education in instruction, training, initiation and induction based upon the concept of extended teaching spaces involving execution, facilitation and liberation, and extended learning spaces used for acquisition, application and construction cemented by dialogue and reflection. The proposed model is based upon…

  4. Hierarchical Network Models for Education Research: Hierarchical Latent Space Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Tracy M.; Thomas, Andrew C.; Junker, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Intervention studies in school systems are sometimes aimed not at changing curriculum or classroom technique, but rather at changing the way that teachers, teaching coaches, and administrators in schools work with one another--in short, changing the professional social networks of educators. Current methods of social network analysis are…

  5. Dedicated Space Science Education Centres Provide the Model for Effective Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfitt, A.

    Planetaria and science centres are traditionally successful players in engaging all levels and ages of society. They have long played a supportive role to and within education. Their value in teacher circles has always been recognised as an effective resource. Given the decline in career choices in traditional Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and astronomy and planetary sciences, they are now more important than ever. Since their inception the role and function of Planetaria has been required to evolve to meet the changing demands of society. They are now faced with the challenge of meeting new requirements and the need for new and different resources, techniques, support and funding models to meet and effectively deliver to new target groups. To face these challenges these pivotal centres require new methodology in their development of programs to be effective in their support to education. New directions specifically tailored for teacher professional development and for student studies. The changing requirements have resulted in a new kind of science centre one dedicated and specially designed using space science and dedicated to formal education across stem activities. The space scientist forms an integral and key role in this type of centre by providing the science, the passion of discovery and the relevance of the science to the community. These programs need to be carefully aligned to flexible course requirements and objectives to ensure relevancy to the education and outreach sector. They need access to and the support and input from the scientist and research institutions. They need real and appropriate material and resources. Scientists need effective channels through which to inform and share their work. Here is the potential for enormously effective symbiosis. This paper describes how new multi million dollar state-of-the-art space science centres are working with cutting edge science, research institutes, universities, government education departments, all education stakeholders and deliverers in formal, informal and non-specialist education support. The dedicated space education centres provide realistic prototypes for the restructuring of existing planetaria and science centres to meet needs of education in 21st Century.

  6. LewiSpace: An Exploratory Study with a Machine Learning Model in an Educational Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghali, Ramla; Ouellet, Sébastien; Frasson, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The use of educational games as a tool for providing learners with a playful and educational aspect is widespread. In this paper, we present an educational game that we developed to teach a chemistry lesson, namely drawing a Lewis diagram. Our game is a 3D environment known as LewiSpace and aims at balancing between playful and educational…

  7. Space physics educational outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this Space Physics Educational Outreach project was to develop a laboratory experiment and classroom lecture on Earth's aurora for use in lower division college physics courses, with the particular aim of implementing the experiment and lecture at Saint Mary's College of California. The strategy is to teach physics in the context of an interesting natural phenomenon by investigating the physical principles that are important in Earth's aurora, including motion of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields, particle collisions and chemical reactions, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy. As a by-product, the undergraduate students would develop an appreciation for naturally occurring space physics phenomena.

  8. Education in space science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbrick, C. Russell

    2005-08-01

    The educational process for teaching space science has been examined as a topic at the 17th European Space Agency Symposium on European Rocket and Balloon, and Related Research. The approach used for an introductory course during the past 18 years at Penn State University is considered as an example. The opportunities for using space science topics to motivate the thinking and efforts of advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students are examined. The topics covered in the introductory course are briefly described in an outline indicating the breath of the material covered. Several additional topics and assignments are included to help prepare the students for their careers. These topics include discussions on workplace ethics, project management, tools for research, presentation skills, and opportunities to participate in student projects.

  9. Using sunshine for elementary space science education: A model for IHY scientist teacher partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M. B.; Fiello, D.; Harter, E.; Holman, G.; Nagumo, N.; Pryharski, A.; Takunaga, C.

    2008-12-01

    An elementary science education professional development partnership between Culver City Unified School District teachers and UCLA has been formed. The project was designed to assist teachers to comfortably present introductory space science concepts, to support them in their efforts, and to aid them in encouraging their students to develop inquiry skills related to space sciences. The project encourages teacher use of observational science techniques in their classrooms, the use of NASA solar mission images and enhanced use of astronomical observation to facilitate discovery learning. The integrated approach of the project has fostered collegial learning activities among the participating teachers and offered them opportunities for continued renewal and professional development of teacher competencies in astronomy and space science. The activities used in the classroom were developed by others, classroom tested, and specifically address National Science Education and California Science Content Standards. These activities have been sustained through on-going collaboration between the scientist and the teachers, a summer Research Experience for Teachers program, and on-going, grade-specific, district-sponsored workshops. Assessment of the value of the program is done by the school district and is used to continuously improve each workshop and program component. Culver City (California) Unified School District is a small urban school district located on the Westside of Los Angeles. This paper describes the program and the plans for incorporating IHY-themed science into the classroom.

  10. Using the Earth as an Effective Model for Integrating Space Science Into Education Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Allen, J.; Galindo, C.; McKay, G.; Obot, V.; Reiff, P.

    2005-05-01

    Our methods of teaching Earth and space science as two disciplines do not represent the spirit of earlier scientists such as Aristotle, da Vinci, and Galileo. We need to re-evaluate these methods and take advantage of the excitement created in the general public over the recent space science exploration programs. The information that we are obtaining from both the Mars missions and Cassini-Huygens focuses on interpreting geomorphology, mineral compositions and gas identification based on Earth as a baseline for data evaluation. This type of evaluation is an extension of Hutton's 18th century principle of Uniformitarianism, the present is the key to the past, or Earth is the key for understanding extraterrestrial bodies. Geomorphological examples are volcanic activity, meteoritic impacts, and evidence of water altering surface features. The Hawaiian, or shield, type volcanoes are analogues for Olympus Mons and the other volcanoes on Mars. Other examples include comparing sand dunes on Earth with possible Martian dunes, known stream patterns on Earth with potential stream patterns on Mars, and even comparing meteoritic impact features on Mars, the Earth, Moon and Mercury. All of these comparisons have been developed into inquiry-based activities and are available through NASA publications. Each of these activities is easily adapted to emphasize either Earth science or space science or both. Beyond geomorphology, solar storms are an excellent topic for integrating Earth and space science. Solar storms are traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand their effect on Earth or the intense effects they could have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include Earth's magnetosphere, which in turn, affect radio transmission and potentially climate. Like geomorphology courses, there are extensive NASA programs available via either the Internet or CD (e.g., those distributed by P. Reiff, Rice University) that provide inquiry-based activities for students. There is great potential to share the connections of Earth and space science by using NASA developed education materials. The materials can be adapted for the classroom, after school programs, family outreach events, and summer science enrichment programs.

  11. Space Station Freedom - A resource for aerospace education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the International Space Station in future U.S. aerospace education efforts is discussed from a NASA perspective. The overall design concept and scientific and technological goals of the Space Station are reviewed, and particular attention is given to education projects such as the Davis Planetarium Student Space Station, the Starship McCullough, the Space Habitat, the working Space Station model in Austin, TX, the Challenger Center for Space Life Education, Space M+A+X, and the Space Science Student Involvement Program. Also examined are learning-theory aspects of aerospace education: child vs adult learners, educational objectives, teaching methods, and instructional materials.

  12. Adaptive Educational Environments as Creative Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loi, Daria; Dillon, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    This paper integrates theoretical perspectives and practical insights to offer a conceptualization of adaptive educational environments as creative spaces for fostering certain intellectual abilities associated with creativity, notably transference and synthesis in cross-disciplinary situations. When educational environments are modeled as…

  13. The Space Academy: Going beyond "Inspiration"--A Pioneering Model for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojha, Anu; Hill, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines the Space Academy programme led by the National Space Centre from 2008 to 2011 with the stated goals of harnessing the inspirational contexts of space and climate change to support GCSE, A-level and vocational students in their curriculum studies as well as to enhance STEM teacher effectiveness and increase the awareness of…

  14. Space Station model - early

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Manned Space Laboratory Research. James Hansen wrote: 'Looking like a huge pneumatic tire sitting on a giant car jack [is] Langley's full-size test model of its 24-foot toroidal space station.' The model was being prepared from a visit by NASA Administrator James Webb in December 1961.

  15. Operational Space Weather in USAF Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithtro, C.; Quigley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Most education programs offering space weather courses are understandably and traditionally heavily weighted with theoretical space physics that is the basis for most of what is researched and modeled. While understanding the theory is a good and necessary grounding for anyone working the field of space weather, few military or commercial jobs employ such theory in real-time operations. The operations sites/centers are much more geared toward use of applied theory-resultant models, tools and products. To ensure its operations centers personnel, commanders, real-time system operators and other customers affected by the space environment are educated on available and soon-to-be operational space weather models and products, the USAF has developed applicable course/lecture material taught at various institutions to include the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) and the Joint Weather Training Complex (335th/TRS/OUA). Less frequent training of operational space weather is available via other venues that will be discussed, and associated course material is also being developed for potential use at the National Security Space Institute (NSSI). This presentation provides an overview of the programs, locations, courses and material developed and/or taught by or for USAF personnel dealing with operational space weather. It also provides general information on student research project results that may be used in operational support, along with observations regarding logistical and professional benefits of teaching such non-theoretical/non-traditional material.

  16. Four educational programs in Space Life Sciences.

    PubMed

    Luttges, M W; Stodieck, L S; Klaus, D M

    1994-01-01

    Four different educational programs impacting Space Life Sciences are described: the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program, the NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) Program, the Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) Program, and the NASA Graduate Research Fellow Program. Each program makes somewhat different demands on the students engaged in them. Each program, at the University of Colorado, involves Space Life Sciences training. While the Graduate Student Research Fellow and NSCORT Programs are discipline oriented, the Advanced Design and CCDS Programs are focused on design, technologies and applications. Clearly, the "training paradigms" differ for these educational endeavors. But, these paradigms can be made to mutually facilitate enthusiasm and motivation. Discipline-oriented academic programs, ideally, must be flexible enough to accommodate the emergent cross-disciplinary needs of Space Life Sciences students. Models for such flexibility and resultant student performance levels are discussed based upon actual academic and professional records. PMID:11537954

  17. Space Shuttle Glider. Educational Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Space Shuttle Glider is a scale model of the U.S. Space Shuttle orbiter. The airplane-like orbiter usually remains in Earth orbit for up to two weeks at a time. It normally carries a six- to seven-person crew which includes the mission commander, pilot, and several mission and/or payload specialists who have specialized training associated with…

  18. Symposium on "Space and education"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of the symposium is to encourage agencies, businessmen and teachers from all countries to share their ideas, programmes and strategies to meet the needs of primary and secondary school pupils and university students and provide in-service training for professionals in the space industry. States are constantly required to meet the challenge of ensuring that educational methods keep pace with a changing world. The new technologies loom ever larger in our daily lives and we must all be given an opportunity to familiarise ourselves with this aspect of the modern world and extend the boundaries of our knowledge by taking part in the rapid advances in this area. Space applications too play an increasing part in our lives, pointing the way to the future. Space can be an excellent adjunct to education, contributing to a better understanding of the world around us and providing young people with the basic knowledge that is an essential part of their training. Space activities play a key role in prompting explorers, pioneers and inventors to press forward, to provide a source of innovation at the service of mankind and improve our quality of life. The space industry and space agencies can contribute to national education by providing and maintaining programmes at all levels and using the most effective teaching methods to foster enthusiasm for space among the young and encourage them to work in that sector later. The symposium will open with an official ceremony at 9.30 on Monday 3 April, and end with a formal dinner on Wednesday 5 April. The programme will include plenary sessions and workshops, starting with four plenary sessions: two on Monday, at which representatives of space firms and agencies will speak, and two on Tuesday morning, at which teachers, students and pupils, will have their say. These will be followed by five workshops, to be held on Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday morning. Media representatives wishing to attend the Symposium are asked to complete the attached form and return it by fax to 01.44.76.7816 by 27.3.2000.

  19. The Higher Education Clearinghouse for Space Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Shipp, S. S.; Dalton, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Higher Education Clearinghouse (HECl) is a searchable database of undergraduate classroom materials for faculty teaching planetary sciences and solar and space physics at both the introductory and upper division levels. Modeled after the highly successful SERC clearinghouse for geosciences assets, HECl was designed for easy submission of classroom assets - from homeworks and computer interactives to laboratories and demonstrations. All materials are peer-reviewed before posting, and authors adhere to the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY). HECl materials are automatically cross-posted to other digital libraries (e.g., ComPADRE) and virtual higher education communities (e.g., Connexions). In addition to classroom materials, HECl provides news and information about educational research and best practices, funding opportunities, and ongoing efforts and collaborations for undergraduate education.

  20. SpaceTech—Postgraduate space education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, Ferdi J.; Ashford, Edward W.; Larson, Wiley J.

    2008-07-01

    SpaceTech is a postgraduate program geared primarily for mid-career space professionals seeking to gain or improve their expertise in space systems engineering and in business engineering. SpaceTech provides a lifelong impact on its participants by broadening their capabilities, encouraging systematic "end-to-end" thinking and preparing them for any technical or business-related engineering challenges they may encounter. This flexible 1-year program offers high competency gain and increased business skills. It is held in attractive locations in a flexible, multi-cultural environment. SpaceTech is a highly effective master's program certified by the esteemed Technical University of Delft (TUD), Netherlands. SpaceTech provides expert instructors who place no barriers between themselves and participants. The program combines innovative and flexible new approaches with time-tested methods to give participants the skills required for future missions and new business, while allowing participants to meet their work commitments at the same time as they study for their master's degree. The SpaceTech program is conducted in separate sessions, generally each of 2-week duration, separated by periods of some 6-8 weeks, during which time participants may return to their normal jobs. It also includes introductory online course material that the participants can study at their leisure. The first session is held at the TUD, with subsequent sessions held at strategic space agency locations. By participating at two or more of these sessions, attendees can earn certificates of satisfactory completion from TU Delft. By participating in all of the sessions, as well as taking part in the companion Central Case Project (CCP), participants earn an accredited and highly respected master's degree in Space Systems Engineering from the TUD. Seven distinct SpaceTech modules are provided during these sessions: Space Mission Analysis and Design, Systems Engineering, Business Engineering, Interpersonal Skills, Telecommunications, Earth Observation and Navigation. A group CCP, a major asset of this unique program, is a focused project, aimed at the formation of a credible virtual commercial space-related business. Participants exercise space systems engineering fundamentals as well as marketing and business engineering tools, with the goal of creating a financially viable business opportunity. They then present the result, in the form of an unsolicited proposal to potential investors, as well as a varied group of engineers, managers and executives from the space community. During the CCP, participants learn the ties between mission and system design and the potential return to investors. They develop an instinct for the technical concepts and which of the parameters to adjust to make their newly conceived business more effective and profitable.

  1. Global visions for space exploration education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Thomson, William A.

    2010-04-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), established in 1997 through a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) competition, is a 12-university consortium dedicated to space life science research and education. NSBRI's Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) has partnered with Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) to support NSBRI-NASA's education mission, which is to strengthen the nation's future science workforce through initiatives that communicate space exploration biology research findings to schools; support undergraduate and graduate programs; fund postdoctoral fellowships; and engage national and international audiences in collegial exchanges that promote global visions for space exploration education. This paper describes select MSM-NSBRI-EPOP activities, including scholarly interchanges with audiences in Austria, Canada, France, China, Greece, Italy, Scotland and Spain. The paper also makes the case for a global space exploration education vision that inspires students, engages educators and informs general audiences about the benefits that space exploration holds for life on Earth.

  2. Space station contamination modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, T. D.

    1989-01-01

    Current plans for the operation of Space Station Freedom allow the orbit to decay to approximately an altitude of 200 km before reboosting to approximately 450 km. The Space Station will encounter dramatically increasing ambient and induced environmental effects as the orbit decays. Unfortunately, Shuttle docking, which has been of concern as a high contamination period, will likely occur during the time when the station is in the lowest orbit. The combination of ambient and induced environments along with the presence of the docked Shuttle could cause very severe contamination conditions at the lower orbital altitudes prior to Space Station reboost. The purpose here is to determine the effects on the induced external environment of Space Station Freedom with regard to the proposed changes in altitude. The change in the induced environment will be manifest in several parameters. The ambient density buildup in front of ram facing surfaces will change. The source of such contaminants can be outgassing/offgassing surfaces, leakage from the pressurized modules or experiments, purposeful venting, and thruster firings. The third induced environment parameter with altitude dependence is the glow. In order to determine the altitude dependence of the induced environment parameters, researchers used the integrated Spacecraft Environment Model (ISEM) which was developed for Marshall Space Flight Center. The analysis required numerous ISEM runs. The assumptions and limitations for the ISEM runs are described.

  3. Popularizing Space Education in Indian Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalagi, Amrut

    Indians have many mythological stories about many constellations and stars. Hindu months are based on MOON and 27 stars on Zodiac. They are very important for many Indians in ritual, religious functions. By prompting them to identify their birth star, really makes them elevated. Similarly conveying them the importance of star gazing with respect to their day today life makes them to take interest and active participation in Space Activities. Space activities should be driven by public; their requirements; their dreams and imaginations. Their active participation definitely gives valuable inputs to space scientists. Hence, there is a need of involving common man or public mass by appropriate motivation by organising sky gazing sessions, exhibitions, workshops, etc. In this connection, even if the some organisation are able to attract a small percent of qualified engineers/scientists,, enthusiastic students, it would result in the creation of a sizable pool of talent in space sciences,which may well determine the future mankind on this planet. Some simple motivation acts have made the people to take interest in space. we have been using certain methodologies to popularize space science - 1] Conducting theory sessions on basics of star gazing and conveying importance of sky gazing with respect to day-today life. 2] Organising seminars, workshops, lectures and other academic/popular science activities with special reference to space science 3] Projects - a] Cubsat Missions b] Automatic Weather Station Facility c] Model making d] Creating and simulating space models and rover making competitions. The 50 year's of Exploration has left tremendous impact on many society's working towards space education and exploration.

  4. An American Construction of European Education Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silova, Iveta; Brehm, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The construction of the European education space has typically been attributed to European education policy makers, institutions, and networks. Rarely do scholars consider the role of outside, non-European actors in shaping the terrain of European education thought and practice. This article considers the construction of the European education…

  5. Global partnerships: Expanding the frontiers of space exploration education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Akinyede, Joseph O.; Goswami, Nandu; Thomson, William A.

    2012-11-01

    Globalization is creating an interdependent space-faring world and new opportunities for international partnerships that strengthen space knowledge development and transfer. These opportunities have been codified in the Global Exploration Strategy, which endorses the "inspirational and educational value of space exploration" [1]. Also, during the 2010 Heads of Space Agencies Summit celebrating the International Academy of Astronautics' (IAA) 50th Anniversary, space-faring nations from across the globe issued a collective call in support of robust international partnerships to expand the frontiers of space exploration and generate knowledge for improving life on Earth [2]. Educators play a unique role in this mission, developing strategic partnerships and sharing best educational practices to (1) further global understanding of the benefits of space exploration for life on Earth and (2) prepare the next generation of scientists required for the 21st Century space workforce. Educational Outreach (EO) programs use evidence-based, measurable outcomes strategies and cutting edge information technologies to transfer space-based science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) knowledge to new audiences; create indigenous materials with cultural resonance for emerging space societies; support teacher professional development; and contribute to workforce development initiatives that inspire and prepare new cohorts of students for space exploration careers. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) have sustained a 13-year space science education partnership dedicated to these objectives. This paper briefly describes the design and achievements of NSBRI's educational programs, with special emphasis on those initiatives' involvement with IAA and the International Astronautical Congress (IAC). The IAA Commission 2 Draft Report, Space for Africa, is discussed as a model for developing sustainable partnerships and indigenous programs that support Africa's steady emergence as a global space-faring force. The IAC will provide timely: 2011 South Africa will provide timely feedback to refine that report's strategies for space life sciences education and public engagement in Africa and around the globe.

  6. NAROM- a national Laboratory for space education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Arne Hjalmar; Østbø, Morten

    2002-07-01

    Despite a considerable growth in space related industry and scientific research over the past few decades, space related education has largely been neglected in our country. NAROM - the National Centre for Space Related Education - was formed last year to organize space related educational activities, to promote recruitment, to promote appreciation for the benefits of space activities, and to stimulate interest for science in general. This year, nine students from Narvik Engineering College have participated in the Hotel Payload Project (HPP) at Andøya Rocket Range. They have thus played an active and essential role in an ongoing engineering project.

  7. Designing Learning Spaces for Interprofessional Education in the Anatomical Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Benjamin; Kvan, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores connections between interprofessional education (IPE) models and the design of learning spaces for undergraduate and graduate education in the anatomical sciences and other professional preparation. The authors argue that for IPE models to be successful and sustained they must be embodied in the environment in which…

  8. Public Spaces and Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Ronald B.

    2009-01-01

    The questions of how and where to do moral education have been with us since antiquity. But, over the past couple of hundred years we have sent moral education to the margins within higher education. Using the historical analysis of Julie Reuben, the moral psychological work of Augusto Blasi, and the educational philosophical work of John Dewey, I…

  9. Public Spaces and Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Ronald B.

    2009-01-01

    The questions of how and where to do moral education have been with us since antiquity. But, over the past couple of hundred years we have sent moral education to the margins within higher education. Using the historical analysis of Julie Reuben, the moral psychological work of Augusto Blasi, and the educational philosophical work of John Dewey, I…

  10. Space Life Sciences Research and Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Alfred C.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1969, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), a private, nonprofit corporation, has worked closely with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to advance space science and technology and to promote education in those areas. USRA's Division of Space Life Sciences (DSLS) has been NASA's life sciences research partner for the past 18 years. For the last six years, our Cooperative Agreement NCC9-41 for the 'Space Life Sciences Research and Education Program' has stimulated and assisted life sciences research and education at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) - both at the Center and in collaboration with outside academic institutions. To accomplish our objectives, the DSLS has facilitated extramural research, developed and managed educational programs, recruited and employed visiting and staff scientists, and managed scientific meetings.

  11. An American Construction of European Education Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silova, Iveta; Brehm, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The construction of the European education space has typically been attributed to European education policy makers, institutions, and networks. Rarely do scholars consider the role of outside, non-European actors in shaping the terrain of European education thought and practice. This article considers the construction of the European education…

  12. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David; Marshall, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  13. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities In the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members. This paper is the final report from this now completed Cooperative Agreement.

  14. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement #NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, know as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  15. Educational space probe model system of lander (Hunveyor), rover (Husar) and test-terrain for planetary science education and analog studies in universities and colleges of Hungary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczi, Sz.; Hegyi, S.; Hudoba, Gy.; Hargitai, H.; Kokany, A.; Drommer, B.; Biro, T.; Gucsik, A.; Pinter, A.; Kovacs, Zs.

    In 1997 we began a complex modelling program in planetary geology unifying field work robotics, electronics and complex environmental analysis by constructing an experimental space probe model system. It consists of an experimental lander HUNVEYOR (Hungarian UNiversity surVEYOR), a rover named HUSAR (Hungarian University Surface Analyser Rover) and a test terrain. For Hunveyor the idea and example was the historical Surveyor program of NASA in the 1960-ies, for the Husar the idea and example was the Pathfinder's rover Sojouner rover. The main goals of this program are: 1) to teach the complex work of planetary science according to the main operations of the procedure of the large scientific and technology system, 2) to build the lander structure and basic electronics from cheap everyday PC compatible elements, 3) to construct basic experiments and their instruments, 4) to use the system as a space activity simulator, 5) to form the electronics of this simulator system which contains lander (with on board computer) for works on a test planetary surface, and a "terrestrial control" computer, "talking" with each other, 6) to harmonize the assemblage of the electronic system and instruments in various levels of autonomy from the power and communication circuits, 7) to use the complex system in education for in situ understanding of the complex planetary environmental problems, 8) to build various planetary environments on the test terrain in order to apply the instrument assemblages in various testing conditions, 9) to use the model system with special internet connections capable of communicating in the web in field trip conditions for users, and 10) to use the model system in real planetary analog field trip simulations, first in Hungary and later in some planetary analog site in the world. We report some of these visits in Hungary and Utah, USA. REFERENCES: [1] Bérczi Sz., Cech V., Hegyi S., Borbola T., Diósy T., Köll? Z., o 1 Tóth Sz. (1998): LPSC XXIX, #1267; [2] Drommer B., Blénessy G., Hanczár G., Gránicz K., Diósy T., Tóth Sz., Bodó E. (1999): LPSC XXX, #1606; [3] Bérczi Sz., Drommer B., Cech V., Hegyi S., Herbert J., Tóth Sz., Diósy T., Roskó F., Borbola T. (1999): LPSC XXX. #1332 [4] Bérczi Sz., Kabai S., Hegyi S., Cech V., Drommer B., Földi T., Fröhlich A., Gévay G. (1999): LPSC XXX, #1037; [5] S. Hegyi, B. Kovács, M. Keresztesi, I. Béres, Gimesi, Imrek, Lengyel, J. Herbert (2000): LPSC XXXI, #1103, Houston, [6] T. Diósy, F. Roskó, K. Gránicz, B. Drommer, S. Hegyi, J. Herbert, M. Keresztesi, B. Kovács, A. Fabriczy, Sz. Bérczi (2000): LPSC XXXI, #1153, Houston, [7] F. Roskó, T. Diósy, Sz. Bérczi, A. Fabriczy, V. Cech, S. Hegyi (2000): LPSC XXXI, #1572, Houston, [8] Balogh, Zs., Bordás, F., Bérczi, Sz., Diósy, T., Hegyi, S., Imrek, Gy., Kabai, S., Keresztesi, M. (2002): LPSC XXXIII, Abstract #1085, LPI, Houston (CD-ROM), [9] Hegyi, S., Horváth, Cs., Németh, I., Keresztesi, M., Hegyi, Á., Kovács, Zs., Diósy, T., Kabai, S., Bérczi, Sz. (2002): LPSC XXXIII, Abstract #1124, LPI, Houston (CD-ROM), [10] Sz. Bérczi, T. Diósy, Sz. Tóth, S. Hegyi, Gy. Imrek, Zs. Kovács, V. Cech, E. Müller-Bodó, F. Roskó, L. Szentpétery, Gy. Hudoba (2002): LPSC XXXIII, Abstract #1496, LPI, Houston (CD-ROM). 2

  16. Education Systems as Transition Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikkanen, Jenni; Bledowski, Piotr; Felczak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The changes that have occurred in the field of education over the course of the last couple of decades have been associated with increased demands that are not only placed on individuals from both within and beyond the education system, but also on the support they require to make successful educational choices. One central way this need is being…

  17. The Space Shuttle as an educational tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, L. W.; Irons, J. J.; Wilson, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the impact of the Space Transportation System (STS) and the Space Shuttle on the science educational community and gives an overview of past space education programs. Construction of four flight 'Orbiters' (Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, and Atlantis) is being planned, with each Orbiter containing an External Tank (ET) to power the Orbiter's main engines, and two solid rocket boosters (SRB). Each Orbiter can carry a crew of seven, has a cargo bay for 65,000 lb of satellites and scientific equipment, and has an average flight duration of up to 7 days. NASA educational programs reviewed are the Skylab Student Program, the 'Getaway Special' Program, and the Shuttle Student Involvement Project for Secondary Schools (SSIP-S), as well as ESA programs including the Educational Physics Experiments in Spacelab and the Access to Spacelab for Young Europeans Program. A 'Classroom in Space' and 'Space University' have been proposed for the future.

  18. Modern Media Education Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  19. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Jonathon A. Webb; Brian J. Gross; Aaron E. Craft

    2009-11-01

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  20. Alternative Education Spaces in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Chloe

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the architecture of the Red de Innovacion y Aprendizaje (RIA), or Learning and Innovation Network, which is a group of education centres that provide access to computers, the Internet and quality education to low-income communities in Mexico. The RIA began in May 2009 when ten pilot centres were opened in four municipalities…

  1. Alternative Education Spaces in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Chloe

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the architecture of the Red de Innovacion y Aprendizaje (RIA), or Learning and Innovation Network, which is a group of education centres that provide access to computers, the Internet and quality education to low-income communities in Mexico. The RIA began in May 2009 when ten pilot centres were opened in four municipalities…

  2. Space market model space industry input-output model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    The goal of the Space Market Model (SMM) is to develop an information resource for the space industry. The SMM is intended to contain information appropriate for decision making in the space industry. The objectives of the SMM are to: (1) assemble information related to the development of the space business; (2) construct an adequate description of the emerging space market; (3) disseminate the information on the space market to forecasts and planners in government agencies and private corporations; and (4) provide timely analyses and forecasts of critical elements of the space market. An Input-Output model of market activity is proposed which are capable of transforming raw data into useful information for decision makers and policy makers dealing with the space sector.

  3. Challenges of Space Education in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sese, Rogel Mari

    The Philippines has recently started in developing and promoting space science education through the Philippine Space Science Education Program (PSSEP) of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). However, as a developing country, there are numerous challenges in promoting space education to students and teachers. In this paper, we assessed the recent activities done by the PSSEP and demonstrate their effectiveness. In addition, we will expound on the social, political and logistical challenges of promoting space education in an archipelago such as the Philippines. We will also present the preliminary feedback and assessment of the Space Science Program (SSP), a pilot program which teaches space science as a separate subject in the basic educational system from kindergarten to high school. We will also discuss the various teaching strategies we utilized in the SSP that can be adopted depending on the needs and capabilities of the host school. Finally, we discuss the challenges of instituting a formal astronomy and space science course and the issues that needs to be addressed for an effective and sustainable program.

  4. Constructing Relational Space in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuorisalo, Mari; Rutanen, Niina; Raittila, Raija

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines early childhood education (ECE) by applying and developing relational-spatial perspectives on everyday life in educational institutions for young children. The aim is to investigate the dynamic process of construction of space and to illustrate with selected empirical episodes how this process occurs in ECE. Drawing on authors…

  5. Constructing Relational Space in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuorisalo, Mari; Rutanen, Niina; Raittila, Raija

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines early childhood education (ECE) by applying and developing relational-spatial perspectives on everyday life in educational institutions for young children. The aim is to investigate the dynamic process of construction of space and to illustrate with selected empirical episodes how this process occurs in ECE. Drawing on authors…

  6. Space technology education programs in Narvik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, Arne

    2005-08-01

    In 1996 the space technology education at Bachelor level was established at Narvik University College (HIN) and in the year 1999 the Master programme opened. Both these programmes are the first and only in Norway of their kind. The programmes, while having a strong space flavour are designed to be broad and generally qualify students for a wide range of opportunities for professional careers. Basically these are educations within electronics with emphasis on communication, basic space technology, space physics and spacecraft dynamics. HIN will conduct an evaluation workshop in June 2005 where representatives from industry in space technology will give feedback on the education. Laboratory resources have been complemented with space related equipment so that theory can be related to practical work in a qualified way wherever relevant. HIN students have been engaged in a number of interesting space technology diploma projects that have been given by national companies and institutions. Currently different groups are engaged in international space technology student projects. HIN has filled a research fellow position associated to research on attitude and orbit control of spacecraft formations. Recently HIN also engaged a visiting professor in space technology.

  7. Space industrialization - Education. [via communication satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joels, K. M.

    1978-01-01

    The components of an educational system based on, and perhaps enhanced by, space industrialization communications technology are considered. Satellite technology has introduced a synoptic distribution system for various transmittable educational media. The cost of communications satellite distribution for educational programming has been high. It has, therefore, been proposed to utilize Space Shuttle related technology and Large Space Structures (LSS) to construct a system with a quantum advancement in communication capability and a quantum reduction in user cost. LSS for communications purposes have three basic advantages for both developed and emerging nations, including the ability to distribute signals over wide geographic areas, the reduced cost of satellite communications systems versus installation of land based systems, and the ability of a communication satellite system to create instant educational networks.

  8. Cost Modeling for Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are an important tool for planning missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper presents on-going efforts to develop single variable and multi-variable cost models for space telescope optical telescope assembly (OTA). These models are based on data collected from historical space telescope missions. Standard statistical methods are used to derive CERs for OTA cost versus aperture diameter and mass. The results are compared with previously published models.

  9. Where Is the Space for Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Ron; Henderson, Lynette K.; Knotts, Greg; Swain, John

    2011-01-01

    Many competing factors are now affecting how students think about higher education. One primary factor is the use of a business model for education--highlighting profit, patents, commercial investments, and the use of market competition, for example--appears to have become commonplace. Boards of education and university presidents now include a…

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Arthur J., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department is a resource for Educator, Students and Lifelong Learners. This paper will highlight the Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department with references to other NASA Education Departments nationwide. The principal focus will be on the responsibilities of the Pre-college Education Team which is responsible for supporting K- 12 teachers highlighting how many of the NASA Pre-college Offices engage teachers and their students in better understanding NASA's inspiring missions, unique facilities, and specialized workforce to carryout these many agency-wide tasks, goals and objectives. Attendee's will learn about the Marshall Educational Alliance Teams, as well, which is responsible for using NASA's unique assets to support all types of learning. All experience and knowledge levels, all grades K-12, and teachers in these specified groupings will gain a true appreciation of what is available for them, through Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department. An agency-wide blue directory booklet will be distributed to all attendees, for future references and related points of contact.

  11. Space Flight Cable Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spak, Kaitlin

    2013-01-01

    This work concentrates the modeling efforts presented in last year's VSGC conference paper, "Model Development for Cable-Harnessed Beams." The focus is narrowed to modeling of space-flight cables only, as a reliable damped cable model is not yet readily available and is necessary to continue modeling cable-harnessed space structures. New experimental data is presented, eliminating the low-frequency noise that plagued the first year's efforts. The distributed transfer function method is applied to a single section of space flight cable for Euler-Bernoulli and shear beams. The work presented here will be developed into a damped cable model that can be incorporated into an interconnected beam-cable system. The overall goal of this work is to accurately predict natural frequencies and modal damping ratios for cabled space structures.

  12. The potential of space exploration for education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shair, Fredrick H.

    1993-01-01

    Space exploration and observations from space offer unique opportunities with respect to education. Recent technical advances have significantly increased the width and sensitivity of the electromagnetic spectrum window through which we are able to 'see' the universe. Observations from space have forced a realization that the earth is a beautiful, complex, and interconnected system. Space astronomy and the remote sensing of objects throughout our solar system have the potential of providing unique educational opportunities. Modern technologies have significantly reduced the cost of collecting, transmitting and processing data. Consequently, we are entering an age where it is possible to open up the process of discovery to almost everyone - and especially to young people throughout the world.

  13. Targeting Pre-Service Teacher Education with FINESSE: Faculty Institutes in NASA Earth & Space Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory R.; Slater, T.; Slater, S.; Shipp, S.; Shupla, C.; Pomeroy, R.; Bailey, J.

    2010-01-01

    Prior work suggests that science education faculty and other science faculty who help prepare future teachers can benefit greatly from professional development (PD) incorporating educationally-researched pedagogical techniques, the latest Earth & space science discoveries, and appropriate educational resources. In response, a team of scientists and science educators has delivered four such 2-day PD experiences, through Faculty Institutes in NASA Earth & Space Science Education (FINESSE). In these workshops, participating science and science education faculty have learned strategies for working inquiry into deeper science understandings by using existing online data to research Earth & space science topics, progressing from creating a valid, easily testable question, to simple data analysis, arriving at a conclusion, and finally presenting and supporting that conclusion in the classroom. This framework is the foundation of the FINESSE workshops, which also incorporate presentations by Earth & space science researchers, discussions on assessment and resources, and opportunities for participants to design individual implementation plans. This project was developed to help faculty overcome several roadblocks, including: many education faculty surveyed stated that they desired, but lacked, access to PD experiences; education faculty responsible for training pre-service education students varied greatly in their own science training and expertise, with a majority having a science background in biology but little or no experience in Earth or space science; the modeling of best science education practices in methods classes also varied greatly (e.g. related to building understanding through authentic inquiry, real data usage, connections to educational research, alignment with standards, etc.), as did the education faculty's awareness and training in the use of suitable Earth & space science resources; and that science faculty often have the content expertise, but rarely model teaching practices that are needed by classroom teachers, making it more challenging for pre-service students to translate science into their future classrooms.

  14. EarthSpace: The Higher Education Clearinghouse for Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, H.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Shipp, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    EarthSpace is a searchable database of undergraduate classroom materials designed specifically for faculty teaching planetary sciences, Earth sciences, astrophysics, and solar and space physics at the introductory and upper division levels. Modeled after the highly successful SERC clearinghouse for geosciences assets, EarthSpace was designed for easy submission of classroom assets, from homework and computer interactives to laboratory exercises, lectures, and demonstrations. The site capabilities are being expanded to allow assignment of a unique Digital Object Identifier (DOI) to submitted materials, which will provide material developers a way to identify their submitted materials as publications on their CVs. EarthSpace materials are automatically cross-posted to other digital libraries (e.g., ComPADRE) and virtual higher education communities (e.g., Connexions), providing a wider distribution of the resources. In addition to classroom materials, EarthSpace provides the latest news and information about educational research and best practices, funding opportunities, and ongoing efforts and collaborations for undergraduate education. This information is emailed monthly in a newsletter to faculty members via the community mailing list, HENews. HENews is a place for the higher education community to share and receive news and information about higher education, teaching, and Earth and space science. EarthSpace also has an RSS feed to notify members when items are added. EarthSpace is a community-driven effort; higher education faculty members contribute and review materials and thus influence the content provided on the site. All materials are peer-reviewed before posting, and authors adhere to the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 3.0). You are invited to visit EarthSpace to search for teaching resources, submit your materials, or volunteer to review submitted resources in your discipline with a frequency designed to fit your schedule.

  15. Space science education in the african continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseno, J. O.

    Through measurement and interpretation of the spectral, spatial and temporal variations in electromagnetic emissions and reflections from the Earth's surface, important information related to natural resources can be acquired. Furthermore, satellite technology has greatly improved the communication and positioning techniques world-wide. Consequently, space science now provides valuable and timely information about natural resources, which has become a major factor in sustainable development. The realization of the full potential of space science in the context of development in Africa requires adequate education and training in order to facilitate project formulation, planning, management and implementation. This, in turn, would lead to the formulation and adoption of national space science policies based on user needs and addressing both the short and long-term needs of a particular country. Space science education in Africa needs to address issues like (i) provision of programme, (ii) integration of the proposed techniques within the existing infrastructure, and (iii) training in Remote Sensing, Global Positioning System, Geographic Information System and other space science techniques, in order to ensure the successful implementation of space science projects within the continent. In this context, African universities ought to play a major role in space science training, research, consultancy and publication. Through international co-operation, it is possible to develop and support national, regional and international training programmes and international scientific exchange in Africa.

  16. Space market model development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the research program, Space Market Model Development Project, (Phase 1) were: (1) to study the need for business information in the commercial development of space; and (2) to propose a design for an information system to meet the identified needs. Three simultaneous research strategies were used in proceeding toward this goal: (1) to describe the space business information which currently exists; (2) to survey government and business representatives on the information they would like to have; and (3) to investigate the feasibility of generating new economical information about the space industry.

  17. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  18. Standardizing the European Education Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Countries in Europe, through the European Union, are creating, as part of the market and its governance, a new policy space in education. It is being formed through law, regulation, networking and harmonization. The development of standards across the different fields of policy, statistical calculation and commerce underpins and extends the…

  19. Lesbian Lacunae: Invisible Spaces in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozingo, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research about sexuality and dance has begun to address the needs of gay male dancers, yet the needs of lesbian dancers have remained mostly absent from scholarly discourse. Exploring the lesbian lacunae, or invisible spaces of dance education, reveals the personal, political, and pedagogical implications of their existence within the dance…

  20. Standardizing the European Education Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Countries in Europe, through the European Union, are creating, as part of the market and its governance, a new policy space in education. It is being formed through law, regulation, networking and harmonization. The development of standards across the different fields of policy, statistical calculation and commerce underpins and extends the…

  1. Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbrough, Larry (Technical Monitor); French, George

    2003-01-01

    The Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project successfilly met its objectives of creating a comprehensive online portfolio of science education curricular resources and providing a professional development program to increase educator competency with Earth and Space science content and teaching pedagogy. Overall, 97% of participants stated that their experience was either good or excellent. The favorable response of participant reactions to the professional development opportunities highlights the high quality of the professional development opportunity. The enthusiasm generated for using the curricular material in classroom settings was overwhelmingly positive at 92%. This enthusiasm carried over into actual classroom implementation of resources from the curricular portfolio, with 90% using the resources between 1-6 times during the school year. The project has had a positive impact on student learning in Wisconsin. Although direct measurement of student performance is not possible in a project of this kind, nearly 75% of participating teachers stated that they saw an increase in student performance in math and science as a result of using project resources. Additionally, nearly 75% of participants saw an increase in the enthusiasm of students towards math and science. Finally, some evidence exists that the professional development academies and curricular portfolio have been effective in changing educator behavior. More than half of all participants indicated that they have used more hands-on activities as a result of the Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project.

  2. Educational Outreach: The Space Science Road Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    The poster presented will give an overview of a study towards a "Space Road Show". The topic of this show is space science. The target group is adolescents, aged 12 to 15, at Dutch high schools. The show and its accompanying experiments would be supported with suitable educational material. Science teachers at schools can decide for themselves if they want to use this material in advance, afterwards or not at all. The aims of this outreach effort are: to motivate students for space science and engineering, to help them understand the importance of (space) research, to give them a positive feeling about the possibilities offered by space and in the process give them useful knowledge on space basics. The show revolves around three main themes: applications, science and society. First the students will get some historical background on the importance of space/astronomy to civilization. Secondly they will learn more about novel uses of space. On the one hand they will learn of "Views on Earth" involving technologies like Remote Sensing (or Spying), Communication, Broadcasting, GPS and Telemedicine. On the other hand they will experience "Views on Space" illustrated by past, present and future space research missions, like the space exploration missions (Cassini/Huygens, Mars Express and Rosetta) and the astronomy missions (Soho and XMM). Meanwhile, the students will learn more about the technology of launchers and satellites needed to accomplish these space missions. Throughout the show and especially towards the end attention will be paid to the third theme "Why go to space"? Other reasons for people to get into space will be explored. An important question in this is the commercial (manned) exploration of space. Thus, the questions of benefit of space to society are integrated in the entire show. It raises some fundamental questions about the effects of space travel on our environment, poverty and other moral issues. The show attempts to connect scientific with community thought. The difficulty with a show this elaborate and intricate is communicating on a level understandable for teenagers, whilst not treating them like children. Professional space scientists know how easy it is to lose oneself in technical specifics. This would, of course, only confuse young people. The author would like to discuss the ideas for this show with a knowledgeable audience and hopefully get some (constructive) feedback.

  3. Modeling the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    There has been a renaissance of interest in space radiation environment modeling. This has been fueled by the growing need to replace long time standard AP-9 and AE-8 trapped particle models, the interplanetary exploration initiative, the modern satellite instrumentation that has led to unprecedented measurement accuracy, and the pervasive use of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) microelectronics that require more accurate predictive capabilities. The objective of this viewgraph presentation was to provide basic understanding of the components of the space radiation environment and their variations, review traditional radiation effects application models, and present recent developments.

  4. Dual models of pore spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glantz, Roland; Hilpert, Markus

    2007-02-01

    We present a model for pore spaces that consists of two parts related by duality: (1) a decomposition of an open polyhedral pore space into open contractible pore bodies separated by relatively open interfaces and (2) a pore network that is homotopy equivalent to the pore space. The dual model is unique and free of parameters, but it relies on regularity conditions for the pore space. We show how to approximate any pore space by the interior of a polyhedral complex such that the regularity conditions are fulfilled. Thus, we are able to calculate the dual model from synthetic porous media and images of real porous media. The pore bodies are unions of relatively open Delaunay cells with respect to the corners of the pore boundary, and the pore network consists of certain at most two-dimensional (2D) Voronoi cells with respect to the corners of the pore boundary. The pore network describes the neighborhood relations between the pore bodies. In particular, any relatively open 2D Delaunay face f separating two pore bodies has a unique (relatively open) dual network edge. In our model, f is a pore throat only if it is hit by its dual network edge. Thus, as opposed to widespread intuition, any pore throat is convex, and adjacent pore bodies are not necessarily separated by pore throats. Due to the duality between the pore network and the decomposition of the pore space into pore bodies it is straightforward to store the geometrical properties of the pore bodies [pore throats] as attributes of the dual network vertices [edges]. Such an attributed network is used to perform 2D drainage simulations. The results agree very well with those from a pore-morphology based modeling approach performed directly on the digital image of a porous medium. Contractibility of the pore bodies and homotopy equivalence of the pore space and the pore network is proven using discrete Morse theory and the nerve theorem from combinatorial topology.

  5. Contemporary childbirth education models.

    PubMed

    Walker, Deborah S; Visger, Joan M; Rossie, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1960s, childbirth education advocates have attempted to persuade pregnant women that educational preparation for labor and birth is an essential component of the transition to motherhood. Initially, pregnant women who were seeking unmedicated births as a refuge from the inhumane childbirth treatments of the mid-20th century embraced this view. However, with the changing childbirth climate, including a growing preference for medicated birth, scheduled inductions, and cesarean sections, attendance has diminished and childbirth education finds itself at a crossroads. Commonly used childbirth education models/organizations and several new emerging models along with the available research literature and recommendations for clinical practice and research are presented. PMID:19879519

  6. An innovative approach to space education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marton, Christine; Berinstain, Alain B.; Criswick, John

    1994-01-01

    At present, Canada does not have enough scientists to be competitive in the global economy, which is rapidly changing from a reliance on natural resources and industry to information and technology. Space is the final frontier and it is a multidisciplinary endeavor. It requires a knowledge of science and math, as well as non-science areas such as architecture and law. Thus, it can attract a large number of students with a diverse range of interests and career goals. An overview is presented of the space education program designed by Canadian Alumni of the International Space University (CAISU) to encourage students to pursue studies and careers in science and technology and to improve science literacy in Canada.

  7. Education of a model student

    PubMed Central

    Novikoff, Timothy P.; Kleinberg, Jon M.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    A dilemma faced by teachers, and increasingly by designers of educational software, is the trade-off between teaching new material and reviewing what has already been taught. Complicating matters, review is useful only if it is neither too soon nor too late. Moreover, different students need to review at different rates. We present a mathematical model that captures these issues in idealized form. The student’s needs are modeled as constraints on the schedule according to which educational material and review are spaced over time. Our results include algorithms to construct schedules that adhere to various spacing constraints, and bounds on the rate at which new material can be introduced under these schedules. PMID:22308334

  8. Mathematical Model of the Public Understanding of Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, V.; Prisniakova, L.

    The success in deployment of the space programs now in many respects depends on comprehension by the citizens of necessity of programs, from "space" erudition of country. Purposefulness and efficiency of the "space" teaching and educational activity depend on knowledge of relationships between separate variables of such process. The empirical methods of ``space'' well-information of the taxpayers should be supplemented by theoretical models permitting to demonstrate a ways of control by these processes. Authors on the basis of their experience of educational activity during 50- years of among the students of space-rocket profession obtain an equation of ``space" state of the society determining a degree of its knowledge about Space, about achievements in its development, about indispensable lines of investigations, rates of informatization of the population. It is supposed, that the change of the space information consists of two parts: (1) - from going of the information about practical achievements, about development special knowledge requiring of independent financing, and (2) from intensity of dissemination of the ``free" information of a general educational line going to the population through mass-media, book, in family, in educational institutions, as a part of obligatory knowledge of any man, etc. In proposed model the level space well-information of the population depends on intensity of dissemination in the society of the space information, and also from a volume of financing of space-rocket technology, from a part of population of the employment in the space-rocket programs, from a factor of education of the population in adherence to space problems, from welfare and mentality of the people, from a rate of unemployment and material inequality. Obtained in the report on these principles the equation of a space state of the society corresponds to catastrophe such as cusp, the analysis has shown which one ways of control of the public understanding of space science. The boundary sectioning area of effective and unefficient modes of training and education of the population of country in space spirit is determined. The mathematical model of quality of process of education concern to an outer space exploration is reviewed separately. The coefficient of quality of education in an estimation of space event is submitted as relation Δ I' to mismatch of the universal standard of behavior with the information, which is going to the external spectator, about the applicable reacting of the considered individual Δ I''. The obtained outcomes allow to control a learning process and education of the society spirit of adherence to space ideals of mankind.

  9. Secondary Education Transition Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins.

    The Secondary Education Transition Model project at Colorado State University-Fort Collins represents a local and state commitment to serve students with severe handicaps who are moving into community work and living roles. These comprehensive transition services begin at the secondary education level and extend into the adult service system. The…

  10. Career Education Facilities: A Planning Guide for Space and Station Requirements. A Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Alan P.

    This publication provides the educational planner and the architect with some suggestions concerning models by which they may plan new flexible-use, shared-space facilities and supports the models with guidelines for the development of facilities and educational programs for occupational education. In addition to discussing the financial…

  11. Space Science Education with MIDEX/IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Odenwald, S. F.; Green, J. L.; Burch, J. L.

    1996-12-01

    The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) was selected as one of two MIDEX programs approved by NASA for a year 2000 launch. Its mission is to acquire, for the first time, a variety of 3-D images of magnetospheric boundaries and plasma distributions in the near-Earth environment. It will investigate their changes due to interactions with the solar wind on time scales from minutes to months. In response to the significant opportunities inherent in the IMAGE data for enhancing K-12 education in Earth and space science, the MIDEX/IMAGE project has begun the development of a WWW-based site (URL=http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov) which includes a program called POETRY: Public Outreach, Education, Teaching and Reaching Youth. The POETRY site contains: descriptive material on the spacecraft and mission objectives; an illustrated glossary of common space science terms; a primer on the physical processes under investigation; an archive of classroom activities highlighting space science concepts; and an 'Ask Dr. Magneto' area where students and teachers can pose questions and receive answers. This paper will review the design of this site, and present a selection of representative classroom activities designed to supplement earth science and physical science curricula.

  12. Space Debris Modeling at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-01-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOLVE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been released with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NASA Safety Standard 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the application of both DAS and ORSAT has increased markedly in the past two years.

  13. Aviation & Space Education: A Teacher's Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Aviation, Austin.

    This resource guide contains information on curriculum guides, resources for teachers, computer software and computer related programs, audio/visual presentations, model aircraft and demonstration aids, training seminars and career education, and an aerospace bibliography for primary grades. Each entry includes all or some of the following items:…

  14. Aviation & Space Education: A Teacher's Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Aviation, Austin.

    This resource guide contains information on curriculum guides, resources for teachers, computer software and computer related programs, audio/visual presentations, model aircraft and demonstration aids, training seminars and career education, and an aerospace bibliography for primary grades. Each entry includes all or some of the following items:…

  15. Uptake of Space Technologies - An Educational Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacai, Hina; Zolotikova, Svetlana; Young, Mandy; Cowsill, Rhys; Wells, Alan; Monks, Paul; Archibald, Alexandra; Smith, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Earth Observation data and remote sensing technologies have been maturing into useful tools that can be utilised by local authorities and businesses to aid in activates such as monitoring climate change trends and managing agricultural land and water uses. The European Earth observation programme Copernicus, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), provides the means to collect and process multi-source EO and environmental data that supports policy developments at the European level. At the regional and local level, the Copernicus programme has been initiated through Regional Contact Office (RCO), which provide knowledge, training, and access to expertise both locally and at a European level through the network of RCOs established across Europe in the DORIS_Net (Downstream Observatory organised by Regions active In Space - Network) project (Grant Agreement No. 262789 Coordination and support action (Coordinating) FP7 SPA.2010.1.1-07 "Fostering downstream activities and links with regions"). In the East Midlands UK RCO, educational and training workshops and modules have been organised to highlight the wider range of tools and application available to businesses and local authorities in the region. Engagement with businesses and LRA highlighted the need to have a tiered system of training to build awareness prior to investigating innovative solutions and space technology uses for societal benefits. In this paper we outline education and training programmes which have been developed at G-STEP (GMES - Science and Technology Education Partnership), University of Leicester, UK to open up the Copernicus programme through the Regional Contact Office to downstream users such as local businesses and LRAs. Innovative methods to introduce the operational uses of Space technologies in real cases through e-learning modules and web-based tools will be described and examples of good practice for educational training in these sectors will be demonstrated. The results from these workshops and awareness building campaigns will show the end-user 'pull' in the uptake of remote sensing and Earth Observation data to implement successful Local Authority action plans and projects developing innovative solutions to critical Local Authority issues.

  16. SpaceNet: Modeling and Simulating Space Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Gene; Jordan, Elizabeth; Shishko, Robert; de Weck, Olivier; Armar, Nii; Siddiqi, Afreen

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in interplanetary supply chain modeling and discusses SpaceNet as one particular method and tool to address space logistics modeling and simulation challenges. Fundamental upgrades to the interplanetary supply chain framework such as process groups, nested elements, and cargo sharing, enabled SpaceNet to model an integrated set of missions as a campaign. The capabilities and uses of SpaceNet are demonstrated by a step-by-step modeling and simulation of a lunar campaign.

  17. Consortium for the Application of Space Data to Education - CASDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygielbaum, A.; Rundquist, D.; Stork, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    From Background section: The Conortium for the Application of Space Data to Education (CASDE) was formed to make space data holdings more easily accessible to educators and students. CASDE will take an even greater step and work with educators to develop specific sets of data and information, and concomitant software to apply these holdings to specific curricula in a diverse set of subjects.

  18. Learning Spaces in Higher Education: An Under-Researched Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The connections between the design and use of space in higher education, and the production of teaching and learning, and of research, are not well understood. This paper reports on a literature review on these topics, and shows that higher education spaces can be considered in various ways: in terms of campus design, in terms of how space can…

  19. Learning Spaces in Higher Education: An Under-Researched Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The connections between the design and use of space in higher education, and the production of teaching and learning, and of research, are not well understood. This paper reports on a literature review on these topics, and shows that higher education spaces can be considered in various ways: in terms of campus design, in terms of how space can…

  20. Modeling volatility using state space models.

    PubMed

    Timmer, J; Weigend, A S

    1997-08-01

    In time series problems, noise can be divided into two categories: dynamic noise which drives the process, and observational noise which is added in the measurement process, but does not influence future values of the system. In this framework, we show that empirical volatilities (the squared relative returns of prices) exhibit a significant amount of observational noise. To model and predict their time evolution adequately, we estimate state space models that explicitly include observational noise. We obtain relaxation times for shocks in the logarithm of volatility ranging from three weeks (for foreign exchange) to three to five months (for stock indices). In most cases, a two-dimensional hidden state is required to yield residuals that are consistent with white noise. We compare these results with ordinary autoregressive models (without a hidden state) and find that autoregressive models underestimate the relaxation times by about two orders of magnitude since they do not distinguish between observational and dynamic noise. This new interpretation of the dynamics of volatility in terms of relaxators in a state space model carries over to stochastic volatility models and to GARCH models, and is useful for several problems in finance, including risk management and the pricing of derivative securities. Data sets used: Olsen & Associates high frequency DEM/USD foreign exchange rates (8 years). Nikkei 225 index (40 years). Dow Jones Industrial Average (25 years). PMID:9730016

  1. Child Spacing as a Component of Nutrition Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Ryland E.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The interval between births, as related to the nutritional status of children in a low-income community in Haiti, suggests the need to integrate education on child spacing into nutrition education programs. (BL)

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  4. Workshops in Science Education and Resources (Project WISER): A Model for Building Content and Pedagogical Skills in Space Science for Elementary and Middle School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, S. R.; Crown, D. A.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Croft, S. K.; Cañizo, T. L.; Pierazzo, E.; Kortenkamp, S.; Baldridge, A.; Project Wiser Team

    2012-08-01

    The Planetary Science Institute (PSI), in partnership with the Tucson Regional Science Center, is offering a series of professional development workshops targeting elementary and middle school science teachers in Southern Arizona. Facilitated by a team of earth and space scientists and educators, these workshops provide teachers with in-depth content knowledge of fundamental concepts in astronomy, geology, and planetary science. Each workshop is designed around core content big ideas (Wiggins & McTighe 1998), including all materials and assessments. During workshops, teachers participate in hands-on exercises using images and maps, and they conduct their own experiments.

  5. The Space Laser Business Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Creating long-duration, high-powered lasers, for satellites, that can withstand the type of optical misalignment and damage dished out by the unforgiving environment of space, is work that is unique to NASA. It is complicated, specific work, where each step forward is into uncharted territory. In the 1990s, as this technology was first being created, NASA gave free reign to a group of "laser jocks" to develop their own business model and supply the Space Agency with the technology it needed. It was still to be a part of NASA as a division of Goddard Space Flight Center, but would operate independently out of a remote office. The idea for this satellite laboratory was based on the Skunk Works concept at Lockheed Martin Corporation. Formerly known as the Lockheed Corporation, in 1943, the aerospace firm, realizing that the type of advanced research it needed done could not be performed within the confines of a larger company, allowed a group of researchers and engineers to essentially run their own microbusiness without the corporate oversight. The Skunk Works project, in Burbank, California, produced America s first jet fighter, the world s most successful spy plane (U-2), the first 3-times-the-speed-of-sound surveillance aircraft, and the F-117A Nighthawk Stealth Fighter. Boeing followed suit with its Phantom Works, an advanced research and development branch of the company that operates independent of the larger unit and is responsible for a great deal of its most cutting-edge research. NASA s version of this advanced business model was the Space Lidar Technology Center (SLTC), just south of Goddard, in College Park, Maryland. Established in 1998 under a Cooperative Agreement between Goddard and the University of Maryland s A. James Clark School of Engineering, it was a high-tech laser shop where a small group of specialists, never more than 20 employees, worked all hours of the day and night to create the cutting- edge technology the Agency required of them. Drs. Robert Afzal and Joseph Dallas were directors of the SLTC, and led the development and production of active spaceborne, remote-sensing, optical instruments. As a pioneer in the area of photonics, Dr. Dallas led basic research, development, and production of semiconductor laser diode products, improving coupling efficiency through novel physical optics modeling and intracavity phase-correction techniques. He worked for NASA for 15 years, 11 of which were as a civil servant, and 4 of which were as a contractor.

  6. NAROM - a national laboratory for space education and student rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Arne Hjalmar; Larsen, May Aimee; Østbø, Morten

    2001-08-01

    Despite a considerable growth in space related industry and scientific research over the past few decades, space related education has largely been neglected in our country. NAROM - the National Centre for Space Related Education - was formed last year to organize space related educational activities, to promote recruitment, to promote appreciation for the benefits of space activities, and to stimulate interest for science in general. This year, nine students from Narvik Engineering College have participated in the Hotel Payload Project (HPP) at Anøya Rocket Range. They have thus played an active and essential role in an ongoing engineering project.

  7. A Model of Classical Space-Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maudlin, Tim

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some historically important reference systems including those by Newton, Leibniz, and Galileo. Provides models illustrating space-time relationship of the reference systems. Describes building models. (YP)

  8. A European Space for Education Looking for Its Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlstrom, Ninni

    2010-01-01

    The open method of coordination (OMC) within the Lisbon strategy is discussed in terms of a European Space for Education and "programme ontology". The focus is on indicators and the European dimension, and how they "work" in the forming of contents and identities in this European Space for Education. The OMC is analyzed in relation to Nancy…

  9. The Space Place: Adventures in Informal Education - and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D.; Leon, N.

    2001-12-01

    Informal education settings provide unique opportunities to convey Earth and space science learning to a variety of audiences. The NASA Space Place suite of outreach products and activities include deliverables to both the formal and the informal education arenas. The question is, how can Earth and space science efforts best create high-quality products and activities for the informal education sector- and how can these products and activities be effectively disseminated to these audiences? This session will describe the approach by a small outreach team for NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) Space Place effort. The Space Place team's approach has been three-fold: 1) develop a suite of products designed to appeal to (and educate) the informal education audience, 2) disseminate these products through leveraged distribution channels which serve the informal education community, and 3) invite participation by missions beyond those within NMP, but rather NASA-wide - for a richer and broader message, and a greater variety of content The informal education audience served by the Space Place can be found in science centers, museums, planetariums, libraries, community centers, and community organizations. This informal education audience seeks to be entertained as well as to be educated, and this audience often includes multiple generations. Personnel at informal education venues may or may not have a science background, may or may not have significant training in conducting activities, and may, as often as not, be volunteers. As a result of valuable lessons learned, Space Place materials developed for informal education settings attempt to be adaptable for multiple age groups, and easy to administer. Dissemination to the informal education community could be a daunting effort. But another lesson learned by the Space Place team is the value of alliances with national organizations within that community. These alliances make distribution of the Space Place activities and products both economical and comprehensive. While the Space Place effort started as a New Millennium Program effort, it was quickly expanded to all NASA missions who wish to participate. The team soon realized that the informal education community wanted a variety of content - not just more and more information about a few missions, but rather a continuous infusion of new content from new missions. This expansion of the Space Place program allows any mission to take advantage of the existing Space Place infrastructure and alliances - and provides the much-needed variety of materials that the informal education community desires. This poster session will provide an overview of the Space Place effort within the informal education community, and will illustrate some of the valuable lessons learned by the team in working with this rich and varied community.

  10. Europeanizing Education: Governing a New Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin; Grek, Sotiria

    2012-01-01

    The study of common and diverse effects in the field of education across Europe is a growing field of inquiry and research. It is the result of many actions, networks and programmes over the last few decades and the development of common European education policies. "Europeanizing Education" describes the origins of European education policy, as…

  11. Europeanizing Education: Governing a New Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin; Grek, Sotiria

    2012-01-01

    The study of common and diverse effects in the field of education across Europe is a growing field of inquiry and research. It is the result of many actions, networks and programmes over the last few decades and the development of common European education policies. "Europeanizing Education" describes the origins of European education policy, as…

  12. Education as Initiation into the Space of Reasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    A long tradition in the philosophy of education identifies education's most fundamental aim and ideal as that of the "fostering" or "cultivation of rationality". In this article I relate this tradition in philosophy of education to recent work inspired by Wilfred Sellars on "the space of reasons". I first offer a very brief overview of the…

  13. Education as Initiation into the Space of Reasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    A long tradition in the philosophy of education identifies education's most fundamental aim and ideal as that of the "fostering" or "cultivation of rationality". In this article I relate this tradition in philosophy of education to recent work inspired by Wilfred Sellars on "the space of reasons". I first offer a very brief overview of the…

  14. Creating Spaces for Transformation: Educational Opportunities for Marginalized Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Burton, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of experience for a special education director as she constructs her life in special education and the spaces that allow for the transformation of practices in the education of all students. A qualitative single case study design was utilized. Interviews with the participant and significant…

  15. Creating Spaces for Transformation: Educational Opportunities for Marginalized Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Burton, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of experience for a special education director as she constructs her life in special education and the spaces that allow for the transformation of practices in the education of all students. A qualitative single case study design was utilized. Interviews with the participant and significant…

  16. Teacher in Space Program - The challenge to education in the space age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Morgan, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the significant events which occurred in the Teacher in Space Program following the Challenger Space Shuttle accident on January 28, 1986. The analysis indicates that the accident has not prevented the continuing effective implementation of the three educational goals of the Teacher in Space Program which are to: (1) raise the prestige of the teaching profession, (2) increase the awareness in the education community of the impact of technology and science on this country's future in preparing students for the future, and (3) use aeronautics and space as a catalyst to enhance all subject areas and grade levels of U.S. education systems.

  17. Space Education in Australia: Public Education and Outreach Through Peer Mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayfield, K. C.; Kenny, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    In Australia, the number of space education programs aimed at secondary and tertiary students has dramatically increased over the last decade. The majority of these programs are organised by young tertiary-educated volunteers with a passion for space; this mode of education is described as `peer mentoring'. Identifying characteristics of peer mentored programs include increased emphasis on the vocational relevance of the educational material presented, and constant updating of course content and mode of delivery. These educational programs and their activities are discussed. Space education in Australia has benefited greatly from the employment of peer mentoring. The ability of the students to relate to the organisers of the space education experience is a vital part of making sure that the experience is circulated out into the general public through families and friends. Peer mentoring also employs an `educate to educate' philosophy, in which graduates of these space education programs are encouraged to become mentors for future programs. To `educate to educate' is to develop `sustainable education', and with a sustainable educational base comes the best chance for developing a sustainable base of highly motivated and educated space pioneers.

  18. Space Sciences Education Program of Moscow State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasotkin, S.; Radchenko, V.; Zhuravlev, V.

    2007-12-01

    The main purpose of the space sciences education program developed in Moscow State University is to incorporate modern space research in the university and high education and popularize basics of space physics. The First Russian University Satellite "Universitetskiy-Tatyana" launched on January 20, 2005 formed a basis for development of a new approach to the space-physics education. The onboard scientific complex, as well as the mission control and information-receiving center, was designed and developed in Moscow State University. The scientific program of the mission includes measurements of space radiation in various energy ranges, and UV luminosity and lightening from the Earth. Educational materials are concentrated to upper high school, junior and senior university levels. There was developed a special computerized hands-on exercises based on the experimental quasi-realtime data obtained from "Universitetskiy-Tatyana" satellite and other internet resources. Students specialized in space physics from several Russian universities are involved in scientific work based on various scientific data. Moscow State University is now extending its space science education program by creation the electronic textbooks on remote sensing, space factors and materials study, satellite design and development, etc. "Space schools" for university teachers and students were held in 2004 - 2007. The main objective of these schools was to attract interest to space research. The mutual idea of these schools was to join forces of Moscow State University scientists, university teachers and students. For modern university world, it is very important to understand what skills future space scientists and space industry employees must be equipped with. The space sciences educational activity of Moscow State University is a non-profit project and is open for all interested parties.

  19. An Overview of contributions of NASA Space Shuttle to Space Science and Engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides an indepth overview of the enormous contrbutions made by the NASA Space Shuttle Program to Space science and engineering education over the past thirty years. The author has served as one of the major contributors and editors of NASA book "Wings In Orbit: Scientific and Engineering Legacies of the Space Shuttle program" (NASA SP-2010-3409). Every Space Shuttle mission was an education mission: student involvement programs such as Get Away Specials housed in Shuttle payload allowed students to propose research and thus enrich their university education experience. School students were able to operate "EarthKAM" to learn the intricacies of orbital mechanics, earth viewing opportunities and were able to master the science and art of proposal writing and scientific collaboration. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the global student and teaching community in space sciences and engineering to the plethora of educational resources available to them for engaging a wide variety of students (from early school to the undergraduate and graduate level and to inspire them towards careers in Space sciences and technologies. The volume "Wings In Orbit" book is one example of these ready to use in classroom materials. This paper will highlight the educational payloads, experiments and on-orbit classroom activities conducted for space science and engineering students, teachers and non-traditional educators. The presentation will include discussions on the science content and its educational relevance in all major disiciplines in which the research was conducted on-board the Space Shuttle.

  20. Target space pseudoduality in supersymmetric sigma models on symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarisaman, Mustafa

    We discuss the target space pseudoduality in supersymmetric sigma models on symmetric spaces. We first consider the case where sigma models based on real compact connected Lie groups of the same dimensionality and give examples using three dimensional models on target spaces. We show explicit construction of nonlocal conserved currents on the pseudodual manifold. We then switch the Lie group valued pseudoduality equations to Lie algebra valued ones, which leads to an infinite number of pseudoduality equations. We obtain an infinite number of conserved currents on the tangent bundle of the pseudo-dual manifold. Since pseudoduality imposes the condition that sigma models pseudodual to each other are based on symmetric spaces with opposite curvatures (i.e. dual symmetric spaces), we investigate pseudoduality transformation on the symmetric space sigma models in the third chapter. We see that there can be mixing of decomposed spaces with each other, which leads to mixings of the following expressions. We obtain the pseudodual conserved currents which are viewed as the orthonormal frame on the pullback bundle of the tangent space of G˜ which is the Lie group on which the pseudodual model based. Hence we obtain the mixing forms of curvature relations and one loop renormalization group beta function by means of these currents. In chapter four, we generalize the classical construction of pseudoduality transformation to supersymmetric case. We perform this both by component expansion method on manifold M and by orthonormal coframe method on manifold SO( M). The component method produces the result that pseudoduality transformation is not invertible at all points and occurs from all points on one manifold to only one point where riemann normal coordinates valid on the second manifold. Torsion of the sigma model on M must vanish while it is nonvanishing on M˜, and curvatures of the manifolds must be constant and the same because of anticommuting grassmann numbers. We obtain the similar results with the classical case in orthonormal coframe method. In case of super WZW sigma models pseudoduality equations result in three different pseudoduality conditions; flat space, chiral and antichiral pseudoduality. Finally we study the pseudoduality transformations on symmetric spaces using two different methods again. These two methods yield similar results to the classical cases with the exception that commuting bracket relations in classical case turns out to be anticommuting ones because of the appearance of grassmann numbers. It is understood that constraint relations in case of non-mixing pseudoduality are the remnants of mixing pseudoduality. Once mixing terms are included in the pseudoduality the constraint relations disappear.

  1. Semantic Vector Space Model: Implementation and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Geoffrey Z.

    1997-01-01

    Presents the Semantic Vector Space Model, a text representation and searching technique based on the combination of Vector Space Model with heuristic syntax parsing and distributed representation of semantic case structures. In this model, both documents and queries are represented as semantic matrices, and retrieval is achieved by computing…

  2. Modeling Educational Usage of Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazman, Sacide Guzin; Usluel, Yasemin Kocak

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a structural model explaining how users could utilize Facebook for educational purposes. In order to shed light on the educational usage of Facebook, in constructing the model, the relationship between users' Facebook adoption processes and their educational use of Facebook were included indirectly while the…

  3. Modeling Educational Usage of Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazman, Sacide Guzin; Usluel, Yasemin Kocak

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a structural model explaining how users could utilize Facebook for educational purposes. In order to shed light on the educational usage of Facebook, in constructing the model, the relationship between users' Facebook adoption processes and their educational use of Facebook were included indirectly while the…

  4. Models for multimegawatt space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-06-01

    This report describes models for multimegawatt, space power systems which Sandia's Advanced Power Systems Division has constructed to help evaluate space power systems for SDI's Space Power Office. Five system models and models for associated components are presented for both open (power system waste products are exhausted into space) and closed (no waste products) systems: open, burst mode, hydrogen cooled nuclear reactor -- turboalternator system; open, hydrogen-oxygen combustion turboalternator system; closed, nuclear reactor powered Brayton cycle system; closed, liquid metal Rankine cycle system; and closed, in-core, reactor therminonic system. The models estimate performance and mass for the components in each of these systems. 17 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Vector space model based on semantic relatedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarchuk, Dmitry; Timofeeva, Galina

    2015-11-01

    Most of data-mining methods are based on the vector space model of knowledge representation. The vector space model uses the frequency of a term in order to determine its relevance in a document. Terms can be similar by semantic meaning but be lexicographically different ones, so the classification based on the frequency of terms does not give desired results in some subject areas such as the vacancies selection. The modified vector space model based on the semantic relatedness is suggested for data-mining in this area. Evaluation results show that the proposed algorithm is better then one based on the standard vector space model.

  6. The Sport Education Tactical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Tony; McCollum, Starla

    2009-01-01

    Two popular instructional models in middle and high school are the sport education model (SEM) and the tactical games model (TGM). The SEM prepares students to become competent, literate, and enthusiastic sportspersons. The TGM prepares students to be able to play games using a tactical approach. Combining the models to form a sport education…

  7. Preliminary Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Prince, F. Andrew; Smart, Christian; Stephens, Kyle; Henrichs, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. However, great care is required. Some space telescope cost models, such as those based only on mass, lack sufficient detail to support such analysis and may lead to inaccurate conclusions. Similarly, using ground based telescope models which include the dome cost will also lead to inaccurate conclusions. This paper reviews current and historical models. Then, based on data from 22 different NASA space telescopes, this paper tests those models and presents preliminary analysis of single and multi-variable space telescope cost models.

  8. Evidence of Second-Order Factor Structure in a Diagnostic Problem Space: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Frank J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Chest pain was identified as a specific medical problem space, and disease classes were modeled to define it. Results from a test taken by 628 medical residents indicate a second-order factor structure that suggests that chest pain is a multidimensional problem space. Implications for medical education are discussed. (SLD)

  9. Outreach Education Modules on Space Sciences in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-Te; Tiger Liu, Jann-Yeng; Chen, Chao-Yen

    2013-04-01

    The Ionospheric Radio Science Laboratory (IRSL) at Institute of Space Science, National Central University in Taiwan has been conducting a program for public outreach educations on space science by giving lectures, organizing camps, touring exhibits, and experiencing hand-on experiments to elementary school, high school, and college students as well as general public since 1991. The program began with a topic of traveling/living in space, and was followed by space environment, space mission, and space weather monitoring, etc. and a series of course module and experiment (i.e. experiencing activity) module was carried out. For past decadal, the course modules have been developed to cover the space environment of the Sun, interplanetary space, and geospace, as well as the space technology of the rocket, satellite, space shuttle (plane), space station, living in space, observing the Earth from space, and weather observation. Each course module highlights the current status and latest new finding as well as discusses 1-3 key/core issues/concepts and equip with 2-3 activity/experiment modules to make students more easily to understand the topics/issues. Meanwhile, scientific camps are given to lead students a better understanding and interesting on space science. Currently, a visualized image projecting system, Dagik Earth, is developed to demonstrate the scientific results on a sphere together with the course modules. This system will dramatically improve the educational skill and increase interests of participators.

  10. Outreach to Space Scientists in Support of K-12 Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Lee, S. W.

    1998-09-01

    NASA's Office of Space (OSS) has undertaken a monumental and inspiring challenge -- that of actively brokering powerful, positive, and productive relationships between the space science community it supports and the multiple realms of K-12 and public education nationwide. The OSS Education and Outreach Broker/Facilitator Program has named a set of regional Brokers/Facilitators whose primary function is to arrange alliances between educators and scientists that will help scientists turn results from space science missions and programs into educationally appropriate products and/or services that can be disseminated regionally or nationally. The Space Science Institute (SSI) has been chosen as one of five organizations serving as OSS Broker/Facilitator in a 12-state region (CO, AZ, NM, UT, WY, NV, MT, ID, WA, OR, Northern CA, and AL). SSI is a non-profit organization located in Boulder, Colorado, dedicated to excellence in research and education in the space and earth sciences. We have a robust program of educational endeavors that involve space and scientists. These include major traveling science exhibits (e.g. MarsQuest), curricular materials development (e.g. Solarscapes and the Cassini Teacher Guide), and workshops for scientists on K-12 education. SSI will carry out its OSS Broker/Facilitator role in collaboration with Wendy Pollock of the Association of Science-Technology Centers, Steve Pompea of Pompea & Associates, Russell Wright of Event Based Science, and James Hubbard of the Four Corners Rural Systemic Initiative.

  11. Space Sciences in the classroom: Educational activities of the European Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korakitis, R.

    2012-01-01

    Education is among the basic, mandatory activities of the European Space Agency (ESA) and aims at all educational levels, from primary school to post-graduate. The primary objective of the ESA educational activities is to enhance the literacy of young people in science and technology and to stimulate interest in STEM (Science - Technology - Engineering - Mathematics) studies and careers, using Space as a theme. The activities mostly follow the IBSE paradigm (Inquiry-Based Science Education) and also aim at the Continuous Professional Development (CPD) for teachers. The backbone supporting all educational activities is the enormous expertise of ESA in the various aspects of Space Science and Technology, like Earth Observation, Space Science (including Astronomy & Astrophysics), Human Spaceflight and Space Technology (launchers, navigation, telecommunications etc.). All educational activities, which are coordinated by the ESA Education Office, are designed for specific age groups, strive to keep the educational community informed and to provide inspirational materials for teachers and students. They can be subdivided in categories, like: Hands-on-projects, opportunities for students, support to teachers, international cooperation activities and outreach initiatives. In addition, ESA develops a variety of educational materials to support teachers in the classroom, both in classic form or on-line, through a network of dedicated websites.

  12. A Web Based Approach to Integrate Space Culture and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerla, F.

    2002-01-01

    Our intention is to dedicate a large section of our web site to space education. As the national User Support and Operation Center (USOC) for the International Space Station, MARS Center is also willing to provide material, such as videos and data, for educational purposes. In order to base our initiative on authoritative precedents, our first step has been a comparative analysis between different space agency education web sites, such as ESA and NASA. As is well known, Internet is a powerful reality, capable of connecting people all over the world and rendering public a huge amount of information. The first problem, then, is to organize this information, in order to use the web as an efficient education tool. That is why studies such as User Modeling (UM), Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Semantic Web have become more important in Information Technology and Science. Traditional search engines are unable to provide an optimal retrieval of contents really searched for by users. Semantic Web is a valid alternative: according to its theories, web information should be represented using metadata language. Users should be able and enabled to successfully search, obtain and study new information from web. Forging knowledge in an intelligent manner, preventing users from making errors, and making this formidable quantity of information easily available have also been the starting points for HCI methodologies for defining Adaptable Interfaces. Here the information is divided into different sets, on the basis of the intended user profile, in order to prevent users from getting lost. Realized as an adaptable interface, an education web site can help users to effectively retrieve the information necessary for their scopes (teaching for a teacher and learning for a student). For students it's a great advantage to use interfaces designed on the basis of their age and scholastic level. Indeed, an adaptable interface is intended not just for students, but also for teachers, who can use it to prepare their lessons, retrieve information and organize the didactic material in order to support their lessons. We think it important to use a user centered "psychology" based on UM: we have to know the needs and expectations of the students. Our intent is to use usability tests not just to prove the site effectiveness and clearness, but also to investigate aesthetical preferences of children and young people. Physics, mathematics, chemistry are just some of the difficult learning fields connected with space technologies. Space culture is a potentially never-ending field, and our scope will be to lead students by hand in this universe of knowledge. This paper will present MARS activities in the framework of the above methodologies aimed at implementing a web based approach to integrate space culture and education. The activities are already in progress and some results will be presented in the final paper.

  13. Space Education as a Crucial Step Towards the Creation of a National Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisio Sese, Rogel Mari

    2015-08-01

    The Philippines has recently started in developing and promoting space science education through the Philippine Space Science Education Program (PSSEP) of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). However, as a developing country, there are numerous challenges in promoting space education to students and teachers. In this paper, we assessed the recent activities done by the PSSEP and demonstrate their effectiveness. In addition, we will expound on the social, political and logistical challenges of promoting space education in an archipelago such as the Philippines. We will also present the preliminary feedback and assessment of the Space Science Program (SSP), a pilot program which teaches space science as a separate subject in the basic educational system from kindergarten to high school. We will also discuss the various teaching strategies we utilized in the SSP that can be adopted depending on the needs and capabilities of the host school. Finally, we discuss the challenges of instituting a formal astronomy and space science course and the issues that needs to be addressed for an effective and sustainable program and how it can be utilized to develop a space-capable workforce for a future Philippine Space Agency.

  14. Outreach to Space Scientists Interested in K-12 Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Cherilynn A

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for work on outreach to space scientists interested in k-12 education. It outlines what was accomplished during the two years of support and one year no-cost extension (October 1995-September 1998).

  15. Near-Earth Space Radiation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.; O'Neill, Patrick M.; O'Brien, T. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Review of models of the near-Earth space radiation environment is presented, including recent developments in trapped proton and electron, galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event models geared toward spacecraft electronics applications.

  16. Knowing One's Place: Space, Theory, Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulson, Kalervo N.; Symes, Colin

    2007-01-01

    In the latter parts of the twentieth century social theory took a spatial turn, one that education has yet to undertake, at least in any concerted way. Nonetheless, this paper aims to demonstrate that there could be, and perhaps is, a more decided turn towards unraveling spatial questions underpinning educational processes and practices. In this…

  17. International Space Station Power System Model Validated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Delleur, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE) is a computer model of the International Space Station's (ISS) Electric Power System (EPS) developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This uniquely integrated, detailed model can predict EPS capability, assess EPS performance during a given mission with a specified load demand, conduct what-if studies, and support on-orbit anomaly resolution.

  18. International Space Station: National Laboratory Education Concept Development Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program has brought together 16 spacefaring nations in an effort to build a permanent base for human explorers in low-Earth orbit, the first stop past Earth in humanity's path into space. The ISS is a remarkably capable spacecraft, by significant margins the largest and most complex space vehicle ever built. Planned for completion in 2010, the ISS will provide a home for laboratories equipped with a wide array of resources to develop and test the technologies needed for future generations of space exploration. The resources of the only permanent base in space clearly have the potential to find application in areas beyond the research required to enable future exploration missions. In response to Congressional direction in the 2005 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Authorization Act, NASA has begun to examine the value of these unique capabilities to other national priorities, particularly education. In early 2006, NASA invited education experts from other Federal agencies to participate in a Task Force charged with developing concepts for using the ISS for educational purposes. Senior representatives from the education offices of the Department of Defense, Department of Education, Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, and National Science Foundation agreed to take part in the Task Force and have graciously contributed their time and energy to produce a plan that lays out a conceptual framework for potential utilization of the ISS for educational activities sponsored by Federal agencies as well as other future users.

  19. Electronic Education System Model-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güllü, Fatih; Kuusik, Rein; Laanpere, Mart

    2015-01-01

    In this study we presented new EES Model-2 extended from EES model for more productive implementation in e-learning process design and modelling in higher education. The most updates were related to uppermost instructional layer. We updated learning processes object of the layer for adaptation of educational process for young and old people,…

  20. The Hubble Space Telescope Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teays, T. J.; Eisenhamer, B.; Eisenhamer, J.; Amazing Space Team

    2001-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has conducted a long-standing and vigorous program in education and public outreach. This program uses a variety of methods to reach a broad spectrum of audiences. Education products are developed in a team environment that partners educators, curriculum experts, scientists, and production experts, such as graphic artists, Web designers, programmers, and education evaluators. A popular Web site is maintained, and has been substantially augmented in the past year. The Amazing Space program consists of a suite of online, interactive modules for use in the kindergarten through 12th grade classroom. The program is rooted in the national education standards and benefits from a robust evaluation process. The HST images and data are used to engage students in learning basic science and mathematics concepts. The activity/lessons include extensive, online assistance for educators, so that they can be readily used in the classroom. Hardcopy products such as posters, lithographs, teacher guides, and trading cards are generally tied to online products, to provide multiple entries to the material. We also provide training for teachers in the use of our products, as appropriate. Informal science education is supported by providing services to museums, planetariums, libraries and related institutions. The very popular ViewSpace, a computer-based video service is being used by many informal science facilities. In addition, HST has supported the creation of both permanent and traveling exhibits about HST. The Space Telescope Science Institute operates the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA.

  1. Comparing Power Spaces: The Shaping of Ghana's Education Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takyi-Amoako, Emefa

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the power spaces occupied by both donors and the Ministry of Education in the formulation of Ghana's Education Strategic Plan (ESP). It shows that the formulation of the ESP was more donor-led than Ministry-led due to the donor-initiated global policy frameworks also referred to as the non-negotiables. Consequently, donors…

  2. Travellers and Home Education: Safe Spaces and Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Arcy, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Elective home education (EHE) is a legal alternative to school in England but the statutory requirements for provision are remarkably vague. This book explores the use of EHE by Gypsy and Traveller families. The accounts of their experiences and their views about education spaces reveal the racism and discrimination their children encounter in…

  3. Renovating Educational Identities: Policy, Space and Urban Renewal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulson, Kalervo N.

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the relationship between policy and space in the sociology of education. This paper analyses the relationships between educational policy change, in the form of the "Excellence in cities" policy initiative, and urban change in inner London. I propose, and apply, a framework for a spatialised policy analysis…

  4. "Religion" in Educational Spaces: Knowing, Knowing Well, and Knowing Differently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'Anson, John; Jasper, Alison

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this article is how "religion", as a materially heterogeneous concept, becomes mobilized in different educational spaces, and the "kinds of knowing" to which this gives rise. Three "case studyish" illustrations are deployed in order to consider how religion and education produce kinds of knowing which may--or may not--involve knowing…

  5. Spaces of Difference: The Contradictions of Alternative Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon the concept of "thirdspace" (Soja 1996), this article extends sociocultural theorizations of space in relation to alternative educational programs: programs designed to re-engage youth who have been pushed out of mainstream schools. Snapshots of educational programs, provided by ethnographic research gathered in the United States,…

  6. THE NEEDS OF EDUCATION FOR UTILIZATION OF SPACE TRANSMISSION TECHNIQUES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRONSON, VERNON; AND OTHERS

    STUDIES AND CONFERENCES WERE HELD ON NEEDS OF EDUCATION FOR THE UTILIZATION OF SATELLITE TV TRANSMISSION TECHNIQUES, TO DETERMINE THE ROLE WHICH EDUCATION MIGHT PLAY IN DEVELOPMENT AND TO PREDICT FUTURE NEEDS. RESULTS OF THESE STUDIES AND CONFERENCES HAVE BEEN REPORTED FOR AN ORGANIZED LOOK AT THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPACE COMMUNICATION, ITS…

  7. Mission Statements, Physical Space, and Strategy in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugazzotto, Sam J.

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of higher education institutions has bases in institutional structures and cultures. However, structure and culture represent abstract concepts while institutions realize high performance in practice. Given their salience in higher education, mission statements and campus space bring structure and culture into the realm of…

  8. Renovating Educational Identities: Policy, Space and Urban Renewal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulson, Kalervo N.

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the relationship between policy and space in the sociology of education. This paper analyses the relationships between educational policy change, in the form of the "Excellence in cities" policy initiative, and urban change in inner London. I propose, and apply, a framework for a spatialised policy analysis…

  9. Travellers and Home Education: Safe Spaces and Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Arcy, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Elective home education (EHE) is a legal alternative to school in England but the statutory requirements for provision are remarkably vague. This book explores the use of EHE by Gypsy and Traveller families. The accounts of their experiences and their views about education spaces reveal the racism and discrimination their children encounter in…

  10. THE NEEDS OF EDUCATION FOR UTILIZATION OF SPACE TRANSMISSION TECHNIQUES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRONSON, VERNON; AND OTHERS

    STUDIES AND CONFERENCES WERE HELD ON NEEDS OF EDUCATION FOR THE UTILIZATION OF SATELLITE TV TRANSMISSION TECHNIQUES, TO DETERMINE THE ROLE WHICH EDUCATION MIGHT PLAY IN DEVELOPMENT AND TO PREDICT FUTURE NEEDS. RESULTS OF THESE STUDIES AND CONFERENCES HAVE BEEN REPORTED FOR AN ORGANIZED LOOK AT THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPACE COMMUNICATION, ITS…

  11. Spaces of Difference: The Contradictions of Alternative Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon the concept of "thirdspace" (Soja 1996), this article extends sociocultural theorizations of space in relation to alternative educational programs: programs designed to re-engage youth who have been pushed out of mainstream schools. Snapshots of educational programs, provided by ethnographic research gathered in the United States,…

  12. Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces: OECD/CELE Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    CELE's International Pilot Project on Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces aims to assist education authorities, schools and others to maximise the use of and investment in learning environments. This article provides an update on the pilot project, which is currently being implemented in Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal and the United…

  13. Comparing Power Spaces: The Shaping of Ghana's Education Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takyi-Amoako, Emefa

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the power spaces occupied by both donors and the Ministry of Education in the formulation of Ghana's Education Strategic Plan (ESP). It shows that the formulation of the ESP was more donor-led than Ministry-led due to the donor-initiated global policy frameworks also referred to as the non-negotiables. Consequently, donors…

  14. Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces: OECD/CELE Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    CELE's International Pilot Project on Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces aims to assist education authorities, schools and others to maximise the use of and investment in learning environments. This article provides an update on the pilot project, which is currently being implemented in Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal and the United…

  15. Space education: Deriving benefits from industrial consortia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Page, John R.

    1993-01-01

    As the number of spacefaring nations of the world increases, so does the difficulty of competing in a global economy. The development of high technology products and services for space programs, and the economic exploitation of these technologies for national economic growth, requires professionals versed in both technical and commercial aspects of space. Meeting this requirement academically presents two challenges. On the technical side, enrollment in science and engineering is decreasing in some of the spacefaring nations. From the commerce perspective, very few colleges and universities offer specific courses in space business.

  16. Engaging Public Space: Art Education Pedagogies for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Considering social justice to be founded on human rights, which, in turn, are grounded in freedom of thought, expression, and assembly, this essay reviews efforts by art educators to engage with public space as a form of social justice pedagogy. Public space, whether actual or virtual, is understood to be inherently devoted to contestation in the…

  17. Space architecture education as a part of aerospace engineering curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannova, Olga; Bell, Larry

    2011-12-01

    Education is particularly important for new fields. In the case of space architecture, there are two core needs: educating the aerospace community about the architect's function and activity and design process within the enterprise; educating space architects and associated specialists about constraints, conditions, and priorities unique to human space systems. These needs can be addressed, respectively, by two key educational tools for the 21st century: introducing the space architecture discipline into the space system engineering curricula; developing space architecture as a distinct, complete training curriculum. New generations of professionals with a space architecture background can help shift professional focus from just engineering-driven transportation systems and "sortie" missions to permanent offworld human presence by offering their inherently integrative design approach to all types of space structures and facilities. Although architectural and engineering approaches share some similarities in solving problems, they also have significant differences. Architectural training teaches young professionals to operate at all scales from the "overall picture" down to the smallest details to provide directive intention - not just analysis - to design opportunities, to address the relationship between human behavior and the built environment, and to interact with many diverse fields and disciplines throughout the project lifecycle.

  18. Spaces of Possibility in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Pre-service teacher education is a spatialised enterprise. It operates across a number of spaces that may or may not be linked ideologically and/or physically. These spaces can include daily practices, locations, infrastructure, relationships and representations of power and ideology. The interrelationships between and within these (sometimes…

  19. Spaces of Possibility in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Pre-service teacher education is a spatialised enterprise. It operates across a number of spaces that may or may not be linked ideologically and/or physically. These spaces can include daily practices, locations, infrastructure, relationships and representations of power and ideology. The interrelationships between and within these (sometimes…

  20. Space Education: A Lifeline to the Skills Shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, I.

    2005-12-01

    There is a crisis in education relating to science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). In the UK, universities are closing physics and chemistry departments in favour of subjects such as media studies. Astronomy and space science may hold the key to engaging and captivating new audiences who may go on to be the scientists and engineers of the future. Orbit Research Ltd is carrying out practical research and development to work cooperatively with teachers and pupils in schools, colleges and universities, and industrial partners such as ESA, the National Science Learning Centre and the UK Space Industry Best Practice Club to rekindle the sense of excitement that space science can bring. The research includes the development of a 'space education centre' where the aim is to link elements of current national curriculum science to contemporary space research and space missions.

  1. The situation of space education in the unified Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Muldau, Hans H.

    Because of the unique situation of the unified Germany it is worth discussing the state of the art and the future aspects of space education in this country. Two different social and educational systems of the F.R.G. (Federal Republic of Germany) and the G.D.R. (German Democratic Republic) have to be synchronized. The increase of the population by the unification affected the space science related people. So the majorities change. At the moment the severe unemployment situation in eastern Germany hides this fact. But we have to be prepared for this in years to come. The different relation to the space science programs of the U.S.A. and Russia for the German scientist gives a chance for more international understanding and cooperation. This becomes a subject of educational approach to the international cooperation problem. The start of DARA (the German national space administration) in 1989 accompanied by dramatic concentration of space knowledge in DASA (the cooperation of the German national space industry) in the late eighties, shows that Germany has begun to concentrate its capabilities. On such a background, space education for the majority of the population becomes understandable and desirable. European commercial unification on an open market at the beginning of 1993 helps to concentrate the Germans on their historical part and task in the European market. Therefore, many solutions to establish effective space education becomes visible which were hidden behind walls of emotions and prejudices in the past. So the forecast for space education in Germany for the nineties has never been better. The only remaining problem—funding—has to be solved by unconventional ways, e.g. a foundation by the industry as in other countries.

  2. Education and training of personnel in space simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rempt, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The training program and procedures developed and implemented at the space simulation laboratory at Martin Marietta Aerospace in Denver are discussed. The training of technicians and professionals as well as preparation for instructors is covered. Training manuals and their compilation are reported as applicable to the specific needs of the laboratory. The development of a space simulation course as part of the Martin Marietta Continuing Education Night School approaching space simulation from an academic viewpoint is presented. Finally, public relations tours of the facility as an informational/educational tool are discussed.

  3. Education and Outreach on Space Sciences and Technologies in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiger Liu, Jann-Yeng; Chen, hao-Yen; Lee, I.-Te

    2014-05-01

    The Ionospheric Radio Science Laboratory (IRSL) at Institute of Space Science, National Central University in Taiwan has been conducting a program for public outreach educations on space science by giving lectures, organizing camps, touring exhibits, and experiencing hand-on experiments to elementary school, high school, and college students as well as general public since 1991. The program began with a topic of traveling/living in space, and was followed by space environment, space mission, and space weather monitoring, etc. and a series of course module and experiment (i.e. experiencing activity) module was carried out. For past decadal, the course modules have been developed to cover the space environment of the Sun, interplanetary space, and geospace, as well as the space technology of the rocket, satellite, space shuttle (plane), space station, living in space, observing the Earth from space, and weather observation. Each course module highlights the current status and latest new finding as well as discusses 1-3 key/core issues/concepts and equip with 2-3 activity/experiment modules to make students more easily to understand the topics/issues. Regarding the space technologies, we focus on remote sensing of Earth's surface by FORMOSAT-2 and occultation sounding by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC of Taiwan space mission. Moreover, scientific camps are given to lead students a better understanding and interesting on space sciences/ technologies. Currently, a visualized image projecting system, Dagik Earth, is developed to demonstrate the scientific results on a sphere together with the course modules. This system will dramatically improve the educational skill and increase interests of participators.

  4. Modelling of Tethered Space-Web Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. J.; Cartnell, M. P.

    Large structures in space are an essential milestone in the path of many projects, from solar power collectors to space stations. In space, as on Earth, these large projects may be split up into more manageable sections, dividing the task into multiple replicable parts. Specially constructed spider robots could assemble these structures piece by piece over a membrane or space- web, giving a method for building a structure while on orbit. The modelling and applications of these space-webs are discussed, along with the derivation of the equations of motion of the structure. The presentation of some preliminary results from the solution of these equations will show that space-webs can take a variety of different forms, and give some guidelines for configuring the space-web system.

  5. Improving science literacy and education through space life sciences.

    PubMed

    MacLeish, M Y; Moreno, N P; Tharp, B Z; Denton, J J; Jessup, G; Clipper, M C

    2001-01-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) encourages open involvement by scientists and the public at large in the Institute's activities. Through its Education and Public Outreach Program, the Institute is supporting national efforts to improve Kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12) and undergraduate education and to communicate knowledge generated by space life science research to lay audiences. Three academic institution Baylor College of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine and Texas A&M University are designing, producing, field-testing, and disseminating a comprehensive array of programs and products to achieve this goal. The objectives of the NSBRI Education and Public Outreach program are to: promote systemic change in elementary and secondary science education; attract undergraduate students--especially those from underrepresented groups--to careers in space life sciences, engineering and technology-based fields; increase scientific literacy; and to develop public and private sector partnerships that enhance and expand NSBRI efforts to reach students and families. PMID:11669133

  6. Changing Places, Changing Spaces? Towards Understanding Teacher Education through Space-Time Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This article draws together theoretical ideas from studies of space/spatiality and the history of teacher education. These ideas form a theoretical framework through which to analyse the findings from a small-scale ethnographic study of the geographical relocations made by two university schools of education in England. Data collection instruments…

  7. Changing Places, Changing Spaces? Towards Understanding Teacher Education through Space-Time Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This article draws together theoretical ideas from studies of space/spatiality and the history of teacher education. These ideas form a theoretical framework through which to analyse the findings from a small-scale ethnographic study of the geographical relocations made by two university schools of education in England. Data collection instruments…

  8. The Role of ESERO Romania in Space and Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Virgiliu

    2015-08-01

    ESERO Romania (The European Space Education Resource Office - Romania) has been established in 2014 as a collaboration between the Europen Space Agency and the Romanian Space Agency. The key aim of ESERO Romania is to increase STEM literacy in Romania by using space as an appealing context to make the teaching and learning of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math subjects more attractive and accessible. In Romania, the Office intends to bridge the gap between the prize-winning elites and the scientifically illiterate mass through the training of teachers, through raising awareness of space activities and through the dissemination of materials, making full use of ESA’s literature and logistical support in this process. The Romanian ESERO is also serving as the main interface between ESA Education and the Romanian educational community. The ultimate aim is to assure the formation of a future work force active in the space and engineering fields - including astronomy. This paper will outline the ways in which ESERO Romania contributes to space and astronomy education in Romania, as well as the challenges and opportunities encountered during the first year of its existence.

  9. Space Technology: Propulsion, Control and Guidance of Space Vehicles. Aerospace Education III. Instructional Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. Junior Reserve Office Training Corps.

    This curriculum guide is prepared for the Aerospace Education III series publication entitled "Space Technology: Propulsion, Control and Guidance of Space Vehicles." It provides guidelines for each chapter. The guide includes objectives, behavioral objectives, suggested outline, orientation, suggested key points, suggestions for teaching,…

  10. Inspiring the Next Generation: The International Space Station Education Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alleyne, Camille W.; Hasbrook, Pete; Knowles, Carolyn; Chicoine, Ruth Ann; Miyagawa, Yayoi; Koyama, Masato; Savage, Nigel; Zell, Martin; Biryukova, Nataliya; Pinchuk, Vladimir; Odelevsky, Vladimir; Firsyuk, Sergey; Alifanov, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has a unique ability to capture the imagination of both students and teachers worldwide. Since 2000, the presence of humans onboard ISS has provided a foundation for numerous educational activities aimed at capturing that interest and motivating study in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over 43 million students around the world have participated in ISS-related educational activities. Projects such as YouTube Space Lab, Sally Ride Earth Knowledge-based Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM), SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) Zero-Robotics, Tomatosphere, and MAI-75 events among others have allowed for global student, teacher and public access to space through student classroom investigations and real-time audio and video contacts with crewmembers. Educational activities are not limited to STEM but encompass all aspects of the human condition. This is well illustrated in the Uchu Renshi project, a chain poem initiated by an astronaut while in space and continued and completed by people on Earth. With ISS operations now extended to 2024, projects like these and their accompanying educational materials are available to more students around the world. From very early on in the program's history, students have been provided with a unique opportunity to get involved and participate in science and engineering projects. Many of these projects support inquiry-based learning that allows students to ask questions, develop hypothesis-derived experiments, obtain supporting evidence and identify solutions or explanations. This approach to learning is well-published as one of the most effective ways to inspire students to pursue careers in scientific and technology fields. Ever since the first space station element was launched, a wide range of student experiments and educational activities have been performed, both individually and collaboratively, by all the international partner agencies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Canadian Space Agency (CSA), European Space Agency, (ESA), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and a number of non-participating countries, some under commercial agreements. Many of these programs still continue, and others are being developed and added to the stations tasks on a regular basis. These diverse student experiments and programs fall into one of the following categories: student-developed experiments; students performing classroom versions of ISS experiments; students participating in ISS investigator experiments; education competitions; students participating in ISS Engineering Education; Education Demonstrations and Cultural Activities. This paper summarizes some of the main student experiments and educational activities that have been conducted on the space station.

  11. Momentum-space Harper-Hofstadter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2015-08-01

    We show how the weakly trapped Harper-Hofstadter model can be mapped onto a Harper-Hofstadter model in momentum space. In this momentum-space model, the band dispersion plays the role of the periodic potential, the Berry curvature plays the role of an effective magnetic field, the real-space harmonic trap provides the momentum-space kinetic energy responsible for the hopping, and the trap position sets the boundary conditions around the magnetic Brillouin zone. Spatially local interactions translate into nonlocal interactions in momentum space: within a mean-field approximation, we show that increasing interparticle interactions leads to a structural change of the ground state, from a single rotationally symmetric ground state to degenerate ground states that spontaneously break rotational symmetry.

  12. Space Sciences Education and Outreach Project of Moscow State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasotkin, S.

    2006-11-01

    sergekras@mail.ru The space sciences education and outreach project was initiated at Moscow State University in order to incorporate modern space research into the curriculum popularize the basics of space physics, and enhance public interest in space exploration. On 20 January 2005 the first Russian University Satellite “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” was launched into circular polar orbit (inclination 83 deg., altitude 940-980 km). The onboard scientific complex “Tatyana“, as well as the mission control and information receiving centre, was designed and developed at Moscow State University. The scientific programme of the mission includes measurements of space radiation in different energy channels and Earth UV luminosity and lightning. The current education programme consists of basic multimedia lectures “Life of the Earth in the Solar Atmosphere” and computerized practice exercises “Space Practice” (based on the quasi-real-time data obtained from “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” satellite and other Internet resources). A multimedia lectures LIFE OF EARTH IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE containing the basic information and demonstrations of heliophysics (including Sun structure and solar activity, heliosphere and geophysics, solar-terrestrial connections and solar influence on the Earth’s life) was created for upper high-school and junior university students. For the upper-university students there a dozen special computerized hands-on exercises were created based on the experimental quasi-real-time data obtained from our satellites. Students specializing in space physics from a few Russian universities are involved in scientific work. Educational materials focus on upper high school, middle university and special level for space physics students. Moscow State University is now extending its space science education programme by creating multimedia lectures on remote sensing, space factors and materials study, satellite design and development, etc. The space sciences educational activity of Moscow State University is a non-profit project and is open for all interested parties. “Space schools” for university teachers and students were held in the autumn of 2004 and 2005. The main objective of those schools was to attract interest in space research. Tutors and students who took part in these schools had never before been involved in the space sciences. The idea behind these schools was to join forces: Moscow State University scientists gave space science lectures, students from different universities (Ulianovsk, Samara, Kostroma and other Russian universities) performed the work (prepared educational material) and their university teachers managed the students. After participating in these schools, both students and teachers started to study space science related topics emphasizing the success of these schools. It is important for the educational community to understand what skills future space scientists and space industry employees must be equipped with. In the next years, emphasis is to be placed on space science education at all educational levels and better communication should be practiced between universities and industry.

  13. Developing Models of Educational Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayston, David; Jesson, David

    1988-01-01

    The London Education Authority (LEA) stresses the importance of developing the interface between quantitative models of assessment and qualitative assessments, describing an interdisciplinary approach to the development of models of educational accountability, recommends an alternative method, data envelopment analysis, and compares it to the…

  14. 3D space analysis of dental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Joon H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Kondo, Toshiaki; Foong, Kelvin W. C.; Yong, Than F.

    2001-05-01

    Space analysis is an important procedure by orthodontists to determine the amount of space available and required for teeth alignment during treatment planning. Traditional manual methods of space analysis are tedious and often inaccurate. Computer-based space analysis methods that work on 2D images have been reported. However, as the space problems in the dental arch exist in all three planes of space, a full 3D analysis of the problems is necessary. This paper describes a visualization and measurement system that analyses 3D images of dental plaster models. Algorithms were developed to determine dental arches. The system is able to record the depths of the Curve of Spee, and quantify space liabilities arising from a non-planar Curve of Spee, malalignment and overjet. Furthermore, the difference between total arch space available and the space required to arrange the teeth in ideal occlusion can be accurately computed. The system for 3D space analysis of the dental arch is an accurate, comprehensive, rapid and repeatable method of space analysis to facilitate proper orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

  15. Road Map to Better Space Environment Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    2004-09-01

    A 5-8 October workshop will pave the way toward replacing the 25-year-old radiation belt and space plasma models still in use and providing new standards that can help produce better spacecraft design and more accurate information about the space environment.

  16. Parametric Cost Models for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    A study is in-process to develop a multivariable parametric cost model for space telescopes. Cost and engineering parametric data has been collected on 30 different space telescopes. Statistical correlations have been developed between 19 variables of 59 variables sampled. Single Variable and Multi-Variable Cost Estimating Relationships have been developed. Results are being published.

  17. Development of a Statewide Space Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Lynda; Lewis, Tim

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews development and use of a statewide (Texas) space model for long-term planning, regulating new construction, and formula appropriations for general academic and, more recently, health-related institutions. Considers the work and recommendation of a 1998 study committee on space needs of health facilities, the Commissioner's…

  18. Role modeling in medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Reuler, J B; Nardone, D A

    1994-01-01

    Role models play an important part in determining how medical trainees mature professionally. Demonstrating clinical skills at the bedside is the most distinctive characteristic of an effective role model. We discuss how role modeling affects professional identity and career choice and offer several suggestions for improving medical education, including the need for leaders to change the educational climate and culture. If implemented, these changes would enhance our ability to provide medical students with positive role models. PMID:8023482

  19. Machinic Assemblages: Women, Art Education and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboukou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I explore connections between women, art education and spatial relations drawing on the Deleuzo-Guattarian concept of "machinic assemblage" as a useful analytical tool for making sense of the heterogeneity and meshwork of life narratives and their social milieus. In focusing on Mary Bradish Titcomb, a fin-de-siecle Bostonian woman…

  20. Machinic Assemblages: Women, Art Education and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboukou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I explore connections between women, art education and spatial relations drawing on the Deleuzo-Guattarian concept of "machinic assemblage" as a useful analytical tool for making sense of the heterogeneity and meshwork of life narratives and their social milieus. In focusing on Mary Bradish Titcomb, a fin-de-siecle Bostonian woman…

  1. Urban Technology, Conflict Education, and Disputed Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stienen, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article examines an urban project in Medellin, Colombia's second city, that sought to form social life by forming space: the city's metropolitan railway (Metro), which started operations at the end of 1995 and became the impetus of the inner city's renewal during the 1990s. The article begins with some background information on Medellin's…

  2. Urban Technology, Conflict Education, and Disputed Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stienen, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article examines an urban project in Medellin, Colombia's second city, that sought to form social life by forming space: the city's metropolitan railway (Metro), which started operations at the end of 1995 and became the impetus of the inner city's renewal during the 1990s. The article begins with some background information on Medellin's…

  3. Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  4. SPACE II. Single Parent Adults Choosing Education. Vocational Education Resource Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evaluation and Training Inst., Los Angeles, CA.

    This Vocational Education Resource Package (VERP) was developed to provide materials useful in replicating an exemplary vocational education program for special student populations in the California Community Colleges. This VERP describes Bakersfield College's Single Parent Adults Choosing Education (SPACE) II program, (an expansion of the…

  5. Parametric Cost Models for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Dollinger, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    Multivariable parametric cost models for space telescopes provide several benefits to designers and space system project managers. They identify major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades. They enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment. And, they provide a basis for estimating total project cost. A survey of historical models found that there is no definitive space telescope cost model. In fact, published models vary greatly [1]. Thus, there is a need for parametric space telescopes cost models. An effort is underway to develop single variable [2] and multi-variable [3] parametric space telescope cost models based on the latest available data and applying rigorous analytical techniques. Specific cost estimating relationships (CERs) have been developed which show that aperture diameter is the primary cost driver for large space telescopes; technology development as a function of time reduces cost at the rate of 50% per 17 years; it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; and increasing mass reduces cost.

  6. Transforming Community Access to Space Science Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Heese, Michael; Kunetsova, Maria; Maddox, Marlo; Rastaetter, Lutz; Berrios, David; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2012-01-01

    Researching and forecasting the ever changing space environment (often referred to as space weather) and its influence on humans and their activities are model-intensive disciplines. This is true because the physical processes involved are complex, but, in contrast to terrestrial weather, the supporting observations are typically sparse. Models play a vital role in establishing a physically meaningful context for interpreting limited observations, testing theory, and producing both nowcasts and forecasts. For example, with accurate forecasting of hazardous space weather conditions, spacecraft operators can place sensitive systems in safe modes, and power utilities can protect critical network components from damage caused by large currents induced in transmission lines by geomagnetic storms.

  7. Validation of Space Weather Models at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. Space weather models and coupled model chains hosted at the CCMC range from the solar corona to the Earth's upper atmosphere. CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as a large number of modeling and data products tailored to address the space weather needs of NASA's robotic missions. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. CCMC has been leading recent comprehensive modeling challenges under GEM, CEDAR and SHINE programs. The presentation will focus on experience in carrying out comprehensive and systematic validation of large sets of. space weather models

  8. Space Environments and Effects: Trapped Proton Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, S. L.; Kauffman, W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An improved model of the Earth's trapped proton environment has been developed. This model, designated Trapped Proton Model version 1 (TPM-1), determines the omnidirectional flux of protons with energy between 1 and 100 MeV throughout near-Earth space. The model also incorporates a true solar cycle dependence. The model consists of several data files and computer software to read them. There are three versions of the mo'del: a FORTRAN-Callable library, a stand-alone model, and a Web-based model.

  9. International Space Education Outreach: Taking Exploration to the Global Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, T. W.; Lichtenberger, L. A.; Chetirkin, P. V.; Garner, L. C.; Barfus, J. R.; Nazarenko, V. I.

    2005-01-01

    With the development of the International Space Station and the need for international collaboration for returning to the moon and developing a mission to Mars, NASA has embarked on developing international educational programs related to space exploration. In addition, with the explosion of educational technology, linking students on a global basis is more easily accomplished. This technology is bringing national and international issues into the classroom, including global environmental issues, the global marketplace, and global collaboration in space. We present the successes and lessons learned concerning international educational and public outreach programs that we have been involved in for NASA as well as the importance of sustaining these international peer collaborative programs for the future generations. These programs will undoubtedly be critical in enhancing the classroom environment and will affect the achievements in and attitudes towards science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

  10. AX-5 space suit reliability model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL; Magistad, John

    1990-01-01

    The AX-5 is an all metal Extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit currently under consideration for use on Space Station Freedom. A reliability model was developed based on the suit's unique design and on projected joint cycle requirements. Three AX-5 space suit component joints were cycled under simulated load conditions in accordance with NASA's advanced space suit evaluation plan. This paper will describe the reliability model developed, the results of the cycle testing, and an interpretation of the model and test results in terms of projected Mean Time Between Failure for the AX-5. A discussion of the maintenance implications and life cycle for the AX-5 based on this projection is also included.

  11. Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A non-recursive model (based on von Karman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the shuttle orbiter was developed. It provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity, and also for simulation of instantaneous gusts gradients. Based on this model the time series for both gusts and gust gradients were generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes, entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided. The results of validating the simulated turbulence are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. One-dimensional von Karman spectra are tabulated, while a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated is provided. The results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT are presented.

  12. Simulation Models in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrisseau, James J.

    1973-01-01

    This paper, adapted from a Society for College and University Planning conference, discusses cost simulation models in higher education. Emphasis is placed on the art of management, mini-models vs. maxi-models, the useful model, the reporting problem, anatomy of failure, information vs. action, and words of caution. (MJM)

  13. Strategies for Engaging NASA Space Scientists in K-12 > Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrak, R. R.

    2001-05-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) has made a significant commitment to increase scientist participation in Education and Public Outreach (EPO), with a focus on providing tools and assistance for educators in K-12 education and for public informal education. The general goals are to use NASA scientific discoveries and mission results to contribute to the technical and scientific literacy of the nation, to inspire youth, and to achieve significant and sustained enhancement of K-12 education. The participation of AGU scientists in EPO activities is vital to achieving these goals. This participation by individual scientists is often voluntary, but it can be funded as supplements to research grants or directly by OSS missions, which are now required to spend a few percent of their total budget on EPO. Scientists can provide inspiring role models for students, be powerful partners with teachers, and can help assure the scientific accuracy of educational materials. Scientists can also contribute by working with their local and regional educational leadership to include modern Earth and space science results in school curricula and in local museum exhibits and programs. The importance of partnerships between scientists and local educators is one element of a new AGU position statement on effective Earth and space science education at the K-12 level. Examples will be presented of highly-effective EPO programs and the successful strategies for active participation of scientists, with emphasis on activities of interest to AGU scientists.

  14. Research and Education in Basic Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naimy, H. M. K.; Celebre, C. P.; Chamcham, K.; de Alwis, H. S. P.; de Carias, M. C. P.; Haubold, H. J.; Troche Boggino, A. E.

    The UN/ESA workshops have been held in the regions of Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Western Asia, and Europe. Additional to the scientific benefits of the workshops and the strengthening of international cooperation, the workshops lead to the establishment of astronomical telescope facilities in Colombia, Egypt, Honduras, Jordan, Paraguay, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. The annual UN/ESA Workshops continue to pursue an agenda to network these astronomical telescope facilities through similar research and education programmes. Teaching material and hands-on astrophysics material has been developed for the operation of such astronomical telescope facilities in an university environment.

  15. Validation of Space Weather Models at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Hesse, M.; Chulaki, A.; Maddox, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multiagency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather modes. CCMC goal is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. The presentation will demonstrate the recent progress in CCMC metrics and validation activities.

  16. String Fragmentation Model in Space Radiation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Alfred; Johnson, Eloise (Editor); Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    String fragmentation models such as the Lund Model fit experimental particle production cross sections very well in the high-energy limit. This paper gives an introduction of the massless relativistic string in the Lund Model and shows how it can be modified with a simple assumption to produce formulas for meson production cross sections for space radiation research. The results of the string model are compared with inclusive pion production data from proton-proton collision experiments.

  17. Preliminary Multivariable Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. Previously, the authors published two single variable cost models based on 19 flight missions. The current paper presents the development of a multi-variable space telescopes cost model. The validity of previously published models are tested. Cost estimating relationships which are and are not significant cost drivers are identified. And, interrelationships between variables are explored

  18. Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for Jet PRopulsion Laboratory (JPL) Deep Space Network (DSN) Data System implementation tasks is described. The resource estimation mdel modifies and combines a number of existing models. The model calibrates the task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit JPL software life-cycle statistics.

  19. Visitors Center Educational Programs (Living and Working in Space)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Educational programs at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center reach more than 30,000 students in grades K-8 each year. Pictured above, a Stennis tour guide conducts a Living and Working in Space program for children at a local mall. This program, and others designed for specific age levels, is offered throughout the school year and summer for visiting students and youth groups.

  20. Models of Games Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Peter; Almond, Len

    1990-01-01

    Physical educators should be selective in deciding what games to include in the games curriculum. Several theoretical frameworks for selecting and teaching games are discussed, and a framework for developing a well-balanced games program is suggested. (IAH)

  1. The Florida Parent Education Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Coll. of Education.

    This paper describes the model for a program of compensatory education designed to intervene directly in the home so that the home situation might lead to better school and life performance. A section on "Rationale and Major Objectives" explains the program emphases: (1) the development of nonprofessionals as parent educators and as effective…

  2. Alternative Models for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffrey, John G.

    Higher education is beset from all sides by criticism, fear, doubt, uncertainty, and prophecies of doom. While the young call for change, the faculty often resist anything that might reduce their privileges and prerogatives. Before alternative models to the present system of higher education can be considered, it is useful to question present…

  3. In-Space Chemical Propulsion System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Woodcock, Gordon; Benfield, Michael P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple, new technologies for chemical systems are becoming available and include high temperature rockets, very light propellant tanks and structures, new bipropellant and monopropellant options, lower mass propellant control components, and zero boil off subsystems. Such technologies offer promise of increasing the performance of in-space chemical propulsion for energetic space missions. A mass model for pressure-fed, Earth and space-storable, advanced chemical propulsion systems (ACPS) was developed in support of the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Program. Data from flight systems and studies defined baseline system architectures and subsystems and analyses were formulated for parametric scaling relationships for all ACPS subsystem. The paper will first provide summary descriptions of the approaches used for the systems and the subsystems and then present selected analyses to illustrate use of the model for missions with characteristics of current interest.

  4. In-Space Chemical Propulsion System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Woodcock, Gordon; Benfield, M. P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple, new technologies for chemical systems are becoming available and include high temperature rockets, very light propellant tanks and structures, new bipropellant and monopropellant options, lower mass propellant control components, and zero boil off subsystems. Such technologies offer promise of increasing the performance of in-space chemical propulsion for energetic space missions. A mass model for pressure-fed, Earth and space-storable, advanced chemical propulsion systems (ACPS) was developed in support of the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Program. Data from flight systems and studies defined baseline system architectures and subsystems and analyses were formulated for parametric scaling relationships for all ACPS subsystems. The paper will first provide summary descriptions of the approaches used for the systems and the subsystems and then present selected analyses to illustrate use of the model for missions with characteristics of current interest.

  5. Teacher Education Physical Education: In Search of a Hybrid Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is argued that a learning environment underpinned by a strengths-based collaborative approach between universities and schools offers extended pre-service teacher learning opportunities and subsequently enhanced preparation. The term "hybrid space" describes the ideal environment of shared partnership where knowledge is jointly…

  6. Developing Viable Financing Models for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilingsfeld, F.; Schaetzler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing commercialization of space services and the impending release of government's control of space access promise to make space ventures more attractive. Still, many investors shy away from going into the space tourism market as long as they do not feel secure that their return expectations will be met. First and foremost, attracting investors from the capital markets requires qualifying financing models. Based on earlier research on the cost of capital for space tourism, this paper gives a brief run-through of commercial, technical and financial due diligence aspects. After that, a closer look is taken at different valuation techniques as well as alternative ways of streamlining financials. Experience from earlier ventures has shown that the high cost of capital represents a significant challenge. Thus, the sophistication and professionalism of business plans and financial models needs to be very high. Special emphasis is given to the optimization of the debt-to-equity ratio over time. The different roles of equity and debt over a venture's life cycle are explained. Based on the latter, guidelines for the design of an optimized loan structure are given. These are then applied to simulating the financial performance of a typical space tourism venture over time, including the calculation of Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) and Net Present Value (NPV). Based on a concluding sensitivity analysis, the lessons learned are presented. If applied properly, these will help to make space tourism economically viable.

  7. A space transportation system operations model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a description of a computer program which permits assessment of the operational support requirements of space transportation systems functioning in both a ground- and space-based environment. The scenario depicted provides for the delivery of payloads from Earth to a space station and beyond using upper stages based at the station. Model results are scenario dependent and rely on the input definitions of delivery requirements, task times, and available resources. Output is in terms of flight rate capabilities, resource requirements, and facility utilization. A general program description, program listing, input requirements, and sample output are included.

  8. Space shuttle traffic model developed from 1971 mission model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Traffic model data for the space shuttle using the 1971 NASA, DOD, and commercial mission models are presented along with descriptions and schedules for the NASA and commercial payloads used to develop the data.

  9. Sigma-Model Solitons on Noncommutative Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Ludwik; Landi, Giovanni; Luef, Franz

    2015-12-01

    We use results from time-frequency analysis and Gabor analysis to construct new classes of sigma-model solitons over the Moyal plane and over noncommutative tori, taken as source spaces, with a target space made of two points. A natural action functional leads to self-duality equations for projections in the source algebra. Solutions, having nontrivial topological content, are constructed via suitable Morita duality bimodules.

  10. Space Plasma Science as a Motivator for Education & Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Education and public outreach (EPO) continue to play an important role in how science is funded by the federal government. The plasma science community has a responsibility to share their exciting science with the American public. Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences, and Neal Lane, former head of NSF, are on record as strong advocates of scientists becoming more actively and effectively engaged in K-12 science education reform. In addition, research directorates of funding agencies like NASA and NSF are increasingly encouraging (and in some cases requiring) the integration of science and education and greater scientist involvement in EPO. How does plasma science and scientists fit into this broader political and social landscape? How well does the public understand our science and technology? Are there ways to effectively engage the public that provide good visibility for plasma science? These questions and more will be addressed in this talk. The Space Science Institute (SSI), a nonprofit organization in Colorado, provides national leadership in developing innovative ways to translate the activities and resources of space and earth science research into exciting and effective K-12 and museum education programs. SSI’s mission is to link its space science research enterprise with its education programs. SSI has active programs in curriculum and exhibit development and professional development for both scientists about education and for educators about science. I will share with you one exhibit project and one curriculum project whose goals are to raise public understanding of space plasmas and by extension all of plasma science.

  11. A Bayesian model for visual space perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    A model for visual space perception is proposed that contains desirable features in the theories of Gibson and Brunswik. This model is a Bayesian processor of proximal stimuli which contains three important elements: an internal model of the Markov process describing the knowledge of the distal world, the a priori distribution of the state of the Markov process, and an internal model relating state to proximal stimuli. The universality of the model is discussed and it is compared with signal detection theory models. Experimental results of Kinchla are used as a special case.

  12. Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for Deep Space Network (DSN) Data Systems implementation tasks is presented. The resource estimation model incorporates principles and data from a number of existing models. The model calibrates task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit DSN software life cycle statistics. The estimation model output scales a standard DSN Work Breakdown Structure skeleton, which is then input into a PERT/CPM system, producing a detailed schedule and resource budget for the project being planned.

  13. Qualitative models for space system engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to investigate the implications of qualitative modeling techniques for problems arising in the monitoring, diagnosis, and design of Space Station subsystems and procedures; (2) to identify the issues involved in using qualitative models to enhance and automate engineering functions. These issues include representing operational criteria, fault models, alternate ontologies, and modeling continuous signals at a functional level of description; and (3) to develop a prototype collection of qualitative models for fluid and thermal systems commonly found in Space Station subsystems. Potential applications of qualitative modeling to space-systems engineering, including the notion of intelligent computer-aided engineering are summarized. Emphasis is given to determining which systems of the proposed Space Station provide the most leverage for study, given the current state of the art. Progress on using qualitative models, including development of the molecular collection ontology for reasoning about fluids, the interaction of qualitative and quantitative knowledge in analyzing thermodynamic cycles, and an experiment on building a natural language interface to qualitative reasoning is reported. Finally, some recommendations are made for future research.

  14. Implementational and Ideological Spaces in Bilingual Education Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David Cassels

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results from an ethnography of language policy which examined language policy appropriation for bilingual learners in a large urban US school district. The purpose of this article is to explore the space left by current US language policy for developmental bilingual education and, specifically, the focus is on how a group of…

  15. SPACE AND UTILIZATION STANDARDS, CALIFORNIA PUBLIC HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MATSLER, FRANKLIN G.; AND OTHERS

    IN LONG RANGE FACILITIES PLANNING, SPACE UTILIZATION STANDARDS ARE NEEDED WHICH 1) ALLOW MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY, 2) ARE EQUITABLE FOR ALL SEGMENTS OF HIGHER EDUCATION WHEN THESE SEGMENTS ARE CONCERNED WITH THE SAME LEVELS OF INSTRUCTION AND THE SAME SUBJECT FIELD AREAS, AND 3) ARE CONTINUALLY REVIEWED. FACTORS IN DETERMINING STANDARDS ARE 1) ROOM USE…

  16. Space Orientation for Professional Educators: Program Evaluation and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Sharon H.

    This evaluation of mini-conferences conducted for Alabama teachers who completed training in the 1996 Summer Space Orientation for Professional Educators (SOPE) examines the effectiveness of follow-up sessions for teachers (N=69) and provides baseline data on teachers' knowledge of and attitudes toward teaching science. Conclusions about the 1996…

  17. Clinical and Educational Support for Space Flight via Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session MP3 includes short reports on: (1) Telemedicine: A User's Perspective; (2) Health Care in Extreme Environments; (3) Integration of Emerging Technologies in Information and Telecommunications in Health Care Systems for Space; (4) Telemedicine and Environmental Medicine in Russia: A First Step in Basic Medical Education; and (5) Clinical Utility of Internet Telemedicine.

  18. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1992-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. The human operator monitors and fine-tunes computer-based control systems and is responsible for ensuring safe and efficient system operation. In such systems, the potential consequences of human mistakes and errors may be very large, and low probability of such events is likely. Thus, models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision support aids. The operator function model represents normative operator behavior-expected operator activities given current system state. The extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications is discussed.

  19. The International Space Station (ISS) Education Accomplishments and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alleyne, Camille W.; Blue, Regina; Mayo, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has the unique ability to capture the imaginations of both students and teachers worldwide and thus stands as an invaluable learning platform for the advancement of proficiency in research and development and education. The presence of humans on board ISS for the past ten years has provided a foundation for numerous educational activities aimed at capturing that interest and motivating study in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines which will lead to an increase in quality of teachers, advancements in research and development, an increase in the global reputation for intellectual achievement, and an expanded ability to pursue unchartered avenues towards a brighter future. Over 41 million students around the world have participated in ISS-related activities since the year 2000. Projects such as the Amateur Radio on International Space Station (ARISS) and Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), among others, have allowed for global student, teacher, and public access to space through radio contacts with crewmembers and student image acquisition respectively. . With planned ISS operations at least until 2020, projects like the aforementioned and their accompanying educational materials will be available to enable increased STEM literacy around the world. Since the launch of the first ISS element, a wide range of student experiments and educational activities have been performed by each of the international partner agencies: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Canadian Space Agency (CSA), European Space Agency (ESA), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos). Additionally, a number of non-participating countries, some under commercial agreements, have also participated in Station-related activities. Many of these programs still continue while others are being developed and added to the station crewmembers tasks on a regular basis. These diverse student experiments and programs fall into one of the following categories: student-developed experiments; students performing classroom versions of ISS experiments; students participating in ISS investigator experiments; students participating in ISS engineering education; education demonstrations and cultural activities. This paper summarizes some of the main student experiments and educational activities that have been conducted on the ISS. It also highlights some upcoming projects.

  20. Educational Technology Funding Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Library and cross-disciplinary literature all stress the increasing importance of instructional technology in higher education. However, there is a dearth of articles detailing funding for library instructional technology. The bulk of library literature on funding for these projects focuses on one-time grant opportunities and on the architecture…

  1. Educational Technology Funding Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Library and cross-disciplinary literature all stress the increasing importance of instructional technology in higher education. However, there is a dearth of articles detailing funding for library instructional technology. The bulk of library literature on funding for these projects focuses on one-time grant opportunities and on the architecture…

  2. The Force of Habit: Channelling Young Bodies at Alternative Education Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This article develops a novel conceptual framework for examining the (re)formulation of habits in education spaces. It is based on the premise that education spaces are key sites for channelling and intervening in children's habits, to various ends. The article focuses on the ways educators at alternative education spaces in the United Kingdom…

  3. Model analysis of Space Shuttle dosimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, J. R.; Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.; Benton, E. V.

    1989-01-01

    An extensive model analysis of plastic track detector measurements of high-LET particles on the Space Shuttle has been performed. Three Shuttle flights: STS-51F (low-altitude, high-inclination), STS-51J (high-altitude, low-inclination), and STS-61C (low-altitude, low-inclination) are considered. The model includes contributions from trapped protons and Galactic cosmic radiation, as well as target secondary particles. Target secondaries, expected to be of importance in thickly shielded space environments, are found to be a significant component of the measured LET (linear energy transfer) spectra.

  4. Space for Technical Education: How to Plan It (And How Not To).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogler, Roger

    1980-01-01

    Algeria's space use model for the Institut National d'Electricite et d'Electronique is discussed. By concentrating all of its training capability in electricity and electronics in a single institution, Algeria has realized dramatic savings in the educational process and in the cost of physical plant and equipment. (MLW)

  5. Educational Applications of Astronomy & Space Flight Operations at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, L. K.

    1999-09-01

    Within two years, the Kennedy Space Center will complete a total redesign of NASA's busiest Visitor's Center. Three million visitors per year will be witness to a new program focused on expanding the interests of the younger public in NASA's major space programs, in space operations, and in astronomy. This project, being developed through the Visitor's Center director, a NASA faculty fellow, and the Visitor's Center contractor, is centered on the interaction between NASA programs, the visiting youth, and their parents. The goal of the Center's program is to provide an appealing learning experience for teens and pre teens using stimulating displays and interactive exhibits that are also educational.

  6. Edgeworth streaming model for redshift space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, Cora; Kopp, Michael; Haugg, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We derive the Edgeworth streaming model (ESM) for the redshift space correlation function starting from an arbitrary distribution function for biased tracers of dark matter by considering its two-point statistics and show that it reduces to the Gaussian streaming model (GSM) when neglecting non-Gaussianities. We test the accuracy of the GSM and ESM independent of perturbation theory using the Horizon Run 2 N -body halo catalog. While the monopole of the redshift space halo correlation function is well described by the GSM, higher multipoles improve upon including the leading order non-Gaussian correction in the ESM: the GSM quadrupole breaks down on scales below 30 Mpc /h whereas the ESM stays accurate to 2% within statistical errors down to 10 Mpc /h . To predict the scale-dependent functions entering the streaming model we employ convolution Lagrangian perturbation theory (CLPT) based on the dust model and local Lagrangian bias. Since dark matter halos carry an intrinsic length scale given by their Lagrangian radius, we extend CLPT to the coarse-grained dust model and consider two different smoothing approaches operating in Eulerian and Lagrangian space, respectively. The coarse graining in Eulerian space features modified fluid dynamics different from dust while the coarse graining in Lagrangian space is performed in the initial conditions with subsequent single-streaming dust dynamics, implemented by smoothing the initial power spectrum in the spirit of the truncated Zel'dovich approximation. Finally, we compare the predictions of the different coarse-grained models for the streaming model ingredients to N -body measurements and comment on the proper choice of both the tracer distribution function and the smoothing scale. Since the perturbative methods we considered are not yet accurate enough on small scales, the GSM is sufficient when applied to perturbation theory.

  7. NASA space life sciences research and education support program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terri K.

    1995-01-01

    USRA's Division of Space Life Sciences (DSLS) was established in 1983 as the Division of Space Biomedicine to facilitate participation of the university community in biomedical research programs at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The DSLS is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Space Studies (CASS), sharing quarters with the Division of Educational Programs and the Lunar and Planetary Institute. The DSLS provides visiting scientists for the Johnson Space Center; organizes conferences, workshops, meetings, and seminars; and, through subcontracts with outside institutions, supports NASA-related research at more than 25 such entities. The DSLS has considerable experience providing visiting scientists, experts, and consultants to work in concert with NASA Life Sciences researchers to define research missions and goals and to perform a wide variety of research administration and program management tasks. The basic objectives of this contract have been to stimulate, encourage, and assist research and education in the NASA life sciences. Scientists and experts from a number of academic and research institutions in this country and abroad have been recruited to support NASA's need to find a solution to human physiological problems associated with living and working in space and on extraterrestrial bodies in the solar system.

  8. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  9. "Educational Regionalization" and the Gated Global: The Construction of the Caribbean Educational Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jules, Tavis D.

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on "regime theory," particularly on the concepts of cooperation, compatibility of interests, and proclivity to compromise, to examine the rise of the Caribbean Educational Policy Space (CEPS). In making this argument, with the aid of a content analysis of 26 educational policies from the 15 member states of the…

  10. "Educational Regionalization" and the Gated Global: The Construction of the Caribbean Educational Policy Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jules, Tavis D.

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on "regime theory," particularly on the concepts of cooperation, compatibility of interests, and proclivity to compromise, to examine the rise of the Caribbean Educational Policy Space (CEPS). In making this argument, with the aid of a content analysis of 26 educational policies from the 15 member states of the…

  11. Space Technology: Propulsion, Control and Guidance of Space Vehicles. Aerospace Education III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savler, D. S.; Mackin, T. E.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education III, includes a discussion of the essentials of propulsion, control, and guidance and the conditions of space travel. Chapter 1 provides a brief account of basic laws of celestial mechanics. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 are devoted to the chemical principles of propulsion. Included are the basics of…

  12. Space Weather Modeling Services at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the Rapid Prototyping Centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires close collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide a description of the current CCMC status, discuss current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and describe the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  13. Space Weather Modeling at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse M.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the rapid prototyping centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires dose collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as distributed computing facilities provided by the US Air Force. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide updates on CCMC status, on current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and on the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  14. USRA's NCSEFSE: a new National Center for Space, Earth, and Flight Sciences Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.; Goldstein, J.; Vanhala, H.; Hamel, J.; Miller, E. A.; Pulkkinen, K.; Richards, S.

    2005-08-01

    A new National Center for Space, Earth, and Flight Sciences Education (NCSEFSE) has been created in the Washington, DC metropolitan area under the auspices of the Universities Space Research Association. The NCSEFSE provides education and public outreach services in the areas of NASA's research foci in programs of both national and local scope. Present NCSEFSE programs include: Journey through the Universe, which unites formal and informal education within communities and connects a nationally-distributed network of communities from Hilo, HI to Washington, DC with volunteer Visiting Researchers and thematic education modules; the Voyage Scale Model Solar System exhibition on the National Mall, a showcase for planetary science placed directly outside the National Air and Space Museum; educational module development and distribution for the MESSENGER mission to Mercury through a national cadre of MESSENGER Educator Fellows; Teachable Moments in the News, which capitalizes on current events in space, Earth, and flight sciences to teach the science that underlies students' natural interests; the Voyages Across the Universe Speakers' Bureau; and Family Science Night at the National Air and Space Museum, which reaches audiences of 2000--3000 each year, drawn from the Washington metropolitan area. Staff scientists of NCSEFSE maintain active research programs, presently in the areas of planetary atmospheric composition, structure, and dynamics, and in solar system formation. NCSEFSE scientists thus are able to act as authentic representatives of frontier scientific research, and ensure accuracy, relevance, and significance in educational products. NCSEFSE instructional designers and educators ensure pedagogic clarity and effectiveness, through a commitment to quantitative assessment.

  15. New Skeletal-Space-Filling Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Frank H.

    1977-01-01

    Describes plastic, skeletal molecular models that are color-coded and can illustrate both the conformation and overall shape of small molecules. They can also be converted to space-filling counterparts by the additions of color-coded polystyrene spheres. (MLH)

  16. Improving science literacy and education through space life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeish, M. Y.; Moreno, N. P.; Tharp, B. Z.; Denton, J. J.; Jessup, G.; Clipper, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) encourages open involvement by scientists and the public at large in the Institute's activities. Through its Education and Public Outreach Program, the Institute is supporting national efforts to improve Kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12) and undergraduate education and to communicate knowledge generated by space life science research to lay audiences. Three academic institution Baylor College of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine and Texas A&M University are designing, producing, field-testing, and disseminating a comprehensive array of programs and products to achieve this goal. The objectives of the NSBRI Education and Public Outreach program are to: promote systemic change in elementary and secondary science education; attract undergraduate students--especially those from underrepresented groups--to careers in space life sciences, engineering and technology-based fields; increase scientific literacy; and to develop public and private sector partnerships that enhance and expand NSBRI efforts to reach students and families. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Earthspace: A National Clearinghouse For Higher Education In Space And Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CoBabe-Ammann, Emily; Shipp, S.; Dalton, H.

    2012-10-01

    The EarthSpace is a searchable database of undergraduate classroom materials for undergraduate faculty teaching earth and space sciences at both the introductory and upper division levels. Modeled after the highly successful SERC clearinghouse for geosciences assets, EarthSpace was designed for easy submission of classroom assets - from homeworks and computerinteractives to laboratories and demonstrations. All materials are reviewedbefore posting, and authors adhere to the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution (CC-BY NC 3.0). If authors wish, their EarthSpace materials are automatically cross-posted to other digital libraries (e.g., ComPADRE) and virtual higher education communities(e.g., Connexions). As new electronic repositories come online, EarthSpace materials will automatically be sent. So faculty submit their materials only once and EarthSpace ensures continual distribution as time goes on and new opportunities arise. In addition to classroom materials, EarthSpace provides news and information about educational research and best practices, funding opportunities, and ongoing efforts and collaborations for undergraduate education. http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace

  18. Hubble Space Telescope electrical power system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggett, Randy; Miller, Jim; Leisgang, Tom

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes one of the most comprehensive models ever developed for a spacecraft electrical power system (EPS). The model was developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to evaluate vehicle power system performance and to assist in scheduling maintenance and refurbishment missions by providing data needed to forecast EPS power and energy margins for the mission phases being planned. The EPS model requires a specific mission phase description as the input driver and uses a high granularity database to produce a multi-orbit power system performance report. The EPS model accurately predicts the power system response to various mission timelines over the entire operational life of the spacecraft.

  19. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  20. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  1. Habitability Concept Models for Living in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrino, M.

    2002-01-01

    As growing trends show, living in "space" has acquired new meanings, especially considering the utilization of the International Space Station (ISS) with regard to group interaction as well as individual needs in terms of time, space and crew accommodations. In fact, for the crew, the Spaced Station is a combined Laboratory-Office/Home and embodies ethical, social, and cultural aspects as additional parameters to be assessed to achieve a user centered architectural design of crew workspace. Habitability Concept Models can improve the methods and techniques used to support the interior design and layout of space architectures and at the same time guarantee a human focused approach. This paper discusses and illustrates some of the results obtained for the interior design of a Habitation Module for the ISS. In this work, two different but complementary approaches are followed. The first is "object oriented" and based on Video Data (American and Russian) supported by Proxemic methods (Edward T. Hall, 1963 and Francesca Pregnolato, 1998). This approach offers flexible and adaptive design solutions. The second is "subject oriented" and based on a Virtual Reality environment. With this approach human perception and cognitive aspects related to a specific crew task are considered. Data obtained from these two approaches are used to verify requirements and advance the design of the Habitation Module for aspects related to man machine interfaces (MMI), ergonomics, work and free-time. It is expected that the results achieved can be applied to future space related projects.

  2. Dynamic modelling and analysis of space webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Baoyin, HeXi; Li, JunFeng

    2011-04-01

    Future space missions demand operations on large flexible structures, for example, space webs, the lightweight cable nets deployable in space, which can serve as platforms for very large structures or be used to capture orbital objects. The interest in research on space webs is likely to increase in the future with the development of promising applications such as Furoshiki sat-ellite of JAXA, Robotic Geostationary Orbit Restorer (ROGER) of ESA and Grapple, Retrieve And Secure Payload (GRASP) of NASA. Unlike high-tensioned nets in civil engineering, space webs may be low-tensioned or tensionless, and extremely flexible, owing to the microgravity in the orbit and the lack of support components, which may cause computational difficulties. Mathematical models are necessary in the analysis of space webs, especially in the conceptual design and evaluation for prototypes. A full three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was developed in this work. Trivial truss elements were adopted to reduce the computational complexity. Considering cable is a compression-free material and its tensile stiffness is also variable, we introduced the cable material constitutive relationship to work out an accurate and feasible model for prototype analysis and design. In the static analysis, the stress distribution and global deformation of the webs were discussed to get access to the knowledge of strength of webs with different types of meshes. In the dynamic analysis, special attention was paid to the impact problem. The max stress and global deformation were investigated. The simulation results indicate the interesting phenomenon which may be worth further research.

  3. Space Weather Around the World: An IHY Education Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J. R.; Ng, C.; Hawkins, I.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2007-05-01

    Fifty years ago the International Geophysical Year organized a unique and unprecedented program of research that united 60,000 scientists from 66 nations to study global phenomena concerning the Earth and its space environment. In that same spirit, "Space Weather Around the World" is a program to coordinate and facilitate the involvement of NASA heliophysics missions and scientists to inspire and educate a world-wide audience about the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). We will use the popular Sun-Earth Day annual event framework sponsored by the Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum to promote IHY science and the spirit of international collaboration. The theme for the March 2007 Sun-Earth Day: "IHY: Living in the Atmosphere of the Sun" was selected a year ago in anticipation of the IHY celebration. These efforts will be expanded through a series of coordinated programs under the theme "Space Weather Around the World" for Sun-Earth Day 2008. We will produce a live broadcast from China of the total solar eclipse on August 1st 2008 as the central event, highlighting investigations associated with the eclipse by the international heliophysics community. Additional collaborative efforts will include: a Space Weather Media Maker web-tool to allow educators and scientists to create their own multi-media resource to enhance teaching and learning at all levels; Rock-n-Sol, a musical composition by children internationally inspired by space weather and incorporating sonifications of solar data; and Space Weather Action Centers for students to track a solar storm featuring podcasts of multi-cultural perspectives on IHY. The anticipated audience would be millions of people internationally The science and E/PO heliophysics community has an exciting story to tell about IHY, and we look forward to the opportunity to share it globally.

  4. Space market model development project, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Hamel, Gary P.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a research project investigating information needs for space commercialization is described. The Space Market Model Development Project (SMMDP) was designed to help NASA identify the information needs of the business community and to explore means to meet those needs. The activity of the SMMDP is reviewed and a report of its operation via three sections is presented. The first part contains a brief historical review of the project since inception. The next part reports results of Phase 3, the most recent stage of activity. Finally, overall conclusions and observations based on the SMMDP research results are presented.

  5. Space Object Tracking Method with Snake Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2015-05-01

    Aimed at the unstable tracking problem of low-orbit variable and bright space objects, an active contour model is accepted, and a refined GVF-Snake algorithm is proposed to realize the real-time searching of the real contour of objects on CCD image in this paper. Combined with the Kalman filter for prediction, a new adaptive tracking approach is proposed for space objects. Experiments show that the method can overcome the tracking difficulty brought by a fixed window, and improve the tracking robustness.

  6. Space science education-an interdisciplinary and international programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycroft, M. J.

    The ISU's Master of Space Studies (MSS) programme is a new, unique and interdisciplinary postgraduate course of eleven months duration. It is designed for those who will lead and work in the international space programmes of the next century. It considers not only many aspects of the space sciences and their applications, but also most engineering, business, management, policy and law issues relevant to the activities of both space agencies and space industries. In the first term, fundamental issues are covered, and MSS participants from many countries around the world select some topics of their choice; within the sciences, attention is focused on basic physics, the space environment and life sciences. In the second and third terms, advanced subjects ranging from astronomy to planetary sciences, microgravity sciences, telecommunications and remote sensing of the Earth's surface and atmosphere are available. For two months in the second term, each participant carries out a project at an affiliate campus or an associated institution, and prepares a written report on this. Throughout the year, all participants play an active part in a team design project on a chosen theme; a substantial written report is prepared, and the results are also presented orally. Thus the aim of the MSS programme is to educate space generalists, yet generalists who are knowledgeable in all the relevant disciplines, including science.

  7. Space Station Freedom integrated fault model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Fred J.

    1989-01-01

    A demonstration of an integrated fault propagation model for Space Station Freedom is described. The demonstration uses a HyperCard graphical interface to show how failures can propagate from one component to another, both within a system and between systems. It also shows how hardware failures can impact certain defined functions like reboost, atmosphere maintenance or collision avoidance. The demonstration enables the user to view block diagrams for the various space station systems using an overview screen, and interactively choose a component and see what single or dual failure combinations can cause it to fail. It also allows the user to directly view the fault model, which is a collection of drawing and text listings accessible from a guide screen. Fault modeling provides a useful technique for analyzing individual systems and also interactions between systems in the presence of multiple failures so that a complete picture of failure tolerance and component criticality can be achieved.

  8. Modeling and Analysis of Space Based Transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Abbott, Ben; Liebetreu, John; Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the tool chain, methodology, and initial results of a study to provide a thorough, objective, and quantitative analysis of the design alternatives for space Software Defined Radio (SDR) transceivers. The approach taken was to develop a set of models and tools for describing communications requirements, the algorithm resource requirements, the available hardware, and the alternative software architectures, and generate analysis data necessary to compare alternative designs. The Space Transceiver Analysis Tool (STAT) was developed to help users identify and select representative designs, calculate the analysis data, and perform a comparative analysis of the representative designs. The tool allows the design space to be searched quickly while permitting incremental refinement in regions of higher payoff.

  9. Modeling and Analysis of Space Based Transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Liebetreu, John; Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Abbott, Ben

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the tool chain, methodology, and initial results of a study to provide a thorough, objective, and quantitative analysis of the design alternatives for space Software Defined Radio (SDR) transceivers. The approach taken was to develop a set of models and tools for describing communications requirements, the algorithm resource requirements, the available hardware, and the alternative software architectures, and generate analysis data necessary to compare alternative designs. The Space Transceiver Analysis Tool (STAT) was developed to help users identify and select representative designs, calculate the analysis data, and perform a comparative analysis of the representative designs. The tool allows the design space to be searched quickly while permitting incremental refinement in regions of higher payoff.

  10. Cross-cultural Education at the International Space University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, J. D.; Peeters, W.; Hill, H.

    2006-12-01

    A typical nine-week summer session of the International Space University includes 100 graduate students and young professionals from as many as thirty countries. In addition to lectures and team projects covering a variety of space-related disciplines, the curriculum contains several modes of cross-cultural education. In role- playing workshops, students (asked to behave in accord with known cultural norms of various countries) engage in negotiations on problems such as the rescue and return of astronauts as mandated in international agreements and treaties. Culture shock that could derail such negotiations in actual practice is observed, and the participants come away with heightened sensitivity to cultural differences. This technique could be extended to other educational settings, such as the activities of the UN's Regional Centres in developing countries and the outreach efforts associated with the International Heliophysical Year.

  11. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical schemes. Depending on the application, we find that different time stepping methods are optimal. Several of the time integration schemes exploit the block-based granularity of the grid structure. The framework and the adaptive algorithms enable physics based space weather modeling and even forecasting.

  12. Modeling the space of camera response functions.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Michael D; Nayar, Shree K

    2004-10-01

    Many vision applications require precise measurement of scene radiance. The function relating scene radiance to image intensity of an imaging system is called the camera response. We analyze the properties that all camera responses share. This allows us to find the constraints that any response function must satisfy. These constraints determine the theoretical space of all possible camera responses. We have collected a diverse database of real-world camera response functions (DoRF). Using this database, we show that real-world responses occupy a small part of the theoretical space of all possible responses. We combine the constraints from our theoretical space with the data from DoRF to create a low-parameter empirical model of response (EMoR). This response model allows us to accurately interpolate the complete response function of a camera from a small number of measurements obtained using a standard chart. We also show that the model can be used to accurately estimate the camera response from images of an arbitrary scene taken using different exposures. The DoRF database and the EMoR model can be downloaded at http://www.cs.columbia.edu/CAVE. PMID:15641715

  13. Scientific and educational center "space systems and technology"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Loginov, Y. Y.; Zelenkov, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The issues of engineers training in the aerospace university on the base of Scientific and Educational Center "Space Systems and Technology" are discussed. In order to improve the quality of education in the Siberian State Aerospace University the research work of students, as well as the practice- oriented training of engineers are introduced in the educational process. It was made possible as a result of joint efforts of university with research institutes of the Russian Academy of Science and industrial enterprises. The university experience in this area promotes the development of a new methods and forms of educational activities, including the project-oriented learning technologies, identifying promising areas of specialization and training of highly skilled engineers for aerospace industry and other institutions. It also allows you to coordinate the work of departments and other units of the university to provide the educational process in workshops and departments of the industrial enterprises in accordance with the needs of the target training. Within the framework of scientific and education center the students perform researches, diploma works and master's theses; the postgraduates are trained in advanced scientific and technical areas of enterprise development.

  14. Creating State-based Alliances to Support Earth and Space Science Education Reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, E. E.; Manduca, C. A.; Barstow, D.

    2002-05-01

    Seven years after the publication of the National Science Education Standards and adoption of new state science education standards, Earth and space science remains outside the mainstream K-12 curriculum. Currently, less than ten percent of high school students in the United States of America take an Earth or space science course before graduation. This state of affairs is simply unacceptable. "All of us who live on this planet have the right and the obligation to understand Earth's unique history, its dynamic processes, its abundant resources, and its intriguing mysteries. As citizens of Earth, with the power to modify our climate and ecosystems, we also have a personal and collective responsibility to understand Earth so that we can make wise decisions about its and our future". As one step toward addressing this situation, we support the establishment of state-based alliances to promote Earth and space science education reform. "In many ways, states are the most vital locus of change in our nation's schools. State departments of education define curriculum frameworks, establish testing policies, support professional development and, in some cases, approve textbooks and materials for adoption". State alliance partners should include a broad spectrum of K-16 educators, scientists, policy makers, parents, and community leaders from academic institutions, businesses, museums, technology centers, and not-for profit organizations. The focus of these alliances should be on systemic and sustainable reform of K-16 Earth and space science education. Each state-based alliance should focus on specific educational needs within their state, but work together to share ideas, resources, and models for success. As we build these alliances we need to take a truly collaborative approach working with the other sciences, geography, and mathematics so that collectively we can improve the caliber and scope of science and mathematics education for all students.

  15. Modelling early failures in Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navard, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    A major problem encountered in planning for Space Station Freedom is the amount of maintenance that will be required. To predict the failure rates of components and systems aboard Space Station Freedom, the logical approach is to use data obtained from previously flown spacecraft. In order to determine the mechanisms that are driving the failures, models can be proposed, and then checked to see if they adequately fit the observed failure data obtained from a large variety of satellites. For this particular study, failure data and truncation times were available for satellites launched between 1976 and 1984; no data past 1984 was available. The study was limited to electrical subsystems and assemblies, which were studied to determine if they followed a model resulting from a mixture of exponential distributions.

  16. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  17. Data Model Management for Space Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Crichton, Daniel J.; Ramirez, Paul; Mattmann, chris

    2006-01-01

    The Reference Architecture for Space Information Management (RASIM) suggests the separation of the data model from software components to promote the development of flexible information management systems. RASIM allows the data model to evolve independently from the software components and results in a robust implementation that remains viable as the domain changes. However, the development and management of data models within RASIM are difficult and time consuming tasks involving the choice of a notation, the capture of the model, its validation for consistency, and the export of the model for implementation. Current limitations to this approach include the lack of ability to capture comprehensive domain knowledge, the loss of significant modeling information during implementation, the lack of model visualization and documentation capabilities, and exports being limited to one or two schema types. The advent of the Semantic Web and its demand for sophisticated data models has addressed this situation by providing a new level of data model management in the form of ontology tools. In this paper we describe the use of a representative ontology tool to capture and manage a data model for a space information system. The resulting ontology is implementation independent. Novel on-line visualization and documentation capabilities are available automatically, and the ability to export to various schemas can be added through tool plug-ins. In addition, the ingestion of data instances into the ontology allows validation of the ontology and results in a domain knowledge base. Semantic browsers are easily configured for the knowledge base. For example the export of the knowledge base to RDF/XML and RDFS/XML and the use of open source metadata browsers provide ready-made user interfaces that support both text- and facet-based search. This paper will present the Planetary Data System (PDS) data model as a use case and describe the import of the data model into an ontology tool. We will also describe the current effort to provide interoperability with the European Space Agency (ESA)/Planetary Science Archive (PSA) which is critically dependent on a common data model.

  18. Dynamic multibody modeling for tethered space elevators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a fundamental modeling strategy for dealing with powered and propelled bodies moving along space tethers. The tether is divided into a large number of discrete masses, which are connected by viscoelastic springs. The tether is subject to the full range of forces expected in Earth orbit in a relatively simple manner. Two different models of the elevator dynamics are presented. In order to capture the effect of the elevator moving along the tether, the elevator dynamics are included as a separate body in both models. One model treats the elevator's motion dynamically, where propulsive and friction forces are applied to the elevator body. The second model treats the elevator's motion kinematically, where the distance along the tether is determined by adjusting the lengths of tether on either side of the elevator. The tether model is used to determine optimal configurations for the space elevator. A modal analysis of two different configurations is presented which show that the fundamental mode of oscillation is a pendular one around the anchor point with a period on the order of 160 h for the in-plane motion, and 24 h for the out-of-plane motion. Numerical simulation results of the effects of the elevator moving along the cable are presented for different travel velocities and different elevator masses.

  19. Space physics education via examples in the undergraduate physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Holland, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The field of space physics is rich with examples of basic physics and analysis techniques, yet it is rarely seen in physics courses or textbooks. As space physicists in an undergraduate physics department we like to use research to inform teaching, and we find that students respond well to examples from magnetospheric science. While we integrate examples into general education courses as well, this talk will focus on physics major courses. Space physics examples are typically selected to illustrate a particular concept or method taught in the course. Four examples will be discussed, from an introductory electricity and magnetism course, a mechanics/nonlinear dynamics course, a computational physics course, and a plasma physics course. Space physics provides examples of many concepts from introductory E&M, including the application of Faraday's law to terrestrial magnetic storm effects and the use of the basic motion of charged particles as a springboard to discussion of the inner magnetosphere and the aurora. In the mechanics and nonlinear dynamics courses, the motion of charged particles in a magnetotail current sheet magnetic field is treated as a Newtonian dynamical system, illustrating the Poincaré surface-of-section technique, the partitioning of phase space, and the KAM theorem. Neural network time series analysis of AE data is used as an example in the computational physics course. Finally, among several examples, current sheet particle dynamics is utilized in the plasma physics course to illustrate the notion of adiabatic/guiding center motion and the breakdown of the adiabatic approximation. We will present short descriptions of our pedagogy and student assignments in this "backdoor" method of space physics education.

  20. Predictive Modeling in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    The current economic crisis, a growing workforce, the increasing lifespan of workers, and demanding, complex jobs have made organizations highly selective in employee recruitment and retention. It is therefore important, to the adult educator, to develop models of learning that better prepare adult learners for the workplace. The purpose of…

  1. Predictive Modeling in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    The current economic crisis, a growing workforce, the increasing lifespan of workers, and demanding, complex jobs have made organizations highly selective in employee recruitment and retention. It is therefore important, to the adult educator, to develop models of learning that better prepare adult learners for the workplace. The purpose of…

  2. Innovative Space Sciences Education Programs for Young People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbar, T.

    2002-01-01

    The future of the world is greatly depends on space. Through space sciences education programs with the main focus is on young people, the society, as a whole will gain in the years to come. The Weizmann Institute of Science is the leading scientific research center in Israel. After the need for science education programs for young students was recognized, the institute established its Youth Activities Section, which serves as the institute's outreach for the general population of school children nation-wide. The youth activities section holds courses, seminars, science camps etc. for almost 40 years. As an instructor in the youth activities section since 1990, my focus is space sciences programs, such as rocketry courses, planetarium demonstrations, astronomical observations and special events - all in the creed of bringing the space science to everyone, in a enjoyable, innovative and creative way. Two of the courses conducted combines' scientific knowledge, hands-on experience and a glimpse into the work of space programs: the rocketry courses offered a unique chance of design, build and fly actual rockets, to height of about 800 meters. The students conduct research on the rockets, such as aerial photography, environmental measurements and aerodynamic research - using student built wind tunnel. The space engineering course extend the high frontier of the students into space: the objective of a two year course is to design, build an launch an experiments package to space, using one of NASA's GAS programs. These courses, combined with special guest lectures by Weizmann institute's senior researchers, tours to facilities like satellite control center, clean rooms, the aeronautical industry, give the students a chance to meet with "the real world" of space sciences applications and industry, and this - in turn - will have payback effect on the society as a whole in years to come. The activities of space sciences education include two portable planetariums, 4 telescopes and special "mobile science" project, which travel to hundreds of school annually, and bring to them mini exhibitions, scientific activities and lectures. Special events are held when something unique happened: in the last years we have had the Galileo special event when the spacecraft arrived at Jupiter; SL-9 event; Mars Pathfinder special event; Mir re- entry event - to name a few. For 11 years, on July 20 we have the Apollo memorial lecture, and a meteors observation night on August 11. The 12 years of experience I have in teaching space sciences subjects to k-12 students, university students and adults, combines with three years as a director of interactive science museum, allowed me to implement my vision of promoting the general knowledge about space and to move a little more in the direction of creating a space oriented, open and globally interacted society in Israel.

  3. Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Betrue, R.

    2004-01-01

    How do we reach the public with the exciting story of Solar System Exploration? How do we encourage girls to think about careers in science, math, engineering and technology? Why should NASA scientists make an effort to reach the public and informal education settings to tell the Solar System Exploration story? These are questions that the Solar System Exploration Forum, a part of the NASA Office of Space Science Education (SSE) and Public Outreach network, has tackled over the past few years. The SSE Forum is a group of education teams and scientists who work to share the excitement of solar system exploration with colleagues, formal educators, and informal educators like museums and youth groups. One major area of the SSE Forum outreach supports the training of Girl Scouts of the USA (GS) leaders and trainers in a suite of activities that reflect NASA missions and science research. Youth groups like Girl Scouts structure their activities as informal education.

  4. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  5. Strategies for Engaging NASA Space Scientists in K-14 Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. R.; Vondrak, R. R.; Hawkins, I.

    2002-12-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) has made a significant commitment to increase scientist participation in Education and Public Outreach (EPO), with a focus on providing tools and assistance for educators in K-14 education and for public informal education. The general goals are to use NASA scientific discoveries and mission results to contribute to the technical and scientific literacy of the nation, to inspire youth, and to achieve significant and sustained enhancement of K-14 education. The participation of AGU scientists in EPO activities is vital to achieving these goals. This participation by individual scientists is often voluntary, but it can be funded as supplements to research grants or directly by OSS missions, which are now required to spend a few percent of their total budget on EPO. Scientists can provide inspiring role models for students, be powerful partners with teachers, work with community-based organizations and museums, and help assure the scientific accuracy of educational materials. The Sun Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) is supported by OSS to facilitate scientist involvement in EPO. SECEF coordinates national programs for broad audiences that highlight solar and geospace missions and research programs. Examples of SECEF high-visibility national events are Sun-Earth Day and Eclipse 2001. These events involved more than 100 space scientists in schools, museums, and other venues across the nation, including members of minority professional societies, such as the National Society of Black Physicists. We will discuss lessons learned and future opportunities for scientist participation.

  6. METHODOLOGY FOR AN EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT MODEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WISLER, CARL E.

    THIS NOTE EXAMINES EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT AS A SOCIAL INDICATOR AND SUGGESTS A METHODOLOGY FOR DEALING WITH THE INHERENT PROBLEMS. THREE MEASURES OF EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT ARE CONSIDERED FOR THE MODEL--ACCUMULATED EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (AEA), CURRENT EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (CEA), AND AGGREGATE EDUCATIONAL CAPACITY. THE CEA MEASURE IS USED. THE…

  7. An Introduction to ESERO-UK, the UK Space Education Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Allan; Mather, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the UK branch of the European Space Education Resource Office (ESERO-UK), also known as the UK Space Education Office. It is a teaching project designed to use space to enthuse primary and secondary students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects. The office is funded by the European Space…

  8. Scientific Benefits of Space Science Models Archiving at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Berrios, David; Chulaki, Anna; Hesse, Michael; MacNeice, Peter J.; Maddox, Marlo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Rastaetter, Lutz; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre

    2009-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) hosts a set of state-of-the-art space science models ranging from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. CCMC provides a web-based Run-on-Request system, by which the interested scientist can request simulations for a broad range of space science problems. To allow the models to be driven by data relevant to particular events CCMC developed a tool that automatically downloads data from data archives and transform them to required formats. CCMC also provides a tailored web-based visualization interface for the model output, as well as the capability to download the simulation output in portable format. CCMC offers a variety of visualization and output analysis tools to aid scientists in interpretation of simulation results. During eight years since the Run-on-request system became available the CCMC archived the results of almost 3000 runs that are covering significant space weather events and time intervals of interest identified by the community. The simulation results archived at CCMC also include a library of general purpose runs with modeled conditions that are used for education and research. Archiving results of simulations performed in support of several Modeling Challenges helps to evaluate the progress in space weather modeling over time. We will highlight the scientific benefits of CCMC space science model archive and discuss plans for further development of advanced methods to interact with simulation results.

  9. Louisiana, A Leader in Earth and Space Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totten, I. M.

    2002-05-01

    Earth and Space Science is too often viewed as a peripheral science compared to chemistry, biology, and physics. It is typically found integrated with geography, ecology, and general science in various stages of the curriculum, and is rarely considered holistically or as a discrete discipline. The status of earth and space science is also commonly reflected in the inadequate preparation of teachers and in the lack of government recognition of the value of earth science education. Louisiana is a state that does not follow the typical trend. It is a leader in earth and space science education with its cadre of programs that impact teacher preparation, state testing programs, curriculum development and technology initiatives. The state science framework introduces earth science in middle school. Grades 5-7 have an integrated science curriculum that includes an earth science component. Grade 8 has either an earth science or an integrated science course depending upon the availability of certified teachers in the district. Earth science is also included in Louisiana's high school science curriculum. It satisfies one science credit required for graduation. The Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP 21) and the Graduation Exit Exam (GEE 21) compose Louisiana's new criterion-referenced testing program. The content standards measured by the LEAP 21/GEE 21science tests include earth and space science. The LEAP 21 is administered at grades 4 and 8, and the GEE 21 at grades 10 and 11. Students have to pass the GEE 21 to graduate from high school. Therefore, all students graduating from a Louisiana high school will have been exposed to earth science concepts multiple times throughout their K-12 schooling. Louisiana also has an array of programs that provide statewide curriculum and student resources and professional development that impact earth and space science education. The Making Connections Project provides web-site resources and lesson plans that have been aligned with the Louisiana Content Standards, which include the earth and space science benchmarks. This web-based resource is available to students, teachers, administrators, and parents. Another Louisiana program is the GIS K-12 Initiative- Where in the World? It introduces K-12 students and teachers to GIS systems. It helps students develop a spatial understanding of the earth's surface, use maps, create maps, and make connections between man and his environment. ThinkQuest Camp is another program that impacts earth and space science in Louisiana. It is a camp designed for students and teachers to build content-rich websites to share with their peers around the world. All of the above mentioned programs are structured around the state science benchmarks, which include earth and space science. Louisiana has incorporated a strong earth and space component into its science curriculum and continues to be a leader in the nation's effort towards science education reform.

  10. Tight dual models of pore spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glantz, Roland; Hilpert, Markus

    2008-05-01

    The pore throats in a porous medium control permeability, drainage, and straining through their pore scale geometry and through the way they are connected via pore bodies on the macroscale. Likewise, imbibition is controlled through the geometry of the pore bodies (pore scale) and through the way the pore bodies are connected via pore throats on the macroscale. In an effort to account for both scales at the same time we recently introduced an image-based model for pore spaces that consists of two parts related by duality: (1) a decomposition of a polyhedral pore space into polyhedral pore bodies separated by polygonal pore throats and (2) a polygonal pore network that is homotopy equivalent to the pore space. In this paper we stick to the dual concept while amending the definition of the pore throats and, as a consequence, the other elements of the dual model. Formerly, the pore throats consisted of single two-dimensional Delaunay cells, while they now usually consist of more than one two-dimensional Delaunay cell and extend all the way into the narrowing ends of the pore channel cross sections. This is the first reason for naming the amended dual model "tight". The second reason is that the formation of the pore throats is now guided by an objective function that always attains its global optimum (tight optimization). At the end of the paper we report on simulations of drainage performed on tight dual models derived from simulated sphere packings and 3D gray-level images. The C-code for the generation of the tight dual model and the simulation of drainage is publicly available at https://jshare.johnshopkins.edu/mhilper1/public_html/tdm.html.

  11. Modeling and control of flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, B.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of actuator and sensor locations on transfer function zeros are investigated, using uniform bars and beams as generic models of flexible space structures. It is shown how finite element codes may be used directly to calculate transfer function zeros. The impulse response predicted by finite-dimensional models is compared with the exact impulse response predicted by the infinite dimensional models. It is shown that some flexible structures behave as if there were a direct transmission between actuator and sensor (equal numbers of zeros and poles in the transfer function). Finally, natural damping models for a vibrating beam are investigated since natural damping has a strong influence on the appropriate active control logic for a flexible structure.

  12. Space station architectural elements model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. C.; Spencer, J. S.; Rocha, C. J.; Kahn, E.; Cliffton, E.; Carr, C.

    1987-01-01

    The worksphere, a user controlled computer workstation enclosure, was expanded in scope to an engineering workstation suitable for use on the Space Station as a crewmember desk in orbit. The concept was also explored as a module control station capable of enclosing enough equipment to control the station from each module. The concept has commercial potential for the Space Station and surface workstation applications. The central triangular beam interior configuration was expanded and refined to seven different beam configurations. These included triangular on center, triangular off center, square, hexagonal small, hexagonal medium, hexagonal large and the H beam. Each was explored with some considerations as to the utilities and a suggested evaluation factor methodology was presented. Scale models of each concept were made. The models were helpful in researching the seven beam configurations and determining the negative residual (unused) volume of each configuration. A flexible hardware evaluation factor concept is proposed which could be helpful in evaluating interior space volumes from a human factors point of view. A magnetic version with all the graphics is available from the author or the technical monitor.

  13. Applying the Sport Education Model to Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    The physical education field abounds with theoretically sound curricular approaches such as fitness education, skill theme approach, tactical approach, and sport education. In an era that emphasizes authentic sport experiences, the Sport Education Model includes unique features that sets it apart from other curricular models and can be a valuable…

  14. Applying the Sport Education Model to Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    The physical education field abounds with theoretically sound curricular approaches such as fitness education, skill theme approach, tactical approach, and sport education. In an era that emphasizes authentic sport experiences, the Sport Education Model includes unique features that sets it apart from other curricular models and can be a valuable…

  15. Model reduction for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1992-01-01

    Model reduction is an important practical problem in the control of flexible spacecraft, and a considerable amount of work has been carried out on this topic. Two of the best known methods developed are modal truncation and internal balancing. Modal truncation is simple to implement but can give poor results when the structure possesses clustered natural frequencies, as often occurs in practice. Balancing avoids this problem but has the disadvantages of high computational cost, possible numerical sensitivity problems, and no physical interpretation for the resulting balanced 'modes'. The purpose of this work is to examine the performance of the subsystem balancing technique developed by the investigator when tested on a realistic flexible space structure, in this case a model of the Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC) of Space Station Freedom. This method retains the desirable properties of standard balancing while overcoming the three difficulties listed above. It achieves this by first decomposing the structural model into subsystems of highly correlated modes. Each subsystem is approximately uncorrelated from all others, so balancing them separately and then combining yields comparable results to balancing the entire structure directly. The operation count reduction obtained by the new technique is considerable: a factor of roughly r(exp 2) if the system decomposes into r equal subsystems. Numerical accuracy is also improved significantly, as the matrices being operated on are of reduced dimension, and the modes of the reduced-order model now have a clear physical interpretation; they are, to first order, linear combinations of repeated-frequency modes.

  16. Modeling utilization distributions in space and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keating, K.A.; Cherry, S.

    2009-01-01

    W. Van Winkle defined the utilization distribution (UD) as a probability density that gives an animal's relative frequency of occurrence in a two-dimensional (x, y) plane. We extend Van Winkle's work by redefining the UD as the relative frequency distribution of an animal's occurrence in all four dimensions of space and time. We then describe a product kernel model estimation method, devising a novel kernel from the wrapped Cauchy distribution to handle circularly distributed temporal covariates, such as day of year. Using Monte Carlo simulations of animal movements in space and time, we assess estimator performance. Although not unbiased, the product kernel method yields models highly correlated (Pearson's r - 0.975) with true probabilities of occurrence and successfully captures temporal variations in density of occurrence. In an empirical example, we estimate the expected UD in three dimensions (x, y, and t) for animals belonging to each of two distinct bighorn sheep {Ovis canadensis) social groups in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. Results show the method can yield ecologically informative models that successfully depict temporal variations in density of occurrence for a seasonally migratory species. Some implications of this new approach to UD modeling are discussed. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. Models of space averaged energetics of plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouthier, O. M.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of high frequency vibrations in plates is of particular interest in the study of structure borne noise in aircrafts. The current methods of analysis are either too expensive (finite element method) or may have a confidence band wider than desirable (Statistical Energy Analysis). An alternative technique to model the space and time averaged response of structural acoustics problems with enough detail to include all significant mechanisms of energy generation, transmission, and absorption is highly desirable. The focus of this paper is the development of a set of equations which govern the space and time averaged energy density in plates. To solve this equation, a new type of boundary value problem must be treated in terms of energy density variables using energy and intensity boundary conditions. A computer simulation verification study of the energy governing equation is performed. A finite element formulation of the new equations is also implemented and several test cases are analyzed and compared to analytical solutions.

  18. Developing a STEM Education Pipeline Using Astronomy and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Capitol College Center for Space Science Education and Public Outreach is in its second year of operation working to address the clearly articulated national need of providing an educated workforce in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Working with the K-12, community college and college students, the Center is actively engaged in providing learning opportunities for future leaders in STEM. This goal is accomplished through the following methods: 1. Increase student awareness of selected astronomy/space science career fields that require a college education, including necessary academic preparation related to STEM courses in high school. 2. Increase the number of community college students, specifically within the traditionally under-represented populations, advance to the bachelor's level degree within the STEM fields and then secure jobs within the field. 3. Increase STEM participation/majors in general (both in community colleges and four-year colleges), and especially NASA-related disciplines. This presentation provides an update regarding the Center's activities, reports on the year-one results working with middle schools and high schools in the state of Maryland and the Prince George's Community College, and highlights plans for the future.

  19. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Percy, Thomas; Mason, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Effective Space Asset Management is one key to addressing the ever-growing issue of space congestion. It is imperative that agencies around the world have access to data regarding the numerous active assets and pieces of space junk currently tracked in orbit around the Earth. At the center of this issues is the effective management of data of many types related to orbiting objects. As the population of tracked objects grows, so too should the data management structure used to catalog technical specifications, orbital information, and metadata related to those populations. Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively catalog a broad set of data related to known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of database and processing that data into useful technical information. Using the universal NORAD number as a unique identifier, the SAM-D processes two-line element data into orbital characteristics and cross-references this technical data with metadata related to functional status, country of ownership, and application category. The SAM-D began as an Excel spreadsheet and was later upgraded to an Access database. While SAM-D performs its task very well, it is limited by its current platform and is not available outside of the local user base. Further, while modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. This paper provides a summary of SAM-D development efforts to date and outlines a proposed data management infrastructure that extends SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated. A service-oriented architecture model using an information sharing platform named SIMON will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for visualizations. In addition, tight control of information sharing policy will increase confidence in the system, which would encourage industry partners to provide commercial data. Combined with the integration of new and legacy M&S tools, a SIMON-based architecture will provide a robust environment that can be extended and expanded indefinitely.

  20. The Space Weather Living History: Connecting Scientists with Students, Educators and the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C.; Thompson, B. J.; Major, E. R.; Odenwald, S. F.; Cline, T. D.; Fox, K.; Lewis, E.; Stephenson, B.; Spadaccini, J.; Davis, H.

    2013-12-01

    Space Weather is a relatively new discipline that studies the sun and Earth as a connected system with much relevance to our technological society. The Space Weather Living History project has gathered stories of observations, discoveries, events and impacts to build a timeline that will highlight the contributions of many scientists. In particular, pioneers and leaders who are active from the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to the present share their personal stories of how they are creating the history of space weather. The goal is to capture not just anecdotes, but careful analogies and insights of researchers and historians associated with various programs and events. Original historical materials also known as primary sources will allow both science and education communities to tell the stories of pioneers and leaders in space weather studies. Utilizing interactive media, this program aims to address important STEM needs, inspire the next generation of explorers, and feature women as role model. The products will align with Appendix H of the Next Generation Science Standards, the Nature of Science, where it is emphasized that 'science knowledge is cumulative and many people, from many generations and nations, have contributed to science knowledge.' This project augments existing historical records with education technology; connect the pioneers, current leaders and the nature and history of space weather with students, educators and the public, covering all areas of studies in Heliophysics. The project is supported by NASA award NNX11AJ61G.

  1. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. Models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision aids. Currently, there several candidate modeling methodologies. They include the Rasmussen abstraction/aggregation hierarchy and decision ladder, the goal-means network, the problem behavior graph, and the operator function model. The research conducted under the sponsorship of this grant focuses on the extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications. The initial portion of this research consists of two parts. The first is a series of technical exchanges between NASA Johnson and Georgia Tech researchers. The purpose is to identify candidate applications for the current operator function model; prospects include mission operations and the Data Management System Testbed. The second portion will address extensions of the operator function model to tailor it to the specific needs of Johnson applications. At this point, we have accomplished two things. During a series of conversations with JSC researchers, we have defined the technical goal of the research supported by this grant to be the structural definition of the operator function model and its computer implementation, OFMspert. Both the OFM and OFMspert have matured to the point that they require infrastructure to facilitate use by researchers not involved in the evolution of the tools. The second accomplishment this year was the identification of the Payload Deployment and Retrieval System (PDRS) as a candidate system for the case study. In conjunction with government and contractor personnel in the Human-Computer Interaction Lab, the PDRS was identified as the most accessible system for the demonstration. Pursuant to this a PDRS simulation was obtained from the HCIL and an initial knowledge engineering effort was conducted to understand the operator's tasks in the PDRS application. The preliminary results of the knowledge engineering effort and an initial formulation of an operator function model (OFM) are contained in the appendices.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Ophthalmic Response to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. S.; Myers, J. G.; Mulugeta, L.; Vera, J.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate ophthalmic changes in spaceflight, we would like to predict the impact of blood dysregulation and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) on Intraocular Pressure (IOP). Unlike other physiological systems, there are very few lumped parameter models of the eye. The eye model described here is novel in its inclusion of the human choroid and retrobulbar subarachnoid space (rSAS), which are key elements in investigating the impact of increased ICP and ocular blood volume. Some ingenuity was required in modeling the blood and rSAS compartments due to the lack of quantitative data on essential hydrodynamic quantities, such as net choroidal volume and blood flowrate, inlet and exit pressures, and material properties, such as compliances between compartments.

  3. Modeling gene expression in time and space.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Cell populations rarely exhibit gene-expression profiles that are homogeneous in time and space. In the temporal domain, dynamical behaviors such as oscillations and pulses of protein production pervade cell biology, underlying phenomena as diverse as circadian rhythmicity, cell cycle control, stress and damage responses, and stem-cell pluripotency. In multicellular populations, spatial heterogeneities are crucial for decision making and development, among many other functions. Cells need to exquisitely coordinate this temporal and spatial variation to survive. Although the spatiotemporal character of gene expression is challenging to quantify experimentally at the level of individual cells, it is beneficial from the modeling viewpoint, because it provides strong constraints that can be probed by theoretically analyzing mathematical models of candidate gene and protein circuits. Here, we review recent examples of temporal dynamics and spatial patterning in gene expression to show how modeling such phenomenology can help us unravel the molecular mechanisms of cellular function. PMID:23527779

  4. Model-based vision for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaconas, Karen; Nashman, Marilyn; Lumia, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a method for tracking moving image features by combining spatial and temporal edge information with model based feature information. The algorithm updates the two-dimensional position of object features by correlating predicted model features with current image data. The results of the correlation process are used to compute an updated model. The algorithm makes use of a high temporal sampling rate with respect to spatial changes of the image features and operates in a real-time multiprocessing environment. Preliminary results demonstrate successful tracking for image feature velocities between 1.1 and 4.5 pixels every image frame. This work has applications for docking, assembly, retrieval of floating objects and a host of other space-related tasks.

  5. Geometric modeling of large space antenna deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazemetz, J.; Sage, K.; Gates, R. L.; Deryder, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A dynamic visualization of large antenna deployment was created to be used as a precursor to further analysis of the structure as it is being deployed. The configuration chosen for this investigation was a box-truss structure consisting of a large reflector 60 meters wide by 120 meters long with a 120-meter mast. The entire space structure is folded and compressed into a container 17.8 meters long by 3.75 meters in diameter for transportation to orbit by the Space Transportation System (STS). A geometric model of this structure was created using an interactive solid modeling package. The building blocks of the structure are boxes and cylinders which are put together to form elements connected by joints and hinges. The elements, joints, and hinges make up the box-truss structure. The geometric model was then passed to the MOVIE.BYU software package. The "utility" module of this program was used to manipulate the elements of the structure to represent 13 different stages of deployment. The "animate" command was then used to create a smooth sequence between stages. Each step in the sequence was recorded on magnetic tape and a short movie was produced.

  6. Educational software for the visualization of space plasma processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Le, G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Littlefield, B.

    1995-01-01

    The UCLA Space Physics Group has developed educational software composed of a series of modules to assist students with understanding basic concepts of space plasmas and charged particle motion. Present modules cover planetary magnetospheres, charged particle motion, cold plasma waves, collisionless shock waves, and solar wind. The software is designed around the principle that students can learn more by doing rather than by reading or listening. The programs provide a laboratory-like environment in which the student can control, observe, and measure complex behavior. The interactive graphics environment allows the student to visualize the results of his or her experimentation and to try different parameters as desired. The current version of the software runs on UNIX-based operating systems in an X-Windows environment. It has been used in a classroom setting at both UCLA and the University of California at San Diego.

  7. Shifting Pedagogical Space: Egyptian Educators Use of Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jayson; Finholt-Daniel, Matt; Sales, Greg; Flora, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on exploring the outcomes of an e-learning initiative in Egypt. Researchers conducted training with 17 Egyptian educators on how to build, maintain, and teach using Moodle, an online content management system. The researchers evaluated the outputs of the training using the Technology Adoption Model (TAM) in an effort to assess…

  8. Mediated Modeling in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloun, Ibrahim A.

    2007-08-01

    Following two decades of corroboration, modeling theory is presented as a pedagogical theory that promotes mediated experiential learning of model-laden theory and inquiry in science education. Students develop experiential knowledge about physical realities through interplay between their own ideas about the physical world and particular patterns in this world. Under teacher mediation, they represent each pattern with a particular model that they develop through a five-phase learning cycle, following particular modeling schemata of well-defined dimensions and rules of engagement. Significantly greater student achievement has been increasingly demonstrated under mediated modeling than under conventional instruction of lecture and demonstration, especially in secondary school and university physics courses. The improved achievement is reflected in more meaningful understanding of course materials, better learning styles, higher success rates, lower attrition rates and narrower gaps between students of different backgrounds.

  9. Why Do They Study There? Diary Research into Students' Learning Space Choices in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckers, Ronald; van der Voordt, Theo; Dewulf, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Higher education learning and teaching methods have changed while most educational buildings are still rather traditional. Yet, there is an increasing interest in whether we can educate today's higher education students in yesterday's buildings. This paper aims to contribute to this debate by studying the learning space choices of higher education…

  10. Mathematical Modeling: A Bridge to STEM Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertil, Mahmut; Gurel, Cem

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is making a theoretical discussion on the relationship between mathematical modeling and integrated STEM education. First of all, STEM education perspective and the construct of mathematical modeling in mathematics education is introduced. A review of literature is provided on how mathematical modeling literature may…

  11. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; MacLeod, T.; Mason, S.; Percy, T.; Prescott, J.

    The Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively track known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of databases and performing calculations to determine the expected position of the object at a specified time. While SAM-D performs this task very well, it is limited by technology and is not available outside of the local user base. Modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D. However, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. A more capable data management infrastructure would extend SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated by the COI. A service-oriented architecture model will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for visualizations. Based on a web-centric approach, the entire COI will be able to access the data and related analytics. In addition, tight control of information sharing policy will increase confidence in the system, which would encourage industry partners to provide commercial data. SIMON is a Government off the Shelf information sharing platform in use throughout DoD and DHS information sharing and situation awareness communities. SIMON providing fine grained control to data owners allowing them to determine exactly how and when their data is shared. SIMON supports a micro-service approach to system development, meaning M&S and analytic services can be easily built or adapted. It is uniquely positioned to fill this need as an information-sharing platform with a proven track record of successful situational awareness system deployments. Combined with the integration of new and legacy M&S tools, a SIMON-based architecture will provide a robust SA environment for the NASA SA COI that can be extended and expanded indefinitely. First Results of Coherent Uplink from a Phased Array of Widely Separated Antennas: Steps Toward a Verifiable Real-Time Atmospheric Phase Fluctuation Correction for a High Resolution Radar System Barry Geldzahler, NASA- HQ NASA is pursuing a demonstration of coherent uplink arraying at 7.145-7.190 GHz (X-band) and 30-31 GHz (Ka-band) at using three 12m diameter COTS antennas separated by 60m at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In addition, we have used up to three 34m antennas separated by ~250m at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex in California and at X-band 7.1 GHz incorporating real-time correction for tropospheric phase fluctuations. Such a demonstration would then enable NASA to establish a high power, high resolution, 24/7 availability radar system for (a) tracking and characterizing observations of Near Earth Objects, (b) tracking, characterizing and determining the statistics of small-scale (?10cm) orbital debris, (c) incorporating the capability into its space communication and navigation tracking stations for emergency spacecraft commanding in the Ka band era which NASA is entering, and (d) fielding capabilities of interest to other US government agencies. We present herein the results of our phased array uplink combining at near 7.17 and 8.3 GHz using widely separated antennas demonstrations at both locales, the results of a study to upgrade from a communication to a radar system, and our vision for going forward. Operations Analysis of Australian-based Systems for Surveillance of Space Mark Graham, Defence Science and Technology Group, Department of Defence Due to increasing dependence on space-based capabilities, in recent years Australia has committed to making a greater contribution to generating space situational awareness (SSA). A natural first step has been to acknowledge Australia's privileged geolocation and accept US invitations to host and jointly operate elements of the Space Surveillance Network (SSN), in particular a C-Band tracking radar to help maintain the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) region of the space object catalogue, and the Space Surveillance Telescope to maintain watch over the relatively crowded Geosynchronous sector above the Indian Ocean. The Australian government has also encouraged and supported increased investment by commercial and academic interests in SSA Research and Development capabilities. Nevertheless, as Australia operates virtually no space systems itself, the Australian government has limited understanding of SSA. This can impact the ability to make informed decisions about participation in systems such as the SSN or further investments in Australian capability. Therefore Defence in Australia has sponsored ongoing work by the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group to build up necessary understanding to support such decisions. This paper describes some of the operational analyses carried out to date in this program. The program has centred on high-level modelling and simulation of the potential contribution sensors in Australia might make to maintain the unclassified LEO catalogue. This has involved calculating the ability of generic sensors to observe LEO objects, as a function of the sensors locations and key coverage parameters such as range, elevation limits and operating hours which in turn depend on whether the sensors are active or passive. It has also required identification, computation and refinement of appropriate performance metrics to summarise the output of the simulations. This paper will outline work done, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn to date. In particular it notes findings so far and outstanding issues in carrying out perhaps the most difficult part of this work: assessing the difference new Australian systems might make to the overall performance of an enlarged SSN.

  12. Model-Based Trade Space Exploration for Near-Earth Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ronald H.; Boncyk, Wayne; Brutocao, James; Beveridge, Iain

    2005-01-01

    We developed a capability for model-based trade space exploration to be used in the conceptual design of Earth-orbiting space missions. We have created a set of reusable software components to model various subsystems and aspects of space missions. Several example mission models were created to test the tools and process. This technique and toolset has demonstrated itself to be valuable for space mission architectural design.

  13. Prevention of Spacecraft Anomalies: The Role of Space Climate and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based systems are developing into critical infrastructure to support the quality of life on Earth. Mission requirements along with rapidly evolving technologies have outpaced efforts to accommodate detrimental space environment impacts on systems. This chapter describes approaches to accommodate space climate and space weather impacts on systems and notes areas where gaps in model development limit our ability to prevent spacecraft anomalies.

  14. Space Station Active Thermal Control System modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, Abdul; Lin, Chin H.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) has been modeled using modified SINDA/SINFLO programs to solve two-phase Thermo-fluid problems. The modifications include changes in several subroutines to incorporate implicit solution which allows larger time step as compared to that for explicit solutions. Larger time step saves computer time but involves larger computational error. Several runs were made using various time steps for the ATCS model. It has been found that for a reasonable approach, three times larger time step as compared to that used in explicit method is a good value which will reduce the computer time by approximately 50 percent and still maintain the accuracy of the output data to within 90 percent of the explicit values.

  15. Modeling geomagnetic cutoffs for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Selesnick, R. S.; Mertens, C. J.; Engel, M.

    2015-07-01

    Access of solar and galactic cosmic rays to the Earth's magnetosphere is quantified in terms of geomagnetic cutoff rigidity. Numerically computed grids of cutoff rigidities are used to model cosmic ray flux in Earth's atmosphere and in low Earth orbit. In recent years, the development of more accurate dynamic geomagnetic field models and an increase in computer power have made a real-time data-driven geomagnetic cutoff computation extending over the inner magnetosphere possible. For computational efficiency, numerically computed cutoffs may be scaled to different altitudes and directions of arrival using the known analytic variation of cutoff in a pure dipole magnetic field. This paper is a presentation of numerical techniques developed to compute effective cutoff rigidities for space weather applications. Numerical tests to determine the error associated with scaling vertical cutoff rigidities with altitude in a realistic geomagnetic field model are included. The tests were performed to guide the development of spatial grids for modeling cosmic ray access to the inner magnetosphere and to gain a better understanding of the accuracy of numerically modeled cutoffs.

  16. Granger causality for state-space models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil K.

    2015-04-01

    Granger causality has long been a prominent method for inferring causal interactions between stochastic variables for a broad range of complex physical systems. However, it has been recognized that a moving average (MA) component in the data presents a serious confound to Granger causal analysis, as routinely performed via autoregressive (AR) modeling. We solve this problem by demonstrating that Granger causality may be calculated simply and efficiently from the parameters of a state-space (SS) model. Since SS models are equivalent to autoregressive moving average models, Granger causality estimated in this fashion is not degraded by the presence of a MA component. This is of particular significance when the data has been filtered, downsampled, observed with noise, or is a subprocess of a higher dimensional process, since all of these operations—commonplace in application domains as diverse as climate science, econometrics, and the neurosciences—induce a MA component. We show how Granger causality, conditional and unconditional, in both time and frequency domains, may be calculated directly from SS model parameters via solution of a discrete algebraic Riccati equation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that Granger causality estimators thus derived have greater statistical power and smaller bias than AR estimators. We also discuss how the SS approach facilitates relaxation of the assumptions of linearity, stationarity, and homoscedasticity underlying current AR methods, thus opening up potentially significant new areas of research in Granger causal analysis.

  17. Granger causality for state-space models.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil K

    2015-04-01

    Granger causality has long been a prominent method for inferring causal interactions between stochastic variables for a broad range of complex physical systems. However, it has been recognized that a moving average (MA) component in the data presents a serious confound to Granger causal analysis, as routinely performed via autoregressive (AR) modeling. We solve this problem by demonstrating that Granger causality may be calculated simply and efficiently from the parameters of a state-space (SS) model. Since SS models are equivalent to autoregressive moving average models, Granger causality estimated in this fashion is not degraded by the presence of a MA component. This is of particular significance when the data has been filtered, downsampled, observed with noise, or is a subprocess of a higher dimensional process, since all of these operations-commonplace in application domains as diverse as climate science, econometrics, and the neurosciences-induce a MA component. We show how Granger causality, conditional and unconditional, in both time and frequency domains, may be calculated directly from SS model parameters via solution of a discrete algebraic Riccati equation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that Granger causality estimators thus derived have greater statistical power and smaller bias than AR estimators. We also discuss how the SS approach facilitates relaxation of the assumptions of linearity, stationarity, and homoscedasticity underlying current AR methods, thus opening up potentially significant new areas of research in Granger causal analysis. PMID:25974424

  18. Continuous Space Education System and its Role in Increasing Efficiency of Engineering Staff Training for Ukraine Space Rocket Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novykov, O.; Perlik, V.; Polyakov, N.; Khytorniy, V.

    2009-01-01

    Adjustment to new economical and social conditions in Ukraine, being a space-faring country, requires a new concept in improving efficiency of engineering education to provide rocket and space field with highly qualified engineers and scientists. General strategy to solve this task is to combine the efforts of the secondary schools, academic institutions, R&D institutes and production enterprises in order to educe gifted youth as early as possible and to train them into rocket and space field specialists following the scheme of continuous education: school - institution of higher education - enterprise. This report analyzes the 20-year experience of Dniepropetrovsk State University, Yuzhnoye State Design Office and Ukraine's National Center for the Aerospace Education of Youth in their joint efforts to organize the system of continuous education and how it managed to enhance the training efficiency of the engineering skills.

  19. Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

  20. Career Education Resource Bibliography: Delaware's Occupational-Vocational Education Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milford Special School District, DE.

    This bibliography lists professional books and instructional materials, concerning aspects of career education, for Delaware's Occupational-Vocational Education Model, at Milford, Delaware. Entries are arranged alphabetically by title under these categories: (1) Educational Theory, including theories relating to career development, child…

  1. Model Learner Outcomes for Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klecker-Higgins, Raymond

    This document records the Minnesota Department of Education's philosophy of art education. Chapter 1 outlines the educational and learner values, philosophy, mission, and goals of the State Board of Education. These ideas aim to provide a model for use by communities and school staff to improve the learning experiences they offer students. They…

  2. Unveiling Third Space: A Case Study of International Educators in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saudelli, Mary Gene

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights one aspect of a case study of international educators at Dubai Women's College (DWC), United Arab Emirates (UAE). It examines perceptions of international educators in third space teaching female Emirati, higher-education students in the UAE. Drawing on third space theory (Bhabha, 1994), this study explored the nature of…

  3. Space Power System Modeling with EBAL

    SciTech Connect

    Zillmer, Andrew; Hanks, David; Wen-Hsiung 'Tony' Tu

    2006-07-01

    Pratt and Whitney Rocket dyne's Engine Balance (EBAL) thermal/fluid system code has been expanded to model nuclear power closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. EBAL was originally developed to perform design analysis of hypersonic vehicle propellant and thermal management systems analysis. Later, it was adapted to rocket engine cycles. The new version of EBAL includes detailed, physics-based models of all key CBC system components. Some component examples are turbo-alternators, heat exchangers, heat pipe radiators, and liquid metal pumps. A liquid metal cooled reactor is included and a gas cooled reactor model is in work. Both thermodynamic and structural analyses are performed for each component. EBAL performs steady-state design analysis with optimization as well as off-design performance analysis. Design optimization is performed both at the component level by the component models and on the system level with a global optimizer. The user has the option to manually drive the optimization process or run parametric analysis to better understand system trade-off. Although recent EBAL developments have focused on a CBC conversion system, the code is easily extendible to other power conversion cycles. This new, more powerful version of EBAL allows for rapid design analysis and optimization of space power systems. A notional example of EBAL's capabilities is included. (authors)

  4. Numerical Modeling of Ocular Dysfunction in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A. J.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Upon introduction to microgravity, the near-loss of hydrostatic pressure causes a marked cephalic (headward) shift of fluid in an astronaut's body. The fluid shift, along with other factors of spaceflight, induces a cascade of interdependent physiological responses which occur at varying time scales. Long-duration missions carry an increased risk for the development of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. In the cases of VIIP found to date, the initial onset of symptoms occurred after several weeks to several months of spaceflight, by which time the gross bodily fluid distribution is well established. We are developing a suite of numerical models to simulate the effects of fluid shift on the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems. These models calculate the modified mean volumes, flow rates and pressures that are characteristic of the altered quasi-homeostatic state in microgravity, including intracranial and intraocular pressures. The results of the lumped models provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element biomechanics simulation of the globe, optic nerve head and retrobulbar subarachnoid space. The integrated set of models will be used to investigate the evolution of the biomechanical stress state in the ocular tissues due to long-term exposure to microgravity.

  5. United States Changing Demographics - English/Spanish Space Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Accordingly the United States Census Bureau, the ethnic group adding the largest number of people to the national population is the Hispanic exceeding 12 percent of the population and growing by almost 60 percent between 1990 and 2000. The status of the nation's educational system with respect to Hispanic students is perhaps one of the most influential issues facing the largest economy of the world. The low income, lack of language skills, highest drop-out rate in the nation, are some of the reasons why Hispanics are less likely to receive a university degree than any other ethical group. In short, the government requires to implement compensatory programs and bilingual education to ensure global leadership. Because of ongoing immigration, Spanish persists longer among Hispanics than it did among other immigrant groups. Spanish is the fourth most spoken language in the world after Mandarin, Hindustani and English. Although not all U.S. Hispanics speak Spanish, almost all U.S. Spanish speakers are Hispanics. This paper is intended to outline the challenging implementation of a bilingual education project affiliated to NASA Johnson Space Center encouraging greater academic success of Hispanics in engineering, math and science. The prospective project covers the overall role of space activities in the development of science and technology, socioeconomic issues and international cooperation. An existent JSC project is the starting stage to keep on developing an interactive video teleconference and web-media technology and produce stimulating learning products in English and Spanish for students and teachers across the nation and around the world.

  6. An Introduction to ESERO-UK, the UK Space Education Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Allan; Mather, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the UK branch of the European Space Education Resource Office (ESERO-UK), also known as the UK Space Education Office. It is a teaching project designed to use space to enthuse primary and secondary students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects. The office is funded by the European Space…

  7. Educational Planning for Utilization of Space Shuttle (ED-PLUSS). Final Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, Harry A.; Christensen, David L.

    Possible educational uses of the proposed space-shuttle program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are outlined. Potential users of information developed by the project are identified and their characteristics analyzed. Other space-education programs operated by NASA are detailed. Proposals for a methodology for expanding…

  8. Space market model development project, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the prototype operations of the Space Business Information Center are presented. A clearinghouse for space business information for members of the U.S. space industry composed of public, private, and academic sectors was conducted. Behavioral and evaluation statistics were recorded from the clearinghouse and the conclusions from these statistics are presented. Business guidebooks on major markets in space business are discussed. Proprietary research and briefings for firms and agencies in the space industry are also discussed.

  9. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  10. Model space diabatization for quantum photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-02-14

    Diabatization is a procedure that transforms multiple adiabatic electronic states to a new representation in which the potential energy surfaces and the couplings between states due to the electronic Hamiltonian operator are smooth, and the couplings due to nuclear momentum are negligible. In this work, we propose a simple and general diabatization strategy, called model space diabatization, that is applicable to multi-configuration quasidegenerate perturbation theory (MC-QDPT) or its extended version (XMC-QDPT). An advantage over previous diabatization schemes is that dynamical correlation calculations are based on standard post-multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) multi-state methods even though the diabatization is based on state-averaged MCSCF results. The strategy is illustrated here by applications to LiH, LiF, and thioanisole, with the fourfold-way diabatization and XMC-QDPT, and the results illustrate its validity.

  11. Model space diabatization for quantum photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-02-01

    Diabatization is a procedure that transforms multiple adiabatic electronic states to a new representation in which the potential energy surfaces and the couplings between states due to the electronic Hamiltonian operator are smooth, and the couplings due to nuclear momentum are negligible. In this work, we propose a simple and general diabatization strategy, called model space diabatization, that is applicable to multi-configuration quasidegenerate perturbation theory (MC-QDPT) or its extended version (XMC-QDPT). An advantage over previous diabatization schemes is that dynamical correlation calculations are based on standard post-multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) multi-state methods even though the diabatization is based on state-averaged MCSCF results. The strategy is illustrated here by applications to LiH, LiF, and thioanisole, with the fourfold-way diabatization and XMC-QDPT, and the results illustrate its validity.

  12. Meeting Classroom Needs: Designing Space Physics Educational Outreach for Science Education Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M.

    2008-12-01

    As with all NASA missions, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) is required to have an education and public outreach program (E/PO). Through our partnership between the University of Texas at Dallas William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences and Department of Science/Mathematics Education, the decision was made early on to design our educational outreach around the needs of teachers. In the era of high-stakes testing and No Child Left Behind, materials that do not meet the content and process standards teachers must teach cannot be expected to be integrated into classroom instruction. Science standards, both state and National, were the fundamental drivers behind the designs of our curricular materials, professional development opportunities for teachers, our target grade levels, and even our popular informal educational resource, the "Cindi in Space" comic book. The National Science Education Standards include much more than content standards, and our E/PO program was designed with this knowledge in mind as well. In our presentation we will describe how we came to our approach for CINDI E/PO, and how we have been successful in our efforts to have CINDI materials and key concepts make the transition into middle school classrooms. We will also present on our newest materials and high school physics students and professional development for their teachers.

  13. Modeling missing data in knowledge space theory.

    PubMed

    de Chiusole, Debora; Stefanutti, Luca; Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio

    2015-12-01

    Missing data are a well known issue in statistical inference, because some responses may be missing, even when data are collected carefully. The problem that arises in these cases is how to deal with missing data. In this article, the missingness is analyzed in knowledge space theory, and in particular when the basic local independence model (BLIM) is applied to the data. Two extensions of the BLIM to missing data are proposed: The former, called ignorable missing BLIM (IMBLIM), assumes that missing data are missing completely at random; the latter, called missing BLIM (MissBLIM), introduces specific dependencies of the missing data on the knowledge states, thus assuming that the missing data are missing not at random. The IMBLIM and the MissBLIM modeled the missingness in a satisfactory way, in both a simulation study and an empirical application, depending on the process that generates the missingness: If the missing data-generating process is of type missing completely at random, then either IMBLIM or MissBLIM provide adequate fit to the data. However, if the pattern of missingness is functionally dependent upon unobservable features of the data (e.g., missing answers are more likely to be wrong), then only a correctly specified model of the missingness distribution provides an adequate fit to the data. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26651988

  14. A 12 years brazilian space education activity experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancato, Fernando; Gustavo Catalani Racca, João; Ballarotti, MaurícioG.

    2001-03-01

    A multidisciplinary group of students from the university and latter also from the high school was formed in 1988 with the objective to make them put in practice their knowledge in physics, chemistry and mathematics and engineering fields in experimental rocketry. The group was called "Grupo de Foguetes Experimentais", GFE. Since that time more than 150 students passed throw the group and now many of them are in the space arena. The benefits for students in a space hands-on project are many: More interest in their school subjects is gotten as they see an application for them; Interrelation attitudes are learned as space projects is a team activity; Responsibility is gained as each is responsible for a part of a critical mission project; Multidisciplinary and international experience is gotten as these are space project characteristics; Learn how to work in a high stress environment as use to be a project launch. This paper will cover the educational experiences gotten during these years and how some structured groups work. It is explained the objectives and how the group was formed. The group structure and the different phases that at each year the new team passes are described. It is shown the different activities that the group uses to do from scientific seminars, scientific club and international meetings to technical tours and assistance to rocket activities in regional schools. It is also explained the group outreach activities as some launches were covered by the media in more then 6 articles in newspaper and 7 television news. In 1999 as formed an official group called NATA, Núcleo de Atividades Aerospaciais within the Universidade Estadual de Londrina, UEL, by some GFE members and teachers from university. It is explained the first group project results.

  15. Space Weather Products at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; MacNeice, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second CCMC activity is to support Space Weather forecasting at national Space Weather Forecasting Centers. This second activity involves model evaluations, model transitions to operations, and the development of space weather forecasting tools. Owing to the pace of development in the science community, new model capabilities emerge frequently. Consequently, space weather products and tools involve not only increased validity, but often entirely new capabilities. This presentation will review the present state of space weather tools as well as point out emerging future capabilities.

  16. "A Disability Rights in Education Model" for Evaluating Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Susan; Johnstone, C.; Ferguson, P.

    2005-01-01

    Current models for evaluating inclusive education programs tend to examine surface-level stricture of day-to-day practices in the organization and operation of schools and also lack significant input from disabled people. In response, the authors have developed a DRE Model to understand and evaluate effective Inclusive Education that is derived…

  17. Building a model by coset space dimensional reduction using 10 dimensional coset spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jittoh, Toshifumi; Koike, Masafumi; Nomura, Takaaki; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

    2008-05-13

    We investigate gauge-Higgs unification models within the scheme of the coset space dimensional reduction, beginning with a gauge theory in a fourteen-dimensional spacetime whose extra-dimensional space has a structure of a ten-dimensional compact coset space. We found seventeen phenomenologically acceptable models through an exhaustive search for the candidates of the coset spaces, the gauge group in fourteen dimension, and fermion representation. Of the seventeen, ten models led to SO(10)(xU(1)) GUT-like models after dimensional reduction, three models led to SU(5)xU(l) GUT-like models, and four to SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1)xU(1) Standard-Model-like models. The combinations of the coset space, the gauge group in the fourteen-dimensional spacetime, and the representation of the fermion contents of such models are listed.

  18. A geometric model of defensive peripersonal space

    PubMed Central

    Bufacchi, R. J.; Liang, M.; Griffin, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    Potentially harmful stimuli occurring within the defensive peripersonal space (DPPS), a protective area surrounding the body, elicit stronger defensive reactions. The spatial features of the DPPS are poorly defined and limited to descriptive estimates of its extent along a single dimension. Here we postulated a family of geometric models of the DPPS, to address two important questions with respect to its spatial features: What is its fine-grained topography? How does the nervous system represent the body area to be defended? As a measure of the DPPS, we used the strength of the defensive blink reflex elicited by electrical stimulation of the hand (hand-blink reflex, HBR), which is reliably modulated by the position of the stimulated hand in egocentric coordinates. We tested the goodness of fit of the postulated models to HBR data from six experiments in which we systematically explored the HBR modulation by hand position in both head-centered and body-centered coordinates. The best-fitting model indicated that 1) the nervous system's representation of the body area defended by the HBR can be approximated by a half-ellipsoid centered on the face and 2) the DPPS extending from this area has the shape of a bubble elongated along the vertical axis. Finally, the empirical observation that the HBR is modulated by hand position in head-centered coordinates indicates that the DPPS is anchored to the face. The modeling approach described in this article can be generalized to describe the spatial modulation of any defensive response. PMID:26510762

  19. A geometric model of defensive peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    Bufacchi, R J; Liang, M; Griffin, L D; Iannetti, G D

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful stimuli occurring within the defensive peripersonal space (DPPS), a protective area surrounding the body, elicit stronger defensive reactions. The spatial features of the DPPS are poorly defined and limited to descriptive estimates of its extent along a single dimension. Here we postulated a family of geometric models of the DPPS, to address two important questions with respect to its spatial features: What is its fine-grained topography? How does the nervous system represent the body area to be defended? As a measure of the DPPS, we used the strength of the defensive blink reflex elicited by electrical stimulation of the hand (hand-blink reflex, HBR), which is reliably modulated by the position of the stimulated hand in egocentric coordinates. We tested the goodness of fit of the postulated models to HBR data from six experiments in which we systematically explored the HBR modulation by hand position in both head-centered and body-centered coordinates. The best-fitting model indicated that 1) the nervous system's representation of the body area defended by the HBR can be approximated by a half-ellipsoid centered on the face and 2) the DPPS extending from this area has the shape of a bubble elongated along the vertical axis. Finally, the empirical observation that the HBR is modulated by hand position in head-centered coordinates indicates that the DPPS is anchored to the face. The modeling approach described in this article can be generalized to describe the spatial modulation of any defensive response. PMID:26510762

  20. Increasing student learning through space life sciences education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Nancy P.; Kyle Roberts, J.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Denk, James P.; Cutler, Paula H.; Thomson, William A.

    2005-05-01

    Scientists and educators at Baylor College of Medicine are using space life sciences research areas as themes for middle school science and health instructional materials. This paper discusses study findings of the most recent unit, Food and Fitness, which teaches concepts related to energy and nutrition through guided inquiry. Results of a field test involving more than 750 students are reported. Use of the teaching materials resulted in significant knowledge gains by students as measured on a pre/post assessment administered by teachers. In addition, an analysis of the time spent by each teacher on each activity suggested that it is preferable to conduct all of the activities in the unit with students rather than allocating the same total amount of time on just a subset of the activities.

  1. The organizations for space education and outreach programs in the Republic of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongwon; Jo, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Jae Dong

    2011-09-01

    Korea has a short history in space development compared to neighboring countries like Japan, China, India and Russia. During the past 20 years, Korea has focused on developing satellite and rocket space technology under the national space development plan. KOMPSAT-1 and 2, and KSLV-1 are the results of the selection and concentration policy of the Korean government. Due to the arduous mission of developing hardware oriented space technology, the topic of space education and outreach for the general public has not received much in the national space program. But recently, the Korean government has begun planning a space science outreach program in the detailed action plan of the mid-long term national space development plan. This paper introduces and analyzes the organizations performing space education and outreach programs for primary and secondary schools in the Republic of Korea. "Young Astronaut Korea (YAK)" is one such program. This is a non-profit organization established to provide space education for students in 1989 when Korea just started its space development program. "YAK" is a unique group in Korea for space education and outreach activities because it is organized by branches at each school in the nation and it is much like the Boy Scout and Girl Scout programs. Space Science Museum and National Youth Space Center (NYSC), which are located near NARO space center in the southernmost part of the Korean peninsula are other examples of space education and outreach programs. NARO space center, which is the only launch site in Korea became the center of public interest by showing the KSLV-1 launch in 2009 and will be expected to play a key role for the space education of students in the Republic of Korea. The NYSC will perform many mission oriented space education programs for students as Space Camp in the USA does. This paper introduces the status of the space education and outreach programs of each organization and presents the future direction of space education and outreach for the Korean public and students. If these three organizations cooperate with each other and develop systematic programs of space education and outreach for the people, they will prepare a base for growth and progress in future space science and technology in Korea.

  2. Why Do They Study There? Diary Research into Students' Learning Space Choices in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckers, Ronald; van der Voordt, Theo; Dewulf, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Higher education learning and teaching methods have changed while most educational buildings are still rather traditional. Yet, there is an increasing interest in whether we can educate today's higher education students in yesterday's buildings. This paper aims to contribute to this debate by studying the learning space choices of higher education…

  3. International Space Station Radiation Shielding Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qualls, G. D.; Wilson, J. W.; Sandridge, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Nealy, J. E.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Hugger, C. P.; Verhage, J.; Anderson, B. M.; Atwell, W.

    2001-01-01

    The projected radiation levels within the International Space Station (ISS) have been criticized by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in their report to the NASA Administrator. Methods for optimal reconfiguration and augmentation of the ISS shielding are now being developed. The initial steps are to develop reconfigurable and realistic radiation shield models of the ISS modules, develop computational procedures for the highly anisotropic radiation environment, and implement parametric and organizational optimization procedures. The targets of the redesign process are the crew quarters where the astronauts sleep and determining the effects of ISS shadow shielding of an astronaut in a spacesuit. The ISS model as developed will be reconfigurable to follow the ISS. Swapping internal equipment rack assemblies via location mapping tables will be one option for shield optimization. Lightweight shield augmentation materials will be optimally fit to crew quarter areas using parametric optimization procedures to minimize the augmentation shield mass. The optimization process is being integrated into the Intelligence Synthesis Environment s (ISE s) immersive simulation facility at the Langley Research Center and will rely on High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) for rapid evaluation of shield parameter gradients.

  4. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  5. Modeling and Analysis of Space Based Transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Reinhart, Richard; Liebetreu, John; Kacpura, Tom J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the tool chain, methodology, and results of an on-going study being performed jointly by Space Communication Experts at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), General Dynamics C4 Systems (GD), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The team is evaluating the applicability and tradeoffs concerning the use of Software Defined Radio (SDR) technologies for Space missions. The Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) project is developing an approach toward building SDR-based transceivers for space communications applications based on an accompanying software architecture that can be used to implement transceivers for NASA space missions. The study is assessing the overall cost and benefit of employing SDR technologies in general, and of developing a software architecture standard for its space SDR transceivers. The study is considering the cost and benefit of existing architectures, such as the Joint Tactical Radio Systems (JTRS) Software Communications Architecture (SCA), as well as potential new space-specific architectures.

  6. A Model for Effective Professional Development of Formal Science Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Jones, A. J. P.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWE) series was developed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) education team in 2010 to provide professional development on lunar science and exploration concepts for grades 6-9 science teachers. Over 300 educators have been trained to date. The LWE model incorporates best practices from pedagogical research of science education, thoughtful integration of scientists and engineer subject matter experts for both content presentations and informal networking with educators, access to NASA-unique facilities, hands-on and data-rich activities aligned with education standards, exposure to the practice of science, tools for addressing common misconceptions, follow-up with participants, and extensive evaluation. Evaluation of the LWE model via pre- and post-assessments, daily workshop surveys, and follow-up surveys at 6-month and 1-year intervals indicate that the LWE are extremely effective in increasing educators' content knowledge, confidence in incorporating content into the classroom, understanding of the practice of science, and ability to address common student misconceptions. In order to address the efficacy of the LWE model for other science content areas, the Dynamic Response of Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars (DREAM2) education team, funded by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, developed and ran a pilot workshop called Dream2Explore at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 2015. Dream2Explore utilized the LWE model, but incorporated content related to the science and exploration of asteroids and the moons of Mars. Evaluation results indicate that the LWE model was effectively used for educator professional development on non-lunar content. We will present more detail on the LWE model, evaluation results from the Dream2Explore pilot workshop, and suggestions for the application of the model with other science content for robust educator professional development.

  7. Suspended in Liminal Space: Special Education Administrators and the Decade of Educational Reform within the NYC School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly politicized educational reforms in New York City have seen special education become marginalized as a casualty of the accountability movement. There is a liminal space between "old" and "new" ways where special education administrators find themselves as they consider their roles and responsibilities in continuing to press for opportunities…

  8. Space education in developing countries in the information era, regional reality and new educational material tendencies: example, South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sausen, Tania Maria

    The initial activities on space education began right after World War II, in the early 1950s, when USA and USSR started the Space Race. At that time, Space education was only and exclusively available to researchers and technicians working directly in space programs. This new area was restricted only to post-graduate programs (basically master and doctoral degree) or to very specific training programs dedicated for beginners. In South America, at that time there was no kind of activity on space education, simply because there was no activity in space research. In the beginning of the 1970s, Brazil, through INPE, had created masteral and doctoral courses on several space areas such as remote sensing and meteorology. Only in the mid-1980s did Brazil, after a UN request, create its specialisation course on remote sensing dedicated to Latin American professionals. At the same period, the Agustin Codazzi Institute (Bogota, Colombia) began to offer specialisation courses in remote sensing. In South America, educational space programs are currently being created for elementary and high schools and universities, but the author personally estimates that 90% of these educational programs still make use of traditional educational materials — such as books, tutorials, maps and graphics. There is little educational material that uses multimedia resources, advanced computing or communication methods and, basically, these are the materials that are best suited to conduct instructions in remote sensing, GIS, meteorology and astronomy.

  9. A new mathematical model in space optimization: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Kamilah; Kamis, Nor Hanimah; Sha'ari, Nor Shahida; Muhammad Halim, Nurul Suhada; Hashim, Syaril Naqiah

    2013-04-01

    Most of higher education institutions provide certain area known as learning centre for their students to study or having group discussions. However, some of the learning centers are not provided by optimum number of tables and seats to accommodate the students sufficiently. This study proposed a new mathematical model in optimizing the number of tables and seats at Laman Najib, Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Shah Alam. An improvement of space capacity with maximum number of students who can facilitate the Laman Najib at the same time has been made by considering the type and size of tables that are appropriate for student's discussions. Our finding is compared with the result of Simplex method of linear programming to ensure that our new model is valid and consistent with other existing approaches. As a conclusion, we found that the round-type tables with six seats provide the maximum number of students who can use Laman Najib for their discussions or group studying. Both methods are also practical to use as alternative approaches in solving other space optimization problems.

  10. AIAA Educator Academy: The Space Weather Balloon Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmier, B.; Henriquez, E.; Bering, E. A.; Slagle, E.

    2013-12-01

    Educator Academy is a K-12 STEM curriculum developed by the STEM K-12 Outreach Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Consisting of three independent curriculum modules, K-12 students participate in inquiry-based science and engineering challenges to improve critical thinking skills and enhance problem solving skills. The Space Weather Balloon Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 9-12. Throughout this module, students learn and refine physics concepts as well as experimental research skills. Students participate in project-based learning that is experimental in nature. Students are engaged with the world around them as they collaborate to launch a high altitude balloon equipped with HD cameras.The program leaders launch high altitude weather balloons in collaboration with schools and students to teach physics concepts, experimental research skills, and to make space exploration accessible to students. A weather balloon lifts a specially designed payload package that is composed of HD cameras, GPS tracking devices, and other science equipment. The payload is constructed and attached to the balloon by the students with low-cost materials. The balloon and payload are launched with FAA clearance from a site chosen based on wind patterns and predicted landing locations. The balloon ascends over 2 hours to a maximum altitude of 100,000 feet where it bursts and allows the payload to slowly descend using a built-in parachute. The payload is located using the GPS device. In April 2012, the Space Weather Balloon team conducted a prototype field campaign near Fairbanks Alaska, sending several student-built experiments to an altitude of 30km, underneath several strong auroral displays. To better assist teachers in implementing one or more of these Curriculum Modules, teacher workshops are held to give teachers a hands-on look at how this curriculum is used in the classroom. And, to provide further support, teachers are each provided with an AIAA professional member as a mentor for themselves and/or their students. These curriculum modules, provided by AIAA are available to any K-12 teachers as well as EPO officers for use in formal or informal education settings.

  11. Model building by Coset Space Dimensional Reduction scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Jittoh, Toshifumi; Koike, Masafumi; Nomura, Takaaki; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

    2009-04-17

    We investigate the gauge-Higgs unification models within the scheme of the coset space dimensional reduction, beginning with a gauge theory in a fourteen-dimensional spacetime where extra-dimensional space has the structure of a ten-dimensional compact coset space. We found seventeen phenomenologically acceptable models through an exhaustive search for the candidates of the coset spaces, the gauge group in fourteen dimension, and fermion representation. Of the seventeen, ten models led to SO(10)(xU(1)) GUT-like models after dimensional reduction, three models led to SU(5)xU(1) GUT-like models, and four to SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1)xU(1) Standard-Model-like models. The combinations of the coset space, the gauge group in the fourteen-dimensional spacetime, and the representation of the fermion contents of such models are listed.

  12. The international space station: An opportunity for industry-sponsored global education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Cathleen E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station provides an excellent opportunity for industry sponsorship of international space education. As a highly visible worldwide asset, the space station already commands our interest. It has captured the imagination of the world's researchers and connected the world's governments. Once operational, it can also be used to capture the dreams of the world's children and connect the world's industry through education. The space station's global heritage and ownership; its complex engineering, construction, and operation; its flexible research and technology demonstration capability; and its long duration make it the perfect educational platform. These things also make a space station education program attractive to industry. Such a program will give private industry the opportunity to sponsor space-related activities even though a particular industry may not have a research or technology-driven need for space utilization. Sponsors will benefit through public relations and goodwill, educational promotions and advertising, and the sale and marketing of related products. There is money to be made by supporting, fostering, and enabling education in space through the International Space Station. This paper will explore various ISS education program and sponsorship options and benefits, will examine early industry response to such an opportunity, and will make the case for moving forward with an ISS education program as a private sector initiative.

  13. Macro Level Simulation Model Of Space Shuttle Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Space Shuttle Processing Simulation Model; 2) Knowledge Acquisition; 3) Simulation Input Analysis; 4) Model Applications in Current Shuttle Environment; and 5) Model Applications for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  14. Process modelling for Space Station experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz; Nadarajah, Arunan; Ouazzani, Jalil; Amiroudine, Sakir

    1990-01-01

    Examined here is the sensitivity of a variety of space experiments to residual accelerations. In all the cases discussed the sensitivity is related to the dynamic response of a fluid. In some cases the sensitivity can be defined by the magnitude of the response of the velocity field. This response may involve motion of the fluid associated with internal density gradients, or the motion of a free liquid surface. For fluids with internal density gradients, the type of acceleration to which the experiment is sensitive will depend on whether buoyancy driven convection must be small in comparison to other types of fluid motion, or fluid motion must be suppressed or eliminated. In the latter case, the experiments are sensitive to steady and low frequency accelerations. For experiments such as the directional solidification of melts with two or more components, determination of the velocity response alone is insufficient to assess the sensitivity. The effect of the velocity on the composition and temperature field must be considered, particularly in the vicinity of the melt-crystal interface. As far as the response to transient disturbances is concerned, the sensitivity is determined by both the magnitude and frequency of the acceleration and the characteristic momentum and solute diffusion times. The microgravity environment, a numerical analysis of low gravity tolerance of the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique, and modeling crystal growth by physical vapor transport in closed ampoules are discussed.

  15. Model Learner Outcomes for Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cheryl, Ed.; And Others

    Chapter 1 of this document contains sets of statements adopted by either the Minnesota State Board of Education or the Minnesota State Legislature. They represent the hierarchy used by Department of Education staff as they develop model learner outcomes for each subject area. Contents include learner values, education system values, philosophy for…

  16. Mathematical Programming Models in Educational Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, James F.

    This document begins by defining and discussing educational planning. A brief overview of mathematical programing with an explanation of the general linear programing model is then provided. Some recent applications of mathematical programing techniques to educational planning problems are reviewed, and their implications for educational research…

  17. Model Learner Outcomes for Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cheryl, Ed.; And Others

    Chapter 1 of this document contains sets of statements adopted by either the Minnesota State Board of Education or the Minnesota State Legislature. They represent the hierarchy used by Department of Education staff as they develop model learner outcomes for each subject area. Contents include learner values, education system values, philosophy for…

  18. Mathematical Programming Models in Educational Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, James F.

    This document begins by defining and discussing educational planning. A brief overview of mathematical programing with an explanation of the general linear programing model is then provided. Some recent applications of mathematical programing techniques to educational planning problems are reviewed, and their implications for educational research…

  19. Modelling Parsing Constraints with High-Dimensional Context Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Curt; Lund, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    Presents a model of high-dimensional context space, the Hyperspace Analogue to Language (HAL), with a series of simulations modelling human empirical results. Proposes that HAL's context space can be used to provide a basic categorization of semantic and grammatical concepts; model certain aspects of morphological ambiguity in verbs; and provide…

  20. National Space Science Data Center Information Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E. V.; McCaslin, P.; Grayzeck, E.; McLaughlin, S. A.; Kodis, J. M.; Morgan, T. H.; Williams, D. R.; Russell, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) was established by NASA in 1964 to provide for the preservation and dissemination of scientific data from NASA missions. It has evolved to support distributed, active archives that were established in the Planetary, Astrophysics, and Heliophysics disciplines through a series of Memoranda of Understanding. The disciplines took over responsibility for working with new projects to acquire and distribute data for community researchers while the NSSDC remained vital as a deep archive. Since 2000, NSSDC has been using the Archive Information Package to preserve data over the long term. As part of its effort to streamline the ingest of data into the deep archive, the NSSDC developed and implemented a data model of desired and required metadata in XML. This process, in use for roughly five years now, has been successfully used to support the identification and ingest of data into the NSSDC archive, most notably those data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) submitted under PDS3. A series of software packages (X-ware) were developed to handle the submission of data from the PDS nodes utilizing a volume structure. An XML submission manifest is generated at the PDS provider site prior to delivery to NSSDC. The manifest ensures the fidelity of PDS data delivered to NSSDC. Preservation metadata is captured in an XML object when NSSDC archives the data. With the recent adoption by the PDS of the XML-based PDS4 data model, there is an opportunity for the NSSDC to provide additional services to the PDS such as the preservation, tracking, and restoration of individual products (e.g., a specific data file or document), which was unfeasible in the previous PDS3 system. The NSSDC is modifying and further streamlining its data ingest process to take advantage of the PDS4 model, an important consideration given the ever-increasing amount of data being generated and archived by orbiting missions at the Moon and Mars, other active projects such as BRRISON, LADEE, MAVEN, INSIGHT, OSIRIS-REX and ground-based observatories. Streamlining the ingest process also benefits the continued processing of PDS3 data. We will report on our progress and status.

  1. Innovating Education with an Educational Modeling Language: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloep, Peter B.; van Bruggen, Jan; Tattersall, Colin; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob; Brouns, Francis; van Rosmalen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The intent of this study was to investigate how to maximize the chances of success of an educational innovation--specifically one based on the implementation of the educational modeling language called EML. This language is both technically and organizationally demanding. Two different implementation cases were investigated, one situated in an…

  2. Innovating Education with an Educational Modeling Language: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloep, Peter B.; van Bruggen, Jan; Tattersall, Colin; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob; Brouns, Francis; van Rosmalen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The intent of this study was to investigate how to maximize the chances of success of an educational innovation--specifically one based on the implementation of the educational modeling language called EML. This language is both technically and organizationally demanding. Two different implementation cases were investigated, one situated in an…

  3. Space education in the context of U.S. government multiagency efforts in science and mathematics education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finarelli, Margaret G.; Brown, Robert W.; Owens, Frank C.

    1992-01-01

    The educational activities of NASA which is one of 16 agencies on the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology is discussed. NASA's education mission is to utilize its unique facilities and its specialized workforce to conduct and to leverage externally conducted science, mathematics, and technology education programs and activities. These efforts aimed at meeting the national education goals should help to preserve U.S. leadership in aeronautics, space science, and technology.

  4. In-space production of large space systems from extraterrestrial materials: A program implementation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program implementation model is presented which covers the in-space construction of certain large space systems from extraterrestrial materials. The model includes descriptions of major program elements and subelements and their operational requirements and technology readiness requirements. It provides a structure for future analysis and development.

  5. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  6. Categorisation of Mapuche Ways of Conceiving Time and Space: Educational Knowledge of the "Kimches"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilaqueo, Daniel; Torres, Hector

    2013-01-01

    The object of this article is to present a categorisation of the ways in which time and space are conceived in the rationale of Mapuche family education. This approach considers knowledge of natural, social, and cultural elements that characterise the classification of time and space by "kimches" (sages) in the education of children and…

  7. Categorisation of Mapuche Ways of Conceiving Time and Space: Educational Knowledge of the "Kimches"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilaqueo, Daniel; Torres, Hector

    2013-01-01

    The object of this article is to present a categorisation of the ways in which time and space are conceived in the rationale of Mapuche family education. This approach considers knowledge of natural, social, and cultural elements that characterise the classification of time and space by "kimches" (sages) in the education of children and…

  8. Spatializing Marxist Educational Theory: School, the Built Environment, Fixed Capital and (Relational) Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, educational theory has begun to incorporate analyses of space where formerly temporal considerations dominated. In this article, Marxist educational theory is spatialized by considering the school as (1) a form of fixed capital, (2) a crucial aspect of the built environment and (3) a relational space. The author begins…

  9. Spatializing Marxist Educational Theory: School, the Built Environment, Fixed Capital and (Relational) Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, educational theory has begun to incorporate analyses of space where formerly temporal considerations dominated. In this article, Marxist educational theory is spatialized by considering the school as (1) a form of fixed capital, (2) a crucial aspect of the built environment and (3) a relational space. The author begins…

  10. The Impact of Regional Higher Education Spaces on the Security of International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The security of international students in regional higher education spaces in Australia has been overlooked. Contingency theory provides the framework for this case study to explore the organisational structure and support services relevant to a regional higher education space and how this impacts the security of international students. In-depth…

  11. Education Curricula of the Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education (affiliated to the United Nations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H. J.

    Since 1988, the United Nations, through the Programme on Space Applications, is supporting the establishment and operation of regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Western Asia. Simultaneously, education curricula have been developed for remote sensing and geographic information system, satellite communications, satellite meteorology and global climate, and space and atmospheric science. The paper reviews briefly these developments and highlights the most recent updated education curricula in the four disciplines that are made available in 2002, in the six official languages of the United Nations, for implementation at the regional Centres and beyond.

  12. Mainstream Issues of Education and Public Awareness of Space Activities and Sciences among universities and Scientific Institutes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Balbir

    This paper is an effort to study and analyze several constraints and issues of space technology and education that organizations other than governmental organizations face in awareness program. In recent years, advancements in technologies have made it possible for Volunteer and Technical Communities, non-government organizations, private agencies and academic research institutions to provide increasing support to space education management and emphasis on response efforts. Important cornerstones of this effort and support are the possibility to access and take advantage of satellite imagery as well as the use of other space-based technologies such as telecommunications satellites and global navigation satellite systems included in main curriculum plus the implementation of programs for use of high class sophisticated technologies used by industries to the students and researchers of non-space faring nations. The authors recognize the importance of such new methodologies for education and public Awareness. This paper demonstrates many hurdles universities and scientific institutions face including lack of access in terms of financial and technical resources for better support. A new model for coordinated private sector partnership in response to space sciences and education has been discussed. In depth analysis and techniques need to connect these pioneering communities with the space industry as well as the space governmental agencies, with special emphasis on financial constraints. The paper mandates its role to promote the use of space-based information; its established networks bringing together national institutions responsible for these space based activities, as well as other end users, and space solution experts; and its technical foundation, particularly in the area of information technologies. To help building a tighter cooperation and further understanding among all these communities, paper delivers an intensive report and solutions for future coordination and ease

  13. Extracting Space Weather Information from Research Models: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In addition to supporting space research in the international community, the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has as its second objective to apply the power of modern research models toward space weather specification and forecasting. Motivated by the objectives to test models and to ease the transition of research models to space weather forecasting organizations, the CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as a large number of modeling and data products for space weather forecasting support. Over time, these activities have produced tailored products for partners, as well as tools, which address the space weather needs of NASA's robotic mission community. All tools are accessible via a configurable, flexible interface. During this process, CCMC has accumulated substantial experience in understanding model performance, as well as in the design and execution of realtime systems. This presentation will focus on lessons learned and it will suggest low hanging fruit for transition to operations at partner agencies.

  14. The disconnections between space, place and learning in interprofessional education: an overview of key issues.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Simon; Nordquist, Jonas; Peller, Jennifer; Grant, Rachel; Reeves, Scott

    2013-09-01

    This article explores and discusses current conceptual and empirical dimensions of the study of space, place, education and interprofessional education (IPE) within a health professions context. This article addresses defining elements of the concepts, their use in nursing and medical literature and their positioning within educational theories. It outlines a series of ideas and approaches for future research aimed at investigating the intersections and relationships amongst these concepts. Importantly, this article argues that the conceptualization of space and place in IPE can potentially impact how educational space, places and curricular are (re)conducted and utilized. PMID:23930685

  15. Development of operational models for space weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun

    Since space weather prediction is currently at the stage of transition from human experience to objective forecasting methods, developing operational forecasting models becomes an important way to improve the capabilities of space weather service. As the existing theoretical models are not fully operational when it comes to space weather prediction, we carried out researches on developing operational models, considering the user needs for prediction of key elements in space environment, which have vital impacts on space assets security. We focused on solar activities, geomagnetic activities, high-energy particles, atmospheric density, plasma environment and so forth. Great progresses have been made in developing 3D dynamic asymmetric magnetopause model, plasma sheet energetic electron flux forecasting model and 400km-atmospheric density forecasting model, and also in the prediction of high-speed solar-wind streams from coronal holes and geomagnetic AE indices. Some of these models have already been running in the operational system of Space Environment Prediction Center, National Space Science Center (SEPC/NSSC). This presentation will introduce the research plans for space weather prediction in China, and current progresses of developing operational models and their applications in daily space weather services in SEPC/NSSC.

  16. Making Educational Spaces through Boundary Work: Territorialisation and "Boundarying"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Globalising processes are shifting the established nation-building project of twentieth-century national education systems. This historic axis between education and territorialised state power is being re-spatialised and remade as a globally networked, lifelong learning educational order. Political sociology of education theorises these de- and…

  17. Making Educational Spaces through Boundary Work: Territorialisation and "Boundarying"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Globalising processes are shifting the established nation-building project of twentieth-century national education systems. This historic axis between education and territorialised state power is being re-spatialised and remade as a globally networked, lifelong learning educational order. Political sociology of education theorises these de- and…

  18. A Mathematical Model for an Educational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McReynolds, William Peter

    The document contents divide into (1) the basic flow model of an educational system and its application to the secondary school system of Ontario and (2) a group of interrelated submodels that describe the entrance to higher education in considerably finer detail. In the first section, the principal variable of the model--the transition…

  19. General Education: The Los Medanos College Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Charles C.; Drexel, Karl O.

    This book-length study justifies, describes, and gives an initial evaluation of the general education model developed at Los Medanos College (California). The opening chapter presents a detailed philosophic argument in favor of general education as a principle, and in support of the innovative aspects of the Los Medanos model. The argument is for…

  20. A Model Technology Educator: Thomas A. Edison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretzer, William S.; Rogers, George E.; Bush, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting back over a century ago to the small village of Menlo Park, New Jersey provides insight into a remarkable visionary and an exceptional role model for today's problem-solving and design-focused technology educator: Thomas A. Edison, inventor, innovator, and model technology educator. Since Edison could not simply apply existing knowledge…

  1. A Model Technology Educator: Thomas A. Edison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretzer, William S.; Rogers, George E.; Bush, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting back over a century ago to the small village of Menlo Park, New Jersey provides insight into a remarkable visionary and an exceptional role model for today's problem-solving and design-focused technology educator: Thomas A. Edison, inventor, innovator, and model technology educator. Since Edison could not simply apply existing knowledge…

  2. Toward Developing a Behavioral Counselor Education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubowski Spector, Patricia; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Counselor education currently does not have a training model that is systematically employed and contains provisions for individual differences or promotes the development of programs for facilitating transfer of training. In the proposed model, counselor educators must decide which of the counseling student's behaviors will become the focus of…

  3. Training Educators to Teach the Sun and Space Weather Using a Kit of Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Ensign, T.

    2014-12-01

    NASA provides a wealth of data from Heliospheric missions to the public, but educators face several challenges to using such data in the classroom. These include the knowledge of what is available and how to use it, a full understanding of the science concepts the data demonstrate, ability to obtain and maintain products to access data, and access to technology (such as computer labs) for anything other than testing. To surmount these challenges, the Educator Resource Center at the NASA Independent Validation and Verification (IV&V) Center in Fairmont, WV has developed an operational model that focuses on housing, maintaining, and lending out kits of necessary equipment along with training educators in the science concepts and use of kit materials. Following this model, we have developed a Sun and Space Weather kit and an educator professional development course that we have presented several times. The kit includes a classroom set of iPads utilized to access data from NASA missions and other sources as well as create video reports for project based outcomes, a set of telescopes for safe solar viewing, and materials to explore magnetic fields and the electromagnetic spectrum. We will present an overview of the training course, the kit materials, and lessons learned.

  4. Music, Policy, and Place-Centered Education: Finding Space for Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    As a volatile educative space, musical education must be interwoven with other concerns and other more encompassing constructs if it is to build robust, meaningful, and complex learning outcomes. This paper attempts to do this by placing music education and a complex understanding of policy side by side, and outlining what people can learn from…

  5. Space, Place, and Social Justice: Developing a Rhythmanalysis of Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Pam

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a methodological approach based on the spatial theory of Henri Lefebvre to address relationships between space, place, and social justice in education. In understanding the contradictory effects of globalization on local education policies and the continuing effects of historical geographies in education, Lefebvre's…

  6. The Architecture of "Educare": Motion and Emotion in Postwar Educational Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozlovsky, Roy

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores the interplay between educational and architectural methodologies for analysing the school environment. It historicises the affinity between architectural and educational practices and modes of knowledge pertaining to the child's body during the period of postwar reconstruction in England to argue that educational spaces were…

  7. The Act of Claiming Higher Education as Indigenous Space: American Indian/Alaska Native Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windchief, Sweeney; Joseph, Darold H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of claiming postsecondary education as Indigenous space using curriculum, American Indian student services, and digital media. The intention of this manuscript is to address the disparities that are the result of assimilative educational practices in higher education for American Indians and Alaska Natives by…

  8. The Act of Claiming Higher Education as Indigenous Space: American Indian/Alaska Native Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windchief, Sweeney; Joseph, Darold H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of claiming postsecondary education as Indigenous space using curriculum, American Indian student services, and digital media. The intention of this manuscript is to address the disparities that are the result of assimilative educational practices in higher education for American Indians and Alaska Natives by…

  9. Applied Drama and the Higher Education Learning Spaces: A Reflective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyo, Cletus

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores Applied Drama as a teaching approach in Higher Education learning spaces. The exploration takes a reflective analysis approach by first examining the impact that Applied Drama has had on my career as a Lecturer/Educator/Teacher working in Higher Education environments. My engagement with Applied Drama practice and theory is…

  10. A Dialogue on Space and Method in Qualitative Research on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildersleeve, Ryan Evely; Kuntz, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors critically examine the use of space in education research and illustrate how spatial analyses of education reframe persistent educational problems in productive, actionable ways. The authors juxtapose critical spatial analyses with traditional temporal analyses. The authors approach the knowledge-construction process…

  11. Music, Policy, and Place-Centered Education: Finding Space for Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    As a volatile educative space, musical education must be interwoven with other concerns and other more encompassing constructs if it is to build robust, meaningful, and complex learning outcomes. This paper attempts to do this by placing music education and a complex understanding of policy side by side, and outlining what people can learn from…

  12. Space Science Educational Media Resources, A Guide for Junior High School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Kenneth M.

    This guide, developed by a panel of teacher consultants, is a correlation of educational media resources with the "North Carolina Curricular Bulletin for Eighth Grade Earth and Space Science" and the state adopted textbook, pModern Earth Science." The three major divisions are (1) the Earth in Space (Astronomy), (2) Space Exploration, and (3)…

  13. Space Awareness, an Adult Education Curriculum Resource Guide. Bulletin No. 71-F-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marvin

    The document was prepared to serve as a guide to adult educators and others interested in specific information relating to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and to provide a source of information of the breadth and scope of space explorations including space benefits to mankind. The course is organized into eight units of…

  14. Personal Spaces in Public Repositories as a Facilitator for Open Educational Resource Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anat; Reisman, Sorel; Sperling, Barbra Bied

    2015-01-01

    Learning object repositories are a shared, open and public space; however, the possibility and ability of personal expression in an open, global, public space is crucial. The aim of this study is to explore personal spaces in a big learning object repository as a facilitator for adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) into teaching practices…

  15. Global Model Analysis by Parameter Space Partitioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Mark A.; Kim, Woojae; Navarro, Daniel J.; Myung, Jay I.

    2006-01-01

    To model behavior, scientists need to know how models behave. This means learning what other behaviors a model can produce besides the one generated by participants in an experiment. This is a difficult problem because of the complexity of psychological models (e.g., their many parameters) and because the behavioral precision of models (e.g.,…

  16. Space Station Freedom electrical performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Green, Robert D.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Mckissock, David B.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    The baseline Space Station Freedom electric power system (EPS) employs photovoltaic (PV) arrays and nickel hydrogen (NiH2) batteries to supply power to housekeeping and user electrical loads via a direct current (dc) distribution system. The EPS was originally designed for an operating life of 30 years through orbital replacement of components. As the design and development of the EPS continues, accurate EPS performance predictions are needed to assess design options, operating scenarios, and resource allocations. To meet these needs, NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has, over a 10 year period, developed SPACE (Station Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation), a computer code designed to predict EPS performance. This paper describes SPACE, its functionality, and its capabilities.

  17. Modeling diurnal hormone profiles by hierarchical state space models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyue; Guo, Wensheng

    2015-10-30

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) diurnal patterns contain both smooth circadian rhythms and pulsatile activities. How to evaluate and compare them between different groups is a challenging statistical task. In particular, we are interested in testing (1) whether the smooth ACTH circadian rhythms in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia patients differ from those in healthy controls and (2) whether the patterns of pulsatile activities are different. In this paper, a hierarchical state space model is proposed to extract these signals from noisy observations. The smooth circadian rhythms shared by a group of subjects are modeled by periodic smoothing splines. The subject level pulsatile activities are modeled by autoregressive processes. A functional random effect is adopted at the pair level to account for the matched pair design. Parameters are estimated by maximizing the marginal likelihood. Signals are extracted as posterior means. Computationally efficient Kalman filter algorithms are adopted for implementation. Application of the proposed model reveals that the smooth circadian rhythms are similar in the two groups but the pulsatile activities in patients are weaker than those in the healthy controls. PMID:26152819

  18. An Evolutionary Model for Space Solar Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boechler, Nicholas; Hameer, Sameer; Wanis, Sam; Komerath, Narayanan

    2006-01-01

    The primary difficulties with the dream of Space Solar Power (SSP) for Earth, are the extreme launch costs of solar power satellites to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO), and the absence of an evolutionary path to SSP. This makes the cost-to-first-power unacceptably high. This paper presents a 3-stage approach to SSP, and lay out the problems and opportunities. The key idea is to use space assets initially for global transmission and distribution, rather than generation, establish the infrastructure, and then add space-based power generation to a revenue-generating power grid. In the first stage, a Space Power Grid is established with satellites 1,200 km above Earth, distributing earth-generated beamed microwaves to other satellites and ground receivers. This boosts the earth-based alternative power industry (wind and solar-thermal) by providing transmission between any points on earth, and accommodating fluctuations in demand and supply. It also satisfies strategic needs for emergency power delivery. In Stage 2, direct power conversion technology will augment the existing space power grid with space-generated solar power. In Stage 3, large ultralight GEO reflectors will beam light to the direct-conversion collectors, and multiply the power through the grid. The need to put expensive, heavy solar arrays in high orbit is avoided, along with the objections to atmospheric transmission of visible light. The system would gain significantly from the development of low-mass, high-efficiency conversion equipment for direct conversion of broadband solar energy to beamed microwaves.

  19. Standardization Process for Space Radiation Models Used for Space System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Daly, Eamonn; Brautigam, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The space system design community has three concerns related to models of the radiation belts and plasma: 1) AP-8 and AE-8 models are not adequate for modern applications; 2) Data that have become available since the creation of AP-8 and AE-8 are not being fully exploited for modeling purposes; 3) When new models are produced, there is no authorizing organization identified to evaluate the models or their datasets for accuracy and robustness. This viewgraph presentation provided an overview of the roadmap adopted by the Working Group Meeting on New Standard Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Models.

  20. Creating Institutional Space for Business Model Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Robert; Crawford, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    From college campuses to the halls of Congress, there is broad agreement that higher education is experiencing a major wave of innovation. This article holds that the changes are significant, but that the resulting threats to existing institutions are manageable if key leaders understand them and if institutions adapt to the new environment. The…

  1. Browsing Space Weather Data and Models with the Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, Marlo M.; Mullinix, Richard E.; Berrios, David H.; Hesse, Michael; Rastaetter, Lutz; Pulkkinen, Antti; Hourcle, Joseph A.; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System is a comprehensive web-based platform for space weather information that combines data from solar, heliospheric and geospace observatories with forecasts based on the most advanced space weather models. The iSWA system collects, generates, and presents a wide array of space weather resources in an intuitive, user-configurable, and adaptable format - thus enabling users to respond to current and future space weather impacts as well as enabling post-impact analysis. iSWA currently provides over 200 data and modeling products, and features a variety of tools that allow the user to browse, combine, and examine data and models from various sources. This presentation will consist of a summary of the iSWA products and an overview of the customizable user interfaces, and will feature several tutorial demonstrations highlighting the interactive tools and advanced capabilities.

  2. Space Weather Products at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In addition to supporting space research in the international community, the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has as its second objective to bring to apply the power of modern research models toward space weather specification and forecasting. Initially motivated by the objective to test models and to ease the transition of research models to space weather forecasting organization, the CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as large number of modeling and data products for space weather forecasting. Over time, these activities have evolved into tailored products for partners, as well as into a direct support of the space weather needs within NASA robotic mission community. Accessible through a customizable interface, users within the US or at partnering institutions internationally have access to space weather tools driven by the most advanced space research models. Through partnering with agencies and institutions in the US and abroad, the CCMC strives to set up further data sharing agreements to the benefit of all participating institutions. In this presentation, we provide an overview of existing CCMC space weather services and products, and we will explore additional avenues for international collaborations.

  3. Comprehensive Physical Education Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamiya, Artie

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the Wake County Public School System (North Carolina) received $1.3 million as one of 237 national winners of the $70 million federal Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) Grant competition. The PEP Grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and provides monies to school districts able to demonstrate the…

  4. Comprehensive Physical Education Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamiya, Artie

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the Wake County Public School System (North Carolina) received $1.3 million as one of 237 national winners of the $70 million federal Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) Grant competition. The PEP Grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and provides monies to school districts able to demonstrate the…

  5. Space Education Strategy Using Data Obtained by Lunar and Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazono, Junya; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Wakabayashi, Naoki

    Japanese two lunar and planetary missions, Kaguya (SELENE) and Hayabusa (MUSES-C) are returning vast amount of result to the Earth, and these data are planned to open to the public via the Internet. These are considered useful not only for scientists and engineers but also for the educators and students as a “real textbook”. In space education, we can use several methods to facilitate students' interest. Here we describe some of our examples to promote space education. One is the event accompanying with the major conferences, and second is the video program describing the Hayabusa mission with very unique viewpoint, and the third is the website carefully designed for children. However, the application of mission results to the space education has some points which should be specific to these missions. This paper describes our current attempt of these application and future prospects for the promotion of space education.

  6. Samoa's Education Policy: Negotiating a Hybrid Space for Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuia, Tagataese Tupu; Iyer, Radha

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the education policy of Samoa to examine the values that are presented within as relevant to the education system. Drawing on the theory of postcolonialism and globalization, we illustrate how the global and local interact within the education policy to create a hybrid, heterogeneous mix of values and, while the policy…

  7. Towards a Framework for Modeling Space Systems Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter; Skipper, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: 1) Statement of the problem: a) Space system architecture is complex; b) Existing terrestrial approaches must be adapted for space; c) Need a common architecture methodology and information model; d) Need appropriate set of viewpoints. 2) Requirements on a space systems model. 3) Model Based Engineering and Design (MBED) project: a) Evaluated different methods; b) Adapted and utilized RASDS & RM-ODP; c) Identified useful set of viewpoints; d) Did actual model exchanges among selected subset of tools. 4) Lessons learned & future vision.

  8. Public Education Resources and Pupil Performance Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spottheim, David; And Others

    This report details three models quantifying the relationships between educational means (resources) and ends (pupil achievements) to analyze resource allocation problems within school districts: (1) the Pupil Performance Model; (2) the Goal Programming Model; and (3) the Operational Structure of a School and Pupil Performance Model. These models…

  9. Higher Education: New Models, New Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Louis; Eaton, Judith S.; Smith, Burck

    2013-01-01

    The Internet enables new models. In the commercial world, for example, we have eBay, Amazon.com, and Netflix. These new models operate with a different set of rules than do traditional models. New models are emerging in higher education as well--for example, competency-based programs. In addition, courses that are being provided from outside the…

  10. Mathematical Modelling Approach in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arseven, Ayla

    2015-01-01

    The topic of models and modeling has come to be important for science and mathematics education in recent years. The topic of "Modeling" topic is especially important for examinations such as PISA which is conducted at an international level and measures a student's success in mathematics. Mathematical modeling can be defined as using…

  11. Higher Education: New Models, New Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Louis; Eaton, Judith S.; Smith, Burck

    2013-01-01

    The Internet enables new models. In the commercial world, for example, we have eBay, Amazon.com, and Netflix. These new models operate with a different set of rules than do traditional models. New models are emerging in higher education as well--for example, competency-based programs. In addition, courses that are being provided from outside the…

  12. Professional Development of Teacher Educators through a "Transitional Space": A Surprising Outcome of a Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Ilana

    2011-01-01

    The challenges facing teacher educators to bridge the gap between theory and practice and to solve the problem of curricular fragmentation necessitate the creation of a more coherent program, the establishment of partnerships with schools, and the building of new educative spaces. In order to provide students with rich learning opportunities, and…

  13. Logic Models: Evaluating Education Doctorates in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creighton, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The author suggests the Logic Model, used especially in the Health Science field, as a model for evaluating the quality of the educational doctorate (i.e., EdD). The manuscript highlights the newly developed EdD program at Virginia Tech.

  14. Space station architectural elements model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    The space station must unite the properties and behavior of individual and place, using proportions from both to make whole the understanding of ourselves at this moment in evolution. Harmonious proportions in any environment are similar to the acceptance and enjoyment of the harmony of many well-tuned musical instruments. A well-tuned or well-ordered environment tends to have invisible proportions. They produce order but do not intrude on the perception and cognitive mapping of the environment. Systems of proportion are not ends in themselves but are a means to select a series of spaces which relate one to another in dimensionally specific terms. These internal relationships create a whole when the forms are harmonious. This harmonic relationship is of intrinsic value for individuals to be physically and psychologically in balance with their universe.

  15. Space weather circulation model of plasma clouds as background radiation medium of space environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalu, A. E.

    A model for Space Weather (SW) Circulation with Plasma Clouds as background radiation medium of Space Environment has been proposed and discussed. Major characteristics of the model are outlined and the model assumes a baroclinic Space Environment in view of observed pronounced horizontal electron temperature gradient with prevailing weak vertical temperature gradient. The primary objective of the study is to be able to monitor and realistically predict on real- or near real-time SW and Space Storms (SWS) affecting human economic systems on Earth as well as the safety and Physiologic comfort of human payload in Space Environment in relation to planned increase in human space flights especially with reference to the ISS Space Shuttle Taxi (ISST) Programme and other prolonged deep Space Missions. Although considerable discussions are now available in the literature on SW issues, routine Meteorological operational applications of SW forecast data and information for Space Environment are still yet to receive adequate attention. The paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature of SW. The paper examines the sensitivity and variability in 3-D continuum of Plasmas in response to solar radiation inputs into the magnetosphere under disturbed Sun condition. Specifically, the presence of plasma clouds in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is stressed as a major source of danger to Space crews, spacecraft instrumentation and architecture charging problems as well as impacts on numerous radiation - sensitive human economic systems on Earth. Finally, the paper considers the application of model results in the form of effective monitoring of each of the two major phases of manned Spaceflights - take-off and re-entry phases where all-time assessment of spacecraft transient ambient micro-incabin and outside Space Environment is vital for all manned Spaceflights as recently evidenced by the loss of vital information during take-off of the February 1, 2003 US Columbia Space Shuttle accident. A good knowledge of Space Weather Circulation of Space Environment will therefore result in the production of a better prediction model for SWS and hence a welcoming improvement on the protection of human lives and economic systems against vagaries of SWS hazards. This is a basic asset for market potential for the ISS Space Shuttle Programme

  16. Development, validation and application of numerical space environment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkonen, Ilja

    2013-10-01

    Currently the majority of space-based assets are located inside the Earth's magnetosphere where they must endure the effects of the near-Earth space environment, i.e. space weather, which is driven by the supersonic flow of plasma from the Sun. Space weather refers to the day-to-day changes in the temperature, magnetic field and other parameters of the near-Earth space, similarly to ordinary weather which refers to changes in the atmosphere above ground level. Space weather can also cause adverse effects on the ground, for example, by inducing large direct currents in power transmission systems. The performance of computers has been growing exponentially for many decades and as a result the importance of numerical modeling in science has also increased rapidly. Numerical modeling is especially important in space plasma physics because there are no in-situ observations of space plasmas outside of the heliosphere and it is not feasible to study all aspects of space plasmas in a terrestrial laboratory. With the increasing number of computational cores in supercomputers, the parallel performance of numerical models on distributed memory hardware is also becoming crucial. This thesis consists of an introduction, four peer reviewed articles and describes the process of developing numerical space environment/weather models and the use of such models to study the near-Earth space. A complete model development chain is presented starting from initial planning and design to distributed memory parallelization and optimization, and finally testing, verification and validation of numerical models. A grid library that provides good parallel scalability on distributed memory hardware and several novel features, the distributed cartesian cell-refinable grid (DCCRG), is designed and developed. DCCRG is presently used in two numerical space weather models being developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The first global magnetospheric test particle simulation based on the Vlasov description of plasma is carried out using the Vlasiator model. The test shows that the Vlasov equation for plasma in six-dimensionsional phase space is solved correctly b! y Vlasiator, that results are obtained beyond those of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of plasma and that global magnetospheric simulations using a hybrid-Vlasov model are feasible on current hardware. For the first time four global magnetospheric models using the MHD description of plasma (BATS-R-US, GUMICS, OpenGGCM, LFM) are run with identical solar wind input and the results compared to observations in the ionosphere and outer magnetosphere. Based on the results of the global magnetospheric MHD model GUMICS a hypothesis is formulated for a new mechanism of plasmoid formation in the Earth's magnetotail.

  17. Contrasting Disciplinary Models in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses advantages and disadvantages of eight discipline approaches: the Neo-Skinnerian reinforcement model, Redl and Wattenberg's group dynamics model, Kounin's lesson-management model, Ginott's communication model, Dreikurs' student choice model, Canter's Assertive Discipline model, Jones's classroom-management model, and Glasser's…

  18. Progress in Valve Modeling at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Russell L.; Woods, Jody L.; Sulyma, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Understanding valve behavior will aid testing of rocket components at Stennis Space Center. The authors of this viewgraph presentation have developed a computational model for a cryogenic liquid control valve, and a gas pressure regulator valve. The model is a compressible/incompressible pressure-based FDNS code from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It is a k-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions.

  19. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  20. Implementation of hydrologic models at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Major watershed simulation models were implemented on the computer system at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and their operation was verified. Historical and physiographic data were acquired for two Maryland river basins (Monocasy River above Jug Bridge and Patuxent River near Laurel, Maryland) and the models were calibrated to simulate them. GSFC personnel were instructed in model operation after the models were implemented.

  1. Preliminary Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hendrichs, Todd

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews creating a preliminary multi-variable cost model for the contract costs of making a space telescope. There is discussion of the methodology for collecting the data, definition of the statistical analysis methodology, single variable model results, testing of historical models and an introduction of the multi variable models.

  2. A neurocomputing approach to model determination of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travassos, Richard H.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs on a neurocomputing approach to model determination of large space structures are presented. Topics covered include: background on neural networks; math modeling with neural networks; computer architectures for real-time modeling; and hardware and software implementation considerations, OPTIMA/1 data acquisition, modeling, and control workstation.

  3. Promoting Mental Model Building in Astronomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ian; Barker, Miles; Jones, Alister

    2003-01-01

    While astronomy has recently re-emerged in many science curricula, there remain unresolved teaching and learning difficulties peculiar to astronomy education. This paper argues that mental model building, the core process in astronomy itself, should be reflected in astronomy education. Also, this crucial skill may promote a better understanding of…

  4. Comprehensive Career Education Models: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ. Research Corp., NY. Educational Policy Research Center.

    The U.S. Office of Education (USOE) has developed the Comprehensive Career Education Models in response to certain perceived social problems. There is an enormous distance, however, between the perception of a social problem and the formulation of a policy or program. In this paper, social problems are examined from a different perspective than…

  5. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  6. Indiana Distributive Education Competency Based Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Rod; And Others

    This Indiana distributive education competency-based curriculum model is designed to help teachers and local administrators plan and conduct a comprehensive marketing and distributive education program. It is divided into three levels--one level for each year of a three-year program. The competencies common to a variety of marketing and…

  7. Mainstreaming: The Educational Resource Centers Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, Diane Berreth; And Others

    The looseleaf binder reports on the Educational Resource Centers (ERC) model program in Jackson County, Oregon, which fosters the mainstreaming of mildly handicapped elementary and secondary students (including learning disabled, educable mentally handicapped, emotionally disturbed, and physically handicapped). The ERC provides academic and social…

  8. Economic Modeling and Analysis of Educational Vouchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epple, Dennis; Romano, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of educational vouchers has evolved from market-based analogies to models that incorporate distinctive features of the educational environment. These distinctive features include peer effects, scope for private school pricing and admissions based on student characteristics, the linkage of household residential and school choices in…

  9. Eclectic Model in the Malaysian Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi; Ilmuwan, Yayasan

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims at analysing the adoption of eclectic model in the Malaysian education system. The analysis is specifically looked from the angle of Islam and the Muslims. Malaysia has a long history of education system developments, from pre to post independence of the country. From what was initially traditional, modernity later came to…

  10. Economic Modeling and Analysis of Educational Vouchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epple, Dennis; Romano, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of educational vouchers has evolved from market-based analogies to models that incorporate distinctive features of the educational environment. These distinctive features include peer effects, scope for private school pricing and admissions based on student characteristics, the linkage of household residential and school choices in…

  11. Promoting Mental Model Building in Astronomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ian; Barker, Miles; Jones, Alister

    2003-01-01

    While astronomy has recently re-emerged in many science curricula, there remain unresolved teaching and learning difficulties peculiar to astronomy education. This paper argues that mental model building, the core process in astronomy itself, should be reflected in astronomy education. Also, this crucial skill may promote a better understanding of…

  12. AGU education and public outreach programs: Empowering future Earth and space scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamec, Bethany; Asher, Pranoti

    2011-10-01

    The staff and leadership of AGU are committed to fostering excellence in Earth and space science education. While AGU's Strategic Plan does not specifically highlight primary or secondary education among its objectives, outreach in this area plays a significant role in developing and nurturing the next generation of Earth and space scientists. Several educational goals along with specific strategies will help AGU meet its goal related to workforce or talent pool development. Particular emphasis is being placed on building partnerships and collaborations that will increase the effectiveness of AGU's outreach efforts related to education.

  13. Space-Hotel Early Bird - An Educational and Public Outreach Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekrane, R.; Holze, C.

    2002-01-01

    In April 2001 the German Aerospace Society DGLR e.V. in cooperation with the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany initiated an interdisciplinary students contest, under the patronage of Mr. Joerg Feustel-Buechl, the Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, European Space Agency (ESA), for the summer term 2001. It was directed to graduated architecture students, who had to conceive and design a space-hotel with specific technical, economical and social requirements. The to be developed Space Hotel for a low earth orbit has to accommodate 220 guests. It was of utmost importance that this contest becomes an integral part of the student's tuition and that professors of the different academic and industrial institutions supported the project idea. During the summer term 2001 about fifty students occupied themselves with the topic, "design of an innovative space-hotel". The overall challenge was to create rooms used under microgravity environment, which means to overcome existing definitions and to find a new definition of living space. Because none of the students were able to experience such a room under microgravity they were forced to use the power of their imagination capability. The students attended moreover a number of lectures on different technical subjects focusing on space and went on several space-related excursions. Having specialists, as volunteers, in the field of space in charge meant that it could be ensured that the designs reflected a certain possibility of being able to be realized. Within the summer term seventeen major designs developed from the conceptual status to high sophisticated concepts and later on also to respective models. A competition combined with a public exhibition, that took place within the Annual German Aeronautics and Astronautics Congress, and intense media relations finalized this project. The project idea of "Early Bird - Visions of a Space Hotel" which was developed within six month is a remarkable example, how education and public outreach can be combined and how a cooperation among an association, the industry and academia can work successfully. Representatives of the DGLR and the academia developed a method to spread space related knowledge in a short time to a motivated working group. The project was a great success in the sense to involve other disciplines in space related topics by interdisciplinary work and in the sense of public and educational outreach. With more than 2.3 million contacts the DGLR e.V. promoted space and the vision of living (in) space to the public. The task of the paper is mainly to describe the approach and the experience made related to the organization, lectures, financing and outreach efforts in respect to similar future international outreach activities, which are planned for the 54th International Astronautical Congress in Bremen/Germany. www.spacehotel.org

  14. Validation of nuclear models used in space radiation shielding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-15

    A program of verification and validation has been undertaken to assess the applicability of models to space radiation shielding applications and to track progress as these models are developed over time. In this work, simple validation metrics applicable to testing both model accuracy and consistency with experimental data are developed. The developed metrics treat experimental measurement uncertainty as an interval and are therefore applicable to cases in which epistemic uncertainty dominates the experimental data. To demonstrate the applicability of the metrics, nuclear physics models used by NASA for space radiation shielding applications are compared to an experimental database consisting of over 3600 experimental cross sections. A cumulative uncertainty metric is applied to the question of overall model accuracy, while a metric based on the median uncertainty is used to analyze the models from the perspective of model development by examining subsets of the model parameter space.

  15. The Pleurodele, an animal model for space biology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualandris, L.; Grinfeld, S.; Foulquier, F.; Kan, P.; Duprat, A. M.

    Pleurodeles waltl, an Urodele amphibian is proposed as a model for space biology studies. Our laboratory is developing three types of experiments in space using this animal: 1) in vivo fertilization and development (``FERTILE'' project); 2) influence of microgravity and space radiation on the organization and preservation of spacialized structures in the neurons and muscle cells (in vitro; ``CELIMENE'' PROJECT); 3) influence of microgravity on tissue regeneration (muscle, bone, epidermis and spinal cord).

  16. The moduli space of superconformal instantons in sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Monastyrsky, M.I. ); Natanzon, S.M. )

    1991-06-21

    In this paper, an approach to instantons in supersymmetrical 2-dimensional sigma models is discussed. In this approach superinstantons are characterized as the superconformal maps of a physical space into the isotopic (target) space. The authors consider a special case of the supersphere with punctures. New topological invariants as the number of the so-called fermionic points appear in this case. The authors also analyze the structure of the moduli space of superinstantons within this framework.

  17. Models and applications for space weather forecasting and analysis at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) was established at the dawn of the new millennium as a long-term flexible solution to the problem of transition of progress in space environment modeling to operational space weather forecasting. CCMC hosts an expanding collection of state-of-the-art space weather models developed by the international space science community. Over the years the CCMC acquired the unique experience in preparing complex models and model chains for operational environment and developing and maintaining custom displays and powerful web-based systems and tools ready to be used by researchers, space weather service providers and decision makers. In support of space weather needs of NASA users CCMC is developing highly-tailored applications and services that target specific orbits or locations in space and partnering with NASA mission specialists on linking CCMC space environment modeling with impacts on biological and technological systems in space. Confidence assessment of model predictions is an essential element of space environment modeling. CCMC facilitates interaction between model owners and users in defining physical parameters and metrics formats relevant to specific applications and leads community efforts to quantify models ability to simulate and predict space environment events. Interactive on-line model validation systems developed at CCMC make validation a seamless part of model development circle. The talk will showcase innovative solutions for space weather research, validation, anomaly analysis and forecasting and review on-going community-wide model validation initiatives enabled by CCMC applications.

  18. Modeling International Space Station (ISS) Floating Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Gardner, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The floating potential of the International Space Station (ISS) as a function of the electron current collection of its high voltage solar array panels is derived analytically. Based on Floating Potential Probe (FPP) measurements of the ISS potential and ambient plasma characteristics, it is shown that the ISS floating potential is a strong function of the electron temperature of the surrounding plasma. While the ISS floating potential has so far not attained the pre-flight predicted highly negative values, it is shown that for future mission builds, ISS must continue to provide two-fault tolerant arc-hazard protection for astronauts on EVA.

  19. Space Science Cloud: a Virtual Space Science Research Platform Based on Cloud Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Tong, Jizhou; Zou, Ziming

    Through independent and co-operational science missions, Strategic Pioneer Program (SPP) on Space Science, the new initiative of space science program in China which was approved by CAS and implemented by National Space Science Center (NSSC), dedicates to seek new discoveries and new breakthroughs in space science, thus deepen the understanding of universe and planet earth. In the framework of this program, in order to support the operations of space science missions and satisfy the demand of related research activities for e-Science, NSSC is developing a virtual space science research platform based on cloud model, namely the Space Science Cloud (SSC). In order to support mission demonstration, SSC integrates interactive satellite orbit design tool, satellite structure and payloads layout design tool, payload observation coverage analysis tool, etc., to help scientists analyze and verify space science mission designs. Another important function of SSC is supporting the mission operations, which runs through the space satellite data pipelines. Mission operators can acquire and process observation data, then distribute the data products to other systems or issue the data and archives with the services of SSC. In addition, SSC provides useful data, tools and models for space researchers. Several databases in the field of space science are integrated and an efficient retrieve system is developing. Common tools for data visualization, deep processing (e.g., smoothing and filtering tools), analysis (e.g., FFT analysis tool and minimum variance analysis tool) and mining (e.g., proton event correlation analysis tool) are also integrated to help the researchers to better utilize the data. The space weather models on SSC include magnetic storm forecast model, multi-station middle and upper atmospheric climate model, solar energetic particle propagation model and so on. All the services above-mentioned are based on the e-Science infrastructures of CAS e.g. cloud storage and cloud computing. SSC provides its users with self-service storage and computing resources at the same time.At present, the prototyping of SSC is underway and the platform is expected to be put into trial operation in August 2014. We hope that as SSC develops, our vision of Digital Space may come true someday.

  20. Phase-Space Networks of Frustrated Spin Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yilong

    2012-02-01

    We propose a complex-network approach to study phase-space structures of frustrated spin models and lattice gas models. Their highly degenerated ground states are mapped as discrete networks such that the quantitative network analysis can be applied to phase-space studies. The resulting phase spaces share some common features and establish a class of complex networks with unique Gaussian spectral densities. A one-to-one correspondence is discovered between the six-vertex model (jigsaw puzzle) and sphere stack.

  1. The Salience of Space for Pedagogy and Identity in Teacher Education: Problem-Based Learning as a Case in Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Dianne

    2006-01-01

    Recently, issues of space and spatiality have been taken up in education, though less so in teacher education. This article examines the significance of space for pedagogy and identity in teacher education. Drawing on topological approaches to the study of pedagogy, it explores the potential of a problem-based approach to teacher education to link…

  2. Shuttle Space Suit: Fabric/LCVG Model Validation. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tweed, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Anderson, B. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Ware, J.; Persans, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed space suit computational model is being developed at the Langley Research Center for radiation exposure evaluation studies. The details of the construction of the space suit are critical to estimation of exposures and assessing the risk to the astronaut on EVA. Past evaluations of space suit shielding properties assumed the basic fabric layup (Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, fabric restraints, and pressure envelope) and LCVG could be homogenized as a single layer overestimating the protective properties over 60 percent of the fabric area. The present space suit model represents the inhomogeneous distributions of LCVG materials (mainly the water filled cooling tubes). An experimental test is performed using a 34-MeV proton beam and high-resolution detectors to compare with model-predicted transmission factors. Some suggestions are made on possible improved construction methods to improve the space suit s protection properties.

  3. "Amazing Space": Creating Educational Resources from Current Scientific Research Results from the Hubble Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, C. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Eisenhamer, Jonathan; Teays, Terry

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Amazing Space program which is designed to enhance student mathematics, science, and technology skills using recent data and results from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Hubble Space Telescope mission. Explains the process of designing multi-media resources in a five-week summer workshop that partners…

  4. "Amazing Space": Creating Educational Resources from Current Scientific Research Results from the Hubble Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, C. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Eisenhamer, Jonathan; Teays, Terry

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Amazing Space program which is designed to enhance student mathematics, science, and technology skills using recent data and results from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Hubble Space Telescope mission. Explains the process of designing multi-media resources in a five-week summer workshop that partners…

  5. Metaphor, Model, and Theory in Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickmeyer, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    The concepts of metaphor, model, and theory are defined and used to show how social science research in general, and education research in particular, has differed from Popper's description of natural science research. (IAH)

  6. Constructing an Integrated Model for Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, W. Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for a model of professional education based on an interdisciplinary approach developed at the University of Calgary. Highlights include professional growth; experts' behavior; mentorship; professional knowledge base; elaboration theory; and fuzzy logic. (Contains 21 references.) (LRW)

  7. Model Rocketry: University-Level Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrowman, James S.

    1974-01-01

    Describes how model rocketry can be a useful educational tool at the university level as a practical application of theoretical aerodynamic concepts and as a tool for students in experimental research. (BR)

  8. Dynamic modeling and adaptive control for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, C. H. C.; Wang, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Of all large space structural systems, space stations present a unique challenge and requirement to advanced control technology. Their operations require control system stability over an extremely broad range of parameter changes and high level of disturbances. During shuttle docking the system mass may suddenly increase by more than 100% and during station assembly the mass may vary even more drastically. These coupled with the inherent dynamic model uncertainties associated with large space structural systems require highly sophisticated control systems that can grow as the stations evolve and cope with the uncertainties and time-varying elements to maintain the stability and pointing of the space stations. The aspects of space station operational properties are first examined, including configurations, dynamic models, shuttle docking contact dynamics, solar panel interaction, and load reduction to yield a set of system models and conditions. A model reference adaptive control algorithm along with the inner-loop plant augmentation design for controlling the space stations under severe operational conditions of shuttle docking, excessive model parameter errors, and model truncation are then investigated. The instability problem caused by the zero-frequency rigid body modes and a proposed solution using plant augmentation are addressed. Two sets of sufficient conditions which guarantee the globablly asymptotic stability for the space station systems are obtained.

  9. Thermal modeling, analysis and control of a space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Anthony Bruce

    The thermal dynamics of two space suits, the Space Shuttle EMU and the MPLSS Advanced Space Suit, are considered as they relate to astronaut thermal comfort control. The activities documented in this dissertation cover three related areas, modeling, analysis, and control. A detailed dynamic lumped capacitance thermal model of the operational Space Shuttle EMU is used to analyze the thermal dynamics of the system with observations verified using experimental and flight data. Prior to using the model to define performance characteristics and limitations for the space suit, the model is first evaluated and improved. This evaluation includes determining the effect of various model parameters on model performance and quantifying various temperature prediction errors in terms of heat transfer and heat storage. The thermal dynamics and design of an Advanced Space Suit are next considered. A transient model of the MPLSS Advanced Space Suit design is developed and implemented using MATLAB/Simulink, to help with sizing, with design evaluation, and with the development of an automatic thermal comfort control strategy. The model is described and the thermal characteristics of the Advanced Space Suit are investigated including various parametric design studies. The steady state performance envelope for the Advanced Space Suit is defined in terms of the thermal environment and human metabolic rate and the transient response of the human-suit-MPLSS system is analyzed. The observations and insights about the thermal dynamics of a space suit are then applied to the automatic thermal comfort control of the MPLSS Advanced Space Suit. Automatic thermal comfort control for the Advanced Space Suit is investigated using three proposed strategies. These strategies use a transient thermal comfort definition based on body heat storage. The first strategy is measurement based using a proposed body heat storage estimation method to determine the astronaut's thermal state. The second strategy is model based using a model to determine the desired liquid cooling garment inlet temperature to provide thermal comfort. The third strategy is a hybrid strategy combining the measurement based and model based approach using the Generalized Predictive Control framework. Each strategy then uses a resource allocation decision logic to determine which of three control mechanisms to use so that thermal comfort can be provided while minimizing the use of consumables. Accuracy and performance of the strategies are evaluated using simulations, highlighting their advantages and limitations.

  10. NASA's Space Science Education and Public Outreach Program: An Overview and Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendhal, J.

    1999-12-01

    Over the past five years, NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS) has planned and is now implementing a comprehensive approach to making education at all levels (with a particular focus on K-14 education) and the enhanced public understanding of science integral parts of Space Science missions and research programs. Major progress has been made in realizing OSS's education and public outreach goals and objectives since they were first presented to the astronomical community at the Toronto AAS meeting in January 1997. All flight missions are now required to have a substantive, funded education and public outreach program as an integral element of the mission. Participants in research programs are strongly encouraged to include an education and public outreach component as part of their research proposals. As a consequence of both these actions, literally hundreds of education and outreach activities of many different types are now underway in communities across the country. A national infrastructure for Space Science education and outreach has been established to: facilitate the involvement of space scientists in education and outreach; help identify appropriate high leverage opportunities; coordinate and synthesize the education and public outreach programs undertaken by flight missions and individual researchers; and arrange for the widest possible dissemination of Space Science-sponsored education and outreach programs and products. The purpose of this talk is to provide a broad overview of current activities and to provide a context for subsequent speakers in this session who will describe the OSS Education Forums and Broker/Facilitators and present examples of the large-scale education programs being undertaken by missions and the smaller-scale activities being undertaken by individual researchers.

  11. Live from the Hubble Space Telescope: a possibility of astronomical education using Internet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agata, H.; Miura, H.; Ito, S.; Koyama, H.; Turuoka, N.; Ebisuzaki, T.

    1996-12-01

    The authors have joined in "Live from the Hubble Space Telescope" which was operated by a Passport to Knowledge Project team. The authors are sure that collaboration between scientists and teachers using Internet have an effect on science education.

  12. ELaNa - Educational Launch of Nanosatellite Enhance Education Through Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrobot, Garrett Lee

    2011-01-01

    One of NASA's missions is to attract and retain students in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Creating missions or programs to achieve this important goal helps strengthen NASA and the nation's future work force as well as engage and inspire Americans and the rest of the world. During the last three years, in an attempt to revitalize educational space flight, NASA generated a new and exciting initiative. This initiative, NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite (ELaNa), is now fully operational and producing exciting results. Nanosatellites are small secondary satellite payloads called CubeSats. One of the challenges that the CubeSat community faced over the past few years was the lack of rides into space. Students were building CubeSats but they just sat on the shelf until an opportunity arose. In some cases, these opportunities never developed and so the CubeSat never made it to orbit. The ELaNa initiative is changing this by providing sustainable launch opportunities for educational CubeSats. Across America, these CubeSats are currently being built by students in high school all the way through graduate school. Now students know that if they build their CubeSat, submit their proposal and are selected for an ELaNa mission, they will have the opportunity to fly their satellite. ELaNa missions are the first educational cargo to be carried on expendable launch vehicles (ELY) for NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP). The first ELaNa CubeSats were slated to begin their journey to orbit in February 2011 with NASA's Glory mission. Due to an anomaly with the launch vehicle, ELaNa II and Glory failed to reach orbit. This first ELaNa mission was comprised of three IU CubeSats built by students at Montana State University (Explorer Prime Flight 1), the University of Colorado (HERMES), and Kentucky Space, a consortium of state universities (KySat). The interface between the launch vehicle and the CubeSat, the Poly-Picosatellite Orbital Deployer (P-POD), was developed and built by students at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly). Integrating a P-POD on a NASA ELV was not an easy task. The creation of new processes and requirements as well as numerous reviews and approvals were necessary within NASA before the first ELaNa mission could be attached to a NASA launch vehicle (LV). One of the key objectives placed on an ELaNa mission is that the CubeSat and PPOD does not increase the baseline risk to the primary mission and launch vehicle. The ELaNa missions achieve this objective by placing a rigorous management and engineering process on both the LV and CubeSat teams. So, what is the future of ELaNa? Currently there are 16 P-POD missions manifested across four launch vehicles to support educational CubeSats selected under the NASA CubeSat Initiative. From this initiative, a rigorous selection process produced 22-student CubeSat missions that are scheduled to fly before the end of 2012. For the initiative to continue, organizations need to submit proposals to the annual CubeSat initiative call so they have the opportunity to be manifested and launched.

  13. A Simulation and Modeling Framework for Space Situational Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the development and initial demonstration of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness enterprise, for quantitatively assessing the benefit of specific sensor systems, technologies and data analysis techniques. The framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient, physics-based simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The details of the modeling and simulation framework are described, including hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, radar cross section calculations, optical brightness calculations, generic radar system models, generic optical system models, specific Space Surveillance Network models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, and visualization tools. The use of this integrated simulation and modeling framework on a specific scenario involving space debris is demonstrated.

  14. Space-propagation model of Tm-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Lü, Haibin; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Jiang, Zongfu

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose the space-propagation model for the Tm-doped fiber laser. This model builds the space-propagation equations for the population densities at different energy levels as well as the pump and laser powers. Compared to the conventional models, this model has significant advantage in reducing the computing time significantly when the steady-state population density rate equations cannot be solved analytically. On the basis of the model, the power characteristic and optimization for the Tm-doped fiber laser are investigated. Excellent agreements are achieved between the numerical simulation and experimental results. PMID:23201794

  15. Models of remote manipulation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake

    1991-01-01

    Robots involved in high value manipulation must be effectively coupled to a human operator either at the work-site or remotely connected via communication links. In order to make use of experimental performance evaluation data, models must be developed. Powerful models of remote manipulation by humans can be used to predict manipulation performance in future systems based on today's laboratory systems. In this paradigm, the models are developed from experimental data, and then used to predict performance in slightly different situations. Second, accurate telemanipulation will allow design of manipulation systems which extend manipulation capability beyond its current bounds.

  16. Dynamics Simulation Model for Space Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, E. M.; Pearson, J.; Oldson, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the development of an accurate model for the dynamics of the Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) system. The MXER is a rotating tether about 100-km long in elliptical Earth orbit designed to catch payloads in low Earth orbit and throw them to geosynchronous orbit or to Earth escape. To ensure successful rendezvous between the MXER tip catcher and a payload, a high-fidelity model of the system dynamics is required. The model developed here quantifies the major environmental perturbations, and can predict the MXER tip position to within meters over one orbit.

  17. Places and Spaces: Environmental Psychology in Education. Fastback 112.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Mark

    The booklet discusses the concept of environmental psychology and suggests ways of applying environmental psychology principles to education. A new field of study, environmental psychology deals with influences of the physical environment on human attitudes and behavior. Of potential use to educators on all levels as they seek to use the physical…

  18. Making Space for Adult Learners in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, R.; Castle, J.

    2006-01-01

    National policy in higher education requires higher education institutions to widen access to adult learners alongside other previously excluded groups, yet gives few indications as to how this should be done. The assumption seems to have been that broadening access is sufficient in itself. In this article we argue that it is possible to construct…

  19. Benefits Awareness: Educating Industry, Finance, and the Public About Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Blake; Nall, Mark; Casas, Joseph C.; Henderson, Robin N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For space to be truly commercialized, businesses of all sizes and types must be involved, from foundries to agricultural research initiatives. Achieving this goal, however, requires three separate but integrated educational efforts to support it. The first is to educate industry leaders about the possibilities available through such research, while dispelling some of the myths and misinformation educate the financial community about the economic benefits that result both from the research and the leveraging of private research dollars through the use of space and microgravity research. The third is to educate the public about the tangible benefits that come directly to them from such efforts, the economic benefits to national economies from same, and the other less tangible benefits that will cascade from commercial operations. Together, these steps will educate and provide the framework necessary to help advance space commercialization.

  20. Innovative Educational Aerospace Research at the Northeast High School Space Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luyet, Audra; Matarazzo, Anthony; Folta, David

    1997-01-01

    Northeast High Magnet School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a proud sponsor of the Space Research Center (SPARC). SPARC, a model program of the Medical, Engineering, and Aerospace Magnet school, provides talented students the capability to successfully exercise full simulations of NASA manned missions. These simulations included low-Earth Shuttle missions and Apollo lunar missions in the past, and will focus on a planetary mission to Mars this year. At the end of each scholastic year, a simulated mission, lasting between one and eight days, is performed involving 75 students as specialists in seven teams The groups are comprised of Flight Management, Spacecraft Communications (SatCom), Computer Networking, Spacecraft Design and Engineering, Electronics, Rocketry, Robotics, and Medical teams in either the mission operations center or onboard the spacecraft. Software development activities are also required in support of these simulations The objective of this paper is to present the accomplishments, technology innovations, interactions, and an overview of SPARC with an emphasis on how the program's educational activities parallel NASA mission support and how this education is preparing student for the space frontier.

  1. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Tracy R.; McNamara, paul

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), shown below, will detect gravitational waves produced by objects such as binary black holes or objects falling into black holes (extreme mass ratio inspirals) over a frequency range of l0(exp -4) to 0.1 Hz. Within the conceptual frame work of Newtonian physics, a gravitational wave produces a strain, (Delta)l/l, with magnitudes of the order of Earth based gravitational wave detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) project, use Michelson interferometers with arm lengths l = 4 km to detect these strains. Earth induced seismic noise limits ground-based instruments detecting gravitational waves with frequencies lower than approx. 1 Hz.

  2. Constructor selection models for space construction missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard J.; Morgenthaler, George W.

    1990-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: systems design; picking the best constructor pool; prototype model; linear programming; simulated annealing; neural networks; and genetic algorithms.

  3. Statistical modeling of space shuttle environmental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J. D.; Brewer, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical models which use a class of bivariate gamma distribution are examined. Topics discussed include: (1) the ratio of positively correlated gamma varieties; (2) a method to determine if unequal shape parameters are necessary in bivariate gamma distribution; (3) differential equations for modal location of a family of bivariate gamma distribution; and (4) analysis of some wind gust data using the analytical results developed for modeling application.

  4. Fluid modeling for ion scale space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis

    2014-05-01

    Fluid models with first-order finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections have been known since the early sixties. It however turns out that a correct dispersion relation for oblique Alfvén waves requires FLR corrections of at least second order in an asymptotics based on temporal and spatial scale separation. Supplementing Landau damping, that provides an essential ingredient for a realistic description of Alfvénic turbulence, is moreover delicate as, in these models, the combination of dispersive and dissipative effects can produce spurious instabilities in some parameter regimes. We thus propose a new kind of fluid model, closed at the level of the fourth-rank moments, that combines the advantages of fully-nonlinear large-scale FLR models, with a small-scale regularization where the nongyrotropic contributions of all the retained moments are evaluated consistently with the low-frequency linear kinetic physics, down to transverse scales comparable to or smaller than the ion gyroradius [see Phys. Plasmas 14, 082502 (2007), Phys. Plasmas 19, 082113 (2012)]. This model, which is based on a matching of the FLR expressions derived both from the fluid formalism and from the kinetic theory, is asymptotically valid at large scales. The small-scale "sub-grid" modeling leads to an accurate description of the linear properties of kinetic Alfvén waves and of the mirror instability, but also provides the correct (in the absence of cyclotron resonance) and sufficient dissipation for turbulent simulations, allowing for the development of power law spectra extending to the smallest resolved scale.

  5. Modeling and Observations of Optical Space Weathering on Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, D. T.; Denevi, B. W.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Schroder, S. E.; Pieters, C. M.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Roatsch, T.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    We use Hapke model spectra to predict the effects of lunar-style space weathering on Vesta, contrast with the effects of mixing with carbonaceous-chondrite material, and to guide interpretation of Dawn multispectral observations of Vesta.

  6. Space Exploration: Manned and Unmanned Flight. Aerospace Education III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, for use only in the Air Force ROTC training program, deals with the idea of space exploration. The possibility of going into space and subsequent moon landings have encouraged the government and scientists to formulate future plans in this field. Brief descriptions (mostly informative in nature) of these plans provide an account of…

  7. Corrections Education Evaluation System Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Orville; And Others

    The purpose of this project was to develop an evaluation system for the competency-based vocational program developed by Wisconsin's Division of Corrections, Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education System (VTAE). Site visits were conducted at five correctional institutions in March and April of…

  8. Military Education: Models from Antiquity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Unlike Westerners today, the Greeks and Romans put military training at the heart of their educational system. Examining the ancients' preoccupation with the inculcation of soldierly skills and disciplines, Professor Strauss asks whether we can find profit in their example. (Contains 7 footnotes.)

  9. Advanced Space Propulsion System Flowfield Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon

    1998-01-01

    Solar thermal upper stage propulsion systems currently under development utilize small low chamber pressure/high area ratio nozzles. Consequently, the resulting flow in the nozzle is highly viscous, with the boundary layer flow comprising a significant fraction of the total nozzle flow area. Conventional uncoupled flow methods which treat the nozzle boundary layer and inviscid flowfield separately by combining the two calculations via the influence of the boundary layer displacement thickness on the inviscid flowfield are not accurate enough to adequately treat highly viscous nozzles. Navier Stokes models such as VNAP2 can treat these flowfields but cannot perform a vacuum plume expansion for applications where the exhaust plume produces induced environments on adjacent structures. This study is built upon recently developed artificial intelligence methods and user interface methodologies to couple the VNAP2 model for treating viscous nozzle flowfields with a vacuum plume flowfield model (RAMP2) that is currently a part of the Plume Environment Prediction (PEP) Model. This study integrated the VNAP2 code into the PEP model to produce an accurate, practical and user friendly tool for calculating highly viscous nozzle and exhaust plume flowfields.

  10. The October 1973 space shuttle traffic model, revision 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Traffic model data for the space shuttle for calendar years 1980 through 1991 are presented along with some supporting and summary data. This model was developed from the 1973 NASA Payload Model, dated October 1973, and the NASA estimate of the 1973 Non-NASA/Non-DoD Payload Model. The estimates for the DoD flights included are based on the 1971 DoD Mission Model.

  11. A simplified dynamic model of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, Ahmet; Eldem, Vasfi; Merrill, Walter; Guo, Ten-Huei

    1991-01-01

    A simplified model is presented of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) dynamics valid within the range of operation of the engine. This model is obtained by linking the linearized point models obtained at 25 different operating points of SSME. The simplified model was developed for use with a model-based diagnostic scheme for failure detection and diagnostics studies, as well as control design purposes.

  12. A reference model for space data system interconnection services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietras, John; Theis, Gerhard

    1993-01-01

    The widespread adoption of standard packet-based data communication protocols and services for spaceflight missions provides the foundation for other standard space data handling services. These space data handling services can be defined as increasingly sophisticated processing of data or information received from lower-level services, using a layering approach made famous in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Open System Interconnection Reference Model (OSI-RM). The Space Data System Interconnection Reference Model (SDSI-RM) incorporates the conventions of the OSIRM to provide a framework within which a complete set of space data handling services can be defined. The use of the SDSI-RM is illustrated through its application to data handling services and protocols that have been defined by, or are under consideration by, the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS).

  13. Mathematical Models in Educational Planning. Education and Development, Technical Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This volume contains papers, presented at a 1966 OECD meeting, on the possibilities of applying a number of related techniques such as mathematical model building, simulation, and systematic control theory to the problems of educational planning. The authors and their papers are (1) Richard Stone, "A View of the Conference," (2) Hector Correa, "A…

  14. Residents as Educators: A Modern Model.

    PubMed

    Kensinger, Clark D; McMaster, William G; Vella, Michael A; Sexton, Kevin W; Snyder, Rebecca A; Terhune, Kyla P

    2015-01-01

    Education during surgical residency has changed significantly. As part of the shifting landscape, the importance of an organized and structured curriculum has increased. However, establishing this is often difficult secondary to clinical demands and pressure both on faculty and residents. We present a peer-assisted learning model for academic institutions without professional non-clinical educations. The "resident as educator" (RAE) model empowers residents to be the organizers of the education curriculum. RAE is built on a culture of commitment to education, skill development and team building, allowing the upper level residents to develop and execute the curriculum. Several modules designed to address junior level residents and medical students' educational needs have been implemented, including (1) intern boot camp, (2) summer school, (3) technical skill sessions, (4) trauma orientation, (5) weekly teaching conferences, and (4) a fourth year medical student surgical preparation course. Promoting residents as educators leads to an overall benefit for the program by being cost-effective and time-efficient, while simultaneously promoting professional development of residents and a culture of education. PMID:26143515

  15. A regressive storm model for extreme space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terkildsen, Michael; Steward, Graham; Neudegg, Dave; Marshall, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Extreme space weather events, while rare, pose significant risk to society in the form of impacts on critical infrastructure such as power grids, and the disruption of high end technological systems such as satellites and precision navigation and timing systems. There has been an increased focus on modelling the effects of extreme space weather, as well as improving the ability of space weather forecast centres to identify, with sufficient lead time, solar activity with the potential to produce extreme events. This paper describes the development of a data-based model for predicting the occurrence of extreme space weather events from solar observation. The motivation for this work was to develop a tool to assist space weather forecasters in early identification of solar activity conditions with the potential to produce extreme space weather, and with sufficient lead time to notify relevant customer groups. Data-based modelling techniques were used to construct the model, and an extensive archive of solar observation data used to train, optimise and test the model. The optimisation of the base model aimed to eliminate false negatives (missed events) at the expense of a tolerable increase in false positives, under the assumption of an iterative improvement in forecast accuracy during progression of the solar disturbance, as subsequent data becomes available.

  16. Rethinking Educational Spaces: A Review of Literature on Urban Youth and Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Terry T.; Carpenter, B. Stephen, II

    2014-01-01

    This paper serves as an exploration into the landscape of social media use in educational research as it relates to urban youth in the United States. Initially, a social and learning context is provided that situates the implications social media may have for urban youth within formal and informal educational spaces. The paper offers a discussion…

  17. Revisualising Innovative Online Learning Spaces in an Early Childhood Teacher Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohio, Lesley; Lee, Maryann

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive analysis of the challenges and rewards of revisualising and designing an innovative online space for a first-year Bachelor of Education Early Childhood Education course, Visual Arts in the Early Years. The perspectives offered are drawn from a design project involving collaboration between the course lecturer and…

  18. Co-Constructing Imaginative Spaces: Public Art in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    This documentary account explores the potential of public art pedagogy to co-construct imaginative spaces in pre-service teacher education. Based upon a collaborative venture between two professors and an arts-based educational organization, the present article describes and analyzes key features and relations that were influential in transforming…

  19. Rethinking Educational Spaces: A Review of Literature on Urban Youth and Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Terry T.; Carpenter, B. Stephen, II

    2014-01-01

    This paper serves as an exploration into the landscape of social media use in educational research as it relates to urban youth in the United States. Initially, a social and learning context is provided that situates the implications social media may have for urban youth within formal and informal educational spaces. The paper offers a discussion…

  20. Community-Based Field Experiences in Teacher Education: Possibilities for a Pedagogical Third Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallman, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses the importance of community-based field experiences as a feature of teacher education programs. Through a qualitative case study, prospective teachers' work with homeless youth in an after-school initiative is presented. Framing community-based field experiences in teacher education through "third space" theory, the…

  1. South Dakota Project to Articulate Continuing Education in Nursing (Project SPACE). Summative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Univ., Brookings. Coll. of Nursing.

    Results of an evaluation of the South Dakota Project to Articulate Continuing Education in Nursing (Project SPACE), which was the extent to which the three-year project had been a value to South Dakota nurses, were presented. According to the Executive Committee's assessment, the project increased quantity and quality of continuing education…

  2. Modeling and control of flexible space stations (slew maneuvers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, N. U.; Lim, S. S.

    1989-01-01

    Large orbiting space structures are expected to experience mechanical vibrations arising from several disturbing forces such as those induced by shuttle takeoff or docking and crew movements. The problem is considered of modeling and control of large space structures subject to these and other disturbing forces. The system consists of a (rigid) massive body, which may play the role of experimental modules located at the center of the space station and flexible configurations, consisting of several beams, forming the space structure. A complete dynamic model of the system was developed using Hamilton's principle. This model consists of radial equations describing the translational motion of the central body, rotational equations describing the attitude motions of the body and several beam equations governing the vibration of the flexible members (platform) including appropriate boundary conditions. In summary, the dynamics of the space structure is governed by a complex system of interconnected partial and ordinary differential equations. Using Lyapunov's approach the asymptotic stability of the space structure is investigated. For asymptotic stability of the rest state (nominal trajectory), feedback controls are suggested. In the investigation, stability of the slewing maneuvers is also considered. Several numerical results are presented for illustration of the impact of coupling and the effectiveness of the stabilizing controls. Some insight is provided into the complexity of modeling, analysis and stabilization of actual space structures.

  3. Decentralisation of Education in Cambodia: Searching for Spaces of Participation between Traditions and Modernity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellini, Arnaldo

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses community participation in Cambodian schools, looking at the spaces for participation and the cluster school system strategy adopted by the royal government to decentralise education. While institutionalised spaces of participation are relatively new, Cambodian communities have traditionally supported schools despite 25 years…

  4. A Mission Possible: Towards a Shared Dialogic Space for Professional Learning in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Margaret; Su, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed the concept of dialogic space to elaborate our view of the importance of creating future academic practice together in relationship with others in a higher education context. We see scope and potential for the dialogic space as a forum for "interthinking" to engage the voices of stakeholders in…

  5. Public Space and Educational Leadership: Reclaiming and Renewing Our Radical Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Among the most important features of a democratic way of life is public space within which we collectively make meaning of our work and lives together and take shared responsibility for past action and future intentions. This article looks briefly at the argument for democratic public space within political and educational theory before focusing…

  6. Public Space and Educational Leadership: Reclaiming and Renewing Our Radical Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Among the most important features of a democratic way of life is public space within which we collectively make meaning of our work and lives together and take shared responsibility for past action and future intentions. This article looks briefly at the argument for democratic public space within political and educational theory before focusing…

  7. Space and Power in the Ivory Tower: Decision Making in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Sandra McCoskrie

    2010-01-01

    The challenges of managing physical space in public higher education are often left unspoken and under researched. In this multiple case study of three urban universities, decision-making processes are examined with particular attention to who has institutional decision-making authority. Effective and efficient space management is important…

  8. Theorising "Sacred" Space in Educational Contexts: A Case Study of Three English Midlands Sixth Form Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    Sixth Form Colleges (along with the general Further Education sector) in England and Wales have of late begun to appoint new chaplains and to set aside space for quiet, prayer and reflection. This article explores this phenomenon as exhibited by three colleges in the English Midlands, utilising spatial theory and the sociology of "sacred" spaces…

  9. Special Planning for Special Spaces. Selected Articles from "Planning for Higher Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickes, Persis, Ed.

    This collection contains articles from the journal "Planning for Higher Education" organized around four core spaces commonly found on a college or university campus. Following an introduction, Section 2, "Cultural Spaces," contains these articles: (1) "Planning the Successful Performing Arts Facility" (Wendell Brase, v18 n3); (2) "Frontier…

  10. Third-Space Practitioners: Women Educating for Justice in the Global South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Leona M.

    2005-01-01

    This article builds on qualitative research with 13 women (9 from Canada and 4 from Asia and Africa) doing international adult education in the Global South. The author examines the cases in light of the postcolonial literature of Bhabha, Spivak, and Khan, giving special attention to their theory of third space. The 13 participants are third-space…

  11. A Mission Possible: Towards a Shared Dialogic Space for Professional Learning in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Margaret; Su, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed the concept of dialogic space to elaborate our view of the importance of creating future academic practice together in relationship with others in a higher education context. We see scope and potential for the dialogic space as a forum for "interthinking" to engage the voices of stakeholders in…

  12. Space and Power in the Ivory Tower: Decision Making in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Sandra McCoskrie

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of managing physical space in higher education are often left unspoken and under researched. In this multiple case study of three urban universities, decision-making processes are examined with particular attention to who has institutional decision-making authority. Effective and efficient space management is important because the…

  13. NASA Wavelength: A Digital Library for Earth and Space Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerin, T.; Peticolas, L. M.; Bartolone, L. M.; Davey, B.; Porcello, D.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums have developed a web-based information system - NASA Wavelength - that will enable easy discovery and retrieval of thousands of resources from the NASA Earth and space science education portfolio. The beta system is being launched fall 2012 and has been developed based on best-practices in the architecture and design of Web-based information systems. The design style and philosophy emphasize simple, reusable data and services that facilitate the free-flow of data across systems. The primary audiences for NASA Wavelength are STEM educators (K-12, higher education and informal education) as well as scientists, education and public outreach professionals who work with k-12, higher education and informal education.

  14. The State of Space Weather Scientific Modeling—An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watermann, J.; Vainio, R.; Lilensten, J.; Belehaki, A.; Messerotti, M.

    2009-11-01

    The discipline of "Space Weather" is built on the scientific foundation of solar-terrestrial physics but with a strong orientation toward applied research. Models describing the solar-terrestrial environment are therefore at the heart of this discipline, for both physical understanding of the processes involved and establishing the capability to predict the consequences of these processes. This issue of Space Science Reviews contains four topical reviews on primarily European scientific progress in understanding and modeling space weather phenomena. The four reviews deal with (i) monitoring, modeling and predicting solar weather, (ii) the radiation environment of the Earth, (iii) solar wind disturbances and their interaction with geospace, and (iv) the upper atmosphere's response to space weather events.

  15. Radiation dosimetry and biophysical models of space radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Shavers, Mark R.; George, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the biological risks from space radiation remains a difficult problem because of the many radiation types including protons, heavy ions, and secondary neutrons, and the absence of epidemiology data for these radiation types. Developing useful biophysical parameters or models that relate energy deposition by space particles to the probabilities of biological outcomes is a complex problem. Physical measurements of space radiation include the absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. In contrast to conventional dosimetric methods, models of radiation track structure provide descriptions of energy deposition events in biomolecules, cells, or tissues, which can be used to develop biophysical models of radiation risks. In this paper, we address the biophysical description of heavy particle tracks in the context of the interpretation of both space radiation dosimetry and radiobiology data, which may provide insights into new approaches to these problems.

  16. Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Space Food Powerpoint Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paglialonga, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the science related to the development of production of space food is presented for school students. Students are acquainted with careers in food science, nutrition, dietetics, microbiology, and astrobiology.

  17. Modeling Web-Based Educational Systems: Process Design Teaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokou, Franca Pantano; Rokou, Elena; Rokos, Yannis

    2004-01-01

    Using modeling languages is essential to the construction of educational systems based on software engineering principles and methods. Furthermore, the instructional design is undoubtedly the cornerstone of the design and development of educational systems. Although several methodologies and languages have been proposed for the specification of…

  18. Driving terrestrial ecosystem models from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Regional air pollution, land-use conversion, and projected climate change all affect ecosystem processes at large scales. Changes in vegetation cover and growth dynamics can impact the functioning of ecosystems, carbon fluxes, and climate. As a result, there is a need to assess and monitor vegetation structure and function comprehensively at regional to global scales. To provide a test of our present understanding of how ecosystems operate at large scales we can compare model predictions of CO2, O2, and methane exchange with the atmosphere against regional measurements of interannual variation in the atmospheric concentration of these gases. Recent advances in remote sensing of the Earth's surface are beginning to provide methods for estimating important ecosystem variables at large scales. Ecologists attempting to generalize across landscapes have made extensive use of models and remote sensing technology. The success of such ventures is dependent on merging insights and expertise from two distinct fields. Ecologists must provide the understanding of how well models emulate important biological variables and their interactions; experts in remote sensing must provide the biophysical interpretation of complex optical reflectance and radar backscatter data.

  19. Combustion space modeling of an aluminum furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, Brian M.; Zhou, C.Q.; Quenette, Antoine .; Han, Quinyou .; King, Paul E.

    2005-02-01

    Secondary aluminum production (melting from aluminum ingots, scraps, etc.) offers significant energy savings and environmental benefits over primary aluminum production since the former consumes only five percent of the energy used in the latter process. The industry, however, faces technical challenges of further improving furnace melting efficiency and has been lacking tools that can help understand combustion process in detail and that will facilitate furnace design. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has played increasingly important roles in evaluating industrial processes. As part of a larger program run by SECAT, a CFD model has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to simulate fuel combustion, heat transfer (including thermal radiation), gaseous product flow (mainly CO2 and H2O), and production/transport of pollutant species/greenhouse gases in an aluminum furnace. Using this code, the surface heat fluxes are calculated and then transferred to a melt code. In order to have a high level of confidence in the computed results, the output from the code will be compared and validated against in-furnace measurements made in the Albany furnace. Once validated, the combustion code may be used to perform inexpensive parametric studies to investigate methods to optimize furnace performance. This paper will present results from the combustion modeling of an aluminum furnace as well as results from several parametric studies.

  20. The ESA Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre - Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poedts, Stefaan

    The ESA ITT project (AO/1-6738/11/NL/AT) to develop Phase 1 of a Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre has the following objectives and scope: 1. The construction of a long term (~10 yrs) plan for the future development of a European virtual space weather modelling centre consisting of a new ‘open’ and distributed framework for the coupling of physics based models for space weather phenomena; 2. The assessment of model capabilities and the amount of work required to make them operational by integrating them in this framework and the identification of computing and networking requirements to do so. 3. The design of a system to enable models and other components to be installed locally or geographically distributed and the creation of a validation plan including a system of metrics for testing results. The consortium that took up this challenge involves: 1)the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Prime Contractor, coordinator: Prof. S. Poedts); 2) the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB); 3) the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB); 4) the Von Karman Institute (VKI); 5) DH Consultancy (DHC); 6) Space Applications Services (SAS). The project started on May 14 2012, and will finish in May 2014. Thus, by the time of the meeting, both Phase 1A and Phase 1B (the development of the prototype) will be finished. The final report will be presented incl. the architecture decisions made, the framework, the current models integrated already as well as the model couplers installed. The prototype VSWMC will be demonstrated.

  1. Connecting in Space: Docking with the International Space Station. Educational Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This brief discusses the space shuttle and the docking procedures used with the International Space Station (ISS). Using this activity designed for grades 5-12, students demonstrate and identify procedures for determining the best method for completing the docking activity. Students will also study and identify Newton's Laws of Motion. A mockup…

  2. AGU Panel to write statement on Earth and space science education in K-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    AGU has convened a panel to write a policy statement that can be used by AGU members and others to argue for effective Earth and space science education at the K-12 level. The panel welcomes comments from AGU members to help them craft a relevant and effective statement.AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) first proposed the idea for the position statement in 1999. The Committee's reasoning was that the Earth and space sciences should be included at all levels of education, because increased public understanding of those sciences is needed to ensure their appropriate application to societal needs and challenges.

  3. SOFTCOST - DEEP SPACE NETWORK SOFTWARE COST MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The early-on estimation of required resources and a schedule for the development and maintenance of software is usually the least precise aspect of the software life cycle. However, it is desirable to make some sort of an orderly and rational attempt at estimation in order to plan and organize an implementation effort. The Software Cost Estimation Model program, SOFTCOST, was developed to provide a consistent automated resource and schedule model which is more formalized than the often used guesswork model based on experience, intuition, and luck. SOFTCOST was developed after the evaluation of a number of existing cost estimation programs indicated that there was a need for a cost estimation program with a wide range of application and adaptability to diverse kinds of software. SOFTCOST combines several software cost models found in the open literature into one comprehensive set of algorithms that compensate for nearly fifty implementation factors relative to size of the task, inherited baseline, organizational and system environment, and difficulty of the task. SOFTCOST produces mean and variance estimates of software size, implementation productivity, recommended staff level, probable duration, amount of computer resources required, and amount and cost of software documentation. Since the confidence level for a project using mean estimates is small, the user is given the opportunity to enter risk-biased values for effort, duration, and staffing, to achieve higher confidence levels. SOFTCOST then produces a PERT/CPM file with subtask efforts, durations, and precedences defined so as to produce the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and schedule having the asked-for overall effort and duration. The SOFTCOST program operates in an interactive environment prompting the user for all of the required input. The program builds the supporting PERT data base in a file for later report generation or revision. The PERT schedule and the WBS schedule may be printed and stored in a file for later use. The SOFTCOST program is written in Microsoft BASIC for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC-XT/AT operating MS-DOS 2.1 or higher with 256K bytes of memory. SOFTCOST was originally developed for the Zylog Z80 system running under CP/M in 1981. It was converted to run on the IBM PC XT/AT in 1986. SOFTCOST is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  4. Community Development: An Adult Education Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Gary J.; Dowling, William D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper includes a conceptual model of community development to be used by change agents and educators of adults to identify its processes and outcomes. The components of the model are the community development specialist, the core group of citizens, their local community and its extended boundaries, special interest groups, and the resources…

  5. A Transformation Model of Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Camelia L.; Fortenberry, Norman L.

    2007-01-01

    A transformation model of engineering education at the undergraduate level is constructed to define the human and technical resources that contribute to the production of a university-trained engineer. The theory of technical systems is applied in the development of the model to transform a graduating pre-university pupil into a university-trained…

  6. Virginia Higher Education Performance Funding Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Richmond.

    This report reviews the proposed Virginia Higher Education Performance Funding Model. It includes an overview of the proposed funding model, examples of likely funding scenarios (including determination of block grants, assumptions underlying performance funding for four-year and two-year institutions); information on deregulation/decentralization…

  7. The Strategies of Modeling in Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svoboda, Julia; Passmore, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling, like inquiry more generally, is not a single method, but rather a complex suite of strategies. Philosophers of biology, citing the diverse aims, interests, and disciplinary cultures of biologists, argue that modeling is best understood in the context of its epistemic aims and cognitive payoffs. In the science education literature,…

  8. The Strategies of Modeling in Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svoboda, Julia; Passmore, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling, like inquiry more generally, is not a single method, but rather a complex suite of strategies. Philosophers of biology, citing the diverse aims, interests, and disciplinary cultures of biologists, argue that modeling is best understood in the context of its epistemic aims and cognitive payoffs. In the science education literature,…

  9. Prediction of magnetic substorms using a state space model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, K.

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical models of the magnetosphere derived from observational time series data using phase space reconstruction techniques have yielded new advances in the understanding of its dynamics. Considering the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction to be a natural input-output system its dynamical features can be reconstructed on the storm time scale by using the method of time delay embedding. Here, fourteen magnetic storm intervals belonging to low/moderate and high solar activity periods are considered and a suitable state space model has designed by performing training and validation tests, for which dawn to dusk electric field (VBz) is chosen as the input, and the AL time series as the output. The percentage of the output variations that is reproduced by the model is termed as fit_model and a higher number of fit_model means a better model. The number of components m used in the state space model is varied from 1-9 and the best prediction is obtained when m=4. The fit_model values of time series used for validation are 67.96, 67.2, 72.44, and 70.89, with m=4. In the present study most of the storms considered are having Dstmax in between -100 and -300 nT, and they can be predicted well with this procedure. To reveal the prediction capability of the proposed state space model the 30 steps ahead outputs for the storm events are generated, which reasonably reproduce the observed values.

  10. The Modeling of Virtual Environment Distance Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueqin, Chang

    This research presented a virtual environment that integrates in a virtual mockup services available in a university campus for students and teachers communication in different actual locations. Advantages of this system include: the remote access to a variety of services and educational tools, the representation of real structures and landscapes in an interactive 3D model that favors localization of services and preserves the administrative organization of the university. For that, the system was implemented a control access for users and an interface to allow the use of previous educational equipments and resources not designed for distance education mode.

  11. Space Weather Models, Tools and Services at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; Pulkkinen, A.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J.; Takakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. Space weather models and coupled model chains hosted at the CCMC range from the solar corona to the Earth's upper atmosphere. CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as a large number of modeling and data products tailored to address the space weather needs of NASA's robotic missions. The presentation will demonstrate the rapid progress towards development the system allowing using products derived from space weather models in applications associated with National Space Weather needs. The adaptable Integrated Space Weather Analysis (ISWA) System developed at CCMC for NASA-relevant space weather information combines forecasts based on advanced space weather models hosted at CCMC with concurrent space environment information. The system is also enabling post-impact analysis and flexible dissemination of space weather information.

  12. [Odontology in Spain: towards the integration to the European high education space].

    PubMed

    Machuca Portillo, María del Carmen; Suárez Marchena, Cira; López del Valle, Lydia; Machuca Portillo, Guillermo; Bullón Fernández, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    The European Higher Education Space (EHES) is a project to harmonize all the European University systems in order that all of them will posses a homogeneous structure of undergraduate, graduate and post graduate studies. The time period established to implement this project is year 2010. The present paper describes the establishment of a new career degree model in Spain, the degree in Dentistry that started twenty years ago. Also it has been stated the number of the present Departments and Schools, the access system to Public University Schools of Spain, the evaluation system, and which are the new mechanisms incorporated in the Spanish University system to implement this integration to the EHEE. This is the moment to design the new master guidelines to obtain homogeneous career degrees that may imply more accessibility and mobility of students and professionals. PMID:15895878

  13. Process modelling for space station experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1988-01-01

    The work performed during the first year 1 Oct. 1987 to 30 Sept. 1988 involved analyses of crystal growth from the melt and from solution. The particular melt growth technique under investigation is directional solidification by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Two types of solution growth systems are also being studied. One involves growth from solution in a closed container, the other concerns growth of protein crystals by the hanging drop method. Following discussions with Dr. R. J. Naumann of the Low Gravity Science Division at MSFC it was decided to tackle the analysis of crystal growth from the melt earlier than originally proposed. Rapid progress was made in this area. Work is on schedule and full calculations were underway for some time. Progress was also made in the formulation of the two solution growth models.

  14. Modeling techniques for gaining additional urban space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thunig, Holger; Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    One of the major accompaniments of the globalization is the rapid growing of urban areas. Urban sprawl is the main environmental problem affecting those cities across different characteristics and continents. Various reasons for the increase in urban sprawl in the last 10 to 30 years have been proposed [1], and often depend on the socio-economic situation of cities. The quantitative reduction and the sustainable handling of land should be performed by inner urban development instead of expanding urban regions. Following the principal "spare the urban fringe, develop the inner suburbs first" requires differentiated tools allowing for quantitative and qualitative appraisals of current building potentials. Using spatial high resolution remote sensing data within an object-based approach enables the detection of potential areas while GIS-data provides information for the quantitative valuation. This paper presents techniques for modeling urban environment and opportunities of utilization of the retrieved information for urban planners and their special needs.

  15. Modeling of nonequilibrium space plasma flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    1995-01-01

    Godunov-type numerical solution of the 20 moment plasma transport equations. One of the centerpieces of our proposal was the development of a higher order Godunov-type numerical scheme to solve the gyration dominated 20 moment transport equations. In the first step we explored some fundamental analytic properties of the 20 moment transport equations for a low b plasma, including the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of propagating disturbances. The eigenvalues correspond to wave speeds, while the eigenvectors characterize the transported physical quantities. In this paper we also explored the physically meaningful parameter range of the normalized heat flow components. In the second step a new Godunov scheme type numerical method was developed to solve the coupled set of 20 moment transport equations for a quasineutral single-ion plasma. The numerical method and the first results were presented at several national and international meetings and a paper describing the method has been published in the Journal of Computational Physics. To our knowledge this is the first numerical method which is capable of producing stable time-dependent solutions to the full 20 (or 16) moment set of transport equations, including the full heat flow equation. Previous attempts resulted in unstable (oscillating) solutions of the heat flow equations. Our group invested over two man-years into the development and implementation of the new method. The present model solves the 20 moment transport equations for an ion species and thermal electrons in 8 domain extending from a collision dominated to a collisionless region (200 km to 12,000 km). This model has been applied to study O+ acceleration due to Joule heating in the lower ionosphere.

  16. Preliminary Shuttle Space Suit Shielding Model. Chapter 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, J. E.; Qualls, G. D.; Staritz, P. J.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Ware, J.; Persans, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    There are two space suits in current usage within the space program: EMU [2] and Orlan-M Space Suit . The Shuttle space suit components are discussed elsewhere [2,5,6] and serve as a guide to development of the current model. The present model is somewhat simplified in details which are considered to be second order in their effects on exposures. A more systematic approach is ongoing on a part-by-part basis with the most important ones in terms of exposure contributions being addressed first with detailed studies of the relatively thin space suit fabric as the first example . Additional studies to validate the model of the head coverings (bubble, helmet, visors.. .) will be undertaken in the near future. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the model as it is now and to examine its impact on estimates of astronaut health risks. In this respect, the nonuniform distribution of mass of the space suit provides increased shielding in some directions and some organs. These effects can be most important in terms of health risks and especially critical to evaluation of potential early radiation effects .

  17. A Space Operations Network Alternative: Using the Globally Connected Research and Education Networks for Space-based Science Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.

    2006-01-01

    Earth based networking in support of various space agency projects has been based on leased service/circuits which has a high associated cost. This cost is almost always taken from the science side resulting in less science. This is a proposal to use Research and Education Networks (RENs) worldwide to support space flight operations in general and space-based science operations in particular. The RENs were developed to support scientific and educational endeavors. They do not provide support for general Internet traffic. The connectivity and performance of the research and education networks is superb. The connectivity at Layer 3 (IP) virtually encompasses the globe. Most third world countries and all developed countries have their own research and education networks, which are connected globally. Performance of the RENs especially in the developed countries is exceptional. Bandwidth capacity currently exists and future expansion promises that this capacity will continue. REN performance statistics has always exceeded minimum requirements for spaceflight support. Research and Education networks are more loosely managed than a corporate network but are highly managed when compared to the commodity Internet. Management of RENs on an international level is accomplished by the International Network Operations Center at Indiana University at Indianapolis. With few exceptions, each regional and national REN has its own network ops center. The acceptable use policies (AUP), although differing by country, allows any scientific program or project the use of their networks. Once in compliance with the first RENs AUP, all others will accept that specific traffic including regional and transoceanic networks. RENs can support spaceflight related scientific programs and projects. Getting the science to the researcher is obviously key to any scientific project. RENs provide a pathway to virtually any college or university in the world, as well as many governmental institutes and science centers. RENs are not to be used for mission critical types of network traffic, even though RENs performance characteristics would support it.

  18. A model for improving cancer patient education.

    PubMed

    Fredette, S L

    1990-08-01

    Adjustment to cancer requires modification of behavior that may be aided through patient education. Numerous programs have been developed to meet this need; however, studies show that even after being taught, patients are not well informed. It seems that the process of educating cancer patients needs to be improved. Authors suggest a progression of psychosocial stages of adjustment to serious illness during which specific behaviors are exhibited and coping mechanisms utilized. Understanding the nature of this process forms the basis for effective patient education since theories of adaptation describe behaviors that impact on motivation to learn, information required, and teaching methodology. Failure to attend to this variable of emotional response to the disease can prevent learning. This article integrates the theories of Weisman, Crate, Engle, and Kubler-Ross into an educational model for the cancer patient consisting of six periods. The model suggests nursing approaches, educational topics, and teaching strategies based on the patient's behavioral responses. Use of this model can improve teaching effectiveness in clinical practice by ensuring that the patient is ready to learn prior to teaching and by utilizing teaching strategies appropriate to the educational period. It can further be used as a tool to teach students of nursing how to use the stages of adjustment to chronic illness when planning patient teaching. PMID:2208096

  19. Identification and Evaluation of Educational Uses and Users for the STS. Executive Summary. Educational Planning for Utilization of Space Shuttle (ED-PLUSS). Final Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, H. A.; Christensen, D. L.

    Reported is a study to consider the educational uses of the space shuttle/space lab. Several specific tasks were identified and accomplished during the study and the summary addresses itself to five that are considered pertinent: (1) Potential User and Identification; (2) Identification and Analysis of Space Education Programs; (3) Planning…

  20. Educational planning for utilization of space shuttle (ED-PLUSS). Executive summary: Identification and evaluation of educational uses and users for the STS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, H. A.; Christensen, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The development and application of educational programs to improve public awareness of the space shuttle/space lab capabilities are reported. Special efforts were made to: identify the potential user, identify and analyze space education programs, plan methods for user involvement, develop techniques and programs to encourage new users, and compile follow-on ideas.

  1. NASA Education Activities on the International Space Station: A National Laboratory for Inspiring, Engaging, Educating and Employing the Next Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severance, Mark T.; Tate-Brown, Judy; McArthur, Cynthia L.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) National Lab Education Project has been created as a part of the ISS National Lab effort mandated by the U.S. Congress The project seeks to expand ISS education of activities so that they reach a larger number of students with clear educational metrics of accomplishments. This paper provides an overview of several recent ISS educational payloads and activities. The expected outcomes of the project, consistent with those of the NASA Office of Education, are also described. NASA performs numerous education activities as part of its ISS program. These cover the gamut from formal to informal educational opportunities in grades Kindergarten to grade 12, Higher Education (undergraduate and graduate University) and informal educational venues (museums, science centers, exhibits). Projects within the portfolio consist of experiments performed onboard the ISS using onboard resources which require no upmass, payloads flown to ISS or integrated into ISS cargo vehicles, and ground based activities that follow or complement onboard activities. Examples include ground based control group experiments, flight or experiment following lesson plans, ground based activities involving direct interaction with ISS or ground based activities considering ISS resources in their solution set. These projects range from totally NASA funded to projects which partner with external entities. These external agencies can be: other federal, state or local government agencies, commercial entities, universities, professional organizations or non-profit organizations. This paper will describe the recent ISS education activities and discuss the approach, outcomes and metrics associated with the projects.

  2. NASA Lunar Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers and Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo rocks and regolith soils first hand. Lunar samples embedded in plastic are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks has revealed the early history of our Earth-Moon system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet as well as connections to the basic lunar surface processes - impact and volcanism. With these samples educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by missions to Moon. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections of the rocks to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the violent impact history of the Moon. The disks also include two regolith soils and orange glass from a pyroclastic deposit. The loan program also includes Meteorite Disks containing six meteorites that will help educators share the early history of the solar system with students and the public. Educators may borrow either lunar or meteorite disks through Johnson Space Center Curatorial Office. In trainings provided by the NASA Aerospace Education Services Program specialists, educators certified to borrow the disk learn about education resources, the proper use of the samples, and the special security for care and shipping of the disks. The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program is set up to bridge to new education programs that will carry NASA exploration to more people. Getting Space Rocks out to the public and connecting the public to the current space exploration missions is the focus the NASA disk loan program.

  3. Interactive geometry modeling of space station conceptual designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deryder, D. D.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.; Mcmillin, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    With the advent of a serious interest in the design and implementaton of a low-Earth orbit, manned space station, the need has arisen to rapidly synthesize, characterize, and analyze many conceptual designs. Because the manual generation and analysis of a mathematical design model could consume many man-months, an interactive modeling and analysis capability is sought. This poster session will demonstrate the activities and current capabilities at NASA LaRC that could support the modeling analysis of space station conceptual designs.

  4. CAD-model-based vision for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Linda G.

    1988-01-01

    A pose acquisition system operating in space must be able to perform well in a variety of different applications including automated guidance and inspections tasks with many different, but known objects. Since the space station is being designed with automation in mind, there will be CAD models of all the objects, including the station itself. The construction of vision models and procedures directly from the CAD models is the goal of this project. The system that is being designed and implementing must convert CAD models to vision models, predict visible features from a given view point from the vision models, construct view classes representing views of the objects, and use the view class model thus derived to rapidly determine the pose of the object from single images and/or stereo pairs.

  5. Modeling of Space Station electric power system with EMTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Yang, Lifeng; Dravid, Narayan V.

    1990-01-01

    The authors provide an introduction to using the electromagnetic transients (EMTP) program to model aerospace power system components. A brief general overview of EMTP is presented. The modeling of the dc/dc converter unit in the space station electric power system is described as an illustration.

  6. The Strategies of Modeling in Biology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Julia; Passmore, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling, like inquiry more generally, is not a single method, but rather a complex suite of strategies. Philosophers of biology, citing the diverse aims, interests, and disciplinary cultures of biologists, argue that modeling is best understood in the context of its epistemic aims and cognitive payoffs. In the science education literature, modeling has been discussed in a variety of ways, but often without explicit reference to the diversity of roles models play in scientific practice. We aim to expand and bring clarity to the myriad uses of models in science by presenting a framework from philosopher of biology Jay Odenbaugh that describes five pragmatic strategies of model use in the biological sciences. We then present illustrative examples of each of these roles from an empirical study of an undergraduate biological modeling curriculum, which highlight how students used models to help them frame their research question, explore ideas, and refine their conceptual understanding in an educational setting. Our aim is to begin to explicate the definition of modeling in science in a way that will allow educators and curriculum developers to make informed choices about how and for what purpose modeling enters science classrooms.

  7. An Educational Model for Hands-On Hydrology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AghaKouchak, A.; Nakhjiri, N.; Habib, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of a hands-on modeling tool developed for students in civil engineering and earth science disciplines to help them learn the fundamentals of hydrologic processes, model calibration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, and practice conceptual thinking in solving engineering problems. The toolbox includes two simplified hydrologic models, namely HBV-EDU and HBV-Ensemble, designed as a complement to theoretical hydrology lectures. The models provide an interdisciplinary application-oriented learning environment that introduces the hydrologic phenomena through the use of a simplified conceptual hydrologic model. The toolbox can be used for in-class lab practices and homework assignments, and assessment of students' understanding of hydrological processes. Using this modeling toolbox, students can gain more insights into how hydrological processes (e.g., precipitation, snowmelt and snow accumulation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff generation) are interconnected. The educational toolbox includes a MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) and an ensemble simulation scheme that can be used for teaching more advanced topics including uncertainty analysis, and ensemble simulation. Both models have been administered in a class for both in-class instruction and a final project, and students submitted their feedback about the toolbox. The results indicate that this educational software had a positive impact on students understanding and knowledge of hydrology.

  8. Space Transportation Operations: Assessment of Methodologies and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joglekar, Prafulla

    2001-01-01

    The systems design process for future space transportation involves understanding multiple variables and their effect on lifecycle metrics. Variables such as technology readiness or potential environmental impact are qualitative, while variables such as reliability, operations costs or flight rates are quantitative. In deciding what new design concepts to fund, NASA needs a methodology that would assess the sum total of all relevant qualitative and quantitative lifecycle metrics resulting from each proposed concept. The objective of this research was to review the state of operations assessment methodologies and models used to evaluate proposed space transportation systems and to develop recommendations for improving them. It was found that, compared to the models available from other sources, the operations assessment methodology recently developed at Kennedy Space Center has the potential to produce a decision support tool that will serve as the industry standard. Towards that goal, a number of areas of improvement in the Kennedy Space Center's methodology are identified.

  9. Space Transportation Operations: Assessment of Methodologies and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joglekar, Prafulla

    2002-01-01

    The systems design process for future space transportation involves understanding multiple variables and their effect on lifecycle metrics. Variables such as technology readiness or potential environmental impact are qualitative, while variables such as reliability, operations costs or flight rates are quantitative. In deciding what new design concepts to fund, NASA needs a methodology that would assess the sum total of all relevant qualitative and quantitative lifecycle metrics resulting from each proposed concept. The objective of this research was to review the state of operations assessment methodologies and models used to evaluate proposed space transportation systems and to develop recommendations for improving them. It was found that, compared to the models available from other sources, the operations assessment methodology recently developed at Kennedy Space Center has the potential to produce a decision support tool that will serve as the industry standard. Towards that goal, a number of areas of improvement in the Kennedy Space Center's methodology are identified.

  10. Modeling and simulation for space medicine operations: preliminary requirements considered.

    PubMed

    Dawson, D L; Billica, R D; McDonald, P V

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Space Medicine program is now developing plans for more extensive use of high-fidelity medical simulation systems. The use of simulation is seen as means to more effectively use the limited time available for astronaut medical training. Training systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of training environments, including classrooms or laboratories, space vehicle mockups, analog environments, and in microgravity. Modeling and simulation can also provide the space medicine development program a mechanism for evaluation of other medical technologies under operationally realistic conditions. Systems and procedures need preflight verification with ground-based testing. Traditionally, component testing has been accomplished, but practical means for "human in the loop" verification of patient care systems have been lacking. Medical modeling and simulation technology offer potential means to accomplish such validation work. Initial considerations in the development of functional requirements and design standards for simulation systems for space medicine are discussed. PMID:11317721

  11. A model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis in space.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R D; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Jones, T D

    2001-01-01

    Astronauts' radiation exposure limits are based on experimental and epidemiological data obtained on Earth. It is assumed that radiation sensitivity remains the same in the extraterrestrial space. However, human radiosensitivity is dependent upon the response of the hematopoietic tissue to the radiation insult. It is well known that the immune system is affected by microgravity. We have developed a mathematical model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis which includes the effect of microgravity on bone marrow kinetics. It is assumed that cellular radiosensitivity is not modified by the space environment, but repopulation rates of stem and stromal cells are reduced as a function of time in weightlessness. A realistic model of the space radiation environment, including the HZE component, is used to simulate the radiation damage. A dedicated computer code was written and applied to solar particle events and to the mission to Mars. The results suggest that altered myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in microgravity might increase human radiosensitivity in space. PMID:11771552

  12. Modeling and simulation for space medicine operations: preliminary requirements considered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, D. L.; Billica, R. D.; McDonald, P. V.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Space Medicine program is now developing plans for more extensive use of high-fidelity medical simulation systems. The use of simulation is seen as means to more effectively use the limited time available for astronaut medical training. Training systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of training environments, including classrooms or laboratories, space vehicle mockups, analog environments, and in microgravity. Modeling and simulation can also provide the space medicine development program a mechanism for evaluation of other medical technologies under operationally realistic conditions. Systems and procedures need preflight verification with ground-based testing. Traditionally, component testing has been accomplished, but practical means for "human in the loop" verification of patient care systems have been lacking. Medical modeling and simulation technology offer potential means to accomplish such validation work. Initial considerations in the development of functional requirements and design standards for simulation systems for space medicine are discussed.

  13. The Arts and Civic Space: An Experiment in Community Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCue, Frances

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: While the arts are being elbowed out of school curricula, new community-based education venues for the arts are emerging in cities across the country. This article describes Richard Hugo House, an arts center for creative writing in Seattle, which attracts people of different ages and sociocultural backgrounds who participate…

  14. Revisiting Reflection: Utilizing Third Spaces in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessner, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written about the importance of reflective practice. What is missing is reflective work on the part of teacher educators to address the mismatch between university-based methods courses and the realities of classroom life. With examples from a third grade mathematics classroom as well as a university-based mathematics methods course,…

  15. Arctic Space, Lonely Place: "Mammy Moments" in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Baptiste, Shewanee D.

    2014-01-01

    Many ideologies and cultural practices influence the way we think about Black women. Specifically, the Mammy trope permeates the walls of higher education in ways that leave Black female professors feeling disrespected, not acknowledged, and questioning their own intellectual ability. The ways in which students, faculty, and staff interact with…

  16. Sudanese Migrants in the Khartoum Area: Fighting for Educational Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breidlid, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the situation of the internally displaced persons from Southern Sudan living in and around the capital and their experience with the dominant Islamic discourse, and particularly the educational discourse of the ruling National Congress (NC). Based on qualitative field data, the article explores the opposing discourses between…

  17. Arctic Space, Lonely Place: "Mammy Moments" in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Baptiste, Shewanee D.

    2014-01-01

    Many ideologies and cultural practices influence the way we think about Black women. Specifically, the Mammy trope permeates the walls of higher education in ways that leave Black female professors feeling disrespected, not acknowledged, and questioning their own intellectual ability. The ways in which students, faculty, and staff interact with…

  18. Teacher Language Awareness Education and Pedagogy: A New Discursive Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomphrey, Cathy; Burley, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to recontextualise the dimensions of teacher language awareness (LA) highlighted by Svalberg ((2007) "Language awareness and language learning." "Language Teaching," 40, 287-308) by emphasising the role of pedagogy in achieving coherence in language education across the subjects of English (L1) and Modern Languages (FL). It…

  19. Curriculum Reform in Higher Education: A Contested Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Suellen

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the theoretical and analytical tools from the sociology of education, in particular the work of Basil Bernstein and Karl Maton, the paper explores the tensions within curriculum reform discourses and how these tensions play out in different global contexts. The analysis focuses on two curriculum reform policies--Hong Kong and South…

  20. Unframing Immigration: Looking through the Educational Space of Contemporary Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Dipti

    2010-01-01

    This article uses the lens of contemporary visual art as a counternarrative to explore the racialization of immigration in the United States and its relationship to education. Drawing on critical race theory, I argue that today several artists use their artistic practice to intervene strategically in the immigration debates. These artistic…